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Sample records for care adult patients

  1. Primary Care for the Older Adult Patient: Common Geriatric Issues and Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Katherine; Shi, Sandra; Kiraly, Carmela

    2016-06-01

    Older adults are the fastest growing segment of the US population and the majority of older adults are women. Primary care for the older adult patient requires a wide variety of skills, reflecting the complexity and heterogeneity of this patient population. Individualizing care through consideration of patients' goals, medical conditions, and prognosis is paramount. Quality care for the older adult patient requires familiarity with common geriatric syndromes, such as dementia, falls, and polypharmacy. In addition, developing the knowledge and communication skills necessary for complex care and end-of-life care planning is essential. PMID:27212097

  2. Assessing general practitioners' care of adult patients with learning disability: case-control study.

    OpenAIRE

    Whitfield, M.; Langan, J; Russell, O

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare general practitioners' care of adult patients with learning disability with that of control patients in the same practice. DESIGN--Case-control study of patients and controls by a structured interview study of general practitioners. SETTING--Avon. PATIENTS--78 adult patients with learning disability and 78 age and sex matched controls--cared for by 62 general practitioners. MAIN MEASURES--Number and content of consultations and opinions of the general practitioners. RESU...

  3. Incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2 complications among Saudi adult patients at primary health care center

    OpenAIRE

    Alsenany, Samira; Al Saif, Amer

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study analyzed type 2 diabetes and its role in complications among adult Saudi patients. [Subjects] Patients attending four primary health care centers in Jeddah were enrolled. [Methods] A cross-sectional design study among Saudi patients attending Ministry of Health primary health care centers in Jeddah was selected for use by the Primary Health Care administration. Patients were interviewed with structured questionnaires to determine the presence of diabetes and risk factors ...

  4. The Influence of Adult Attachment on Patient Self-Management in Primary Care - The Need for a Personalized Approach and Patient-Centred Care

    OpenAIRE

    Katja Brenk-Franz; Bernhard Strauss; Fabian Tiesler; Christian Fleischhauer; Paul Ciechanowski; Nico Schneider; Jochen Gensichen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Self-management strategies are essential elements of evidence-based treatment in patients with chronic conditions in primary care. Our objective was to analyse different self-management skills and behaviours and their association to adult attachment in primary care patients with multiple chronic conditions. Methods In the apricare study (Adult Attachment in Primary Care) we used a prospective longitudinal design to examine the association between adult attachment and self-management...

  5. Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten;

    2012-01-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2012; Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care Rationale:  Despite the fact that communication has become a core topic in health care, patients still experience the information provided as...... insufficient or incorrect and a lack of involvement. Objective:  To investigate whether adult orthopaedic patients' evaluation of the quality of care had improved after a communication skills training course for healthcare professionals. Design and methods:  The study was designed as an intervention study...... limitation. Response rates were comparable to those of other studies. Conclusion:  Patients show increased satisfaction with the quality of health care after professionals have attended a communication skills training course, even when implemented in an entire department. Practice implications:  We recommend...

  6. From pediatric to adult care: strategic evaluation of a transition program for patients with osteogenesis imperfecta

    OpenAIRE

    Dogba, Maman Joyce; Rauch, Frank; Wong, Trudy; Ruck, Joanne; Glorieux, Francis H; Bedos, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Background Achieving a successful transition from pediatric to adult care for young adults with special needs, especially rare genetic diseases such as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), is a prominent issue in healthcare research. This transition represents a challenge for patients with OI, their families, clinicians and healthcare managers because of the complex nature of the process and the lack of evaluation of existing transition programs. We evaluated a transition program for adolescents and...

  7. Implementation of Patient-Centered Medical Homes in Adult Primary Care Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jeffrey A; Markovitz, Amanda R; Paustian, Michael L; Wise, Christopher G; El Reda, Darline K; Green, Lee A; Fetters, Michael D

    2015-08-01

    There has been relatively little empirical evidence about the effects of patient-centered medical home (PCMH) implementation on patient-related outcomes and costs. Using a longitudinal design and a large study group of 2,218 Michigan adult primary care practices, our study examined the following research questions: Is the level of, and change in, implementation of PCMH associated with medical surgical cost, preventive services utilization, and quality of care in the following year? Results indicated that both level and amount of change in practice implementation of PCMH are independently and positively associated with measures of quality of care and use of preventive services, after controlling for a variety of practice, patient cohort, and practice environmental characteristics. Results also indicate that lower overall medical and surgical costs are associated with higher levels of PCMH implementation, although change in PCMH implementation did not achieve statistical significance. PMID:25861803

  8. The Influence of Adult Attachment on Patient Self-Management in Primary Care--The Need for a Personalized Approach and Patient-Centred Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Brenk-Franz

    Full Text Available Self-management strategies are essential elements of evidence-based treatment in patients with chronic conditions in primary care. Our objective was to analyse different self-management skills and behaviours and their association to adult attachment in primary care patients with multiple chronic conditions.In the apricare study (Adult Attachment in Primary Care we used a prospective longitudinal design to examine the association between adult attachment and self-management in primary care patients with multimorbidity. The attachment dimensions avoidance and anxiety were measured using the ECR-RD. Self-management skills were measured by the FERUS (motivation to change, coping, self-efficacy, hope, social support and self-management-behaviour by the DSMQ (glucose management, dietary control, physical activity, health-care use. Clinical diagnosis and severity of disease were assessed by the patients' GPs. Multivariate analyses (GLM were used to assess the relationship between the dimensions of adult attachment and patient self-management.219 patients in primary care with multiple chronic conditions (type II diabetes, hypertension and at least one other chronic condition between the ages of 50 and 85 were included in the study. The attachment dimension anxiety was positively associated with motivation to change and negatively associated with coping, self-efficacy and hope, dietary control and physical activity. Avoidance was negatively associated with coping, self-efficacy, social support and health care use.The two attachment dimensions anxiety and avoidance are associated with different components of self-management. A personalized, attachment-based view on patients with chronic diseases could be the key to effective, individual self-management approaches in primary care.

  9. Blueprint for Implementing New Processes in Acute Care: Rescuing Adult Patients With Intraosseous Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chreiman, Kristen M; Kim, Patrick K; Garbovsky, Lyudmila A; Schweickert, William D

    2015-01-01

    The intraosseous (IO) access initiative at an urban university adult level 1 trauma center began from the need for a more expeditious vascular access route to rescue patients in extremis. The goal of this project was a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving to increase access of IO catheters to rescue patients in all care areas. The initiative became a collaborative effort between nursing, physicians, and pharmacy to embark on an acute care endeavor to standardize IO access. This is a descriptive analysis of processes to effectively develop collaborative strategies to navigate hospital systems and successfully implement multilayered initiatives. Administration should empower nurse to advance their practice to include IO for patient rescue. Intraosseous access may expedite resuscitative efforts in patients in extremis who lack venous access or where additional venous access is required for life-saving therapies. Limiting IO dwell time may facilitate timely definitive venous access. Continued education and training by offering IO skill laboratory refreshers and annual e-learning didactic is optimal for maintaining proficiency and knowledge. More research opportunities exist to determine medication safety and efficacy in adult patients in the acute care setting. PMID:26352658

  10. Insulin Resistance in Adult Primary Care Patients With a Surrogate Index, Guadalajara, Mexico, 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Espinel-Bermúdez, María Claudia; Robles-Cervantes, José Antonio; del Sagrario Villarreal-Hernández, Liliana; Villaseñor-Romero, Juan Pablo; Hernández-González, Sandra Ofelia; González-Ortiz, Manuel; Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; Pérez-Rubio, Karina Griselda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Insulin resistance (IR) is a key molecular disorder related with diabetes mellitus, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to determine IR in adult primary care patients using the triglyceride/glucose (TyG) index [(Ln TG (mg/dL) × FG (mg/dL))/2]. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional secondary analysis and identified IR subjects according to the TyG index. Results There were 1500 patients included. Significant differences were found between the IR g...

  11. Psychiatric morbidity among adult patients in a semi-urban primary care setting in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Omar Khairani; Midin Marhani; Thambu Maniam; ZamZam Ruzanna; Kaur Pervesh

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Screening for psychiatric disorders in primary care can improve the detection rate and helps in preventing grave consequences of unrecognised and untreated psychiatric morbidity. This is relevant to the Malaysian setting where mental health care is now also being provided at primary care level. The aim of this paper is to report the prevalence of psychiatric illness in a semi-urban primary care setting in Malaysia using the screening tool Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)...

  12. Fisioterapia motora em pacientes adultos em terapia intensiva Motor physiotherapy in intensive care adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Marcos Borges

    2009-12-01

    ventilados mecanicamente é um procedimento seguro e viável, diminuindo o tempo de internação na unidade de terapia intensiva e hospitalar. Porém mais estudos se fazem necessário para se identificar o tipo de exercício, duração, intensidade e a repercussão da fisioterapia motora precoce em grupos específicos de pacientes.This study aimed to review the literature addressing motor physical therapy for intensive care unit adult patients. A literature search was conducted in the databases, PubMed, MedLine (International Literature and Health, LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences and Cochrane between 1995 and December 2008 using the keywords: physical therapy, mobilization and intensive care unit. For comparison purposes we selected randomized controlled trials and prospective studies, addressing the subject motor physical therapy for intensive care unit adult patients. Pediatric and experimental studies, systematic reviews and meta-analysis were excluded. Of the 121 articles identified, only 4 met the inclusion criteria. Among these, three focused early motor physical therapy in patients with a range of diagnoses, showing that these patients left the bed and walked earlier, and stayed shorter both in the intensive care unit and hospital. Furthermore, patients on early motor physical therapy had shorter mechanical ventilation duration. Another paper compares the use of electrical stimulation associated with physical therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, showing increased muscle strength and shorter time for these patients bed to chair transference as compared with those only receiving physiotherapy. The risks of immobilization in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients are not fully understood. However, it is clear that the survivors show impaired quality of life due to persistent weakness and fatigue. Early mobilization is a new area, with little evidence so far. However, recent studies have confirmed that mechanically

  13. Adult HIV care resources, management practices and patient characteristics in the Phase 1 IeDEA Central Africa cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jules Mushingantahe

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite recent advances in the management of HIV infection and increased access to treatment, prevention, care and support, the HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to be a major global health problem, with sub-Saharan Africa suffering by far the greatest humanitarian, demographic and socio-economic burden of the epidemic. Information on HIV/AIDS clinical care and established cohorts’ characteristics in the Central Africa region are sparse. Methods: A survey of clinical care resources, management practices and patient characteristics was undertaken among 12 adult HIV care sites in four countries of the International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS Central Africa (IeDEA-CA Phase 1 regional network in October 2009. These facilities served predominantly urban populations and offered primary care in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC; six sites, secondary care in Rwanda (two sites and tertiary care in Cameroon (three sites and Burundi (one site. Results: Despite some variation in facility characteristics, sites reported high levels of monitoring resources, including electronic databases, as well as linkages to prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission programs. At the time of the survey, there were 21,599 HIV-positive adults (median age=37 years enrolled in the clinical cohort. Though two-thirds were women, few adults (6.5% entered HIV care through prevention of mother-to-child transmission services, whereas 55% of the cohort entered care through voluntary counselling and testing. Two-thirds of patients at sites in Cameroon and DRC were in WHO Stage III and IV at baseline, whereas nearly all patients in the Rwanda facilities with clinical stage information available were in Stage I and II. WHO criteria were used for antiretroviral therapy initiation. The most common treatment regimen was stavudine/lamivudine/nevirapine (64%, followed by zidovudine/lamivudine/nevirapine (19%. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate the

  14. [Bioethics and nutrition in adult patients with cancer in palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benarroz, Monica de Oliveira; Faillace, Giovanna Borges Damião; Barbosa, Leandro Augusto

    2009-09-01

    Cancer constitutes a major group of chronic diseases and is the second leading cause of death in the developed countries. Palliative care proposes to offer comprehensive support to control symptoms and improve quality of life for patients and their families. Nutrition is an important tool in palliative care, helping patients with their physical, psychological, and social issues and promoting comfort and quality of life. However, in the context of palliative care, nutritional support rarely achieves its role of fully recovering and assuring nutritional status. At this point, the nutritionist must consider the individual patient's needs, preferences, and eating habits, which are essential both for controlling symptoms and assuring satisfaction and comfort. The impossibility of conventionally applying established management and the development of a new perception of the patient often raise dilemmas for professional nutritionists. PMID:19750375

  15. The Role of the Primary Care Physician in Helping Adolescent and Adult Patients Improve Asthma Control

    OpenAIRE

    Yawn, Barbara P.

    2011-01-01

    Many adolescents and adults with asthma continue to have poorly controlled disease, often attributable to poor adherence to asthma therapy. Failure to adhere to recommended treatment may result from a desire to avoid regular reliance on medications, inappropriate high tolerance of asthma symptoms, failure to perceive the chronic nature of asthma, and poor inhaler technique. Primary care physicians need to find opportunities and methods to address these and other issues related to poor asthma ...

  16. Enteral nutrition in the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in adult critical care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jill; Rasmussen, Louisa

    2014-12-01

    Prevention and healing of pressure ulcers in critically ill patients can be especially challenging because of the patients' burden of illness and degree of physiological compromise. Providing adequate nutrition may help halt the development or worsening of pressure ulcers. Optimization of nutrition can be considered an essential ingredient in prevention and healing of pressure ulcers. Understanding malnutrition in critical care patients, the effect of nutrition on wound healing, and the application of evidence-based nutritional guidelines are important aspects for patients at high risk for pressure ulcers. Appropriate screenings for nutritional status and risk for pressure ulcers, early collaboration with a registered dietician, and administration of appropriate feeding formulations and micronutrient and macronutrient supplementation to promote wound healing are practical solutions to improve the nutritional status of critical care patients. Use of nutritional management and enteral feeding protocols may provide vital elements to augment nutrition and ultimately result in improved clinical outcomes. PMID:25452406

  17. Mead Johnson Critical Care Symposium for the Practising Surgeon. 1. Transport of critically ill adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotti, M J; Pagliarello, G

    1988-09-01

    Interhospital transportation of critically ill patients over long distances is common in the tiered health care systems of North America. The authors describe their 1-year experience with a physician-assisted transport system, operating out of the surgical intensive care unit at the Toronto General Hospital. The application of a well-known severity of illness measure (therapeutic intervention scoring system) allowed them to correlate severity of illness, as assessed over the telephone before patient transfer, with eventual outcome after admission to the surgical intensive care unit. Their analysis of 107 critically ill patients transported by this system led them to conclude that the system is reliable and is associated with acceptable morbidity and mortality. PMID:3138018

  18. Point-of-care urine tests for smoking status and isoniazid treatment monitoring in adult patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Nicolau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Poor adherence to isoniazid (INH preventive therapy (IPT is an impediment to effective control of latent tuberculosis (TB infection. TB patients who smoke are at higher risk of latent TB infection, active disease, and TB mortality, and may have lower adherence to their TB medications. The objective of our study was to validate IsoScreen and SmokeScreen (GFC Diagnostics, UK, two point-of-care tests for monitoring INH intake and determining smoking status. The tests could be used together in the same individual to help identify patients with a high-risk profile and provide a tailored treatment plan that includes medication management, adherence interventions, and smoking cessation programs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 200 adult outpatients attending the TB and/or the smoking cessation clinic were recruited at the Montreal Chest Institute. Sensitivity and specificity were measured for each test against the corresponding composite reference standard. Test reliability was measured using kappa statistic for intra-rater and inter-rater agreement. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to explore possible covariates that might be related to false-positive and false-negative test results. IsoScreen had a sensitivity of 93.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 80.3, 98.2 and specificity of 98.7% (94.8, 99.8. IsoScreen had intra-rater agreement (kappa of 0.75 (0.48, 0.94 and inter-rater agreement of 0.61 (0.27, 0.90. SmokeScreen had a sensitivity of 69.2% (56.4, 79.8, specificity of 81.6% (73.0, 88.0, intra-rater agreement of 0.77 (0.56, 0.94, and inter-rater agreement of 0.66 (0.42, 0.88. False-positive SmokeScreen tests were strongly associated with INH treatment. CONCLUSIONS: IsoScreen had high validity and reliability, whereas SmokeScreen had modest validity and reliability. SmokeScreen tests did not perform well in a population receiving INH due to the association between INH treatment and false-positive Smoke

  19. Psychiatric morbidity among adult patients in a semi-urban primary care setting in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Khairani

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening for psychiatric disorders in primary care can improve the detection rate and helps in preventing grave consequences of unrecognised and untreated psychiatric morbidity. This is relevant to the Malaysian setting where mental health care is now also being provided at primary care level. The aim of this paper is to report the prevalence of psychiatric illness in a semi-urban primary care setting in Malaysia using the screening tool Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ. Methods This is a cross-sectional study carried out in a semi-urban primary healthcare centre located south of Kuala Lumpur. Systematic random sampling was carried out and a total of 267 subjects completed the PHQ during the study period. Results The proportion of respondents who had at least one PHQ positive diagnosis was 24.7% and some respondents had more than one diagnosis. Diagnoses included depressive illness (n = 38, 14.4%, somatoform disorder (n = 32, 12.2%, panic and anxiety disorders (n = 17, 6.5%, binge eating disorder (n = 9, 3.4% and alcohol abuse (n = 6, 2.3%. Younger age (18 to 29 years and having a history of stressors in the previous four weeks were found to be significantly associated (p = 0.036 and p = 0.044 respectively with PHQ positive scores. Conclusion These findings are broadly similar to the findings of studies done in other countries and are a useful guide to the probable prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in primary care in other similar settings in Malaysia.

  20. Current understanding of treatment and management protocol for adult diabetic in-patients at a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the current understanding of treatment and management protocols for adult diabetic in-patients at a tertiary care hospital. Methods: This cross-sectional study, conducted at the Civil Hospital Karachi from July to September 2009, involved 450 participants, who were interviewed through a well-structured questionnaire regarding the patient's demography, clinical features, past medical history, type of diabetes mellitus, duration, associated complications, and also involved patient notes for laboratory tests and management. SPSSv15.0 was used for descriptive analysis. Results: The study population of 450 diabetics had 144 (32%) males and 306 (68%) females. Of the total, 435 (96.7%) patients had type 2 diabetes. There were 231 (51%) patients using insulin, 168 (37.3%) oral hypoglycaemic drugs, and 51 (11.3%) using both. Among patients using insulin, regular insulin usage stood at 30% followed by a combination of regular insulin and NPH (26.7%) and NPH alone at 6%. The most popular drug used was metformin (27.3%) and the least used drug was glitazones (4%). In the study population, 73.3% patients controlled their diabetes with diet, and 24.7% with regular exercise. Conclusion: Majority of the study population had type 2 diabetes with a female preponderance. Insulin was prescribed for half the patients. Metformin was the most frequently used oral hypoglycaemic drug. (author)

  1. Screening for psychological distress in adult primary brain tumor patients and caregivers: considerations for cancer care coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafa eTrad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThis study aimed to assess psychological distress (PD as scored by the Distress Thermometer (DT in adult primary brain tumor (PBT patients and caregivers in a clinic setting, and ascertain if any high risk sub-groups for PD exist. Material and MethodsFrom May 2012 to August 2013, n=96 patients and n=32 caregivers (CG underwent DT screening at diagnosis, and a differing cohort of n=12 patients and n=14 caregivers at first recurrence. Groups were described by diagnosis (high grade, low grade and benign, and English versus non-English speaking. Those with DT score≥4 met caseness criteria for referral to psycho-oncology services. One-way ANOVA tests were conducted to test for between group differences where appropriate.ResultsAt diagnosis and first recurrence, 37.5% and 75.0% (respectively of patients had DT scores above the cut-off for distress. At diagnosis, 78.1% of caregivers met caseness criteria for distress. All caregivers at recurrence met distress criterion. Patients with high grade glioma had significantly higher scores than those with a benign tumor. For patients at diagnosis, non-English speaking participants did not report significantly higher DT scores than English speaking participants.DiscussionPsychological distress is particularly elevated in caregivers, and in patients with high grade glioma at diagnosis. Effective PD screening, triage and referral by skilled care coordinators is vital to enable timely needs assessment, psychological support and effective intervention.

  2. O impacto da obesidade no tratamento intensivo de adultos Impact of obesity on critical care treatment in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Moock

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Verificar o prognóstico de pacientes obesos e eutróficos internados em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva (UTI de adultos. DESENHO: Estudo retrospectivo e observacional MÉTODOS: Todos os pacientes admitidos na UTI durante 52 meses foram incluídos. Foram selecionados pacientes com IMC ≥30 Kg/M² para compor o grupo obeso e outros com IMC 40 Kg/M² totalizaram apenas 10 pacientes. Não se observou diferença na taxa de mortalidade real, na mortalidade prevista pelo APACHE II, na mediana do tempo de ventilação mecânica e na freqüência da realização de traqueostomia. As diferenças observadas foram na mediana do tempo de internação na unidade de terapia intensiva (7,0 versus 5,0 dias respectivamente; p 40Kg/M². CONCLUSÕES: Neste estudo a obesidade não aumentou a taxa de mortalidade, mas aumentou o tempo médio de permanência na UTI. Os atuais indicadores prognósticos ao não incluírem o IMC poderiam subestimar o risco de morrer e interferir em outros indicadores de qualidade do desempenho assistencial. Como ainda não há um consenso sobre a interferência da obesidade na mortalidade, a inclusão do índice de massa corpórea nos indicadores permanece controversa. Novos estudos, com maior número de obesos, poderão apontar qual o ponto de corte a partir do qual o índice de massa corpórea determinaria o incremento da taxa de mortalidade.STUDY OBJECTIVE: Obese patients seem to have worse outcomes and more complications during intensive care unit (ICU stay. This study describes the clinical course, complications and prognostic factors of obese patients admitted to an intensive care unit compared to a control group of nonobese patients. DESIGN: Retrospective observational study. SETTING: A 10-bed adult intensive care unit in a university-affiliated hospital. METHODS: All patients admitted to the intensive care unit over 52 months (April 01/2005 to November 30/2008 were included. Obese patients were defined as those with a

  3. In a unique position or squeezed out? The professional roles of general practitioners in cancer care in general and of young adult cancer patients in particular

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, B.; Christensen, I.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exploring experiences of general practitioners (GPs), regarding roles in cancer care of young adults (YAs). METHODS: Ten qualitative interviews with GPs were theoretically analyzed against professional characteristics. FINDINGS: The GPs tended to make general statements, using everyday...... language, they experience that their patients disappear, they are seldom involved, and they lack knowledge. CONCLUSIONS: GPs have few experiences with YA cancer patients, but they have a potentially unique role in general primary cancer care if they develop their vocational vocabulary, relate more to...

  4. Older patients in transition : From home care towards emergency care

    OpenAIRE

    Kihlgren, Annica

    2005-01-01

    The overall aim of the thesis was to study the praxis of referrals to the emergency department (ED) from different community health care settings and the caring process of older adults in the ED (I-V). With this knowledge, the prerequisites needed to provide older adults with better care can be attained. The thesis focuses on the older adults and the nurses' involvement in the referrals and the caring process. Study I focused on the extent and reasons that 719 patients > 75...

  5. Problems in the organization of care for patients with adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Meijboom; B.J.M. Mulder

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of congenital heart disease among adults in Europe, or in any country in Europe, is not known. This is due to a lack of agreement on the incidence of congenital heart disease, with estimations varying from four per 1000 births to 50 per 1000 births, and it is not known how many patien

  6. Diagnosing pneumonia, influenza and obstructive pulmonary diseases in adult patients presenting to primary care with acute cough: a multinomial logistic regression analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mesiri, Pavlina

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this report is to assess the diagnostic value of signs and symptoms and added value of bio markers, e.g. C-Reactive Protein, of adult patients from 16 primary care networks from 12 European countries who presented to primary care with acute cough for GRACE studies in the diagnosis of pneumonia, influenza and obstructive pulmonary diseases treating the diagnoses in parallel rather than in series.

  7. Ten years of specialized adult care for phenylketonuria

    OpenAIRE

    Mütze, Ulrike; Thiele, Alena Gerlinde; Baerwald, Christoph; Ceglarek, Uta; Kiess, Wieland; Beblo, Skadi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Specialized adult care of phenylketonuria (PKU) patients is of increasing importance. Adult outpatient clinics for inherited errors of metabolism can help to achieve this task, but experience is limited. Ten years after establishment of a coordinated transition process and specialised adult care for inherited metabolic diseases, adult PKU care was evaluated with respect to metabolic control, therapy satisfaction, life satisfaction, sociodemographic data, economical welfare as well...

  8. Spinal opioids in adult patients with cancer pain: a systematic review: a European Palliative Care Research Collaborative (EPCRC) opioid guidelines project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Kaasa, Stein; Sjøgren, Per

    2011-01-01

    A systematic review, undertaken according to an initiative to revise European Association for Palliative Care guidelines on the use of opioids for cancer pain, which aimed to analyse analgesic efficacy and side effects of spinal opioids in adult cancer patients previously treated with systemic...

  9. Association of Health Literacy with Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use: A Cross-Sectional Study in Adult Primary Care Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bains Sujeev S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the United States, it is estimated that 40% of adults utilize complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies. Recently, national surveys report that over 90 million adults have inadequate health literacy. To date, no study has assessed health literacy and its effect on CAM use. The primary objective of this study was to assess the relationship between health literacy and CAM use independent of educational attainment. Second objective was to evaluate the differential effect of health literacy on CAM use by race. Methods 351 patients were recruited from an outpatient primary care clinic. Validated surveys assessed CAM use (I-CAM-Q, health literacy (REALM-R, and demographic information. We compared demographics by health literacy (adequate vs. inadequate and overall and individual CAM categories by health literacy using chi square statistics. We found a race by health literacy interaction and ran sequential logistic regression models stratified by race to test the association between health literacy and overall CAM use (Model 1, Model 1 + education (Model 2, and Model 2 + other demographic characteristics (Model 3. We reported the adjusted effect of health literacy on CAM use for both whites and African Americans separately. Results 75% of the participants had adequate literacy and 80% used CAM. CAM use differed by CAM category. Among whites, adequate health literacy was significantly associated with increased CAM use in both unadjusted (Model 1, OR 7.68; p = 0.001 and models adjusted for education (Model 2, OR 7.70; p = 0.002 and other sociodemographics (Model 3, OR 9.42; p = 0.01. Among African Americans, adequate health literacy was not associated with CAM use in any of the models. Conclusions We found a race by literacy interaction suggesting that the relationship between health literacy and CAM use differed significantly by race. Adequate health literacy among whites is associated with increased CAM use, but not

  10. [Transition in health care, from pediatrics to adult care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cunto, Carmen L

    2012-08-01

    The number of adolescent patients with chronic diseases and special heath needs are increasing, and they are reaching adulthood. Sometimes the passage to the adult health care is abrupt, depending upon the chronological age reached or because of an acute health problem that requires hospitalization. In order to facilitate the transition process, preparation of the child, the family and the health professionals involved is needed, as well as the coordination between the pediatric group and the adult team that will be incharge of the patient. This review shows the obstacles to this process and the recommended implementation steps required to a successful transition. It also describes the main aspects of a program that we implemented at the Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires in conjunction with some departments of adult health care high lighting the main steps to follow before and during program´s implementation. PMID:22859330

  11. Retention in Care of Adult HIV Patients Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy in Tigray, Ethiopia: A Prospective Observational Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bucciardini, Raffaella; Fragola, Vincenzo; Abegaz, Teshome; Lucattini, Stefano; Halifom, Atakilt; Tadesse, Eskedar; Berhe, Micheal; Pugliese, Katherina; Binelli, Andrea; De Castro, Paola; Terlizzi, Roberta; Fucili, Luca; Di Gregorio, Massimiliano; Mirra, Marco; Olivieri, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although Ethiopia has been scaling up the antiretroviral therapy (ART) services, low retention in care of patients remains one of the main obstacles to treatment success. We report data on retention in care and its associated determinants in Tigray, Ethiopia. Methods We used data from the CASA project, a prospective observational and multi-site study of a cohort of HIV-infected patients who initiated ART for the first time in Tigray. Four participating health facilities (HFs) loc...

  12. Patient-centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, April

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient and the individual's particular health care needs. The goal of patient-centered health care is to empower patients to become active participants in their care. This requires that physicians, radiologic technologists and other health care providers develop good communication skills and address patient needs effectively. Patient-centered care also requires that the health care provider become a patient advocate and strive to provide care that not only is effective but also safe. For radiologic technologists, patient-centered care encompasses principles such as the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept and contrast media safety. Patient-centered care is associated with a higher rate of patient satisfaction, adherence to suggested lifestyle changes and prescribed treatment, better outcomes and more cost-effective care. This article is a Directed Reading. Your access to Directed Reading quizzes for continuing education credit is determined by your area of interest. For access to other quizzes, go to www.asrt.org/store. According to one theory, most patients judge the quality of their healthcare much like they rate an airplane flight. They assume that the airplane is technically viable and is being piloted by competent people. Criteria for judging a particular airline are personal and include aspects like comfort, friendly service and on-time schedules. Similarly, patients judge the standard of their healthcare on nontechnical aspects, such as a healthcare practitioner's communication and "soft skills." Most are unable to evaluate a practitioner's level of technical skill or training, so the qualities they can assess become of the utmost importance in satisfying patients and providing patient-centered care.(1). PMID:19901351

  13. Access and care issues in urban urgent care clinic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Adams Jill C; Majeres Sharon; Batal Holly A; Scott David R; Dale Rita; Mehler Philip S

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Although primary care should be the cornerstone of medical practice, inappropriate use of urgent care for non-urgent patients is a growing problem that has significant economic and healthcare consequences. The characteristics of patients who choose the urgent care setting, as well as the reasoning behind their decisions, is not well established. The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation behind, and characteristics of, adult patients who choose to access hea...

  14. The Affordable Care Act and implications for young adult health

    OpenAIRE

    Monaghan, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    In the USA, young adults are most likely to be uninsured and least likely to report a usual source of medical care than any age group. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) recognizes the critical need for expanded insurance coverage for this age group, and multiple provisions of the ACA address insurance coverage and health care utilization in young adults. This paper presents a brief overview of the challenges of maintaining health insurance coverage and accessing health care...

  15. Developing the Botswana Primary Care Guideline: an integrated, symptom-based primary care guideline for the adult patient in a resource-limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsima BM

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Billy M Tsima,1 Vincent Setlhare,1 Oathokwa Nkomazana2 1Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, 2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana Background: Botswana’s health care system is based on a primary care model. Various national guidelines exist for specific diseases. However, most of the guidelines address management at a tertiary level and often appear nonapplicable for the limited resources in primary care facilities. An integrated symptom-based guideline was developed so as to translate the Botswana national guidelines to those applicable in primary care. The Botswana Primary Care Guideline (BPCG integrates the care of communicable diseases, including HIV/AIDS and noncommunicable diseases, by frontline primary health care workers.Methods: The Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, together with guideline developers from the Knowledge Translation Unit (University of Cape Town collaborated with the Ministry of Health to develop the guideline. Stakeholder groups were set up to review specific content of the guideline to ensure compliance with Botswana government policy and the essential drug list.Results: Participants included clinicians, academics, patient advocacy groups, and policymakers from different disciplines, both private and public. Drug-related issues were identified as necessary for implementing recommendations of the guideline. There was consensus by working groups for updating the essential drug list for primary care and expansion of prescribing rights of trained nurse prescribers in primary care within their scope of practice. An integrated guideline incorporating common symptoms of diseases seen in the Botswana primary care setting was developed.Conclusion: The development of the BPCG took a broad consultative approach with buy in from relevant stakeholders. It is anticipated that implementation of the BPCG will translate into better

  16. Screening for Psychological Distress in Adult Primary Brain Tumor Patients and Caregivers: Considerations for Cancer Care Coordination

    OpenAIRE

    Trad, Wafa; Koh, Eng-Siew; Daher, Maysaa; Bailey, Alanah; Kastelan, Marina; Legge, Dianne; Fleet, Marcia; Simpson, Grahame K.; Hovey, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study aimed to assess psychological distress (PD) as scored by the Distress Thermometer (DT) in adult primary brain tumor patients and caregivers (CGs) in a clinic setting and ascertain if any high-risk subgroups for PD exist. Material and methods From May 2012 to August 2013, n = 96 patients and n = 32 CG underwent DT screening at diagnosis, and a differing cohort of n = 12 patients and n = 14 CGs at first recurrence. Groups were described by diagnosis (high grad...

  17. Associations Between the Continuity of Ambulatory Care of Adult Diabetes Patients in Korea and the Incidence of Macrovascular Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Young-Hoon; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Seo, Hyeyoung; Kim, Dongwoo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The goal of this study was to identify association between the continuity of ambulatory care of diabetes patients in South Korea (hereafter Korea) and the incidence of macrovascular complications of diabetes, using claims data compiled by the National Health Insurance Services of Korea. Methods: This study was conducted retrospectively. The subjects of the study were 43 002 patients diagnosed with diabetes in 2007, who were over 30 years of age, and had insurance claim data from 2...

  18. Improving Cultural Competency and Disease Awareness among Oncology Nurses Caring for Adult T-Cell Leukemia and Lymphoma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese-Peske, Marisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Foreign-born residents face significant challenges accessing and receiving quality healthcare in the U.S. These obstacles include a lack of information on how to access care, fear, as well as communication and cultural barriers (Portes, Fernandez-Kelly & Light, 2012). Increasing healthcare providers' knowledge regarding a patient's…

  19. Diabetes care for emerging adults: transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young Ah

    2013-01-01

    With the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus in children, transitioning patients from childhood to adulthood are increasing. High-risk behaviors and poor glycemic control during the transition period increase the risk for hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia as well as chronic microvascular and macrovascular complications. Discussions regarding complications and preparations for transition must take place before the actual transition to adult care systems. Pediatric care providers should foc...

  20. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a Framework for Providing Patient- and Family-Centered Audiological Care for Older Adults and Their Significant Others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenness, Caitlin; Meyer, Carly; Scarinci, Nerina; Ekberg, Katie; Hickson, Louise

    2016-08-01

    Hearing impairment is highly prevalent in the older population, and it impacts communication and quality of life for both the people with the hearing difficulties and their significant others. In this article, typical audiological assessment and management of an older adult is contrasted with a best practice approach wherein the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework is applied. The aim of the comparison is to demonstrate how the ICF expands our focus: rather than merely focusing on impairment, we also consider the activities, participation, and contextual factors for both the person with the hearing impairment and his or her family. A case example of an older patient and her spouse is provided, and their shared experience of the patient's hearing impairment is mapped onto the ICF framework. Family-centered hearing care is recommended for individualizing care and improving outcomes for older patients and their families. PMID:27489398

  1. Screening for acromegaly by application of a simple questionnaire evaluating the enlargement of extremities in adult patients seen at primary health care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Pedro Weslley; Calsolari, Maria Regina

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to screen for acromegaly by application of a simple questionnaire in patients seen at primary health care units. A total of 17,000 patients of both genders >18 and physiognomy (confirmed by the comparison of photographs), in addition to the enlargement of extremities. The present investigation suggests a much higher prevalence of acromegaly in the adult population than that reported traditionally. We propose that screening based on phenotypic alterations is cost-effective since these changes occur early and almost universally in acromegaly and are uncommon in the general population. PMID:21380935

  2. Characteristics and dying trajectories of adult hospital patients from acute care wards who die following review by the rapid response team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, M A; Nelson, K; Psirides, A J; Suter, N; Pedersen, A

    2016-03-01

    A third of patients reviewed by rapid response teams (RRT) require end-of-life care. However, little is known about the characteristics and management of these patients following RRT review. This paper presents results of a retrospective, descriptive audit that explored the dying trajectory of adult ward inpatients who died outside of intensive care following RRT review. The study setting was a 430-bed tertiary New Zealand hospital during 2013. RRT, inpatient databases and hospital notes were used to identify 100 consecutive adult inpatients who died subsequent to RRT review. Outcome measures included time from RRT review to death, place of death, pre-existing co-morbidities and frequency of medical review. Results demonstrated that patients were old (median 77 years, IQR 63-85years), emergency admissions (n=100) and admitted under a medical specialty (n=71). All but one of the cohort had pre-existing co-morbidities (mean 3.2, SD 1.7), almost a third (n=31) had cancer and 51% had 1-4 previous inpatient admissions within the previous 12 months. The mean length of stay prior to RRT review was 4.9 days (SD 5.5) during which patients were frequently reviewed by senior medical staff (mean 6.8 times, SD 6.9, range 0-44). Twenty per cent of patients died after their first RRT review with a further 40% receiving treatment limitation/palliation. Fifty-two per cent of patients had a pre-existing DNAR. Eighty per cent of patients died in hospital. Whilst the RRT fulfils an unmet need in decision-making at end of life, there is a need to understand what RRT, instead of ward-based or palliative care teams, offers dying patients. PMID:27029659

  3. Optimizing Health Care for Adults with Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Survival into adulthood for individuals with spina bifida has significantly improved over the last 40 years with the majority of patients now living as adults. Despite this growing population of adult patients who have increased medical needs compared to the general population, including spina bifida (SB)-specific care, age-related secondary…

  4. Comparison of a nurse initiated insulin infusion protocol for intensive insulin therapy between adult surgical trauma, medical and coronary care intensive care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuper Philip J

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sustained hyperglycemia is a known risk factor for adverse outcomes in critically ill patients. The specific aim was to determine if a nurse initiated insulin infusion protocol (IIP was effective in maintaining blood glucose values (BG within a target goal of 100–150 mg/dL across different intensive care units (ICUs and to describe glycemic control during the 48 hours after protocol discontinuation. Methods A descriptive, retrospective review of 366 patients having 28,192 blood glucose values in three intensive care units, Surgical Trauma Intensive Care Unit (STICU, Medical (MICU and Coronary Care Unit (CCU in a quaternary care hospital was conducted. Patients were > 15 years of age, admitted to STICU (n = 162, MICU (n = 110 or CCU (n = 94 over 8 months; October 2003-June 2004 and who had an initial blood glucose level > 150 mg/dL. We summarized the effectiveness and safety of a nurse initiated IIP, and compared these endpoints among STICU, MICU and CCU patients. Results The median blood glucose values (mg/dL at initiation of insulin infusion protocol were lower in STICU (188; IQR, 162–217 than in MICU, (201; IQR, 170–268 and CCU (227; IQR, 178–313; p p = 0.27. Hypoglycemia (BG p = 0.85. Protocol violations were uncommon in all three ICUs. Mean blood glucose 48 hours following IIP discontinuation was significantly different for each population: 142 mg/dL in STICU, 167 mg/dL in MICU, and 160 mg/dL in CCU (p Conclusion The safety and effectiveness of nurse initiated IIP was similar across different ICUs in our hospital. Marked variability in glucose control after the protocol discontinuation suggests the need for further research regarding glucose control in patients transitioning out of the ICU.

  5. Cancer-Related Pain in Older Adults Receiving Palliative Care: Patient and Family Caregiver Perspectives on the Experience of Pain

    OpenAIRE

    McPherson, Christine J; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Lobchuk, Michelle M; Kilgour, Kelly N

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite an emphasis on pain management in palliative care, pain continues to be a common problem for individuals with advanced cancer. Many of those affected are older due to the disproportionate incidence of cancer in this age group. There remains little understanding of how older patients and their family caregivers perceive patients’ cancer-related pain, despite its significance for pain management in the home setting.OBJECTIVES: To explore and describe the cancer pain percepti...

  6. 452 Asthma Control and Quality of Care of Adult Asthma Patients in Primary Health Care Facilities in Saint-Petersburg, Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Emelyanov, Alexander; Tsukanova, Inessa; Fedoseev, Gleb; Sergeeva, Galina; Lisitsyna, Natalia; Bakanina, Lubov; Nikitina, Ekaterina

    2012-01-01

    Background This study was performed to assess the control asthma and quality of care of asthmatic patient in primary health care facilities in Saint-Petersburg, the second largest city in Russia. Methods We conducted telephone interviews with 205 asthma outpatients (aged 24 to 90 years). Asthma control was assessed by using the Asthma Control Test (ACT). Results During the past 12 month spirometry were performed in 26.8%. Only 2% of outpatients were consulted by allergist and 26.8% - by respi...

  7. "Patient care in radiology"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro Brask, Kirsten; Birkelund, Regner

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to research how the staff experience care expressed during the brief encounter with the patients in a diagnostic imaging department. This was a qualitative study with a phenomenological and hermeneutical frame of reference. The data were collected using field observations...... and semistructured interviews and analyzed according to the guidelines for meaning condensation by Giorgi. The imaging staff found that care is expressed in an administrative, an instrumental, and a compassionate sense. The imaging staff perceived care in a way that clearly differs from the traditional perception...... of care understood as the close relations between people. In their self-understanding, the staff found that care not only comprised the relational aspect but also that it was already delivered during the preparatory phases before the actual meeting with the patient and up until the image...

  8. Progressive Care of Obese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambaugh, Lori A; Ecklund, Margaret M

    2016-08-01

    Obese patients have complex needs that complicate their care during hospitalization. These patients often have comorbid conditions, including hypertension, heart failure, obstructive sleep apnea, pressure ulcers, and difficulty with mobility. Obese patients may be well served in the progressive care setting because they may require more intensive nursing care than can be delivered in a general care unit. Progressive care nurses have core competencies that enable them to safely and effectively care for obese patients. A plan of care with interdisciplinary collaboration illustrates the integrative care for obese progressive care patients. (Critical Care Nurse 2016; 36[4]:58-63). PMID:27481802

  9. Home care to Older adult with cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Home care of the elderly with cancer. After the development of a program of oncology home care and over a period of five years, we believe that the evaluation allows us to have our proposal and challenges in the continuity of the program. This evidence is based in our old advanced Uruguayan population, and consequently increase this cancer population, we should define which pointed toward our objective, in order to get the best quality life. After one year with a project based on general rules, the evidence threw an evaluation, that we should review the model of care with which we were working. We continue to Auto-care model Dorothea Orem. The main objective became quality of life:Take care as the primary Older Adult; Specific care their cancer to become symptomatic secondary complications to the evolution of tumor biology; Secondary prevention of cause therapeutic effect; Family integration, without changing the pace of life that the elderly had before being with cancer. Nursing challenge: Maintain autonomy achieved in these 5 years. Deepen the social equilibrium that we are committed daily between patient and family.Do not miss the professionalism achieved today.Proposal for nursing: Consider a wide field of nursing and for this achievement is need knowledge of 2nd level of community work, knowledge Clinical knowledge in Oncology Nursing, autonomy in decision making. For older adults with cancer: No out of its middle. Maintain priority habits and customs. Do not let it lose their self-esteem with their own values. Caution changes must take care to better manage the evolution of their illness. Conclusion: Oncology nursing is a specialty. Without this formation will be ever more away the development of these programs in our environment, or fall in applying for only economic convenience, losing professionalism. Our population is increasing

  10. Medicaid Adult Health Care Quality Measures

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Affordable Care Act (Section 1139B) requires the Secretary of HHS to identify and publish a core set of health care quality measures for adult Medicaid...

  11. Design considerations for adult patient education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, P L

    1982-01-01

    A variety of factors require attention in the design of patient education programs for adults. Andragogy, the art and science of helping adults learn, describes certain conditions of learning that are more conducive to growth and development for adults and prescribes practices in the learning-teaching transaction to meet them. Stigma, a special discrepancy between virtual and actual social identity, reduces a patient's self-esteem and fosters a feeling of dependence on others for care. Anxiety related to diagnosis and illness creates a situation in which patients cannot productively learn. The stages in acceptance of diagnosis provide a roadmap for understanding a patient's feelings/psychological processes and insight into opportunities to intervene with patient education. The specific disease a patient has effects his ability to learn. Each of these factors is considered with implications described for designing and implementing patient education activities for adults. PMID:10258421

  12. Access and care issues in urban urgent care clinic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Jill C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although primary care should be the cornerstone of medical practice, inappropriate use of urgent care for non-urgent patients is a growing problem that has significant economic and healthcare consequences. The characteristics of patients who choose the urgent care setting, as well as the reasoning behind their decisions, is not well established. The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation behind, and characteristics of, adult patients who choose to access health care in our urgent care clinic. The relevance of understanding the motivation driving this patient population is especially pertinent given recent trends towards universal healthcare and the unclear impact it may have on the demands of urgent care. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of patients seeking care at an urgent care clinic (UCC within a large acute care safety-net urban hospital over a six-week period. Survey data included demographics, social and economic information, reasons that patients chose a UCC, previous primary care exposure, reasons for delaying care, and preventive care needs. Results A total of 1, 006 patients were randomly surveyed. Twenty-five percent of patients identified Spanish as their preferred language. Fifty-four percent of patients reported choosing the UCC due to not having to make an appointment, 51.2% because it was convenient, 43.9% because of same day test results, 42.7% because of ability to get same-day medications and 15.1% because co-payment was not mandatory. Lack of a regular physician was reported by 67.9% of patients and 57.2% lacked a regular source of care. Patients reported delaying access to care for a variety of reasons. Conclusion Despite a common belief that patients seek care in the urgent care setting primarily for economic reasons, this study suggests that patients choose the urgent care setting based largely on convenience and more timely care. This information is especially applicable to

  13. Primary care for young adult cancer survivors: an international perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Blake-Gumbs, Lyla; Miedema, Baujke;

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Internationally, family physicians (FP) are not routinely involved in young adult cancer (YAC) care. In this short report, we would like to make a compelling argument for primary care involvement. METHODS: Comparative descriptions and literature review. RESULTS: Cancer among YAs is rare...... psychosocial issues the YA cancer patient may present with. The role of the FP in follow-up care seems to be very limited. CONCLUSIONS: YACs in the western world seem to have comparable medical and psychosocial problems. However, the nature of health insurance is such that it impacts differently on the care of...... this group of cancer patients. Primary care features such as patient-centered, integrated, and comprehensive care over extended periods of time bring the FP into the unique position to provide follow-up for YAC. However, this will require integrating patient's perspectives on their care, professional...

  14. Integrating Adolescents and Young Adults into Adult-Centered Care for IBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Itishree; Holl, Jane L; Hanauer, Stephen; Keefer, Laurie

    2016-05-01

    Planned healthcare transition, initiated in pediatric care, is a gradual process aimed at fostering the adolescent patient's disease knowledge and skills with the ultimate objective of preparing patients and families for adult-centered care. The process is critical in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) where there is an increased risk of non-adherence, hospitalizations, and emergency department use as young adult patients graduate from pediatric to adult-centered care. While evidence for healthcare transition in IBD is mounting, important gaps remain in the understanding of this process from the perspective of the adult gastroenterologist. This paper summarizes what is known about healthcare transition in IBD and explores the unanswered questions-a conceptual and methodological framework for transition interventions, relevant outcomes that define successful transition, and key stakeholder perspectives. For the adult gastroenterologist managing the young adult patient population, this paper presents the paradigm of "care integration"-a process of ongoing, multi-modality support for the patient, initiated in the adult care setting, with the goal of improving self-management skills and active participation in medical decision-making. PMID:27086002

  15. 成人麻疹患者护理及预防措施%Nursing care of adult patients with measles and preventive measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林桂梅

    2015-01-01

    本文探讨成人麻疹的临床护理及预防措施。通过对成人麻疹患者20例开展临床护理及健康宣教,全部治愈出院,未发生并发症及造成医源性的麻疹感染和流行。因此,加强预防接种是控制麻疹发病率的基本措施,做好麻疹患者的护理和管理也是预防麻疹发病率的关键。%In this paper,we explored the nursing care of adult patients with measles and preventive measures.20 adult patients with measles were given clinical nursing and health education,and they were all cured,and there was no complication and cause of iatrogenic infection and epidemic of measles.Therefor,to strengthen the vaccination is the basic measure to control the incidence of measles,and good nursing and management for patients with measles is the key to prevent the incidence of measles.

  16. Prevalence of undiagnosed abnormal glucose tolerance in adult patients cared for by general practitioners in Hungary. Results of a risk-stratified screening based on FINDRISC questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Gábor; Hidvégi, Tibor; Vándorfi, Győző; Balogh, Sándor; Jermendy, György

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is rapidly increasing, worldwide and also in Hungary. Timely diagnosis and early treatment could be aided by targeted screening. Recognizing this, the Hungarian Diabetes Association initiated a risk-stratified screening with the involvement of primary care physicians. Material/Methods In the first phase of screening, the FINDRISC questionnaire was completed, followed by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) for those with a score of ≥12. Between September 1, 2010 and March 31, 2011, 70,432 non-diabetic adults, who visited their general practitioners for any reason, were involved in the screening. Of these, 68,476 questionnaires proved to be suitable for processing. Results From the questionnaires, 28,077 (41.0%) had a score of ≥12. A valid OGTT was performed in 22,846 cases; of this group 3,217 subjects (14.1%) had elevated fasting glucose levels, 5,663 (24.8%) had impaired glucose tolerance, and 1,750 (7.6%) had manifest, previously undiagnosed, diabetes mellitus. Overall, from the valid OGTT group, 46.5% subjects had some degree of glucose intolerance. Conclusions Based on the FINDRISC questionnaire, the risk-stratified screening for diabetes mellitus proved to be simple and cost-effective method for the early detection of carbohydrate metabolism disorders. Using this method, the prevalence rate of previously undiagnosed abnormal glucose tolerance was high in adult patients cared for by general practitioners in Hungary. PMID:23344680

  17. Preferences for end-of-life care among community-dwelling older adults and patients with advanced cancer: A discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Eric A; Bilger, Marcel; Flynn, Terry N; Malhotra, Chetna

    2015-11-01

    Singapore is in the midst of several healthcare reforms in efforts to finance and deliver health services for a rapidly aging population. The primary focus of these reforms is to make healthcare services, including those at the end of life (EOL), affordable. Given the increasingly high health care costs at the EOL, policy makers need to consider how best to allocate resources. One strategy is to allocate resources based on the preferences of sub-populations most likely to be affected. This paper thus aims to quantify preferences for EOL care both among community dwelling older adults (CDOAs) and among patients with a life-limiting illness. A discrete choice experiment was administered to CDOAs and advanced cancer patients in Singapore and willingness to pay (WTP) for specific EOL improvements was estimated. We find that patients have a higher WTP for nearly all EOL attributes compared with CDOAs. We also show that, for both groups, moderate life extension is not the most important consideration; WTP for one additional life year is lower than common thresholds for cost-effectiveness. Irrespective of whose preference are considered, the results highlight the importance of pain management and supporting home deaths at the EOL, perhaps at the expense of public funding for costly but only marginally effective treatments. PMID:26421597

  18. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis. PMID:26857767

  19. Type 1 diabetes: addressing the transition from pediatric to adult-oriented health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaghan M

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Maureen Monaghan,1,2 Katherine Baumann2 1Center for Translational Science, Children's National Health System, 2George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes are at risk for poor health outcomes, including poor glycemic control, acute and chronic complications, and emergency department admissions. During this developmental period, adolescent and young adult patients also experience significant changes in living situation, education, and/or health care delivery, including transferring from pediatric to adult health care. In recent years, professional and advocacy organizations have proposed expert guidelines to improve the process of preparation for and transition to adult-oriented health care. However, challenges remain and evidence-based practices for preparing youth for adult health care are still emerging. Qualitative research suggests that adolescent and young adult patients rely on health care providers to guide them through the transition process and appreciate a gradual approach to preparing for adult-oriented health care, keeping parents in supportive roles into young adulthood. Patients also benefit from specific referrals and contact information for adult care providers. Promising models of transition care include provision of transition navigators, attendance at a young adult bridge clinic, or joint visits with pediatric and adult care providers. However, much of this research is in its early stages, and more rigorous trials need to be conducted to evaluate health outcomes during transition into adult health care. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the transition process, patient and health care provider perceptions of transition care, and emerging evidence of successful models of care for engagement in adult-oriented health care. Recommendations and resources for health care providers are also presented. Keywords: type 1 diabetes

  20. Potential prescription patterns and errors in elderly adult patients attending public primary health care centers in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Corona-Rojo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available José Antonio Corona-Rojo1, Marina Altagracia-Martínez1, Jaime Kravzov-Jinich1, Laura Vázquez-Cervantes1, Edilberto Pérez-Montoya2, Consuelo Rubio-Poo31Division of Biological Sciences and Health, Metropolitan Autonomous University, Campus Xochimilco (UAM-X, Xochimilco, México; 2National Polytechnical Institute (IPN, México DF; 3Faculty of Higher Studies – Zaragoza (FES-Zaragoza, National Autonomous University of México (UNAM, México City, MéxicoIntroduction: Six out of every 10 elderly persons live in developing countries.Objective: To analyze and assess the drug prescription patterns and errors in elderly outpatients attending public health care centers in Mexico City, Mexico.Materials and methods: A descriptive and retrospective study was conducted in 2007. Fourteen hundred prescriptions were analyzed. Prescriptions of ambulatory adults aged >70 years who were residents of Mexico City for at least two years were included. Prescription errors were divided into two groups: (1 administrative and legal, and (2 pharmacotherapeutic. In group 2, we analyzed drug dose strength, administration route, frequency of drug administration, treatment length, potential drug–drug interactions, and contraindications. Variables were classified as correct or incorrect based on clinical literature. Variables for each drug were dichotomized as correct (0 or incorrect (1. A Prescription Index (PI was calculated by considering each drug on the prescription. SPSS statistical software was used to process the collected data (95% confidence interval; p < 0.05.Results: The drug prescription pattern in elderly outpatients shows that 12 drugs account for 70.72% (2880 of prescribed drugs. The most prescribed drugs presented potential pharmacotherapeutic errors (as defined in the present study. Acetylsalicylic acid–captopril was the most common potential interaction (not clinically assessed. Potential prescription error was high (53% of total prescriptions. Most

  1. Barriers and facilitators of adherence to antiretroviral drug therapy and retention in care among adult HIV-positive patients: a qualitative study from Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woldesellassie M Bezabhe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy (ART has been life saving for hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians. With increased availability of ART in recent years, achievement of optimal adherence and patient retention are becoming the greatest challenges in the management of HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia. However, few studies have explored factors influencing medication adherence to ART and retention in follow-up care among adult Ethiopian HIV-positive patients, especially in the Amhara region of the country, where almost one-third of the country's ART is prescribed. The aim of this qualitative study was to collect such data from patients and healthcare providers in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 patients, of whom 11 had been lost to follow-up and were non-persistent with ART. In addition, focus group discussions were performed with 15 ART nurses and 19 case managers. All interviews and focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes and patterns in Amharic using a grounded theory approach. The emergent concepts and categories were translated into English. RESULTS: Economic constraints, perceived stigma and discrimination, fasting, holy water, medication side effects, and dissatisfaction with healthcare services were major reasons for patients being non-adherent and lost to follow-up. Disclosure of HIV status, social support, use of reminder aids, responsibility for raising children, improved health on ART, and receiving education and counseling emerged as facilitators of adherence to ART. CONCLUSIONS: Improving adherence and retention requires integration of enhanced treatment access with improved job and food security. Healthcare providers need to be supported to better equip patients to cope with the issues associated with ART. Development of social policies and cooperation between various agencies are required to facilitate optimal adherence to ART, patient retention, and improved

  2. Hospital Patients Are Adult Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffarella, Rosemary S.

    Patient education is recognized by health care providers and patients themselves as an important component of adequate health care for hospital patients. Through this informational process, patients receive information about specific health problems, learn the necessary competencies to deal with them, and develop accepting attitudes toward the…

  3. Association of Health Literacy with Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use: A Cross-Sectional Study in Adult Primary Care Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bains Sujeev S; Egede Leonard E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In the United States, it is estimated that 40% of adults utilize complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies. Recently, national surveys report that over 90 million adults have inadequate health literacy. To date, no study has assessed health literacy and its effect on CAM use. The primary objective of this study was to assess the relationship between health literacy and CAM use independent of educational attainment. Second objective was to evaluate the differen...

