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  1. Incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2 complications among Saudi adult patients at primary health care center

    OpenAIRE

    Alsenany, Samira; Al Saif, Amer

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study analyzed type 2 diabetes and its role in complications among adult Saudi patients. [Subjects] Patients attending four primary health care centers in Jeddah were enrolled. [Methods] A cross-sectional design study among Saudi patients attending Ministry of Health primary health care centers in Jeddah was selected for use by the Primary Health Care administration. Patients were interviewed with structured questionnaires to determine the presence of diabetes and risk factors ...

  2. The Influence of Adult Attachment on Patient Self-Management in Primary Care - The Need for a Personalized Approach and Patient-Centred Care

    OpenAIRE

    Katja Brenk-Franz; Bernhard Strauss; Fabian Tiesler; Christian Fleischhauer; Paul Ciechanowski; Nico Schneider; Jochen Gensichen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Self-management strategies are essential elements of evidence-based treatment in patients with chronic conditions in primary care. Our objective was to analyse different self-management skills and behaviours and their association to adult attachment in primary care patients with multiple chronic conditions. Methods In the apricare study (Adult Attachment in Primary Care) we used a prospective longitudinal design to examine the association between adult attachment and self-management...

  3. Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten;

    2012-01-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2012; Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care Rationale:  Despite the fact that communication has become a core topic in health care, patients still experience the information provided...... as insufficient or incorrect and a lack of involvement. Objective:  To investigate whether adult orthopaedic patients' evaluation of the quality of care had improved after a communication skills training course for healthcare professionals. Design and methods:  The study was designed as an intervention study...... limitation. Response rates were comparable to those of other studies. Conclusion:  Patients show increased satisfaction with the quality of health care after professionals have attended a communication skills training course, even when implemented in an entire department. Practice implications:  We recommend...

  4. The Influence of Adult Attachment on Patient Self-Management in Primary Care--The Need for a Personalized Approach and Patient-Centred Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Brenk-Franz

    Full Text Available Self-management strategies are essential elements of evidence-based treatment in patients with chronic conditions in primary care. Our objective was to analyse different self-management skills and behaviours and their association to adult attachment in primary care patients with multiple chronic conditions.In the apricare study (Adult Attachment in Primary Care we used a prospective longitudinal design to examine the association between adult attachment and self-management in primary care patients with multimorbidity. The attachment dimensions avoidance and anxiety were measured using the ECR-RD. Self-management skills were measured by the FERUS (motivation to change, coping, self-efficacy, hope, social support and self-management-behaviour by the DSMQ (glucose management, dietary control, physical activity, health-care use. Clinical diagnosis and severity of disease were assessed by the patients' GPs. Multivariate analyses (GLM were used to assess the relationship between the dimensions of adult attachment and patient self-management.219 patients in primary care with multiple chronic conditions (type II diabetes, hypertension and at least one other chronic condition between the ages of 50 and 85 were included in the study. The attachment dimension anxiety was positively associated with motivation to change and negatively associated with coping, self-efficacy and hope, dietary control and physical activity. Avoidance was negatively associated with coping, self-efficacy, social support and health care use.The two attachment dimensions anxiety and avoidance are associated with different components of self-management. A personalized, attachment-based view on patients with chronic diseases could be the key to effective, individual self-management approaches in primary care.

  5. Blueprint for Implementing New Processes in Acute Care: Rescuing Adult Patients With Intraosseous Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chreiman, Kristen M; Kim, Patrick K; Garbovsky, Lyudmila A; Schweickert, William D

    2015-01-01

    The intraosseous (IO) access initiative at an urban university adult level 1 trauma center began from the need for a more expeditious vascular access route to rescue patients in extremis. The goal of this project was a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving to increase access of IO catheters to rescue patients in all care areas. The initiative became a collaborative effort between nursing, physicians, and pharmacy to embark on an acute care endeavor to standardize IO access. This is a descriptive analysis of processes to effectively develop collaborative strategies to navigate hospital systems and successfully implement multilayered initiatives. Administration should empower nurse to advance their practice to include IO for patient rescue. Intraosseous access may expedite resuscitative efforts in patients in extremis who lack venous access or where additional venous access is required for life-saving therapies. Limiting IO dwell time may facilitate timely definitive venous access. Continued education and training by offering IO skill laboratory refreshers and annual e-learning didactic is optimal for maintaining proficiency and knowledge. More research opportunities exist to determine medication safety and efficacy in adult patients in the acute care setting. PMID:26352658

  6. Mental health care Monitor Older adults (MEMO) : monitoring patient characteristics and outcome in Dutch mental health services for older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerbeek, Marjolein; Voshaar, Richard Oude; Depla, Marja; Pot, Anne Margriet

    2013-01-01

    Information on which older adults attend mental health care and whether they profit from the care they receive is important for policy-makers. To assess this information in daily practice, the Mental health care Monitor Older adults (MEMO) was developed in the Netherlands. The aim of this paper is t

  7. Insulin Resistance in Adult Primary Care Patients With a Surrogate Index, Guadalajara, Mexico, 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Espinel-Bermúdez, María Claudia; Robles-Cervantes, José Antonio; del Sagrario Villarreal-Hernández, Liliana; Villaseñor-Romero, Juan Pablo; Hernández-González, Sandra Ofelia; González-Ortiz, Manuel; Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; Pérez-Rubio, Karina Griselda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Insulin resistance (IR) is a key molecular disorder related with diabetes mellitus, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to determine IR in adult primary care patients using the triglyceride/glucose (TyG) index [(Ln TG (mg/dL) × FG (mg/dL))/2]. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional secondary analysis and identified IR subjects according to the TyG index. Results There were 1500 patients included. Significant differences were found between the IR g...

  8. Burns ITU admissions: length of stay in specific levels of care for adult and paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, Zeshaan N; Frew, Quentin; Din, Asmat H; Unluer, Zeynep; Smailes, Sarah; Philp, Bruce; El-Muttardi, Naguib; Dziewulski, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Prediction of total length of stay (LOS) for burns patients based on the total burn surface area (TBSA) is well accepted. Total LOS is a poor measure of resource consumption. Our aim was to determine the LOS in specific levels of care to better inform resource allocation. We performed a retrospective review of LOS in intensive treatment unit (ITU), burns high dependency unit (HDU) and burns low dependency unit (LDU) for all patients requiring ITU admission in a regional burns service from 2003 to 2011. During this period, our unit has admitted 1312 paediatric and 1445 adult patients to our Burns ITU. In both groups, ITU comprised 20% of the total LOS (mean 0.23±0.02 [adult] and 0.22±0.02 [paediatric] days per %burn). In adults, 33% of LOS was in HDU (0.52±0.06 days per %burn) and 48% (0.68±0.06 days per %burn) in LDU, while in children, 15% of LOS was in HDU (0.19±0.03 days per %burn) and 65% in LDU (0.70±0.06 days per %burn). When considering Burns ITU admissions, resource allocation ought to be planned according to expected LOS in specific levels of care rather than total LOS. The largest proportion of stay is in low dependency, likely due to social issues.

  9. CLINICAL, BIOCHEMICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL PROFILE OF ADULT NEPHROTIC SYNDROME PATIENTS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

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    Krishnamoorthy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The nephrotic syndrome is recognized as an independent entity of renal disease for over half a century . 1 Causes of nephrotic syndrome varies with age, time period, geographical location and race. In children, minimal change nephrotic syndrome is the commonest 2 ; however, membranous nephropathy is most frequent in adults . 3 As it commonly affects the younger age group and is associated with high morbidity and mortality, there is a need to understand and diagnose the disease at an early stage. Hence, this study has been done to identify the clinical presentation, biochemical parameters and histopathology associated with nephrotic syndrome in adults and its subtypes. OBJECTIVE: To study the clinical, biochemical and histopathological profile of patients with Adult Nephrotic Syndrome admitted in our tertiary care hospital. METHODS: Prospective study of 100 patients with Adult Nephrotic Syndrome admitt ed in our tertiary care hospital were screened with facial puffiness and pedal edema. They were tested for urine proteinuria, urine protein creatinine ratio or 24 hour urine protein estimation. Later renal biopsy was done for all patients to stratify the subtypes. RESULTS: In this study, males were predominantly affected. Most common presenting complaints were facial puffiness and pedal edema. Systolic BP was increased in 96% of patients and diastolic BP was elevated in 50% of patients. Serum LDL and TGL were elevated in nephrotic syndrome. In young patients less than 40 years Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS is the commonest type, then Membrano Proliferative Glomerulo Nephritis (MPGN and Minimal Change Disease (MCD. In individuals more than 40 years, membranous nephropathy was predominantly seen followed by FSGS. CONCLUSION: There is a changing trend in primary nephrotic syndrome and FSGS was found to be the commonest subtype. Male preponderance was noticed and also FSGS was found to be more common in younger adults. Most

  10. Multidisciplinary Treatments, Patient Characteristics, Context of Care, and Adverse Incidents in Older, Hospitalized Adults

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    Leah L. Shever

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine factors that contribute to adverse incidents by creating a model that included patient characteristics, clinical conditions, nursing unit context of care variables, medical treatments, pharmaceutical treatments, and nursing treatments. Data were abstracted from electronic, administrative, and clinical data repositories. The sample included older adults hospitalized during a four-year period at one, academic medical facility in the Midwestern United States who were at risk for falling. Relational databases were built and a multistep, statistical model building analytic process was used. Total registered nurse (RN hours per patient day (HPPD and HPPDs dropping below the nursing unit average were significant explanatory variables for experiencing an adverse incident. The number of medical and pharmaceutical treatments that a patient received during hospitalization as well as many specific nursing treatments (e.g., restraint use, neurological monitoring were also contributors to experiencing an adverse incident.

  11. Blood transcriptomic biomarkers in adult primary care patients with major depressive disorder undergoing cognitive behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redei, E E; Andrus, B M; Kwasny, M J; Seok, J; Cai, X; Ho, J; Mohr, D C

    2014-09-16

    An objective, laboratory-based diagnostic tool could increase the diagnostic accuracy of major depressive disorders (MDDs), identify factors that characterize patients and promote individualized therapy. The goal of this study was to assess a blood-based biomarker panel, which showed promise in adolescents with MDD, in adult primary care patients with MDD and age-, gender- and race-matched nondepressed (ND) controls. Patients with MDD received cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and clinical assessment using self-reported depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). The measures, including blood RNA collection, were obtained before and after 18 weeks of CBT. Blood transcript levels of nine markers of ADCY3, DGKA, FAM46A, IGSF4A/CADM1, KIAA1539, MARCKS, PSME1, RAPH1 and TLR7, differed significantly between participants with MDD (N=32) and ND controls (N=32) at baseline (qdepressed. Thus, blood levels of different transcript panels may identify the depressed from the nondepressed among primary care patients, during a depressive episode or in remission, or follow and predict response to CBT in depressed individuals.

  12. A biopsychosocial model for the management of patients with sickle-cell disease transitioning to adult medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Lori E; Quinn, Charles T; Kalinyak, Karen A

    2015-04-01

    The lifespan of patients with sickle-cell disease (SCD) continues to increase, and most affected individuals in high-resource countries now live into adulthood. This necessitates a successful transition from pediatric to adult health care. Care for transitioning patients with SCD often falls to primary care providers who may not be fully aware of the many challenges and issues faced by patients and the current management strategies for SCD. In this review, we aim to close the knowledge gap between primary care providers and specialists who treat transitioning patients with SCD. We describe the challenges and issues encountered by these patients, and we propose a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary approach to the management of the identified issues. Examples of this approach, such as transition-focused integrated care models and quality improvement collaboratives, with the potential to improve health outcomes in adulthood are also described.

  13. Adult HIV care resources, management practices and patient characteristics in the Phase 1 IeDEA Central Africa cohort

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    Jules Mushingantahe

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite recent advances in the management of HIV infection and increased access to treatment, prevention, care and support, the HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to be a major global health problem, with sub-Saharan Africa suffering by far the greatest humanitarian, demographic and socio-economic burden of the epidemic. Information on HIV/AIDS clinical care and established cohorts’ characteristics in the Central Africa region are sparse. Methods: A survey of clinical care resources, management practices and patient characteristics was undertaken among 12 adult HIV care sites in four countries of the International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS Central Africa (IeDEA-CA Phase 1 regional network in October 2009. These facilities served predominantly urban populations and offered primary care in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC; six sites, secondary care in Rwanda (two sites and tertiary care in Cameroon (three sites and Burundi (one site. Results: Despite some variation in facility characteristics, sites reported high levels of monitoring resources, including electronic databases, as well as linkages to prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission programs. At the time of the survey, there were 21,599 HIV-positive adults (median age=37 years enrolled in the clinical cohort. Though two-thirds were women, few adults (6.5% entered HIV care through prevention of mother-to-child transmission services, whereas 55% of the cohort entered care through voluntary counselling and testing. Two-thirds of patients at sites in Cameroon and DRC were in WHO Stage III and IV at baseline, whereas nearly all patients in the Rwanda facilities with clinical stage information available were in Stage I and II. WHO criteria were used for antiretroviral therapy initiation. The most common treatment regimen was stavudine/lamivudine/nevirapine (64%, followed by zidovudine/lamivudine/nevirapine (19%. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate the

  14. [Bioethics and nutrition in adult patients with cancer in palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benarroz, Monica de Oliveira; Faillace, Giovanna Borges Damião; Barbosa, Leandro Augusto

    2009-09-01

    Cancer constitutes a major group of chronic diseases and is the second leading cause of death in the developed countries. Palliative care proposes to offer comprehensive support to control symptoms and improve quality of life for patients and their families. Nutrition is an important tool in palliative care, helping patients with their physical, psychological, and social issues and promoting comfort and quality of life. However, in the context of palliative care, nutritional support rarely achieves its role of fully recovering and assuring nutritional status. At this point, the nutritionist must consider the individual patient's needs, preferences, and eating habits, which are essential both for controlling symptoms and assuring satisfaction and comfort. The impossibility of conventionally applying established management and the development of a new perception of the patient often raise dilemmas for professional nutritionists. PMID:19750375

  15. The Role of the Primary Care Physician in Helping Adolescent and Adult Patients Improve Asthma Control

    OpenAIRE

    Yawn, Barbara P.

    2011-01-01

    Many adolescents and adults with asthma continue to have poorly controlled disease, often attributable to poor adherence to asthma therapy. Failure to adhere to recommended treatment may result from a desire to avoid regular reliance on medications, inappropriate high tolerance of asthma symptoms, failure to perceive the chronic nature of asthma, and poor inhaler technique. Primary care physicians need to find opportunities and methods to address these and other issues related to poor asthma ...

  16. Enteral nutrition in the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in adult critical care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jill; Rasmussen, Louisa

    2014-12-01

    Prevention and healing of pressure ulcers in critically ill patients can be especially challenging because of the patients' burden of illness and degree of physiological compromise. Providing adequate nutrition may help halt the development or worsening of pressure ulcers. Optimization of nutrition can be considered an essential ingredient in prevention and healing of pressure ulcers. Understanding malnutrition in critical care patients, the effect of nutrition on wound healing, and the application of evidence-based nutritional guidelines are important aspects for patients at high risk for pressure ulcers. Appropriate screenings for nutritional status and risk for pressure ulcers, early collaboration with a registered dietician, and administration of appropriate feeding formulations and micronutrient and macronutrient supplementation to promote wound healing are practical solutions to improve the nutritional status of critical care patients. Use of nutritional management and enteral feeding protocols may provide vital elements to augment nutrition and ultimately result in improved clinical outcomes.

  17. Mead Johnson Critical Care Symposium for the Practising Surgeon. 1. Transport of critically ill adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotti, M J; Pagliarello, G

    1988-09-01

    Interhospital transportation of critically ill patients over long distances is common in the tiered health care systems of North America. The authors describe their 1-year experience with a physician-assisted transport system, operating out of the surgical intensive care unit at the Toronto General Hospital. The application of a well-known severity of illness measure (therapeutic intervention scoring system) allowed them to correlate severity of illness, as assessed over the telephone before patient transfer, with eventual outcome after admission to the surgical intensive care unit. Their analysis of 107 critically ill patients transported by this system led them to conclude that the system is reliable and is associated with acceptable morbidity and mortality. PMID:3138018

  18. Point-of-care urine tests for smoking status and isoniazid treatment monitoring in adult patients.

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    Ioana Nicolau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Poor adherence to isoniazid (INH preventive therapy (IPT is an impediment to effective control of latent tuberculosis (TB infection. TB patients who smoke are at higher risk of latent TB infection, active disease, and TB mortality, and may have lower adherence to their TB medications. The objective of our study was to validate IsoScreen and SmokeScreen (GFC Diagnostics, UK, two point-of-care tests for monitoring INH intake and determining smoking status. The tests could be used together in the same individual to help identify patients with a high-risk profile and provide a tailored treatment plan that includes medication management, adherence interventions, and smoking cessation programs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 200 adult outpatients attending the TB and/or the smoking cessation clinic were recruited at the Montreal Chest Institute. Sensitivity and specificity were measured for each test against the corresponding composite reference standard. Test reliability was measured using kappa statistic for intra-rater and inter-rater agreement. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to explore possible covariates that might be related to false-positive and false-negative test results. IsoScreen had a sensitivity of 93.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 80.3, 98.2 and specificity of 98.7% (94.8, 99.8. IsoScreen had intra-rater agreement (kappa of 0.75 (0.48, 0.94 and inter-rater agreement of 0.61 (0.27, 0.90. SmokeScreen had a sensitivity of 69.2% (56.4, 79.8, specificity of 81.6% (73.0, 88.0, intra-rater agreement of 0.77 (0.56, 0.94, and inter-rater agreement of 0.66 (0.42, 0.88. False-positive SmokeScreen tests were strongly associated with INH treatment. CONCLUSIONS: IsoScreen had high validity and reliability, whereas SmokeScreen had modest validity and reliability. SmokeScreen tests did not perform well in a population receiving INH due to the association between INH treatment and false-positive Smoke

  19. Ethical problems with the mental health evaluation standards of care for adult gender variant prospective patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, C Jabob

    2007-01-01

    The World Professional Association for Transgender Health's "Standards of Care: The Hormonal and Surgical Sex Reassignment of Gender Dysphoric Persons" (SOC) set forth standards clinicians must meet to ensure ethical care of adequate quality. The SOC also set requirements gender variant prospective patients must meet to receive medical interventions to change their sexual characteristics to those more typical for the sex to which they were not assigned at birth. One such requirement is that mental health professionals must ascertain that prospective patients have met the SOC's eligibility and readiness criteria. This article raises two objections to this requirement: ethically obligatory considerations of the overall balance of potential harms and benefits tell against it, and it violates the principle of respect for autonomy. This requirement treats gender variant prospective patients who request medical intervention as different in kind, not merely degree, from other patient populations, as it constructs the very request as a phenomenon of incapacity. This is ethically indefensible in and of itself, but it is especially pernicious in a sociocultural and political context that already denies gender variant people full moral status. PMID:17951884

  20. Prevalence and outcome of gastrointestinal bleeding and use of acid suppressants in acutely ill adult intensive care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Mette; Perner, Anders; Wetterslev, Jørn;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the prevalence of, risk factors for, and prognostic importance of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and use of acid suppressants in acutely ill adult intensive care patients. METHODS: We included adults without GI bleeding who were acutely admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU......) during a 7-day period. The primary outcome was clinically important GI bleeding in ICU, and the analyses included estimations of baseline risk factors and potential associations with 90-day mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1,034 patients in 97 ICUs in 11 countries were included. Clinically important GI...... replacement therapy (6.9, 2.7-17.5), co-existing coagulopathy (5.2, 2.3-11.8), acute coagulopathy (4.2, 1.7-10.2), use of acid suppressants (3.6, 1.3-10.2) and higher organ failure score (1.4, 1.2-1.5). In ICU, 73 % (71-76 %) of patients received acid suppressants; most received proton pump inhibitors...

  1. Psychiatric morbidity among adult patients in a semi-urban primary care setting in Malaysia

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    Omar Khairani

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening for psychiatric disorders in primary care can improve the detection rate and helps in preventing grave consequences of unrecognised and untreated psychiatric morbidity. This is relevant to the Malaysian setting where mental health care is now also being provided at primary care level. The aim of this paper is to report the prevalence of psychiatric illness in a semi-urban primary care setting in Malaysia using the screening tool Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ. Methods This is a cross-sectional study carried out in a semi-urban primary healthcare centre located south of Kuala Lumpur. Systematic random sampling was carried out and a total of 267 subjects completed the PHQ during the study period. Results The proportion of respondents who had at least one PHQ positive diagnosis was 24.7% and some respondents had more than one diagnosis. Diagnoses included depressive illness (n = 38, 14.4%, somatoform disorder (n = 32, 12.2%, panic and anxiety disorders (n = 17, 6.5%, binge eating disorder (n = 9, 3.4% and alcohol abuse (n = 6, 2.3%. Younger age (18 to 29 years and having a history of stressors in the previous four weeks were found to be significantly associated (p = 0.036 and p = 0.044 respectively with PHQ positive scores. Conclusion These findings are broadly similar to the findings of studies done in other countries and are a useful guide to the probable prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in primary care in other similar settings in Malaysia.

  2. Screening for psychological distress in adult primary brain tumor patients and caregivers: considerations for cancer care coordination

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    Wafa eTrad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThis study aimed to assess psychological distress (PD as scored by the Distress Thermometer (DT in adult primary brain tumor (PBT patients and caregivers in a clinic setting, and ascertain if any high risk sub-groups for PD exist. Material and MethodsFrom May 2012 to August 2013, n=96 patients and n=32 caregivers (CG underwent DT screening at diagnosis, and a differing cohort of n=12 patients and n=14 caregivers at first recurrence. Groups were described by diagnosis (high grade, low grade and benign, and English versus non-English speaking. Those with DT score≥4 met caseness criteria for referral to psycho-oncology services. One-way ANOVA tests were conducted to test for between group differences where appropriate.ResultsAt diagnosis and first recurrence, 37.5% and 75.0% (respectively of patients had DT scores above the cut-off for distress. At diagnosis, 78.1% of caregivers met caseness criteria for distress. All caregivers at recurrence met distress criterion. Patients with high grade glioma had significantly higher scores than those with a benign tumor. For patients at diagnosis, non-English speaking participants did not report significantly higher DT scores than English speaking participants.DiscussionPsychological distress is particularly elevated in caregivers, and in patients with high grade glioma at diagnosis. Effective PD screening, triage and referral by skilled care coordinators is vital to enable timely needs assessment, psychological support and effective intervention.

  3. Which health care facilities do adult malawian antiretroviral therapy patients utilize during intercurrent illness? a cross sectional study

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    Masangalawe Caroline

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART clinic populations have expanded enormously in the successful Malawi ART scale-up programme. Overcrowding, long waiting times and living far away from the clinic may affect the extent to which patients use their ART clinic for intercurrent illnesses. Methods We interviewed patients of a large urban ART clinic in Blantyre, Malawi, during routine visits about the choice of health care facility during recent illness episodes. Results Out of 346 enrolled adults, mean age 39.8 (range 18-70 years, 54.3% female, 202 (58% reported one or more illness in the past 6 months, during which 85 (42.1%; 95%-confidence interval: 36.9-47.3% did not utilize their own clinic. Long distance to the clinic was the main subjective reason, while low education attainment, rural residence, perceived mild illness and dissatisfaction with the ART service were associated with not using their own clinic in multivariate analyses. Of all participants, 83.6% were satisfied with the service provided; only 6.1% were aware of the full service package of the ART clinic. Conclusions ART patients often seek health care outside their own clinic, which may have detrimental effects, and has consequences for ART counseling content and reporting of ART information in health passports.

  4. In a unique position or squeezed out? The professional roles of general practitioners in cancer care in general and of young adult cancer patients in particular

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, B.; Christensen, I.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exploring experiences of general practitioners (GPs), regarding roles in cancer care of young adults (YAs). METHODS: Ten qualitative interviews with GPs were theoretically analyzed against professional characteristics. FINDINGS: The GPs tended to make general statements, using everyday...... language, they experience that their patients disappear, they are seldom involved, and they lack knowledge. CONCLUSIONS: GPs have few experiences with YA cancer patients, but they have a potentially unique role in general primary cancer care if they develop their vocational vocabulary, relate more to...

  5. Survey mode matters: adults' self-reported statistical confidence, ability to obtain health information, and perceptions of patient-health-care provider communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Lorraine S; Chisolm, Deena J; Abdel-Rasoul, Mahmoud; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2013-08-01

    This study examined adults' self-reported understanding and formatting preferences of medical statistics, confidence in self-care and ability to obtain health advice or information, and perceptions of patient-health-care provider communication measured through dual survey modes (random digital dial and mail). Even while controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, significant differences in regard to adults' responses to survey variables emerged as a function of survey mode. While the analyses do not allow us to pinpoint the underlying causes of the differences observed, they do suggest that mode of administration should be carefully adjusted for and considered.

  6. Problems in the organization of care for patients with adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Meijboom; B.J.M. Mulder

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of congenital heart disease among adults in Europe, or in any country in Europe, is not known. This is due to a lack of agreement on the incidence of congenital heart disease, with estimations varying from four per 1000 births to 50 per 1000 births, and it is not known how many patien

  7. Ten years of specialized adult care for phenylketonuria

    OpenAIRE

    Mütze, Ulrike; Thiele, Alena Gerlinde; Baerwald, Christoph; Ceglarek, Uta; Kiess, Wieland; Beblo, Skadi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Specialized adult care of phenylketonuria (PKU) patients is of increasing importance. Adult outpatient clinics for inherited errors of metabolism can help to achieve this task, but experience is limited. Ten years after establishment of a coordinated transition process and specialised adult care for inherited metabolic diseases, adult PKU care was evaluated with respect to metabolic control, therapy satisfaction, life satisfaction, sociodemographic data, economical welfare as well...