  4. Supportive Care in Older Adults with Cancer: Across the Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koll, Thuy; Pergolotti, Mackenzi; Holmes, Holly M; Pieters, Huibrie C; van Londen, G J; Marcum, Zachary A; MacKenzie, Amy R; Steer, Christopher B

    2016-08-01

    Supportive care is an essential component of anticancer treatment regardless of age or treatment intent. As the number of older adults with cancer increases, and supportive care strategies enable more patients to undergo treatment, greater numbers of older patients will become cancer survivors. These patients may have lingering adverse effects from treatment and will need continued supportive care interventions. Older adults with cancer benefit from geriatric assessment (GA)-guided supportive care interventions. This can occur at any stage across the cancer treatment continuum. As a GA commonly uncovers issues potentially unrelated to anticancer treatment, it could be argued that the assessment is essentially a supportive care strategy. Key aspects of a GA include identification of comorbidities, assessing for polypharmacy, screening for cognitive impairment and delirium, assessing functional status, and screening for psychosocial issues. Treatment-related issues of particular importance in older adults include recognition of increased bone marrow toxicity, management of nausea and vomiting, identification of anemia, and prevention of neurotoxicity. The role of physical therapy and cancer rehabilitation as a supportive care strategy in older adults is important regardless of treatment stage or intent. PMID:27342609

  5. Developing the Botswana Primary Care Guideline: an integrated, symptom-based primary care guideline for the adult patient in a resource-limited setting

    OpenAIRE

    Tsima,; Setlhare, Vincent; Nkomazana, Oathokwa

    2016-01-01

    Billy M Tsima,1 Vincent Setlhare,1 Oathokwa Nkomazana2 1Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, 2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana Background: Botswana’s health care system is based on a primary care model. Various national guidelines exist for specific diseases. However, most of the guidelines address management at a tertiary level and often appear nonapplicable for the limited resources in primary care facilities. An in...

  6. Ten years of specialized adult care for phenylketonuria – a single-centre experience

    OpenAIRE

    Mütze, Ulrike; Thiele, Alena Gerlinde; Baerwald, Christoph; Ceglarek, Uta; Kiess, Wieland; Beblo, Skadi

    2016-01-01

    Background Specialized adult care of phenylketonuria (PKU) patients is of increasing importance. Adult outpatient clinics for inherited errors of metabolism can help to achieve this task, but experience is limited. Ten years after establishment of a coordinated transition process and specialised adult care for inherited metabolic diseases, adult PKU care was evaluated with respect to metabolic control, therapy satisfaction, life satisfaction, sociodemographic data, economical welfare as well ...

  7. Prioritization of care in adults with diabetes and comorbidity

    OpenAIRE

    Laiteerapong, Neda; Huang, Elbert S.; Chin, Marshall H

    2011-01-01

    Approximately half of adults with diabetes have at least one comorbid condition. However, diabetes care guidelines focus on diabetes-specific care, and their recommendations may not be appropriate for many patients with diabetes and comorbidity. We describe Piette and Kerr's typology of comorbid conditions, which categorizes conditions based on if they are clinically dominant (eclipse diabetes management), symptomatic versus asymptomatic, and concordant (similar pathophysiologic processes as ...

  8. Association of vitamin d deficiency with tuberculosis in adult patients reporting to a tertiary care hospital of rawalpindi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the mean vitamin Dlevels in pulmonary tuberculosis patients and healthy controls and to find out the frequency and association of vitamin D deficiency in patients with tuberculosis. Study Design: Case control study. Place and Duration of Study: Pulmonology department, Military Hospital Rawalpindi from Jan 2013 to Dec 2013. Patients and Methods:Fifty two incident outdoor pulmonary tuberculosis patients were selected with 52 age and gender matched controls. Tuberculosis was diagnosed by the sputum examination through gene Xpert technique from National Institute of Health (NIH), Islamabad. Serum 25-hydroxvitamin D level 0.05). Conclusion: Significant vitamin D deficiency was seen in newly diagnosed TB patients. It was found that vitamin D deficiency is associated with tuberculosis, but its causal role has not been established. (author)

  9. A study on prescribing pattern of antihypertensives in adult patients attending in a tertiary care hospital of Assam, India

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Sikidar; Pinaki Chakravarty; Ayan Purkayastha; Rohit Tigga

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is one of the most common chronic medical problems prompting visits to health care providers. It has been estimated that hypertension accounts for 13% of deaths worldwide. The main objective of the present study was to assess the pattern of drug utilisation and to evaluate whether the prescribing patterns for anti-hypertensive in our institution is in adherence with JNC 8 guidelines for treatment of hypertension. Methods: A prospective, observational, non-intervent...

  10. Clinical and Biochemical Data of Adult Thalassemia Major patients (TM) with Multiple Endocrine Complications (MEC) versus TM Patients with Normal Endocrine Functions: A long-term Retrospective Study (40 years) in a Tertiary Care Center in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Elsedfy, Heba; Soliman, Ashraf T.; Elhakim, Ihab Zaki; Kattamis, Christos; Soliman, Nada A.; Elalaily, Rania

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is well known that the older generation of adult TM patients has a higher incidence of morbidities and co-morbidities. At present, little information is available on adult TM patients with multiple endocrine complications (MEC). The main objectives of this longitudinal retrospective survey were: 1) to establish the incidence and progression of MEC (3 or more) in TM patients; 2) to compare the clinical, laboratory and imaging data to a sex and age-matched group of TM patients without MEC; 3) to assess the influence of iron overload represented by serum ferritin (peak and mean annual value at the last endocrine observation). Patients and methods The study was started in January 1974 and was completed by the same physician at the end of December 2015. The registry database of the regularly followed TM patients from diagnosis included 145 adults (> 18 years). All TM patients were of Italian ethnic origin. Eleven out of 145 patients (7.5 %) developed MEC. Twenty-four other patients (12 females and 12 males) had a normal endocrine function (16.5 %) and served as controls. Results In our survey, four important, relevant aspects emerged in the MEC group. These included the late age at the start of chelation therapy with desferrioxamine mesylate (DFO); the higher serum ferritin peak (8521.8 ± 5958.9 vs 3575.2 ± 1801.4 ng/ml); the upper proportion of splenectomized (81.8 % vs. 28.5%) patients and poor compliance registered mainly during the peripubertal and pubertal age (72.7 % vs.16.6 %) in TM patients developing MEC versus those without endocrine complications. Furthermore, a negative correlation was observed in all TM patients between LIC and final height (r: −0.424; p = 0.031). Conclusions Our study supports the view that simultaneous involvement of more than one endocrine gland is not uncommon (7.5 %). It mainly occurred in TM patients who started chelation therapy with DFO late in life and who had irregular/poor compliance to treatment. Therefore

  11. CLINICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL DATA OF ADULT THALASSEMIA MAJOR PATIENTS (TM WITH MULTIPLE ENDOCRINE COMPLICATIONS (MEC VERSUS TM PATIENTS WITH NORMAL ENDOCRINE FUNCTIONS: A RETROSPECTIVE LONG-TERM STUDY (40 YEARS IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTER IN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo De Sanctis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Introduction: It is well known that the older generation of adult TM patients has a higher incidence of morbidities and co-morbidities. At present, little information is available on adult TM patients with multiple endocrine complications (MEC. The main objectives of this longitudinal retrospective survey were: 1 to establish the incidence and progression of MEC (3 or more in TM patients; 2 to compare the clinical, laboratory and imaging data to a sex and age-matched group of TM patients without MEC; 3 to assess the influence of iron overload represented by serum ferritin (peak and mean annual value at the last endocrine observation. Patients and Methods: The study was started in January 1974 and was completed by the same physician at the end of December 2015. The registry database of the regularly followed TM patients from diagnosis included 145 adults (> 18 years. All TM patients were of Italian ethnic origin. Eleven out of 145 patients (7.5 % developed MEC. Twenty-four other patients (12 females and 12 males had a normal endocrine function (16.5 % and served as controls. Results: In our survey, four important, relevant aspects emerged in the MEC group. These included the late age at the start of chelation therapy with desferrioxamine mesylate (DFO; the higher serum ferritin peak (8521.8 ± 5958.9 vs 3575.2± 1801.4 ng/ml ; the higher percentage of splenectomized (81.8 % vs. 28.5% patients and poor compliance registered mainly during the peripubertal and pubertal age (72.7 % vs.16.6 % in TM patients developing MEC versus those without endocrine complications. Furthermore, a negative correlation was observed in all TM patients between LIC and final height (r: -0.424; p= 0.031. Conclusions: Our study supports the view that simultaneous involvement of more than one endocrine gland is not uncommon (7.5 %. It mainly occurred in TM patients who started chelation therapy with DFO late in life and who had irregular/poor compliance to

  12. Adult Day Care Program(高二适用)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙启禄

    2004-01-01

    David Brown and Anne are two patients in the Adult Day Care Pro-gram at Mercy Hospitals. David Brown is seventy-two years old. He'sfriendly and likes to talk. He lives with his wife in the city. But David is

  13. Patient care and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter deals with important aspects of patient care, which may become the radiographer's responsibility in the absence of dedicated nursing staff. Although large pediatric centers usually employ nurses for bedside patient management, the general radiographer should be familiar with some aspects of routine patient care. This knowledge guarantees the safety and well-being of children entrusted to the technologist

  14. Caring for young adults on a paediatric ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Paul A J; Routley, Christine; Paul, Siba Prosad

    The need for adolescents and young adults (AYA) to have suitable age-specific inpatient facilities has been recognised for many years, yet has received relatively little attention. This article reports the successful introduction of an inpatient facility for AYA, aged 17-24 years, on a general paediatric ward in a small district general hospital. From December 2010, a young person's unit (YPU) consisting of an 8-bed area was opened within a 24-bed children's ward. Nursing care was provided by the ward staff, all of whom had been trained in the care of young adults. Policies regarding admission criteria, safeguarding, patient choice, visiting and 'house rules' were drafted, implemented and modified as necessary. Discussions with the adult clinicians (for medical care) and site managers were held to ensure smooth running of the system, and to address any concerns or difficulties. Paediatric patients had priority of admission at times of bed crisis. During 2012, there were a total of 2351 inpatient admissions to the paediatric ward, of whom 379 (16%) were YPU patients aged from 17-24 years. Median length of stay was 2 days for patients aged 17-24 years as compared with 1 day for patients aged less than or equal to 16 years. Patients who chose admission to the paediatric ward tended to be younger, in transition from paediatric to adult services for chronic conditions, or with special needs. Patient surveys showed a high level of satisfaction with the facility. Young adults can be cared for safely and effectively on a paediatric ward with minimal additional costs. The essential ingredients for success include discussion with affected parties to address specific concerns, and the establishment of a clear, simple and unambiguous admission policy. PMID:24165407

  15. A study on prescribing pattern of antihypertensives in adult patients attending in a tertiary care hospital of Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Sikidar

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Our study shows that the most commonly prescribed drug classes involved were angiotensin II receptor antagonists followed by calcium channel blocker and the anti-hypertensive drug combinations among hypertensive patients were considerable and this practice positively impacted on the overall blood pressure control. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 975-978

  16. Spread of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones in patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia in an adult intensive care unit at a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Royer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:In Brazil, ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP caused by carbapenem resis- tant Acinetobacter baumanniiand Pseudomonas aeruginosaisolates are associated with significant mortality, morbidity and costs. Studies on the clonal relatedness of these isolates could lay the foundation for effective infection prevention and control programs.Objectives: We sought to study the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of A. baumannii vs. P. aeruginosaVAP in an adult intensive care unit (ICU.Methods: It was conducted a cohort study of patients with VAP caused by carbapenem resistant A. baumanniiand P'. aeruginosaduring 14 months in an adult ICU. Genomic studies were used to investigate the clonal relatedness of carbapenem resistant OXA-23-producing A. baumanniiand P. aeruginosaclinical isolates. The risk factors for acquisition of VAP were also evaluated. Clinical isolates were collected for analysis as were samples from the environment and were typed using pulsed field gel electrophoresis.Results: Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified trauma diagnosed at admission and inappropriate antimicrobial therapy as independent variables associated with the development of A. baumanniiVAP and hemodialysis as independent variable associated with P. aeruginosaVAP. All carbapenem resistant clinical and environmental isolates of A. baumanniiwere OXA-23 producers. No MBL-producer P. aeruginosawas detected. Molecular typing revealed a polyclonal pattern; however, clone A (clinical and H (surface were the most frequent among isolates of A. baumanniitested, with a greater pattern of resistance than other isolates. In P. aeruginosathe most frequent clone I was multi-sensitive.Conclusion: These findings suggest the requirement of constant monitoring of these microor- ganisms in order to control the spread of these clones in the hospital environment.

  17. Prevalence and outcome of gastrointestinal bleeding and use of acid suppressants in acutely ill adult intensive care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Mette; Perner, Anders; Wetterslev, Jørn;

    2015-01-01

    replacement therapy (6.9, 2.7-17.5), co-existing coagulopathy (5.2, 2.3-11.8), acute coagulopathy (4.2, 1.7-10.2), use of acid suppressants (3.6, 1.3-10.2) and higher organ failure score (1.4, 1.2-1.5). In ICU, 73 % (71-76 %) of patients received acid suppressants; most received proton pump inhibitors. In...

  18. Palliative care for adolescents and young adults with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg AR

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Abby R Rosenberg,1–3 Joanne Wolfe4–61Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA; 2Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 4Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care/Division of Pediatric Palliative Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA; 5Department of Medicine/Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA; 6Department of Pediatrics, Harvard University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Adolescents and young adults (AYAs with cancer represent a unique and challenging group of patients with distinct developmental and psychosocial needs that may be unrecognized or unmet during their cancer experience. Palliative care refers to the total care of a patient, regardless of his or her disease status, and aims to improve quality of life by controlling symptoms and alleviating physical, social, psychological, and spiritual suffering. Integrating palliative care into standard oncology practice for AYAs is therefore valuable, if not imperative, in improving their overall cancer experience. In this review, we aimed to describe the scope, benefits, and challenges of palliative care for AYA oncology patients. We provide a broad impression of the existing literature describing or investigating palliative care in this population. Put together, the evidence suggests that palliative care is not only needed, but can also be critically beneficial to patients, families, and health care professionals alike. As we increase public and professional awareness of the needs and applications of palliative care for AYA patients with cancer, we will ultimately enable better psychosocial outcomes of the AYA patients and their larger communities.Keywords: supportive care, end of life, psychosocial outcomes, psychosocial oncology, psychosocial needs, quality of life

  19. Advance Care Planning and Goals of Care Communication in Older Adults with Cardiovascular Disease and Multi-Morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Hillary D; Sudore, Rebecca L

    2016-05-01

    This article provides an approach to advance care planning (ACP) and goals of care communication in older adults with cardiovascular disease and multi-morbidity. The goal of ACP is to ensure that the medical care patients receive is aligned with their values and preferences. In this article, the authors outline common benefits and challenges to ACP for older adults with cardiovascular disease and multimorbidity. Recognizing that these patients experience diverse disease trajectories and receive care in multiple health care settings, the authors provide practical steps for multidisciplinary teams to integrate ACP into brief clinic encounters. PMID:27113144

  20. Assisting the Adult with a Respiratory Condition: Pharmacology. Care of the Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoka-Hennepin Area Vocational Technical Inst., MN.

    These two units for students in a practical nursing program provide supplemental instruction, with a focus on pharmacology, in caring for adult patients with a respiratory condition. Unit titles are Antibiotics, and Drugs that Affect the Respiratory System. Each unit contains the following: objectives, an introduction, and five to nine learning…

  1. Young Adults Seeking Medical Care: Do Race and Ethnicity Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reports from the National Medical Care Utilization and Expenditure Survey Clearinghouse on Health Indexes Statistical Notes for Health Planners ... Adults Seeking Medical Care: Do Race and Ethnicity ...

  2. Perception of older adults receiving palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Laporti Seredynskyj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at understanding the perception of older adults who are receiving palliative oncological care on self care in relation to different stages of the disease and how such perception affected their lives. This is a qualitative study using oral history conducted with 15 older adults receiving palliative chemotherapy treatment in a health institution. The following categories emerged: social network, perspectives for confronting life, changes and spirituality. It is necessary for nursing staff to understand this process so that the measures implemented take into account all of the implications of the disease and aim at improving quality of life.   doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i2.22795.

  3. Pattern of Cutaneous Pathology among a Cohort of HIV/AIDS Patients Accessing Care in a Rural/Suburban Adult ART Clinic in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Salami, T. A. T.; Adewuyi, G. M.; Echekwube, P.; Affusim, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous diseases are common in patients with HIV/AIDS however there are few documented reports of these lesions from some parts of world such as Nigeria and West Africa. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify cutaneous pathologies in patients attending an adult outpatient (HIV/AIDS) clinic department in a rural/suburban centre in the south geopolitical zone of Nigeria. Additionally it also aims to determine if there are differences in the pattern of presentation as com...

  4. High rates of unsuccessful transfer to adult care among young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffy Ciarán M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to describe the proportion of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA who had experienced an unsuccessful transfer from a pediatric rheumatology team to an adult rheumatologist and to compare the characteristics of those who achieved successful transfer to those who did not. Methods We conducted a systematic chart review of all patients with JIA who attended their final Montreal Children's Hospital JIA clinic appointment between 1992 and 2005. We tracked these patients for the two years after transfer to an adult rheumatologist. We then compared characteristics of patients with successful and unsuccessful transfers of care. Variables pertaining to disease characteristics, disease severity and psychosocial factors were examined. Univariate analyses were performed to determine if any single factor was associated with the outcome of unsuccessful transfer of care. Results 52% of patients fulfilled our criteria for unsuccessful transfer. Of the variables tested, an active joint count (AJC of zero at last visit was associated with the outcome of unsuccessful transfer (OR = 2.67 (CI 1.16-6.16; p = 0.0199. Conclusions Despite the presence of a coordinated process of transfer from pediatric to adult health care for the majority of the patients in this study, there was a high rate of unsuccessful transfer and/or sustained follow up which is disheartening. We found that patients with less active disease at the time of transfer, as indicated by a lower AJC, were more likely to be lost to follow up. Recent literature suggests that even in the least severe categories of JIA, 50% of patients persist with active disease into adulthood. Thus educating all JIA patients about the possibility of disease flare in adulthood may improve their adherence to recommendations for sustained follow-up in the adult milieu. This may lead to improvement of longitudinal outcomes for all JIA patients.

  5. National Patient Care Database (NPCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The National Patient Care Database (NPCD), located at the Austin Information Technology Center, is part of the National Medical Information Systems (NMIS). The NPCD...

  6. Patients report positive impacts of collaborative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, John H; Johnson, Deborah J; Benjamin, Regina; Phillips, Jill; MacKenzie, Todd A

    2006-01-01

    Collaborative Care refers to a partnership between healthcare professionals and patients who feel confident to manage their health conditions. Using an Internet-based assessment of health needs and healthcare quality, we surveyed 24,609 adult Americans aged 19 to 69 who had common chronic diseases or significant dysfunction. In these patients, we examined the association of Collaborative Care with specific measures for treatment effect, disease control, prevention, and economic impacts. These measures were adjusted for respondents' demographic characteristics, burden of illness, health behaviors, and overall quality of healthcare. Only 21% of respondents participated in good Collaborative Care, 36% attained fair Collaborative Care, and 43% experienced poor Collaborative Care. Regardless of overall care quality or the respondents' personal characteristics, burden of illness, or health behaviors, good Collaborative Care was associated with better control of blood pressure, blood glucose level, serum cholesterol level, and treatment effectiveness for pain and emotional problems. Some preventive actions were better, and some adverse economic impacts of illness were mitigated. PMID:16788352

  7. Patient education on back care

    OpenAIRE

    C. Van Eck

    2009-01-01

    Study Design: Clinical PerspectiveObjective: To provide back care education for patients with low back pain. Background:  Understanding the internal and external forces the body issubjected to, as well as the spine’s response to these forces, can better equipphysiotherapists in educating patients with low back pain. Methods and Measures: The focus of the clinical perspective is to providephysiotherapists with clinically sound reasoning when educating patients. Results: Providing a patient han...

  8. The impact of informal care-giving networks on adult children's care-giver burden

    OpenAIRE

    Tolkacheva, N.; Broese van Groenou, M. I.; Boer; Tilburg, van, P.J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research on the care-giver burden experienced by adult children has typically focused on the adult child and parent dyad. This study uses information on multiple informal care-givers and examines how characteristics of the informal care-giving network affect the adult child's care-giver burden. In 2007, 602 Dutch care-givers who were assisting their older parents reported on parental and personal characteristics, care activities, experienced burden and characteristics of other inform...

  9. Caring for transgender patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, Alyssa

    2016-06-01

    Clinicians need a better understanding of transgender populations and a systematic approach to treating transgender patients medically and psychologically while managing any potential judgment or bias. This article explains key concepts, describes transgender patient health concerns, and discusses how to perform a comprehensive history. PMID:27228044

  10. Incorporating Geriatric Medicine Providers into the Care of the Older Adult with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Allison; Canin, Beverly; van Londen, G J; Edwards, Beatrice; Bakalarski, Pamela; Parker, Ira

    2016-11-01

    A significant proportion of cancer patients and survivors are age 65 and over. Older adults with cancer often have more complex medical and social needs than their younger counterparts. Geriatric medicine providers (GMPs) such as geriatricians, geriatric-trained advanced practice providers, and geriatric certified registered nurses have expertise in caring for older adults, managing complex medical situations, and optimizing function and independence for this population. GMPs are not routinely incorporated into cancer care for older adults; however, their particular skill set may add benefit at many points along the cancer care continuum. In this article, we review the role of geriatric assessment in the care of older cancer patients, highlight specific case scenarios in which GMPs may offer additional understanding and insight in the care of older adults with cancer, and discuss specific mechanisms for incorporating GMPs into oncology care. PMID:27613166

  11. Model of Care for Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: The Youth Project in Milan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, Chiara; Veneroni, Laura; Silva, Matteo; Casanova, Michela; Chiaravalli, Stefano; Massimino, Maura; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Ferrari, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer form a particular group of patients with unique characteristics, who inhabit a so-called "no man's land" between pediatric and adult services. In the last 10 years, the scientific oncology community has started to pay attention to these patients, implementing dedicated programs. A standardized model of care directed toward patients in this age range has yet to be developed and neither the pediatric nor the adult oncologic systems perfectly fit these patients' needs. The Youth Project of the Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan, dedicated to AYA with pediatric-type solid tumors, can be seen as a model of care for AYA patients, with its heterogeneous multidisciplinary staff and close cooperation with adult medical oncologists and surgeons. Further progress in the care of AYA cancer patients is still needed to improve their outcomes. PMID:27606308

  12. Transition experiences and health care utilization among young adults with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garvey KC

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Katharine C Garvey,1 Jonathan A Finkelstein,2,3 Lori M Laffel,1,4 Victoria Ochoa,1 Joseph I Wolfsdorf,1 Erinn T Rhodes1 1Division of Endocrinology, Boston Children's Hospital, 2Division of General Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital, 3Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, 4Pediatric, Adolescent and Young Adult Section, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA, USA Background: The purpose of this study was to describe the current status of adult diabetes care in young adults with type 1 diabetes and examine associations between health care transition experiences and care utilization. Methods: We developed a survey to assess transition characteristics and current care in young adults with type 1 diabetes. We mailed the survey to the last known address of young adults who had previously received diabetes care at a tertiary pediatric center. Results: Of 291 surveys sent, 83 (29% were undeliverable and three (1% were ineligible. Of 205 surveys delivered, 65 were returned (response rate 32%. Respondents (mean age 26.6 ± 3.0 years, 54% male, 91% Caucasian transitioned to adult diabetes care at a mean age of 19.2 ± 2.8 years. Although 71% felt mostly/completely prepared for transition, only half received recommendations for a specific adult provider. Twenty-six percent reported gaps exceeding six months between pediatric and adult diabetes care. Respondents who made fewer than three diabetes visits in the year prior to transition (odds ratio [OR] 4.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2–16.5 or cited moving/relocation as the most important reason for transition (OR 6.3, 95% CI 1.3–31.5 were more likely to report gaps in care exceeding six months. Patients receiving current care from an adult endocrinologist (79% were more likely to report at least two diabetes visits in the past year (OR 6.0, 95% CI 1.5–24.0 compared with those receiving diabetes care from a general internist/adult primary care doctor (17%. Two

  13. Patient education on back care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Van Eck

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Study Design: Clinical PerspectiveObjective: To provide back care education for patients with low back pain. Background:  Understanding the internal and external forces the body issubjected to, as well as the spine’s response to these forces, can better equipphysiotherapists in educating patients with low back pain. Methods and Measures: The focus of the clinical perspective is to providephysiotherapists with clinically sound reasoning when educating patients. Results: Providing a patient handout, educating them in how to incorporate back care knowledge into their dailyactivities.Conclusion: Physiotherapists can play a significant role in empowering patients through education to take responsi-bility for their disability.

  14. Oropharyngeal or gastric colonization and nosocomial pneumonia in adult intensive care unit patients. A prospective study based on genomic DNA analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Garrouste-Orgeas, Maïté; Chevret, S; Arlet, G; Marie, O.; Rouveau, M.; Popoff, N.; Schlemmer, B

    1997-01-01

    Colonization of the digestive tract has been supposed to be the source of many hospital-acquired infections, especially nosocomial pneumonia. To assess the relationship between oropharyngeal and gastric colonization and subsequent occurrence of nosocomial pneumonia, we prospectively studied 86 ventilated, intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Oropharyngeal or gastric colonizations were detected and quantified on admission and twice weekly during ICU stay. When nosocomial pneumonia was suspected...

  15. Model of Care for Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: The Youth Project in Milan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, Chiara; Veneroni, Laura; Silva, Matteo; Casanova, Michela; Chiaravalli, Stefano; Massimino, Maura; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Ferrari, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer form a particular group of patients with unique characteristics, who inhabit a so-called “no man’s land” between pediatric and adult services. In the last 10 years, the scientific oncology community has started to pay attention to these patients, implementing dedicated programs. A standardized model of care directed toward patients in this age range has yet to be developed and neither the pediatric nor the adult oncologic systems perfectly fit these patients’ needs. The Youth Project of the Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan, dedicated to AYA with pediatric-type solid tumors, can be seen as a model of care for AYA patients, with its heterogeneous multidisciplinary staff and close cooperation with adult medical oncologists and surgeons. Further progress in the care of AYA cancer patients is still needed to improve their outcomes. PMID:27606308

  16. Self-Care Among Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lovén Wickman, Ulrica; Yngman-Uhlin, Pia; Hjortswang, Henrik; Riegel, Barbara; Stjernman, Henrik; Hollman Frisman, Gunilla

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease of unknown etiology. The disease occurs early in life and the burden of symptoms is significant. Patients need to perform self-care to handle their symptoms, but knowledge about what kind of self-care patients do is limited and these individuals need to learn how to manage the symptoms that arise. The aim of this study was to explore self-care among patients with IBD. Twenty adult patients with IBD, 25–66 years of age, were interviewed. Da...

  17. Gay patients. Context for care.

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, G; Saunders, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Gays and lesbians are a part of our society and our practices: real people with real lives, not stereotypes. Understanding their inner world and their social milieu is the first step to providing care that is holistic and appropriate. The "coming out" process and other unique health issues are described. Guidance is provided on how to identify and relate to gay and lesbian patients.

  18. Trajectories of health care service utilization and differences in patient characteristics among adults with specific chronic pain: analysis of health plan member claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruetsch C

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Charles Ruetsch,1 Joseph Tkacz,1 Peter G Kardel,1 Andrew Howe,2 Helen Pai,2 Bennett Levitan31Health Analytics, LLC, Columbia, Maryland, 2Janssen Research & Development, Raritan, New Jersey, 3Janssen Research & Development, Titusville, New Jersey, USAIntroduction: The lack of consistency surrounding the diagnosis of chronic non-cancer pain, treatment approaches, and patient management suggests the need for further research to better characterize the chronic non-cancer pain population.Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify distinct trajectories of health care service utilization of chronic non-cancer pain patients and describe the characteristic differences between trajectory groups.Patients and methods: This study utilized the MarketScan claims databases. A total of 71,392 patients diagnosed with either low back pain or osteoarthritis between 2006 and 2009 served as the study sample. Each subject's claims data were divided into three time periods around an initial diagnosis date: pre-period, post-Year 1, and post-Year 2. Subjects were categorized as either high (H or low (L cost at each post period, resulting in the creation of four trajectory groups based on the post-Year 1 and 2 cost pattern: H-H, H-L, L-H, and L-L. Multivariate statistical tests were used to predict and discriminate between trajectory group memberships.Results: The H-H, L-H, and H-L groups each utilized significantly greater pre-period high-cost venue services, post-Year 1 outpatient services, and post-Year 1 opioids compared to the L-L group (P <0.001. Additionally, the H-H and L-H groups displayed elevated Charlson comorbidity index scores compared with the L-L group (P <0.001, with each showing increased odds of having both opioid dependence and cardiovascular disease diagnoses (P <0.01.Conclusion: This study identified patient characteristics among chronic pain patients that discriminated between different levels of post-index high-cost venue service

  19. Consensus statement on the management of the GH-treated adolescent in the transition to adult care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clayton, P E; Cuneo, R C; Juul, A; Monson, J P; Shalet, S M; Tauber, M

    2005-01-01

    The European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology held a consensus workshop in Manchester, UK in December 2003 to discuss issues relating to the care of GH-treated patients in the transition from paediatric to adult life. Clinicians experienced in the care of paediatric and adult patients on GH t...

  20. Compliance with treatment in adult patients with cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Conway, S P; Pond, M. N.; Hamnett, T.; Watson, A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic disease comply with about 50% of their treatment. The complex and time consuming daily drug regimens needed in the care of adult patients with cystic fibrosis encourage non-compliance with prescribed treatments. Understanding the reasons for, and the extent of, non-compliance is essential for a realistic appraisal of the patient's condition and sensible planning of future treatment programmes. METHODS: Patients were invited to complete a questionnaire which a...

  1. Meaning and Practice of Palliative Care for Hospitalized Older Adults with Life Limiting Illnesses

    OpenAIRE

    Bethel Ann Powers; Norton, Sally A.; Schmitt, Madeline H.; Quill, Timothy E.; Maureen Metzger

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To illustrate distinctions and intersections of palliative care (PC) and end-of-life (EOL) services through examples from case-centered data of older adults cared for during a four-year ethnographic study of an acute care hospital palliative care consultation service. Methods. Qualitative narrative and thematic analysis. Results. Description of four practice paradigms (EOL transitions, prognostic uncertainty, discharge planning, and patient/family values and preferences) and identi...

  2. Challenges Caring for Adults With Congenital Heart Disease in Pediatric Settings: How Nurses Can Aid in the Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Kristin

    2016-08-01

    As surgery for complex congenital heart disease is becoming more advanced, an increasing number of patients are surviving into adulthood, yet many of these adult patients remain in the pediatric hospital system. Caring for adult patients is often a challenge for pediatric nurses, because the nurses have less experience and comfort with adult care, medications, comorbid conditions, and rehabilitation techniques. As these patients age, the increased risk of complications and comorbid conditions from their heart disease may complicate their care further. Although these patients are admitted on a pediatric unit, nurses can aid in promoting their independence and help prepare them to transition into the adult medical system. Nurses, the comprehensive medical teams, and patients' families can all effectively influence the process of preparing these patients for transition to adult care. PMID:27481810

  3. Care of adolescents and young adults with diabetes - much more than transitional care: a personal view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winocour, Peter H

    2014-06-01

    There is increasing recognition that type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) acquired in childhood and adolescence requires a sophisticated approach that facilitates better self-management through adherence to generic principles in managing chronic disease in this age group, allied to the complex clinical needs of managing T1DM and related conditions. Transitional care should be seen as a process over time supported by both paediatric and adult diabetologists within a multidisciplinary team, given the complementary skills that can be brought to bear. Undoubtedly, there is a need for more effective training of all healthcare professionals working in this service. However, the accumulation of older teenagers over time and new diagnoses in those aged 19 years or more confirms that a new paradigm is necessary for the successful care of young adults beyond transitional care. Traditional clinical models will often not work for those in employment and higher education, with evidence that ongoing engagement following transfer to adult services often ceases. The alarming evidence of progressive complications in T1DM of longer duration in patients under the age of 40 years is a wake-up call to transform the care of this most vulnerable group. PMID:24889572

  4. Bullying, mentoring, and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Dorothea

    2014-05-01

    The literature suggests that acts of bullying are a root cause of new nurses leaving their units or the profession entirely and have the potential to worsen the nursing shortage. As an effective way to address bullying in the perioperative setting, mentoring benefits the nursing profession. Mentoring can have a direct influence on nurses' longevity in a health care organization, thereby strengthening the nursing workforce. Magnet-designated hospitals support the importance of mentor-mentee relationships for positive employee retention and positive recruitment outcomes. One of the most important tasks that a mentor should undertake is that of a role model. Establishing a culture of mentoring requires authentic leadership, genuine caring and respect for employees, and open communication. The entire nursing profession benefits from a culture of mentoring, as do the patients and families who receive care. PMID:24766920

  5. Experiences of health care transition voiced by young adults with type 1 diabetes: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garvey KC

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Katharine C Garvey,1,5 Margaret G Beste,2 Donna Luff,3,5 Astrid Atakov-Castillo,2 Howard A Wolpert,2,5 Marilyn D Ritholz4–61Division of Endocrinology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 2Adult Section, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA, USA; 3Institute for Professionalism and Ethical Practice, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 4Behavioral and Mental Health Unit, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA, USA; 5Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 6Department of Psychiatry, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USAObjective: This qualitative study aimed to explore the experience of transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care reported by posttransition emerging adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D, with a focus on preparation for the actual transfer in care.Methods: Twenty-six T1D emerging adults (mean age 26.2±2.5 years receiving adult diabetes care at a single center participated in five focus groups stratified by two levels of current glycemic control. A multidisciplinary team coded transcripts and conducted thematic analysis.Results: Four key themes on the process of transfer to adult care emerged from a thematic analysis: 1 nonpurposeful transition (patients reported a lack of transition preparation by pediatric providers for the transfer to adult diabetes care; 2 vulnerability in the college years (patients conveyed periods of loss to follow-up during college and described health risks and diabetes management challenges specific to the college years that were inadequately addressed by pediatric or adult providers; 3 unexpected differences between pediatric and adult health care systems (patients were surprised by the different feel of adult diabetes care, especially with regards to an increased focus on diabetes complications; and 4 patients’ wish list for improving the transition process (patients recommended enhanced pediatric transition counseling, implementation of adult clinic orientation programs, and peer

  6. Care of Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kyle Bradford; Wilson, Benjamin; Weedon, Dean; Bilder, Deborah

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that primarily affect motor function. This developmental disability is becoming more common in adults as life expectancy increases for individuals with CP. Many physical, medical, mental, and behavioral health conditions are associated with CP, and assistance should be provided to patients with CP to optimize function, when available. These comorbidities include intellectual disabilities, seizures, muscle contractures, abnormal gait, osteoporosis, communication disorders, malnutrition, sleep disorders, and mental health disorders, such as depression and anxiety. The physician should be familiar with screening for and assisting patients with these issues. Optimizing quality of life requires individualized care plans that may include physical therapy, muscle relaxants, surgery, and nutritional support. Other issues to be addressed include methods to facilitate employment; sexual concerns; and support through local and national organizations for patients, families, and caregivers. PMID:26669212

  7. Predictors of Treatment with Duloxetine or Venlafaxine XR among Adult Patients Treated for Depression in Primary Care Practices in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nianwen Shi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Knowledge about real-world use of duloxetine and venlafaxine XR to treat depression in the UK is limited. Aims. To identify predictors of duloxetine or venlafaxine XR initiation. Method. Adult depressed patients who initiated duloxetine or venlafaxine XR between January 1, 2006 and September 30, 2007 were identified in the UK’s General Practice Research Database. Demographic and clinical predictors of treatment initiation with duloxetine and venlafaxine XR were identified using logistic regression. Results. Patients initiating duloxetine (n=909 were 4 years older than venlafaxine XR recipients (n=1286. Older age, preexisting unexplained pain, respiratory disease, and pre-period use of anticonvulsants, opioids, and antihyperlipidemics were associated with increased odds of initiating duloxetine compared to venlafaxine XR. Pre-period anxiety disorder was associated with decreased odds of receiving duloxetine. Conclusion. Initial treatment choice with duloxetine versus venlafaxine XR was primarily driven by patient-specific mental and medical health characteristics. General practitioners in the UK favor duloxetine over venlafaxine XR when pain conditions coexist with depression.

  8. Diarrhea - what to ask your health care provider - adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your health care provider about diarrhea - adult; Loose stools - what to ask your health care provider - adult ... Questions you should ask: Can I eat dairy foods? What foods can make my problem worse? Can I have greasy or spicy foods? ...

  9. Wound Care in Burn Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Orhan Çizmeci; Samet Vasfi Kuvat

    2011-01-01

    Wound care in one of the most important prognostic factors in burn victims. Open wound carries risks for infection due to hypothermia, protein and fluid losses. In addition, unhealed wounds are the major risk factors for acute-subacute or chronic complications in burn patients. Although no exact algorithm exists for open wound treatment, early escarectomy or debridement together with grafting is the best option. Ointments together with topical epithelizing agents without dressings are generea...

  10. Familism and Health Care Provision to Hispanic Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Brittany; Foli, Karen J; Edwards, Nancy E; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    considerations with decision making and caregiving within Hispanic families. DISCLOSURE STATEMENT Neither the planners nor the authors have any conflicts of interest to disclose. The Hispanic older adult population's rapid growth calls for an awareness of values that can affect the rendering and receipt of care. Familism, or familismo, a traditional Hispanic value, places importance of family over the self and can potentially affect health care perceptions and practices for Hispanic older adults. The current article discusses familism, which is upheld by some Hispanic older adults, and the potential for underuse of health care services. The traditional feminine role, marianismo, and masculine role, machismo, are considered, as well as implications for how decision making may be made by family members rather than the patient. Clinical implications for the provision of health care to Hispanic older adults are provided, along with the importance of considering acculturation and ethnic heterogeneity. Health care management strategies that reflect recognition and respect of familism, yet emphasize optimization of adherence and self-care, are described. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(1), 21-29.]. PMID:26651861

  11. Up Close and Personal: Theorising Care Work in Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Vaughn M.

    2016-01-01

    How do we account for the close personal bonds and deeply caring relationships forged by educators with learners in many adult educational encounters? The literature is relatively silent on the emotional and relational basis to adult educator work. This is a serious silence, given the stressful nature of adult education in developing contexts such…

  12. Use of and interest in alternative therapies among adult primary care clinicians and adult members in a large health maintenance organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, N P; Sobel, D S; Tarazona, E Z

    1998-09-01

    During spring 1996, random samples of adult primary care physicians, obstetrics-gynecology physicians and nurse practitioners, and adult members of a large northern California group practice model health maintenance organization (HMO) were surveyed by mail to assess the use of alternative therapies and the extent of interest in having them incorporated into HMO-delivered care. Sixty-one percent (n = 624) of adult primary care physicians, 70% (n = 157) of obstetrics-gynecology clinicians, and 50% (2 surveys, n = 1,507 and n = 17,735) of adult HMO members responded. During the previous 12 months, 25% of adults reported using and nearly 90% of adult primary care physicians and obstetrics-gynecology clinicians reported recommending at least 1 alternative therapy, primarily for pain management. Chiropractic, acupuncture, massage, and behavioral medicine techniques such as meditation and relaxation training were most often cited. Obstetrics-gynecology clinicians used herbal and homeopathic medicines more often than adult primary care physicians, primarily for menopause and premenstrual syndrome. Two thirds of adult primary care physicians and three fourths of obstetrics-gynecology clinicians were at least moderately interested in using alternative therapies with patients, and nearly 70% of young and middle-aged adult and half of senior adult members were interested in having alternative therapies incorporated into their health care. Adult primary care physicians and members were more interested in having the HMO cover manipulative and behavioral medicine therapies than homeopathic or herbal medicines. PMID:9771154

  13. Threading the cloak: palliative care education for care providers of adolescents and young adults with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiener L

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lori Wiener,1,*,# Meaghann Shaw Weaver,2,3,*,# Cynthia J Bell,4,# Ursula M Sansom-Daly,5–7 1Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Department of Oncology, Children’s National Health System, Washington, DC, USA; 3Department of Oncology, St Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA; 4College of Nursing, Wayne State University and Hospice of Michigan Institute, Detroit, MI, USA; 5Behavioural Sciences Unit, Kids Cancer Centre, Sydney Children’s Hospital, Randwick, NSW, Australia; 6Discipline of Paediatrics, School of Women’s and Children’s Health, UNSW Medicine, The University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW, Australia; 7Sydney Youth Cancer Service, Sydney Children’s/Prince of Wales Hospitals, Randwick, NSW, Australia *These authors have contributed equally to this work #On behalf of the Pediatric Palliative Care Special Interest Group at Children’s National Health System Abstract: Medical providers are trained to investigate, diagnose, and treat cancer. Their primary goal is to maximize the chances of curing the patient, with less training provided on palliative care concepts and the unique developmental needs inherent in this population. Early, systematic integration of palliative care into standard oncology practice represents a valuable, imperative approach to improving the overall cancer experience for adolescents and young adults (AYAs. The importance of competent, confident, and compassionate providers for AYAs warrants the development of effective educational strategies for teaching AYA palliative care. Just as palliative care should be integrated early in the disease trajectory of AYA patients, palliative care training should be integrated early in professional development of trainees. As the AYA age spectrum represents sequential transitions through developmental stages, trainees experience changes in their learning needs during their progression through sequential

  14. Nursing care of patients with nephrostomy

    OpenAIRE

    ZIKOVÁ, Jana

    2014-01-01

    The subject of the Bachelor thesis is Nursing care of patient with nephrostomy. Despite the fact that creation of nephrostomy is not as common as for example colostomy, patients with nephrostomies are on the increase. Nursing care is based not only on complex nursing of patient but also on careful raising his awareness and education contributing to complete self-sufficiency in the area of the care of nephrostomy. Nurse has to approach patients with nephrostomy individually with consideration ...

  15. Primary care patient and provider preferences for diabetes care managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona S DeJesus

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ramona S DeJesus1, Kristin S Vickers2, Robert J Stroebel1, Stephen S Cha31Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, MN, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAPurpose: The collaborative care model, using care managers, has been shown to be effective in achieving sustained treatment outcomes in chronic disease management. Little effort has been made to find out patient preferences for chronic disease care, hence, we conducted a study aimed at identifying these.Methods: A 20-item questionnaire, asking for patients’ and providers’ preferences and perceptions, was mailed out to 1000 randomly selected patients in Olmsted County, Minnesota, identified through a diabetes registry to have type 2 diabetes mellitus, a prototypical prevalent chronic disease. Surveys were also sent to 42 primary care providers.Results: There were 254 (25.4% patient responders and 28 (66% provider responders. The majority of patients (>70% and providers (89% expressed willingness to have various aspects of diabetes care managed by a care manager. Although 75% of providers would be comfortable expanding the care manager role to other chronic diseases, only 39.5% of patient responders would be willing to see a care manager for other chronic problems. Longer length of time from initial diagnosis of diabetes was associated with decreased patient likelihood to work with a care manager.Conclusion: Despite study limitations, such as the lack of validated measures to assess perceptions related to care management, our results suggest that patients and providers are willing to collaborate with a care manager and that both groups have similar role expectations of a care manager.Keywords: care manager, collaborative care, patient preference, diabetes care

  16. Bedside Reporting: Protocols for Improving Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Teresa D; Howell, Teresa L

    2015-12-01

    Bedside reporting continues to gain much attention and is being investigated to support the premise that "hand-off" communications enhance efficacy in delivery of patient care. Patient inclusion in shift reports enhances good patient outcomes, increased satisfaction with care delivery, enhanced accountability for nursing professionals, and improved communications between patients and their direct care providers. This article discusses the multiple benefits of dynamic dialogue between patients and the health care team, challenges often associated with bedside reporting, and protocols for managing bedside reporting with the major aim of improving patient care. Nursing research supporting the concept of bedside reporting is examined. PMID:26596661

  17. Mortality in eating disorders: a follow-up study of adult eating disorder patients treated in tertiary care, 1995-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suokas, Jaana T; Suvisaari, Jaana M; Gissler, Mika; Löfman, Rasmus; Linna, Milla S; Raevuori, Anu; Haukka, Jari

    2013-12-30

    Elevated mortality risk in anorexia nervosa has been established, but less is known about the outcomes of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. In this follow-up study we determined mortality in adults (N=2450, 95% women) admitted to the eating disorder clinic of the Helsinki University Central Hospital in the period 1995-2010. Most of the patients (80.7%) were outpatients. For each patient four controls were selected and matched for age, sex and place of residence. The matching was taken into account by modelling end-point events using Cox's proportional hazard model. The hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause mortality was 6.51 (95% CI 3.46-12.26) in broad anorexia nervosa (AN), 2.97 (95% CI 1.90-4.65) in broad bulimia nervosa (BN), and 1.77 (95% CI 0.60-5.27) in binge eating disorder (BED). Mortality risk in broad AN was highest during the first years after admission but declined thereafter, while in broad BN the mortality risk started to rise two years after the first admission. The HR for suicide was elevated both in broad AN (HR 5.07; 95% CI 1.37-18.84) and in broad BN (HR 6.07; 95% CI 2.47-14.89). Results show that eating disorders are associated with increased mortality risk even when specialised treatment is available. PMID:23958333

  18. Depression in Older Adults in Primary Care: An Integrative Approach to Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, Sheila

    2015-09-01

    Depression in older adults is a problem often encountered in primary care. While depression is evident in all populations in the primary care setting, assessment and care are more complicated in the older adult due to factors such as comorbidities, clinical presentation, adverse drug effects and drug interactions, and psychosocial factors. Due to these complications, it is essential to incorporate both conventional and alternative methods in assessment and treatment. This article aims to define depression in older adults, present the epidemiology, discuss clinical presentation and screening, and offer an integrative approach to intervention, including both pharmacological and nonpharmacological methods. Providing holistic and integrative care to older adults diagnosed with depression in the primary care setting is essential to promote healing and recovery. This article aims to provide insight for nurses, nurse practitioners, and other providers regarding the holistic and integrative care of depression in older adults in the primary care setting. PMID:25673577

  19. Linguistic Stereotyping in Older Adults' Perceptions of Health Care Aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Donald; Coles, Valerie Berenice; Barnett, Joshua Trey

    2016-07-01

    The cultural and linguistic diversity of the U.S. health care provider workforce is expanding. Diversity among health care personnel such as paraprofessional health care assistants (HCAs)-many of whom are immigrants-means that intimate, high-stakes cross-cultural and cross-linguistic contact characterizes many health interactions. In particular, nonmainstream HCAs may face negative patient expectations because of patients' language stereotypes. In other contexts, reverse linguistic stereotyping has been shown to result in negative speaker evaluations and even reduced listening comprehension quite independently of the actual language performance of the speaker. The present study extends the language and attitude paradigm to older adults' perceptions of HCAs. Listeners heard the identical speaker of Standard American English as they watched interactions between an HCA and an older patient. Ethnolinguistic identities-either an Anglo native speaker of English or a Mexican nonnative speaker-were ascribed to HCAs by means of fabricated personnel files. Dependent variables included measures of perceived HCA language proficiency, personal characteristics, and professional competence, as well as listeners' comprehension of a health message delivered by the putative HCA. For most of these outcomes, moderate effect sizes were found such that the HCA with an ascribed Anglo identity-relative to the Mexican guise-was judged more proficient in English, socially superior, interpersonally more attractive, more dynamic, and a more satisfactory home health aide. No difference in listening comprehension emerged, but the Anglo guise tended to engender a more compliant listening mind set. Results of this study can inform both provider-directed and patient-directed efforts to improve health care services for members of all linguistic and cultural groups. PMID:26606170

  20. How Important Is Intrinsic Spirituality in Depression Care?: A Comparison of White and African-American Primary Care Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Lisa A.; Brown, Charlotte; Thi Vu, Hong; FORD, DANIEL E.; Powe, Neil R

    2001-01-01

    We used a cross-sectional survey to compare the views of African-American and white adult primary care patients (N = 76) regarding the importance of various aspects of depression care. Patients were asked to rate the importance of 126 aspects of depression care (derived from attitudinal domains identified in focus groups) on a 5-point Likert scale. The 30 most important items came from 9 domains: 1) health professionals' interpersonal skills, 2) primary care provider recognition of depression...

  1. Patient involvement in Danish health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrangbæk, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    of patient involvement in health care. This framework is used to analyse key governance features of patient involvement in Denmark based on previous research papers and reports describing patient involvement in Danish health care. Findings – Patient involvement is important in Denmark at the...... research results may lack generalisability. Practical implications – The paper includes implications for the development of patient involvement in health care. Originality/value – This paper fulfils a need to study different types of patient involvement and to develop a theoretical framework for...... characterizing and analysing such involvement strategies. Keywords: patient involvement, health care...

  2. Experiences of Community-Living Older Adults Receiving Integrated Care Based on the Chronic Care Model: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoorenberg, Sophie L. W.; Wynia, Klaske; Fokkens, Andrea S.; Slotman, Karin; Kremer, Hubertus P. H.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrated care models aim to solve the problem of fragmented and poorly coordinated care in current healthcare systems. These models aim to be patient-centered by providing continuous and coordinated care and by considering the needs and preferences of patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the opinions and experiences of community-living older adults with regard to integrated care and support, along with the extent to which it meets their health and social needs. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 older adults receiving integrated care and support through “Embrace,” an integrated care model for community-living older adults that is based on the Chronic Care Model and a population health management model. Embrace is currently fully operational in the northern region of the Netherlands. Data analysis was based on the grounded theory approach. Results Responses of participants concerned two focus areas: 1) Experiences with aging, with the themes “Struggling with health,” “Increasing dependency,” “Decreasing social interaction,” “Loss of control,” and “Fears;” and 2) Experiences with Embrace, with the themes “Relationship with the case manager,” “Interactions,” and “Feeling in control, safe, and secure”. The prospect of becoming dependent and losing control was a key concept in the lives of the older adults interviewed. Embrace reinforced the participants’ ability to stay in control, even if they were dependent on others. Furthermore, participants felt safe and secure, in contrast to the fears of increasing dependency within the standard care system. Conclusion The results indicate that integrated care and support provided through Embrace met the health and social needs of older adults, who were coping with the consequences of aging. PMID:26489096

  3. Experiences of Community-Living Older Adults Receiving Integrated Care Based on the Chronic Care Model: A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie L W Spoorenberg

    Full Text Available Integrated care models aim to solve the problem of fragmented and poorly coordinated care in current healthcare systems. These models aim to be patient-centered by providing continuous and coordinated care and by considering the needs and preferences of patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the opinions and experiences of community-living older adults with regard to integrated care and support, along with the extent to which it meets their health and social needs.Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 older adults receiving integrated care and support through "Embrace," an integrated care model for community-living older adults that is based on the Chronic Care Model and a population health management model. Embrace is currently fully operational in the northern region of the Netherlands. Data analysis was based on the grounded theory approach.Responses of participants concerned two focus areas: 1 Experiences with aging, with the themes "Struggling with health," "Increasing dependency," "Decreasing social interaction," "Loss of control," and "Fears;" and 2 Experiences with Embrace, with the themes "Relationship with the case manager," "Interactions," and "Feeling in control, safe, and secure". The prospect of becoming dependent and losing control was a key concept in the lives of the older adults interviewed. Embrace reinforced the participants' ability to stay in control, even if they were dependent on others. Furthermore, participants felt safe and secure, in contrast to the fears of increasing dependency within the standard care system.The results indicate that integrated care and support provided through Embrace met the health and social needs of older adults, who were coping with the consequences of aging.

  4. An audit of the quality of inpatient care for adults with learning disability in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Sheehan, Rory; Gandesha, Aarti; Hassiotis, Angela; Gallagher, Pamela; Burnell, Matthew; Jones, Glyn; Kerr, Michael; Hall, Ian; Chaplin, Robert; Crawford, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To audit patient hospital records to evaluate the performance of acute general and mental health services in delivering inpatient care to people with learning disability and explore the influence of organisational factors on the quality of care they deliver. Setting Nine acute general hospital Trusts and six mental health services. Participants Adults with learning disability who received inpatient hospital care between May 2013 and April 2014. Primary and secondary outcome measure...

  5. Transition from Pediatric to Adult OI Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... example, preparing for adult employment begins with the process of learning responsibility by doing chores and helping at home. As ... Similarly, developing satisfying adult relationships is a gradual process that begins ... social experiences in school and throughout adolescence. Some of ...

  6. Implementing the chronic care model for frail older adults in the Netherlands: study protocol of ACT (frail older adults: care in transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntinga Maaike E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care for older adults is facing a number of challenges: health problems are not consistently identified at a timely stage, older adults report a lack of autonomy in their care process, and care systems are often confronted with the need for better coordination between health care professionals. We aim to address these challenges by introducing the geriatric care model, based on the chronic care model, and to evaluate its effects on the quality of life of community-dwelling frail older adults. Methods/design In a 2-year stepped-wedge cluster randomised clinical trial with 6-monthly measurements, the chronic care model will be compared with usual care. The trial will be carried out among 35 primary care practices in two regions in the Netherlands. Per region, practices will be randomly allocated to four allocation arms designating the starting point of the intervention. Participants: 1200 community-dwelling older adults aged 65 or over and their primary informal caregivers. Primary care physicians will identify frail individuals based on a composite definition of frailty and a polypharmacy criterion. Final inclusion criterion: scoring 3 or more on a disability case-finding tool. Intervention: Every 6 months patients will receive a geriatric in-home assessment by a practice nurse, followed by a tailored care plan. Expert teams will manage and train practice nurses. Patients with complex care needs will be reviewed in interdisciplinary consultations. Evaluation: We will perform an effect evaluation, an economic evaluation, and a process evaluation. Primary outcome is quality of life as measured with the Short Form-12 questionnaire. Effect analyses will be based on the “intention-to-treat” principle, using multilevel regression analysis. Cost measurements will be administered continually during the study period. A cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-utility analysis will be conducted comparing mean total costs to functional

  7. Adolescent and young adult cancer: principles of care

    OpenAIRE

    Ramphal, R; Aubin, S.; Czaykowski, P.; Pauw, S; Johnson, A.; McKillop, S.; Szwajcer, D; Wilkins, K; ROGERS, P.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (ayas) with cancer in active treatment face a number of barriers to optimal care. In the present article, we focus on the 3 critical domains of care for ayas—medical, psychosocial, and research—and how changes to the system could overcome barriers. We summarize the current literature, outline recommended principles of care, raise awareness of barriers to optimal care, and suggest specific changes to the system to overcome those barriers in the Canadian context. Ma...

  8. Prevalence of Mental and Social Disorders in Adults Attending Primary Care Centers in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    OpenAIRE

    Broers, Teresa; Hodgetts, Geoffrey; Batić-Mujanović, Olivera; Petrović, Verica; Hasanagić, Melida; Godwin, Marshall

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To determine the prevalence of mental and social disorders in adults who attend primary care health centers in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Methods: Sixty-nine family physicians from the Primary Care Research Network in Bosnia and Herzegovina each invited 20 randomly selected patients from their practices to complete the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ), which consists of 26-58 questions about symptoms and signs of depression, anxiety, somatization disorder, eating disorders, and alcohol...

  9. Patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics and level of care associated with lost to follow-up and mortality in adult patients on first-line ART in Nigerian hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Odafe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical outcome is an important determinant of programme success. This study aims to evaluate patients’ baseline characteristics as well as level of care associated with lost to follow-up (LTFU and mortality of patients on antiretroviral treatment (ART. Methods: Retrospective cohort study using routine service data of adult patients initiated on ART in 2007 in 10 selected hospitals in Nigeria. We captured data using an electronic medical record system and analyzed using Stata. Outcome measures were probability of being alive and retained in care at 12, 24 and 36 months on ART. Potential predictors associated with time to mortality and time to LTFU were assessed using competing risks regression models. Results: After 12 months on therapy, 85% of patients were alive and on ART. Survival decreased to 81.2% and 76.1% at 24 and 36 months, respectively. Median CD4 count for patients at ART start, 12, 18 and 24 months were 152 (interquartile range, IQR: 75 to 242, 312 (IQR: 194 to 450, 344 (IQR: 227 to 501 and 372 (IQR: 246 to 517 cells/µl, respectively. Competing risk regression showed that patients’ baseline characteristics significantly associated with LTFU were male (adjusted sub-hazard ratio, sHR=1.24 [95% CI: 1.08 to 1.42], ambulatory functional status (adjusted sHR=1.25 [95% CI: 1.01 to 1.54], World Health Organization (WHO clinical Stage II (adjusted sHR=1.31 [95% CI: 1.08 to 1.59] and care in a secondary site (adjusted sHR=0.76 [95% CI: 0.66 to 0.87]. Those associated with mortality include CD4 count <50 cells/µl (adjusted sHR=2.84 [95% CI: 1.20 to 6.71], WHO clinical Stage III (adjusted sHR=2.67 [95% CI: 1.26 to 5.65] and Stage IV (adjusted sHR=5.04 [95% CI: 1.93 to 13.16] and care in a secondary site (adjusted sHR=2.21 [95% CI: 1.30 to 3.77]. Conclusions: Mortality was associated with advanced HIV disease and care in secondary facilities. Earlier initiation of therapy and strengthening systems in secondary level

  10. Psychosocial care to patients with Malignant Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Charlotte Brun

    Psychosocial care to patients with Malignant Melanoma Intensions: The intension of this project is to link new knowledge with the nurses experience based knowledge within the psychosocial care to patients, who have been diagnosed with Malignant Melanoma (MM), thereby improving the care to this...

  11. The experience of transition in adolescents and young adults transferring from paediatric to adult care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fegran, Liv; Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid; Aagaard, Hanne;

    Introduction: Despite research and implementation of transition models in the last decades, transfer from paediatric to adult care still poses great challenges. Predominantly studies on health care transition have been based on the perspective of experts or health care professionals. Aim: To...... synthesize qualitative studies on how adolescents and young adults with chronic diseases experience transition from paediatric to adult care. Methods: Literature search in major databases covering the years from 1999 to November 2010 was performed. Further forward citation snowballing search was conducted in...

  12. Foster Care Experiences and Educational Outcomes of Young Adults Formerly Placed in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havalchak, Anne; White, Catherine Roller; O'Brien, Kirk; Pecora, Peter J.; Sepulveda, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This study contributes to the body of research on the educational outcomes of young adults who were formerly placed in foster care. Telephone interviews were conducted with 359 young adults (a 54.6% response rate). Participants must have been served for at least one year by one private foster care agency in one of its twenty-two offices. Results…

  13. Care management: agreement between nursing prescriptions and patients' care needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeda, Marília Silveira; Perroca, Márcia Galan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: analyze agreement between nursing prescriptions recorded in medical files and patients' care needs; investigate the correlation between the nurses' professional background and agreement of prescriptions. Method: descriptive study with quantitative and documentary approach conducted in the medical clinic, surgical, and specialized units of a university hospital in the interior of São Paulo, Brazil. The new validated version of a Patient Classification Instrument was used and 380 nursing prescriptions written at the times of hospital admission and discharge were assessed. Results: 75% of the nursing prescriptions items were compatible with the patients' care needs. Only low correlation between nursing prescription agreement and professional background was found. Conclusion: the nursing prescriptions did not fully meet the care needs of patients. The care context and work process should be analyzed to enable more effective prescriptions, while strategies to assess the care needs of patients are recommended. PMID:27508902

  14. Acute undifferentiated febrile illness in adult hospitalized patients: the disease spectrum and diagnostic predictors - an experience from a tertiary care hospital in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrispal, Anugrah; Boorugu, Harikishan; Gopinath, Kango Gopal; Chandy, Sara; Prakash, John Antony Jude; Thomas, Elsa Mary; Abraham, Asha Mary; Abraham, O C; Thomas, Kurien

    2010-10-01

    Local prevalences of individual diseases influence the prioritization of the differential diagnoses of a clinical syndrome of acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AFI). This study was conducted in order to delineate the aetiology of AFI that present to a tertiary hospital in southern India and to describe disease-specific clinical profiles. An 1-year prospective, observational study was conducted in adults (age >16 years) who presented with an undifferentiated febrile illness of duration 5-21 days, requiring hospitalization. Blood cultures, malarial parasites and febrile serology (acute and convalescent), in addition to clinical evaluations and basic investigations were performed. Comparisons were made between each disease and the other AFIs. A total of 398 AFI patients were diagnosed with: scrub typhus (47.5%); malaria (17.1%); enteric fever (8.0%); dengue (7.0%); leptospirosis (3.0%); spotted fever rickettsiosis (1.8%); Hantavirus (0.3%); alternate diagnosis (7.3%); and unclear diagnoses (8.0%). Leucocytosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, aseptic meningitis, mild serum transaminase elevation and hypoalbuminaemia were independently associated with scrub typhus. Normal leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia, renal failure, splenomegaly and hyperbilirubinaemia with mildly elevated serum transaminases were associated with malaria. Rash, overt bleeding manifestations, normal to low leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia and significantly elevated hepatic transaminases were associated with dengue. Enteric fever was associated with loose stools, normal to low leukocyte counts and normal platelet counts. It is imperative to maintain a sound epidemiological database of AFIs so that evidence-based diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines can be developed. PMID:20870680

  15. Geriatric simulation: practicing management and leadership in care of the older adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sally; Overstreet, Maria

    2015-06-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, patients age 65 and older account for 43% of hospital days. The complexity of caring for older adults affords nursing students opportunities to assess, prioritize, intervene, advocate, and experience being a member of an interdisciplinary health care team. However, these multifaceted hospital experiences are not consistently available for all students. Nursing clinical simulation (NCS) can augment or replace specific clinical hours and provide clinically relevant experiences to practice management and leadership skills while caring for older adults. This article describes a geriatric management and leadership NCS. PMID:25999076

  16. Diarrhea - what to ask your health care provider - adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your health care provider about diarrhea - adult; Loose stools - what to ask your health ... medicines, vitamins, herbs, or supplements I take cause diarrhea? Should I stop taking any of them? What ...

  17. Keep Your Mouth Healthy: Oral Care for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Keep Your Mouth Healthy Oral Care for Older Adults Oral health ... decay. You can take steps to keep your mouth healthy throughout your lifetime. And if you’re ...

  18. Oral care in patients on mechanical ventilation in intensive care unit: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Atay

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available intensive care patients needs to oral assessment and oral care for avoid complications caused by orafarengeal bacteria. In this literature review, it is aimed to determine the practice over oral hygiene in mechanical ventilator patients in intensive care unit. For the purpose of collecting data, Medline/pub MED and EBSCO HOST databases were searched with the keywords and lsquo;oral hygiene, oral hygiene practice, mouth care, mouth hygiene, intubated, mechanical ventilation, intensive care and critical care and rdquo; between the years of 2000- 2012. Inclusion criteria for the studies were being performed in adult intensive care unit patients on mechanical ventilation, published in peer-reviewed journals in English between the years of 2000-2012, included oral care practice and presence of a nurse among researchers. A total of 304 articles were identified. Six descriptive evaluation studies, three randomised controlled trials, four literature reviews, three meta-Analysis randomized clinical trials, one qualitative study and one semi-experimental study total 18 papers met all of the inclusion criteria. Oral care is emphasized as an infection control practice for the prevention of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP. In conclusion, we mention that oral care is an important nursing practice to prevent VAP development in intensive care unit patients; however, there is no standard oral evaluation tool and no clarity on oral care practice frequency, appropriate solution and appropriate material. It can be recommended that the study projects on oral care in intensive care patients to have high proof level and be experimental, and longitudinal. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(3.000: 822-829

  19. Providers' Perspectives of Survivorship Care for Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Carla; Stratton, Erin; Esiashvili, Natia; Mertens, Ann; Vanderpool, Robin C

    2016-03-01

    We examined healthcare providers' perceptions of the goals of survivorship care and survivor programs, systems-level barriers and individual patient-level barriers to engaging patients in survivorship care, and potential resources for increasing engagement. In 2012, we recruited 21 healthcare providers of young adult survivors of childhood cancers from a children's hospital and a cancer center in the Southeastern USA to complete telephone-based semi-structured interviews. The sample was 45.95 years old (SD = 7.57) on average, 52.4 % female, and 81.0 % MDs. The major goals of survivorship programs identified were medical care management (e.g., addressing late and long-term effects, providing survivorship care plans (SCPs), assisting in transition of care) and holistic care including addressing psychosocial issues and promoting healthy lifestyles. Systems-level barriers to engagement in survivorship care included limited resources (e.g., time), role confusion (e.g., within cancer centers, from treatment team to survivorship care, role of primary care providers), communication challenges within the medical system (e.g., limited tracking of patients, lack of understanding of the role of survivorship clinic), communication challenges with patients (e.g., setting expectations regarding transition to survivorship care), and lack of insurance coverage. Perceived patient-level factors included psychological barriers (e.g., fear, avoidance), resistance to survivorship care, and physical barriers (e.g., distance from survivorship clinics). Resources to address these barriers included increased access to information, technology-based resources, and ensuring valuable services. There are several systems-level and patient-level barriers to survivorship care, thus requiring multilevel interventions to promote engagement in care among young adult survivors of childhood cancer. PMID:25943901

  20. Diabetes Self-Care and the Older Adult

    OpenAIRE

    Weinger, Katie; Beverly, Elizabeth A.; Smaldone, Arlene

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is highest in older adults, a population that is increasing. Diabetes self-care is complex with important recommendations for nutrition, physical activity, checking glucose levels, and taking medication. Older adults with diabetes have unique issues which impact self-care. As people age, their health status, support systems, physical and mental abilities, and nutritional requirements change. Furthermore, comorbidities, complications, and polypharmacy complicate diab...

  1. Many COPD Patients Have Trouble Finding Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158830.html Many COPD Patients Have Trouble Finding Care They can face ... first comprehensive look at chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) care in the United States. COPD is the ...

  2. Adult Patients’ Satisfaction with Inpatient Nursing Care and Associated Factors in an Ethiopian Referral Hospital, Northeast, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Haile Eyasu, Kokeb; Adane, Akilew Awoke; Amdie, Fisseha Zewdu; Getahun, Tesfaye Bisenebit; Biwota, Mulunesh Abuhay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Patient satisfaction with nursing care is considered as an important factor in explaining patients’ perceptions of service quality. Care assessed to be high quality according to clinical, economic, or other provider-defined criteria is far from ideal if as a result of that care the patient is unhappy or dissatisfied. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess adult patients’ satisfaction with inpatient nursing care and associated factors in Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeas...

  3. Wound Care in Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Çizmeci

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Wound care in one of the most important prognostic factors in burn victims. Open wound carries risks for infection due to hypothermia, protein and fluid losses. In addition, unhealed wounds are the major risk factors for acute-subacute or chronic complications in burn patients. Although no exact algorithm exists for open wound treatment, early escarectomy or debridement together with grafting is the best option. Ointments together with topical epithelizing agents without dressings are genereally adequate for first-degree burns. However, topical antibacterial agents are usually required for second to third-degree wounds. Standart treatment for the open wound without epithelization is autologous skin grafting. In cases where more than 50% of the skin surface in affected, autologus donor skin may not be enough. For these cases, epidermal cell culture in vitro may be used. Mesenchymal stem cell applications which have immunosupressive effects should be utilized in cases where cells need to be prepared as allografts. (Journal of the Turkish Society intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 51-4

  4. Meaning and practice of palliative care for hospitalized older adults with life limiting illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Bethel Ann; Norton, Sally A; Schmitt, Madeline H; Quill, Timothy E; Metzger, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To illustrate distinctions and intersections of palliative care (PC) and end-of-life (EOL) services through examples from case-centered data of older adults cared for during a four-year ethnographic study of an acute care hospital palliative care consultation service. Methods. Qualitative narrative and thematic analysis. Results. Description of four practice paradigms (EOL transitions, prognostic uncertainty, discharge planning, and patient/family values and preferences) and identification of the underlying structure and communication patterns of PC consultation services common to them. Conclusions. Consistent with reports by other researchers, study data support the need to move beyond equating PC with hospice or EOL care and the notion that EOL is a well-demarcated period of time before death. If professional health care providers assume that PC services are limited to assisting with and helping patients and families prepare for dying, they miss opportunities to provide care considered important to older individuals confronting life-limiting illnesses. PMID:21584232

  5. Dental Care among Young Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kancherla, Vijaya; Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Yeargin-Allsopp, Marshalyn

    2013-01-01

    Dental care among young adults with intellectual disability (ID) is poorly documented and largely unmet. By using population-based data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Follow-Up Study, we assessed factors associated with at least one or two dental visits per year among young adults with and without ID. Significantly fewer…

  6. Perioperative Care of the Transgender Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2016-02-01

    Transgender patients are individuals whose gender identity is not related to their biological sex. Assuming a new gender identity that does not conform to societal norms often results in discrimination and barriers to health care. The exact number of transgender patients is unknown; however, these patients are increasingly seen in health care. Transgender individuals may experience provider-generated discrimination in health care facilities, including refusal of service, disrespect, and abuse, which contribute to depression and low self-esteem. Transgender therapies include mental health counseling for depression and low self-esteem, hormone therapy, and sex reassignment surgery. Health care professionals require cultural competence, an understanding of the different forms of patient identification, and adaptive approaches to care for transgender patients. VA (Veterans Affairs) hospitals provide a model for the care for transgender patients and staff. PMID:26849981

  7. Care of patients with permanent tracheostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, Erica

    The third article in our series on tracheostomy care discusses the care of patients with a permanent tracheostomy. While these patients make up a small proportion of all patients who have a tracheostomy inserted, they have complex needs. This means they require practitioners in both acute and community settings, who have time, support and competent tracheostomy-care skills, to achieve a successful discharge and ongoing management of their tracheostomy. PMID:27396099

  8. Physician-patient communication in managed care.

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, G H; Baker, L; Levinson, W

    1995-01-01

    The quality of physician-patient communication affects important health care outcomes. Managed care presents a number of challenges to physician-patient communication, including shorter visits, decreased continuity, and lower levels of trust. Good communication skills can help physicians create and maintain healthy relationships with patients in the face of these challenges. We describe 5 communication dilemmas that are common in managed care and review possible solutions suggested by recent ...

  9. Child Nutrition Programs: Child and Adult Care Food Program. Family Day Care Home Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    This handbook details requirements for family day care homes in Oklahoma for providing child nutrition through the Child and Adult Care Food Program. The handbook includes contact information for state consultants. The basic responsibilities for sponsors of family day care home child nutrition programs are outlined, and the sponsoring organization…

  10. Personality Assessment Screener, Childhood Abuse, and Adult Partner Violence in African American Women Using Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcerelli, John H; Hurrell, Kristen; Cogan, Rosemary; Jeffries, Keturah; Markova, Tsveti

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the relationship between psychopathology with the Personality Assessment Screener (PAS) and childhood physical and sexual abuse and adult physical and sexual partner violence in a primary care sample of 98 urban-dwelling African American women. Patients completed the PAS, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, and the Conflict Tactics Scale. The PAS total score significantly correlated with all measures of childhood and adult abuse. Stepwise regression analyses revealed that PAS element scores of Suicidal Thinking and Hostile Control significantly predicted a history of childhood physical abuse; Suicidal Thinking, Hostile Control, and Acting Out significantly predicted a history of childhood sexual abuse; Suicidal Thinking, Negative Affect, and Alienation significantly predicted current adult partner physical violence; and Psychotic Features, Alcohol Problems, and Anger Control significantly predicted current adult sexual partner violence. The PAS appears to be a useful measure for fast-paced primary care settings for identifying patients who need a more thorough assessment for abuse. PMID:26374084

  11. Supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Rahmani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A supportive needs assessment is an essential component of any care program. There is no research evidence regarding the supportive care needs of cancer patients in Iran or other Middle Eastern countries. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in a referral medical center in the northwest of Iran. A total of 274 cancer patients completed the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-59. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: In 18 items of the SCNS, more than 50% of the participants reported that their needs were unmet. Most frequently, unmet needs were related to the health system, information, physical, and daily living domains, and most met needs were related to sexuality, patient care, and support domains. Conclusions: Iranian cancer patients experience many unmet needs and there is an urgent need for establishing additional supportive care services in Iran.

  12. Primary care patient and provider preferences for diabetes care managers

    OpenAIRE

    DeJesus, Ramona

    2010-01-01

    Ramona S DeJesus1, Kristin S Vickers2, Robert J Stroebel1, Stephen S Cha31Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, MN, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAPurpose: The collaborative care model, using care managers, has been shown to be effective in achieving sustained treatment outcomes in chronic disease management. Little effort has been made to find out patient preferenc...

  13. The role of chiropractic care in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dougherty Paul E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are a rising number of older adults; in the US alone nearly 20% of the population will be 65 or older by 2030. Chiropractic is one of the most frequently utilized types of complementary and alternative care by older adults, used by an estimated 5% of older adults in the U.S. annually. Chiropractic care involves many different types of interventions, including preventive strategies. This commentary by experts in the field of geriatrics, discusses the evidence for the use of spinal manipulative therapy, acupuncture, nutritional counseling and fall prevention strategies as delivered by doctors of chiropractic. Given the utilization of chiropractic services by the older adult, it is imperative that providers be familiar with the evidence for and the prudent use of different management strategies for older adults.

  14. Older patients' experiences during care transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustad EC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Else Cathrine Rustad,1–4 Bodil Furnes,1 Berit Seiger Cronfalk,2,5,6 Elin Dysvik1 1Department of Health Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway; 2Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Stord Haugesund University College, Stord, Norway; 3Research Network on Integrated Health Care in Western Norway, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 5Palliative Research Center, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; 6Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Background: A fragmented health care system leads to an increased demand for continuity of care across health care levels. Research indicates age-related differences during care transition, with the oldest patients having experiences and needs that differ from those of other patients. To meet the older patients’ needs and preferences during care transition, professionals must understand their experiences.Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore how patients ≥80 years of age experienced the care transition from hospital to municipal health care services.Methods: The study has a descriptive, explorative design, using semistructured interviews. Fourteen patients aged ≥80 participated in the study. Qualitative content analysis was used to describe the individuals’ experiences during care transition.Results: Two complementary themes emerged during the analysis: “Participation depends on being invited to plan the care transition” and “Managing continuity of care represents a complex and challenging process”.Discussion: Lack of participation, insufficient information, and vague responsibilities among staff during care transition seemed to limit the continuity of care. The patients are the vulnerable part of the care transition process, although they possess important

  15. Primary care physicians’ perceived barriers and facilitators to conservative care for older adults with chronic kidney disease: design of a mixed methods study

    OpenAIRE

    Tam-Tham, Helen; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Campbell, David; Thomas, Chandra; Quinn, Robert; Fruetel, Karen; King-Shier, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Background Guideline committees have identified the need for research to inform the provision of conservative care for older adults with stage 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD) who have a high burden of comorbidity or functional impairment. We will use both qualitative and quantitative methodologies to provide a comprehensive understanding of barriers and facilitators to care for these patients in primary care. Objectives Our objectives are to (1) interview primary care physicians to determine t...

  16. Preventive care delivered within Public Dental Service after caries risk assessment of young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hänsel Petersson, G; Ericson, E; Twetman, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study preventive care provided to young adults in relation to their estimated risk category over a 3-year period. METHODS: The amount and type of preventive treatment during 3 years was extracted from the digital dental records of 982 patients attending eight public dental clinics...... adults attending public dental service. Further research is needed how to reach those with the greatest need of primary and secondary prevention....

  17. Cognitive Performance Associated With Self-care Activities in Mexican Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Compeán Ortiz, Lidia Guadalupe; Gallegos Cabriales, Esther C; Gonzalez Gonzalez, Jose G; GÓMEZ MEZA, MARCO VINICIO; Therrien, Barbara; Salazar Gonzalez, Bertha C

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of memory-learning on self-care activities in adults with type 2 diabetes moderated by previous education/understanding in diabetes and to explore the explicative capacity of age, gender, schooling, diabetes duration, and glycemic control in memory-learning. METHODS: A descriptive correlational study was conducted in a randomized sample of 105 Mexican adult patients with type 2 diabetes at a community-based outpatient clinic. Eval...

  18. Care of Adult Refugees with Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaki, Genji; Ahrenholz, Nicole Chow; Haider, Mahri Z

    2015-09-01

    Refugees share a common experience of displacement from their country of origin, migration, and resettlement in an unfamiliar country. More than 17 million people have fled their home countries due to war, generalized violence, and persecution. US primary care physicians must care for their immediate and long-term medical needs. Challenges include (1) language and cultural barriers, (2) high rates of mental health disorders, (3) higher prevalence of latent infections, and (4) different explanatory models for chronic diseases. This article discusses management strategies for common challenges that arise in the primary care of refugees. PMID:26320045

  19. Acute nursing care of the older adult with fragility hip fracture: An international perspective (Part 2)

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maher, Ann Butler

    2012-10-23

    The second part of this paper provides those who care for orthopaedic patients with evidence-supported international perspectives about acute nursing care of the older adult with fragility hip fracture. Developed by an international group of nurse experts and guided by a range of information from research and clinical practice, it focuses on nurse sensitive quality indicators during the acute hospitalisation for fragility hip fracture. Optimal care for the patient who has experienced such a fracture is the focus. This includes (in the first, earlier, part):\\r\

  20. QL-04FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH SUICIDAL IDEATION IN CLINICALLY DISTRESSED ADULT GLIOMA PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Pia; Cloughesy, Timothy; Cervantes, Sandra; Pham, Jennifer; Nghiemphu, Phioanh; Lai, Albert; Wellisch, David

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: During patient care, it is critical to identify the glioma patients who are experiencing suicidal ideation among those who present with elevated levels of psychological distress, so appropriate interventions can be implemented. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that differentiated adult glioma patients with possible suicidal ideation from those without suicidal ideation among patients experiencing psychological distress. METHODS: 317 adult patients with WHO Grade I...

  1. 78 FR 45176 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2013 Through June 30, 2014 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service...-risk afterschool care centers, and adult day care centers; the food service payment rates for meals...

  2. Preventive Care Recommendations for Adults with MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Examination Every 6 months. (Note: Make sure your dentist has a current list of all the medications ... care provider) Self Breast Exam Mammogram Prostate exam (digital rectal exam) PSA (prostate specific antigen) test Clinical ...

  3. Patient Preferences for Information on Post-Acute Care Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefcik, Justine S; Nock, Rebecca H; Flores, Emilia J; Chase, Jo-Ana D; Bradway, Christine; Potashnik, Sheryl; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore what hospitalized patients would like to know about post-acute care (PAC) services to ultimately help them make an informed decision when offered PAC options. Thirty hospitalized adults 55 and older in a Northeastern U.S. academic medical center participated in a qualitative descriptive study with conventional content analysis as the analytical technique. Three themes emerged: (a) receiving practical information about the services, (b) understanding "how it relates to me," and (c) having opportunities to understand PAC options. Study findings inform clinicians what information should be included when discussing PAC options with older adults. Improving the quality of discharge planning discussions may better inform patient decision making and, as a result, increase the numbers of patients who accept a plan of care that supports recovery, meets their needs, and results in improved quality of life and fewer readmissions. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2016; 9(4):175-182.]. PMID:26815304

  4. Intensive care patient diaries in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Storli, Sissel Lisa; Åkerman, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness and intensive care therapy are often followed by psychological problems such as nightmares, hallucinations, delusions, anxiety, depression, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress. Intensive care patient diaries have been kept by nurses and the patients' family since the early 1990s...

  5. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B and C virus in two institutions caring for mentally handicapped adults.

    OpenAIRE

    Cramp, M.E.; Grundy, H C; Perinpanayagam, R M; Barnado, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection is common in institutions caring for the mentally handicapped. Hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus share routes of transmission but the prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in this population is unknown. We have tested 101 patients from two institutions in South-East England caring for adults with mental handicap for the presence of hepatitis C antibody, hepatitis B core antibody, and if necessary hepatitis B surface antigen. None tested positive for hepat...

  6. Care of oral cavity in irradiated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procedures are reviewed of therapeutic and preventive care in patients with malignant tumours in the area of the head and neck during radiotherapy and during the subsequent follow-up of patients. As compared with previous views, the care is now more conservative, indications for tooth extractions are now limited, careful oral hygiene is emphasized and, in particular, the long-term use of fluorine gel is recommended. Surgery is only recommended where conservative treatment fails. (author)

  7. Early mobilization in the critical care unit: A review of adult and pediatric literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Saoirse; Ball, Ian; Cepinskas, Gediminas; Choong, Karen; Doherty, Timothy J; Ellis, Christopher G; Martin, Claudio M; Mele, Tina S; Sharpe, Michael; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Fraser, Douglas D

    2015-08-01

    Early mobilization of critically ill patients is beneficial, suggesting that it should be incorporated into daily clinical practice. Early passive, active, and combined progressive mobilizations can be safely initiated in intensive care units (ICUs). Adult patients receiving early mobilization have fewer ventilator-dependent days, shorter ICU and hospital stays, and better functional outcomes. Pediatric ICU data are limited, but recent studies also suggest that early mobilization is achievable without increasing patient risk. In this review, we provide a current and comprehensive appraisal of ICU mobilization techniques in both adult and pediatric critically ill patients. Contraindications and perceived barriers to early mobilization, including cost and health care provider views, are identified. Methods of overcoming barriers to early mobilization and enhancing sustainability of mobilization programs are discussed. Optimization of patient outcomes will require further studies on mobilization timing and intensity, particularly within specific ICU populations. PMID:25987293

  8. Clinical and Financial Effects of Psychoeducational Care Provided by Staff Nurses to Adult Surgical Patients in the Post-DRG Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Elizabeth C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A three-hour, two-stage workshop for staff nurses on providing education and psychological support to 148 patients who had abdominal surgery. After the workshop the patients used fewer sedatives or antiemetics, fewer hypnotics, and were discharged from the hospital on the average half a day sooner. (Author/BJV)

  9. Using function-focused care to increase physical activity among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Barbara; Galik, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Despite the known benefits of physical activity for older adults, adherence to regular physical activity recommendations is poor. Less than half of adults in this country meet physical activity recommendations with reasons for lack of adherence including such things as access, motivation, pain, fear, comorbidities, among others. To overcome these challenges, function-focused care was developed. Function-focused care is a philosophy of care that focuses on evaluating the older adult's underlying capability with regard to function and physical activity and helping him or her optimize and maintain physical function and ability and continually increase time spent in physical activity. Examples of function-focused care include such things as using verbal cues during bathing, so the older individual performs the tasks rather than the caregiver bathing the individual; walking a resident or patient to the bathroom rather than using a urinal, or taking a resident to an exercise class. There are now over 20 studies supporting the benefits of function-focused care approaches across all settings and different types of patient groups (i.e, those with mild versus moderate-to-severe cognitive impairment). The approaches for implementation of function-focused care have also been well supported and have moved beyond establishing effectiveness to considering dissemination and implementation of this approach into real world clinical settings. The process of dissemination and implementation has likewise been articulated and supported, and ongoing work needs to continue in this venue across all care settings. PMID:24894140

  10. Activating Older Adults With Serious Mental Illness for Collaborative Primary Care Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Stephen J.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Rolin, Stephanie A.; Hendrick, Delia Cimpean; Naslund, John A.; Faber, Marjan J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Persons with serious mental illness frequently receive inadequate medical care and are more likely to experience difficulty navigating the health care system compared with the general population. To address this gap in quality, we developed a program of peer co-led collaborative activation training for primary care (CAT-PC) designed to improve “patient activation” and person-centered care in primary care visits for middle-aged and older adults with serious mental illness and cardiovascular risk. This report presents pilot study feasibility and participant outcomes for CAT-PC. Method A pre-post pilot evaluation of CAT-PC included N = 17 adults (age ≥ 50) with serious mental illness and cardiovascular health risk conditions, and N = 6 primary care providers. CAT-PC consists of 9 weekly peer co-led patient education and skills training sessions and a 45-min video-based training for primary care providers. Pre-post measures included the Patient Activation Measure (PAM), Perceived Efficacy in Patient-Physician Interactions (PEPPI), Autonomy Preference Index (API) for preferred role in primary care encounters, and Social Skills Performance Assessment (SSPA) role-play test for medical visits. Results All 17 participants attended 5 or more sessions. Post-intervention improvement was found for patient activation and simulated performance of medical visit communication skills. Trends were observed for improved self-efficacy in provider interactions and greater preference for a more collaborative role in decision-making. Conclusions and Implications CAT-PC is a brief, peer co-led education and skills training intervention potentially improving patient activation in primary care encounters and providing an important missing component in emerging models of “patient-centered behavioral health homes” for this high-risk group. PMID:24219769

  11. Patients' experiences of intensive care diaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bagger, Christine

    2010-01-01

    had a triangulated approach and group dynamics were described as the focus group was used to explore agreement and disagreement among the participants. Little is known about the content of intensive care diaries and their usefulness and meaning for the patients. The participants in our study agreed......The aim of the study was to explore patients' experiences and perceptions of receiving intensive care diaries. A focus group and intensive care diaries for four former ICU patients were analysed to understand what works and what needs further development for patients who receive a diary. The study...

  12. Psychiatric Nursing Care for Adult Survivors of Child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zalm, Yvonne van der; Nugteren, Willem; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra van der; Venne, Cokky van der; Kool, Nienke; Meijel, Berno van

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine what is known from the literature about nursing care of psychiatric patients with a history of child maltreatment. CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric nurses underline the importance of a routine inquiry of child abuse on admission of patients to psychiatric care, but are reluctant to as

  13. Measuring patient satisfaction in complex continuing care/rehabilitation care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Navin; Alvaro, Celeste; Kuluski, Kerry; Wilkinson, Andrea J

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to develop a psychometrically validated survey to assess satisfaction in complex continuing care (CCC)/rehabilitation patients. Design/methodology/approach - A paper or computer-based survey was administered to 252 CCC/rehabilitation patients (i.e. post-acute hospital care setting for people who require ongoing care before returning home) across two hospitals in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Findings - Using factor analysis, five domains were identified with loadings above 0.4 for all but one item. Behavioral intention and information/communication showed the lowest patient satisfaction, while patient centredness the highest. Each domain correlated positively and significantly predicted overall satisfaction, with quality and safety showing the strongest predictive power and the healing environment the weakest. Gender made a significant contribution to predicting overall satisfaction, but age did not. Research limitations/implications - Results provide evidence of the survey's psychometric properties. Owing to a small sample, supplemental testing with a larger patient group is required to confirm the five-factor structure and to assess test-retest reliability. Originality/value - Improving the health system requires integrating patient perspectives. The patient experience, however, will vary depending on the population being served. This is the first psychometrically validated survey specific to a smaller specialty patient group receiving care at a CCC/rehabilitation facility in Canada. PMID:27120509

  14. The patient experience of intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Lindahl, Berit;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sedation practices in the intensive care unit have evolved from deep sedation and paralysis toward lighter sedation and better pain management. The new paradigm of sedation has enabled early mobilization and optimized mechanical ventilator weaning. Intensive care units in the Nordic c...... state, where they face the choice of life or death. Caring nurses and family members play an important role in assisting the patient to transition back to life.......BACKGROUND: Sedation practices in the intensive care unit have evolved from deep sedation and paralysis toward lighter sedation and better pain management. The new paradigm of sedation has enabled early mobilization and optimized mechanical ventilator weaning. Intensive care units in the Nordic...... countries have been particularly close to goals of lighter or no sedation and a more humane approach to intensive care. OBJECTIVES: The aim of our study was to systematically review and reinterpret newer Nordic studies of the patient experience of intensive care to obtain a contemporary description of human...

  15. Care participation and burden among informal caregivers of older adults with care needs and associations with dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann; Abdin, Edimansyah; Picco, Louisa; Jeyagurunathan, Anitha; Zhang, Yunjue; Sambasivam, Rajeswari; Chua, Boon Yiang; Ng, Li Ling; Prince, Martin; Subramaniam, Mythily

    2015-01-01

    Background: Few studies have estimated care burden in large, representative, multi-ethnic Asian population-based informal caregivers of older adults with care needs. This study describes informal caregivers’ care participation for a population-based sample of older adults with care needs in Singapore, investigates differences by dementia status, and examines correlates of caregivers’ burden. Methods: Data collected from 693 pairs of older adults, aged 60 to 100 years, having any care needs, a...

  16. Telemedicine: an enhanced emergency care program for older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi PY

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Paul Y Takahashi,1 Anupam Chandra,1 Frederick North,1 Jennifer L Pecina,2 Benjavan Upatising,3 Gregory J Hanson11Mayo Clinic Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, 2Mayo Clinic Department of Family Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA; 3Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USAAbstract: Recent changes and consolidations in health care systems have resulted in an increase in new health care delivery models. Telemedicine holds great promise as one of these models. There is a great potential for new patient evaluation and treatment models in emergency care (EC, especially when patients are miles away from a medical team. Evaluations can be performed in a patient's home, a nursing care facility, and in hospitals that focus on advanced subspecialty care. Due to rapid developments in this area, current care models are constantly being evaluated and modified. This review article outlines current telemedicine models for EC and summarizes their potential benefits to patients and the health care system. The review examines the role that the telephone, a fundamental tool of telemedicine, plays in these new models. The review also examines evidence of improved health care outcomes by highlighting the role of telemedicine in reducing hospitalizations. The patient is the primary focus; as a result, this review also examined patient experiences and satisfaction levels regarding telemedicine health care teams. The authors support these technological advances and their potential for information transfer. Health care providers need to continue developing these models by making use of increasing amounts of information. One of the main implementation barriers of these new models in the US and other countries is the issue of payment and reimbursement. Despite this, advancements in EC telemedicine continue.Keywords: telemedicine, emergency care, geriatric, patient evaluation models

  17. Providing Palliative Care to LGBTQ Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Nina; Wholihan, Dorothy

    2016-09-01

    Nurses should be familiar with and equipped to address the challenges that arise when caring for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer-identified (LGBTQ) patients. LGBTQ individuals have increased rates of certain physical diseases and are at greater risk of suffering from stress-sensitive mental health issues. Negative social attitudes, widespread discrimination and stigma, physical and psychological victimization, and less social support with aging contribute to the complexity of care for these individuals. Open communication, welcoming and accepting attitudes and environments, and sensitivity to unique multidimensional issues improve care to LGBTQ patients with serious advanced illness. Nursing can reach this vulnerable minority and positively impact the quality of care. PMID:27497022

  18. Experiences of critical care nurses caring for unresponsive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, N E

    1999-08-01

    Grounded theory methodology was utilized to explore the experiences of critical care nurses caring for patients who were unable to respond due to a traumatic brain injury or receiving neuromuscular blocking agents. The registered nurses participating in the study worked in a neuroscience intensive care unit. Saturation of the categories was achieved with 16 interviews. The core category that emerged from the study is Giving the Patient a Chance. The subcategories of Learning about My Patient, Maintaining and Monitoring, Talking to My Patient, Working with Families, Struggling with Dilemmas and Personalizing the Experience all centered upon the focus of doing everything to help the patient attain the best possible outcome. Factors influencing each of the subcategories were identified such as the acuity of the patient, experience level of the nurse and the presence or absence of family members or significant others. These factors accounted for the variations in the nurses' experience. Several reasons accounting for the variations were determined. The study identified areas that need to be addressed in both general nursing education and nursing practice, such as instruction on talking to comatose patients, working with families and orientation information for nurses new to caring for these populations. Recommendations for improvement in these areas, as well as for future studies are discussed. PMID:10553569

  19. Psychiatric Nursing Care for Adult Survivors of Child

    OpenAIRE

    Zalm, Yvonne van der; Nugteren, Willem; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra van der; Venne, Cokky van der; Kool, Nienke; van Meijel, Berno

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine what is known from the literature about nursing care of psychiatric patients with a history of child maltreatment. CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric nurses underline the importance of a routine inquiry of child abuse on admission of patients to psychiatric care, but are reluctant to ask about child abuse. They often feel insufficiently competent to respond effectively to patients with a history of child maltreatment. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Psychiatric nurses need training in how ...

  20. Palliative care in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlvennan, Colleen K; Allen, Larry A

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in cardiac therapy, heart failure (HF) remains a progressive, highly symptomatic, and deadly disease that places great demands on patients, caregivers, and healthcare systems. Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to care that focuses on communication, shared decision making, and advance care planning; provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms; integrates psychological and spiritual aspects of care; and offers a support system to help families cope during illness and bereavement. Palliative care has applications across the stages of heart failure, including early in the course of illness, often in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life. However, the incorporation of palliative care into the management of heart failure has been suboptimal for several reasons: uncertainty in the disease trajectory, failure to reward communication between healthcare providers and patients, siloed care, lack of knowledge, overlay of comorbidity and frailty, life saving devices with complex trade-offs, and a limited evidence base. This review will summarize the current literature on the emerging role of palliative care in patients with heart failure and the challenges and opportunities for its integration into routine care. It will discuss current initiatives and future directions of the collaborative relationship between the palliative care and heart failure disciplines. PMID:27079896

  1. 76 FR 43254 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ..., 2010, at 75 FR 41793. Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) [Per meal rates in whole or fractions... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2011 Through June 30, 2012 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition...

  2. 75 FR 41793 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ..., 2009, at 74 FR 34295. Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Lunch and Centers Breakfast supper \\1... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2010 Through June 30, 2011 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition...

  3. Advance care planning: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials conducted with older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, Elizabeth; O'Caoimh, Rónán; Cornally, Nicola; Fitzgerald, Carol; Kearns, Tara; Coffey, Alice; Daly, Edel; O'Sullivan, Ronan; McGlade, Ciara; Molloy, D William

    2016-09-01

    Advance care planning (ACP), involving discussions between patients, families and healthcare professionals on future healthcare decisions, in advance of anticipated impairment in decision-making capacity, improves satisfaction and end-of-life care while respecting patient autonomy. It usually results in the creation of a written advanced care directive (ACD). This systematic review examines the impact of ACP on several outcomes (including symptom management, quality of care and healthcare utilisation) in older adults (>65years) across all healthcare settings. Nine randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were identified by searches of the CINAHL, PubMed and Cochrane databases. A total of 3646 older adults were included (range 72-88 years). Seven studies were conducted with community dwellers and the other two RCTs were conducted in nursing homes. Most studies did not implement a standardised ACD, or measure the impact on quality of end-of-life care or on the death and dying experience. All studies had some risk of bias, with most scoring poorly on the Oxford Quality Scale. While ACP interventions are well received by older adults and generally have positive effects on outcomes, this review highlights the need for well-designed RCTs that examine the economic impact of ACP and its effect on quality of care in nursing homes and other sectors. PMID:27451328

  4. Implementing the chronic care model for frail older adults in the Netherlands: study protocol of ACT (frail older adults: care in transition)

    OpenAIRE

    Muntinga Maaike E; Hoogendijk Emiel O; van Leeuwen Karen M; van Hout Hein PJ; Twisk Jos WR; van der Horst Henriette E; Nijpels Giel; Jansen Aaltje PD

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Care for older adults is facing a number of challenges: health problems are not consistently identified at a timely stage, older adults report a lack of autonomy in their care process, and care systems are often confronted with the need for better coordination between health care professionals. We aim to address these challenges by introducing the geriatric care model, based on the chronic care model, and to evaluate its effects on the quality of life of community-dwelling...

  5. Drug incompatibilities in the adult intensive care unit of a university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Marsilio, Naiane Roveda; da Silva, Daiandy; Bueno, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to identify the physical and chemical incompatibilities among the drugs administered intravenously to patients admitted to an adult intensive care unit. We also aimed to establish pharmaceutical guidelines for administering incompatible drugs. Methods This cross-sectional, prospective, and quantitative study was conducted from July to September 2015. Drug incompatibilities were identified based on an analysis of the patient prescriptions available in the hospital ...

  6. Care in the perception of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Henriques

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Being a cancer patient is a unique and singular. The cancer disease associated with pain and suffering is a challenging process for the sufferer, for whom have around or for those caring for the sick. Pain, considered the 5 th vital sign, is often identified as the main complaint of our patients suffering from cancer. We dare to say that to explore the essence of the care provided by nurses and primary health care to cancer patients with prolonged pain at the time found in his home and family, we would be helping to build a know -how by itself, with positive externalities for patients, families, professionals and nursing itself. Methods: Ask "What does Care for Nurses and primary health care for cancer patients with prolonged pain in time for your family?" we may lead the cornerstone of our problems, by studying quantitative nature using a questionnaire and a significance level of care. Results: the average age is 59.27 years, mostly women, 51% are married and in 29.8% of studies has only completed the first cycle of education. The majority of cancer patients who participated in this study share a room with a relative. In regard to aspects of their pain, cancer patients referred to 47.1% of cases, that their pain started weeks ago and 38.5% even refers to the pain persists for months. The pain felt by these patients is not the severe type, in 68.3% of cases, and has an average intensity of 5, although we have 25% of these patients with pain greater than a 6.75. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of nurses who provide care at primary health reveals an alpha of 0.8857 and 0.9025 standardized alpha. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of cancer patients with prolonged pain at the time they are at home shows an alpha of 0.6672and 0.7374 standardized alpha. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of cancer family patients with prolonged pain shows an alpha of 0.6712 and an alpha standardized 0

  7. 重症加强治疗病房成人患者浅镇静治疗进展%The progress of light sedation for critically ill adult patients in intensive care unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李双玲; 王东信; 杨拔贤

    2016-01-01

    The latest advance of sedation for critically ill adult patients in intensive care unit (ICU) was reviewed in order to provide certain clinical information for the ICU physicians about sedation. Guidelines, clinical research, Meta-analysis, and reviews in recent years were collected using electronic data base. Discussions included: ① the definition of light sedation, and its effects on clinical outcome, stress, sleep and delirium; ② light sedation strategies included: the target population, the target sedation strategy and daily sedation interruption, clinical assessment and monitoring of sedation, selection of sedative drugs, light sedation extenuation; ③ light sedation strategies and pain, agitation, delirium control bundles; ④ the problems and prospects of light sedation. Light sedation is the main principle of currently ICU sedation strategy in critically ill adult patients. Goal-directed light sedation should be considered as a routine therapy in most clinical situation, and its goal should be achieved as early as possible in the early stage of sedation. Routine use of benzodiazepines should be avoided, especially in patients with or at a risk of delirium. Prevention and treatment of agitation with a combination of non-pharmacologic or pharmacologic methods; ICU specification rules for pain, agitation and delirium prevention and treatment should be made. Light sedation is the main ICU sedation strategy in adult patients now, but must be individualized for each patient.%对重症加强治疗病房(ICU)成人患者镇静方面的最新进展进行综述,强调浅镇静策略是目前ICU危重患者镇静的主要治疗原则,其主要内容包括:①目标导向的浅镇静应常规化,尽可能在镇静早期即达标;②应摒弃常规使用苯二氮类药物,尤其对有谵妄风险或已经有谵妄的患者;③联合药物或非药物的有效方法预防和治疗躁动;④制定纳入疼痛、躁动和谵

  8. Adult Basic Education. Child Care, Transportation, Support Services Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Deborah; Morris, Jamie, Ed.

    This workbook focuses on two primary needs of adult basic education (ABE) students--child care and transportation--and provides ideas to assist program administrators (especially in Texas) to develop appropriate, workable, community-based strategies to meet these needs. The book contains five chapters. Each chapter addresses a particular aspect of…

  9. Patient involvement in Danish health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrangbaek, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    for analysis of patient involvement in health care. This framework is used to analyze key governance features of patient involvement in Denmark based on previous research papers and reports describing patient involvement in Danish health care. FINDINGS: Patient involvement is important in Denmark...... be identified when pursuing the strategies at the same time. RESEARCH LIMITATIONS/IMPLICATIONS: Because of the chosen research approach, the research results may lack generalizability. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed framework further. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: The paper includes...... implications for the development of patient involvement in health care. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: This paper fulfills a need to study different types of patient involvement and to develop a theoretical framework for characterizing and analyzing such involvement strategies....

  10. Intensive Care Management in Pediatric Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Ebru Sakallıoğlu Abalı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury is still a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children. This article aimed to review the current principles of management from initial assessment to early management and intensive care for pediatric burn patients. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 62-9

  11. Leadership: improving the quality of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, A

    The satisfaction staff achieve from their work is in part determined by the style of management they work under. This article analyses the impact of a proactive leadership style on team performance and the quality of patient care. PMID:11973895

  12. Partial Knee with Personalized Patient Care

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Oxford® Partial Knee with Signature™ Personalized Patient Care You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy ...

  13. Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... view charts and maps. State Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care by ... U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 200 Independence Avenue, S.W. — Washington, D.C. 20201

  14. Effective Perioperative Communication to Enhance Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, J Hudson

    2016-08-01

    Breakdowns in health care communication are a significant cause of sentinel events and associated patient morbidity and mortality. Effective communication is a necessary component of a patient safety program, which enables all members of the interdisciplinary health care team to effectively manage their individual roles and responsibilities in the perioperative setting; set expectations for safe, high-reliability care; and measure and assess outcomes. To sustain a culture of safety, effective communication should be standardized, complete, clear, brief, and timely. Executive leadership and support helps remove institutional barriers and address challenges to support the engagement of patients in health care communication, which has been shown to improve outcomes, reduce costs, and improve the patient experience. PMID:27472971

  15. Partial Knee with Personalized Patient Care

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Oxford® Partial Knee with Signature™ Personalized Patient Care You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy and ...

  16. PATIENT EDUCATION ABUOT SELF CARE KNOWLEDGE IN CHF PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R DARYABEIGI

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cardiovascular disease are the major cause of mortality in developed countries. CHF is also a chronic cardiovascular disorder. Teaching the self care plays a major role in its prevention and chronic complications. Regarding the importance of self care investigating the, effect of self care education on the knowledge of the patients on CHF is so important. Methods. In this study 42 patients with CHF were selected in the first exam held 15 days before and after a two hour training class. A training booklet was given to them. Data was collected by a questionnarie which includ 5 section as follows. The 1st section included the demographic charactristics. The 2nd section, 7 questions about anatpmy and physiology of the heart, the 3rd section included eight questions about drugs history, the 4th section included nine questions about regimen of the patients and the 5th section included 6 questions about physical activity. Results. The self care knowledge of patients increased 95 percent after education. There was no correlation between the effects of self care education and the age of all units studied. Statistical tests showed no correlation between the effects of self care education and educational level. Discussion. The knowlegde of the patients is low regarding the self care. The self care education to patients is the main duty of nurses. So, it is recommended to be considered as the first nursing intervention regarding these patients.

  17. Transitions at the end of life for older adults - patient, carer and professional perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Hanratty, Barbara; Lowson, Elizabeth; Grande, Gunn; Payne, Sheila; Addington-Hall, Julia; Valtorta, Nicole; Seymour, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Background The end of life may be a time of high service utilisation for older adults. Transitions between care settings occur frequently, but may produce little improvement in symptom control or quality of life for patients. Ensuring that patients experience co-ordinated care, and moves occur because of individual needs rather than system imperatives, is crucial to patients’ well-being and to containing health-care costs. Objective The aim of this study was to understand the expe...