  8. Effectiveness and predictors of outcome in routine out-patient mental health care for older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerbeek, Marjolein A.; Oude Voshaar, Richard; Pot, Anne Margriet

    2014-01-01

    Background: Meta-analyses show efficacy of several psychological and pharmacological interventions for late-life psychiatric disorders, but generalization of effects to routine mental health care for older people remains unknown. Aim of this study is to investigate the improvement of functioning wit

  9. Association of Health Literacy with Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use: A Cross-Sectional Study in Adult Primary Care Patients

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    Bains Sujeev S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the United States, it is estimated that 40% of adults utilize complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies. Recently, national surveys report that over 90 million adults have inadequate health literacy. To date, no study has assessed health literacy and its effect on CAM use. The primary objective of this study was to assess the relationship between health literacy and CAM use independent of educational attainment. Second objective was to evaluate the differential effect of health literacy on CAM use by race. Methods 351 patients were recruited from an outpatient primary care clinic. Validated surveys assessed CAM use (I-CAM-Q, health literacy (REALM-R, and demographic information. We compared demographics by health literacy (adequate vs. inadequate and overall and individual CAM categories by health literacy using chi square statistics. We found a race by health literacy interaction and ran sequential logistic regression models stratified by race to test the association between health literacy and overall CAM use (Model 1, Model 1 + education (Model 2, and Model 2 + other demographic characteristics (Model 3. We reported the adjusted effect of health literacy on CAM use for both whites and African Americans separately. Results 75% of the participants had adequate literacy and 80% used CAM. CAM use differed by CAM category. Among whites, adequate health literacy was significantly associated with increased CAM use in both unadjusted (Model 1, OR 7.68; p = 0.001 and models adjusted for education (Model 2, OR 7.70; p = 0.002 and other sociodemographics (Model 3, OR 9.42; p = 0.01. Among African Americans, adequate health literacy was not associated with CAM use in any of the models. Conclusions We found a race by literacy interaction suggesting that the relationship between health literacy and CAM use differed significantly by race. Adequate health literacy among whites is associated with increased CAM use, but not

  10. Patient-centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, April

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient and the individual's particular health care needs. The goal of patient-centered health care is to empower patients to become active participants in their care. This requires that physicians, radiologic technologists and other health care providers develop good communication skills and address patient needs effectively. Patient-centered care also requires that the health care provider become a patient advocate and strive to provide care that not only is effective but also safe. For radiologic technologists, patient-centered care encompasses principles such as the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept and contrast media safety. Patient-centered care is associated with a higher rate of patient satisfaction, adherence to suggested lifestyle changes and prescribed treatment, better outcomes and more cost-effective care. This article is a Directed Reading. Your access to Directed Reading quizzes for continuing education credit is determined by your area of interest. For access to other quizzes, go to www.asrt.org/store. According to one theory, most patients judge the quality of their healthcare much like they rate an airplane flight. They assume that the airplane is technically viable and is being piloted by competent people. Criteria for judging a particular airline are personal and include aspects like comfort, friendly service and on-time schedules. Similarly, patients judge the standard of their healthcare on nontechnical aspects, such as a healthcare practitioner's communication and "soft skills." Most are unable to evaluate a practitioner's level of technical skill or training, so the qualities they can assess become of the utmost importance in satisfying patients and providing patient-centered care.(1). PMID:19901351

  11. The Affordable Care Act and implications for young adult health

    OpenAIRE

    Monaghan, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    In the USA, young adults are most likely to be uninsured and least likely to report a usual source of medical care than any age group. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) recognizes the critical need for expanded insurance coverage for this age group, and multiple provisions of the ACA address insurance coverage and health care utilization in young adults. This paper presents a brief overview of the challenges of maintaining health insurance coverage and accessing health care...

  12. Developing the Botswana Primary Care Guideline: an integrated, symptom-based primary care guideline for the adult patient in a resource-limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsima BM

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Billy M Tsima,1 Vincent Setlhare,1 Oathokwa Nkomazana2 1Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, 2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana Background: Botswana’s health care system is based on a primary care model. Various national guidelines exist for specific diseases. However, most of the guidelines address management at a tertiary level and often appear nonapplicable for the limited resources in primary care facilities. An integrated symptom-based guideline was developed so as to translate the Botswana national guidelines to those applicable in primary care. The Botswana Primary Care Guideline (BPCG integrates the care of communicable diseases, including HIV/AIDS and noncommunicable diseases, by frontline primary health care workers.Methods: The Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, together with guideline developers from the Knowledge Translation Unit (University of Cape Town collaborated with the Ministry of Health to develop the guideline. Stakeholder groups were set up to review specific content of the guideline to ensure compliance with Botswana government policy and the essential drug list.Results: Participants included clinicians, academics, patient advocacy groups, and policymakers from different disciplines, both private and public. Drug-related issues were identified as necessary for implementing recommendations of the guideline. There was consensus by working groups for updating the essential drug list for primary care and expansion of prescribing rights of trained nurse prescribers in primary care within their scope of practice. An integrated guideline incorporating common symptoms of diseases seen in the Botswana primary care setting was developed.Conclusion: The development of the BPCG took a broad consultative approach with buy in from relevant stakeholders. It is anticipated that implementation of the BPCG will translate into better

  13. Improving Cultural Competency and Disease Awareness among Oncology Nurses Caring for Adult T-Cell Leukemia and Lymphoma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese-Peske, Marisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Foreign-born residents face significant challenges accessing and receiving quality healthcare in the U.S. These obstacles include a lack of information on how to access care, fear, as well as communication and cultural barriers (Portes, Fernandez-Kelly & Light, 2012). Increasing healthcare providers' knowledge regarding a patient's…

  14. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a Framework for Providing Patient- and Family-Centered Audiological Care for Older Adults and Their Significant Others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenness, Caitlin; Meyer, Carly; Scarinci, Nerina; Ekberg, Katie; Hickson, Louise

    2016-08-01

    Hearing impairment is highly prevalent in the older population, and it impacts communication and quality of life for both the people with the hearing difficulties and their significant others. In this article, typical audiological assessment and management of an older adult is contrasted with a best practice approach wherein the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework is applied. The aim of the comparison is to demonstrate how the ICF expands our focus: rather than merely focusing on impairment, we also consider the activities, participation, and contextual factors for both the person with the hearing impairment and his or her family. A case example of an older patient and her spouse is provided, and their shared experience of the patient's hearing impairment is mapped onto the ICF framework. Family-centered hearing care is recommended for individualizing care and improving outcomes for older patients and their families. PMID:27489398

  15. Characteristics and dying trajectories of adult hospital patients from acute care wards who die following review by the rapid response team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, M A; Nelson, K; Psirides, A J; Suter, N; Pedersen, A

    2016-03-01

    A third of patients reviewed by rapid response teams (RRT) require end-of-life care. However, little is known about the characteristics and management of these patients following RRT review. This paper presents results of a retrospective, descriptive audit that explored the dying trajectory of adult ward inpatients who died outside of intensive care following RRT review. The study setting was a 430-bed tertiary New Zealand hospital during 2013. RRT, inpatient databases and hospital notes were used to identify 100 consecutive adult inpatients who died subsequent to RRT review. Outcome measures included time from RRT review to death, place of death, pre-existing co-morbidities and frequency of medical review. Results demonstrated that patients were old (median 77 years, IQR 63-85years), emergency admissions (n=100) and admitted under a medical specialty (n=71). All but one of the cohort had pre-existing co-morbidities (mean 3.2, SD 1.7), almost a third (n=31) had cancer and 51% had 1-4 previous inpatient admissions within the previous 12 months. The mean length of stay prior to RRT review was 4.9 days (SD 5.5) during which patients were frequently reviewed by senior medical staff (mean 6.8 times, SD 6.9, range 0-44). Twenty per cent of patients died after their first RRT review with a further 40% receiving treatment limitation/palliation. Fifty-two per cent of patients had a pre-existing DNAR. Eighty per cent of patients died in hospital. Whilst the RRT fulfils an unmet need in decision-making at end of life, there is a need to understand what RRT, instead of ward-based or palliative care teams, offers dying patients. PMID:27029659

  16. Optimizing Health Care for Adults with Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Survival into adulthood for individuals with spina bifida has significantly improved over the last 40 years with the majority of patients now living as adults. Despite this growing population of adult patients who have increased medical needs compared to the general population, including spina bifida (SB)-specific care, age-related secondary…

  17. Predictive power of the Braden scale for pressure sore risk in adult critical care patients: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Critical care is designed for managing the sickest patients within our healthcare system. Multiple factors associated with an increased likelihood of pressure ulcer development have been investigated in the critical care population. Nevertheless, there is a lack of consensus regarding which of these factors poses the greatest risk for pressure ulceration. While the Braden scale for pressure sore risk is the most commonly used tool for measuring pressure ulcer risk in the United States, research focusing on the cumulative Braden Scale score and subscale scores is lacking in the critical care population. This author conducted a literature review on pressure ulcer risk assessment in the critical care population, to include the predictive value of both the total score and the subscale scores. In this review, the subscales sensory perception, mobility, moisture, and friction/shear were found to be associated with an increased likelihood of pressure ulcer development; in contrast, the Activity and Nutrition subscales were not found to predict pressure ulcer development in this population. In order to more precisely quantify risk in the critically ill population, modification of the Braden scale or development of a critical care specific risk assessment tool may be indicated.

  18. Comparison of a nurse initiated insulin infusion protocol for intensive insulin therapy between adult surgical trauma, medical and coronary care intensive care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuper Philip J

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sustained hyperglycemia is a known risk factor for adverse outcomes in critically ill patients. The specific aim was to determine if a nurse initiated insulin infusion protocol (IIP was effective in maintaining blood glucose values (BG within a target goal of 100–150 mg/dL across different intensive care units (ICUs and to describe glycemic control during the 48 hours after protocol discontinuation. Methods A descriptive, retrospective review of 366 patients having 28,192 blood glucose values in three intensive care units, Surgical Trauma Intensive Care Unit (STICU, Medical (MICU and Coronary Care Unit (CCU in a quaternary care hospital was conducted. Patients were > 15 years of age, admitted to STICU (n = 162, MICU (n = 110 or CCU (n = 94 over 8 months; October 2003-June 2004 and who had an initial blood glucose level > 150 mg/dL. We summarized the effectiveness and safety of a nurse initiated IIP, and compared these endpoints among STICU, MICU and CCU patients. Results The median blood glucose values (mg/dL at initiation of insulin infusion protocol were lower in STICU (188; IQR, 162–217 than in MICU, (201; IQR, 170–268 and CCU (227; IQR, 178–313; p p = 0.27. Hypoglycemia (BG p = 0.85. Protocol violations were uncommon in all three ICUs. Mean blood glucose 48 hours following IIP discontinuation was significantly different for each population: 142 mg/dL in STICU, 167 mg/dL in MICU, and 160 mg/dL in CCU (p Conclusion The safety and effectiveness of nurse initiated IIP was similar across different ICUs in our hospital. Marked variability in glucose control after the protocol discontinuation suggests the need for further research regarding glucose control in patients transitioning out of the ICU.

  19. 452 Asthma Control and Quality of Care of Adult Asthma Patients in Primary Health Care Facilities in Saint-Petersburg, Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Emelyanov, Alexander; Tsukanova, Inessa; Fedoseev, Gleb; Sergeeva, Galina; Lisitsyna, Natalia; Bakanina, Lubov; Nikitina, Ekaterina

    2012-01-01

    Background This study was performed to assess the control asthma and quality of care of asthmatic patient in primary health care facilities in Saint-Petersburg, the second largest city in Russia. Methods We conducted telephone interviews with 205 asthma outpatients (aged 24 to 90 years). Asthma control was assessed by using the Asthma Control Test (ACT). Results During the past 12 month spirometry were performed in 26.8%. Only 2% of outpatients were consulted by allergist and 26.8% - by respi...

  20. Familism and Health Care Provision to Hispanic Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Brittany; Foli, Karen J; Edwards, Nancy E; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The Hispanic older adult population's rapid growth calls for an awareness of values that can affect the rendering and receipt of care. Familism, or familismo, a traditional Hispanic value, places importance of family over the self and can potentially affect health care perceptions and practices for Hispanic older adults. The current article discusses familism, which is upheld by some Hispanic older adults, and the potential for underuse of health care services. The traditional feminine role, marianismo, and masculine role, machismo, are considered, as well as implications for how decision making may be made by family members rather than the patient. Clinical implications for the provision of health care to Hispanic older adults are provided, along with the importance of considering acculturation and ethnic heterogeneity. Health care management strategies that reflect recognition and respect of familism, yet emphasize optimization of adherence and self-care, are described.

  1. Home care to Older adult with cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Home care of the elderly with cancer. After the development of a program of oncology home care and over a period of five years, we believe that the evaluation allows us to have our proposal and challenges in the continuity of the program. This evidence is based in our old advanced Uruguayan population, and consequently increase this cancer population, we should define which pointed toward our objective, in order to get the best quality life. After one year with a project based on general rules, the evidence threw an evaluation, that we should review the model of care with which we were working. We continue to Auto-care model Dorothea Orem. The main objective became quality of life:Take care as the primary Older Adult; Specific care their cancer to become symptomatic secondary complications to the evolution of tumor biology; Secondary prevention of cause therapeutic effect; Family integration, without changing the pace of life that the elderly had before being with cancer. Nursing challenge: Maintain autonomy achieved in these 5 years. Deepen the social equilibrium that we are committed daily between patient and family.Do not miss the professionalism achieved today.Proposal for nursing: Consider a wide field of nursing and for this achievement is need knowledge of 2nd level of community work, knowledge Clinical knowledge in Oncology Nursing, autonomy in decision making. For older adults with cancer: No out of its middle. Maintain priority habits and customs. Do not let it lose their self-esteem with their own values. Caution changes must take care to better manage the evolution of their illness. Conclusion: Oncology nursing is a specialty. Without this formation will be ever more away the development of these programs in our environment, or fall in applying for only economic convenience, losing professionalism. Our population is increasing

  2. Medicaid Adult Health Care Quality Measures

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Affordable Care Act (Section 1139B) requires the Secretary of HHS to identify and publish a core set of health care quality measures for adult Medicaid...

  3. "Patient care in radiology"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro Brask, Kirsten; Birkelund, Regner

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to research how the staff experience care expressed during the brief encounter with the patients in a diagnostic imaging department. This was a qualitative study with a phenomenological and hermeneutical frame of reference. The data were collected using field observations...... and semistructured interviews and analyzed according to the guidelines for meaning condensation by Giorgi. The imaging staff found that care is expressed in an administrative, an instrumental, and a compassionate sense. The imaging staff perceived care in a way that clearly differs from the traditional perception...... of care understood as the close relations between people. In their self-understanding, the staff found that care not only comprised the relational aspect but also that it was already delivered during the preparatory phases before the actual meeting with the patient and up until the image...

  4. Progressive Care of Obese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambaugh, Lori A; Ecklund, Margaret M

    2016-08-01

    Obese patients have complex needs that complicate their care during hospitalization. These patients often have comorbid conditions, including hypertension, heart failure, obstructive sleep apnea, pressure ulcers, and difficulty with mobility. Obese patients may be well served in the progressive care setting because they may require more intensive nursing care than can be delivered in a general care unit. Progressive care nurses have core competencies that enable them to safely and effectively care for obese patients. A plan of care with interdisciplinary collaboration illustrates the integrative care for obese progressive care patients. (Critical Care Nurse 2016; 36[4]:58-63). PMID:27481802

  5. Access and care issues in urban urgent care clinic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Jill C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although primary care should be the cornerstone of medical practice, inappropriate use of urgent care for non-urgent patients is a growing problem that has significant economic and healthcare consequences. The characteristics of patients who choose the urgent care setting, as well as the reasoning behind their decisions, is not well established. The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation behind, and characteristics of, adult patients who choose to access health care in our urgent care clinic. The relevance of understanding the motivation driving this patient population is especially pertinent given recent trends towards universal healthcare and the unclear impact it may have on the demands of urgent care. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of patients seeking care at an urgent care clinic (UCC within a large acute care safety-net urban hospital over a six-week period. Survey data included demographics, social and economic information, reasons that patients chose a UCC, previous primary care exposure, reasons for delaying care, and preventive care needs. Results A total of 1, 006 patients were randomly surveyed. Twenty-five percent of patients identified Spanish as their preferred language. Fifty-four percent of patients reported choosing the UCC due to not having to make an appointment, 51.2% because it was convenient, 43.9% because of same day test results, 42.7% because of ability to get same-day medications and 15.1% because co-payment was not mandatory. Lack of a regular physician was reported by 67.9% of patients and 57.2% lacked a regular source of care. Patients reported delaying access to care for a variety of reasons. Conclusion Despite a common belief that patients seek care in the urgent care setting primarily for economic reasons, this study suggests that patients choose the urgent care setting based largely on convenience and more timely care. This information is especially applicable to

  6. Integrating Adolescents and Young Adults into Adult-Centered Care for IBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Itishree; Holl, Jane L; Hanauer, Stephen; Keefer, Laurie

    2016-05-01

    Planned healthcare transition, initiated in pediatric care, is a gradual process aimed at fostering the adolescent patient's disease knowledge and skills with the ultimate objective of preparing patients and families for adult-centered care. The process is critical in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) where there is an increased risk of non-adherence, hospitalizations, and emergency department use as young adult patients graduate from pediatric to adult-centered care. While evidence for healthcare transition in IBD is mounting, important gaps remain in the understanding of this process from the perspective of the adult gastroenterologist. This paper summarizes what is known about healthcare transition in IBD and explores the unanswered questions-a conceptual and methodological framework for transition interventions, relevant outcomes that define successful transition, and key stakeholder perspectives. For the adult gastroenterologist managing the young adult patient population, this paper presents the paradigm of "care integration"-a process of ongoing, multi-modality support for the patient, initiated in the adult care setting, with the goal of improving self-management skills and active participation in medical decision-making.

  7. 成人麻疹患者护理及预防措施%Nursing care of adult patients with measles and preventive measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林桂梅

    2015-01-01

    本文探讨成人麻疹的临床护理及预防措施。通过对成人麻疹患者20例开展临床护理及健康宣教,全部治愈出院,未发生并发症及造成医源性的麻疹感染和流行。因此,加强预防接种是控制麻疹发病率的基本措施,做好麻疹患者的护理和管理也是预防麻疹发病率的关键。%In this paper,we explored the nursing care of adult patients with measles and preventive measures.20 adult patients with measles were given clinical nursing and health education,and they were all cured,and there was no complication and cause of iatrogenic infection and epidemic of measles.Therefor,to strengthen the vaccination is the basic measure to control the incidence of measles,and good nursing and management for patients with measles is the key to prevent the incidence of measles.

  8. Potential prescription patterns and errors in elderly adult patients attending public primary health care centers in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona-Rojo, José Antonio; Altagracia-Martínez, Marina; Kravzov-Jinich, Jaime; Vázquez-Cervantes, Laura; Pérez-Montoya, Edilberto; Rubio-Poo, Consuelo

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Six out of every 10 elderly persons live in developing countries. Objective To analyze and assess the drug prescription patterns and errors in elderly outpatients attending public health care centers in Mexico City, Mexico. Materials and methods A descriptive and retrospective study was conducted in 2007. Fourteen hundred prescriptions were analyzed. Prescriptions of ambulatory adults aged >70 years who were residents of Mexico City for at least two years were included. Prescription errors were divided into two groups: (1) administrative and legal, and (2) pharmacotherapeutic. In group 2, we analyzed drug dose strength, administration route, frequency of drug administration, treatment length, potential drug–drug interactions, and contraindications. Variables were classified as correct or incorrect based on clinical literature. Variables for each drug were dichotomized as correct (0) or incorrect (1). A Prescription Index (PI) was calculated by considering each drug on the prescription. SPSS statistical software was used to process the collected data (95% confidence interval; p <0.05). Results The drug prescription pattern in elderly outpatients shows that 12 drugs account for 70.72% (2880) of prescribed drugs. The most prescribed drugs presented potential pharmacotherapeutic errors (as defined in the present study). Acetylsalicylic acid–captopril was the most common potential interaction (not clinically assessed). Potential prescription error was high (53% of total prescriptions). Most of the prescription errors were due to omissions of dosage, administration route, and length of treatment and may potentially cause harm to the elderly outpatients. Conclusions A high number of potential prescription errors were found, mainly due to omissions. The drug prescription pattern of the study population is mainly constituted by 12 drugs. The results indicate that prescription quality depends on the number of prescribed drugs per prescription (p < 0

  9. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  10. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis. PMID:26857767

  11. Type 1 diabetes: addressing the transition from pediatric to adult-oriented health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaghan M

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Maureen Monaghan,1,2 Katherine Baumann2 1Center for Translational Science, Children's National Health System, 2George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes are at risk for poor health outcomes, including poor glycemic control, acute and chronic complications, and emergency department admissions. During this developmental period, adolescent and young adult patients also experience significant changes in living situation, education, and/or health care delivery, including transferring from pediatric to adult health care. In recent years, professional and advocacy organizations have proposed expert guidelines to improve the process of preparation for and transition to adult-oriented health care. However, challenges remain and evidence-based practices for preparing youth for adult health care are still emerging. Qualitative research suggests that adolescent and young adult patients rely on health care providers to guide them through the transition process and appreciate a gradual approach to preparing for adult-oriented health care, keeping parents in supportive roles into young adulthood. Patients also benefit from specific referrals and contact information for adult care providers. Promising models of transition care include provision of transition navigators, attendance at a young adult bridge clinic, or joint visits with pediatric and adult care providers. However, much of this research is in its early stages, and more rigorous trials need to be conducted to evaluate health outcomes during transition into adult health care. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the transition process, patient and health care provider perceptions of transition care, and emerging evidence of successful models of care for engagement in adult-oriented health care. Recommendations and resources for health care providers are also presented. Keywords: type 1 diabetes

  12. Potential prescription patterns and errors in elderly adult patients attending public primary health care centers in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Corona-Rojo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available José Antonio Corona-Rojo1, Marina Altagracia-Martínez1, Jaime Kravzov-Jinich1, Laura Vázquez-Cervantes1, Edilberto Pérez-Montoya2, Consuelo Rubio-Poo31Division of Biological Sciences and Health, Metropolitan Autonomous University, Campus Xochimilco (UAM-X, Xochimilco, México; 2National Polytechnical Institute (IPN, México DF; 3Faculty of Higher Studies – Zaragoza (FES-Zaragoza, National Autonomous University of México (UNAM, México City, MéxicoIntroduction: Six out of every 10 elderly persons live in developing countries.Objective: To analyze and assess the drug prescription patterns and errors in elderly outpatients attending public health care centers in Mexico City, Mexico.Materials and methods: A descriptive and retrospective study was conducted in 2007. Fourteen hundred prescriptions were analyzed. Prescriptions of ambulatory adults aged >70 years who were residents of Mexico City for at least two years were included. Prescription errors were divided into two groups: (1 administrative and legal, and (2 pharmacotherapeutic. In group 2, we analyzed drug dose strength, administration route, frequency of drug administration, treatment length, potential drug–drug interactions, and contraindications. Variables were classified as correct or incorrect based on clinical literature. Variables for each drug were dichotomized as correct (0 or incorrect (1. A Prescription Index (PI was calculated by considering each drug on the prescription. SPSS statistical software was used to process the collected data (95% confidence interval; p < 0.05.Results: The drug prescription pattern in elderly outpatients shows that 12 drugs account for 70.72% (2880 of prescribed drugs. The most prescribed drugs presented potential pharmacotherapeutic errors (as defined in the present study. Acetylsalicylic acid–captopril was the most common potential interaction (not clinically assessed. Potential prescription error was high (53% of total prescriptions. Most

  13. Barriers and facilitators of adherence to antiretroviral drug therapy and retention in care among adult HIV-positive patients: a qualitative study from Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woldesellassie M Bezabhe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy (ART has been life saving for hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians. With increased availability of ART in recent years, achievement of optimal adherence and patient retention are becoming the greatest challenges in the management of HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia. However, few studies have explored factors influencing medication adherence to ART and retention in follow-up care among adult Ethiopian HIV-positive patients, especially in the Amhara region of the country, where almost one-third of the country's ART is prescribed. The aim of this qualitative study was to collect such data from patients and healthcare providers in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 patients, of whom 11 had been lost to follow-up and were non-persistent with ART. In addition, focus group discussions were performed with 15 ART nurses and 19 case managers. All interviews and focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes and patterns in Amharic using a grounded theory approach. The emergent concepts and categories were translated into English. RESULTS: Economic constraints, perceived stigma and discrimination, fasting, holy water, medication side effects, and dissatisfaction with healthcare services were major reasons for patients being non-adherent and lost to follow-up. Disclosure of HIV status, social support, use of reminder aids, responsibility for raising children, improved health on ART, and receiving education and counseling emerged as facilitators of adherence to ART. CONCLUSIONS: Improving adherence and retention requires integration of enhanced treatment access with improved job and food security. Healthcare providers need to be supported to better equip patients to cope with the issues associated with ART. Development of social policies and cooperation between various agencies are required to facilitate optimal adherence to ART, patient retention, and improved

  14. Caring for Latino patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckett, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Latinos comprise nearly 16 percent of the U.S. population, and this proportion is anticipated to increase to 30 percent by 2050. Latinos are a diverse ethnic group that includes many different cultures, races, and nationalities. Barriers to care have resulted in striking disparities in quality of health care for these patients. These barriers include language, lack of insurance, different cultural beliefs, and in some cases, illegal immigration status, mistrust, and illiteracy. The National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services address these concerns with recommendations for culturally competent care, language services, and organizational support. Latinos have disproportionately higher rates of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Other health problems include stress, neurocysticercosis, and tuberculosis. It is important to explore the use of alternative therapies and belief in traditional folk illnesses, recognizing that health beliefs are dependent on education, socioeconomic status, and degree of acculturation. Many-but not all-folk and herbal treatments can be safely accommodated with conventional therapy. Physicians must be sensitive to Latino cultural values of simpatia (kindness), personalismo (relationship), respeto (respect), and modestia (modesty). The LEARN technique can facilitate cross-cultural interviews. Some cultural barriers may be overcome by using the "teach back" technique to ensure that directions are correctly understood and by creating a welcoming health care environment for Latino patients. PMID:23317025

  15. Association of Health Literacy with Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use: A Cross-Sectional Study in Adult Primary Care Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bains Sujeev S; Egede Leonard E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In the United States, it is estimated that 40% of adults utilize complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies. Recently, national surveys report that over 90 million adults have inadequate health literacy. To date, no study has assessed health literacy and its effect on CAM use. The primary objective of this study was to assess the relationship between health literacy and CAM use independent of educational attainment. Second objective was to evaluate the differen...