  18. Self-care in heart failure patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula da Conceição

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: to describe self-care behavior and its associated factors in a sample of heart failure Brazilian patients.Method: descriptive cross-sectional study with non-probabilistic sample of 116 ambulatory patients undergoing heart failure treatment. Self-care was evaluated using the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index, (scores ≥70 points=appropriate self-care. Association tests were applied, considering a descriptive level of 0.05.Results: the mean age of participants was 57.7 (SD =11.3 years; 54.3% were male; the mean schooling was 5.5 (SD = 4.0 years; and 74.1% had functional class II-III. The mean scores on the subscales of the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index indicated inappropriate self-care (self-care maintenance: 53.2 (SD =14.3, selfcare management: 50.0 (SD = 20.3 and self-care confidence: 52.6 (SD=22.7 and it was found low frequencies of participants with appropriate self-care (self-care maintenance, 6.9%, self-care management (14.7% and self-care confidence (19%. Higher scores of the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index were associated with: reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (p=0.001, longer time of experience with the disease (p=0.05 and joint monitoring by physician and nurse (p=0.007.Conclusion: investments are needed to improve the self-care behavior and the nursing can play a relevant role in this improvement.

  19. Retention in care, resource utilization, and costs for adults receiving antiretroviral therapy in Zambia: a retrospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Callie A.; Iyer, Hari S.; McCoy, Kelly; Moyo, Crispin; Long, Lawrence; Bruce A. Larson; Rosen, Sydney

    2014-01-01

    Background Of the estimated 800,000 adults living with HIV in Zambia in 2011, roughly half were receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). As treatment scale up continues, information on the care provided to patients after initiating ART can help guide decision-making. We estimated retention in care, the quantity of resources utilized, and costs for a retrospective cohort of adults initiating ART under routine clinical conditions in Zambia. Methods Data on resource utilization (antiretroviral [A...

  20. Dental care of patients with dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Nordenram, Gunilla

    1997-01-01

    Dental care of patients with dementia. Clinical and ethical considerations Gunilla Nordenram Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine Huddinge Hospital and School of Dentistry, Division of Geriatric Dentistry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, ISBN 91-628-2416-3 To establish guidelines for fair and proper oral care for patients with dementia, the following aims were specified: To develop an appropriate method for ana...

  1. Critical-care visitation: the patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Sonya R; Bernhardt-Tindal, Kim; Hart, Ann; Stepp, Amber; Henson, April

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine critically ill patients' satisfaction and preference with the restricted visiting hours in the critical-care units in a 435-bed acute-care hospital in North Carolina. The major aims of the study were to (1) identify the time that most patients preferred for visitation and (2) identify how often patients wanted to have visitors. This article discusses the findings of this study, one of which is that patients want more control over visitation. PMID:21135614

  2. Perceived barriers to mental health care and goal setting among depressed, community-dwelling older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark I Weinberger

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Mark I Weinberger1, Camila Mateo2, Jo Anne Sirey11Department of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College, White Plains, NY, USA; 2College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USAObjective: Older adults are particularly vulnerable to the deleterious effects of depression and tend to underutilize mental health services. The current study aims to characterize the perceived barriers to care and goal setting in a sample of depressed, community-dwelling older adults. Methods: We report on the association among perceived barriers to care, goal setting and accepting a mental health referral using a subset of data from a larger study. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 was used to assess depressive symptoms. Results: Forty-seven participants completed the study (Mean age = 82, SD = 7.8, 85% female. Accessing and paying for mental health treatment were the barriers most frequently cited by participants. Clinical improvement and improved socialization were most cited goals. In bivariate associations, participants who set goals (χ2 = 5.41, p = 0.02 and reported a logistic barrier (χ2 = 5.30, p = 0.02 were more likely to accept a mental health referral.Conclusion: Perceived barriers to care and goal setting appear to be central to accepting a mental health referral among community dwelling older, depressed adults. Developing interventions that can be used to increase mental health service utilization of older adults is necessary. Keywords: depression, older adults, community, perceived barriers to care

  3. Cancer patients, emergencies service and provision of palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Miranda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Objective: To describe the clinical and sociodemographic profile of cancer patients admitted to the Emergency Center for High Complexity Oncologic Assistance, observing the coverage of palliative and home care. Method: Cross sectional study including adult cancer patients admitted to the emergency service (September-December/2011 with a minimum length of hospital stay of two hours. Student’s t-test and Pearson chi-square test were used to compare the means. Results: 191 patients were enrolled, 47.6% elderly, 64.4% women, 75.4% from the city of Recife and greater area. The symptom prevalent at admission was pain (46.6%. 4.2% of patients were linked to palliative care and 2.1% to home care. The most prevalent cancers: cervix (18.3%, breast (13.6% and prostate (10.5%; 70.7% were in advanced stages (IV, 47.1%; 39.4% without any cancer therapy. Conclusion: Patients sought the emergency service on account of pain, probably due to the incipient coverage of palliative and home care. These actions should be included to oncologic therapy as soon as possible to minimize the suffering of the patient/family and integrate the skills of oncologists and emergency professionals.

  4. Caring for independent lives: geographies of caring for young adults with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Andrew

    2008-09-01

    This paper engages with the emerging disciplinary clash between 'care' and 'independence' within disability studies by examining the geography of home care for young adults with intellectual disabilities. The care system as a whole is viewed as central to disablist structures within disability studies (see Thomas, C. (2007). Sociologies of disability and illness: Contested ideas in disability studies and medical sociology. Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan.). However, despite the theorisation of dependency as being in antipathy to the goals of the disability movement, caregiving at home still continues to dominate community care. The paper attempts to address how family carers are 'caught-in-the-middle' between their 'duty' to care and at the same time, perpetuating dependency; the reality being that parents have to deal with issues of being overprotective and confronting various social assumptions about disability. It examines the narratives from 25 family caregivers in Ireland who provide personal assistance to young adults with intellectual disabilities. PMID:18573581

  5. Erectile dysfunction among diabetic patients in Saudi Arabia: A hospital-based primary care study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef A Al-Turki

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions: Complete (severe and partial erectile dysfunction was quite common among adult diabetic patients in a hospital-based primary care setting in Saudi Arabia. It is important for primary care physicians to diagnose erectile dysfunction in diabetic patients, and to counsel them early, as most patients are hesitant to discuss their concern during a consultation. Further studies are recommended to evaluate the effect of other risk factors on erectile dysfunction in diabetic patients.

  6. Provision of Transition Education and Referral Patterns from Pediatric Cardiology to Adult Cardiac Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbison, Anna L; Grady, Stafford; Chi, Kevin; Fernandes, Susan M

    2016-02-01

    ACC/AHA guidelines recommend a structured preparation for and transfer to adult-oriented cardiac care for adult survivors of pediatric onset heart disease (POHD). Given this, we sought to describe the transition and transfer practices for a cohort of young adults with POHD and to determine factors associated with successful transfer to adult-oriented cardiac care. We performed a single-center, retrospective chart review on patients ≥18 years of age, with POHD likely to require lifelong cardiac care, who were seen in outpatient pediatric cardiology (PC) between 2008 and 2011. Successful transfer was defined as the subsequent attendance at adult cardiology (AC) within 2 years of PC visit. We identified 118 patients who met study criteria. Mean age 22.4 ± 2.0 years, 59 % male, 64 % white and 40 % Hispanic. Mean transition education topics noted was 3.3 ± 1.8 out of 20 and covered the underlying cardiac disease (89 %), follow-up and current medications (56 %) and exercise limitations (34 %). Recommendations for follow-up were AC (57 %) and PC (33 %). Of those told to transfer to AC, 79 % successfully transferred. Characteristics of successful transfer included: prior cardiac surgery (p = 0.008), cardiac medication use (p = 0.006) and frequency of follow-up ≤1 year (p = 0.037). One-quarter of all subjects did not follow-up within at least 2 years. Despite published guidelines, transition education appears lacking and the approach to transfer to adult cardiac care is not consistent. Given the increased risk of morbidity and mortality in this patient population, standardization of transition education and transfer processes appear warranted. PMID:26385471

  7. Primary Care Endocrinology in the Adult Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Celeste C; Zeytinoglu, Meltem

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus, thyroid disorders, and osteoporosis are endocrine conditions affecting a significant proportion of women presenting to the obstetrician-gynecologist. Obstetrician-gynecologists are often the first health-care providers that young women see in adulthood, and thus, have a critical opportunity to identify women at risk for gestational and overt diabetes and manage the condition in those who have developed it. The obstetrician-gynecologist should be aware of the appropriate therapeutic options and treatment goals (eg, hemoglobin A1c) for women with diabetes. Thyroid disorders often present with menstrual irregularities or infertility, can affect pregnancy outcomes, and contribute to cardiovascular and bone disorders as women age. Finally, osteoporosis and low bone mineral density affect a substantial proportion of older women and some younger women with risk factors for secondary osteoporosis. The morbidity and mortality of osteoporotic fractures is substantial. There are many lifestyle interventions and therapeutic options available for these conditions, and the gynecologist plays a key role in optimizing risk factor assessment, screening, and providing treatment when appropriate. PMID:27212095

  8. Family Violence Among Older Adult Patients Consulting in Primary Care Clinics: Results From the ESA (Enquête sur la santé des aînés) Services Study on Mental Health and Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Préville, Michel; Mechakra-Tahiri, Samia Djemaa; Vasiliadis, Helen-Maria; Mathieu, Véronique; Quesnel, Louise; Gontijo-Guerra, Samantha; Lamoureux-Lamarche, Catherine; Berbiche, Djamal

    2014-01-01

    Objective To document the reliability and construct validity of the Family Violence Scale (FVS) in the older adult population aged 65 years and older. Method: Data came from a cross-sectional survey, the Enquête sur la santé des aînés et l’utilisation des services de santé (ESA Services Study), conducted in 2011–2013 using a probabilistic sample of older adults waiting for medical services in primary care clinics (n = 1765). Family violence was defined as a latent variable, coming from a spou...

  9. Stakeholder Perspectives on Changes in Hypertension Care Under the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    OpenAIRE

    O’Donnell, Alison J.; Bogner, Hillary R.; Cronholm, Peter F.; Kellom, Katherine; Miller-Day, Michelle; McClintock, Heather F. de Vries; Kaye, Elise M.; Gabbay, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hypertension is a major modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular and kidney disease, yet the proportion of adults whose hypertension is controlled is low. The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a model for care delivery that emphasizes patient-centered and team-based care and focuses on quality and safety. Our goal was to investigate changes in hypertension care under PCMH implementation in a large multipayer PCMH demonstration project that may have led to improvements in ...

  10. Patient satisfaction with in-centre haemodialysis care: an international survey

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Suetonia C; De Berardis, Giorgia; Craig, Jonathan C; Tong, Allison; Tonelli, Marcello; Pellegrini, Fabio; Ruospo, Marinella; Hegbrant, Jörgen; Wollheim, Charlotta; Celia, Eduardo; Gelfman, Ruben; Ferrari, Juan Nin; Törok, Marietta; Murgo, Marco; Leal, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate patient experiences of specific aspects of haemodialysis care across several countries. Design Cross-sectional survey using the Choices for Healthy Outcomes in Caring for End-Stage Renal Disease (CHOICE) questionnaire. Setting Haemodialysis clinics within a single provider in Europe and South America. Participants 2748 adults treated in haemodialysis. Primary and secondary outcomes The primary outcome was patient satisfaction with overall care. Secondary outcomes includ...

  11. Developing Navigation Competencies to Care for Older Rural Adults with Advanced Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggleby, Wendy; Robinson, Carole A; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Pesut, Barbara; Nekolaichuk, Cheryl; MacLeod, Roderick; Keating, Norah C; Santos Salas, Anna; Hallstrom, Lars K; Fraser, Kimberly D; Williams, Allison; Struthers-Montford, Kelly; Swindle, Jennifer

    2016-06-01

    Navigators help rural older adults with advanced illness and their families connect to needed resources, information, and people to improve their quality of life. This article describes the process used to engage experts - in rural aging, rural palliative care, and navigation - as well as rural community stakeholders to develop a conceptual definition of navigation and delineate navigation competencies for the care of this population. A discussion paper on the important considerations for navigation in this population was developed followed by a four-phased Delphi process with 30 expert panel members. Study results culminated in five general navigation competencies for health care providers caring for older rural persons and their families at end of life: provide patient/family screening; advocate for the patient/family; facilitate community connections; coordinate access to services and resources; and promote active engagement. Specific competencies were also developed. These competencies provide the foundation for research and curriculum development in navigation. PMID:27093177

  12. Research proposal: evaluation of ART in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanata, Régia Luzia

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) is to reduce the indication of tooth extraction by means of a low-cost technique. Considering the difficulties of Brazilian public services to meet the demand of care of the low-income population, with lack of care to the adult population, which usually receives only emergency care, the aim of this study is to assess the performance of high-viscosity glass ionomer cements accomplished by the modified atraumatic restorative treatment in one- and multiple-surface cavities, compared to the conventional restorative approach. It will be analyzed the clinical performance of the materials; cost (material and human resources); patient satisfaction with the treatment received; and preventive effect of treatment. PMID:19089083

  13. Surgonomics. Health care financing policy for hospitalized otolaryngology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, E; Zahtz, G; Goldstein, J; Benacquista, T; Mulloy, K; Wise, L

    1988-11-01

    The Medicare diagnosis related group (DRG) prospective payment model is changing hospital payment. Currently many states are using DRG prospective "All Payor Systems" for hospital reimbursement. In All Payor Systems, Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross, and other commercial insurers pay by the DRG mode; New York State has been All Payor since Jan 1, 1988. This study simulated DRG All Payor methods on a large sample (N = 1074) of adult otolaryngology patients for a two-year period using both federal and New York DRG reimbursement now in effect. Both Medicare and Medicaid patients had (on average) a longer hospital stay and total hospital cost compared with patients from Blue Cross and other commercial payors. Medicare and Medicaid patients also had a greater severity of illness compared with patients from Blue Cross or other payors. All payors (ie, Medicaid, Blue Cross, and commercial insurers), except Medicare, generated financial risk under the DRG All Payor scheme. These data suggest that state and private payors may be underreimbursing for the care of the hospitalized otolaryngology patient using the DRG prospective hospital payment scheme. Health care financing policy described in this study may limit both the access and/or the quality of care for many otolaryngology patients in the future. PMID:3139014

  14. Teaching Humane Care for Dying Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Elise L.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an elective, upper-level course on caring for terminally ill patients, designed for baccalaureate nursing students. Discusses the hospice concept and its background, course design, communication with dying patients and their families, and outcomes of the course as measured by a pretest and two posttests. (CH)

  15. Introducing Optometry Students to Clinical Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gable, Eileen M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the innovative content and structure of an introductory course on clinical patient care at the Illinois College of Optometry. Critiques its success based on student grades and feedback, concluding that it was successful in imparting skills of data analysis but had minimal impact on students' ability to empathize with patients. (EV)

  16. Translating Personality Psychology to Help Personalize Preventive Medicine for Young-Adult Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Israel, Salomon; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Belsky, Daniel W.; Hancox, Robert J; Poulton, Richie; Roberts, Brent; Thomson, W Murray; Caspi, Avshalom

    2014-01-01

    The rising number of newly insured young adults brought on by healthcare reform will soon increase demands on primary-care physicians. Physicians will face more young-adult patients which presents an opportunity for more prevention-oriented care. In the current study, we evaluated whether brief observer reports of young adults’ personality traits could predict which individuals would be at greater risk for poor health as they entered midlife. Following the Dunedin Study cohort of 1,000 indivi...

  17. Yoga in adult cancer: an exploratory, qualitative analysis of the patient experience

    OpenAIRE

    McCall, Marcy; Thorne, Sally; Ward, Alison; Heneghan, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Background Some patients receiving treatment in conventional health care systems access therapeutic yoga outside their mainstream care to improve cancer symptoms. Given the current knowledge gap around patient preferences and documented experiences of yoga in adult cancer, this study aimed to describe patient-reported benefits, barriers and characteristics of programming for yoga practice during conventional treatment. Methods In depth semi-structured interviews (n = 10) were conducted in men...

  18. Primary care providers' judgments of opioid analgesic misuse in a community-based cohort of HIV-infected indigent adults

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayaraghavan, M.; Penko, J; D. Guzman; Miaskowski, C; Kushel, MB

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care providers (PCPs) must balance treatment of chronic non-cancer pain with opioid analgesics with concerns about opioid misuse. OBJECTIVE: We co-enrolled community-based indigent adults and their PCPs to determine PCPs' accuracy of estimating opioid analgesic misuse and illicit substance use. DESIGN: Patient-provider dyad study. PARTICIPANTS: HIV-infected, community-based indigent adults ('patients') and their PCPs. MAIN MEASURES: Using structured interviews, we queried ...

  19. [Enriching patient care with aromatherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogno-Lalloz, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    There are increasing numbers of initiatives in healthcare institutions focusing on the benefits of essential oils. Received positively by patients who appreciate the resulting wellbeing, these innovative approaches around aromatherapy are based on the initiative of pioneering caregivers. Following on from an international congress held each year in Grasse, this article presents some example schemes. PMID:25065196

  20. Evaluating components of dental care utilization among adults with diabetes and matched controls via hurdle models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhari Monica

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About one-third of adults with diabetes have severe oral complications. However, limited previous research has investigated dental care utilization associated with diabetes. This project had two purposes: to develop a methodology to estimate dental care utilization using claims data and to use this methodology to compare utilization of dental care between adults with and without diabetes. Methods Data included secondary enrollment and demographic data from Washington Dental Service (WDS and Group Health Cooperative (GH, clinical data from GH, and dental-utilization data from WDS claims during 2002–2006. Dental and medical records from WDS and GH were linked for enrolees continuously and dually insured during the study. We employed hurdle models in a quasi-experimental setting to assess differences between adults with and without diabetes in 5-year cumulative utilization of dental services. Propensity score matching adjusted for differences in baseline covariates between the two groups. Results We found that adults with diabetes had lower odds of visiting a dentist (OR = 0.74, p  0.001. Among those with a dental visit, diabetes patients had lower odds of receiving prophylaxes (OR = 0.77, fillings (OR = 0.80 and crowns (OR = 0.84 (p 0.005 for all and higher odds of receiving periodontal maintenance (OR = 1.24, non-surgical periodontal procedures (OR = 1.30, extractions (OR = 1.38 and removable prosthetics (OR = 1.36 (p  Conclusions Patients with diabetes are less likely to use dental services. Those who do are less likely to use preventive care and more likely to receive periodontal care and tooth-extractions. Future research should address the possible effectiveness of additional prevention in reducing subsequent severe oral disease in patients with diabetes.

  1. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Heidi L.; Leykum, Luci K.; Mattison, Melissa L. P.; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Meltzer, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalists and others acute care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients (ACOP) Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through four steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a Partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of ten research questions in the following areas: advanced care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision-making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  2. Health care financing policy for hospitalized black patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, E; Johnson, H; Goldstein, J; Benacquista, T; Mulloy, K; Wise, L

    1988-09-01

    The Medicare diagnostic-related group (DRG) prospective payment model is changing hospital payment. Currently many states are using DRG prospective "all payer systems" for hospital reimbursement. In all payer systems, Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross, and other commercial insurers pay by the DRG mode; New York State has had an all payer system since January 1, 1988. This study simulated DRG all payer methods on a large sample (N = 6,134) of adult black medical and surgical patients for a three-year period using both federal and New York DRG reimbursement. Both Medicare and Medicaid patients had, on average, a longer hospital stay and total hospital cost compared with patients covered by Blue Cross and other commercial insurers. Medicare and Medicaid patients also had a greater severity of illness compared with those of Blue Cross and others. All insurers (ie, Medicaid, Blue Cross, Medicare, and commercial) generated substantial financial risk under the DRG all payer scheme. These data suggest that federal, state, and private payers may be under-reimbursing for the care of the hospitalized black patient using the DRG prospective hospital payment scheme. Health care financing policy such as that demonstrated in this study may limit both the access and quality of care for many black patients in the future. PMID:3149307

  3. Reimagining care for adolescent and young adult cancer programs: Moving with the times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Abha A; Papadakos, Janet K; Jones, Jennifer M; Amin, Leila; Chang, Eugene K; Korenblum, Chana; Mina, Daniel Santa; McCabe, Lianne; Mitchell, Laura; Giuliani, Meredith E

    2016-04-01

    Literature regarding the development of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer programs has been dominantly informed by pediatric centers and practitioners. However, the majority of young adults are seen and treated at adult cancer centers, in which cancer volumes afford the development of innovative supportive care services. Although the supportive care services in adult cancer centers are helpful to AYAs, some of the most prominent and distinct issues faced by AYAs are not adequately addressed through these services alone. This article describes how the AYA Program at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre has collaborated with existing supportive care services in addition to supplying its own unique services to meet the comprehensive needs of AYAs in the domains of: symptom management (sexuality and fatigue), behavior modification (return to work and exercise), and health services (advanced cancer and survivorship). These collaborations are augmented by patient education interventions and timely referrals. The objective of this article was to assist other centers in expanding existing services to address the needs of AYA patients with cancer. Cancer 2016;122:1038-1046. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26848554

  4. Children as partners with adults in their medical care

    OpenAIRE

    Alderson, P.; Sutcliffe, K; Curtis, K.

    2006-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the seldom published views of children with type 1 diabetes about their condition and ways in which they share in managing their medical and health care with adults. Methods: Semi-structured, tape recorded interviews, during 2003, with a purposive sample of 24 children aged 3–12 years who have type I diabetes and who attend two inner London hospitals and one hospital in a commuter town. Results: The children reported high levels of understanding, knowledge, and ...

  5. Access to Care Among Disabled Adults on Medicaid

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Sharon K.; Coughlin, Teresa A.; Kendall, Stephanie J.

    2002-01-01

    Although disabled individuals account for a disproportionate share of Medicaid expenditures, little is known about their health care needs and experiences. This article explores differences in access and use among key disability subgroups—adults with physical disabilities, mental illness, and mental retardation/development disabilities (MR/DD). We find that disabled Medicaid beneficiaries with mental illness and those with greater health and functional limitations face more difficulties in ob...

  6. Accessibility of mental health care for adults with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Pihlaja, Kimmo; Päivärinta, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to describe the accessibility in mental health care from the point of view of an adult with cerebral palsy. The theoretical framework of this thesis is constructed from the related literature and previous studies closely linked to the topic. Research was done to clarify the concepts of disability, cerebral palsy, and mental health. The research showed cerebral palsy as a multidimensional physical disability which may include different types of accompanying im...

  7. Patient Care Partnership: Understanding Expectations, Rights and Responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ` e Patient Care Partnership Understanding Expectations, Rights and Responsibilities What to expect during your hospital stay: • High ... e Patient Care Partnership Understanding Expectations, Rights and Responsibilities W hen you need hospital care, your doctor ...

  8. Perioperative Care of the Liver Transplant Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Mark T; Kramer, David J

    2016-07-01

    With the evolution of surgical and anesthetic techniques, liver transplantation has become "routine," allowing for modifications of practice to decrease perioperative complications and costs. There is debate over the necessity for intensive care unit admission for patients with satisfactory preoperative status and a smooth intraoperative course. Postoperative care is made easier when the liver graft performs optimally. Assessment of graft function, vigilance for complications after the major surgical insult, and optimization of multiple systems affected by liver disease are essential aspects of postoperative care. The intensivist plays a vital role in an integrated multidisciplinary transplant team. PMID:27339683

  9. A qualitative study of patient and family perceptions of chaplain presence during post-trauma care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Steven C; Hildebrand, Alice A

    2015-01-01

    Improving the provision of spiritual care to hospitalized patients requires understanding what patients look for from a hospital chaplain, and why. This qualitative study uses grounded theory methodology to analyze data from 25 interviews with adult patients and/or adult family members who received spiritual care in a large tertiary care hospital. Analysis reveals three key themes in chaplaincy care: the attributes valued in the chaplain's presence, the elements necessary to form relationship with the chaplain, and the role of the chaplain in helping patients to discover and express meaning in their experiences. The authors weave these three themes together into a grounded theory and propose an assessment model that incorporates psychological theory about human motivation, faith development, and the development of autonomy. An understanding of the proposed assessment model can guide chaplain interventions and benefit all members of the clinical care team. PMID:25793422

  10. Depression Care for Patients at Home (Depression CAREPATH): Home Care Depression Care Management Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce, Martha L; Raue, Patrick J.; Sheeran, Thomas; Reilly, Catherine; Pomerantz, Judith C.; Meyers, Barnett S.; Weinberger, Mark I.; Zukowski, Diane

    2011-01-01

    High levels of depressive symptoms are common and contribute to poorer clinical outcomes even in geriatric patients who are already taking antidepressant medication. The Depression CARE for PATients at Home (Depression CAREPATH) intervention was designed to meet the needs of medical and surgical patients who suffer from depression. The intervention’s clinical protocols are designed to guide clinicians in managing depression as part of routine home care.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of chiropractic care versus self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain

    OpenAIRE

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Sørensen, Jan; Vach, Werner; Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess whether primary sector healthcare in the form of chiropractic care is cost-effective compared with self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain, that is, a subgroup of patients with non-specific chest pain. Methods and results 115 adults aged 18–75 years with acute, non-specific chest pain of musculoskeletal origin were recruited from a cardiology department in Denmark. After ruling out acute coronary syndrome and receiving usual care, patients with musculoskelet...

  12. The Effect of Performance-Based Financial Incentives on Improving Patient Care Experiences: A Statewide Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Hector P. Rodriguez; Glahn, Ted; Elliott, Marc N.; Rogers, William H.; Safran, Dana Gelb

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patient experience measures are central to many pay-for-performance (P4P) programs nationally, but the effect of performance-based financial incentives on improving patient care experiences has not been assessed. METHODS The study uses Clinician & Group CAHPS data from commercially insured adult patients (n = 124,021) who had visits with 1,444 primary care physicians from 25 California medical groups between 2003 and 2006. Medical directors were interviewed to assess the magnitude ...

  13. Constraints faced by urban poor in managing diabetes care: patients' perspectives from South India

    OpenAIRE

    Bhojani, Upendra; Mishra, Arima; Amruthavalli, Subramani; Devadasan, Narayanan; Kolsteren, Patrick; De Henauw, Stefaan; Criel, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Background: Four out of five adults with diabetes live in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). India has the second highest number of diabetes patients in the world. Despite a huge burden, diabetes care remains suboptimal. While patients (and families) play an important role in managing chronic conditions, there is a dearth of studies in LMIC and virtually none in India capturing perspectives and experiences of patients in regard to diabetes care.Objective: The objective of this study was...

  14. Temporal Artery versus Bladder Thermometry during Adult Medical-Surgical Intensive Care Monitoring: An Observational Study

    OpenAIRE

    Stelfox Henry T; Straus Sharon E; Ghali William A; Conly John; Laupland Kevin; Lewin Adriane

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background We sought to evaluate agreement between a new and widely implemented method of temperature measurement in critical care, temporal artery thermometry and an established method of core temperature measurement, bladder thermometry as performed in clinical practice. Methods Temperatures were simultaneously recorded hourly (n = 736 observations) using both devices as part of routine clinical monitoring in 14 critically ill adult patients with temperatures ranging ≥1°C prior to ...

  15. Regulatory focus and adherence to self-care behaviors among adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraham, Rinat; Van Dijk, Dina; Simon-Tuval, Tzahit

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were, first, to test the association between regulatory focus of adults with type 2 diabetes and their adherence to two types of self-care behaviors - lifestyle change (e.g. physical activity and diet) and medical care regimens (blood-glucose monitoring, foot care and medication usage). Second, to explore whether a fit between the message framing and patients' regulatory focus would improve their intentions to adhere specifically when the type of behavior fits the patients' regulatory focus as well. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 130 adults with type 2 diabetes who were hospitalized in an academic medical center. The patients completed a set of questionnaires that included their diabetes self-care activities, regulatory focus, self-esteem and demographic, socioeconomic and clinical data. In addition, participants were exposed to either a gain-framed or a loss-framed message, and were then asked to indicate their intention to improve adherence to self-care behaviors. A multivariable linear regression model revealed that promoters reported higher adherence to lifestyle change behaviors than preventers did (B = .60, p = .028). However, no effect of regulatory focus on adherence to medical care regimens was found (B = .46, p = .114). In addition, preventers reported higher intentions to adhere to medical care behaviors when the message framing was congruent with prevention focus (B = 1.16, p = .023). However, promoters did not report higher intentions to adhere to lifestyle behaviors when the message framing was congruent with promotion focus (B = -.16, p = .765). These findings justify the need to develop tailor-made interventions that are adjusted to both patients' regulatory focus and type of health behavior. PMID:26576471

  16. Assessing the Quality of Diabetic Patients Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkis Vicente Sánchez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the actions of family doctors and nurses in this area is an indispensable requisite in order to achieve a comprehensive health care. Objective: to assess the quality of health care provided to diabetic patients by the family doctor in Abreus health area. Methods: a descriptive and observational study based on the application of tools to assess the performance of family doctors in the treatment of diabetes mellitus in the five family doctors consultation in Abreus health area from January to July 2011 was conducted. The five doctors working in these consultations, as well as the 172 diabetic patients were included in the study. At the same time, 172 randomly selected medical records were also revised. Through observation, the existence of some necessary material resources and the quality of their performance as well as the quality of medical records were evaluated. Patient criteria served to assess the quality of the health care provided. Results: scientific and technical training on diabetes mellitus has been insufficient; the necessary equipment for the appropriate care and monitoring of patients with diabetes is available; in 2.9% of medical records reviewed, interrogation appears in its complete form including the complete physical examination in 12 of them and the complete medical indications in 26. Conclusions: the quality of comprehensive medical care to diabetic patients included in the study is compromised. Doctors interviewed recognized the need to be trained in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetes in order to improve their professional performance and enhance the quality of the health care provided to these patients.

  17. Health care financing policy for hospitalized nephrology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, E; Barrau, L; Goldstein, J; Benacquista, T; Mulloy, K; Wise, L

    1988-12-01

    The Medicare diagnosis-related group (DRG) prospective payment system is now entering its 6th year, with no reported major adverse effects on the health status of the American people. Currently 13 states are using DRG prospective "all-payer systems" for hospital reimbursement; other state may adopt DRG all payer systems. In DRG all-payer systems, Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross, and other commercial insurers pay by the DRG mode; New York state has been all-payer since January 1, 1988. This study simulated DRG all-payer methods on a large sample (n = 558) of adult nephrology patients for a 2-year period using both federal and New York DRG reimbursements now in effect. Both Medicare and Medicaid patients had (on average) longer hospital lengths of stay and higher total hospital costs compared with patients from Blue Cross and other commercial payers. Medicare and Medicaid patients also had greater severity of illness than patients from Blue Cross or other payers. However, all payers (ie, Medicaid, Blue Cross, Medicare, and commercial insurers) generated significant financial risk under our DRG all-payer scheme. These data suggest that federal, state, and private payers may be underreimbursing for the care of hospitalized nephrology patients using the DRG prospective hospital payment scheme. As DRG payment rates are further reduced compared with the real hospital costs of treating patients, both the access to and the quality of care for many nephrology patients may be jeopardized. PMID:3143261

  18. Care of patients undergoing external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anxiety and associated depression suffered by most patients undergoing radiotherapy is discussed and the possibilities open to the nurse to encourage and reassure patients thus facilitating physical care are considered. The general symptoms of anorexia, nausea, tiredness, skin problems, alopecia, bonemarrow depresssion and rapid tumour destruction are described and nursing care prescribed. The side-effects which may occur following radiation of the brain, head and neck region, eyes, oesophagus, lung, abdomen, pelvis, bones, skin, spine, and spinal cord are considered from the nursing standpoint. The specialised subject of radiotherapy in children is discussed briefly. (U.K.)

  19. A review of statistical estimators for risk-adjusted length of stay: analysis of the Australian and new Zealand intensive care adult patient data-base, 2008–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran John L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the analysis of length-of-stay (LOS data, which is characteristically right-skewed, a number of statistical estimators have been proposed as alternatives to the traditional ordinary least squares (OLS regression with log dependent variable. Methods Using a cohort of patients identified in the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database, 2008–2009, 12 different methods were used for estimation of intensive care (ICU length of stay. These encompassed risk-adjusted regression analysis of firstly: log LOS using OLS, linear mixed model [LMM], treatment effects, skew-normal and skew-t models; and secondly: unmodified (raw LOS via OLS, generalised linear models [GLMs] with log-link and 4 different distributions [Poisson, gamma, negative binomial and inverse-Gaussian], extended estimating equations [EEE] and a finite mixture model including a gamma distribution. A fixed covariate list and ICU-site clustering with robust variance were utilised for model fitting with split-sample determination (80% and validation (20% data sets, and model simulation was undertaken to establish over-fitting (Copas test. Indices of model specification using Bayesian information criterion [BIC: lower values preferred] and residual analysis as well as predictive performance (R2, concordance correlation coefficient (CCC, mean absolute error [MAE] were established for each estimator. Results The data-set consisted of 111663 patients from 131 ICUs; with mean(SD age 60.6(18.8 years, 43.0% were female, 40.7% were mechanically ventilated and ICU mortality was 7.8%. ICU length-of-stay was 3.4(5.1 (median 1.8, range (0.17-60 days and demonstrated marked kurtosis and right skew (29.4 and 4.4 respectively. BIC showed considerable spread, from a maximum of 509801 (OLS-raw scale to a minimum of 210286 (LMM. R2 ranged from 0.22 (LMM to 0.17 and the CCC from 0.334 (LMM to 0.149, with MAE 2.2-2.4. Superior residual behaviour was

  20. Patterns of research utilization on patient care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lander Janice

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organizational context plays a central role in shaping the use of research by healthcare professionals. The largest group of professionals employed in healthcare organizations is nurses, putting them in a position to influence patient and system outcomes significantly. However, investigators have often limited their study on the determinants of research use to individual factors over organizational or contextual factors. Methods The purpose of this study was to examine the determinants of research use among nurses working in acute care hospitals, with an emphasis on identifying contextual determinants of research use. A comparative ethnographic case study design was used to examine seven patient care units (two adult and five pediatric units in four hospitals in two Canadian provinces (Ontario and Alberta. Data were collected over a six-month period by means of quantitative and qualitative approaches using an array of instruments and extensive fieldwork. The patient care unit was the unit of analysis. Drawing on the quantitative data and using correspondence analysis, relationships between various factors were mapped using the coefficient of variation. Results Units with the highest mean research utilization scores clustered together on factors such as nurse critical thinking dispositions, unit culture (as measured by work creativity, work efficiency, questioning behavior, co-worker support, and the importance nurses place on access to continuing education, environmental complexity (as measured by changing patient acuity and re-sequencing of work, and nurses' attitudes towards research. Units with moderate research utilization clustered on organizational support, belief suspension, and intent to use research. Higher nursing workloads and lack of people support clustered more closely to units with the lowest research utilization scores. Conclusion Modifiable characteristics of organizational context at the patient care unit

  1. [Palliative Care for Non-cancer Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegaki, Junichi

    2016-03-01

    Although palliative care has been developed and implemented as care for cancer pain, it is holistic care for suffering that includes physical, psychosocial and spiritual pain of life-threatening illness. It turned out that non-cancer patients in the end-stage are also suffering from various pain that should be treated as cancer patients. Trajectories of illness in non-cancer patients are with more gradual decline than those of cancer patients with steady progression and it is often difficult to make decision about end-of-life. The purpose of advance care planning was originally to help describe legal documents. This process is proved to contribute to improving QOL of patients and their families to discuss preference, hope, economic problems, spiritual question as well as medical treatment In Japan guideline of decision making process in end-of-life stage has been established. A program of communication training in end-of-life discussion has been made. Under current situation some comments on the role of anesthesiologists are also mentioned. PMID:27097506

  2. Cancer treatment, symptom monitoring, and self-care in adults: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Phoebe Dauz; Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Ducey, Kathleen; Badura, Jody; Boltz, Kristin D; Olberding, Karmen; Wingate, Anita; Williams, Arthur R

    2006-01-01

    A descriptive study was conducted on self-reported symptoms and self-care by 37 adults receiving chemotherapy primarily for leukemia, lymphomas, or breast cancer or radiation therapy for head and neck or lung cancers. The Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist and demographic and interview forms on self-care for identified symptoms were used. Severe symptoms on the Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist subscales fatigue, eating, nausea, pain, numbness in fingers/toes, hair loss, and constipation were reported by patients on chemotherapy. Those on radiation therapy reported severe symptoms on the eating, fatigue, skin changes, oropharynx, and constipation subscales.Self-care strategies were in the following categories, using complementary medicine as framework: diet/nutrition/lifestyle change (eg, use of nutritional supplements; modifications of food and of eating habits; naps, sleep, and rest); mind/body control (eg, relaxation methods, prayer, music, attending granddaughter's sports events); biologic treatments (vitamins); herbal treatments (green mint tea); and ethnomedicine (lime juice and garlic). The first category was predominantly used by patients in both treatment types. Medications were prescribed also to help control symptoms (eg, pain and nausea). Symptom monitoring and self-care for symptoms identified may be facilitated by the Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist; based on reported symptom severity, care providers may prioritize interventions. A larger study needs to be done on (a) the use of the Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist as a clinical tool to assess symptoms that oncology patients experience during therapy; (b) whether care providers, based on patient-reported symptom severity, can prioritize interventions--and how this influences the efficiency of care; (c) the self-care strategies used by patients on chemotherapy or radiation therapy or both; and (d) how useful these strategies are in alleviating symptoms. PMID:17006107

  3. Acute nursing care of the older adult with fragility hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maher, A.B.; Meehan, A.J.; Hertz, K.;

    2013-01-01

    The second part of this paper provides those who care for orthopaedic patients with evidence-supported international perspectives about acute nursing care of the older adult with fragility hip fracture. Developed by an international group of nurse experts and guided by a range of information from...... research and clinical practice, it focuses on nurse sensitive quality indicators during the acute hospitalisation for fragility hip fracture. Optimal care for the patient who has experienced such a fracture is the focus. This includes (in the first, earlier, part):. Pain. Delirium. and in this part....... Pressure Ulcers. Fluid Balance/Nutrition. Constipation/Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infection. Vigilant nursing assessment and prompt intervention may prevent the development of the complications we discuss. If they do occur and are identified early on, they may resolve with appropriate and timely...

  4. Changing the world of patient care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Bettan; Poulsen, Dorthe Varning; Hørdam, Britta

    2013-01-01

    Political and cultural visions for health care necessitate the need for transnational resources and services optimizing and supporting patients and their families. The project has its approach in an Interregional Project named Pro-hip. Lead partner is University College Zealand collaborating...... - Uncover possibilities and barriers in users perspective - Political and cultural visions in European countries Involving the target group - Testing platform and informatics - Moviemaking - Developing learning programs in collaboration with patient organizations Presentation and sharing: - Targetgroup...

  5. Managing the Patient with Pulmonary Hypertension: Specialty Care Centers, Coordinated Care, and Patient Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakinala, Murali M; Duncan, Maribeth; Wirth, Joel

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension remains a challenging condition to diagnose and manage. Decentralized care for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has led to shortcomings in the diagnosis and management of PAH. The Pulmonary Hypertension Association-sponsored Pulmonary Hypertension Care Center program is designed to recognize specialty centers capable of providing multidisciplinary and comprehensive care of PAH. Ideally, Pulmonary Hypertension Care Centers will comanage PAH patients with community-based practitioners and address the growing needs of this emerging population of long-term PAH patients. PMID:27443143

  6. Integrated Care for Older Adults Improves Perceived Quality of Care : Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Embrace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uittenbroek, Ronald J; Kremer, Hubertus P H; Spoorenberg, Sophie L W; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Wynia, Klaske

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: All community-living older adults might benefit from integrated care, but evidence is lacking on the effectiveness of such services for perceived quality of care. OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of Embrace, a community-based integrated primary care service, on perceived quality of care.

  7. Screening for alcohol and drug use disorders among adults in primary care: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilowsky DJ

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Daniel J Pilowsky1, Li-Tzy Wu21Departments of Epidemiology and Psychiatry, Columbia University, and the New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York City, NY, 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USABackground: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 supports integration of substance abuse interventions and treatments into the mainstream health care system. Thus, effective screening and intervention for substance use disorders in health care settings is a priority.Objective: This paper reviews the prevalence of alcohol and drug use disorders (abuse or dependence in primary care settings and emergency departments, as well as current screening tools and brief interventions.Methods: MEDLINE was searched using the following keywords: alcohol use, alcohol use disorder, drug use, drug use disorder, screening, primary care, and emergency departments. Using the related-articles link, additional articles were screened for inclusion. This review focuses on alcohol and drug use and related disorders among adults in primary care settings.Conclusion: Screening, brief intervention, and referral for treatment are feasible and effective in primary care settings, provided that funding for screening is available, along with brief interventions and treatment facilities to which patients can be referred and treated promptly.Keywords: brief intervention, emergency departments

  8. Effective dose conversion coefficients for health care provider exposed to pediatric and adult victims in radiological dispersal device incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an incident of radiological dispersal devices (RDD), health care providers will be exposed to the contaminated patients in the extended medical treatments. Assessment of potential radiation dose to the health care providers will be crucial to minimize their health risk. In this study, we compiled a set of conversion coefficients (mSv MBq−1 s−1) to readily estimate the effective dose from the time-integrated activity for the health care providers while they deal with internally contaminated patients at different ages. We selected Co-60, Ir-192, Am-241, Cs-137, and I-131 as the major radionuclides that may be used for RDD. We obtained the age-specific organ burdens after the inhalation of those radionuclides from the Dose and Risk Calculation Software (DCAL) program. A series of hybrid computational phantoms (1-, 5-, 10-, and 15 year-old, and adult males) were implemented in a general purpose Monte Carlo (MC) transport code, MCNPX v 2.7, to simulate an adult male health care provider exposed to contaminated patients at different ages. Two exposure scenarios were taken into account: a health care provider (a) standing at the side of patients lying in bed and (b) sitting face to face with patients. The conversion coefficients overall depended on radionuclides, the age of the patients, and the orientation of the patients. The conversion coefficient was greatest for Co-60 and smallest for Am-241. The dose from the 1 year-old patient phantom was up to three times greater than that from the adult patient phantom. The conversion coefficients were less dependent on the age of the patients in the scenario of a health care provider sitting face to face with patients. The dose conversion coefficients established in this study will be useful to readily estimate the effective dose to the health care providers in RDD events. (paper)

  9. Six-month survival and quality of life of intensive care patients with acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Nisula, Sara; Vaara, Suvi T; Kaukonen, Kirsi-Maija; Reinikainen, Matti; Koivisto, Simo-Pekka; Inkinen, Outi; Poukkanen, Meri; Tiainen, Pekka; Pettilä, Ville; Korhonen, Anna-Maija

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) has high incidence among the critically ill and associates with dismal outcome. Not only the long-term survival, but also the quality of life (QOL) of patients with AKI is relevant due to substantial burden of care regarding these patients. We aimed to study the long-term outcome and QOL of patients with AKI treated in intensive care units. Methods We conducted a predefined six-month follow-up of adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients from the prospect...

  10. HOME CARE IN CYSTIC-FIBROSIS PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANAALDEREN, WMC; MANNES, GPM; BOSMA, ES; ROORDA, RJ; HEYMANS, HSA

    1995-01-01

    Intravenous antibiotics and enteral tube feeding at home for the treatment of pulmonary exacerbations and underweight condition in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have become tools that are used in many cystic fibrosis centres, The experience with home care programmes from different countries is quite

  11. Intensive care for the adult population in Ireland: a multicentre study of intensive care population demographics

    OpenAIRE

    ,

    2008-01-01

    Introduction This prospective observational study was conducted to describe the nature of the intensive care population across Ireland, identify adherence to international benchmarks of practice, and describe patient outcomes in critically ill patients. Methods A prospective observational multicentre study of demographics and organ failure incidence was carried out over a 10-week period in 2006 across the intensive care units (ICUs) of 14 hospitals in both the Republic and Northern Ireland. R...

  12. Satisfaction with care in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchgessner, J; Perera-Chang, M; Klinkner, G; Soley, I; Marcelli, D; Arkossy, O; Stopper, A; Kimmel, P L

    2006-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important aspect of dialysis care, only recently evaluated in clinical studies. We developed a tool to assess peritoneal dialysis (PD) customer satisfaction, and sought to evaluate and validate the Customer Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ), quantifying PD patient satisfaction. The CSQ included questions regarding administrative issues, Delivery Service, PD Training, Handling Requests, and transportation. The study was performed using interviews in all Hungarian Fresenius Medical Care dialysis centers offering PD. CSQ results were compared with psychosocial measures to identify if patient satisfaction was associated with perception of social support and illness burden, or depression. We assessed CSQ internal consistency and validity. Factor analysis explored potential underlying dimensions of the CSQ. One hundred and thirty-three patients treated with PD for end-stage renal disease for more than 3 months were interviewed. The CSQ had high internal consistency. There was high patient satisfaction with customer service. PD patient satisfaction scores correlated with quality of life (QOL) and social support measures, but not with medical or demographic factors, or depressive affect. The CSQ is a reliable tool to assess PD customer satisfaction. PD patient satisfaction is associated with perception of QOL. Efforts to improve customer satisfaction may improve PD patients' quantity as well as QOL. PMID:16900092

  13. [Adult patients with congenital heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabitz, R G; Kaemmerer, H; Mohr, F-W

    2013-01-01

    Unlike a few decades ago, today most patients with congenital heart disease reach adulthood after intervention or reparative surgery. As complete correction is generally not possible, a patient population with great complexity and a particular challenge to medical management is rising and a regular follow-up is mandatory. The aim of care is the timely recognition of residual or associated problems. Frequency and intensity of follow-up examinations depend on type and complexity of the lesion. The standard repertoire at follow-up consists of a specific history, clinical examination, ECG, Holter-monitoring, exercise tests, and echocardiography. Depending on the indication, cardio-MRI, CT scan, and sophisticated cardiac catheterization may become necessary. Long-term complications like rhythm disturbances, pulmonary hypertension, or heart failure are frequent, despite optimal care. Acute complications like arrhythmias, infective endocarditis, cerebral events, cerebral abscesses, aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and bleeding have to be recognized early and treated appropriately. Additional focus has to be placed on counseling and management of noncardiac disease and surgery, pregnancy and delivery, exercise at work and in private life, driving, and insurance issues. Training and certification of physicians as well as the establishment of specialized centers will help to ensure high quality health care for the affected patient population. PMID:23318541

  14. Willingness to Favor Aggressive Care and Live with Disability Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Survey of Healthy Young Adults in Hawai‘i

    OpenAIRE

    Nakagawa, Kazuma; Obana, Kyle K

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health problem that significantly impacts young adults. Since severe TBI patients lack decision-making capacity, the providers and patient surrogates are often faced with the challenging task of deciding whether to continue with aggressive life-prolonging care or to transition to comfort-focused care with an expected outcome of natural death. The assumption is often made that aggressive care is appropriate for young patients who suffer severe TBI...

  15. Prevalence of oral pain and barriers to use of emergency oral care facilities among adult Tanzanians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahabuka Febronia

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral pain has been the major cause of the attendances in the dental clinics in Tanzania. Some patients postpone seeing the dentist for as long as two to five days. This study determines the prevalence of oral pain and barriers to use of emergency oral care in Tanzania. Methods Questionnaire data were collected from 1,759 adult respondents aged 18 years and above. The study area covered six urban and eight rural study clusters, which had been selected using the WHO Pathfinder methodology. Chi-square tests and logistic regression analyses were performed to identify associations. Results Forty two percent of the respondents had utilized the oral health care facilities sometimes in their lifetime. About 59% of the respondents revealed that they had suffered from oral pain and/or discomfort within the twelve months that preceded the study, but only 26.5% of these had sought treatment from oral health care facilities. The reasons for not seeking emergency care were: lack of money to pay for treatment (27.9%; self medication (17.6%; respondents thinking that pain would disappear with time (15.7%; and lack of money to pay for transport to the dental clinic (15.0%. Older adults were more likely to report that they had experienced oral pain during the last 12 months than the younger adults (OR = 1.57, CI 1.07–1.57, P dental clinics far from home (OR = 5.31, CI = 2.09–13.54, P and being treated by traditional healer (OR = 5.31, CI = 2.25–12.49, P as reasons for not seeking emergency care from the oral health care facilities than their counterparts from urban areas. Conclusion Oral pain and discomfort were prevalent among adult Tanzanians. Only a quarter of those who experienced oral pain or discomfort sought emergency oral care from oral health care facilities. Self medication was used as an alternative to using oral care facilities mainly by rural residents. Establishing oral care facilities in rural areas is recommended.

  16. [Oncologic after-care--a patient-oriented concept. Basic diagnostic plan for pediatric oncology patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffner, U; Sauter, S; Bergsträsser, E; Brandis, M; Niemeyer, C

    1995-01-01

    With intensive treatment many children and young adults with cancer can be cured of their disease. Therefore, the recognition of late effects of therapy will become increasingly important. Future concepts of follow-up care in pediatric oncology will have to serve two purposes: First, to determine the status of the malignant disease with early diagnosis of relapse and second, to recognize relevant side effects of treatment. We present a comprehensive approach of follow-up care which is primarily based on the definition of risk criteria for the development of relevant organ toxicity after different treatment modalities. For each patient a standardized summary of therapy delivered is documented. According to the definition of the risk criteria an individualized schedule for follow-up is decided upon. We hope that this structured concept will result in appropriate patient care while keeping the diagnostic efforts and costs limited. PMID:7564151

  17. Carepaths: a framework for quality patient care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: The goals of a carepath are to provide a framework for quality patient care, enhance collaborative practice, improve resource utilization, and increase patient satisfaction. Carepaths are designed to move the patient toward specific clinical outcomes, which have been defined by a multidisciplinary team. Carepaths enhance the quality improvement process by tracking clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. The purpose of this report is to share the 1996 results of our breast cancer carepath. Methods: In 1994 the multidisciplinary Quality Improvement Committee of the Division of Radiation Oncology constructed a carepath for women with breast cancer receiving breast or chest wall radiation. Eleven clinical outcomes were defined which reflected the educational and selfcare focus of the carepath. Recording on the carepath of patient attainment of the outcomes was done by the RN, RTT and MD. Patient satisfaction tools were designed by the quality improvement committee in conjunction with the Department of Marketing Support. Each patient was given a written survey at two points along the carepath: post simulation and post treatment. Results: Ninety-five women were placed on the breast carepath in 1996. Outcomes were reviewed for 40 of these carepaths. The return rate of patient satisfaction surveys post simulation and post treatment approached 99%. Overall satisfaction was high with 76% of patients feeling 'very satisfied' with the simulation process and 93% 'very satisfied' with the treatment experience. Common themes noted in anecdotes related to comfort and privacy issues. Conclusions: Based on our experience, carepaths facilitated the structuring of a comprehensive and collaborative approach to patient care. Strategies for process improvement were guided by the ongoing surveillance of clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction

  18. Promoting Patient- and Family-Centered Care Through Personal Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Beverley H

    2016-03-01

    Patient- and family-centered care is an approach to the planning, delivery, and evaluation of health care that is grounded in mutually beneficial partnerships among patients, their families, and health care professionals. It redefines the relationships in health care by placing an emphasis on collaborating with patients of all ages, and their families, at all levels of care, in all health care settings, and in organizational change and improvement. This collaboration ensures that health care is responsive to an individual's priorities, preferences, and values. In patient- and family-centered care, patients define their "family" and determine how they and their family will participate in care and decision making. While patient- and family-centered care can improve the experience of care, safety, and quality, it also can improve the learning environment for students and trainees. The author shares personal stories to illustrate the core concepts of patient- and family-centered care, when they are present in health care interactions, and when they are not. Drawing from these stories and the author's experience in working with academic medical centers and other health care organizations over many decades, recommendations for changes in medical education are suggested that can contribute to the development of a health care workforce with the skills and commitment to partner respectfully, effectively, and authentically with patients and families. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act gives new impetus for building a health care delivery system and related educational programs to support patient- and family-centered practice. PMID:26796094

  19. Nursing care mapping for patients at risk of falls in the Nursing Interventions Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa de Freitas Luzia; Miriam de Abreu Almeida; Amália de Fátima Lucena

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Identifying the prescribed nursing care for hospitalized patients at risk of falls and comparing them with the interventions of the Nursing Interventions Classifications (NIC). Method: A cross-sectional study carried out in a university hospital in southern Brazil. It was a retrospective data collection in the nursing records system. The sample consisted of 174 adult patients admitted to medical and surgical units with the Nursing Diagnosis of Risk for falls. The prescribed care we...

  20. Mapping the nursing care with the NIC for patients in risk for pressure ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Gabriela Silva Pereira; Cássia Teixeira dos Santos; Dóris Baratz Menegon; Bruna Schroeder Mello; Fernanda Azambuja; Amália de Fátima Lucena

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To identify the nursing care prescribed for patients in risk for pressure ulcer (PU) and to compare those with the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) interventions. Method: Cross mapping study conducted in a university hospital. The sample was composed of 219 adult patients hospitalized in clinical and surgical units. The inclusion criteria were: score ≤ 13 in the Braden Scale and one of the nursing diagnoses, Self-Care deficit syndrome, Impaired physical mobility, Impaired ...