  16. Supportive Care in Older Adults with Cancer: Across the Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koll, Thuy; Pergolotti, Mackenzi; Holmes, Holly M; Pieters, Huibrie C; van Londen, G J; Marcum, Zachary A; MacKenzie, Amy R; Steer, Christopher B

    2016-08-01

    Supportive care is an essential component of anticancer treatment regardless of age or treatment intent. As the number of older adults with cancer increases, and supportive care strategies enable more patients to undergo treatment, greater numbers of older patients will become cancer survivors. These patients may have lingering adverse effects from treatment and will need continued supportive care interventions. Older adults with cancer benefit from geriatric assessment (GA)-guided supportive care interventions. This can occur at any stage across the cancer treatment continuum. As a GA commonly uncovers issues potentially unrelated to anticancer treatment, it could be argued that the assessment is essentially a supportive care strategy. Key aspects of a GA include identification of comorbidities, assessing for polypharmacy, screening for cognitive impairment and delirium, assessing functional status, and screening for psychosocial issues. Treatment-related issues of particular importance in older adults include recognition of increased bone marrow toxicity, management of nausea and vomiting, identification of anemia, and prevention of neurotoxicity. The role of physical therapy and cancer rehabilitation as a supportive care strategy in older adults is important regardless of treatment stage or intent. PMID:27342609

  17. Developing the Botswana Primary Care Guideline: an integrated, symptom-based primary care guideline for the adult patient in a resource-limited setting

    OpenAIRE

    Tsima,; Setlhare, Vincent; Nkomazana, Oathokwa

    2016-01-01

    Billy M Tsima,1 Vincent Setlhare,1 Oathokwa Nkomazana2 1Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, 2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana Background: Botswana’s health care system is based on a primary care model. Various national guidelines exist for specific diseases. However, most of the guidelines address management at a tertiary level and often appear nonapplicable for the limited resources in primary care facilities. An in...

  18. Ten years of specialized adult care for phenylketonuria – a single-centre experience

    OpenAIRE

    Mütze, Ulrike; Thiele, Alena Gerlinde; Baerwald, Christoph; Ceglarek, Uta; Kiess, Wieland; Beblo, Skadi

    2016-01-01

    Background Specialized adult care of phenylketonuria (PKU) patients is of increasing importance. Adult outpatient clinics for inherited errors of metabolism can help to achieve this task, but experience is limited. Ten years after establishment of a coordinated transition process and specialised adult care for inherited metabolic diseases, adult PKU care was evaluated with respect to metabolic control, therapy satisfaction, life satisfaction, sociodemographic data, economical welfare as well ...

  19. Describing the sublanguage of wound care in an adult ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson-Ojala, Riitta; Lundgren-Laine, Heljä; Salanterä, Sanna

    2012-01-01

    Comprehensive wound documentation is an important tool in evaluating and planning patient care. The sublanguage used in ICUs may affect negatively to the wound care and thus to the healing process. We made a quantitative content analysis of nursing documentation of cardiac surgery adult patients (n=60) who had stayed over four days in the ICU. The sublanguage used in nursing documentation of wounds and ulcers in the ICU was unstructured with many words of colloquial language, misspellings and abbreviations. The documentation did not cover all aspects of proper wound care. The information technology could be helpful for nurses to document right things with plain language. PMID:22874364

  20. Prioritization of care in adults with diabetes and comorbidity

    OpenAIRE

    Laiteerapong, Neda; Huang, Elbert S.; Chin, Marshall H

    2011-01-01

    Approximately half of adults with diabetes have at least one comorbid condition. However, diabetes care guidelines focus on diabetes-specific care, and their recommendations may not be appropriate for many patients with diabetes and comorbidity. We describe Piette and Kerr's typology of comorbid conditions, which categorizes conditions based on if they are clinically dominant (eclipse diabetes management), symptomatic versus asymptomatic, and concordant (similar pathophysiologic processes as ...

  1. Association of vitamin d deficiency with tuberculosis in adult patients reporting to a tertiary care hospital of rawalpindi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the mean vitamin Dlevels in pulmonary tuberculosis patients and healthy controls and to find out the frequency and association of vitamin D deficiency in patients with tuberculosis. Study Design: Case control study. Place and Duration of Study: Pulmonology department, Military Hospital Rawalpindi from Jan 2013 to Dec 2013. Patients and Methods:Fifty two incident outdoor pulmonary tuberculosis patients were selected with 52 age and gender matched controls. Tuberculosis was diagnosed by the sputum examination through gene Xpert technique from National Institute of Health (NIH), Islamabad. Serum 25-hydroxvitamin D level 0.05). Conclusion: Significant vitamin D deficiency was seen in newly diagnosed TB patients. It was found that vitamin D deficiency is associated with tuberculosis, but its causal role has not been established. (author)

  2. A study on prescribing pattern of antihypertensives in adult patients attending in a tertiary care hospital of Assam, India

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Sikidar; Pinaki Chakravarty; Ayan Purkayastha; Rohit Tigga

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is one of the most common chronic medical problems prompting visits to health care providers. It has been estimated that hypertension accounts for 13% of deaths worldwide. The main objective of the present study was to assess the pattern of drug utilisation and to evaluate whether the prescribing patterns for anti-hypertensive in our institution is in adherence with JNC 8 guidelines for treatment of hypertension. Methods: A prospective, observational, non-intervent...

  3. Adult Day Care Program(高二适用)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙启禄

    2004-01-01

    David Brown and Anne are two patients in the Adult Day Care Pro-gram at Mercy Hospitals. David Brown is seventy-two years old. He'sfriendly and likes to talk. He lives with his wife in the city. But David is

  4. CLINICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL DATA OF ADULT THALASSEMIA MAJOR PATIENTS (TM WITH MULTIPLE ENDOCRINE COMPLICATIONS (MEC VERSUS TM PATIENTS WITH NORMAL ENDOCRINE FUNCTIONS: A RETROSPECTIVE LONG-TERM STUDY (40 YEARS IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTER IN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo De Sanctis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Introduction: It is well known that the older generation of adult TM patients has a higher incidence of morbidities and co-morbidities. At present, little information is available on adult TM patients with multiple endocrine complications (MEC. The main objectives of this longitudinal retrospective survey were: 1 to establish the incidence and progression of MEC (3 or more in TM patients; 2 to compare the clinical, laboratory and imaging data to a sex and age-matched group of TM patients without MEC; 3 to assess the influence of iron overload represented by serum ferritin (peak and mean annual value at the last endocrine observation. Patients and Methods: The study was started in January 1974 and was completed by the same physician at the end of December 2015. The registry database of the regularly followed TM patients from diagnosis included 145 adults (> 18 years. All TM patients were of Italian ethnic origin. Eleven out of 145 patients (7.5 % developed MEC. Twenty-four other patients (12 females and 12 males had a normal endocrine function (16.5 % and served as controls. Results: In our survey, four important, relevant aspects emerged in the MEC group. These included the late age at the start of chelation therapy with desferrioxamine mesylate (DFO; the higher serum ferritin peak (8521.8 ± 5958.9 vs 3575.2± 1801.4 ng/ml ; the higher percentage of splenectomized (81.8 % vs. 28.5% patients and poor compliance registered mainly during the peripubertal and pubertal age (72.7 % vs.16.6 % in TM patients developing MEC versus those without endocrine complications. Furthermore, a negative correlation was observed in all TM patients between LIC and final height (r: -0.424; p= 0.031. Conclusions: Our study supports the view that simultaneous involvement of more than one endocrine gland is not uncommon (7.5 %. It mainly occurred in TM patients who started chelation therapy with DFO late in life and who had irregular/poor compliance to

  5. Patient care and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter deals with important aspects of patient care, which may become the radiographer's responsibility in the absence of dedicated nursing staff. Although large pediatric centers usually employ nurses for bedside patient management, the general radiographer should be familiar with some aspects of routine patient care. This knowledge guarantees the safety and well-being of children entrusted to the technologist

  6. A study on prescribing pattern of antihypertensives in adult patients attending in a tertiary care hospital of Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Sikidar

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Our study shows that the most commonly prescribed drug classes involved were angiotensin II receptor antagonists followed by calcium channel blocker and the anti-hypertensive drug combinations among hypertensive patients were considerable and this practice positively impacted on the overall blood pressure control. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 975-978

  7. 25 CFR 20.331 - What is Adult Care Assistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.331 What is Adult Care Assistance... require personal care and supervision due to advanced age, infirmity, physical condition, or mental... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is Adult Care Assistance? 20.331 Section...

  8. Palliative care for adolescents and young adults with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg AR

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Abby R Rosenberg,1–3 Joanne Wolfe4–61Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA; 2Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 4Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care/Division of Pediatric Palliative Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA; 5Department of Medicine/Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA; 6Department of Pediatrics, Harvard University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Adolescents and young adults (AYAs with cancer represent a unique and challenging group of patients with distinct developmental and psychosocial needs that may be unrecognized or unmet during their cancer experience. Palliative care refers to the total care of a patient, regardless of his or her disease status, and aims to improve quality of life by controlling symptoms and alleviating physical, social, psychological, and spiritual suffering. Integrating palliative care into standard oncology practice for AYAs is therefore valuable, if not imperative, in improving their overall cancer experience. In this review, we aimed to describe the scope, benefits, and challenges of palliative care for AYA oncology patients. We provide a broad impression of the existing literature describing or investigating palliative care in this population. Put together, the evidence suggests that palliative care is not only needed, but can also be critically beneficial to patients, families, and health care professionals alike. As we increase public and professional awareness of the needs and applications of palliative care for AYA patients with cancer, we will ultimately enable better psychosocial outcomes of the AYA patients and their larger communities.Keywords: supportive care, end of life, psychosocial outcomes, psychosocial oncology, psychosocial needs, quality of life

  9. Advance Care Planning and Goals of Care Communication in Older Adults with Cardiovascular Disease and Multi-Morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Hillary D; Sudore, Rebecca L

    2016-05-01

    This article provides an approach to advance care planning (ACP) and goals of care communication in older adults with cardiovascular disease and multi-morbidity. The goal of ACP is to ensure that the medical care patients receive is aligned with their values and preferences. In this article, the authors outline common benefits and challenges to ACP for older adults with cardiovascular disease and multimorbidity. Recognizing that these patients experience diverse disease trajectories and receive care in multiple health care settings, the authors provide practical steps for multidisciplinary teams to integrate ACP into brief clinic encounters.

  10. Epidemiology and risk factors for nosocomial Non-Candida albicans candidemia in adult patients at a tertiary care hospital in North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiurong; Yan, Donghui; Sun, Wei; Zeng, Zhaoyin; Su, Ruirui; Su, Jianrong

    2015-09-01

    Nosocomial candidemia extends the length of hospital stay, increases the costs of medical care, and is associated with a high mortality rate. Epidemiological data that assist in the choice of initial therapy may help to improve the prognosis. The present study was undertaken to investigate the epidemiology of nosocomial candidemia and identify risk factors for nosocomial candidemia caused by C. albicans and non-albicans Candida species (NAC). A retrospective chart review was undertaken to analyze cases of nosocomial candidemia treated at the Beijing Friendship Hospital between January 2008 and December 2012. All cases of candidemia were identified using the previously published criteria. Among 106 patients analyzed, 53.8% had nosocomial candidemia caused by NAC. Candida albicans was the most common causative agent, accounting for 46.2% of all cases, followed by C. glabrata (25.5%), C. tropicalis (15.1%), C. parapsilosis (10.4%) and C. Krusei (0.9%). Comparison of nosocomial C. albicans and NAC candidemia by multivariate logistic regression showed that factors independently associated with nosocomial NAC candidemia included exposure to azole agents (odds ratio [OR]: 3.359; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.136-10.154; P = .031) and artificial surgical implants (OR: 37.519; 95% CI: 2.5-562.998; P = .009). A significant risk factor for nosocomial C. albicans candidemia was cancer surgery (OR: 0.075; 95% CI: 0.013-0.437; P = .004). Clinical and epidemiological differences in the risk factors between nosocomial candidemia caused by C. albicans and NAC should be considered when selecting an initial antifungal regimen for the treatment of adult patients. This should be undertaken before the availability of species identification and/or antifungal susceptibility results.

  11. Perception of older adults receiving palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Laporti Seredynskyj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at understanding the perception of older adults who are receiving palliative oncological care on self care in relation to different stages of the disease and how such perception affected their lives. This is a qualitative study using oral history conducted with 15 older adults receiving palliative chemotherapy treatment in a health institution. The following categories emerged: social network, perspectives for confronting life, changes and spirituality. It is necessary for nursing staff to understand this process so that the measures implemented take into account all of the implications of the disease and aim at improving quality of life.   doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i2.22795.