  1. Appropriate Application of Evidence to the Care of Elderly Patients with Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Elbert S.

    2007-01-01

    Modern diabetes care may benefit a significant proportion of adults living with diabetes; however, these benefits may not be consistently realized among the heterogeneous subpopulation of elderly patients over 65 years of age. There are three clinical constraints that have been proposed as important considerations for individualizing diabetes care among elderly patients. Life expectancy should be an important determinant of the intensity of glucose control because intensive control has been f...

  2. Objectively Measured Activity Patterns among Adults in Residential Aged Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Reid

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the feasibility of using the activPAL3TM activity monitor, and, to describe the activity patterns of residential aged care residents. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Randomly selected aged care facilities within 100 km of the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. Participants: Ambulatory, older (≥60 years residential aged care adults without cognitive impairment. Measurements: Feasibility was assessed by consent rate, sleep/wear diary completion, and through interviews with staff/participants. Activity patterns (sitting/lying, standing, and stepping were measured via activPAL3TM monitors worn continuously for seven days. Times spent in each activity were described and then compared across days of the week and hours of the day using linear mixed models. Results: Consent rate was 48% (n = 41. Activity patterns are described for the 31 participants (mean age 84.2 years who provided at least one day of valid monitor data. In total, 14 (45% completed the sleep/wear diary. Participants spent a median (interquartile range of 12.4 (1.7 h sitting/lying (with 73% of this accumulated in unbroken bouts of ≥30 min, 1.9 (1.3 h standing, and 21.4 (36.7 min stepping during their monitored waking hours per day. Activity did not vary significantly by day of the week (p ≥ 0.05; stepping showed significant hourly variation (p = 0.018. Conclusions: Older adults in residential aged care were consistently highly sedentary. Feasibility considerations for objective activity monitoring identified for this population include poor diary completion and lost monitors.

  3. Adults ages 50-64 and the Affordable Care Act of 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sara R; Doty, Michelle M; Garber, Tracy

    2010-12-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which will provide health insurance to nearly all U.S. citizens and improve the quality of health insurance, will particularly benefit adults ages 50 to 64, a group suffering from extended unemployment and a loss of employer health benefits. Several early provisions that go into effect in 2010, including preexisting condition insurance plans, will provide transitional assistance for adults who have struggled to gain health insurance. The biggest improvements will come in 2014 through a significant expansion in eligibility for Medicaid and the creation of health insurance exchanges with subsidized private insurance for people with low and moderate incomes. Of the 8.6 million adults ages 50 to 64 who were uninsured in 2009, up to 6.8 million may gain subsidized insurance through Medicaid and the exchanges and 1.4 million with higher incomes will have access to comprehensive health plans with new consumer protections. PMID:21155372

  4. Advance Directives And Nursing Home Stays Associated With Less Aggressive End-Of-Life Care For Severe Dementia Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas, Lauren Hersch; Bynum, Julie P. W.; Weir, David R.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.; Langa, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    The number of older adults with cognitive impairment is increasing, and such adults often require a surrogate to make decisions about health care. However, little is known about the aggressiveness of end-of-life care for these people, especially those who reside in the community. We found that cognitive impairment is common among older adults approaching the end of life, whether they live in the community or a nursing home, and that nearly 30 percent of patients with severe dementia remained ...

  5. Rheumatoid arthritis patients' experience of climate care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaks, Katrin; Sjöström, Rita

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand and examine how patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience climate care and its effects. A qualitative approach was chosen for the study. Two men and six women were interviewed according to a semistructured interview guide. The text was analyzed using a manifest content analysis. The analysis resulted in four categories and 10 subcategories. The interviewees experienced climate care positively. The training was perceived increasing gradually. The patients felt that they performed to a maximum capacity during training and were impressed by the staff's enthusiasm and encouragement. The patients felt that they were involved in the goal setting and the choice of treatment, and the staff noticed individual needs. There was a feeling among the patients of being acknowledged by the staff. Information about the disease was perceived as individualized. The climate and beautiful surroundings were viewed as encouraging physical activity and a feeling of well-being. Patients made new friends, had fun together and also shared experiences about their disease. Furthermore, the patients described a sense of belonging to a group as well as a feeling of not being the only one that was sick among the healthy. Not having to do everyday tasks and having time to themselves were perceived positively. Several factors contributed to the positive experiences of climate care; climate, environment, physical activity, social context, staff involvement, and information about the disease were described as interacting together and resulting in a sense of well-being. A proposal for future research would be to examine if/how the various factors might interact and affect the RA patients' illness and quality of life. PMID:26730385

  6. Integration and continuity of Care in health care network models for frail older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veras, Renato Peixoto; Caldas, Célia Pereira; da Motta, Luciana Branco; de Lima, Kenio Costa; Siqueira, Ricardo Carreño; Rodrigues, Renata Teixeira da Silva Vendas; Santos, Luciana Maria Alves Martins; Guerra, Ana Carolina Lima Cavaletti

    2014-01-01

    A detailed review was conducted of the literature on models evaluating the effectiveness of integrated and coordinated care networks for the older population. The search made use of the following bibliographic databases: Pubmed, The Cochrane Library, LILACS, Web of Science, Scopus and SciELO. Twelve articles on five different models were included for discussion. Analysis of the literature showed that the services provided were based on primary care, including services within the home. Service users relied on the integration of primary and hospital care, day centers and in-home and social services. Care plans and case management were key elements in care continuity. This approach was shown to be effective in the studies, reducing the need for hospital care, which resulted in savings for the system. There was reduced prevalence of functional loss and improved satisfaction and quality of life on the part of service users and their families. The analysis reinforced the need for change in the approach to health care for older adults and the integration and coordination of services is an efficient way of initiating this change. PMID:24897058

  7. Dental care for the deaf pediatric patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat K Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Great strides have been accomplished recently in providing better medical services for handicapped children. As the dentist begins to understand the complexity of each particular form of handicap and its characteristics, he is able to plan more efficiently for satisfactory treatment. Because many dentists do not understand deafness and the unique problems that deaf children exhibit, inadequate dental care for deaf children still ensues. Handicapped persons are at a greater risk for dental disease, for the most part, because of greater neglect or poor oral hygiene and access to routine dental care. Deaf patients in particular often fail to obtain needed care because of communication difficulties experienced in the treatment situation.

  8. Who Are the Clients?: Goal Displacement in an Adult Care Center for Elders with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Corey M.

    2009-01-01

    This ethnographic study of "goal displacement" in an adult day care center explains how and why certain goals come to surpass others in the organizational practices of elder day care settings. Adult day care is often oriented towards providing family caregivers with respite rather than attempting to directly improve the lives of the elders…

  9. Brief Report: The Medical Care of Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders--Identifying the Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Mary Beth; Kerins, Gerard; Mazzarella, Cynthia; Sims, Jessica; Stein, Neil

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of information concerning adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), especially with regards to their access to health care. A paper and electronic survey was sent to 1,580 primary care physicians in Connecticut. 346 respondents returned a survey and provided care to adults with an ASD. This physician survey provides data on…

  10. Caring for risky patients: duty or virtue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, T

    2008-06-01

    The emergence several years ago of SARS, with its high rate of infection and death among healthcare workers, resurrected a recurring ethical question: do health professionals have a duty to provide care to patients with deadly infectious diseases, even at some substantial risk to themselves and their families? The conventional answer, repeated on the heels of the SARS epidemic, is that they do. In this paper, I argue that the arguments in support of such a duty are wanting in significant respects, and that the language of duty is simply not adequate to an understanding of all the moral dimensions of professional responses to the care of risky patients. Instead, we should speak the language of virtues and ideals if we want to do justice to the complexity of such harrowing circumstances. PMID:18511620

  11. Specialised care in patients undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Gouma, D. J.; Busch, O.R.C.; Tol, J.A.M.G.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies the controversies in the management of patients with pancreatic cancer undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy and determines different factors that will improve this management and thereby the postoperative outcomes. The studies were performed in both the pre-, peri- and postoperative phase. The improvement of preoperative care is analysed by studying the impact of preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) by using metal stents instead of plastic stents, whether the type of stent infl...

  12. Changing education to improve patient care

    OpenAIRE

    Leach, D.

    2001-01-01

    Health professionals need competencies in improvement skills if they are to contribute usefully to improving patient care. Medical education programmes in the USA have not systematically taught improvement skills to residents (registrars in the UK). The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has recently developed and begun to deploy a competency based model for accreditation that may encourage the development of improvement skills by the 100 000 residents in accredited ...

  13. Crew Management Processes Revitalize Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, two physicians, former NASA astronauts, created LifeWings Partners LLC in Memphis, Tennessee and began using Crew Resource Management (CRM) techniques developed at Ames Research Center in the 1970s to help improve safety and efficiency at hospitals. According to the company, when hospitals follow LifeWings? training, they can see major improvements in a number of areas, including efficiency, employee satisfaction, operating room turnaround, patient advocacy, and overall patient outcomes. LifeWings has brought its CRM training to over 90 health care organizations and annual sales have remained close to $3 million since 2007.

  14. Primary health care to patients with gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vladimirovna Sklyanova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gout is a systemic tophaceous disease that is becoming more and more prevalent. If untreated or poorly managed, gout can result in disability. The possible reason for inadequate gout control may be that the primary care physicians are unaware of diagnostic criteria and clinical guidelines for the management of these patients and diagnostic errors. Objective: to estimate the level of gout knowledge in primary care physicians. Subjects and methods. Fifty Irkutsk local therapists were questioned. A specially developed anonymous questionnaire included items on sex, age, work experience, and the principles of gout diagnosis and treatment. Results. Only 42% of the therapists know that the gold standard for diagnosis of gout is identification of monosodium urate crystals by polarizing microscopy. Only 6% of the therapists use the Wallace classification criteria for the early diagnosis of gout. 56 % of the physicians consider it possible to prescribe allopurinol in the acute period of the disease 26% think that allopurinol intake can be stopped after normouricemia is achieved; 10% of the physicians do not prescribe allopurinol for gout patients. These widespread errors lead to worsening arthritis and a negative attitude of patients towards allopurinol treatment in future. Conclusion. The findings suggest that the level of gout knowledge should be increased in primary care physicians.

  15. Primary health care to patients with gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vladimirovna Sklyanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gout is a systemic tophaceous disease that is becoming more and more prevalent. If untreated or poorly managed, gout can result in disability. The possible reason for inadequate gout control may be that the primary care physicians are unaware of diagnostic criteria and clinical guidelines for the management of these patients and diagnostic errors. Objective: to estimate the level of gout knowledge in primary care physicians. Subjects and methods. Fifty Irkutsk local therapists were questioned. A specially developed anonymous questionnaire included items on sex, age, work experience, and the principles of gout diagnosis and treatment. Results. Only 42% of the therapists know that the gold standard for diagnosis of gout is identification of monosodium urate crystals by polarizing microscopy. Only 6% of the therapists use the Wallace classification criteria for the early diagnosis of gout. 56 % of the physicians consider it possible to prescribe allopurinol in the acute period of the disease 26% think that allopurinol intake can be stopped after normouricemia is achieved; 10% of the physicians do not prescribe allopurinol for gout patients. These widespread errors lead to worsening arthritis and a negative attitude of patients towards allopurinol treatment in future. Conclusion. The findings suggest that the level of gout knowledge should be increased in primary care physicians.

  16. Clowning in Health Care Settings: The Point of View of Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionigi, Alberto; Canestrari, Carla

    2016-08-01

    Within the past decade, there has been a surge of interest in investigating the effects of clown intervention in a large variety of clinical settings. Many studies have focused on the effects of clown intervention on children. However, few studies have investigated clowning effects on adults. This paper presents an overview of the concept of medical clowning followed by a literature review conducted on the empirical studies drawn from three data bases (PubMed, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar), with the aim of mapping and discussing the evidence of clowning effects on non-children, namely adults. The following areas were investigated: Adult and elderly patients (mainly those with dementia), observers of clowning, namely non-hospitalized adults who are at the hospital as relatives of patients or health-care staff, and finally clowns themselves. The main results are that 1) clown intervention induces positive emotions, thereby enhancing the patient's well-being, reduces psychological symptoms and emotional reactivity, and prompts a decrease in negative emotions, such as anxiety and stress; 2) clown doctors are also well-perceived by relatives and healthcare staff and their presence appears to be useful in creating a lighter atmosphere in the health setting; 3) few pilot studies have been conducted on clown doctors and this lacuna represents a subject for future research. PMID:27547261

  17. Effect of Organizational Culture on Patient Access, Care Continuity, and Experience of Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Dorothy; Chung, Sukyung; Martinez, Meghan; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined relationships between organizational culture and patient-centered outcomes in primary care. Generalized least squares regression was used to analyze patient access, care continuity, and reported experiences of care among 357 physicians in 41 primary care departments. Compared with a "Group-oriented" culture, a "Rational" culture type was associated with longer appointment wait times, and both "Hierarchical" and "Developmental" culture types were associated with less care continuity, but better patient experiences with care. Understanding the unique effects of organizational culture can enhance the delivery of more patient-centered care. PMID:27232685

  18. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Older Adults with Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Therapist Manual for Primary Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Melinda A.; Diefenbach, Gretchen J.; Hopko, Derek R.

    2004-01-01

    At least four academic clinical trials have demonstrated the utility of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). These data may not generalize, however, to more heterogeneous and functionally impaired patients and the medical settings in which they typically receive care. A recent pilot project…

  19. Patient Navigation Through the Cancer Care Continuum: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins, Janice; Mumber, Matthew P.

    2009-01-01

    Technologic advances, medical specialization, novel payment structures, and an increased scientific knowledge base have resulted in a health care system requiring trained experts to deliver guidance as patients complete care plans: Enter the concept of patient navigation.

  20. Is personality a determinant of patient satisfaction with hospital care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.J. Hendriks; E.M.A. Smets; M.R. Vrielink; S.Q. van Es; J.C.J.M. de Haes

    2006-01-01

    Objective. We investigated to what extent personality is associated with patient satisfaction with hospital care. A sizeable association with personality would render patient satisfaction invalid as an indicator of hospital care quality. Design. Overall satisfaction and satisfaction with aspects of

  1. 76 FR 44573 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service Payment Rates, and Administrative Reimbursement Rates for Sponsoring Organizations of Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2011 Through June 30, 2012 Correction In notice document...

  2. What is supportive when an adult next-of-kin is in critical care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Ingrid; Fridlund, Bengt; Hildingh, Cathrine

    2005-01-01

    There is little documented knowledge about what is supportive from the perspective of relatives with a critically ill next-of-kin in the intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of the present study was to generate a theoretical understanding of what relatives experience as supportive when faced with the situation of having an adult next-of-kin admitted to critical care. The study was designed using a grounded theory methodology. Interviews were conducted with 29 adult relatives of adult ICU patients in southwest Sweden. Relatives described the need to be empowered and that support was needed to enable them to use both internal and external resources to cope with having a next-of-kin in critical care. To achieve empowerment, the relatives described the need to trust in oneself, to encounter charity and to encounter professionalism. The findings can contribute understanding and sensitivity to the situation of the relatives as well as indicating what form social support should take. It is essential that healthcare professionals understand how important it is for relatives to have control over their vulnerable situation and that they also reflect upon how they would like to be treated themselves in a similar situation. Recommendations for future practice are presented. PMID:16255336

  3. Dental care of patients with substance abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, K

    1999-07-01

    Patients who abuse alcohol, crack, heroin or prescription drugs, are likely to interact with the dental professional. The dentist should therefore be able to identify problems of abuse and provide informed care and referral. Substance abuse should be a consideration in all patients who present with dental trauma and those who present with frequent vague complaints, multiple pain medication allergies, and regimens with multiple narcotic medications. Polydrug use, either prescription or illicit, is also a possibility, and effective treatment requires prompt recognition. Dentists should be alert to drug-seeking behavior within the context of pain management, and because pain severity is an objective experience, each patient must be treated carefully and sensitively. Unrelieved or unremitting pain can be a relapse trigger and therefore adequate pain control is a necessity in the recovering chemically dependent patient. New modalities, such as coanalgesia with low-dose ketamine in the opioid addicted have been shown to work effectively. In the post-dental surgical patient with chemical dependency, agents with less psychoactive activity than their drugs of abuse, such as extended-release morphine (MS Contin) have been tried with variable success. An informed treatment plan includes recognition of substance abuse, appropriate intervention, and referral. This plan may include universal screening, followed by brief interventional therapy for positive patients and in some cases, pharmacological pain control. On discharge from the office, instructions concerning referral to a substance abuse program or, in the case of the patient who may require more immediate treatment, to the emergency department are important. PMID:10516924

  4. Optimization of health-care organization and perceived improvement of patient comfort by switching from intra-venous BU four-times-daily infusions to a once-daily administration scheme in adult hematopoietic stem cell recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhaard, A; Rzepecki, P; Valcarcel, D; Santarone, S; Fürst, S; Serrano, D; De Angelis, G; Krüger, W; Scheid, C

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have shown an equivalent pharmacokinetic profile between four-times-daily (4QD) and once-daily (QD) administration of intra-venous (IV) BU, without increased toxicity. We assess the impact of a switch in IV BU from a 4QD to a QD schedule, in terms of health-care organization, staff working conditions, quality of care dispensed and perceived patient comfort. Clinicians, nurses and pharmacists from nine allogeneic transplantation units in five European countries were interviewed face to face. Overall perception of QD versus 4QD BU was very positive. Both administration schemes were evaluated to be equally efficaciousZ. QD BU was perceived to be safer and more convenient. Clinicians and nurses perceived that patient comfort was improved, due to fewer complications associated with repeated infusions, and avoiding night infusions associated with stress, anxiety and decreased quality of sleep. Switching from 4QD to QD BU had a significant impact on health-care organization, with a better integration in the overall management and usual timelines in the pharmacies and transplantation units. Time spent to prepare and administer BU was significantly reduced, leading to potential financial savings that merit further assessment and would be of particular interest in the current economic climate. PMID:24419513

  5. Making the Hospital Safer for Older Adult Patients: A Focus on the Indwelling Urinary Catheter

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eric A.; Malatt, Camille

    2011-01-01

    The needs of hospitalized geriatric patients differ from the needs of hospitalized younger adults. In an attempt to improve systems of care for the older adult, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services classified urinary tract infections related to the use of indwelling urinary catheters (IUC) as one of eight “never events.” The insertion of an IUC is a commonly performed procedure that can cause an array of iatrogenic complications. In addition, the placement of an IUC without medical ...

  6. Cost-effectiveness of chiropractic care versus self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Sørensen, Jan; Vach, Werner;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To assess whether primary sector healthcare in the form of chiropractic care is cost-effective compared with self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain, that is, a subgroup of patients with non-specific chest pain. METHODS AND RESULTS: 115 adults aged 18-75 years with acute...... information session aimed at encouraging self-management as complementary to usual care (n=56). Data on resource use were obtained from Danish national registries and valued from a societal perspective. Patient cost and health-related quality-adjusted life years (QALYs; based on EuroQol five...... QALYs between the groups were negligible. CONCLUSIONS: Chiropractic care was more cost-effective than self-management. Therefore, chiropractic care can be seen as a good example of a targeted primary care approach for a subgroup of patients with non-specific chest pain. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT...

  7. An audit of the quality of inpatient care for adults with learning disability in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Rory; Gandesha, Aarti; Hassiotis, Angela; Gallagher, Pamela; Burnell, Matthew; Jones, Glyn; Kerr, Michael; Hall, Ian; Chaplin, Robert; Crawford, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To audit patient hospital records to evaluate the performance of acute general and mental health services in delivering inpatient care to people with learning disability and explore the influence of organisational factors on the quality of care they deliver. Setting Nine acute general hospital Trusts and six mental health services. Participants Adults with learning disability who received inpatient hospital care between May 2013 and April 2014. Primary and secondary outcome measures Data on seven key indicators of high-quality care were collected from 176 patients. These covered physical health/monitoring, communication and meeting needs, capacity and decision-making, discharge planning and carer involvement. The impact of services having an electronic system for flagging patients with learning disability and employing a learning disability liaison nurse was assessed. Results Indicators of physical healthcare (body mass index, swallowing assessment, epilepsy risk assessment) were poorly recorded in acute general and mental health inpatient settings. Overall, only 34 (19.3%) patients received any assessment of swallowing and 12 of the 57 with epilepsy (21.1%) had an epilepsy risk assessment. For most quality indicators, there was a non-statistically significant trend for improved performance in services with a learning disability liaison nurse. The presence of an electronic flagging system showed less evidence of benefit. Conclusions Inpatient care for people with learning disability needs to be improved. The work gives tentative support to the role of a learning disability liaison nurse in acute general and mental health services, but further work is needed to confirm these benefits and to trial other interventions that might improve the quality and safety of care for this high-need group. PMID:27091821

  8. Factors that limit access to dental care for adults with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Hon K; Wolf, Bethany J; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Magruder, Kathryn M; Selassie, Anbesaw W; Salinas, Carlos F

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated dental care service utilization among adults with spinal cord injury (SCI) and identified barriers and other factors affecting utilization among this population. There were 192 subjects with SCI who participated in the oral health survey assessing dental care service utilization and they were compared with subjects from the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System (BRFSS). There was no significant difference in the proportion of subjects with SCI who visited the dentist for any reason in the past year compared to the general population (65.5% vs. 68.8%, p= .350). However, subjects with SCI were less likely to go to the dentist for a dental cleaning in the past year compared to the general population (54.6% vs. 69.4%, p dental care were cost (40.1%), physical barriers (22.9%), and dental fear (15.1%). Multivariate modeling showed that physical barriers and fear of dental visits were the two significant factors deterring subjects from dental visits in the past year. Physical barriers preventing access to dental facilities and dental fear are prevalent and significantly impede the delivery of dental health care to adults with SCI. Dentists should undertake necessary physical remodeling of their facilities to accommodate wheelchair users and implement appropriate strategies for the management of dental fear among patients with SCI. PMID:20618781

  9. Care of the patient with a tracheotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobillo-De Lamo F

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A tracheostomy is a hole coming through the neck into the trachea, allowing the placement of a tube. Tracheotomy: Temporary opening in the trachea. Tracheostomy: Permanent opening (total laryngectomy. The opening of the trachea modifies the physiology of the aerodigestive tract: you need to humidify inspired air; lost sense of smell and as a result taste (decreasing appetite; disappears the phonation (in the case of tracheostomy spoken with oesophageal voice or through prosthesis phonatory; altered swallowing; lost the protection of the airway and sphincter function, decreasing the abdominal press (cough, defecation childbirth.... The care of the patient with a tracheotomy involves treatment of respiratory secretions, humidification and heating of inspired air, tracheal suction procedures and care and cleaning of the tracheal stoma. But it is also necessary to know and know to solve the complications that may arise, such as: obstruction of the tracheotomy tube, the bleeding of the stoma or spontaneous decannulation. Otolaryngology and the intensive care unit nurses, explain what you need to know of the patient with a tracheotomy that it is driven to plant from these services.

  10. Caring for elderly patients with dementia: nursing interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joosse LL

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Laura L Joosse,1 Debra Palmer,1 Norma M Lang21University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, College of Nursing, Milwaukee, WI, USA; 2University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, College of Nursing, Knowledge Based Nursing Research Initiative, Milwaukee, WI, USAAbstract: Elderly patients suffering from chronic cognitive decline/dementia are susceptible to poor quality of care which further erodes their quality of life. Seemingly benign events can create cascade iatrogenesis in those whose compensatory ability is compromised by impairments in multiple domains. Under recognition, misrecognition, or failure to intervene and manage this vulnerable population leads to suboptimal care. This places them at risk for cognitive decline, functional decline, and challenging behaviors, creating financial and emotional burdens for not only the patients but also family, staff, and organizations that are attempting to provide care. Identifying, managing, and therapeutically responding to confused elderly is complex. Recognizing the challenges makes the development of tools that guide comprehensive assessment planning, interpretation of findings, and treatment plans imperative. Innovative and effective assessment and interventional approaches are present in the literature. This article synthesizes the scientific evidence to guide clinicians to implement in practice.Keywords: dementia, older adults, assessment, intervention, quality of life, elderly, cognitive decline

  11. Modeling Safety Outcomes on Patient Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Anita; Effken, Judith; Carley, Kathleen; Lee, Ju-Sung

    In its groundbreaking report, "To Err is Human," the Institute of Medicine reported that as many as 98,000 hospitalized patients die each year due to medical errors (IOM, 2001). Although not all errors are attributable to nurses, nursing staff (registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and technicians) comprise 54% of the caregivers. Therefore, it is not surprising, that AHRQ commissioned the Institute of Medicine to do a follow-up study on nursing, particularly focusing on the context in which care is provided. The intent was to identify characteristics of the workplace, such as staff per patient ratios, hours on duty, education, and other environmental characteristics. That report, "Keeping Patients Safe: Transforming the Work Environment of Nurses" was published this spring (IOM, 2004).

  12. Comparison of two pain assessment tools in nonverbal critical care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson-Conger, Melissa; Leske, Jane; Maidl, Carolyn; Hanson, Andrew; Dziadulewicz, Laurel

    2011-12-01

    It is recommended that patient's self-report of pain should be obtained as often as possible as the "gold standard." Unfortunately in critical care, many factors can alter verbal communication with patients, making pain assessment more difficult. Scientific advances in understanding pain mechanisms, multidimensional methods of pain assessment, and analgesic pharmacology have improved pain management strategies. However, pain assessment for nonverbal patients in critical care continues to present a challenge for clinicians and researchers. The purpose of this study was to compare the Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia (PAINAD) and the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT) scores for assessment in nonverbal critical care patients. A descriptive, comparative, prospective design was used in this study. A convenience sample of 100 critical care, nonverbal, adult patients of varying medical diagnoses who required pain evaluation were assessed with the PAINAD and CPOT scales. Data were collected over a 6-month period in all critical care areas. Observations of pain assessments for nonverbal patients who required pain evaluation were recorded on the PAINAD and the CPOT successively. Internal consistency reliability for the PAINAD was 0.80 and for the CPOT 0.72. Limits of agreement indicated that there was no difference in PAINAD and CPOT scores for assessing pain in nonverbal patients in critical care. Further research in the area of pain assessment for nonverbal patients in critical care is needed. PMID:22117753

  13. Glycemia management in critical care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Bilotta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, the approach to clinical management of blood glucose concentration (BGC in critical care patients has dramatically changed. In this editorial, the risks related to hypo, hyperglycemia and high BGC variability, optimal BGC target range and BGC monitoring devices for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU will be discussed. Hypoglycemia has an increased risk of death, even after the occurrence of a single episode of mild hypoglycemia (BGC < 80 mg/dL, and it is also associated with an increase in the ICU length of stay, the major determinant of ICU costs. Hyperglycemia (with a threshold value of 180 mg/dL is associated with an increased risk of death, longer length of stay and higher infective morbidity in ICU patients. In ICU patients, insulin infusion aimed at maintaining BGC within a 140-180 mg/dL target range (NICE-SUGAR protocol is considered to be the state-of-the-art. Recent evidence suggests that a lower BGC target range (129-145 mg/dL is safe and associated with lower mortality. In trauma patients without traumatic brain injury, tight BGC (target < 110 mg/dL might be associated with lower mortality. Safe BGC targeting and estimation of optimal insulin dose titration should include an adequate nutrition protocol, the length of insulin infusion and the change in insulin sensitivity over time. Continuous glucose monitoring devices that provide accurate measurement can contribute to minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia and improve insulin titration. In conclusion, in ICU patients, safe and effective glycemia management is based on accurate glycemia monitoring and achievement of the optimal BGC target range by using insulin titration, along with an adequate nutritional protocol.

  14. Consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux-Charles Louise

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensivists must provide enough analgesia and sedation to ensure dying patients receive good palliative care. However, if it is perceived that too much is given, they risk prosecution for committing euthanasia. The goal of this study is to develop consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients that help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia. Methods Using the Delphi technique, panelists rated levels of agreement with statements describing how analgesics and sedatives should be given to dying ICU patients and how palliative care should be distinguished from euthanasia. Participants were drawn from 3 panels: 1 Canadian Academic Adult Intensive Care Fellowship program directors and Intensive Care division chiefs (N = 9; 2 Deputy chief provincial coroners (N = 5; 3 Validation panel of Intensivists attending the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group meeting (N = 12. Results After three Delphi rounds, consensus was achieved on 16 statements encompassing the role of palliative care in the intensive care unit, the management of pain and suffering, current areas of controversy, and ways of improving palliative care in the ICU. Conclusion Consensus guidelines were developed to guide the administration of analgesics and sedatives to dying ICU patients and to help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia.

  15. Clowning in Health Care Settings: The Point of View of Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionigi, Alberto; Canestrari, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Within the past decade, there has been a surge of interest in investigating the effects of clown intervention in a large variety of clinical settings. Many studies have focused on the effects of clown intervention on children. However, few studies have investigated clowning effects on adults. This paper presents an overview of the concept of medical clowning followed by a literature review conducted on the empirical studies drawn from three data bases (PubMed, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar), with the aim of mapping and discussing the evidence of clowning effects on non-children, namely adults. The following areas were investigated: Adult and elderly patients (mainly those with dementia), observers of clowning, namely non-hospitalized adults who are at the hospital as relatives of patients or health-care staff, and finally clowns themselves. The main results are that 1) clown intervention induces positive emotions, thereby enhancing the patient’s well-being, reduces psychological symptoms and emotional reactivity, and prompts a decrease in negative emotions, such as anxiety and stress; 2) clown doctors are also well-perceived by relatives and healthcare staff and their presence appears to be useful in creating a lighter atmosphere in the health setting; 3) few pilot studies have been conducted on clown doctors and this lacuna represents a subject for future research. PMID:27547261

  16. Alternate Level of Care Patients in Hospitals: What Does Dementia Have To Do With This?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Rose; Jarrett, Pamela; Stewart, Connie; Nicholson, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients in acute care hospitals no longer in need of acute care are called Alternate Level of Care (ALC) patients. This is growing and common all across Canada. A better understanding of this patient population would help to address this problem. Methods A chart review was conducted in two hospitals in New Brunswick. All patients designated as ALC on July 1, 2009 had their charts reviewed. Results Thirty-three per cent of the hospital beds were occupied with ALC patients; 63% had a diagnosis of dementia. The mean length of stay was 379.6 days. Eighty-six per cent were awaiting a long-term care bed in the community. Most patients experienced functional decline during their hospitalization. One year prior to admission, 61% had not been admitted to hospital and 59.2% had had at least one visit to the emergency room. Conclusions The majority of the ALC patients in hospital have a diagnosis of dementia and have been waiting in hospital for over one year for a long-term care bed in the community. Many participants were recipients of maximum home care in the community, suggesting home maker services alone may not be adequate for some community-dwelling older adults. Early diagnosis of dementia, coupled with appropriate care in the community, may help to curtail the number of patients with dementia who end up in hospital as ALC patients. PMID:25232367

  17. Palliative care among heart failure patients in primary care: a comparison to cancer patients using English family practice data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Gadoud

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with heart failure have a significant symptom burden and other palliative care needs often over a longer period than patients with cancer. It is acknowledged that this need may be unmet but by how much has not been quantified in primary care data at the population level. METHODS: This was the first use of Clinical Practice Research Datalink, the world's largest primary care database to explore recognition of the need for palliative care. Heart failure and cancer patients who had died in 2009 aged 18 or over and had at least one year of primary care records were identified. A palliative approach to care among patients with heart failure was compared to that among patients with cancer using entry onto a palliative care register as a marker for a palliative approach to care. RESULTS: Among patients with heart failure, 7% (234/3 122 were entered on the palliative care register compared to 48% (3 669/7 608 of cancer patients. Of heart failure patients on the palliative care register, 29% (69/234 were entered onto the register within a week of their death. CONCLUSIONS: This confirms that the stark inequity in recognition of palliative care needs for people with heart failure in a large primary care dataset. We recommend a move away from prognosis based criteria for palliative care towards a patient centred approach, with assessment of and attention to palliative needs including advance care planning throughout the disease trajectory.

  18. Guiding Hypertensive Adult Patients : A Literature Review of Evidence- Based Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Afolabi, Joshua; Guo, Haochuan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract of Thesis LAPLAND UNIVERSITY OF APPLIED SCIENCES Health Care And Social Services Degree Programme in Nursing Bachelor’s Thesis________________________________________ Authors Guo Haochuan And Joshua Afolabi Year 2014 Advisors Mirja Anttila And Seppo Kilpiäinen Title Guiding Hypertensive Adult Patients Pages 47pages________________________________________ This thesis dealt with the guida...

  19. Experiences of nursing staff on psychiatric care of depressed patients

    OpenAIRE

    Suutarinen, Kreetta-Maija

    2012-01-01

    The thesis researched the views and experiences of nursing staff of psychiatric special care ward on psychiatric care of depressed patients. Because caring is patient/client oriented profession, it is essential to include patients and nursing staff in the development work. This assumption was basis for the thesis. The thesis aimed to add knowledge on the views of the nursing staff and to show how this knowledge can be used in development of psychiatric care. The thesis also pursue...

  20. From Practice Culture to Patient Outcomes: Improving Primary Care Through Interdisciplinary Health Care Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Grace, Sherry M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2011, a large integrated healthcare organization implemented a primary care team redesign in five pilot practices to improve the delivery of patient-centered chronic illness care and augment the physician-medical assistant dyads by adding two new primary care team roles for each practice - a nurse care manager (NCM) and a patient health coach (PHC). This work examines three aspects of implementing the care team redesign: 1) The facilitators and barriers of implementation, 2) Th...

  1. Determining level of care appropriateness in the patient journey from acute care to rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Bashford Guy; Magee Christopher; Poulos Christopher J; Eagar Kathy

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The selection of patients for rehabilitation, and the timing of transfer from acute care, are important clinical decisions that impact on care quality and patient flow. This paper reports utilization review data on inpatients in acute care with stroke, hip fracture or elective joint replacement, and other inpatients referred for rehabilitation. It examines reasons why acute level of care criteria are not met and explores differences in decision making between acute care an...

  2. Oral care in patients on mechanical ventilation in intensive care unit: literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Selma Atay; Ukke Karabacak

    2014-01-01

    intensive care patients needs to oral assessment and oral care for avoid complications caused by orafarengeal bacteria. In this literature review, it is aimed to determine the practice over oral hygiene in mechanical ventilator patients in intensive care unit. For the purpose of collecting data, Medline/pub MED and EBSCO HOST databases were searched with the keywords and lsquo;oral hygiene, oral hygiene practice, mouth care, mouth hygiene, intubated, mechanical ventilation, intensive care an...

  3. Medical Assistant-based care management for high risk patients in small primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M.;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk of potentially avoidable hospital admissions, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. Objective......: To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves patient care in patients at high risk of future hospitalization in primary care. Design: Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. Setting: 115 primary care practices in Germany. Patients: 2,076 patients...... with type 2 diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or chronic heart failure and a likelihood of hospitalization in the upper quartile of the population, as predicted by insurance data analysis. Intervention: We compared protocol-based care management including structured assessment, action...

  4. [Chemotherapy for brain tumors in adult patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, M

    2008-02-01

    Chemotherapy has become a third major treatment option for patients with brain tumors, in addition to surgery and radiotherapy. The role of chemotherapy in the treatment of gliomas is no longer limited to recurrent disease. Temozolomide has become the standard of care in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Several ongoing trials seek to define the role of chemotherapy in the primary care of other gliomas. Some of these studies are no longer only based on histological diagnoses, but take into consideration molecular markers such as MGMT promoter methylation and loss of genetic material on chromosomal arms 1p and 19q. Outside such clinical trials chemotherapy is used in addition to radiotherapy, e.g., in anaplastic astrocytoma, medulloblastoma or germ cell tumors, or as an alternative to radiotherapy, e.g., in anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors or low-grade gliomas. In contrast, there is no established role for chemotherapy in other tumors such as ependymomas, meningiomas or neurinomas. Primary cerebral lymphomas are probably the only brain tumors which can be cured by chemotherapy alone and only by chemotherapy. The chemotherapy of brain metastases follows the recommendations for the respective primary tumors. Further, strategies of combined radiochemotherapy using mainly temozolomide or topotecan are currently explored. Leptomeningeal metastases are treated by radiotherapy or systemic or intrathecal chemotherapy depending on their pattern of growth. PMID:18253773

  5. Knee pain and osteoarthritis in older adults: a review of community burden and current use of primary health care

    OpenAIRE

    Peat, G; McCarney, R.; Croft, P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Osteoarthritis is the single most common cause of disability in older adults, and most patients with the condition will be managed in the community and primary care.
AIM—To discuss case definition of knee osteoarthritis for primary care and to summarise the burden of the condition in the community and related use of primary health care in the United Kingdom.
DESIGN—Narrative review.
METHOD—A literature search identified studies of incidence and prevalence of knee pain, disability, ...

  6. Very old patients admitted to intensive care in Australia and New Zealand: a multi-centre cohort analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sean M Bagshaw; Webb, Steve AR; Delaney, Anthony; George, Carol; Pilcher, David; Hart, Graeme K; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Older age is associated with higher prevalence of chronic illness and functional impairment, contributing to an increased rate of hospitalization and admission to intensive care. The primary objective was to evaluate the rate, characteristics and outcomes of very old (age ≥ 80 years) patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs). Methods Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from the Australian New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database. Data we...

  7. Living with and Caring for Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease in Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Yektatalab

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many of the patients with Alzheimer disease are taken care of in nursing homes. However the literature on the experiences of Iranian formal caregivers of older adults with Alzheimer disease is scarce. This qualitative study explored the caring experiences of formal caregivers in nursing homes that can improve the quality of care and patient’s quality of life. Methods: This qualitative study used the principles of descriptive content analysis to analyze these data. Our participants included 11 female and 3 male caregivers aged 25 to 38 years who were selected for interviewing based on a purposive sampling method. The data were analyzed with a content analysis method. Results: Nearly 900 initial codes were extracted and categorized into 6 main themes including "managing difficult behaviors", "dependence on familial care", "continuum of different feelings", "care for a child", "living with the patients" and "not understanding the patients", which was further analyzed in the two subcategories "caring without enough information" and " a dead man moving". Conclusion: The care provided by our informants was mainly influenced by attitudes, culture and religious beliefs of caregivers about family attachment and ample driven reward of helping and caring frail or old people in Islam. These cultural and religious beliefs could facilitate provision of care and confrontation with patients’ child-like behaviors. It is suggested that employment of trained staff and plans for their continued education can improve the quality of care and the quality of the patient's life.

  8. Physical Function and Mental Health in Trauma Intensive Care Patients: A 2-Year Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Aitken, L.M.; Macfarlane, B.; Chaboyer, W; Schuetz, M.; Joyce, C.; Barnett, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:: This study was designed to examine changes in function over time after injury and to identify factors associated with long-term recovery that may be amenable to change through intervention. DESIGN:: Prospective cohort study. SETTING:: Intensive care in a tertiary hospital in Queensland, Australia. PATIENTS:: Adult (n = 123) admitted to intensive care for treatment of injury. INTERVENTIONS:: Data were collected prior to hospital discharge and 1, 6, 12, and 24 months post injury. D...

  9. Prevalence of insomnia and its impact on daily function amongst Malaysian primary care patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zailinawati Abu-Hassan; Mazza Danielle; Teng Cheong Lieng

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Insomnia is a common public health problem and the prevalence and impact of insomnia in primary care attendees is not well documented in the Asian population. Objectives To determine the prevalence of self-reported insomnia symptoms amongst adult primary care attendees and the association with socio-demographic factors; to ascertain the impact of insomnia on daily functioning and to describe the psychological profile of patients with insomnia. Methods In this cross-section...

  10. Experiences of Community-Living Older Adults Receiving Integrated Care Based on the Chronic Care Model : A Qualitative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoorenberg, Sophie L. W.; Wynia, Klaske; Fokkens, Andrea S.; Slotman, Karin; Kremer, Hubertus P. H.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrated care models aim to solve the problem of fragmented and poorly coordinated care in current healthcare systems. These models aim to be patient-centered by providing continuous and coordinated care and by considering the needs and preferences of patients. The objective of this stu

  11. Health care practitioners and dying patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Pentaris

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A full understanding of and a competent approach to dying patients may lead to a more qualitative service delivery, an enhanced quality of life paradigms, and the patients’ wellbeing, all of which remain the ultimate goal of health care practice. The modern world has developed in parallel with secularism and religious diversity. This paper aims to illustrate the secularization process in Britain (with indications of generalized meanings and juxtaposes it with a description of the needs of dying patients regarding the meanings of religion and nonreligion. Although this paper draws on and provides a review of selected theoretical literature, it also addresses a significant challenge: the lack of scientifi c research on the subject. Hence, this paper aims to give an overview of the issues, but not synthesise them. The arguments that are elaborated in the paper are also supported by the author’s current research project in the city of London. The approach here is client oriented, and concerns social and health care. Practitioners ought to become competent, and maintain their competence throughout their professional career. Religious competence seems to have not been at the centre of discussions, regardless of the historical pathway that religious discourse has drawn since the beginnings of humanity. The paper concludes with certain suggestions for future research and inclusive approaches regarding religious matters.

  12. Bioética e nutrição em cuidados paliativos oncológicos em adultos Bioethics and nutrition in adult patients with cancer in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica de Oliveira Benarroz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O câncer vem se destacando entre as doenças crônicas, sendo a segunda causa de morte em países desenvolvidos. Os cuidados paliativos se propõem a oferecer cuidados de suporte global, visando ao controle de sintomas e à melhora da qualidade de vida dos pacientes e de seus familiares. A nutrição é uma ferramenta importante nos cuidados paliativos, podendo ajudar o paciente nos aspectos físico, psicológico e social, além de promover o bem-estar e a qualidade de vida. Entretanto, a nutrição raramente poderá cumprir seu papel de recuperar e garantir o estado nutricional. Nesse momento, a intervenção do nutricionista é considerar as necessidades do indivíduo, preferências e hábitos alimentares, fundamentais tanto para o controle dos sintomas, quanto para garantir satisfação e conforto. A impossibilidade do exercício convencional das condutas já estabelecidas e o desenvolvimento de uma nova percepção do doente muitas vezes produzem dilemas para o profissional nutricionista.Cancer constitutes a major group of chronic diseases and is the second leading cause of death in the developed countries. Palliative care proposes to offer comprehensive support to control symptoms and improve quality of life for patients and their families. Nutrition is an important tool in palliative care, helping patients with their physical, psychological, and social issues and promoting comfort and quality of life. However, in the context of palliative care, nutritional support rarely achieves its role of fully recovering and assuring nutritional status. At this point, the nutritionist must consider the individual patient's needs, preferences, and eating habits, which are essential both for controlling symptoms and assuring satisfaction and comfort. The impossibility of conventionally applying established management and the development of a new perception of the patient often raise dilemmas for professional nutritionists.

  13. Separate and Cumulative Effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences in Predicting Adult Health and Health Care Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Mariette J.; Walker, John R.; Naimark, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Objectives of this population-based study were: (1) to examine the relative contribution of childhood abuse and other adverse childhood experiences to poor adult health and increased health care utilization and (2) to examine the cumulative effects of adverse childhood experiences on adult health and health care utilization. Methods:…

  14. The survey of the knowledge,attitude and behavior about the self-care products of oral health of adult patients with oral disease%成年口腔疾病患者对自我口腔保健产品知识、态度、行为调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秀如; 张秀军; 赵春晖; 张秀梅; 罗勇

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To understand the knowledge and behavior of adult patients with oral disease about the toothbrush,toothpaste, solutions of mouth rinsing, interdental embrasure cleaning tool and sugar-free chewing gum. Methods:The adult patients with oral disease from the 2nd level hospital in Anhui province were investigated by a cluster random ampling method. Results:There were 44. 7% of patients knew the health care toothbrush,and 23. 0% of patients randomly chose toothbrush;71. 4% of patients knew the fluoride toothpaste,22. 3% of patients used it for long-term,and 39. 3% of patients randomly chose a toothpaste;41. 5% of patients knew the dental floss, and 11. 7% of patients regularly used it;20. 6% of patients knew the interdental toothbrush, and 3. 1% of patients regularly used it;51. 7% of patients knew the mouth rinsing,and 8. 0% of patients regularly used it;47. 5% of patients knew the sugar-free gum,and 35. 2% of patients frequently chewed it for strengthening oral health. There was not statistically significant difference in gender cognitive behavior of all cases(P>0. 05). The cognitive level of the patients with high education level was high, and the cognitive levels of the patients from city and enterprises were higher than that of rural residents(P0.05),相对较高文化教育程度者具有较高认知水平,城市、企事业工作人员认知水平均高于农村居民(P<0.01)。结论:患者对基本口腔自我保健产品的知识行为普遍不足;应重点加强含氟牙膏、牙线等牙间隙清洁工具以及漱口液的认知宣教;低教育水平、农村居民应是今后口腔自我保健健康教育的重点人群;应建立以刷牙和牙线清洁牙间隙作为最基本的口腔自我保健方式,辅以咀嚼无糖口香糖、漱口液漱口的系统性口腔自我保健模式和平衡发展的口腔护理产品市场体系。

  15. Home care for patients in need of advanced care and technology : a challenge for patients and their caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    Swedberg, Lena

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim: There is an ongoing trend of advanced care ‘moving out’ from hospitals and into patients' homes. In Sweden, caregivers with limited training, employed by municipalities or private agencies take 24-hour responsibility for patient care with limited support from healthcare professionals. The aim of this thesis was to explore and gain new and broadened understanding of 24-hour home care for patients in need of advanced care and technology. Material and methods: A multi ...

  16. Clinical nursing care for transgender patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Nathan

    2015-06-01

    Transgender people often face barriers in their pursuit of receiving sensitive and informed health care, and many avoid preventive care and care for life threatening conditions because of those obstacles. This article focuses on cancer care of the transgender patient, as well as ways that nurses and other providers can help to create a transgender-sensitive healthcare environment. PMID:26000586

  17. Young Cancer Patients' Perceptions of a Video Game Used to Promote Self Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, Ivan L.; Marin-Bowling, Veronica M.; Guthrie, Nicole: Kato, Pamela M.

    2006-01-01

    A video game called "Re-Mission" has recently been investigated with adolescent and young adult cancer patients enrolled in a multi-site randomized controlled evaluation of the game as a psycho-educational intervention. The main focus of the trial was to determine effects of the game on self-care and other health-related outcomes. It was also…

  18. Advancing patient-centered care through transformative educational leadership: a critical review of health care professional preparation for patient-centered care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lévesque MC

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Martine C Lévesque,1,2 Richard Bruce Hovey,2,3 Christophe Bedos2,4 1Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; 2Division of Oral Health and Society, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 4Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Faculté de médicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada Abstract: Following a historical brief on the development of patient-centered care (PCC, we discuss PCC's value and role in counterbalancing the evidence-based movement in health care. We in turn make a case for a philosophical shift in thinking about the PCC concept, one based on a consideration for how knowledge is produced, used, and valued within care provision processes. A “shared epistemology” foundation is presented, defined, and promoted as essential to the authentic and ethical realization of “shared decision making” between patient and health care provider, and, more generally, of PCC. In accordance with these views, this article critically reviews the literature on health care professional education for the development of PCC. We uncover the disturbing ways in which education frequently undermines the development of patient centeredness, despite curricular emphasis on professionalism and ethical PCC. We also establish the need to raise awareness of how dominant approaches to evaluating student or practitioner performance often fail to reinforce or promote patient centeredness. Finally, we identify successful and inspiring cases of teaching and learning experiences that have achieved perspective transformation on PCC and on new ways of providing care. The pertinence of adopting the theoretical foundations of adult transformative learning is argued, and a call to action is proposed to the leadership of health professional educators across all disciplines. Keywords: patient-centered care, health professional

  19. Procalcitonin versus C-reactive protein for predicting pneumonia in adults with lower respiratory tract infection in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anette; Pedersen, Svend S; Nexoe, Joergen;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of procalcitonin in diagnosing bacterial infection has mainly been studied in patients with severe infections. There is no study on the value of procalcitonin measurements in adults with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) treated in primary care. AIM: To evaluate the...... accuracy of plasma procalcitonin in predicting radiographic pneumonia, bacterial infection, and adverse outcome in a population of adults with LRTI treated in primary care. DESIGN OF STUDY: Prospective, observational study. SETTING: Forty-two general practices and an outpatient clinic at the Department of...... Infectious Diseases, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. METHOD: A total of 364 patients with LRTI were prospectively enrolled from 42 general practices. Patients were examined with chest radiography, microbiological analyses, and measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin. The outcome...

  20. Contributors to Adult Sibling Relationships and Intention to Care of Siblings of Individuals with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuskelly, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of childhood sibling relationships to adult sibling relationships and intention to provide care was investigated in a sample in which one member of each dyad had Down syndrome. Thirty-nine adult siblings of an adult with Down syndrome who had participated in a study of sibling relationships in childhood/adolescence provided data…

  1. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care: Survey of oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Salins

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients felt that integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer improves symptom control, end-of-life care, health-related communication, and continuity of care. The perceptions of benefit of the palliative care intervention in the components surveyed, differed among the three groups.

  2. Frailty screening in older patients in primary care using routine care data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drubbel, I.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Primary care for frail older people is reported to be suboptimal. A transition toward proactive patient-centred care is needed. We investigated the effectiveness of U-PRIM, a frailty screening intervention based on routine care data, and of U-PRIM followed by U-CARE, a nurse-led personal

  3. Comparing Information Needs of Health Care Providers and Older Adults: Findings from a Wellness Study

    OpenAIRE

    Reeder, Blaine; Le, Thai; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Demiris, George

    2013-01-01

    Consumer health informatics technologies have the potential to enhance shared decision-making and communication between older adults, health care providers, and other stakeholders. The objective of this study was to characterize the information needs of these stakeholders to inform the design of informatics tools that support wellness in older adults. We conducted four focus groups with 31 older adults and three focus groups with 10 health care providers to explore information needs, goals, a...

  4. Defining and measuring integrated patient care: promoting the next frontier in health care delivery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singer, S.J.; Burgers, J.S.; Friedberg, M.; Rosenthal, M.B.; Leape, L.; Schneider, E.

    2011-01-01

    Integration of care is emerging as a central challenge of health care delivery, particularly for patients with multiple, complex chronic conditions. The authors argue that the concept of "integrated patient care" would benefit from further clarification regarding (a) the object of integration and (b

  5. Shared Care Contributions to Self-Care and Quality of Life in Chronic Cardiac Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebern, Margaret; Brown, Roger; Flatley-Brennan, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    Shared care is an interpersonal interaction system composed of communication, decision making, and reciprocity; it is used by patients and family caregivers (care dyads) to exchange social support. This study's purpose was to describe the contributions of shared care to outcomes for individuals with cardiac disease. A secondary data analysis was used to answer the following questions. What is the association between elements of shared care and patient outcomes? Do dyad perceptions of shared care differentially contribute to patient outcomes? Participants in this study were 93 individuals with a cardiac disease and 93 family caregivers. Composite index structured equation modeling was the analytic tool. Caregiver communication and reciprocity were related to patient mental quality of life. Patient communication and reciprocity were related to their own mental and physical quality of life and self-care confidence. Findings from this study contribute a better understanding of how care dyads are integral to patient outcomes. PMID:26864996

  6. Evaluating Adult Cystic Fibrosis Care in BC: Disparities in Access to a Multidisciplinary Treatment Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Roberts

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cystic fibrosis (CF care that is delivered through dedicated, multidisciplinary CF clinics is believed to be partly responsible for improvements in the length and quality of life of persons with CF. We hypothesized patients living farthest from a CF clinic would be seen less frequently than recommended, which would result in reduced access to guideline-recommended care and poorer health outcomes. Methods. We performed a retrospective chart review of 168 patients who accessed CF care primarily through the St. Paul’s Hospital Adult CF Clinic. Subjects were stratified into four geographical groups according to the estimated one-way travel time by automobile from their home address to the clinic (360 mins. Results. There were no significant differences in pulmonary function, nutritional status, CF-related complications, or access to guideline-recommended CF pulmonary therapies between the four groups. Compared to the reference (150 mins were less likely to be seen in the clinic quarterly as recommended by current CF care guidelines (p=0.002. Those in the farthest group (>360 mins were at risk for more rapid decline in lung function compared to the reference group (FEV1% predicted annual change: −3.1%/year [95% CI −5.1 to −1.1] versus −0.9%/year [95% CI −1.6 to 0.1], resp., p=0.04. Conclusions. Access to CF care is a challenge for individuals who live outside Metro Vancouver and has health policy implications. Further initiatives should be undertaken to ensure equitable care for people living with CF.