  12. High rates of unsuccessful transfer to adult care among young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffy Ciarán M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to describe the proportion of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA who had experienced an unsuccessful transfer from a pediatric rheumatology team to an adult rheumatologist and to compare the characteristics of those who achieved successful transfer to those who did not. Methods We conducted a systematic chart review of all patients with JIA who attended their final Montreal Children's Hospital JIA clinic appointment between 1992 and 2005. We tracked these patients for the two years after transfer to an adult rheumatologist. We then compared characteristics of patients with successful and unsuccessful transfers of care. Variables pertaining to disease characteristics, disease severity and psychosocial factors were examined. Univariate analyses were performed to determine if any single factor was associated with the outcome of unsuccessful transfer of care. Results 52% of patients fulfilled our criteria for unsuccessful transfer. Of the variables tested, an active joint count (AJC of zero at last visit was associated with the outcome of unsuccessful transfer (OR = 2.67 (CI 1.16-6.16; p = 0.0199. Conclusions Despite the presence of a coordinated process of transfer from pediatric to adult health care for the majority of the patients in this study, there was a high rate of unsuccessful transfer and/or sustained follow up which is disheartening. We found that patients with less active disease at the time of transfer, as indicated by a lower AJC, were more likely to be lost to follow up. Recent literature suggests that even in the least severe categories of JIA, 50% of patients persist with active disease into adulthood. Thus educating all JIA patients about the possibility of disease flare in adulthood may improve their adherence to recommendations for sustained follow-up in the adult milieu. This may lead to improvement of longitudinal outcomes for all JIA patients.

  13. National Patient Care Database (NPCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The National Patient Care Database (NPCD), located at the Austin Information Technology Center, is part of the National Medical Information Systems (NMIS). The NPCD...

  14. Patients report positive impacts of collaborative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, John H; Johnson, Deborah J; Benjamin, Regina; Phillips, Jill; MacKenzie, Todd A

    2006-01-01

    Collaborative Care refers to a partnership between healthcare professionals and patients who feel confident to manage their health conditions. Using an Internet-based assessment of health needs and healthcare quality, we surveyed 24,609 adult Americans aged 19 to 69 who had common chronic diseases or significant dysfunction. In these patients, we examined the association of Collaborative Care with specific measures for treatment effect, disease control, prevention, and economic impacts. These measures were adjusted for respondents' demographic characteristics, burden of illness, health behaviors, and overall quality of healthcare. Only 21% of respondents participated in good Collaborative Care, 36% attained fair Collaborative Care, and 43% experienced poor Collaborative Care. Regardless of overall care quality or the respondents' personal characteristics, burden of illness, or health behaviors, good Collaborative Care was associated with better control of blood pressure, blood glucose level, serum cholesterol level, and treatment effectiveness for pain and emotional problems. Some preventive actions were better, and some adverse economic impacts of illness were mitigated. PMID:16788352

  15. The impact of informal care-giving networks on adult children's care-giver burden

    OpenAIRE

    Tolkacheva, N.; Broese van Groenou, M. I.; Boer; Tilburg, van, P.J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research on the care-giver burden experienced by adult children has typically focused on the adult child and parent dyad. This study uses information on multiple informal care-givers and examines how characteristics of the informal care-giving network affect the adult child's care-giver burden. In 2007, 602 Dutch care-givers who were assisting their older parents reported on parental and personal characteristics, care activities, experienced burden and characteristics of other inform...

  16. Incorporating Geriatric Medicine Providers into the Care of the Older Adult with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Allison; Canin, Beverly; van Londen, G J; Edwards, Beatrice; Bakalarski, Pamela; Parker, Ira

    2016-11-01

    A significant proportion of cancer patients and survivors are age 65 and over. Older adults with cancer often have more complex medical and social needs than their younger counterparts. Geriatric medicine providers (GMPs) such as geriatricians, geriatric-trained advanced practice providers, and geriatric certified registered nurses have expertise in caring for older adults, managing complex medical situations, and optimizing function and independence for this population. GMPs are not routinely incorporated into cancer care for older adults; however, their particular skill set may add benefit at many points along the cancer care continuum. In this article, we review the role of geriatric assessment in the care of older cancer patients, highlight specific case scenarios in which GMPs may offer additional understanding and insight in the care of older adults with cancer, and discuss specific mechanisms for incorporating GMPs into oncology care. PMID:27613166

  17. Model of Care for Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: The Youth Project in Milan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, Chiara; Veneroni, Laura; Silva, Matteo; Casanova, Michela; Chiaravalli, Stefano; Massimino, Maura; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Ferrari, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer form a particular group of patients with unique characteristics, who inhabit a so-called "no man's land" between pediatric and adult services. In the last 10 years, the scientific oncology community has started to pay attention to these patients, implementing dedicated programs. A standardized model of care directed toward patients in this age range has yet to be developed and neither the pediatric nor the adult oncologic systems perfectly fit these patients' needs. The Youth Project of the Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan, dedicated to AYA with pediatric-type solid tumors, can be seen as a model of care for AYA patients, with its heterogeneous multidisciplinary staff and close cooperation with adult medical oncologists and surgeons. Further progress in the care of AYA cancer patients is still needed to improve their outcomes. PMID:27606308

  18. Transition experiences and health care utilization among young adults with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garvey KC

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Katharine C Garvey,1 Jonathan A Finkelstein,2,3 Lori M Laffel,1,4 Victoria Ochoa,1 Joseph I Wolfsdorf,1 Erinn T Rhodes1 1Division of Endocrinology, Boston Children's Hospital, 2Division of General Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital, 3Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, 4Pediatric, Adolescent and Young Adult Section, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA, USA Background: The purpose of this study was to describe the current status of adult diabetes care in young adults with type 1 diabetes and examine associations between health care transition experiences and care utilization. Methods: We developed a survey to assess transition characteristics and current care in young adults with type 1 diabetes. We mailed the survey to the last known address of young adults who had previously received diabetes care at a tertiary pediatric center. Results: Of 291 surveys sent, 83 (29% were undeliverable and three (1% were ineligible. Of 205 surveys delivered, 65 were returned (response rate 32%. Respondents (mean age 26.6 ± 3.0 years, 54% male, 91% Caucasian transitioned to adult diabetes care at a mean age of 19.2 ± 2.8 years. Although 71% felt mostly/completely prepared for transition, only half received recommendations for a specific adult provider. Twenty-six percent reported gaps exceeding six months between pediatric and adult diabetes care. Respondents who made fewer than three diabetes visits in the year prior to transition (odds ratio [OR] 4.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2–16.5 or cited moving/relocation as the most important reason for transition (OR 6.3, 95% CI 1.3–31.5 were more likely to report gaps in care exceeding six months. Patients receiving current care from an adult endocrinologist (79% were more likely to report at least two diabetes visits in the past year (OR 6.0, 95% CI 1.5–24.0 compared with those receiving diabetes care from a general internist/adult primary care doctor (17%. Two

  19. Oropharyngeal or gastric colonization and nosocomial pneumonia in adult intensive care unit patients. A prospective study based on genomic DNA analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Garrouste-Orgeas, Maïté; Chevret, S; Arlet, G; Marie, O.; Rouveau, M.; Popoff, N.; Schlemmer, B

    1997-01-01

    Colonization of the digestive tract has been supposed to be the source of many hospital-acquired infections, especially nosocomial pneumonia. To assess the relationship between oropharyngeal and gastric colonization and subsequent occurrence of nosocomial pneumonia, we prospectively studied 86 ventilated, intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Oropharyngeal or gastric colonizations were detected and quantified on admission and twice weekly during ICU stay. When nosocomial pneumonia was suspected...

  20. Model of Care for Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: The Youth Project in Milan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, Chiara; Veneroni, Laura; Silva, Matteo; Casanova, Michela; Chiaravalli, Stefano; Massimino, Maura; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Ferrari, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer form a particular group of patients with unique characteristics, who inhabit a so-called “no man’s land” between pediatric and adult services. In the last 10 years, the scientific oncology community has started to pay attention to these patients, implementing dedicated programs. A standardized model of care directed toward patients in this age range has yet to be developed and neither the pediatric nor the adult oncologic systems perfectly fit these patients’ needs. The Youth Project of the Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan, dedicated to AYA with pediatric-type solid tumors, can be seen as a model of care for AYA patients, with its heterogeneous multidisciplinary staff and close cooperation with adult medical oncologists and surgeons. Further progress in the care of AYA cancer patients is still needed to improve their outcomes. PMID:27606308

  1. Pain distribution in primary care patients with hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Erik; Overgaard, Søren; Vestergaard, Jacob T;

    2016-01-01

    by 109 patients of which 108 (99%) were valid. The mean age of patients was 65 (SD 9) years and 44% were females. The mean pain intensity was 5.4 (SD 2.0). A total of 77% had marked the greater trochanter area, 53% the groin area, 42% the anterior/lateral thigh area, 38% the buttock area, 17% the knee......BACKGROUND: Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common diagnosis in primary care adult patients presenting with hip pain but pain location and pain distribution in primary care patients with hip OA have been reported inadequately. OBJECTIVE: To describe pain location and pain distribution...... in primary care patients with clinical and radiographic confirmed hip OA. METHODS: Primary care patients with unilateral clinical and radiographic hip OA living on the island of Funen, Denmark were recruited from primary care to participate in a randomized clinical trial. At baseline, patients recorded pain...

  2. Self-Care Among Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lovén Wickman, Ulrica; Yngman-Uhlin, Pia; Hjortswang, Henrik; Riegel, Barbara; Stjernman, Henrik; Hollman Frisman, Gunilla

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease of unknown etiology. The disease occurs early in life and the burden of symptoms is significant. Patients need to perform self-care to handle their symptoms, but knowledge about what kind of self-care patients do is limited and these individuals need to learn how to manage the symptoms that arise. The aim of this study was to explore self-care among patients with IBD. Twenty adult patients with IBD, 25–66 years of age, were interviewed. Da...

  3. Intensive care of haematological patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magid, Tobias; Haase, Nicolai; Andersen, Jakob Steen;

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the treatment results of 320 consecutive patients with malignant haematological diagnoses admitted to a tertiary intensive care unit at a Danish University hospital over a six-year period (2005-2010). With reference to international publications, we describe the development...

  4. Gay patients. Context for care.

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, G; Saunders, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Gays and lesbians are a part of our society and our practices: real people with real lives, not stereotypes. Understanding their inner world and their social milieu is the first step to providing care that is holistic and appropriate. The "coming out" process and other unique health issues are described. Guidance is provided on how to identify and relate to gay and lesbian patients.

  5. Challenges Caring for Adults With Congenital Heart Disease in Pediatric Settings: How Nurses Can Aid in the Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Kristin

    2016-08-01

    As surgery for complex congenital heart disease is becoming more advanced, an increasing number of patients are surviving into adulthood, yet many of these adult patients remain in the pediatric hospital system. Caring for adult patients is often a challenge for pediatric nurses, because the nurses have less experience and comfort with adult care, medications, comorbid conditions, and rehabilitation techniques. As these patients age, the increased risk of complications and comorbid conditions from their heart disease may complicate their care further. Although these patients are admitted on a pediatric unit, nurses can aid in promoting their independence and help prepare them to transition into the adult medical system. Nurses, the comprehensive medical teams, and patients' families can all effectively influence the process of preparing these patients for transition to adult care. PMID:27481810

  6. Registered Nurse Care Coordination: Creating a Preferred Future for Older Adults with Multimorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Jean; Minaudo, Judith

    2015-09-30

    The concept of care coordination is often touted as the preferred way to streamline care for complex patients. Care coordination is even more popular with the mention of it in the Affordable Care Act of 2010 and with new Medicare payment models. The purpose of this article is to define care coordination, briefly describe trends for older adults and care coordination, and explore roles for registered nurses. We describe elder-appropriate models of care coordination useful for older adults with multimorbidity. A brief exemplar provides an example of evidence-based care coordination services provided by a nursing and social work team, a model supported by recent literature. As a result of this discussion, readers will become informed about possibilities for the future of care delivery and the future of professional nursing practice.