  7. Evaluating Adult Cystic Fibrosis Care in BC: Disparities in Access to a Multidisciplinary Treatment Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James M; Wilcox, Pearce G; Quon, Bradley S

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cystic fibrosis (CF) care that is delivered through dedicated, multidisciplinary CF clinics is believed to be partly responsible for improvements in the length and quality of life of persons with CF. We hypothesized patients living farthest from a CF clinic would be seen less frequently than recommended, which would result in reduced access to guideline-recommended care and poorer health outcomes. Methods. We performed a retrospective chart review of 168 patients who accessed CF care primarily through the St. Paul's Hospital Adult CF Clinic. Subjects were stratified into four geographical groups according to the estimated one-way travel time by automobile from their home address to the clinic (360 mins). Results. There were no significant differences in pulmonary function, nutritional status, CF-related complications, or access to guideline-recommended CF pulmonary therapies between the four groups. Compared to the reference (150 mins) were less likely to be seen in the clinic quarterly as recommended by current CF care guidelines (p = 0.002). Those in the farthest group (>360 mins) were at risk for more rapid decline in lung function compared to the reference group (FEV1% predicted annual change: -3.1%/year [95% CI -5.1 to -1.1] versus -0.9%/year [95% CI -1.6 to 0.1], resp., p = 0.04). Conclusions. Access to CF care is a challenge for individuals who live outside Metro Vancouver and has health policy implications. Further initiatives should be undertaken to ensure equitable care for people living with CF. PMID:27445568

  8. Creating and Maintaining a Wellness Environment in Child Care Centers Participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofton, Kristi L.; Carr, Deborah H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study identifies issues associated with creating and maintaining a wellness environment in child care centers (CCCs) participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Methods: Structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with CCC professionals and state agency personnel to develop a survey to assess…

  9. Prehospital Management of Gunshot Patients at Major Trauma Care Centers: Exploring the Gaps in Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Norouzpour

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prehospital management of gunshot-wounded (GW patients influences injury-induced morbidity and mortality.Objectives: To evaluate prehospital management to GW patients emphasizing the protocol of patient transfer to appropriate centers.Patients and Methods: This prospective study, included all GW patients referred to four major, level-I hospitals in Mashhad, Iran. We evaluated demographic data, triage, transport vehicles of patients, hospitalization time and the outcome.Results: There were 66 GW patients. The most affected body parts were extremities (60.6%, n = 40; 59% of cases (n = 39 were transferred to the hospitals with vehicles other than an ambulance. Furthermore, 77.3% of patients came to the hospitals directly from the site of event, and 22.7% of patients were referred from other medical centers. EMS action intervals from dispatchers to scene departure was not significantly different from established standards; however, arrival to hospital took longer than optimal standards. Additionally, time spent at emergency wards to stabilize vital signs was significantly less in patients who were transported by EMS ambulances (P = 0.01, but not with private ambulances (P = 0.47. However, ambulance pre-hospital care was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. Injury Severity was the only determinant of hospital stay duration (β = 0.36, P = 0.01 in multivariate analysis.Conclusions: GW was more frequent in extremities and the most patients were directly transferred from the accident site. EMS (but not private ambulance transport improved patients' emergency care and standard time intervals were achieved by EMS; however more than a half of the cases were transferred by vehicles other than an ambulance. Nevertheless, ambulance transportation (either by EMS or by private ambulance was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. This showed that upgrade of ambulance equipment and training of private ambulance personnel may be needed.

  10. Improving stroke care for patients at Cavan hospital [poster

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murugasu, G Dr.

    2013-07-01

    Under the Quality and Continuing Care Directorate (QCCD) in stroke care Cavan General Hospital was identified as a hospital that received a large number of stroke and TIA patients. A programme was established to improve services to this population.

  11. Training care givers of stroke patients: economic evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Anita; Knapp, Martin; Evans, Andrew; Perez, Inigo; Kalra, Lalit

    2004-01-01

    Background Training care givers reduces their burden and improves psychosocial outcomes in care givers and patients at one year. However, the cost effectiveness of this approach has not been investigated.

  12. Dietary intake and nutritional status in cancer patients: comparing adults and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henyse Gómez Valiente da Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the nutrient intake and nutritional status of food in cancer patients admitted to a university hospital, with comparison of adult and older adult age category Methods: Cross-sectional study. This study involved cancer patients admitted to a hospital in 2010. Dietary habits were collected using a Brazilian food frequency questionnaire. Participants were divided in two groups: adults or older adults and in 4-cancer category: hematologic, lung, gastrointestinal and others. Body Mass Index evaluated nutritional status. Results: A total of 86 patients with a mean age of 56.5 years, with 55% males and 42% older adults were evaluated. The older adult category had a higher frequency of being underweight (24.4% vs 16.3%, p < 0.01 and a lower frequency of being overweight (7% vs. 15.1%, p < 0.01 than adults. Both, adult and older adults had a high frequency of smoking, alcohol consumption and physical inactivity. The older adults had lower consumption of calories, intake of iron and folic acid. Inadequacy of vitamin intake was observed in both groups; respectively, 52%, 43%, 95%, 76% and 88% for Vitamin A, C, D, E and folic acid. The older adults had a higher folic acid and calcium inadequacy than the adults (97% vs 82%, p <0.01; 88% vs 72%, p < 0.01. There was no association of micronutrient intake with cancer, nor with nutritional status. Conclusion: The food intake, macro and micronutrients ingestion is insufficient among cancer individuals. Food intake of older adults was inferior, when compared to the adult category. There was a high prevalence of BMI excess in the adult group and a worst nutritional status in the older adult category.

  13. Effectiveness the pharmaceutical care in diabetic patients*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E Machado -Alba

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the effectiveness of pharmaceutical care to improve control of type-2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: We carried out pharmacotherapeutical intervention during 19 months on patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus who were affiliate members of the contributive regime of the General System for Healthcare and Social Security in  Bogotá and Cartagena. Through an interview and evaluation of medical records, we obtained information about antidiabetic medications used, doses, other medications, along with Hemoglobin A1c level, arterial pressure, serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, nephropathy screening, retinal screening, foot exams in the last year and problems associated with medication use by means of the DADER method Negative Outcomes Associated with Medication (NOM. Results: The study had a sample of 143 patients (64 intervened and 79 controls with female predominance (67.1% and 53.1%, respectively, mean age of 63.9±11.2 years. The patients in both groups were taking an average of 6.0±2.7 medications. Initial HbA1c mean was 7.7% and 7.8%, without improvement by the end of the study (7.4% for those intervened and 7.8% for the control group. Hypertension (81.1% and dyslipidemia (62.9% were the most important comorbidities. About 50.4% of NOM were of effectiveness, follows 31.3% of necessity. The mean cost per patient in controls was 1.4 greater than for the intervened group. Conclusions: Increased effectiveness of the antidiabetic therapy was not demonstrated in patients intervened with pharmacotherapeutical monitoring, but we did obtain a reduction in healthcare costs.

  14. Effectiveness the pharmaceutical care in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E. Machado-Alba

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the effectiveness of pharmaceutical care to improve control of type-2 diabetes mellitus.Methods: We carried out pharmacotherapeutical intervention during 19 months on patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus who were affiliate members of the contributive regime of the General System for Healthcare and Social Security in Bogotá and Cartagena. Through an interview and evaluation of medical records, we obtained information about antidiabetic medications used, doses, other medications, along with Hemoglobin A1c level, arterial pressure, serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, nephropathy screening, retinal screening, foot exams in the last year and problems associated with medication use by means of the DADER method Negative Outcomes Associated with Medication (NOM.Results: The study had a sample of 143 patients (64 intervened and 79 controls with female predominance (67.1% and 53.1%, respectively, mean age of 63.9±11.2 years. The patients in both groups were taking an average of 6.0±2.7 medications. Initial HbA1c mean was 7.7% and 7.8%, without improvement by the end of the study (7.4% for those intervened and 7.8% for the control group. Hypertension (81.1% and dyslipidemia (62.9% were the most important comorbidities. About 50.4% of NOM were of effectiveness, follows 31.3% of necessity. The mean cost per patient in controls was 1.4 greater than for the intervened group.Conclusions: Increased effectiveness of the antidiabetic therapy was not demonstrated in patients intervened with pharmacotherapeutical monitoring, but we did obtain a reduction in healthcare costs.

  15. Functional prognosis of dizziness in older adults in primary care: a prospective cohort study.

    OpenAIRE

    Dros, J.; Maarsingh, O.R.; Beem, L.; van der Horst, H.E.; Riet, G. ter; Schellevis, F G; van Weert, H.C.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the 6-month functional prognosis of dizziness in older adults in primary care, to identify important predictors of dizziness-related impairment, and to construct a score to assist risk prediction. Design: Prospective cohort study with 6-month follow-up. Setting: Twenty-four primary care practices in the Netherlands. Participants: Four hundred seventeen older adults (mean age 78.5, range 65–95, 74% female) presenting consecutively to primary care with dizziness. Meas...

  16. The provision of staff development programs in Virginia adult day care centers

    OpenAIRE

    Hensley, A. Dawn

    1994-01-01

    This study examined a neglected area in long term care and adult day care research: staff development. The specific purposes of this study were to describe the provision of a comprehensive staff development program in adult day care centers in Virginia in order to (a) differentiate those centers providing only the minimum required inservice training from those centers providing more comprehensive staff development programs and (b) define what meaning is placed upon sta...

  17. [Breast cancer: patient care, rehabilitation, psychooncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Szántó, István; Molnár, Mária; Rohánszky, Magda; Koncz, Zsuzsa; Mailáth, Mónika; Kapitány, Zsuzsanna; Dudás, Rita

    2016-09-01

    The development of a recommendation was intended for the follow-up of breast cancer patients treated with curative intent in Hungary. Follow-up includes the permanent contact with and health education of the patient, the surveillance and control of the adverse effects of oncological therapies or radiotherapy, the screening of metachron cancers, and the comprehensive (physical, psychological and social) rehabilitation of the patient. The early detection of local/regional tumor relapse is essential with careful follow-up, but there is no need for screening of distant metastases by means of imaging studies or tumor marker tests. If adjuvant endocrine therapy is needed, optimal adherence should be ensured with supportive therapy. In rare cases, special issues such as breast cancer risk/genetic mutation, pregnancy are raised, which should be thoughtfully discussed in view of recent advances in oncology. Follow-up is generally practised by the oncologist, however, in some cases the social worker, the physiotherapist, the psychooncologist, or in special cases, the lymphoedema expert is to be involved. The follow-up approach should be comprehensive and holistic. PMID:27579724

  18. [The Nutrition Care of Severe Burn Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Hsiu

    2016-02-01

    In addition to recent advances in burn patient care techniques such as maintaining warm circumambient temperature, the early excision of wounds, and the use of closed dressing, providing nutrition support through early feeding has proven instrumental in greatly increasing the survival rate of burn patients. Severe burns complicated by many factors initiate tremendous physiological stress that leads to postburn hypermetabolism that includes enhanced tissue catabolism, the loss of muscle mass, and decreases in the body's reservoirs of protein and energy. These problems have become the focus of burn therapy. Treating severe burns aims not only to enhance survival rates but also to restore normal bodily functions as completely as possible. Recent research evaluating the application of anabolic agents and immune-enhance formula for severe burns therapy has generated significant controversy. Inadequate caloric intake is one of the main differences among the related studies, with the effect of many special nutrients such as bran acid amides not taken into consideration. Therefore, considering the sufficiency of caloric and protein intake is critical in assessing effectiveness. Only after patients receive adequate calories and protein may the effect of special nutrients such as glutamine and supplements be evaluated effectively. PMID:26813059

  19. An opportunity for coordinated cancer care: intersection of health care reform, primary care providers, and cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Lauren G; Wender, Richard; Altshuler, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The US health care system has become increasingly unsustainable, threatened by poor quality and spiraling costs. Many Americans are not receiving recommended preventive care, including cancer screening tests. Passage of the Affordable Care Act in March 2010 has the potential to reverse this course by increasing access to primary care providers, extending coverage and affordability of health insurance, and instituting proven quality measures. In order for health care reform to succeed, it will require a stronger primary care workforce, a new emphasis on patient-centered care, and payment incentives that reward quality over quantity. Innovations such as patient-centered medical homes, accountable care organizations, and improved quality reporting methods are central features of a redesigned health care delivery system and will ultimately change the face of cancer care in the United States. PMID:21131791

  20. The Affordable Care Act and Cancer Stage at Diagnosis Among Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuesong; Zang Xiong, Ka; Kramer, Michael R; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2016-09-01

    The Affordable Care Act-dependent coverage expansion provision implemented in 2010 allows young adults to be covered under their parents' health insurance until age 26 years, and millions of young adults have gained insurance as a result. The impact of this policy on cancer patients has yet to be determined. Using 2007 to 2012 data from 18 registries of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, comparing cancer patients age 19 to 25 years to a control group of patients age 26 to 34 years who were not affected by the provision, we observed a 2.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.7 to 3.4) percentage point decrease in uninsured rate and a 2.7 (95% CI = 0.6 to 4.8) percentage point increase in diagnosis at stage I disease for patients age 19-25 years. Further analyses by specific cancer site revealed that the statistically significant shifts were confined to carcinoma of cervix (21.2, 95% CI = 9.6 to 32.7 percentage points) and osseous and chondromatous neoplasms (14.4, 95% CI = 0.3 to 28.5 percentage points), which are detectable by either screening or clinical manifestation. These early observations suggest the policy has had positive benefits in cancer outcomes. PMID:27140956

  1. Health Care Provider Mobility Counseling Provision to Older Adults: A Rural/Urban Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huseth-Zosel, Andrea L; Sanders, Gregory; O'Connor, Melissa; Fuller-Iglesias, Heather; Langley, Linda

    2016-02-01

    The current study examined rural-urban differences in health care provider (HCP) perceptions, attitudes, and practices related to driving safety/cessation-related anticipatory guidance provision to older adults. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with HCPs in several north central states. Exploratory factor analysis was used to examine dimensions of HCP perceptions and attitudes related to mobility counseling. Binary logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine if HCP rurality was significantly predictive of HPC provision of mobility counseling by age. Rural HCPs were less likely than urban HCPs to provide mobility counseling to their patients aged 75 or older. Rural HCPs were less likely to refer patients to a driving fitness evaluation resource if they had questions related to driving issues, and were less likely to perceive there were adequate resources to help with driving issues. Rural-urban differences in HCP mobility counseling provision may contribute to potential health disparities between urban and rural patients. Both rural and urban HCPs need training about older driver issues, so they may educate their patients about driving safety/cessation. Future research should examine the association between rural-urban differences in HCP mobility counseling provision and rural older adult overrepresentation in motor vehicle injuries and fatalities statistics. PMID:26070871

  2. Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever. Clinical Study of Hospitalized Adult Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Espinosa Brito

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: the description of an epidemic is crucial from a clinical and epidemiological point of view.Objective: to identify the main clinical characteristics of hospitalized adult patients diagnosed with dengue hemorrhagic fever. Methods: a prospective case series study was conducted in 997 patients who met the diagnostic criteria for dengue hemorrhagic fever and were discharged from the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima Hospital from June 1st. to August 31, 1981. An automated database was developed based on the information collected from medical records using forms designed for the purpose. Results: forty eight point seven percent of the patients were in the third and fourth decades of life; females predominated (60.1 %. General symptoms were fever (97.4 %, asthenia (78.6 %, headache (76.4 %, anorexia (75.9 %, myalgia (62.1 % and sweating (37.2 %. The digestive symptoms included: nausea (57.8 %, vomiting (46.2 %, abdominal pain (31.6 % and diarrhea (14.1 %. The rash was developed by 32.5 % of the patients. Among the hemorrhagic manifestations were: petechiae (31.2 %, ecchymosis (11.5 %, epistaxis (7.6 %, hematemesis (6.2 %, hematuria (5.5 %, melena (3.4 %, gingival bleeding (3.4 %, enterorrhagia (2.2 %, metrorrhagia (2.1 %. The signs included: abdominal tenderness (53.6 %, tachycardia (25.9 %, lymphadenopathy (22.1 %, hypotension (12.0 %, pharyngeal redness (11.7 %, hepatomegaly (8.3 %, shock or "pre-shock" (6.9 % and splenomegaly (6.2%. Symptoms and signs were more frequent and severe among women. Eighty one point five percent of the patients were admitted one to three days after developing the symptoms. Thrombocytopenia (less than 100 000 platelets per mm3 was found in all cases and leukopenia was observed in 38.9 % of females and 20.6 % of men. Fourteen patients were admitted to intensive care, mostly due to shock; four of them with severe hemorrhagic manifestations. Only one patient died. Conclusions: the high morbidity due to dengue

  3. Patient determinants of mental health interventions in primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Raine, R.; Lewis, L.; Sensky, T; Hutchings, A; Hirsch, S; Black, N.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A large proportion of a general practitioner's (GP's) caseload comprises patients with mental health problems. It is important to ensure that care is provided appropriately, on the basis of clinical need. It is therefore necessary to investigate the determinants of the use of mental health care in the primary care sector and, in particular, to identify any non-clinical characteristics of patients that affect the likelihood of their receiving appropriate care. AIM: To identify and ...

  4. Involvement of the family members in caring of patients an acute care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bhalla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Family members are critical partners in the plan of care for patients both in the hospital and at home. Involving the members of the family in acute care can help the nursing staff in emergency. The present study was aimed to find out the role of the family members while caring for the patients admitted in emergency unit of a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: A total of 400 family members of the patients were conveniently selected. Only one member per family was interviewed and their role in taking care of the patient in acute care setting was evaluated. Results: The mean age of patients admitted in acute care setting was 46.6 yrs ± 18.8 with the age range of 18-84 years. Majority (39% of the patients were in the age group of 31-60 years. More than half of the caregivers of patients were males and 88% of them were first-degree relatives. The major tasks performed by the caregivers during the patient care was communicating with doctors/ nursing staff (98%, cleaning and dressing the patient (94%, feeding the patient (90%, procuring medication and other supplies (88%, administering oral medications (74%, changing position and helping for back care (65%, shifting the patients for investigations (60%, collecting reports (35% and providing physiotherapy (25%. Conclusions: The results of the study concluded that family involvement in acute care setting can help the nursing staff in taking care of the patient in acute care setting and it also provides the opportunity for preparing them for after care of the patients at home following discharge.

  5. Medication transitions and polypharmacy in older adults following acute care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamble JM

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available John-Michael Gamble,1,* Jill J Hall,2,* Thomas J Marrie,3 Cheryl A Sadowski,2 Sumit R Majumdar,4 Dean T Eurich5 1School of Pharmacy, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's, NL, 2Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, 3Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, 4Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, 5School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada *These authors contributed equally to this work Background/objective: Medication changes at transitions of care and polypharmacy are growing concerns that adversely impact optimal drug use. We aimed to describe transitions and patterns of medication use before and 1 year after older patients were hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia, the second-most common reason for admission in North America. Materials and methods: This was an analysis of a population-based clinical registry of patients treated in any of the six hospitals or seven emergency departments in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, comprising 2,105 patients 65 years and older with community-acquired pneumonia who had survived at least 1 year. The prevalence of polypharmacy (five or more unique prescription drugs, as well as new use and persistence of common drug classes were assessed. Results: The mean age was 78 years (standard deviation 8 years, 50% were female, 62% were hospitalized, and 58% had severe pneumonia. Among the 2,105 patients, 949 (45% were using five or more medications prior to hospitalization, increasing to 1,559 (74% within 90 days postdischarge and remaining over 70% at 1 year. Overall, 1,690 (80% patients newly started and 1,553 (74% patients stopped at least one medication in the first 90 days of follow-up. The prevalence of the most common drug classes (ie, cardiovascular, alimentary/metabolism remained stable, with the exception of anti-infective agents, whereby 25% of patients were dispensed an anti-infective agent 3 months to 1 year

  6. Transitions to Adult Care for Rhode Island Youth with Special Healthcare Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Suzanne; Terry, Christopher; Neukirch, Jodie; Garneau, Deborah; Golding, Deb; Brown, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The transitioning of youth from pediatric to adult care systems is often fraught with discontinuity, miscommunication and gaps in care. This is most significant for youth with special health care needs. A panel discussion on transitioning youth to adult care systems that was part of a learning collaborative held by The RI Care Transformation Collaborative (CTC) is presented here, illustrated by a pertinent case of a youth with type 1 diabetes. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-08.asp, free with no login]. PMID:27472770

  7. Ketamine in adult cardiac surgery and the cardiac surgery Intensive Care Unit: An evidence-based clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mazzeffi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine is a unique anesthetic drug that provides analgesia, hypnosis, and amnesia with minimal respiratory and cardiovascular depression. Because of its sympathomimetic properties it would seem to be an excellent choice for patients with depressed ventricular function in cardiac surgery. However, its use has not gained widespread acceptance in adult cardiac surgery patients, perhaps due to its perceived negative psychotropic effects. Despite this limitation, it is receiving renewed interest in the United States as a sedative and analgesic drug for critically ill-patients. In this manuscript, the authors provide an evidence-based clinical review of ketamine use in cardiac surgery patients for intensive care physicians, cardio-thoracic anesthesiologists, and cardio-thoracic surgeons. All MEDLINE indexed clinical trials performed during the last 20 years in adult cardiac surgery patients were included in the review.

  8. Caring for Older Adults With Complex Needs: Drafting an Interdisciplinary Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, Elisa M; Hendre, Amruta

    2015-10-01

    Providing dental care for seniors with complex medical and/or social needs can seem daunting. Many dental providers may question their resources to manage such patients. However, many of these patients have teams in place that can be accessed to improve the efficacy and satisfaction in providing care to them. Seeking out patients' other health care providers, and understanding how to work effectively with them, is important to improve total patient care, comfort, function and dignity. PMID:26798913

  9. Physician Perspectives on Providing Primary Medical Care to Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warfield, Marji Erickson; Crossman, Morgan K.; Delahaye, Jennifer; Der Weerd, Emma; Kuhlthau, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted in-depth case studies of 10 health care professionals who actively provide primary medical care to adults with autism spectrum disorders. The study sought to understand their experiences in providing this care, the training they had received, the training they lack and their suggestions for encouraging more physicians to provide this…

  10. [Interdisciplinary care for a patient suffering from Diogenes syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggah-Alioua, Sabah; Berger, Jérôme; Cheseaux, Michel

    2014-06-25

    Interdisciplinarity is the combined care of a patient by two or more healthcare professionals. Taking into account the contribution of the different healthcare partners improves patient follow-up, quality of the care and use of resources. General practitioner (GP) becomes the pivot of a combined interdisciplinary ambulatory care allowing a prolonged staying at home and avoiding the multiplication of care offers. This paper, by the clinical description of a patient suffering from Diogenes Syndrome, allows a cross of the care between the GP, home nurse and pharmacist. It deals with follow-up questions, acceptance, objectives of treatment, communication between healthcare partners and "false notes" in the follow-up. PMID:25055477

  11. Patients’ perceptions of actual care conditions and patient satisfaction with care quality in hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Abrahamsen Grøndahl, Vigdis

    2012-01-01

    There are theoretical and methodological difficulties in measuring the concepts of quality of care and patient satisfaction, and the conditions associated with these concepts. A theoretical framework of patient satisfaction and a theoretical model of quality of care have been used as the theoretical basis in this thesis. Aim. The overall aim was to describe and explore relationships between person-related conditions, external objective care conditions, patients’ perceptions of quality of care...

  12. Fatigue in Family Caregivers of Adult Intensive Care Unit Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, JiYeon; Tate, Judith A.; Hoffman, Leslie A.; Schulz, Richard; Ren, Dianxu; Donahoe, Michael P.; Given, Barbara A.; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Context Family caregivers are a vital resource in the recovery of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. Of concern, the stress associated with this role can negatively affect caregiver health. Fatigue, an important health indicator, has been identified as a predictor of various illnesses, greater use of health services, and early mortality. Examining the impact of fatigue on caregivers’ physical health can assist in identifying critical time points and potential targets for intervention. Objectives To describe self-reported fatigue in caregivers of ICU survivors from patients’ ICU admission to ≤ two weeks, two- and four-months post-ICU discharge. Methods Patient-caregiver pairs were enrolled from a medical ICU. Caregiver fatigue was measured using the Short-Form-36 Health Survey Vitality subscale (SF-36 Vitality). Caregiver psychobehavioral stress responses included depressive symptoms, burden, health risk behaviors, and sleep quality. Patient data included self-reported physical symptoms and disposition (home vs. institution). Results Forty seven patient-caregiver pairs were initially enrolled. Clinically significant fatigue (SF-36 Vitality ≤ 45) was reported by 43% to 53% of caregivers across the time points and these caregivers reported worse scores in measures of depressive symptoms, burden, health risk behaviors and sleep quality, and patients’ symptom burden. In 26 caregivers with data for all time points (55% of the total sample), SF-36 Vitality scores showed trends of improvement when the patient returned home and greater impairment when institutionalization continued. Conclusion In caregivers of ICU survivors, fatigue is common and potentially linked with poor psychobehavioral responses. Worsening fatigue was associated with greater symptom distress and long-term patient institutionalization. PMID:24439845

  13. Patient and provider perceptions of care for diabetes: results of the cross-national DAWN Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peyrol, Mark; Rubin, Richard R.; Lauritzen, Torsten;

    2006-01-01

    respondent characteristics and outcomes varied by country. Conclusions/interpretation There is much need for improvement in applying the chronic-care model to the treatment and prevention of diabetes in all of the countries studied. Each country must develop its own priorities for improving diabetes care and......Aims/hypothesis We assessed country-level and individual-level patterns in patient and provider perceptions of diabetes care. Methods The study used a cross-sectional design with face-to-face or telephone interviews of diabetic patients and healthcare providers in 13 countries from Asia, Australia......, Europe and North America. Participants were randomly selected adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes (n=5,104), and randomly selected diabetes-care providers, including primary-care physicians (n=2,070), diabetes specialist physicians (n=635) and nurses (n=1,122). Multivariate analysis was used to examine...

  14. Comparison of Nutritional Parameters among Adult and Elderly Hemodialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gülperi Çelik, Bahar Oc, Inci Kara, Mümtaz Yılmaz, Ali Yuceaktas, Seza Apiliogullari

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the nutritional biochemical parameters, prealbumin levels, and bioimpedance analysis parameters of adult and elderly hemodialysis (HD) patients.Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study included 50 adult HD patients (42.0 % female). Nutritional status was assessed by post-dialysis multifrequency bioimpedance analysis (BIA), serum prealbumin and other nutritional biochemical parameters.Results: Mean age of patients was 57.4±15.1 years (range...

  15. Comparison of Nutritional Parameters among Adult and Elderly Hemodialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Çelik, Gülperi; Oc, Bahar; Kara, Inci; Yılmaz, Mümtaz; Yuceaktas, Ali; Apiliogullari, Seza

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the nutritional biochemical parameters, prealbumin levels, and bioimpedance analysis parameters of adult and elderly hemodialysis (HD) patients. Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study included 50 adult HD patients (42.0 % female). Nutritional status was assessed by post-dialysis multifrequency bioimpedance analysis (BIA), serum prealbumin and other nutritional biochemical parameters. Results: Mean age of patients was 57.4±15.1 years (range: 3...

  16. Social support, self-care, and quality of life in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was two-fold: (1) to examine the relationships among self-care, social support, and quality of life in adult cancer patients receiving radiotherapy while the selected basic conditioning factors of age, marital and socio-economic status, living arrangement, stage and site of cancer were statistically controlled; and (2) to test a theoretical model which postulated that (a) quality of life was predicted jointly by the selected basic conditioning factors, social support and self-care, and (b) self-care was predicted jointly by the selected basic conditioning factors and social support. A convenience sample of 112 adult cervical and head/neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy was obtained from radiotherapy outpatient clinic in three hospitals located in Bangkok, Thailand. Results of the study indicated positive relationships among self-care, social support, and quality of life. Socio-economic status, site of cancer, and self-care were significant predictors for reported quality of life. Social support appeared to be a significant predictor of quality of life indirectly through self-care. Socio-economic status and social support were also significant predictors of self-care, whereas, stage and site of cancer seemed to predict self-care indirectly through social support

  17. Identifying drivers of overall satisfaction in patients receiving HIV primary care: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bich N Dang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study seeks to understand the drivers of overall patient satisfaction in a predominantly low-income, ethnic-minority population of HIV primary care patients. The study's primary aims were to determine 1 the component experiences which contribute to patients' evaluations of their overall satisfaction with care received, and 2 the relative contribution of each component experience in explaining patients' evaluation of overall satisfaction. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 489 adult patients receiving HIV primary care at two clinics in Houston, Texas, from January 13-April 21, 2011. The participation rate among eligible patients was 94%. The survey included 15 questions about various components of the care experience, 4 questions about the provider experience and 3 questions about overall care. To ensure that the survey was appropriately tailored to our clinic population and the list of component experiences reflected all aspects of the care experience salient to patients, we conducted in-depth interviews with key providers and clinic staff and pre-tested the survey instrument with patients. RESULTS: Patients' evaluation of their provider correlated the strongest with their overall satisfaction (standardized β = 0.445, p<0.001 and accounted for almost half of the explained variance. Access and availability, like clinic hours and ease of calling the clinic, also correlated with overall satisfaction, but less strongly. Wait time and parking, despite receiving low patient ratings, did not correlate with overall satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: The patient-provider relationship far exceeds other component experiences of care in its association with overall satisfaction. Our study suggests that interventions to improve overall patient satisfaction should focus on improving patients' evaluation of their provider.

  18. Prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of dental anxiety among a group of adult patients attending a dental institution in Vadodara city, Gujarat, India

    OpenAIRE

    Ekta A Malvania; C G Ajithkrishnan

    2011-01-01

    Context: Anxiety is a subjective state of feelings. Dental anxiety is often reported as a cause of irregular dental attendance, delay in seeking dental care or even avoidance of dental care, resulting in poor oral health related quality of life. Aim: To assess the prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of dental anxiety among a group of adult patients attending a dental institution in Vadodara, Gujarat. Patients and Methods: A total of 150 adult patients waiting in the out-patien...

  19. Antiretroviral therapy outcome in human immuno-deficiency virus infected patients in a tertiary care hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Hasitha Diana Manohar; Smita Shenoy; Muralidhar Varma; Asha Kamath; Chaithanya Malalur; Kurady Laxminarayana Bairy; Amod Tilak; Kavitha Saravu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) presently accounts for the highest number of deaths due to any infective agent in the world. The present study assessed the one year treatment outcome following antiretroviral therapy in HIV positive, treatment na and iuml;ve patients in a tertiary care hospital. Methods: Adult HIV positive, antiretroviral treatment naive patients who were started on antiretroviral therapy (ART) between 1st January 2011 and 31st May 2013 were included in the s...

  20. Role of general practitioners in care of long term mentally ill patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Kendrick, T.; Sibbald, B; Burns, T.; Freeling, P.

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess general practitioners' involvement with long term mentally ill patients and attitudes towards their care. DESIGN--Postal questionnaire survey. SETTING--General practices in South West Thames region. SUBJECTS--507 general practitioners, 369 (73%) of whom returned the questionnaire. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--The number of adult long term mentally ill patients whom general practitioners estimate they have on their lists and general practitioners' willingness to take responsibil...

  1. Caring for the brain tumor patient: Family caregiver burden and unmet needs

    OpenAIRE

    Schubart, Jane R.; Kinzie, Mable B.; Farace, Elana

    2008-01-01

    The rapid onset and progression of a brain tumor, cognitive and behavioral changes, and uncertainty surrounding prognosis are issues well known to health practitioners in neuro-oncology. We studied the specific challenges that family caregivers face when caring for patients experiencing the significant neurocognitive and neurobehavioral disorders associated with brain tumors. We selected 25 family caregivers of adult brain tumor patients to represent the brain tumor illness trajectory (crisis...

  2. Agenda-setting revisited: When and how do primary-care physicians solicit patients' additional concerns?

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, JD; Tate, A.; Heritage, J

    2016-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Objective: Soliciting patients' complete agendas of concerns (aka. 'agenda setting') can improve patients' health outcomes and satisfaction, and physicians' time management. We assess the distribution, content, and effectiveness of physicians' post-chief-complaint, agenda-setting questions. Methods: We coded videotapes/transcripts of 407 primary-, acute-care visits between adults and 85 general-practice physicians operating in 46 community-based clinics in two sta...

  3. HIV Care and Treatment Beliefs among Patients Initiating Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) in Oromia, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymejczyk, Olga; Hoffman, Susie; Kulkarni, Sarah Gorrell; Gadisa, Tsigereda; Lahuerta, Maria; Remien, Robert H; Elul, Batya; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Melaku, Zenebe; Nash, Denis

    2016-05-01

    To better understand patient beliefs, which may influence adherence to HIV care and treatment, we examined three dimensions of beliefs among Ethiopian adults (n = 1177) initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART). Beliefs about benefits of ART/HIV clinical care were largely accurate, but few patients believed in the ability of ART to prevent sexual transmission and many thought Holy Water could cure HIV. Factors associated with lower odds of accurate beliefs included advanced HIV, lack of formal education, and Muslim religion (benefits of ART/clinical care); secondary or university education and more clinic visits (ART to prevent sexual transmission); and pregnancy and Orthodox Christian religion (Holy Water). Assessment of patient beliefs may help providers identify areas needing reinforcement. In this setting, counselors also need to stress the benefits of ART as prevention and that Holy Water should not be used to the exclusion of HIV care and ART. PMID:26346333

  4. Dental care for the irradiated patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many treatment sequelae are encountered when treating head and neck cancer patients by means of ionizing radiation therapy. In many cases, these sequelae are compounded by various nutritional and other medical disorders. Many sequelae can eventually result in severe complications of the jaws and teeth. The radiotherapist needs to utilize the help of the dentist (as well as the surgeon) to prevent many of these complications from occurring, to maintain and manage those that do occur, and to contribute to the overall care of head and neck cancer patients. It was thought for many years that problems of the jaws and teeth, such as osteoradionecrosis and post-irradiation caries of the teeth, were an end product of aggressive radiotherapy. Many of these complications can now be prevented. It should be borne in mind that changes that do occur start approximately 2 months after initiation of irradiation, although it sometimes takes a long time to observe the changes. The priorities along which the objectives of dental treatment should be directed, are discussed in this article

  5. Family Involvement in the Care of Hospitalized Elderly Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Gholizadeh, Leila; Mohammadi, Eesa; Yazdi, Khadijeh

    2015-09-01

    Family participation in caregiving to elderly inpatients is likely to improve the quality of care to older patients. This qualitative design study applied semi-structured interviews to elicit experiences from nurses, families, and patients on the notion of family participation in the care of elderly patients in two general teaching hospitals in Iran. Data were gathered using individual interviews, field notes, and participant observations. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis. The following main themes emerged through the data analysis process: (a) safety and quality in patient care and (b) unplanned and unstructured patient care participation. The study concludes that family involvement in caregiving to elderly patients is important, yet the participation should be based upon a planned and structured framework to ensure a safe and satisfying experience for patients, families, and health care team. PMID:24652880

  6. Assessment of spontaneous pneumothorax in adults in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparup Dhua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Pneumothorax continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality among respiratory patients, but there is a paucity of data regarding etiology, clinical profile, management, and outcome of spontaneous pneumothorax (SP, from this part of the world. Aims: To assess the patients of spontaneous pneumothorax in adults with special reference to the etiology, clinical presentation, management, and outcome of SP. Settings and Design: Prospective, observational study conducted in a tertiary care institution over a period of one year. Materials and Methods: All adult patients of SP attending the department of pulmonary medicine in a tertiary hospital were studied and detailed clinical, radiological, and management data were recorded and analyzed. Results: Sixty consecutive patients, who satisfied the inclusion criteria were included in the study. Among them 10 had primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP and 50 had secondary spontaneous pneumothorax (SSP. The overall male to female ratio was 4:1. The mean age of the PSP patients was 26.3 ± 2.19 years, whereas, that of the SSP patients was 53.42 ± 2.07 years (P < 0.0001. Seventy percent of the patients were smokers. The most common clinical manifestation of PSP was chest pain (80% in contrast to dyspnea in SSP (96%. The most common cause of SSP (42% was found to be chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD followed by pulmonary tuberculosis (30%. The cases were managed with intercostal tube drainage (85%, simple aspiration (8.33%, and observation (6.67%. Full expansion of the lung was noted in 91.67% of the cases. Conclusion: Spontaneous pneumothorax was more common in men. SSP was far more common in this study, and the predominant underlying cause of SSP was COPD, which surpassed tuberculosis as the leading cause of SSP. This is in contrast to the results from previous studies done in our country. Intercostal tube drainage was the mainstay of treatment and the response was good.

  7. Intensive care nurses′ opinions and practice for oral care of mechanically ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Adib-Hajbaghery

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Oral care is an essential aspect of critical care nursing. However, no study has been published on oral care practice of Iranian and Asian nurses. The majority of published studies were conducted in western and European countries. Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the nurses′ opinions and practice about oral care in patients under mechanical ventilation. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 130 intensive care nurses from 6 intensive care units in the university hospitals of Iran. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was used to gather the data and charts of 45 patients were evaluated. Statistical analysis: Descriptive statistical analysis are presented. Results: Oral care obtained the 7 th rank in prority and a mean score of 5.7 on a scale of 1-10. More than 21% of subjects did not perform oral care in their usual duties. High load of writing tasks and personnel shortages were the major barriers to oral care. Only 20% of the patients′ charts contained a report on oral care. Conclusions: Nurses did not consider oral care in intensive care patients as a high priority. This result highlights the need to continue education programs on oral care for improving the knowledge and attitude of intensive care nurses with respect to oral care.

  8. Identification and characteristics of patients with palliative care needs in Brazilian primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Marcucci, Fernando C. I.; Cabrera, Marcos A. S.; Perilla, Anamaria Baquero; Brun, Marilia Maroneze; de Barros, Eder Marcos L.; Martins, Vanessa M.; Rosenberg, John P.; Yates, Patsy

    2016-01-01

    Background The Brazilian healthcare system offers universal coverage but lacks information about how patients with PC needs are serviced by its primary care program, Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF). Methods Cross-sectional study in community settings. Patients in ESF program were screened using a Palliative Care Screening Tool (PCST). Included patients were assessed with Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS), Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) and Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS). Res...

  9. The effects of patient care in health care work: The effects of patient care on job stress, emotional exhaustion, and job satifaction among health care workers in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Granbo, Sanna Mari Dyrkorn

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that patient care is a source of job stress and emotional exhaustion, but at the same time a source of job satisfaction. The present study examined the effects of hours spent in patient care on job stress, emotional exhaustion, and job satisfaction, and investigated the relationship between hardiness, job control and work-related support and the three dependent variables. A questionnaire survey, consisting of Cooper’s Job Stress Questionnaire, the Emotional Exh...

  10. Person-Centered Care for Older Adults with Chronic Conditions and Functional Impairment: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Alexis Coulourides; Wilber, Kathleen; Mosqueda, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Person-centered care (PCC) shifts focus away from the traditional biomedical model in favor of embracing personal choice and autonomy for people receiving health services. It has become an important avenue for improving primary care, and older adults remain a priority target for PCC because they are more likely to have complex care needs than younger individuals. Nevertheless, despite a growing body of evidence regarding its use, PCC still lacks an agreed-upon definition. A literature review was conducted to explore extant scholarship on PCC for older adults, assess corresponding definitions of PCC, and identify important elements of quality PCC. Nearly 3,000 articles published between 1990 and 2014 were identified. Excluding search results outside the parameters of this study, the final review comprised 132 nonduplicate sources focused on patient-centered care or PCC in older adults. Fifteen descriptions of PCC were identified, addressing 17 central principles or values. The six most-prominent domains of PCC were holistic or whole-person care, respect and value, choice, dignity, self-determination, and purposeful living. The body of evidence reviewed suggests that PCC is an important area of growing interest. Although multiple definitions and elements of PCC abound-with many commonalities and some overlap-the field would benefit from a consensus definition and list of essential elements to clarify how to operationalize a PCC approach to health care and services for older adults. This work guided the development of a separate American Geriatrics Society expert panel statement presenting a standardized definition and a list of PCC elements for older adults with chronic conditions or functional impairment. PMID:26626408

  11. Negative health care experiences of immigrant patients: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stronks Karien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Negative events are abusive, potentially dangerous or life-threatening health care events, as perceived by the patient. Patients' perceptions of negative events are regarded as a potentially important source of information about the quality of health care. We explored negative events in hospital care as perceived by immigrant patients. Methods Semi-structured individual and group interviews were conducted with respondents about negative experiences of health care. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using a framework method. A total of 22 respondents representing 7 non-Dutch ethnic origins were interviewed; each respondent reported a negative event in hospital care or treatment. Results Respondents reported negative events in relation to: 1 inadequate information exchange with care providers; 2 different expectations between respondents and care providers about medical procedures; 3 experienced prejudicial behavior on the part of care providers. Conclusions We identified three key situations in which negative events were experienced by immigrant patients. Exploring negative events from the immigrant patient perspective offers important information to help improve health care. Our results indicate that care providers need to be trained in adequately exchanging information with the immigrant patient and finding out specific patient needs and perspectives on illness and treatment.

  12. A study assessing patient satisfaction in a tertiary care hospital in India: the changing healthcare scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Aashima; Garg, Shalini; Pareek, Udai

    2009-06-01

    The healthcare service scenario in India is expected to evolve into a more developed stage. More emphasis has been given on patient satisfaction as this is an important consideration for the assessment of the hospital services. The concept of patient satisfaction is also rapidly changing and the hospitals are using variety of techniques to improve patient care and organizational efficiency. Patient satisfaction questionnaire is a validated instrument to assess the level of the satisfaction of adult patients. The questionnaire was administered on those patients who were admitted in hospital for at least three days. In our study 88% patients were satisfied with treatment and medical care they had received. About 86% patients found that the hospital services were excellent. However, it is felt that patient values and culture should be explored for further improving patient doctor communication. There is hence a scope for improvement in meeting patient's needs and preferences and rendering hospital services. This can be achieved by some feedback system which could be available to the patients and later worked upon by the management, to improve the patient care by bridging the gap between senior management and patients. PMID:22010498

  13. Clinical Approach to Nonresponsive Pneumonia in Adults Diagnosed by a Primary Care Clinician: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiley B. Vander Wyst

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is commonly diagnosed in the primary care setting. Management of nonresponsive pneumonia (NRP, i.e. failure to respond to CAP treatment, is not clearly understood. The purpose of this study was to describe the initial work-up and treatment of CAP in the ambulatory primary care setting and to determine relative proportion of, diagnostic approach to and treatment of NRP. Methods: We retrospectively studied adult patients diagnosed with CAP within our large, integrated health care system from October 2006 through July 2013. Cases were defined as patients with CAP who worsened after 4 days, or did not improve within 10 days, of antibiotic treatment. Controls were CAP patients who did not meet case definition. Mann-Whitney and t-tests were used to analyze continuous variables. Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test was used to analyze categorical variables. Significant variables were used to construct a multivariable logistic regression model. Results: Of 250 total patients studied, there were 85 cases and 165 controls. The case population was significantly older (59 ± 16 vs. 53 ± 19 years, P = 0.02. Multivariable logistic regression revealed former smoker (P < 0.01, initial presentation to urgent care (P = 0.02 and myalgia (P = 0.003 as predictors of NRP. Chest X-rays were more commonly ordered for cases at initial visit (80% vs. 68%, P = 0.06. Overall, 24% of patients had additional testing at the initial visit (39% of cases vs. 16% of controls, P < 0.001. Additionally, a higher proportion of cases underwent antibiotic change at their first (62% vs. 15%, P < 0.001 or second (47% vs. 5%, P < 0.001 follow-up visit. Conclusions: Patients with NRP tended to be former smokers, report myalgia and/or present to urgent care. The majority of providers conducted chest X-rays, but no further pneumonia testing, at the initial visit. Further study is needed to determine if this strategy leads to delayed etiologic

  14. A patient perspective in research on intercultural caring in maternity care: A meta-ethnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Wikberg

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore and describe a patient perspective in research on intercultural caring in maternity care. In total, 40 studies are synthesized using Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnography method. The following opposite metaphors were found: caring versus non-caring; language and communication problems versus information and choice; access to medical and technological care versus incompetence; acculturation: preserving the original culture versus adapting to a new culture; professional caring relationship versus family and community involvement; caring is important for well-being and health versus conflicts cause interrupted care; vulnerable women with painful memories versus racism. Alice in Wonderland emerged as an overarching metaphor to describe intercultural caring in maternity care. Furthermore, intercultural caring is seen in different dimensions of uniqueness, context, culture, and universality. There are specific cultural and maternity care features in intercultural caring. There is an inner core of caring consisting of respect, presence, and listening as well as external factors such as economy and organization that impact on intercultural caring. Moreover, legal status of the patient, as well as power relationships and racism, influences intercultural caring. Further meta-syntheses about well-documented intercultural phenomena and ethnic groups, as well as empirical studies about current phenomena, are suggested.

  15. A patient perspective in research on intercultural caring in maternity care: A meta-ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikberg, Anita; Bondas, Terese

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore and describe a patient perspective in research on intercultural caring in maternity care. In total, 40 studies are synthesized using Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnography method. The following opposite metaphors were found: caring versus non-caring; language and communication problems versus information and choice; access to medical and technological care versus incompetence; acculturation: preserving the original culture versus adapting to a new culture; professional caring relationship versus family and community involvement; caring is important for well-being and health versus conflicts cause interrupted care; vulnerable women with painful memories versus racism. Alice in Wonderland emerged as an overarching metaphor to describe intercultural caring in maternity care. Furthermore, intercultural caring is seen in different dimensions of uniqueness, context, culture, and universality. There are specific cultural and maternity care features in intercultural caring. There is an inner core of caring consisting of respect, presence, and listening as well as external factors such as economy and organization that impact on intercultural caring. Moreover, legal status of the patient, as well as power relationships and racism, influences intercultural caring. Further meta-syntheses about well-documented intercultural phenomena and ethnic groups, as well as empirical studies about current phenomena, are suggested. PMID:20640028

  16. Towards better patient care: drugs to avoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Common sense dictates that one should choose tried and tested drugs with proven, concrete benefits that outweigh their adverse effects. Many new drugs are approved each year, often despite a lack of solid evidence that they are any better than existing treatments. Worse, some are approved despite being less effective or more harmful than current options. Massive promotion is used to ensure that such drugs achieve a positive image in the eyes of healthcare professionals and patients. Renowned "opinion leaders" intervene in their favour at conferences and in specialist media, and their opinions are further propagated by specialists in the field. Finally, campaigns in the lay media are used to highlight the target illness, encouraging patients to request a prescription. New data sometimes show that older, initially promising drugs are less effective or more harmful than first thought. For all these reasons, many drugs that are now present on the market are more harmful than beneficial and should be avoided. Unfortunately, negative assessment data and warnings are often drowned in the flood of promotion and advertising. Front-line healthcare professionals who are determined to act in their patients' best interests can find themselves swimming against a tide of specialist opinion, marketing authorisation, and reimbursement decisions. By leaving drugs that are more harmful than beneficial on the market and contenting themselves with simple half-measures, healthcare authorities are failing in their duty to protect patients. Prescrire, a journal funded solely by its subscribers, does not seek to do the work of health authorities, and does not have the means to do so. Prescrire's goal is simply to help healthcare professionals provide better care. The following text lists the principal drugs that we consider more harmful than beneficial, based on our reviews published between 2010 and 2012 in our French edition. These drugs should not be used. Patients and healthcare

  17. Transition is the Change from Pediatric Medicine to Adult Medicine by the Example of Congenital Heart Disease. Epidemiology and Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmaltz А.А.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Owing to significant medical progress in the last decades, at present there are more adults with congenital heart disease (CHD than children and adolescents. The three cardiac scientific societies — Deutsche Gesellschaft für Kardiologie — DGK (German Society of Cardiology, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Pädiatrische Kardiologie — DGPK (German Society of Pediatric Cardiology and Deutsche Gesellschaft für Thorax-, Herz- und Gefüchirurgie — DGTHG (German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery — have taken this fact into consideration and developed the statement of an integrated medical care of adult patients with CHD, the curriculum of post-doctoral education of pediatric and adult cardiologists and medical guidelines for diagnosis and therapy of CHD patients. The certification of adult CHD physicians and interregional centers of CHD in adults have been started. The approach enables to smooth the transition of CHD patients from children group to adult age group.

  18. Experiences of adult patients hearing loss postlingually with Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa María Lizcano Tejado

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is a significant public health problem. The incidence is difficult to establish because of the lack of data in people under age three, but is estimated about 1 per thousand for severe and profound hearing loss.A cochlear implant (CI is a device that converts sounds into electrical energy that triggers a sensation of hearing. The IC is indicated in patients with severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with null or poor benefit use of hearing aids.The general objective of this project is to understand the experiences of adult patients with severe-profound sensorineural hearing loss with IC postlingually throughout the implementation process.A personal vision of those implemented will allow us to learn how to face the possibility to hear and interact with their environment, applying this information to improve health care provided to them and identifying those areas where such assistance should be improved. Also allow us to compare the initial expectations and have been achieved, creating realistic expectations for future candidates.For its development we have designed a qualitative study, based on the principles and procedures of grounded theory, semistructured interviews, participant observation and discussion groups.The data will be analyzed using the software Nudist ViVo 9.

  19. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia presenting with arthritis in an adult patient

    OpenAIRE

    Usalan, C.; Ozarslan, E; Zengin, N.; Buyukayk, Y.; Gullu, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The earliest manifestations of leukaemia often include rheumatic signs and symptoms. Arthritis is a well recognised complication of leukaemia in children, but acute and chronic leukaemia may also cause arthritis in adults. Leukaemic arthritis may occur at any time during the course of leukaemia and may be the presenting manifestation. It should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of both childhood and adult rheumatic disease. We present an adult patient presenting with arthr...

  20. Do health literacy and patient empowerment affect self-care behaviour? A survey study among Turkish patients with diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyüboğlu, Ezgi; Schulz, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the impact of health literacy and patient empowerment on diabetes self-care behaviour in patients in metropolitan Turkish diabetes centres. The conceptual background is provided by the psychological health empowerment model, which holds that health literacy without patient empowerment comes down to wasting health resources, while empowerment without health literacy can lead to dangerous or suboptimal health behaviour. Design, setting and participants A cross-sectional study was conducted with 167 patients over the age of 18 from one of two diabetes clinics in a major Turkish City. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to eligible outpatients who had an appointment in one of the clinics. Health literacy was measured by a newly translated Turkish version of the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA) and the Chew self-report scale. Patient empowerment was measured by a 12-item scale based on Spreitzer's conceptualisation of psychological empowerment in the workplace. Self-care behaviour was measured by the Self-care behaviours were measured by the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Measure (SDSCA). Level of diabetes knowledge was measured by Diabetes Knowledge Test. Results Two subscales of empowerment, impact and self-determination, predicted self-reported frequency of self-care behaviours. Neither health literacy nor diabetes knowledge had an effect on self-care behaviours. Conclusions Health literacy might be more effective in clinical decisions while empowerment might exert a stronger influence on habitual health behaviours. PMID:26975936

  1. Integrated care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoef, John

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes an example of optimization of the traditional multidisciplinary team care model and evolving arthritis care models with emphasis on the question how theoretical models of the system theory and communication can be used to analyse, evaluate, and optimize care delivery. With respect to the team care model we used a rehabilitation tool, for which we developed an accompanying computer application. This thesis contributes to the use of theoretical models, measurement instrume...

  2. Adult Asylum Seekers from the Middle East Including Syria in Central Europe: What Are Their Health Care Problems?

    OpenAIRE

    Pfortmüller, Carmen; Schwetlick, Miriam; Müller, Thomas; Lehmann, Beat; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis

    2016-01-01

    Background Forced displacement related to persecution and violent conflict has reached a new peak in recent years. The primary aim of this study is to provide an initial overview of the acute and chronic health care problems of asylum seekers from the Middle East, with special emphasis on asylum seekers from Syria. Methods Our retrospective data analysis comprised adult patients presenting to our emergency department between 01.11.2011 and 30.06.2014 with the official resident sta...

  3. Obstetrics Patients' Assessment of Medical Students' Role in Their Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrane, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Obstetric patients rated the skills and assessed the roles of students caring for them during a clinical clerkship. They rated skills and attitudes high, generally, with lower ratings for their ability to answer questions and preparation to participate in care. Most felt students improved their care, primarily in supportive ways. (Author/MSE)

  4. Impact of Physician Asthma Care Education on Patient Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, Michael D.; Slish, Kathryn K.; Evans, David; Mellins, Robert B.; Brown, Randall W.; Lin, Xihong; Kaciroti, Niko; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of a continuing medical education program, Physician Asthma Care Education, in improving pediatricians' asthma therapeutic and communication skills and patients' health care utilization for asthma. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 10 regions in the United States. Primary care providers…

  5. Cancer patients' use of family practice and secondary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokolowski, Ineta; Kjeldgaard, Anette Hvenegaard; Olesen, Frede;

    recently diagnosed with cancer and among previous cancer patients. Materials and methods: In a nationwide database in Denmark (population 5.5 million) all contacts to the health care system are registered. We describe the pattern of contact with all parts of the health care system for a) the total...... who have recently undergone treatment and patients in the survivorship phase of cancer use different parts of the health care system, and how much they use FP. Information about this will enable us to discuss the need for shared care, integrated care and information exchange and create a platform for......Aims: We know that in Denmark some 90% of citizens have contact with family practice (FP) during a year and around 40% has contact with secondary care.  This demands efforts to create integrated and shared care. The aim of this study is to document the pattern of contacts with FP among patients...

  6. A scoping review of the implications of adult obesity in the delivery and acceptance of dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, A; Loescher, A; Marshman, Z

    2016-09-01

    Background Due to the increasing prevalence of obesity within the general population it is presumed that the prevalence of overweight and obese adults accessing dental services will also increase. For this reason dentists need to be aware of implications of managing such patients.Methods A scoping review was carried out. Both Medline via OVID and Scopus databases were searched along with grey literature databases and the websites of key organizations. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were established. The data were collected on a purpose-made data collection form and analysed descriptively.Results The review identified 28 relevant published articles and two relevant items of grey literature. Following review of this literature three themes relating to adult obesity in the delivery and acceptance of dental care emerged; clinical, service delivery and patient implications. The majority of the papers focused on the clinical implications.Conclusion On the topic of adult obesity and dental care, the majority of published and grey literature focuses on the clinical implications. Further research is needed on both the patients' perspectives of being overweight or obese and the delivery and acceptance of dental care and the service delivery implications. PMID:27608579

  7. Burden of Hospital Acquired Infections and Antimicrobial Use in Vietnamese Adult Intensive Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Mattias; Nadjm, Behzad; Dinh, Quynh-Dao; Nilsson, Lennart E.; Rydell, Ulf; Le, Tuyet Thi Diem; Trinh, Son Hong; Pham, Hung Minh; Tran, Cang Thanh; Doan, Hanh Thi Hong; Tran, Nguyen Thua; Le, Nhan Duc; Huynh, Nhuan Van; Tran, Thao Phuong; Tran, Bao Duc; Nguyen, Son Truong; Pham, Thao Thi Ngoc; Dang, Tam Quang; Nguyen, Chau Van Vinh; Lam, Yen Minh; Thwaites, Guy; Van Nguyen, Kinh; Hanberger, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Vietnam is a lower middle-income country with no national surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections (HAIs). We assessed the prevalence of hospital-acquired infections and antimicrobial use in adult intensive care units (ICUs) across Vietnam. Methods Monthly repeated point prevalence surveys were systematically conducted to assess HAI prevalence and antimicrobial use in 15 adult ICUs across Vietnam. Adults admitted to participating ICUs before 08:00 a.m. on the survey day were included. Results Among 3287 patients enrolled, the HAI prevalence was 29.5% (965/3266 patients, 21 missing). Pneumonia accounted for 79.4% (804/1012) of HAIs Most HAIs (84.5% [855/1012]) were acquired in the survey hospital with 42.5% (363/855) acquired prior to ICU admission and 57.5% (492/855) developed during ICU admission. In multivariate analysis, the strongest risk factors for HAI acquired in ICU were: intubation (OR 2.76), urinary catheter (OR 2.12), no involvement of a family member in patient care (OR 1.94), and surgery after admission (OR 1.66). 726 bacterial isolates were cultured from 622/1012 HAIs, most frequently Acinetobacter baumannii (177/726 [24.4%]), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (100/726 [13.8%]), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (84/726 [11.6%]), with carbapenem resistance rates of 89.2%, 55.7%, and 14.9% respectively. Antimicrobials were prescribed for 84.8% (2787/3287) patients, with 73.7% of patients receiving two or more. The most common antimicrobial groups were third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, and carbapenems (20.1%, 19.4%, and 14.1% of total antimicrobials, respectively). Conclusion A high prevalence of HAIs was observed, mainly caused by Gram-negative bacteria with high carbapenem resistance rates. This in combination with a high rate of antimicrobial use illustrates the urgent need to improve rational antimicrobial use and infection control efforts. PMID:26824228

  8. Burden of Hospital Acquired Infections and Antimicrobial Use in Vietnamese Adult Intensive Care Units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Dinh Phu

    Full Text Available Vietnam is a lower middle-income country with no national surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections (HAIs. We assessed the prevalence of hospital-acquired infections and antimicrobial use in adult intensive care units (ICUs across Vietnam.Monthly repeated point prevalence surveys were systematically conducted to assess HAI prevalence and antimicrobial use in 15 adult ICUs across Vietnam. Adults admitted to participating ICUs before 08:00 a.m. on the survey day were included.Among 3287 patients enrolled, the HAI prevalence was 29.5% (965/3266 patients, 21 missing. Pneumonia accounted for 79.4% (804/1012 of HAIs Most HAIs (84.5% [855/1012] were acquired in the survey hospital with 42.5% (363/855 acquired prior to ICU admission and 57.5% (492/855 developed during ICU admission. In multivariate analysis, the strongest risk factors for HAI acquired in ICU were: intubation (OR 2.76, urinary catheter (OR 2.12, no involvement of a family member in patient care (OR 1.94, and surgery after admission (OR 1.66. 726 bacterial isolates were cultured from 622/1012 HAIs, most frequently Acinetobacter baumannii (177/726 [24.4%], Pseudomonas aeruginosa (100/726 [13.8%], and Klebsiella pneumoniae (84/726 [11.6%], with carbapenem resistance rates of 89.2%, 55.7%, and 14.9% respectively. Antimicrobials were prescribed for 84.8% (2787/3287 patients, with 73.7% of patients receiving two or more. The most common antimicrobial groups were third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, and carbapenems (20.1%, 19.4%, and 14.1% of total antimicrobials, respectively.A high prevalence of HAIs was observed, mainly caused by Gram-negative bacteria with high carbapenem resistance rates. This in combination with a high rate of antimicrobial use illustrates the urgent need to improve rational antimicrobial use and infection control efforts.

  9. A comparison of strategies to recruit older patients and carers to end-of-life research in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Hanratty, B; Lowson, E.; Holmes, L.; Addington-Hall, J.; Arthur, A.; Grande, G.; Payne, S.; Seymour, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Older adults receive most of their end-of-life care in the community, but there are few published data to guide researchers on recruitment to studies in primary care. The aim of this study was to compare recruitment of patients and bereaved carers from general practices in areas with different research network support, and identify challenges in obtaining samples representative of those in need of end-of-life care. Methods: Comparative analysis of recruitment from gene...

  10. Providing care for critically ill surgical patients: challenges and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisherman, Samuel A; Kaplan, Lewis; Gracias, Vicente H; Beilman, Gregory J; Toevs, Christine; Byrnes, Matthew C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2013-07-01

    Providing optimal care for critically ill and injured surgical patients will become more challenging with staff shortages for surgeons and intensivists. This white paper addresses the historical issues behind the present situation, the need for all intensivists to engage in dedicated critical care per the intensivist model, and the recognition that intensivists from all specialties can provide optimal care for the critically ill surgical patient, particularly with continuing involvement by the surgeon of record. The new acute care surgery training paradigm (including trauma, surgical critical care, and emergency general surgery) has been developed to increase interest in trauma and surgical critical care, but the number of interested trainees remains too few. Recommendations are made for broadening the multidisciplinary training and practice opportunities in surgical critical care for intensivists from all base specialties and for maintaining the intensivist model within acute care surgery practice. Support from academic and administrative leadership, as well as national organizations, will be needed. PMID:23754675

  11. Patient and health care professional views and experiences of computer agent-supported health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Neville

    2006-03-01

    Conclusions Patients and HCPs welcomed the introduction of agent technology to the delivery of health care. Widespread use will depend more on the trust patients place in their own GP than on technological issues.

  12. Advanced lung cancer patients' experience with continuity of care and supportive care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Amna; Barbera, Lisa; Howell, Doris; Moineddin, Rahim; Bezjak, Andrea; Sussman, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    As cancer care becomes increasingly complex, the ability to coordinate this care is more difficult for health care providers, patients and their caregivers alike. Despite the widely recognized need for improving continuity and coordination of care, the relationship of continuity of care with patient outcomes has yet to be elucidated. Our study's main finding is that the Continuity and Coordination subscale of the widely used Picker System of Ambulatory Cancer Care Survey is able to distinguish between lung cancer patients with unmet supportive care needs and those without. Specifically, this study shows a new association between this widely implemented continuity and coordination survey and the 'psychological needs' domain, as well as the 'health system and information' domains of supportive care needs. The finding provides support for the idea that interventions to improve continuity may impact tangible indicators of patient care such as supportive care needs being met. The study focuses attention on continuity of care as an important aspect of optimizing outcomes in cancer care. PMID:23274923

  13. Physical and psychosocial challenges in adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    duTreil S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sue duTreil Louisiana Center for Bleeding and Clotting Disorders, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: Numerous challenges confront adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors, including difficulty in controlling bleeding episodes, deterioration of joints, arthritic pain, physical disability, emotional turmoil, and social issues. High-intensity treatment regimens often used in the treatment of patients with inhibitors also impose significant scheduling, economic, and emotional demands on patients and their families or primary caregivers. A comprehensive multidisciplinary assessment of the physical, emotional, and social status of adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors is essential for the development of treatment strategies that can be individualized to address the complex needs of these patients. Keywords: adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors, adherence, physical challenges, psychosocial challenges, health-related quality of life

  14. Cognitive behavioral treatment for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder. A therapist manual for primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Melinda A; Diefenbach, Gretchen J; Hopko, Derek R

    2004-01-01

    At least four academic clinical trials have demonstrated the utility of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). These data may not generalize, however, to more heterogeneous and functionally impaired patients and the medical settings in which they typically receive care. A recent pilot project suggested the potential benefits of a new version of CBT for GAD among older patients in primary care. The manual developed and tested in this pilot project is presented here. Treatment components include motivation and education, relaxation skills, cognitive therapy, problem-solving-skills training, exposure exercises, and sleep-management-skills training. Procedures are designed to be administered flexibly to maximize attention to individual patient needs. Examples of session summaries, patient handouts, and homework forms are provided. PMID:14710708

  15. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application

  16. Anesthesia for an Adult Patient with Congenital Diaphragmatic Eventration

    OpenAIRE

    Uysal, Hale Yarkan

    2007-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic eventration is an uncommon condition in adults and is defined as an abnormal elevation of the diaphragm. In adults, diaphragmatic eventration causes respiratory impairment that is associated with severe dyspnea, orthopnea and hypoxia. Most of the symptomatic patients may survive with supportive therapy without any need for surgical correction, though they are at risk of spontaneous diaphragm rupture. Spontaneous diaphragmatic rupture may develop in a patient with dia...

  17. An Integrated Care Initiative to Improve Patient Outcome in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Norbert eMayer-Amberg; Rainer eWoltmann; Stefanie eWalther

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment of schizophrenia patients requires integration of medical and psychosocial inputs. In Germany, various healthcare service providers and institutions are involved in the treatment process. Early and continuous treatment is important but often not possible because of the fragmented medical care system in Germany. The current work is a quality monitoring report of a novel care setting, called Integrated Care Initiative Schizophrenia. It has implemented a networked care con...

  18. Musculoskeletal problems in intensive care unit patients post discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Devine, H.; MacTavish, P.; Quasim, T.; Kinsella, J; McPeake, J.; Daniel, M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to examine the incidence of musculoskeletal problems (i.e. pain, weakness, decreased joint range of movement) in critical care patients post discharge. Post intensive care syndrome (PICS) is now a widely used term to describe the collection of problems patients develop due to their stay in intensive care. ICU survivors have been found to have a high risk of developing not only psychological problems but physical problems such as Int...

  19. Patient Activation and Mental Health Care Experiences Among Women Veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Kimerling, Rachel; Pavao, Joanne; Wong, Ava

    2016-01-01

    We utilized a nationally representative survey of women veteran primary care users to examine associations between patient activation and mental health care experiences. A dose–response relationship was observed, with odds of high quality ratings significantly greater at each successive level of patient activation. Higher activation levels were also significantly associated with preference concordant care for gender-related preferences (use of female providers, women-only settings, and women-...

  20. Improving organizational climate for excellence in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    Managers in health care organizations today are expected to achieve higher-quality patient care at a lower cost. Developing and maintaining a positive organizational climate can help improve motivation and foster higher employee performance. In turn, this will help the organization deliver better patient care at a lower cost. This article offers metrics for assessing organizational climate, analyzes barriers to a positive climate, and explores strategies that managers can use to build the type of climate that fosters high performance. PMID:23903945

  1. Contributors to Adult Sibling Relationships and Intention to Care of Siblings of Individuals With Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuskelly, Monica

    2016-05-01

    The contribution of childhood sibling relationships to adult sibling relationships and intention to provide care was investigated in a sample in which one member of each dyad had Down syndrome. Thirty-nine adult siblings of an adult with Down syndrome who had participated in a study of sibling relationships in childhood/adolescence provided data about the quality of current relationships and of their intention to provide care for their brother/sister with Down syndrome in the future. Only behavior problems in the child with Down syndrome predicted warmth of the current adult relationship. Although adult sibling relationships were reported to be warm, the quality of neither the current nor the past relationship was associated with the reported intention to provide care. PMID:27119212

  2. Hypertensive patients in primary health care: access, connection and care involved in spontaneous demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girão, Ana Lívia Araújo; Freitas, Consuelo Helena Aires de

    2016-06-01

    Objective To assess the impacts of inclusion of care for spontaneous demands in the treatment of hypertensive patients in primary health care. Methods Third generation qualitative assessment survey conducted with 16 workers in a Primary Care Health Unit (PHCU) of the city of Fortaleza, state of Ceara, in the period between July and September of 2015. To collect data, systematic field observation and semi-structured interviews were used, and the stages of thematic content analysis were adopted for data analysis. Results Participants revealed that access, connection and care are fundamental to the treatment of hypertension. However, they said that the introduction of free access for spontaneous demands compromised the flow of care in the hypertension programs. Conclusion A dichotomy between the practice of care recommended by health policies and the one existing in the reality of PHCUs was shown, causing evident losses to the care of hypertensive patients in primary care. PMID:27253602

  3. Responding to vulnerability in old age: patient-centred care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abley, Clare

    Patient-centred care is a term widely used in health policy and is familiar to staff as a principle or commonly agreed approach to care. However, nursing and multidisciplinary teams often do not agree how it should be provided for older patients. This article outlines three different models of patient-centred care applicable to the care of older people. The article also explores the concept of vulnerability in old age, highlighting differences between the perspectives of older people and those of professionals and how clinical practice can be improved to achieve a more patient-centred approach. The links between patient-centred care and vulnerability in old age are considered along with the implications of this for clinical practice. PMID:23240515

  4. Characteristics of Care and Caregivers of Alzheimer's Patients in Elderly Care Homes: A Qualitative Research

    OpenAIRE

    Yektatalab, Sh; Kaveh, M H; F. Sharif; Fallahi Khoshknab, M; Petramfar, P

    2012-01-01

    Background Due to the increase in the number of Alzheimer’s patients in Iran and also the limitation of cultural knowledge about caring of these patients, this study was designed to explore the perceptions of Iranian caregivers about caring Alzheimer patients in the elderly care homes. Methods A qualitative content analysis method was conducted on two elderly care homes of Shiraz/Iran, during 2009-2011. Fourteen key informants (10 women and 4 men, between 25-35 years of age), who had been wor...

  5. Determining level of care appropriateness in the patient journey from acute care to rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashford Guy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The selection of patients for rehabilitation, and the timing of transfer from acute care, are important clinical decisions that impact on care quality and patient flow. This paper reports utilization review data on inpatients in acute care with stroke, hip fracture or elective joint replacement, and other inpatients referred for rehabilitation. It examines reasons why acute level of care criteria are not met and explores differences in decision making between acute care and rehabilitation teams around patient appropriateness and readiness for transfer. Methods Cohort study of patients in a large acute referral hospital in Australia followed with the InterQual utilization review tool, modified to also include reasons why utilization criteria are not met. Additional data on team decision making about appropriateness for rehabilitation, and readiness for transfer, were collected on a subset of patients. Results There were 696 episodes of care (7189 bed days. Days meeting acute level of care criteria were 56% (stroke, hip fracture and joint replacement patients and 33% (other patients, from the time of referral. Most inappropriate days in acute care were due to delays in processes/scheduling (45% or being more appropriate for rehabilitation or lower level of care (30%. On the subset of patients, the acute care team and the utilization review tool deemed patients ready for rehabilitation transfer earlier than the rehabilitation team (means of 1.4, 1.3 and 4.0 days from the date of referral, respectively. From when deemed medically stable for transfer by the acute care team, 28% of patients became unstable. From when deemed stable by the rehabilitation team or utilization review, 9% and 11%, respectively, became unstable. Conclusions A high proportion of patient days did not meet acute level of care criteria, due predominantly to inefficiencies in care processes, or to patients being more appropriate for an alternative level of

  6. PRIMARY PALLIATIVE CARE? - Treating terminally ill cancer patients in the primary care sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Olesen, Frede;

    BACKGROUND. Palliative care for cancer patients is an important part of a GP's work. Although every GP is frequently involved in care for terminally ill cancer patients, only little is known about how these palliative efforts are perceived by the patients and their families, a knowledge that is...... vital to further improve palliative care in the primary sector.AIM. The aim of the study was to analyse the quality of palliative home care with focus on the GP's role based on evaluations by relatives of recently deceased cancer patients and professionals from both the primary and secondary health care...... sectors.METHOD. A number of focus group interviews were conducted with three types of subgroups: 1) Bereaved relatives, 2) GPs and 3) Various health-care-professionals, namely community nurses, hospital physicians and GPs. The interviews were transcribed and analysed according to a phenomenological...

  7. Patients' experiences of postoperative intermediate care and standard surgical ward care after emergency abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Vester-Andersen, Morten; Nielsen, Martin Vedel;

    2015-01-01

    patients experience postoperative care. The patient population is generally older with multiple comorbidities, and the short-term postoperative mortality rate is 15-20%. Thus, vigilant surgeon and nursing attention is essential. The present study is a qualitative sub-study of a randomised trial evaluating......AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how...... postoperative intermediate care after emergency abdominal surgery, the InCare trial. DESIGN: A qualitative study with individual semi-structured interviews. METHODS: We analysed interviews using Systematic Text Condensation. RESULTS: Eighteen patients (nine intervention/nine controls) were strategically sampled...

  8. Being Overweight Is Associated With Greater Survival in ICU Patients: Results From the Intensive Care Over Nations Audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakr, Y.; Alhussami, I.; Nanchal, R.; Wunderink, R.G.; Pellis, T.; Wittebole, X.; Martin-Loeches, I.; Francois, B.; Leone, M.; Vincent, J.L.; Pickkers, P.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of body mass index on ICU outcome and on the development of ICU-acquired infection. DESIGN: A substudy of the Intensive Care Over Nations audit. SETTING: Seven hundred thirty ICUs in 84 countries. PATIENTS: All adult ICU patients admitted between May 8 and 18, 2012, e

  9. Being Overweight Is Associated With Greater Survival in ICU Patients : Results From the Intensive Care Over Nations Audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakr, Yasser; Alhussami, Ilmi; Nanchal, Rahul; Wunderink, Richard G; Pellis, Tommaso; Wittebole, Xavier; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; François, Bruno; Leone, Marc; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Kesecioglu, J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of body mass index on ICU outcome and on the development of ICU-acquired infection. DESIGN: A substudy of the Intensive Care Over Nations audit. SETTING: Seven hundred thirty ICUs in 84 countries. PATIENTS: All adult ICU patients admitted between May 8 and 18, 2012, e

  10. In Sickness and in Health: Health Care Experiences of Korean Immigrant Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Juhn, Erica

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the health care experiences of Korean immigrant older adults, 65 years of age or older, living in Los Angeles County, who have health care access through Medicare and/or Medi-Cal, access to a large Korean ethnic enclave, and a diverse social support network. Twelve Korean immigrant older adults were recruited through word-of-mouth via community contacts. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with individual seniors, with the help of ...

  11. Is older adult care mediated by caregivers’ cultural stereotypes? The role of competence and warmth attribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío; Bustillos, Antonio; Santacreu, Marta; Schettini, Rocio; Díaz-Veiga, Pura; Huici, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to examine, from the stereotype content model (SCM) perspective, the role of the competence and warmth stereotypes of older adults held by professional caregivers. Methods A quasi-experimental design, ex post facto with observational analyses, was used in this study. The cultural view on competence and warmth was assessed in 100 caregivers working in a set of six residential geriatric care units (three of them organized following a person-centered care approach and the other three providing standard geriatric care). In order to assess caregivers’ cultural stereotypical views, the SCM questionnaire was administered. To evaluate the role of caregivers’ cultural stereotypes in their professional performance as well as in older adult functioning, two observational scales from the Sistema de Evaluación de Residencias de Ancianos (assessment system for older adults residences)-RS (staff functioning and residents’ functioning) were applied. Results Caregivers’ cultural views of older adults (compared to young people) are characterized by low competence and high warmth, replicating the data obtained elsewhere from the SCM. Most importantly, the person-centered units predict better staff performance and better resident functioning than standard units. Moreover, cultural stereotyping of older adult competence moderates the effects of staff performance on resident functioning, in line with the findings of previous research. Conclusion Our results underline the influence of caregivers’ cultural stereotypes on the type of care, as well as on their professional behaviors and on older adult functioning. Caregivers’ cultural stereotypes could be considered as a central issue in older adult care since they mediate the triangle of care: caregivers/older adults/type of care; therefore, much more attention should be paid to this psychosocial care component. PMID:27217736

  12. Translating personality psychology to help personalize preventive medicine for young adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Salomon; Moffitt, Terrie E; Belsky, Daniel W; Hancox, Robert J; Poulton, Richie; Roberts, Brent; Thomson, W Murray; Caspi, Avshalom

    2014-03-01

    The rising number of newly insured young adults brought on by health care reform will soon increase demands on primary care physicians. Physicians will face more young adult patients, which presents an opportunity for more prevention-oriented care. In the present study, we evaluated whether brief observer reports of young adults' personality traits could predict which individuals would be at greater risk for poor health as they entered midlife. Following the cohort of 1,000 individuals from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study (Moffitt, Caspi, Rutter, & Silva, 2001), we show that very brief measures of young adults' personalities predicted their midlife physical health across multiple domains (metabolic abnormalities, cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function, periodontal disease, and systemic inflammation). Individuals scoring low on the traits of Conscientiousness and Openness to Experience went on to develop poorer health even after accounting for preexisting differences in education, socioeconomic status, smoking, obesity, self-reported health, medical conditions, and family medical history. Moreover, personality ratings from peer informants who knew participants well, and from a nurse and receptionist who had just met participants for the first time, predicted health decline from young adulthood to midlife despite striking differences in level of acquaintance. Personality effect sizes were on par with other well-established health risk factors such as socioeconomic status, smoking, and self-reported health. We discuss the potential utility of personality measurement to function as an inexpensive and accessible tool for health care professionals to personalize preventive medicine. Adding personality information to existing health care electronic infrastructures could also advance personality theory by generating opportunities to examine how personality processes influence doctor-patient communication, health service use, and patient

  13. Primary care providers' perspective on prescribing opioids to older adults with chronic non-cancer pain: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Barbara J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of opioid medications as treatment for chronic non-cancer pain remains controversial. Little information is currently available regarding healthcare providers' attitudes and beliefs about this practice among older adults. This study aimed to describe primary care providers' experiences and attitudes towards, as well as perceived barriers and facilitators to prescribing opioids as a treatment for chronic pain among older adults. Methods Six focus groups were conducted with a total of 23 physicians and three nurse practitioners from two academically affiliated primary care practices and three community health centers located in New York City. Focus groups were audiotape recorded and transcribed. The data were analyzed using directed content analysis; NVivo software was used to assist in the quantification of identified themes. Results Most participants (96% employed opioids as therapy for some of their older patients with chronic pain, although not as first-line therapy. Providers cited multiple barriers, including fear of causing harm, the subjectivity of pain, lack of education, problems converting between opioids, and stigma. New barriers included patient/family member reluctance to try an opioid and concerns about opioid abuse by family members/caregivers. Studies confirming treatment benefit, validated tools for assessing risk and/or dosing for comorbidities, improved conversion methods, patient education, and peer support could facilitate opioid prescribing. Participants voiced greater comfort using opioids in the setting of delivering palliative or hospice care versus care of patients with chronic pain, and expressed substantial frustration managing chronic pain. Conclusions Providers perceive multiple barriers to prescribing opioids to older adults with chronic pain, and use these medications cautiously. Establishing the long-term safety and efficacy of these medications, generating improved prescribing methods

  14. Antidepressant or Antipsychotic Overdose in the Intensive Care Unit - Identification of Patients at Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Linda; Julkunen, Anna; Rørbaek Madsen, Kristian; Strøm, Thomas; Toft, Palle

    2016-07-01

    It is often advised that patients who have ingested an overdose of antidepressants (AD) or antipsychotics (AP) are monitored with continuous ECG for minimum of 12-24 hr. These patients are often observed in an ICU. Our aim was to identify the number of patients with AD and/or AP overdose without adverse signs at hospital admission that turned out to need intensive care treatment. The effect of the antidepressants overdose risk assessment (ADORA) system was evaluated in patients with antidepressant as well as antipsychotic overdose. Our hypothesis was that patients with low ADORA do not need intensive care treatment. This retrospective study was conducted in adult patients admitted to the ICU at Odense University Hospital after an overdose with AP and/or AD between 1 January 2009 and 1 September 2014. Patients with predefined adverse signs in the emergency department were excluded due to obvious need of intensive care. Of the 157 patients included, 12 patients (8%) developed events during the ICU stay. Only 3 patients received intubation, vasoactive drugs and/or dialysis. None developed ventricular dysrhythmias. There were no fatalities. All the patients with low-risk assessment by ADORA within the first 6 hr did not develop events within the first 24 hr after hospital admission. The vast majority of patients with AD and/or AP overdose and no adverse signs at admission did not require intensive care treatment. Low-risk ADORA identified patients with antidepressant as well as antipsychotic overdose who would not require initial intensive care treatment. This is the first time the ADORA system has been evaluated in patients with antidepressant as well as antipsychotic overdose. PMID:26663682

  15. Involvement of supportive care professionals in patient care in the last month of life

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkman-Stoppelenburg, Arianne; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D.; van der Heide, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    Background In the last month of life, many patients suffer from multiple symptoms and problems. Professional supportive care involvement may help to alleviate patients’ suffering and provide them with an optimal last phase of life. Purpose We investigated how often palliative care consultants, pain specialists, psychological experts and spiritual caregivers are involved in caring for patients in the last month of life, and which factors are associated with their involvement. Methods Questionn...

  16. Home care of dying patients. Family physicians' experience with a palliative care support team.

    OpenAIRE

    McWhinney, I R; Stewart, M A

    1994-01-01

    Family physicians were asked about their recent experience with caring for dying patients at home and for their evaluation of a recently established Palliative Care Home Support Team. Ninety-four percent of the respondents had cared for at least one dying patient at home during the previous 2 years. About two thirds felt comfortable, competent, confident, supported, and in control. One quarter felt personally drained by the experience, but almost as many found it personally renewing. Of those...

  17. Pain care for patients with epidermolysis bullosa: best care practice guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Goldschneider, Kenneth R; Good, Julie; Harrop, Emily; Liossi, Christina; Lynch-Jordan, Anne; Martinez, Anna E; Maxwell, Lynne G; Stanko-Lopp, Danette

    2014-01-01

    Background Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) comprises a group of rare disorders that have multi-system effects and patients present with a number of both acute and chronic pain care needs. Effects on quality of life are substantial. Pain and itching are burdensome daily problems. Experience with, and knowledge of, the best pain and itch care for these patients is minimal. Evidence-based best care practice guidelines are needed to establish a base of knowledge and practice for practitioner...

  18. Patient-, organization-, and system-level barriers and facilitators to preventive oral health care: a convergent mixed-methods study in primary dental care

    OpenAIRE

    Templeton, Anna Rose; Young, Linda; Bish, Alison; Gnich, Wendy; Cassie, Heather; Treweek, Shaun; Bonetti, Debbie; Stirling, Douglas; Macpherson, Lorna; McCann, Sharon; Clarkson, Jan; Ramsay, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Background Dental caries is the most common chronic disease of adult and childhood, a largely preventable yet widespread, costly public health problem. This study identified patient-, organization-, and system-level factors influencing routine delivery of recommended care for prevention and management of caries in primary dental care. Methods A convergent mixed-methods design assessed six guidance-recommended behaviours to prevent and manage caries (recording risk, risk-based recall intervals...

  19. The Perceived Needs and Availability of Eye Care Services for Older Adults in Long-term Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kergoat, Hélène; Boisjoly, Hélène; Freeman, Ellen E.; Monette, Johanne; Roy, Sylvie; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective was to evaluate the eye care services offered to older residents living in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Methods A questionnaire targeting residents aged ≥65 years was sent to all LTCFs in Quebec. Questions related to the institution’s characteristics, demographic data related to residents, oculovisual health of residents and barriers to eye care, eye care services offered within and outside the institution, and degree of satisfaction regarding the eye care services offered to residents. Results 196/428 (45.8%) LTCFs completed the questionnaire. Participating LTCFs had an average of 97.0 ± 5.1 residents with a mean age of 82.8 ± 3.0 yrs and 69% women. Eye care services were mostly offered outside the institution, on a “per request” basis. The main barriers to eye care were the perception that residents could not cooperate and the lack of eye care professionals. Most LTCFs were satisfied with the eye care services offered to residents. Conclusions The fact that the LTCFs were satisfied with the eye care services offered to their residents, although it was neither provided on a regular basis nor to all residents, suggests that eye care professionals should take a proactive educational role for improving services to older institutionalized adults. PMID:25232370

  20. Promoting patient-centred fundamental care in acute healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feo, Rebecca; Kitson, Alison

    2016-05-01

    Meeting patients' fundamental care needs is essential for optimal safety and recovery and positive experiences within any healthcare setting. There is growing international evidence, however, that these fundamentals are often poorly executed in acute care settings, resulting in patient safety threats, poorer and costly care outcomes, and dehumanising experiences for patients and families. Whilst care standards and policy initiatives are attempting to address these issues, their impact has been limited. This discussion paper explores, through a series of propositions, why fundamental care can be overlooked in sophisticated, high technology acute care settings. We argue that the central problem lies in the invisibility and subsequent devaluing of fundamental care. Such care is perceived to involve simple tasks that require little skill to execute and have minimal impact on patient outcomes. The propositions explore the potential origins of this prevailing perception, focusing upon the impact of the biomedical model, the consequences of managerial approaches that drive healthcare cultures, and the devaluing of fundamental care by nurses themselves. These multiple sources of invisibility and devaluing surrounding fundamental care have rendered the concept underdeveloped and misunderstood both conceptually and theoretically. Likewise, there remains minimal role clarification around who should be responsible for and deliver such care, and a dearth of empirical evidence and evidence-based metrics. In explicating these propositions, we argue that key to transforming the delivery of acute healthcare is a substantial shift in the conceptualisation of fundamental care. The propositions present a cogent argument that counters the prevailing perception that fundamental care is basic and does not require systematic investigation. We conclude by calling for the explicit valuing and embedding of fundamental care in healthcare education, research, practice and policy. Without this

  1. Nurses’ Caring Behaviors for Dying Patients in Southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuleeporn Prompahakul

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, the end-of-life care becomes an indicator of the quality of care in a hospital. However, current nursing standards and quality of care related to the end of life do not meet the desired expectations of both dying patients and their families. Therefore, caring behaviors of nurses need to be described.Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive research was to describe the level of nurses’ caring behaviors for dying patients in southern Thailand. Method: Proportionate stratified random sampling was used to select 360 registered nurses who had been working in general hospitals and regional/university hospitals in southern Thailand for at least one year. Instruments used in the study included the Demographic Data Questionnaire (DDQ and the Nurse’s Caring Behavior for Dying Patients Questionnaire (NCBDQ. The questionnaires were content validated by three experts. The reliability of the NCBDQ was tested with 30 nurses yielding a Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of .97. The data were analyzed by using frequency, percentage, mean and standard deviation.Results: The level of nurses’ caring behaviors for dying patients was high (M = 2.12, SD = .43. The five dimensions of the nurses' caring behaviors including compassion, confidence, conscience, commitment and comportment were also at a high level. However, the competence dimension was at a moderate level (M = 1.82, SD = .51. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that nurses perceived themselves as having a moderate level of competency in taking care of dying patients. Therefore, educational intervention on enhancing nurses’ competency for end of life care is recommended. In addition, factors relating to nurses’ caring behavior for dying patients should be further explored.Keywords: caring behaviors, dying patients, nurses, southern Thailand

  2. Transition from Hospital to Community Care: The Experience of Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Admi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study examines care transition experiences of cancer patients and assesses barriers to effective transitions.Methods: Participants were adult Hebrew, Arabic, or Russian speaking oncology patients and health care providers from hospital and community settings. Qualitative (n=77 and quantitative (n=422 methods such as focus groups, interviews and self-administered questionnaires were used. Qualitative analysis showed that patients faced difficulties navigating a complex and fragmented healthcare system.Results: Mechanisms to overcome barriers included informal routes such as personal relationships, coordinating roles by nurse coordinators and the patients' general practitioners (GPs. The most significant variable was GPs involvement, which affected transition process quality as rated on the CTM (p<0.001. Our findings point to the important interpersonal role of oncology nurses to coordinate and facilitate the care transition process.Conclusion: Interventions targeted towards supporting the care transition process should emphasize ongoing counseling throughout a patient’s care, during and after hospitalization.-----------------------------------------Cite this article as:  Admi H, Muller E, Shadmi E. Transition from Hospital to Community Care: The Experience of Cancer Patients. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2015; 3(4:34011.[This abstract was presented at the BIT’s 8th Annual World Cancer Congress, which was held from May 15-17, 2015 in Beijing, China.

  3. Long-term care services and support systems for older adults: The role of technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaja, Sara J

    2016-01-01

    The aging of the population, especially the increase in the "oldest old," is a remarkable achievement that presents both opportunities and challenges for policymakers, researchers, and society. Although many older adults enjoy relatively good health into their later years, many have one or more chronic conditions or diseases and need help with disease management activities or activities important to independent living. Technology is playing an increasingly important role in the health care arena and is becoming ubiquitous in health management activities. There are a variety of technology applications that can be used to enhance the mobility and quality of life of people who have limitations and help to foster the ability of those with chronic conditions to remain at home. Technology applications can also provide a central role in providing support to family caregivers in terms of enhancing access to information and community resources and connections to formal and informal support services. Monitoring technologies may also allow caregivers to check on the status or activities of their loved one while they are at work or at a distant location. Furthermore, telemedicine applications can aid the ability of care providers to monitor patients and deliver health services. The objective of this article is to highlight the potential role that technology can play in the provision of long-term support for older adults and their families. Challenges and barriers that currently limit the full potential of technology to be realized for these populations will also be discussed. Finally the role of psychological science toward maximizing the potential of technology applications in enhancing long term care and support services will be highlighted. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27159436

  4. Measuring health-related quality of life in adults with chronic conditions in primary care settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Carri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe health-related quality of life (HRQOL) conceptual frameworks, critically review 3 commonly used HRQOL scales relevant to adults with chronic conditions in primary care settings, and make recommendations for using HRQOL scales in primary care practice. Data sources Information was accessed regarding HRQOL conceptual and theoretical approaches. A comprehensive search strategy identified 3 commonly used scales that met the review criteria and evidence regarding use of the scales in adults with chronic conditions in community settings. Scale selection Scales were selected if they were designed for clinical use; were easy to administer; were generic and broad in content areas; and contained some individualized items. Scales were critiqued according to content development, theoretical basis, psychometric properties, scoring, feasibility, the concepts being measured, and the number of items that measured an individualized concept. Synthesis Early HRQOL approaches focused on health and functional status while recent approaches incorporate individualized concepts such as the person’s own values and the environment. The abbreviated World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale (WHOQOL-BREF), the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Duke Health Profile were critiqued. All address physical, mental, and social domains, while the WHOQOL-BREF also addresses environment. Psychometric evidence supports use of the SF-36 and WHOQOL-BREF with this population. The SF-36 has the most evidence of responsiveness but has some floor and ceiling effects, while the WHOQOL-BREF does not appear to have floor or ceiling effects but has limited evidence of responsiveness. The WHOQOL-BREF has the highest proportion of individualized items. Conclusion Measurement of HRQOL in adults with chronic conditions can support patient management and contribute to primary care service evaluation. Scales that are based on a broad definition of health and that

  5. Making Work Fit Care: Reconciliation Strategies Used by Working Mothers of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Fu, Li-yeh; Chang, Heng-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study explored the experiences of working mothers with an adult child with intellectual disabilities to understand how they reconcile paid work and care responsibilities. Methods: Fifteen working mothers in Taiwan with an adult child with intellectual disabilities were interviewed, and an interpretative phenomenological approach…

  6. Patient characteristics and clinical management of patients with shoulder pain in U.S. primary care settings: Secondary data analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansfield Richard J

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although shoulder pain is a commonly encountered problem in primary care, there are few studies examining its presenting characteristics and clinical management in this setting. Methods We performed secondary data analysis of 692 office visits for shoulder pain collected through the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (Survey years 1993–2000. Information on demographic characteristics, history and place of injury, and clinical management (physician order of imaging, physiotherapy, and steroid intraarticular injection were examined. Results Shoulder pain was associated with an injury in one third (33.2% (230/692 of office visits in this population of US primary care physicians. Males, and younger adults (age ≤ 52 more often associated their shoulder pain with previous injury, but there were no racial differences in injury status. Injury-related shoulder pain was related to work in over one-fifth (21.3% (43/202 of visits. An x-ray was performed in 29.0% (164/566 of office visits, a finding that did not differ by gender, race, or by age status. Other imaging (CT scan, MRI, or ultrasound was infrequently performed (6.5%, 37/566. Physiotherapy was ordered in 23.9% (135/566 of visits for shoulder pain. Younger adults and patients with a history of injury more often had physiotherapy ordered, but there was no significant difference in the ordering of physiotherapy by gender or race. Examination of the use of intraarticular injection was not possible with this data set. Conclusion These data from the largest sample of patients with shoulder pain presenting to primary care settings offer insights into the presenting characteristics and clinical management of shoulder pain at the primary care level. The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey is a useful resource for examining the clinical management of specific symptoms in U.S. primary care offices.

  7. Socioeconomic status and glycemic control in adult patients with type 2 diabetes: a mediation analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Houle, Janie; Lauzier-Jobin, François; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; MEUNIER, Sophie; Coulombe, Simon; Côté, José; Lespérance, François; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Bherer, Louis; Lambert, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to examine the contribution of health behaviors (self-management and coping), quality of care, and individual characteristics (depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, illness representations) as mediators in the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and glycemic control. Methods A sample of 295 adult patients with type 2 diabetes was recruited at the end of a diabetes education course. Glycemic control was evaluated through glycosylated hemoglobin ...

  8. Primary care practice-based care management for chronically ill patients (PraCMan: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN56104508

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldauf Annika

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care management programmes are an effective approach to care for high risk patients with complex care needs resulting from multiple co-occurring medical and non-medical conditions. These patients are likely to be hospitalized for a potentially "avoidable" cause. Nurse-led care management programmes for high risk elderly patients showed promising results. Care management programmes based on health care assistants (HCAs targeting adult patients with a high risk of hospitalisation may be an innovative approach to deliver cost-efficient intensified care to patients most in need. Methods/Design PraCMan is a cluster randomized controlled trial with primary care practices as unit of randomisation. The study evaluates a complex primary care practice-based care management of patients at high risk for future hospitalizations. Eligible patients either suffer from type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic heart failure or any combination. Patients with a high likelihood of hospitalization within the following 12 months (based on insurance data will be included in the trial. During 12 months of intervention patients of the care management group receive comprehensive assessment of medical and non-medical needs and resources as well as regular structured monitoring of symptoms. Assessment and monitoring will be performed by trained HCAs from the participating practices. Additionally, patients will receive written information, symptom diaries, action plans and a medication plan to improve self-management capabilities. This intervention is addition to usual care. Patients from the control group receive usual care. Primary outcome is the number of all-cause hospitalizations at 12 months follow-up, assessed by insurance claims data. Secondary outcomes are health-related quality of life (SF12, EQ5D, quality of chronic illness care (PACIC, health care utilisation and costs, medication adherence (MARS, depression

  9. Innovative Strategies Designed to Improve Adult Pneumococcal Immunizations in Safety Net Patient-Centered Medical Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Nina J; Sklaroff, Laura Myerchin; Gross-Schulman, Sandra; Hoang, Khathy; Tran, Helen; Campa, David; Scheib, Geoffrey; Guterman, Jeffrey J

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a principal cause of serious illness, including bacteremia, meningitis, and pneumonia, worldwide. Pneumococcal immunization is proven to reduce morbidity and mortality in high-risk adult and elderly populations. Current pneumococcal vaccination practices are suboptimal in part because of recommendation complexity, the high cost of provider-driven immunization interventions, and outreach methods that are not patient-centric. These barriers are amplified within the safety net. This paper identifies efforts by the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services to increase pneumococcal immunization rates for adult indigent patient populations. A 4-part approach will be used to increase vaccination rates: (1) protocol driven care, (2) staff education, (3) electronic identification of eligible patients, and (4) automated patient outreach and scheduling. The proposed analytics plan and potential for scalability are described. (Population Health Management 2016;19:240-247). PMID:26824148

  10. Advance directives and nursing home stays associated with less aggressive end-of-life care for patients with severe dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Lauren H; Bynum, Julie P W; Iwashyna, Theodore J; Weir, David R; Langa, Kenneth M

    2014-04-01

    The number of older adults with cognitive impairment is increasing, and such adults often require a surrogate to make decisions about health care. However, little is known about the aggressiveness of end-of-life care for these people, especially those who reside in the community. We found that cognitive impairment is common among older adults approaching the end of life, whether they live in the community or in a nursing home, and that nearly 30 percent of patients with severe dementia remained in the community until death. Among those patients, having an advance directive in the form of a living will was associated with significantly less aggressive care at the end of life, compared to similar patients without an advance directive-as measured by Medicare spending ($11,461 less per patient), likelihood of in-hospital death (17.9 percentage points lower), and use of the intensive care unit (9.4 percentage points lower). In contrast, advance directives were not associated with differences in care for people with normal cognition or mild dementia, whether they resided in the community or in a nursing home. Timely advance care planning after a diagnosis of cognitive impairment may be particularly important for older adults who reside in the community. PMID:24711329

  11. Prevalence and associated factors of polypharmacy among adult Saudi medical outpatients at a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Bin Salih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of polypharmacy (PP and the associated factors in medical outpatients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, observational, descriptive study was carried out in adult medical outpatients attending internal medicine clinics at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from 1 March 2009 to 31 December 2009. PP was defined as the concomitant use of ≥5 medications daily. The number of medications being currently taken by patient was recorded. Effect of patients′ age, gender, educational level, number of prescribers, disease load and disease type on PP was assessed by multivariate analysis using Statistical Package for Social Sciences Incorporated (SPSS Inc Version 18. Results: Out of 766 patients included in the study, 683 (89% had PP. The mean number of prescribed medications, oral pills and doses was 8.8, 9.6 and 12.1, respectively. Factors significantly associated with PP included age (≥61 years, disease load and the number of prescribers. Gender had no impact on PP while education beyond primary education significantly decreased PP. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia alone and as a cluster increased PP. Conclusion: We found an extremely high level of PP in medical outpatients at our tertiary care center. The impact of PP on medication compliance and control of underlying diseases in Saudi Arabia is unknown and needs to be studied at different levels of care.

  12. Self-assessment in cancer patients referred to palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strömgren, Annette S; Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens;

    2002-01-01

    -based study using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality-of-life instrument EORTC QLQ-C30, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in cancer patients who were receiving palliative care. This report describes the......-based study of symptomatology in consecutive cancer patients in palliative care, achieving rather complete data from the participants. The symptomatology in these patients was very pronounced. The questionnaires were able to detect clinically important differences between places of service.......BACKGROUND: Research in palliative care is considered difficult due to the poor health of patients. However, patient-provided data are essential for a thorough description of patient symptomatology and for the evaluation of care. METHODS: The authors examined the feasibility of a questionnaire...

  13. The palliative care needs of ethnic minority patients: staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diver, Fiona; Molassiotis, Alexander; Weeks, Les

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess palliative care staff's perceptions of multicultural care provision and explore the barriers and facilitators to culturally sensitive care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews with five palliative care staff were conducted. Staff showed awareness of inter-cultural diversity and the importance of individualized care. It also became apparent that staff did not possess ethnocentric attitudes. Facilitators of multicultural care that emerged from the data included training, learning from experience, the use of culturally specific literature and resources, and effective communication channels in the team. However, barriers were present, including limited interpreting services, and some staff and other patients' negative behaviours towards ethnic minority patients. The findings lead to recommendations for better resourcing and expansion of interpreting services, and for more training, based on staff's desire for limited culturally specific knowledge in sensitive combination with an individualized care philosophy. PMID:12968120

  14. ABC for Nursing Care to Terminal Patients in Primary Health Care

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    Angelina Basilia Estela Díaz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Terminal patients suffer from an acute or chronic process that immerses them in a critical situation leading to death. When providing a cure is no longer possible, the focus is on providing comfort and relief for the dying. Therefore, it is very important to provide an appropriate orientation to the staff nurses taking care of these patients. Objective: To develop an ABC for nursing care to terminally ill patients in Primary Health Care. Methods: A research was conducted in Area VI Polyclinic, in the municipality of Cienfuegos, from January to June 2012, in order to conform the ABC for nursing care to terminally ill patients in Primary Health Care. Theoretical methods of analysis and synthesis and induction-deduction as well as empirical methods were used: document analysis and brainstorming. Results: The ABC for nursing care to terminal patients was conformed for the following stages: initial or stability, symptomatic or state, and decline and final agony. In each of them possible diagnoses, objectives and actions were included. The document was created in such a way that it can be used by all nurses who attend these patients, regardless of their occupational category. Conclusions: This ABC could be useful to facilitate nursing care to terminally ill patients in primary health care.

  15. Integrated patient unit care in schizophrenia population vs a non-integrated patient unit care

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    Waago-Hansen C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have described the benefits of integrated care in chronic conditions. Keeping the patients out of hospital is considered to increase value to the patient and is also benefit to the society and the healthcare provider.As we have an increase in the treatment options, costs, age and demand, an optimized treatment model is required if we want to maintain or obtain a sustainable system. The objective of this study was to describe how costs of treatment and value to the patient, to the hospital and the society differs in a non integrated patient unit (IPU vs an IPU system.Methods: Contact data of schizophrenic patients (n=51 from the hospital's electronic medical records (EMRs was accessed (from October 2010 till March 2012 and analyzed. All financial data was obtained from the finance department. Time driven activity based costing (TDABC as used to calculate the costs.Results: The study examined 1,149 out-patient consultations and 4,386 days of occupancy. By adopting an IPU approach, the costs were significantly reduced compared to the non-IPU approach. Increased complexity benefitted significantly from IPU. These patients had a higher frequency of contact but lower degrees of admission, whilst the non-IPU had significantly higher admission rates and duration of stay.Conclusions: This study shows a striking difference in the resources used on patients treated with an IPU vs a non-IPU approach. In almost every aspect, the IPU approach is by far superior to the non-IPU approach.

  16. Evaluation of the predictive indices for candidemia in an adult intensive care unit

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    Gilberto Gambero Gaspar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: To evaluate predictive indices for candidemia in an adult intensive care unit (ICU and to propose a new index. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted between January 2011 and December 2012. This study was performed in an ICU in a tertiary care hospital at a public university and included 114 patients staying in the adult ICU for at least 48 hours. The association of patient variables with candidemia was analyzed. RESULTS: There were 18 (15.8% proven cases of candidemia and 96 (84.2% cases without candidemia. Univariate analysis revealed the following risk factors: parenteral nutrition, severe sepsis, surgical procedure, dialysis, pancreatitis, acute renal failure, and an APACHE II score higher than 20. For the Candida score index, the odds ratio was 8.50 (95% CI, 2.57 to 28.09; the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 0.78, 0.71, 0.33, and 0.94, respectively. With respect to the clinical predictor index, the odds ratio was 9.45 (95%CI, 2.06 to 43.39; the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 0.89, 0.54, 0.27, and 0.96, respectively. The proposed candidemia index cutoff was 8.5; the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 0.77, 0.70, 0.33, and 0.94, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The Candida score and clinical predictor index excluded candidemia satisfactorily. The effectiveness of the candidemia index was comparable to that of the Candida score.

  17. Identifying Care Coordination Interventions Provided to Community-Dwelling Older Adults Using Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Youn; Marek, Karen D; Coenen, Amy

    2016-07-01

    Although care coordination is a popular intervention, there is no standard method of delivery. Also little is known about who benefits most, or characteristics that predict the amount of care coordination needed, especially with chronically ill older adults. The purpose of this study was to identify types and amount of nurse care coordination interventions provided to 231 chronically ill older adults who participated in a 12-month home care medication management program in the Midwest. For each participant, the nurse care coordinator spent an average of 134 min/mo providing in-person home care, 48 min/mo of travel, and 18 min/mo of indirect care occurring outside the home visit. This accounted for 67.2%, 23.8%, and 9.0% of nursing time, respectively, for home visits, travel, and indirect care. Four of 11 nursing interventions focused on medication management were provided to all participants. Seven of the 11 main interventions were individualized according to each person's special needs. Wide variations were observed in time provided with in-person home care and communications with multiple stakeholders. Study findings indicate the importance of individualizing interventions and the variability in the amount of nursing time needed to provide care coordination to chronically ill older adults. PMID:26985762

  18. Patient Care, Communication, and Safety in the Mammography Suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Leisa

    2016-09-01

    Producing high-quality mammograms requires excellent technical skills along with exemplary communication. Mammographers must be able to address differences in patients' mental states, body habitus, and physical ability to obtain an optimal examination. In addition, every mammographer must practice consistently with patient safety, care, and satisfaction in mind. This article discusses verbal and nonverbal communication strategies, barriers to communication, and the care and safety of patients in the mammography suite who present special challenges. PMID:27601710

  19. Implications of managed care for health systems, clinicians, and patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Fairfield, G.; Hunter, D.J.; Mechanic, D.; Rosleff, F.

    1997-01-01

    The rhetoric and realities of managed care are easily confused. The rapid growth of managed care in the United States has had many implications for patients, doctors, employers, state and federal programmes, the health insurance industry, major medical institutions, medical research, and vulnerable patient populations. It has restricted patients' choice of doctors and limited access to specialists, reduced the professional autonomy and earnings of doctors, shifted power from the non-profit to...

  20. Scoping review of patient-centered care approaches in healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Constand, Marissa K; MacDermid, Joy C; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Law, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this scoping review was to describe how three tenants of patient-centered care provision: communication, partnership, and health promotion are addressed in patient-centered care models/frameworks across the literature. Methods A scoping review of literature published in English since 1990 was conducted using Medline, CINAHL, and EMBASE. A key term search strategy was employed using “patient-centered care”, “client-centered care”, “framework” and “model” to identify r...

  1. Monitoring patients with rheumatoid arthritis in routine care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund; Jensen, Dorte Vendelbo; Krogh, Niels Steen

    2014-01-01

    , little is known about the feasibility of a T2T strategy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated in routine care. The aim of the present study was to (i) present the annual number of patients included in DANBIO between 2006 and 2013 and their disease characteristics and (ii) estimate coverage......-time feedback to the physician is feasible, although the goal of treat-to-target is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients in routine care....

  2. Adapting evidence-based, cognitive-behavioral interventions for anxiety for use with adults in integrated primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepardson, Robyn L; Funderburk, Jennifer S; Weisberg, Risa B

    2016-06-01

    Evidence-based treatments for adult patients with anxiety are greatly needed within primary care settings. Psychotherapy protocols, including those for cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), are often disorder-specific and were developed for specialty mental health settings, rendering them infeasible in primary care. Behavioral health consultants (BHCs) integrated into primary care settings are uniquely positioned to provide anxiety treatment. However, due to the dearth of empirically supported brief treatments for anxiety, BHCs are tasked with adapting existing treatments for use in primary care, which is quite challenging due to the abbreviated format and population-based approach to care. CBT protocols are highly effective in the treatment of anxiety and fit well with the self-management emphasis of integrated primary care. We review the rationale and procedure for 6 evidence-based CBT intervention techniques (psycho-education, mindfulness and acceptance-based behavioral techniques, relaxation training, exposure, cognitive restructuring, and behavioral activation) that can be adapted for use in the brief format typical of integrated primary care. We offer tips based on our clinical experience, highlight resources (e.g., handouts, websites, apps), and discuss 2 case examples to aid BHCs in their everyday practice. Our goal is to provide BHCs with practical knowledge that will facilitate the use of evidence-based interventions to improve the treatment of anxiety in primary care settings. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27064434

  3. Palliative care provision for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohannes Abebaw

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality in old age. Patients with advanced stage COPD are most likely to be admitted three to four times per year with acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD which are costly to manage. The adverse events of AECOPD are associated with poor quality of life, severe physical disability, loneliness, and depression and anxiety symptoms. Currently there is a lack of palliative care provision for patients with advanced stage COPD compared with cancer patients despite having poor prognosis, intolerable dyspnoea, lower levels of self efficacy, greater disability, poor quality of life and higher levels of anxiety and depression. These symptoms affect patients' quality of life and can be a source of concern for family and carers as most patients are likely to be housebound and may be in need of continuous support and care. Evidence of palliative care provision for cancer patients indicate that it improves quality of life and reduces health care costs. The reasons why COPD patients do not receive palliative care are complex. This partly may relate to prognostic accuracy of patients' survival which poses a challenge for healthcare professionals, including general practitioners for patients with advanced stage COPD, as they are less likely to engage in end-of-life care planning in contrast with terminal disease like cancer. Furthermore there is a lack of resources which constraints for the wider availability of the palliative care programmes in the health care system. Potential barriers may include unwillingness of patients to discuss advance care planning and end-of-life care with their general practitioners, lack of time, increased workload, and fear of uncertainty of the information to provide about the prognosis of the disease and also lack of appropriate tools to guide general practitioners when to refer patients for palliative care. COPD is a chronic

  4. Predicting self-care practices and glycaemic control using health belief model (HBM) in patients with insulin-treated diabetes in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Aris, Aishairma

    2016-01-01

    Background: The practice of diabetes self-care plays an important role in glycaemic control. However, not all patients with insulin-treated diabetes engage in their self-care activities. Although there is evidence that self-care practices in patients with insulin-treated diabetes can be understood and predicted by health beliefs proposed by Health Belief Model (HBM), little is known about adult patients due to several methodological weaknesses of previous studies. Furthermore, knowledge is la...