  7. Care of adolescents and young adults with diabetes - much more than transitional care: a personal view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winocour, Peter H

    2014-06-01

    There is increasing recognition that type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) acquired in childhood and adolescence requires a sophisticated approach that facilitates better self-management through adherence to generic principles in managing chronic disease in this age group, allied to the complex clinical needs of managing T1DM and related conditions. Transitional care should be seen as a process over time supported by both paediatric and adult diabetologists within a multidisciplinary team, given the complementary skills that can be brought to bear. Undoubtedly, there is a need for more effective training of all healthcare professionals working in this service. However, the accumulation of older teenagers over time and new diagnoses in those aged 19 years or more confirms that a new paradigm is necessary for the successful care of young adults beyond transitional care. Traditional clinical models will often not work for those in employment and higher education, with evidence that ongoing engagement following transfer to adult services often ceases. The alarming evidence of progressive complications in T1DM of longer duration in patients under the age of 40 years is a wake-up call to transform the care of this most vulnerable group. PMID:24889572

  8. Survivorship care for older adults with cancer: U13 conference report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerard, Emily J; Nightingale, Ginah; Bellizzi, Keith; Burhenn, Peggy; Rosko, Ashley; Artz, Andrew S; Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz; Canin, Beverly; Dale, William; Ferrell, Betty

    2016-07-01

    Older adult cancer survivors currently account for almost 60% of all cancer survivors. The number of older cancer survivors will continue to increase as the population ages and as patients' live longer after a cancer diagnosis. As part of cancer center accreditation, the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer® (CoC) has placed great importance on survivorship care planning. While the CoC has set standards for general survivorship care, there is sparse evidence on how to best care for older adult cancer survivors. Concern exists among the medical community that survivorship care plans could increase paperwork without improving outcomes. Given the diverse and unique needs of older adult cancer survivors, the inter-professional team provides a structure and process for survivorship care built around the particular needs of older adults. The Cancer and Aging Research Group (CARG), in partnership with the NIA/NCI, held a U13 conference in May 2015 in part to discuss survivorship care for older adults with cancer. This report discusses four themes that emerged from one section of the conference: (1) survivorship care is a process that continually evolves to meet the needs of older adults; (2) older adult cancer survivors have unique needs and care plans should be tailored to meet these needs; (3) the inter-professional team is ideally suited to structure survivorship care of older adults; (4) patient advocacy must be encouraged throughout the cancer care continuum. As evidence based survivorship practices develop, the unique needs of older adults need to be given substantial attention.

  9. Orthogeriatric care: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarazona-Santabalbina FJ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Francisco José Tarazona-Santabalbina,1,2 Ángel Belenguer-Varea,1,2 Eduardo Rovira,1,2 David Cuesta-Peredó1,21Geriatric Medicine Unit, Internal Medicine Department, Hospital Universitario de la Ribera, 2Medical School, Universidad Católica de Valencia San vicente Mártir, Valencia, SpainAbstract: Hip fractures are a very serious socio-economic problem in western countries. Since the 1950s, orthogeriatric units have introduced improvements in the care of geriatric patients admitted to hospital because of hip fractures. During this period, these units have reduced mean hospital stays, number of complications, and both in-hospital mortality and mortality over the middle term after hospital discharge, along with improvements in the quality of care and a reduction in costs. Likewise, a recent clinical trial has reported greater functional gains among the affected patients. Studies in this field have identified the prognostic factors present upon admission or manifesting themselves during admission and that increase the risk of patient mortality or disability. In addition, improved care afforded by orthogeriatric units has proved to reduce costs. Nevertheless, a number of management issues remain to be clarified, such as the optimum anesthetic, analgesic, and thromboprophylactic protocols; the type of diagnostic and therapeutic approach best suited to patients with cognitive problems; or the efficiency of the programs used in convalescence units or in home rehabilitation care. Randomized clinical trials are needed to consolidate the evidence in this regard. Keywords: hip fractures, geriatric assessment, orthogeriatric care, recovery of function, mortality

  10. Predictors of Treatment with Duloxetine or Venlafaxine XR among Adult Patients Treated for Depression in Primary Care Practices in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nianwen Shi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Knowledge about real-world use of duloxetine and venlafaxine XR to treat depression in the UK is limited. Aims. To identify predictors of duloxetine or venlafaxine XR initiation. Method. Adult depressed patients who initiated duloxetine or venlafaxine XR between January 1, 2006 and September 30, 2007 were identified in the UK’s General Practice Research Database. Demographic and clinical predictors of treatment initiation with duloxetine and venlafaxine XR were identified using logistic regression. Results. Patients initiating duloxetine (n=909 were 4 years older than venlafaxine XR recipients (n=1286. Older age, preexisting unexplained pain, respiratory disease, and pre-period use of anticonvulsants, opioids, and antihyperlipidemics were associated with increased odds of initiating duloxetine compared to venlafaxine XR. Pre-period anxiety disorder was associated with decreased odds of receiving duloxetine. Conclusion. Initial treatment choice with duloxetine versus venlafaxine XR was primarily driven by patient-specific mental and medical health characteristics. General practitioners in the UK favor duloxetine over venlafaxine XR when pain conditions coexist with depression.

  11. Supporting Nutrition in Early Care and Education Settings: The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Child care centers, Head Start programs, and family child care providers serving young children--as well as after school programs and homeless shelters that reach older children, adults, and families--are supported in providing healthy meals and snacks by reimbursements through the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Administered by the…

  12. Transitioning the young adult with congenital heart disease for life-long medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Susan M; Landzberg, Michael J

    2004-12-01

    Guidelines for the successful orchestration of transitioning of the adolescent and young and older adult patient with congenital heart disease to a health care system appropriate for their long-term congenital heart disease care and counseling appear necessary to improve patient and family confidence, education, therapy, life quality, and survival outcomes. Schema for care organization and delivery for adult patients with congenital heart disease remain primitive and largely unimplemented. The presence of a strong central care oversight organization and the establishment of a multi-institutional database to assist in assessment of care outcomes and guidelines appears requisite to these needs and for the establishment of transitioning guidelines for these patients as they assume a greater and deeper shared control of their futures with their caregivers.

  13. Up Close and Personal: Theorising Care Work in Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Vaughn M.

    2016-01-01

    How do we account for the close personal bonds and deeply caring relationships forged by educators with learners in many adult educational encounters? The literature is relatively silent on the emotional and relational basis to adult educator work. This is a serious silence, given the stressful nature of adult education in developing contexts such…

  14. Self-care ability investigation and intervention in the adult patients with cirrhosis%肝硬化患者自我护理能力调查及干预效果的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张明芹

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the self-care ability in the adult patients with cirrhosis and explore intervene effects. Methods 80 patients with cirrhosis were surveyed the self-care ability and health behaviors and then were equally divided into treatment group and control group, the control group were given with general nursing intervention, and treatment group were given actively i intervention. Results The self-care ability score was (112.43?3.47) which was at high levels. Self-care ability score and each dimension score had significant positive correlation to the health behavior (P<0.05). After intervention, the situation of maintain emotional stability,reasonable diet and master of their own medication of the treatment group were better than the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion Adult patients with cirrhosis of self-care ability shows the upper level, which has relatively good health behaviors, and actively intervention can improve patients' quality of life.%目的:调查肝硬化患者自我护理能力,探讨参与干预对于肝硬化患者的影响.方法:对80例肝硬化患者自我护理能力调查与健康行为进行调查,根据干预方法的不同,将肝硬化患者分为治疗组与对照组各40例,对照组采用一般护理干预,治疗组采用积极的参与干预方法.结果:治疗组患者自我护理能力总分在(112.43±23.47)范围,呈中高水平.自我护理能力总分与各维度得分与健康行为都呈现明显正向相关性(P<0.05).经过干预后,治疗组患者在保持情绪稳定、合理饮食、自行掌握用药等方面均优于对照组(P<0.05).结论:成人肝硬化患者自我护理能力呈现中上等水平,从而拥有比较好的健康行为,同时积极的参与干预能够提高患者生活质量.

  15. Wound Care in Burn Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Orhan Çizmeci; Samet Vasfi Kuvat

    2011-01-01

    Wound care in one of the most important prognostic factors in burn victims. Open wound carries risks for infection due to hypothermia, protein and fluid losses. In addition, unhealed wounds are the major risk factors for acute-subacute or chronic complications in burn patients. Although no exact algorithm exists for open wound treatment, early escarectomy or debridement together with grafting is the best option. Ointments together with topical epithelizing agents without dressings are generea...

  16. Use of and interest in alternative therapies among adult primary care clinicians and adult members in a large health maintenance organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, N P; Sobel, D S; Tarazona, E Z

    1998-09-01

    During spring 1996, random samples of adult primary care physicians, obstetrics-gynecology physicians and nurse practitioners, and adult members of a large northern California group practice model health maintenance organization (HMO) were surveyed by mail to assess the use of alternative therapies and the extent of interest in having them incorporated into HMO-delivered care. Sixty-one percent (n = 624) of adult primary care physicians, 70% (n = 157) of obstetrics-gynecology clinicians, and 50% (2 surveys, n = 1,507 and n = 17,735) of adult HMO members responded. During the previous 12 months, 25% of adults reported using and nearly 90% of adult primary care physicians and obstetrics-gynecology clinicians reported recommending at least 1 alternative therapy, primarily for pain management. Chiropractic, acupuncture, massage, and behavioral medicine techniques such as meditation and relaxation training were most often cited. Obstetrics-gynecology clinicians used herbal and homeopathic medicines more often than adult primary care physicians, primarily for menopause and premenstrual syndrome. Two thirds of adult primary care physicians and three fourths of obstetrics-gynecology clinicians were at least moderately interested in using alternative therapies with patients, and nearly 70% of young and middle-aged adult and half of senior adult members were interested in having alternative therapies incorporated into their health care. Adult primary care physicians and members were more interested in having the HMO cover manipulative and behavioral medicine therapies than homeopathic or herbal medicines. PMID:9771154

  17. Linguistic Stereotyping in Older Adults' Perceptions of Health Care Aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Donald; Coles, Valerie Berenice; Barnett, Joshua Trey

    2016-07-01

    The cultural and linguistic diversity of the U.S. health care provider workforce is expanding. Diversity among health care personnel such as paraprofessional health care assistants (HCAs)-many of whom are immigrants-means that intimate, high-stakes cross-cultural and cross-linguistic contact characterizes many health interactions. In particular, nonmainstream HCAs may face negative patient expectations because of patients' language stereotypes. In other contexts, reverse linguistic stereotyping has been shown to result in negative speaker evaluations and even reduced listening comprehension quite independently of the actual language performance of the speaker. The present study extends the language and attitude paradigm to older adults' perceptions of HCAs. Listeners heard the identical speaker of Standard American English as they watched interactions between an HCA and an older patient. Ethnolinguistic identities-either an Anglo native speaker of English or a Mexican nonnative speaker-were ascribed to HCAs by means of fabricated personnel files. Dependent variables included measures of perceived HCA language proficiency, personal characteristics, and professional competence, as well as listeners' comprehension of a health message delivered by the putative HCA. For most of these outcomes, moderate effect sizes were found such that the HCA with an ascribed Anglo identity-relative to the Mexican guise-was judged more proficient in English, socially superior, interpersonally more attractive, more dynamic, and a more satisfactory home health aide. No difference in listening comprehension emerged, but the Anglo guise tended to engender a more compliant listening mind set. Results of this study can inform both provider-directed and patient-directed efforts to improve health care services for members of all linguistic and cultural groups.

  18. Linguistic Stereotyping in Older Adults' Perceptions of Health Care Aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Donald; Coles, Valerie Berenice; Barnett, Joshua Trey

    2016-07-01

    The cultural and linguistic diversity of the U.S. health care provider workforce is expanding. Diversity among health care personnel such as paraprofessional health care assistants (HCAs)-many of whom are immigrants-means that intimate, high-stakes cross-cultural and cross-linguistic contact characterizes many health interactions. In particular, nonmainstream HCAs may face negative patient expectations because of patients' language stereotypes. In other contexts, reverse linguistic stereotyping has been shown to result in negative speaker evaluations and even reduced listening comprehension quite independently of the actual language performance of the speaker. The present study extends the language and attitude paradigm to older adults' perceptions of HCAs. Listeners heard the identical speaker of Standard American English as they watched interactions between an HCA and an older patient. Ethnolinguistic identities-either an Anglo native speaker of English or a Mexican nonnative speaker-were ascribed to HCAs by means of fabricated personnel files. Dependent variables included measures of perceived HCA language proficiency, personal characteristics, and professional competence, as well as listeners' comprehension of a health message delivered by the putative HCA. For most of these outcomes, moderate effect sizes were found such that the HCA with an ascribed Anglo identity-relative to the Mexican guise-was judged more proficient in English, socially superior, interpersonally more attractive, more dynamic, and a more satisfactory home health aide. No difference in listening comprehension emerged, but the Anglo guise tended to engender a more compliant listening mind set. Results of this study can inform both provider-directed and patient-directed efforts to improve health care services for members of all linguistic and cultural groups. PMID:26606170

  19. Nursing care of patients with nephrostomy

    OpenAIRE

    ZIKOVÁ, Jana

    2014-01-01

    The subject of the Bachelor thesis is Nursing care of patient with nephrostomy. Despite the fact that creation of nephrostomy is not as common as for example colostomy, patients with nephrostomies are on the increase. Nursing care is based not only on complex nursing of patient but also on careful raising his awareness and education contributing to complete self-sufficiency in the area of the care of nephrostomy. Nurse has to approach patients with nephrostomy individually with consideration ...