  5. Patient satisfaction and side effects in primary care: An observational study comparing homeopathy and conventional medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thurneysen André

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study is part of a nationwide evaluation of complementary medicine in Switzerland (Programme Evaluation of Complementary Medicine PEK and was funded by the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health. The main objective of this study is to investigate patient satisfaction and perception of side effects in homeopathy compared with conventional care in a primary care setting. Methods We examined data from two cross-sectional studies conducted in 2002–2003. The first study was a physician questionnaire assessing structural characteristics of practices. The second study was conducted on four given days during a 12-month period in 2002/2003 using a physician and patient questionnaire at consultation and a patient questionnaire mailed to the patient one month later (including Europep questionnaire. The participating physicians were all trained and licensed in conventional medicine. An additional qualification was required for medical doctors providing homeopathy (membership in the Swiss association of homeopathic physicians SVHA. Results A total of 6778 adult patients received the questionnaire and 3126 responded (46.1%. Statistically significant differences were found with respect to health status (higher percentage of chronic and severe conditions in the homeopathic group, perception of side effects (higher percentage of reported side effects in the conventional group and patient satisfaction (higher percentage of satisfied patients in the homeopathic group. Conclusion Overall patient satisfaction was significantly higher in homeopathic than in conventional care. Homeopathic treatments were perceived as a low-risk therapy with two to three times fewer side effects than conventional care

  6. Older Parents Providing Child Care for Adult Children: Does It Pay Off?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Teun; Poortman, Anne-Rigt; van Tilburg, Theo G.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether past grandparental child care is related to present support from adult children. On the basis of social exchange theory, the authors expected that grandparental child care creates a debt that is repaid in the form of receiving support later in life. Using data from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (N = 349…

  7. Impact of pain and palliative care services on patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Santha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Palliative care has become an emerging need of the day as the existing health-care facilities play only a limited role in the care of the chronically ill in the society. Patients with terminal illness in most cases spend their lives in the community among their family and neighbors, so there is the need for a multi disciplinary team for their constant care. Volunteers are primary care givers who originate normally from the same locality with local knowledge and good public contact through which they can make significant contributions in a team work by bridging the gap between the patient community and outside world. Aim: The present study has been undertaken to analyze the impact of palliative care services on patients by considering 51 variables. Materials and Methods: The respondents of the study include 50 pain and palliative care patients selected at random from 15 palliative care units functioning in Ernakulam district. The analysis was made by using statistical techniques viz. weighted average method, Chi-square test, Friedman repeated measures analysis of variance on ranks and percentages. Results: The study revealed that the major benefit of palliative care to the patients is the reduction of pain to a considerable extent, which was unbearable for them earlier. Second, the hope of patients could be maintained or strengthened through palliative care treatment. Conclusion: It is understood that the services of the doctors and nurses are to be improved further by making available their services to all the palliative care patients in a uniform manner.

  8. Care of the ventilator-dependent patient: public policy considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, M E

    1986-04-01

    Because traditional cost-based reimbursement for acute hospital care has been replaced by the DRG system and other limited-payment approaches, hospital managers are seeking more cost-effective provision of care. This has shortened patient-stay periods in hospitals and increased demand for such alternatives as nursing home and private home care for chronically ill persons, including those dependent on ventilators. At the same time that hospitals seek to discharge patients earlier, patients themselves would prefer to remain in hospitals for long-term care because adequate financial coverage is not available to most of them for alternative-site care. In this setting of conflict between the financial policies of hospitals and those of Medicare and private insurance carriers, it is important to keep quality of care, not financial considerations, as the first consideration when a facility is chosen for long-term care. But the long-term patient, including the patient requiring ventilator support, is caught in the web of competing financial incentives and the fact that there is no consensus on how such care should be organized, delivered, or paid for. The only significant source of funding for long-term nursing home care is Medicaid, which requires the patient to give up his personal assets, including his home; this makes it nearly certain that he will always remain institutionalized. Private insurance carriers have not yet come to terms with the idea that long-term ventilator care can be made less expensive at sites other than hospitals--and thus many patients have no satisfactory answer to the problem of where to receive such care or how it can be financed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10315693

  9. What Is Known About the Benefits of Patient-Centered Care in Patients with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulin, Kerstin; Malm, Dan; Nygårdh, Annette

    2015-12-01

    Treatment for chronic heart failure (CHF) has improved, and symptom burden has been identified as an important treatment goal. Because patient-centered care may ease the burden, we need to know its benefits for patients with CHF, hence this systematic literature review. We found that one benefit of person-centered care is an increase in quality of life in patients with CHF. Improvements were found in self-care, physical and mental status, health care costs, general uncertainty regarding illness and recovery, patient dignity, treatment, and systems of care. Improvements also were observed in symptom burden, self-efficacy, and quality of life. These findings indicate that person-centered care is a powerful approach to current and future health care. However, because an appropriate tool to measure person-centered care does not yet exist, it will be a challenge to determine whether the goal has been reached from a long-term and patient perspective. PMID:26497193

  10. Integrating Spirituality as a Key Component of Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzette Brémault-Phillips

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Patient care frequently focuses on physical aspects of disease management, with variable attention given to spiritual needs. And yet, patients indicate that spiritual suffering adds to distress associated with illness. Spirituality, broadly defined as that which gives meaning and purpose to a person’s life and connectedness to the significant or sacred, often becomes a central issue for patients. Growing evidence demonstrates that spirituality is important in patient care. Yet healthcare professionals (HCPs do not always feel prepared to engage with patients about spiritual issues. In this project, HCPs attended an educational session focused on using the FICA Spiritual History Tool to integrate spirituality into patient care. Later, they incorporated the tool when caring for patients participating in the study. This research (1 explored the value of including spiritual history taking in clinical practice; (2 identified facilitators and barriers to incorporating spirituality into person-centred care; and (3 determined ways in which HCPs can effectively utilize spiritual history taking. Data were collected using focus groups and chart reviews. Findings indicate positive impacts at organizational, clinical/unit, professional/personal and patient levels when HCPs include spirituality in patient care. Recommendations are offered.

  11. Self-care practice of patients with arterial hypertension in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Rayanna Silva Mendes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the practice of self-care performed by patients with systemic arterial hypertension in primary health care. Methods: this is a descriptive and cross-sectional study, conducted with 92 individuals with arterial hypertension in a primary care unit. The data collection occurred through script and data analyzed using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean and standard deviation and through the understanding of the adaption between capacity and self-care demand. Results: it was identified as a practice of self-care: adequate water intake, salt intake and restricted coffee, satisfactory sleep period, abstinence from smoking and alcoholism, continuing pharmacological treatment and attending medical appointments. As the demands: inadequate feeding, sedentary lifestyle, had no leisure activities, self-reported stress, and limited knowledge. Conclusion: although patients performed treatment a few years ago, still showed up self-care deficits, highlighting the need for nurses to advise and sensitize about the importance of self-care practice.

  12. Management of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in UK primary care: a survey of general practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Suzanne; Wilton, Lynda; Murray, Macey; Hodgkins, Paul; Asherson, Philip; Wong, Ian CK

    2013-01-01

    Background Compared to existing literature on childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), little published adult data are available, particularly outside of the United States. Using General Practitioner (GP) questionnaires from the United Kingdom, this study aimed to examine a number of issues related to ADHD in adults, across three cohorts of patients, adults who received ADHD drug treatment in childhood/adolescence but stopped prior to adulthood; adults who received ADHD drug...

  13. A snapshot of the adult spina bifida patient – high incidence of urologic procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Joceline S.; Greiman, Alyssa; Casey, Jessica T.; Mukherjee, Shubhra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To describe the urologic outcomes of contemporary adult spina bifida patients managed in a multidisciplinary clinic. Material and methods A retrospective chart review of patients seen in our adult spina bifida clinic from January 2004 to November 2011 was performed to identify urologic management, urologic surgeries, and co-morbidities. Results 225 patients were identified (57.8% female, 42.2% male). Current median age was 30 years (IQR 27, 36) with a median age at first visit of 25 years (IQR 22, 30). The majority (70.7%) utilized clean intermittent catheterization, and 111 patients (49.3%) were prescribed anticholinergic medications. 65.8% had urodynamics performed at least once, and 56% obtained appropriate upper tract imaging at least every other year while under our care. 101 patients (44.9%) underwent at least one urologic surgical procedure during their lifetime, with a total of 191 procedures being performed, of which stone procedures (n = 51, 26.7%) were the most common. Other common procedures included continence procedures (n = 35, 18.3%) and augmentation cystoplasty (n = 29, 15.2%). Only 3.6% had a documented diagnosis of chronic kidney disease and 0.9% with end-stage renal disease. Conclusions Most adult spina bifida patient continue on anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. A large percentage of patients required urologic procedures in adulthood. Patients should be encouraged to utilize conservative and effective bladder management strategies to reduce their risk of renal compromise. PMID:27123330

  14. Analyzing the "CareGap": assessing gaps in adherence to clinical guidelines in adult soft tissue sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waks, Zeev; Goldbraich, Esther; Farkash, Ariel; Torresani, Michele; Bertulli, Rossella; Restifo, Nicola; Locatelli, Paolo; Casali, Paolo; Carmeli, Boaz

    2013-01-01

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) are gaining popularity as tools that assist physicians in optimizing medical care. These systems typically comply with evidence-based medicine and are designed with input from domain experts. Nonetheless, deviations from CDSS recommendations are abundant across a broad spectrum of disorders, raising the question as to why this phenomenon exists. Here, we analyze this gap in adherence to a clinical guidelines-based CDSS by examining the physician treatment decisions for 1329 adult soft tissue sarcoma patients in northern Italy using patient-specific parameters. Dubbing this analysis "CareGap", we find that deviations correlate strongly with certain disease features such as local versus metastatic clinical presentation. We also notice that deviations from the guideline-based CDSS suggestions occur more frequently for patients with shorter survival time. Such observations can direct physicians' attention to distinct patient cohorts that are prone to higher deviation levels from clinical practice guidelines. This illustrates the value of CareGap analysis in assessing quality of care for subsets of patients within a larger pathology. PMID:23542965

  15. Pulmonary manifestations in adult patients with chronic granulomatous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvator, Hélène; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Catherinot, Emilie; Rivaud, Elisabeth; Pilmis, Benoit; Borie, Raphael; Crestani, Bruno; Tcherakian, Colas; Suarez, Felipe; Dunogue, Bertrand; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Hurtado-Nedelec, Margarita; Dreyfus, Jean-François; Durieu, Isabelle; Fouyssac, Fanny; Hermine, Olivier; Lortholary, Olivier; Fischer, Alain; Couderc, Louis-Jean

    2015-06-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by failure of superoxide production in phagocytic cells. The disease is characterised by recurrent infections and inflammatory events, frequently affecting the lungs. Improvement of life expectancy now allows most patients to reach adulthood. We aimed to describe the pattern of pulmonary manifestations occurring during adulthood in CGD patients. This was a retrospective study of the French national cohort of adult patients (≥16 years old) with CGD. Medical data were obtained for 67 adult patients. Pulmonary manifestations affected two-thirds of adult patients. Their incidence was significantly higher than in childhood (mean annual rate 0.22 versus 0.07, p=0.01). Infectious risk persisted despite anti-infectious prophylaxis. Invasive fungal infections were frequent (0.11 per year per patient) and asymptomatic in 37% of the cases. They often required lung biopsy for diagnosis (10 out of 30). Noninfectious respiratory events concerned 28% of adult patients, frequently associated with a concomitant fungal infection (40%). They were more frequent in patients with the X-linked form of CGD. Immune-modulator therapies were required in most cases (70%). Respiratory manifestations are major complications of CGD in adulthood. Noninfectious pulmonary manifestations are as deleterious as infectious pneumonia. A specific respiratory monitoring is necessary. PMID:25614174

  16. Comparison of Nutritional Parameters among Adult and Elderly Hemodialysis Patients

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    Gülperi Çelik, Bahar Oc, Inci Kara, Mümtaz Yılmaz, Ali Yuceaktas, Seza Apiliogullari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the nutritional biochemical parameters, prealbumin levels, and bioimpedance analysis parameters of adult and elderly hemodialysis (HD patients.Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study included 50 adult HD patients (42.0 % female. Nutritional status was assessed by post-dialysis multifrequency bioimpedance analysis (BIA, serum prealbumin and other nutritional biochemical parameters.Results: Mean age of patients was 57.4±15.1 years (range: 30-83 years and mean dialysis duration was 68.3 ± 54.5 months (range: 3-240 months. When the patients were divided into two groups according to age of patients (<65 and ≥65, prealbumin (p=0.003, blood urea nitrogen (BUN (p=0.000, serum creatinine (p=0.013, albumin (p=0.016, protein catabolic rate per normalized body weight (nPCR (p=0.001, intracellular water (ICW/total body weight (0.003 , body fat mass (p00.000, lean body mass (p=0.031, lean dry mass (p=0.001, illness marker (p=0.005, basal metabolism (p=0.007, body mass index (BMI (p=0.028, body fat mass index (BFMI (p=0.000, fat free mass index (FFMI (p=0.040 values were significantly different between the groups. In the elderly patients (age ≥65, body fat mass, illness marker, BMI, BFMI were higher compared to adult patients (age <65. Additionally, in the elderly patients, prealbumin, BUN, creatinine, albumin, nPCR, ICW/ total body weight, lean body weight, lean dry weight, basal metabolism and FFMI were lower than adult patients.Conclusions: Our results indicate that BFMI were higher, albumin, prealbumin, nPCR and lean body mass and FFMI were lower in elderly patients compared to adults. These results imply that elderly HD patients may be prone sarcopenic obesity and may require special nutritional support.

  17. Palliative care in advanced cancer patients in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand

    OpenAIRE

    Manisha Bisht; Bist, S. S.; Dhasmana, D. C.; Sunil Saini

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Advanced cancer, irrespective of the site of the cancer, is characterized by a number of associated symptoms that impair the quality of life of patients. The management of these symptoms guides palliative care. The present study aims to describe the symptoms and appropriate palliation provided in patients with advanced cancer in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand. Methods: This was an observational study. A total of 100 patients with advanced cancer were included in the study. T...

  18. Developing patient-centered teams: The role of sharing stories about patients and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Ariana H; Hassinger, Jane A; Martin, Lisa A; Harris, Lisa H; Gold, Marji

    2015-09-01

    Research indicates that health care teams are good for staff, patients, and organizations. The characteristics that make teams effective include shared objectives, mutual respect, clarity of roles, communication, trust, and collaboration. We were interested in examining how teams develop these positive characteristics. This paper explores the role of sharing stories about patients in developing patient-centered teams. Data for this paper came from 1 primary care clinic as part of a larger Providers Share Workshop study conducted by the University of Michigan. Each workshop included 5 facilitated group sessions in which staff met to talk about their work. This paper analyzes qualitative data from the workshops. Through an iterative process, research team members identified major themes, developed a coding scheme, and coded transcripts for qualitative data analysis. One of the most powerful ways group members connected was through sharing stories about their patients. Sharing clinical cases and stories helped participants bond around their shared mission of patient-centered care, build supportive relationships, enhance compassion for patients, communicate and resolve conflict, better understand workflows and job roles, develop trust, and increase morale. These attributes highlighted by participants correspond to those documented in the literature as important elements of teambuilding and key indicators of team effectiveness. The sharing of stories about patients seems to be a promising tool for positive team development in a primary care clinical setting and should be investigated further. PMID:26348238

  19. Supporting families of dying patients in the intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad Reza; Norouzadeh, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Family support in the intensive care units is a challenge for nurses who take care of dying patients. This article aimed to determine the Iranian nurses' experience of supporting families in end-of-life care. Using grounded theory methodology, 23 critical care nurses were interviewed. The theme of family support was extracted and divided into 5 categories: death with dignity; facilitate visitation; value orientation; preparing; and distress. With implementation of family support approaches, family-centered care plans will be realized in the standard framework. PMID:25099985

  20. Quality and coordination of care for patients with multiple conditions: results from an international survey of patient experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Jako S; Voerman, Gerlienke E; Grol, Richard; Faber, Marjan J; Schneider, Eric C

    2010-09-01

    Previous studies using clinical performance measures suggest that quality of care for patients with multiple chronic conditions is not worse than that for others. This article presents patient-reported experiences of health care among 8,973 of chronically ill adults from eight countries, using telephone survey data. We designed a ''morbidity score'' combining the number of conditions and reported health status. Respondents with high morbidity scores reported less favorable experience with coordination of care compared to those with low morbidity scores. They also reported lower ratings of overall quality of care. There were no differences in reported experience with the individual physicians. Comparing type of comorbidity, chronic lung, and mental health problems were associated with lower ratings than hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, and cancer. The implications and limitations of this study are discussed in the context of health care reform. Pay-for-performance programs need to account for chronic conditions to avoid penalizing physicians who care for larger shares of such patients. PMID:20801976

  1. Role of relatives of ethnic minority patients in patient safety in hospital care: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    van Rosse, F.; Suurmond, J.; Wagner, C; de Bruijne, M.; M. L. Essink-Bot

    2016-01-01

    Objective Relatives of ethnic minority patients often play an important role in the care process during hospitalisation. Our objective was to analyse the role of these relatives in relation to the safety of patients during hospital care. Setting Four large urban hospitals with an ethnic diverse patient population. Participants On hospital admission of ethnic minority patients, 20 cases were purposively sampled in which relatives were observed to play a role in the care process. Outcome measur...

  2. Overview of outcome measurement for adults using social care services and support

    OpenAIRE

    Netten, Ann

    2011-01-01

    What is meant by outcome inevitably varies depending on the context and scope of what is under consideration. This review discusses the measurement of outcome for individuals and their carers for research purposes, particularly the type of research which evaluates the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of social care for adults and which has implications for social care practice. The review discusses what is meant by outcome in social care, presenting a model that describes different ‘types...

  3. Primary Care of Adult Women: Common Dermatologic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Luzuriaga, Arlene M; Mhlaba, Julie; Roman, Carly

    2016-06-01

    Dermatologic disease often presents in the primary care setting. Therefore, it is important for the primary care provider to be familiar with the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of common skin conditions. This article provides an overview of acne, rosacea, melasma, vitiligo, alopecia, nonmelanoma, and melanoma skin cancer, dermatitis, and lichen sclerosus. PMID:27212088

  4. Quality of care for patients with non-communicable diseases in the Dedza District, Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Wood

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Malawi, non-communicable diseases (NCDs are thought to cause 28% of deaths in adults. The aim of this study was to establish the extent of primary care morbidity related to NCDs, as well as to audit the quality of care, in the primary care setting of Dedza District, central Malawi.Methods: This study was a baseline audit using clinic registers and a questionnaire survey of senior health workers at 5 clinics, focusing on care for hypertension, diabetes, asthma and epilepsy.Results: A total of 82 581 consultations were recorded, of which 2489 (3.0% were for the selected NCDs. Only 5 out of 32 structural criteria were met at all 5 clinics and 9 out of 29process criteria were never performed at any clinic. The only process criteria performed at all five clinics was measurement of blood pressure. The staff’s knowledge on NCDs was basic and the main barriers to providing quality care were lack of medication and essential equipment, inadequate knowledge and guidelines, fee-for-service at two clinics, geographic inaccessibility and lack of confidence in the primary health care system by patients.Conclusion: Primary care morbidity from NCDs is currently low, although other studies suggest a significant burden of disease. This most likely represents a lack of utilisation, recognition, diagnosis and ability to manage patients with NCDs. Quality of care is poor due to a lack of essential resources, guidelines, and training.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of chiropractic care versus self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Jan; Vach, Werner; Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess whether primary sector healthcare in the form of chiropractic care is cost-effective compared with self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain, that is, a subgroup of patients with non-specific chest pain. Methods and results 115 adults aged 18–75 years with acute, non-specific chest pain of musculoskeletal origin were recruited from a cardiology department in Denmark. After ruling out acute coronary syndrome and receiving usual care, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain were randomised to 4 weeks of community-based chiropractic care (n=59) or to a single information session aimed at encouraging self-management as complementary to usual care (n=56). Data on resource use were obtained from Danish national registries and valued from a societal perspective. Patient cost and health-related quality-adjusted life years (QALYs; based on EuroQol five-dimension questionnaire (EQ-5D) and Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36)) were compared in cost-effectiveness analyses over 12 months from baseline. Mean costs were €2183 lower for the group with chiropractic care, but not statistically significant (95% CI −4410.5 to 43.0). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio suggested that chiropractic care was cost-effective with a probability of 97%, given a threshold value of €30 000 per QALY gained. In both groups, there was an increase in the health-related quality of life, and the mean increases were similar over the 12-month evaluation period. The mean differences in QALYs between the groups were negligible. Conclusions Chiropractic care was more cost-effective than self-management. Therefore, chiropractic care can be seen as a good example of a targeted primary care approach for a subgroup of patients with non-specific chest pain. Trial registration number NCT00462241. PMID:27175285

  6. Bi-parental care contributes to sexually dimorphic neural cell genesis in the adult mammalian brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria K Mak

    Full Text Available Early life events can modulate brain development to produce persistent physiological and behavioural phenotypes that are transmissible across generations. However, whether neural precursor cells are altered by early life events, to produce persistent and transmissible behavioural changes, is unknown. Here, we show that bi-parental care, in early life, increases neural cell genesis in the adult rodent brain in a sexually dimorphic manner. Bi-parentally raised male mice display enhanced adult dentate gyrus neurogenesis, which improves hippocampal neurogenesis-dependent learning and memory. Female mice display enhanced adult white matter oligodendrocyte production, which increases proficiency in bilateral motor coordination and preference for social investigation. Surprisingly, single parent-raised male and female offspring, whose fathers and mothers received bi-parental care, respectively, display a similar enhancement in adult neural cell genesis and phenotypic behaviour. Therefore, neural plasticity and behavioural effects due to bi-parental care persist throughout life and are transmitted to the next generation.

  7. Impact of advance care planning on the care of patients with heart failure: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra, Chetna; Sim, David Kheng Leng; Jaufeerally, Fazlur; Vikas, Nivedita Nadkarni; Sim, Genevieve Wong Cheng; Tan, Boon Cheng; Ng, Clarice Shu Hwa; Tho, Pei Leng; Lim, Jingfen; Chuang, Claire Ya-Ting; Fong, Florence Hui Mei; Liu, Joy; Finkelstein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the promise and popularity of advance care planning, there is insufficient evidence that advance care planning helps patients to meet their end-of-life care preferences, especially in Asian settings. Thus, the proposed study aims to assess whether patients with advanced heart failure who are receiving advance care planning have a greater likelihood of receiving end-of-life care consistent with their preferences compared to patients receiving usual care. Secondary objectives...

  8. Care of patients with alzheimer and their skills in caring, in the city of cartagena

    OpenAIRE

    MONTALVO PRIETO, AMPARO ASTRID

    2010-01-01

    The study established the characteristics and the skills in caring for an Alzheimer's patient, by the main family care provider in Cartagena. We carried out a descriptive quantitative study of 84 care providers for Alzheimer patients, in Cartagena and neighboring towns, of different gender and social level, who came to the hospital institution, i.e. the "Fundación Instituto de Rehabilitación del Epiléptico (FIRE)". The instruments used was care ability index or, "Inventario de la habilidad de...

  9. Inequalities in the care experiences of patients with cancer: analysis of data from the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey 2011–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, Anna; Mc Grath-Lone, Louise; Day, Sophie; Ward, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To explore inequalities in the care experiences of care by patients clinical or trust-level factors for patients with cancer. Design Secondary analysis of data from the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey 2011–2012. Setting and participants Adult patients with a primary diagnosis of cancer who attended an acute or specialist National Health Service (NHS) trust in England. Outcome measure OR of a patient rating their overall care positively, adjusting for other patient, clinical and trust-level factors. Methods Using cross-sectional data from 71 793 patients with cancer who completed the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey 2011–2012, we examined associations between patient, clinical and trust-level factors and a summary measure of patient experience, namely overall rating of care. Multivariate logistic regression was used to investigate variation by sociodemographic characteristics adjusting for other patient, clinical and trust-level factors. Results Female, non-white and younger patients were less likely to rate their overall care as excellent or very good. Patients with long-standing conditions, particularly those with learning disabilities or mental health conditions, also reported poorer overall care. This variation persisted when other patient, clinical and trust-level factors were controlled for, indicating that there are real differences in experiences among patients with cancer by sociodemographic characteristics. Conclusions There is evidence of inequalities in the experiences of patients with cancer in the UK by sociodemographic characteristics such as gender, age, ethnicity and disability. Quality cancer care services must strive to meet the needs of a diverse patient population equally; this study identifies patient groups for whom it appears cancer care services are in greatest need of improvement. PMID:24531454

  10. Shared Decision Making and Effective Physician-Patient Communication: The Quintessence of Patient-Centered Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huy Ming Lim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Institute of Medicine’s (IOM 2001 landmark report, Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, identified patient-centeredness as one of the fundamental attributes of quality health care, alongside safety, effectiveness, timeliness, efficiency, and equity. The IOM defined patient-centeredness as “providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions.” This concept of patient-centered care represents a paradigm shift from the traditional disease-oriented and physician-centered care, grounding health care in the subjective experience of illness and the needs and preferences of individual patients rather than the evaluation and treatment of diseases which emphasizes on leveraging clinical expertise and evidence derived from population-based studies. Regrettably, despite the ubiquitous talk about patient-centered care in modern health care, shared decision-making and effective physician-patient communication—the two cruxes of patient-centered care—are yet to become the norms. Strategies to promote and enhance shared decision-making and effective communication between clinicians and patients should be rigorously implemented to establish a health care system that truly values patients as individuals and turn the rhetoric of patient-centered care into reality.

  11. Hospitalists caring for patients with advanced cancer: An experience-based guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Douglas J; Tonorezos, Emily S; Kumar, Chhavi B; Goring, Tabitha N; Salvit, Cori; Egan, Barbara C

    2016-04-01

    Every year, nearly 5 million adults with cancer are hospitalized. Limited evidence suggests that hospitalization of the cancer patient is associated with adverse morbidity and mortality. Hospitalization of the patient with advanced cancer allows for an intense examination of health status in the face of terminal illness and an opportunity for defining goals of care. This experience-based guide reports what is currently known about the topic and outlines a systematic approach to maximizing opportunities, improving quality, and enhancing the well-being of the hospitalized patient with advanced cancer. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:292-296. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26588430

  12. Patient satisfaction with emergency oral health care in rural Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntabaye, M K; Scheutz, F; Poulsen, S

    1998-10-01

    Emergency oral health care, as conceived in Tanzania, is an on-demand service provided at a rural health center or dispensary by a Rural Medical Aide. The service includes: simple tooth extraction under local anesthesia, draining of abscesses, control of acute oral infection with appropriate drug therapy, first aid for maxillo-facial trauma, and recognition of oral conditions requiring patient referral for further care at the district or regional hospital dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to describe patient satisfaction with emergency oral health care services in rural Tanzania and determine the relative importance of factors influencing patient satisfaction. The study was carried out as a cross-sectional interview survey between April 1993 and May 1994 using a patient satisfaction questionnaire in rural villages in the Rungwe district of Tanzania. It included 206 patients aged 18 years or more who had received emergency oral health care between April 1993 and March 1994. Overall, 92.7% of the respondents reported that they were satisfied with the service. Patients who were married, had no formal education and lived more than 3 km from the dispensary were more likely to be satisfied with treatment. In a logistic regression model, a good working atmosphere at the dispensary, a good relationship between care provider and patients (art of care) and absence of post-treatment complications significantly influenced patient satisfaction with odds ratios of 10.3, 17.4 and 6.2, respectively. PMID:9792119

  13. Older patients' experiences during care transition

    OpenAIRE

    Rustad, Else

    2016-01-01

    Else Cathrine Rustad,1–4 Bodil Furnes,1 Berit Seiger Cronfalk,2,5,6 Elin Dysvik1 1Department of Health Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway; 2Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Stord Haugesund University College, Stord, Norway; 3Research Network on Integrated Health Care in Western Norway, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 5Pal...

  14. Older patients' experiences during care transition

    OpenAIRE

    Rustad EC; Furnes B; Cronfalk BS; Dysvik E

    2016-01-01

    Else Cathrine Rustad,1–4 Bodil Furnes,1 Berit Seiger Cronfalk,2,5,6 Elin Dysvik1 1Department of Health Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway; 2Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Stord Haugesund University College, Stord, Norway; 3Research Network on Integrated Health Care in Western Norway, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 5Palliat...

  15. Skin care of the pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallija, G; Mondozzi, M; Webb, A A

    1999-04-01

    Several factors influence the chronically ill child's susceptibility for skin breakdown. Nurses are an integral part of the care team that has the responsibility for identification of these factors, as well as pressure ulcer prevention and early intervention. An important aspect of this responsibility is identification of individuals at risk. This article provides a guide for assessment and early intervention for skin breakdown in chronically ill children. A care plan and consultation recommendations are included. PMID:10337118

  16. Helicobacter pylori eradication in dyspeptic primary care patients: a randomized controlled trial of a pharmacy intervention

    OpenAIRE

    STEVENS, Victor J; Shneidman, Robert J; Johnson, Richard E; Boles, Myde; Steele, Paul E.; Lee, Nancy L

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine the effectiveness of structured adherence counseling by pharmacists on the eradication of Helicobacter pylori when using a standard drug treatment regimen. Design Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting Nonprofit group-practice health maintenance organization (HMO). Participants HMO primary care providers referred 1,393 adult dyspeptic patients for carbon 14 urea breath testing (UBT). Interventions Those whose tests were positive for H pylori (23.3%) were provided...

  17. Selecting process quality indicators for the integrated care of vulnerable older adults affected by cognitive impairment or dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebel Paule

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed at evaluating face and content validity, feasibility and reliability of process quality indicators developed previously in the United States or other countries. The indicators can be used to evaluate care and services for vulnerable older adults affected by cognitive impairment or dementia within an integrated service system in Quebec, Canada. Methods A total of 33 clinical experts from three major urban centres in Quebec formed a panel representing two medical specialties (family medicine, geriatrics and seven health or social services specialties (nursing, occupational therapy, psychology, neuropsychology, pharmacy, nutrition, social work, from primary or secondary levels of care, including long-term care. A modified version of the RAND®/University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA appropriateness method, a two-round Delphi panel, was used to assess face and content validity of process quality indicators. The appropriateness of indicators was evaluated according to a agreement of the panel with three criteria, defined as a median rating of 7–9 on a nine-point rating scale, and b agreement among panellists, judged by the statistical measure of the interpercentile range adjusted for symmetry. Feasibility of quality assessment and reliability of appropriate indicators were then evaluated within a pilot study on 29 patients affected by cognitive impairment or dementia. For measurable indicators the inter-observer reliability was calculated with the Kappa statistic. Results Initially, 82 indicators for care of vulnerable older adults with cognitive impairment or dementia were submitted to the panellists. Of those, 72 (88% were accepted after two rounds. Among 29 patients for whom medical files of the preceding two years were evaluated, 63 (88% of these indicators were considered applicable at least once, for at least one patient. Only 22 indicators were considered applicable at least once for ten or more out

  18. The Effect of Free Adult Preventive Care Services on Subsequent Utilization of Inpatient Services in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wei-Hua

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate the relationship between the utilization of free adult preventive care services and subsequent utilization of inpatient services among elderly people under the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan. The study used secondary data from the 2005 Taiwan National Health Interview Survey and claim data from the 2006 Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database for the elderly aged 65 or over. A bivariate probit model was used to avoid the possible endogeneity in individuals' utilization of free adult preventive care and inpatient services. This study finds that, when individuals had utilized the preventive care services in 2005, the probability that they utilized inpatient services in 2006 was significantly reduced by 13.89%. The findings of this study may provide a good reference for policy makers to guide the efficient allocation of medical resources through the continuous promotion of free adult preventive care services under the National Health Insurance program. PMID:27287671

  19. Prevalence of physical and verbal aggressive behaviours and associated factors among older adults in long-term care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desrosiers Johanne

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Verbal and physical aggressive behaviours are among the most disturbing and distressing behaviours displayed by older patients in long-term care facilities. Aggressive behaviour (AB is often the reason for using physical or chemical restraints with nursing home residents and is a major concern for caregivers. AB is associated with increased health care costs due to staff turnover and absenteeism. Methods The goals of this secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study are to determine the prevalence of verbal and physical aggressive behaviours and to identify associated factors among older adults in long-term care facilities in the Quebec City area (n = 2 332. Results The same percentage of older adults displayed physical aggressive behaviour (21.2% or verbal aggressive behaviour (21.5%, whereas 11.2% displayed both types of aggressive behaviour. Factors associated with aggressive behaviour (both verbal and physical were male gender, neuroleptic drug use, mild and severe cognitive impairment, insomnia, psychological distress, and physical restraints. Factors associated with physical aggressive behaviour were older age, male gender, neuroleptic drug use, mild or severe cognitive impairment, insomnia and psychological distress. Finally, factors associated with verbal aggressive behaviour were benzodiazepine and neuroleptic drug use, functional dependency, mild or severe cognitive impairment and insomnia. Conclusion Cognitive impairment severity is the most significant predisposing factor for aggressive behaviour among older adults in long-term care facilities in the Quebec City area. Physical and chemical restraints were also significantly associated with AB. Based on these results, we suggest that caregivers should provide care to older adults with AB using approaches such as the progressively lowered stress threshold model and reactance theory which stress the importance of paying attention to the severity of cognitive

  20. Wilms Tumor: An Uncommon Entity in the Adult Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Fade; Allen, M Brandon; Cox, Roni; Davis, Rodney

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor, the most common kidney tumor in children, is rarely seen in adults, making it a challenge for the adult oncologist to diagnose and treat. Unlike with renal cell carcinoma, patients with Wilms tumor should receive adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy. Adult oncologists may not be familiar with pediatric oncology protocols, so it is important to consult with pediatric oncologists who have more experience in this disease. Multimodal therapy based on pediatric protocols improved the outcomes of adults with Wilms tumor worldwide. We report a rare case of a 24-year-old woman with a slow-growing mass of the left kidney during a 4-year period. The mass was surgically removed and final diagnosis confirmed by pathology to be Wilms tumor. The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and has been free of disease since 2014. PMID:27043834

  1. Caring for cancer patients on non-specialist wards.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Finola

    2012-02-01

    As cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide, every nurse will be required to care for patients with the condition at some point in his\\/her career. However, non-specialized oncology nurses are often ill-prepared to nurse patients suffering from cancer. This literature review aims to provide an overview of current trends and developments in cancer care nursing in an attempt to identify the range of previous research pertaining to caring for patients with cancer on non-specialist wards. The review finds that non-specialized cancer nurses report a lack of education and training with regard to cancer care and cancer treatments, which acts as a barrier to providing quality nursing care. Emotional and communication issues with patients and their families can also cause non-specialist nurses significant distress. International research has shown that specialist oncology nurses make a considerable difference to physical and psychosocial patient care. It is therefore paramount that non-speciality nurses\\' educational needs are met to develop clinical competence and to provide supportive holistic care for both patients and their families.

  2. Case managers optimize patient safety by facilitating effective care transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Dana Deravin

    2007-01-01

    In this new era of patient safety, the case manager, as an advocate and facilitator of care, has a pivotal role on the front line of healthcare delivery. Effective communication and collaboration between disciplines is key to the promotion of patient safety, and ultimately the avoidance of life-threatening medical errors. Across the healthcare continuum and within hospitals in particular, patients are routinely transferred from one service to another, from one level of care to another, or from one provider to another. As patients are stabilized and transitioned through the hospital system, there are multiple hand-offs of care or care transitions that can often expose the patient to fragmented service and increase the risk of communication breakdown. Ineffective hand-offs can result in a disruption of continuity between one level of care and the next. In a culture that places a strong emphasis on patient safety, case managers can facilitate opportunities that ease care transitions whereby a change in venue is no longer perceived as a disruption in the flow of care but rather is viewed as a coordinated changeover where cautious and comprehensive communication sets the tone for the continued delivery of safe and effective healthcare. PMID:17413671

  3. Assessments of urine cofilin-1 in patients hospitalized in the intensive care units with acute kidney injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Jang; Chao, Cheng-Han; Chang, Ying-Feng; Chou, Chien

    2013-02-01

    The actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family has been reported to be associated with ischemia induced renal disorders. Here we examine if cofilin-1 is associated with acute kidney injury (AKI). We exploited a 96-well based fiber-optic biosensor that uses conjugated gold nanoparticles and a sandwich immunoassay to detect the urine cofilin-1 level of AKI patients. The mean urine cofilin-1 level of the AKI patients was two-fold higher than that of healthy adults. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve showed that cofilin-1 is a potential biomarker for discriminating AKI patients from healthy adults for intensive care patients.

  4. PRIMARY CARE PROBLEMS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Shtegman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate primary care efficacy in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF.Material and methods. Outpatients (n=139 with CHF and 35 primary care physicians were included into the study. The evaluation of drug therapy and patient awareness of the principles of non-drug CHF treatment were performed. An anonymous survey among doctors in terms of current CHF guidelines knowledge, patient information provided by physicians, and doctors’ burnout status was also carried out.Results. Only 39% and 10% of CHF outpatients received target doses of ACE inhibitors/sartans and beta-blockers, respectively. Majority of CHF outpatients and their doctors need in additional education/training. 56% of primary care physicians demonstrated an emotional burnout.Conclusion. Author considers it essential to distribute short pocket-guidelines on CHF management among primary care physicians, and to reduce the load on primary care physicians with simultaneous strengthening of their performance control.

  5. Outpatient percutaneous renal biopsy in adult patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the safety and efficacy of performing percutanaeous renal biopsy in the outpatient department compared to the traditional inpatient policy, we studied 44 consecutive patients with proteinuria and other urinary sediment abnormalities, at King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, during the period from September 2004 to August 2006. The patients were divided into two groups: group I, in whom kidney biopsy was performed and followed by 1-day hospital admission; and group II, in whom renal biopsy was performed in the outpatient department and followed by 6 hours observation period and then by regular outpatient visits. All biopsies were performed with the use of real-time ultrasound and automated biopsy needle. Patients with a history of bleeding diathesis or abnormal coagulation profile and those receiving warfarin, heparin, aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were excluded from the study. Only minor biopsy-related complications such as gross hematuria, perinephric hematoma that resolved without the need for blood transfusion or surgical intervention occurred in three (13.6%) patients in group I and in two (9.1%) patients in group II. The complications were apparent within 6 hours in all but one patient (97.7%). Overall, hematuria was identified in 52% of patients at <-72 hours, 85% at <-4 hours and 97.7% at <- 6 hours. The 24-hour hematocrit levels were not significantly different between the study groups. One (4.5%) patient from group II had a small perinephric hematoma, which was detected by ultrasound examination at 24 hours but not at 6 hours post biopsy period; it resolved spontaneously without intervention. We conclude that in selected patients, same day discharge after 6 hours of renal biopsy may be given safety without increased risk of complications. (author)

  6. Orthodontic – prosthetic treatment of adult patients with forced

    OpenAIRE

    Radeska, Ana; Radeski, Josif; Zlatanovska, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    Introduction:Adult patient with forced progenia , bilateral hipodontia of maxillary lateral incisors, diastema mediana and cross bite of 2mm in front.Purpose:To present the interdisciplinary cooperation between orthodontist and prosthodontist in resolving malocclusions of this kind. Material and method: The patient ZH.K age 22 years with forced progenia , bilateral hipodontia of the maxillary lateral incisors and cross bite of 2mm in front. The patient was treated with active orthodontic mobi...

  7. Treatment with active orthodontic appliance in adult patient

    OpenAIRE

    Radeska, Ana; Radeski, Josif; Zlatanovska, Katerina; Papakoca, Kiro; Zarkova, Julija

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Showing the efficiency of orthodontic mobile appliance in treatment of adult patient Case summary: The patient A.K. Age 25 years whit forced progenia, bilateral hypodontia of the maxillary incisors and cross bite of 2 mm in front. The patient was treated with active orthodontic appliance whit bitten ridge and down labial arch. The treatment lasted 18 months after which periods is reached normal occlusion with normal overlap in front and closed diastema mediana. The hypodontia of the m...

  8. Clinician styles of care: transforming patient care at the intersection of leadership and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Ho P; Sweeny, Kate

    2014-11-01

    A key role of clinicians is to motivate their patients to initiate and maintain beneficial health behaviors. This article integrates research on transformational leadership, clinician-patient communication, and health behavior to introduce a novel approach to understanding and improving clinicians' effectiveness as motivators. We describe three dominant clinician styles or patterned approaches to patient care that derive from leadership theory (in order of least to most effective): laissez-faire, transactional, and transformational. Additionally, we suggest potential mediators and effects of the transformational style of care. Finally, we discuss future research directions for the study of clinician styles of care. PMID:23864074

  9. Care of Patients at the End of Life: Advance Care Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Richard J

    2016-08-01

    Advance directives are legal documents that give instructions about how to provide care when patients develop life-threatening illnesses and can no longer communicate their wishes. Two types of documents are widely used-a living will and a durable power of attorney for health care. Most states also authorize physician orders for life-sustaining treatment. Physicians should encourage patients, particularly those with severe chronic or terminal conditions, to prepare advance directives. Medicare now reimburses billing codes for advance care consultations. Directions regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation and artificial ventilation often are included in advance care plans, and use of artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH) also should be addressed, particularly for patients with advanced dementia. Evidence shows that in such patients, ANH does not prolong survival, increase comfort, or improve quality of life. Given the lack of benefit, physicians should recommend against use of ANH for patients with dementia. Finally, physicians should encourage use of hospice services by patients whose life expectancy is 6 months or less. Although Medicare and most other health care insurers cover hospice care, and despite evidence that patient and family satisfaction increase when hospice services are used, many patients do not use these services. PMID:27490070

  10. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tralongo, Paolo; Ferraù, Francesco; Borsellino, Nicolò; Verderame, Francesco; Caruso, Michele; Giuffrida, Dario; Butera, Alfredo; Gebbia, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients’ needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients’ needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective. PMID:21941445

  11. Serum 25 Hydroxy Vitamin D Levels In Adult Asthmatic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa M. Shaaban*, Manal Hashem

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with chronic lung disease as asthma appear to be at increased risk for vitamin D deficiency for reasons that are not clear. Methods: A cross sectional study including 75 asthmatic adults aged older than 18 years and 75 adults healthy control aged older than 18 years (35 males and 40 females for both groups) assessing the relationship between serum 25 hydroxy vitamin D levels and lung function. Result: In our study only (12٫31%) of our asthmatic adults had sufficient vitamin...

  12. Environmental Design for Patient Families in Intensive Care Units

    OpenAIRE

    Rashid, Mahbub

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to define the role of environmental design in improving family integration with patient care in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). It argues that it is necessary to understand family needs, experience and behavioral responses in ICUs to develop effective models for family integration. With its two components—the “healing culture” promoting effective relationships between caregivers and care seekers, and the “environmental design” supporting the healing culture—a “healin...

  13. Improving haemophilia patient care through sharing best practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moerloose, Philippe; Arnberg, Daniel; O'Mahony, Brian; Colvin, Brian

    2015-10-01

    At the 2014 Annual Congress of the European Haemophilia Consortium (EHC) held in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Pfizer initiated and funded a satellite symposium entitled: 'Improving Patient Care Through Sharing Best Practice'. Co-chaired by Brian Colvin (Pfizer Global Innovative Pharma Business, Rome, Italy) and Brian O'Mahony [President of the EHC, Brussels, Belgium], the symposium provided an opportunity to consider patient care across borders, to review how patient advocacy groups can successfully engage with policymakers in healthcare decision-making and to discuss the importance of patient involvement in data collection to help shape the future environment for people with haemophilia. Professor Philippe de Moerloose (University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine of Geneva, Switzerland) opened the session by discussing the gap between the haemophilia management guidelines and the reality of care for many patients living in Europe, highlighting the importance of sharing of best practice and building a network of treaters and patient organisations to support the improvement of care across Europe. Daniel Arnberg (SCISS AB, Hägersten, Sweden) reviewed the health technology assessment process conducted in Sweden, the first for haemophilia products, as a case study, focusing on the role of the patient organisation. Finally, Brian O'Mahony reflected on the central role of patients as individuals and also within patient organisations in shaping the future of haemophilia care. PMID:26338268

  14. Development of a survey instrument to measure patient experience of integrated care

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Kara Odom; Stewart, Anita L; Grumbach, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background Healthcare systems are working to move towards more integrated, patient-centered care. This study describes the development and testing of a multidimensional self-report measure of patients’ experiences of integrated care. Methods Random-digit-dial telephone survey in 2012 of 317 adults aged 40 years or older in the San Francisco region who had used healthcare at least twice in the past 12 months. One-time cross-sectional survey; psychometric evaluation to confirm dimensions and cr...

  15. THE MEANING OF INSULIN PUMPE THERAPY TO ADULT PATIENTS WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Heidi; Aagaard, Hanne

    Background: Insulin pump therapy is an increasing field. Studies have documented a clinical relevant decrease in HbA1c, especially among adults type 1 diabetes patients with initial high HbA1c. However, only few studies investigate the lived experience with and the meaning of the insulin pump...... therapy in adulthood. Aim: The study explore the lived experiences and the meaning of insulin pump therapy in adulthood. Method: The study is based on a phenomenological – hermeneutic approach. Four adult type 1 diabetes patients were interviewed about their insulin pump therapy. The interviews were based...... meaningfulness in relation to diabetes self-care and self-management. The bolus guide, as a rather new feature, seem to play an important role. Conclusion: Based on The Shifting Perspectives Model of Chronic Illness, we concluded that a well established insulin pump therapy lead to changing the patients...

  16. The effect of pharmacist-led interventions in optimising prescribing in older adults in primary care: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, David O; Walsh, Kieran A; Galvin, Rose; Sinnott, Carol; Kearney, Patricia M; Byrne, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate studies of pharmacist-led interventions on potentially inappropriate prescribing among community-dwelling older adults receiving primary care to identify the components of a successful intervention. Data sources: An electronic search of the literature was conducted using the following databases from inception to December 2015: PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE (through Ovid), Trip, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ISI Web of Science, ScienceDirect, ClinicalTrials.gov, metaRegister of Controlled Trials, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database (Theses in Great Britain, Ireland and North America). Review methods: Studies were included if they were randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised studies involving a pharmacist-led intervention compared to usual/routine care which aimed to reduce potentially inappropriate prescribing in older adults in primary care. Methodological quality of the included studies was independently assessed. Results: A comprehensive literature search was conducted which identified 2193 studies following removal of duplicates. Five studies met the inclusion criteria. Four studies involved a pharmacist conducting a medication review and providing feedback to patients or their family physician. One randomised controlled trial evaluated the effect of a computerised tool that alerted pharmacists when elderly patients were newly prescribed potentially inappropriate medications. Four studies were associated with an improvement in prescribing appropriateness. Conclusion: Overall, this review demonstrates that pharmacist-led interventions may improve prescribing appropriateness in community-dwelling older adults. However, the quality of evidence is low. The role of a pharmacist working as part of a multidisciplinary primary care team requires further investigation to optimise prescribing in this group of patients. PMID

  17. Depressed older adults may be less cared for than depressed younger ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanglier, Thibaut; Saragoussi, Delphine; Milea, Dominique; Tournier, Marie

    2015-10-30

    The aim of the study was to investigate depression treatment use, either psychotherapy (PT) or antidepressant drugs (ADT) in the older and younger depressed population. Cohorts of 6316 elderly (≥65 year-old) and 25,264 matched non-elderly (25-64 year-old) depressed patients were created from a large national claims database of managed care plans from 2003 to 2006. Factors associated with ADT or PT were assessed using multivariate logistic models. During the 120 days following the depression diagnosis, the elderly persons were less often treated than the younger adults either by ADT (25.6% vs. 33.8%) or by PT (13.0% vs. 34.4%). ADT dispensing occurred later in the elderly group (51 vs. 14 days). ADT was associated with comorbid chronic conditions or polypharmacy in the elderly and younger adults. The selection of treatment (ADT or PT) was associated with the history of treated depression using the same type of treatment, in both groups. Thus, depression goes commonly untreated. Comorbidity was associated with higher ADT dispensing rates. However, although depressed elderly commonly presented with comorbidity, this age group was at higher risk of untreated illness or later treatment. PMID:26233825

  18. Iopentol for cardioangiography in adult patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cineangiography of the left ventricle, the ascending aorta, and the coronary arteries was performed with iopentol 350 mg I/ml in an open Phase II trial in 11 patients with coronary artery disease. Iopentol was well tolerated, both subjectively by the patients, and as shown by evaluation of results in several haemodynamic, electrocardiographic and clinical chemical parameters. Films of high quality were obtained for all patients. Thereafter, a randomized double-blind Phase III study was performed in two comparable groups of patients, using the same procedures as in the open series. One group was examined with iopentol and the other with iohexol, both media with 350 mg I/ml. Iopentol was found to be well suited for cardioangiography and its properties appear similar to those of iohexol. (author). 8 refs.; 1 tab

  19. Improving Diabetes Care for Hospice Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sei J; Jacobson, Margaret A; Johnston, C Bree

    2016-07-01

    Although type 2 diabetes guidelines recommend less aggressive glycemic control for patients with limited life expectancy, many hospice patients continue their glucose-lowering medications, resulting in an increased risk of hypoglycemia. Three common reasons for overly tight glycemic control in hospice patients include (1) discussions about reducing or stopping chronic medications are uncomfortable; (2) many patients and families believe that mild hyperglycemia can cause symptoms; and (3) until 2014, Healthcare Information and Data Information Set (HEDIS) quality indicators for glycemic control included hospice patients. To address these issues, we recommend (1) providers discuss with patients and families upon hospice enrollment that diabetes medications can be reduced or discontinued as their life-limiting disease progresses; (2) keeping blood glucose levels between 200 and 300 mg/dL; and (3) educate providers that HEDIS measures now exclude hospice patients. Implementing these recommendations should decrease the risk of hypoglycemia in hospice patients and improve their quality of life. PMID:25852204

  20. [Mesial temporal sclerosis syndrome in adult patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consalvo, D; Giobellina, R; Silva, W; Rugilo, C; Saidón, P; Schuster, G; Kochen, S; Sica, R

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential tool in the work-up of epilepsy. Since its appearance it has been possible to identify pathologies, such as hippocampal sclerosis (HS), that had previously only been detected by histopathological assays. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical manifestations, EEG and the outcome of patients with HS as shown by MRI. We revised the clinical histories of 384 outpatients from the Epilepsy Center, Ramos Mejía Hospital, who had been studied by MRI. Thirty five of them (15.5%) had a diagnosis of HS, based on the structural changes observed on the images. Six patients were excluded because of incomplete clinical data. Therefore, we studied 29 patients including 15 men. The mean age was 32.7 +/- 10.2 years (range: 19-58). All of them had partial seizures. Ten subjects had had febrile convulsions (34.5%) in childhood. Neurological examination was normal in all subjects. Interictal EEG showed focal abnormalities that were coincident in their location with the MRI abnormalities in 16 patients (55.1%). Fourteen patients (48.3%) showed right side hippocampal lesions on MRI, thirteen on the left side (44.9%) and 2 bilateral HS (6.8%). Twenty-seven patients (93.1%) had intractable epilepsy. Anterior temporal lobectomy was performed in 3 subjects with good outcome. The identification of these patients who present certain clinical and MRI characteristics, provides an opportunity to define the mesial temporal sclerosis syndrome. This could benefit patients in their prognosis and for specific treatments. PMID:10962804