  20. Primary care patient and provider preferences for diabetes care managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona S DeJesus

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ramona S DeJesus1, Kristin S Vickers2, Robert J Stroebel1, Stephen S Cha31Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, MN, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAPurpose: The collaborative care model, using care managers, has been shown to be effective in achieving sustained treatment outcomes in chronic disease management. Little effort has been made to find out patient preferences for chronic disease care, hence, we conducted a study aimed at identifying these.Methods: A 20-item questionnaire, asking for patients’ and providers’ preferences and perceptions, was mailed out to 1000 randomly selected patients in Olmsted County, Minnesota, identified through a diabetes registry to have type 2 diabetes mellitus, a prototypical prevalent chronic disease. Surveys were also sent to 42 primary care providers.Results: There were 254 (25.4% patient responders and 28 (66% provider responders. The majority of patients (>70% and providers (89% expressed willingness to have various aspects of diabetes care managed by a care manager. Although 75% of providers would be comfortable expanding the care manager role to other chronic diseases, only 39.5% of patient responders would be willing to see a care manager for other chronic problems. Longer length of time from initial diagnosis of diabetes was associated with decreased patient likelihood to work with a care manager.Conclusion: Despite study limitations, such as the lack of validated measures to assess perceptions related to care management, our results suggest that patients and providers are willing to collaborate with a care manager and that both groups have similar role expectations of a care manager.Keywords: care manager, collaborative care, patient preference, diabetes care

  1. Predicting Outcome in Internet-Based Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Major Depression: A Large Cohort Study of Adult Patients in Routine Psychiatric Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljótsson, Brjánn; Hedman, Erik; Svanborg, Cecilia; Kaldo, Viktor; Lindefors, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the effectiveness of therapist-guided internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) for treating depression has been well documented, knowledge of outcome predictors and risk factors associated with lower treatment response is limited, especially when the treatment has been conducted within a naturalistic clinical setting. Identification of such factors is important for clinicians when making treatment recommendations. Methods Data from a large cohort (N = 1738) of adult outpatients having been treated with ICBT for depression at an outpatient psychiatric clinic were analysed. A multilevel modelling approach was used to identify patient and treatment variables associated with the speed of recovery during treatment using weekly measurements of the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale Self-Rated (MADRS-S). Outcomes Adhering to the treatment, perceiving it as credible and working full-time emerged as predictors of a faster pace of recovery and were also associated with a lower level of depression at the end of treatment. Higher pre-treatment depression and sleep problems were associated with a greater improvement rate, but predicted higher depression after treatment. Having a history of psychotropic medication was associated with both slower improvement and higher post-treatment depression. Conclusion Perceived credibility of ICBT is a strong predictor of treatment response. Assessing patient beliefs and expectations may be a useful aid for clinicians when identifying those who are more or less likely to benefit from ICBT. Helping patients improve expectations prior to treatment may be an important goal for clinicians during the initial assessment phase. PMID:27618548

  2. Transition from Pediatric to Adult OI Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... example, preparing for adult employment begins with the process of learning responsibility by doing chores and helping at home. As ... Similarly, developing satisfying adult relationships is a gradual process that begins ... social experiences in school and throughout adolescence. Some of ...

  3. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient related outcomes: A critical review of evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Salins

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: In adult oncology, there is evidence to suggest early specialist palliative care improves HRQOL, mood, treatment decision-making, health care utilization, advanced care planning, patient satisfaction, and end-of-life care. There is moderate evidence to support the role of early specialist palliative care intervention in improvement of symptoms, survival, and health-related communication. There is limited evidence at present to support role of early specialist palliative care interventions in pediatric and geriatric oncology. Qualitative studies on barriers and negative patient outcomes may provide useful insights toward restructuring early specialist palliative care interventions.

  4. Experiences of Community-Living Older Adults Receiving Integrated Care Based on the Chronic Care Model: A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie L W Spoorenberg

    Full Text Available Integrated care models aim to solve the problem of fragmented and poorly coordinated care in current healthcare systems. These models aim to be patient-centered by providing continuous and coordinated care and by considering the needs and preferences of patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the opinions and experiences of community-living older adults with regard to integrated care and support, along with the extent to which it meets their health and social needs.Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 older adults receiving integrated care and support through "Embrace," an integrated care model for community-living older adults that is based on the Chronic Care Model and a population health management model. Embrace is currently fully operational in the northern region of the Netherlands. Data analysis was based on the grounded theory approach.Responses of participants concerned two focus areas: 1 Experiences with aging, with the themes "Struggling with health," "Increasing dependency," "Decreasing social interaction," "Loss of control," and "Fears;" and 2 Experiences with Embrace, with the themes "Relationship with the case manager," "Interactions," and "Feeling in control, safe, and secure". The prospect of becoming dependent and losing control was a key concept in the lives of the older adults interviewed. Embrace reinforced the participants' ability to stay in control, even if they were dependent on others. Furthermore, participants felt safe and secure, in contrast to the fears of increasing dependency within the standard care system.The results indicate that integrated care and support provided through Embrace met the health and social needs of older adults, who were coping with the consequences of aging.

  5. Primary care for young adult cancer survivors: an international perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Blake-Gumbs, Lyla; Miedema, Baujke;

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Internationally, family physicians (FP) are not routinely involved in young adult cancer (YAC) care. In this short report, we would like to make a compelling argument for primary care involvement. METHODS: Comparative descriptions and literature review. RESULTS: Cancer among YAs is rare ...... continuing medical education (CME) initiatives, and an enhanced cooperative effort between those delivering and coordinating cancer care.......PURPOSE: Internationally, family physicians (FP) are not routinely involved in young adult cancer (YAC) care. In this short report, we would like to make a compelling argument for primary care involvement. METHODS: Comparative descriptions and literature review. RESULTS: Cancer among YAs is rare...... and usually not the first thing that comes into the FP's mind. Youth is sometimes mistakenly regarded as a protective factor. Across the countries, almost all YACs are treated in tertiary health care facilities with specialists providing the majority of care. Health care services are covered by the universal...

  6. Implementing the chronic care model for frail older adults in the Netherlands: study protocol of ACT (frail older adults: care in transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntinga Maaike E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care for older adults is facing a number of challenges: health problems are not consistently identified at a timely stage, older adults report a lack of autonomy in their care process, and care systems are often confronted with the need for better coordination between health care professionals. We aim to address these challenges by introducing the geriatric care model, based on the chronic care model, and to evaluate its effects on the quality of life of community-dwelling frail older adults. Methods/design In a 2-year stepped-wedge cluster randomised clinical trial with 6-monthly measurements, the chronic care model will be compared with usual care. The trial will be carried out among 35 primary care practices in two regions in the Netherlands. Per region, practices will be randomly allocated to four allocation arms designating the starting point of the intervention. Participants: 1200 community-dwelling older adults aged 65 or over and their primary informal caregivers. Primary care physicians will identify frail individuals based on a composite definition of frailty and a polypharmacy criterion. Final inclusion criterion: scoring 3 or more on a disability case-finding tool. Intervention: Every 6 months patients will receive a geriatric in-home assessment by a practice nurse, followed by a tailored care plan. Expert teams will manage and train practice nurses. Patients with complex care needs will be reviewed in interdisciplinary consultations. Evaluation: We will perform an effect evaluation, an economic evaluation, and a process evaluation. Primary outcome is quality of life as measured with the Short Form-12 questionnaire. Effect analyses will be based on the “intention-to-treat” principle, using multilevel regression analysis. Cost measurements will be administered continually during the study period. A cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-utility analysis will be conducted comparing mean total costs to functional

  7. Adolescent and young adult cancer: principles of care

    OpenAIRE

    Ramphal, R; Aubin, S.; Czaykowski, P.; Pauw, S; Johnson, A.; McKillop, S.; Szwajcer, D; Wilkins, K; ROGERS, P.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (ayas) with cancer in active treatment face a number of barriers to optimal care. In the present article, we focus on the 3 critical domains of care for ayas—medical, psychosocial, and research—and how changes to the system could overcome barriers. We summarize the current literature, outline recommended principles of care, raise awareness of barriers to optimal care, and suggest specific changes to the system to overcome those barriers in the Canadian context. Ma...

  8. Skin tears: care and management of the older adult at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Regina F; Davidson, Martha W; Thompson, Bonnie J; Kelechi, Teresa J

    2013-02-01

    Skin tears experienced by older adults require special skills to promote healing. Home healthcare providers are in key positions to manage skin tears and prevent further skin trauma. Several guidelines, risk assessments, classifications, and products exist to manage high-risk patients. Frequent evaluation of the effectiveness of the treatment and prevention strategies in an overall skin care protocol for home care patients is critical to reduce skin tear incidence and promote prompt healing when skin tears are present.

  9. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? An adult Indian is eligible to receive adult care assistance under this part if...

  10. Taiwanese nurses' appraisal of a lecture on spiritual care for patients in critical care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, F J; Gau, M L; Mao, H C; Chen, C H

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a lecture on spiritual care for adult critical care trainees, and to evaluate the trainees' appraisal of the effectiveness of this lecture in preparing them to provide spiritual care for their clients in a critical care setting. A between-method triangulation research design encompassing a questionnaire and descriptive qualitative content analysis was used. A convenience sample consisting of 64 registered nurses who attended an adult critical care nurse training programme in a leading medical centre in northern Taiwan were invited to participate in this study. A total of 64 female participants completed the questionnaire. Ninety-two per cent (59) of the subjects considered the lecture on spiritual care to be helpful in assisting them to provide holistic care for critically ill patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Three types of help were identified by the subjects: (1) help in clarifying the abstract concepts related to spiritual care (86%); (2) help in self-disclosing the nurses' personal beliefs and values regarding life goals, nursing, and spiritual needs (67%); (3) help in learning how to provide spiritual care to patients in a critical care setting (34%). Twenty per cent of the subjects thought that inclusion of the following content in the lecture would have been helpful to provide a more comprehensive picture of spiritual care: religious practices and rituals (11%); the culturally bonded nursing care plan (9%); the development of human spirituality (3%); patients' families' spiritual needs in the ICU (3%); and resources for nurses in providing spiritual care (2%). Thirteen per cent of the subjects suggested that the instructor might employ the following strategies to improve the quality of teaching: providing more empirical examples (5%); discussion with the students in classes of smaller size following the lecture or extending the instruction time (5%); and providing a syllabus with detailed information (3%).

  11. Patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics and level of care associated with lost to follow-up and mortality in adult patients on first-line ART in Nigerian hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Odafe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical outcome is an important determinant of programme success. This study aims to evaluate patients’ baseline characteristics as well as level of care associated with lost to follow-up (LTFU and mortality of patients on antiretroviral treatment (ART. Methods: Retrospective cohort study using routine service data of adult patients initiated on ART in 2007 in 10 selected hospitals in Nigeria. We captured data using an electronic medical record system and analyzed using Stata. Outcome measures were probability of being alive and retained in care at 12, 24 and 36 months on ART. Potential predictors associated with time to mortality and time to LTFU were assessed using competing risks regression models. Results: After 12 months on therapy, 85% of patients were alive and on ART. Survival decreased to 81.2% and 76.1% at 24 and 36 months, respectively. Median CD4 count for patients at ART start, 12, 18 and 24 months were 152 (interquartile range, IQR: 75 to 242, 312 (IQR: 194 to 450, 344 (IQR: 227 to 501 and 372 (IQR: 246 to 517 cells/µl, respectively. Competing risk regression showed that patients’ baseline characteristics significantly associated with LTFU were male (adjusted sub-hazard ratio, sHR=1.24 [95% CI: 1.08 to 1.42], ambulatory functional status (adjusted sHR=1.25 [95% CI: 1.01 to 1.54], World Health Organization (WHO clinical Stage II (adjusted sHR=1.31 [95% CI: 1.08 to 1.59] and care in a secondary site (adjusted sHR=0.76 [95% CI: 0.66 to 0.87]. Those associated with mortality include CD4 count <50 cells/µl (adjusted sHR=2.84 [95% CI: 1.20 to 6.71], WHO clinical Stage III (adjusted sHR=2.67 [95% CI: 1.26 to 5.65] and Stage IV (adjusted sHR=5.04 [95% CI: 1.93 to 13.16] and care in a secondary site (adjusted sHR=2.21 [95% CI: 1.30 to 3.77]. Conclusions: Mortality was associated with advanced HIV disease and care in secondary facilities. Earlier initiation of therapy and strengthening systems in secondary level

  12. Transitioning Adolescents and Young Adults With Sickle Cell Disease From Pediatric to Adult Health Care: Provider Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stollon, Natalie B; Paine, Christine W; Lucas, Matthew S; Brumley, Lauren D; Poole, Erika S; Peyton, Tamara; Grant, Anne W; Jan, Sophia; Trachtenberg, Symme; Zander, Miriam; Bonafide, Christopher P; Schwartz, Lisa A

    2015-11-01

    The transition from pediatric to adult health care is often challenging for adolescents and young adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). Our study aimed to identify (1) measures of success for the transition to adult health care; and (2) barriers and facilitators to this process. We interviewed 13 SCD experts and asked them about their experiences caring for adolescents and young adults with SCD. Our interview guide was developed based on Social-Ecological Model of Adolescent and Young Adult Readiness to Transition framework, and interviews were coded using the constant comparative method. Our results showed that transition success was measured by health care utilization, quality of life, and continuation on a stable disease trajectory. We also found that barriers to transition include negative experiences in the emergency department, sociodemographic factors, and adolescent skills. Facilitators include a positive relationship with the provider, family support, and developmental maturity. Success in SCD transition is primarily determined by the patients' quality of relationships with their parents and providers and their developmental maturity and skills. Understanding these concepts will aid in the development of future evidence-based transition care models.

  13. Foster Care Experiences and Educational Outcomes of Young Adults Formerly Placed in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havalchak, Anne; White, Catherine Roller; O'Brien, Kirk; Pecora, Peter J.; Sepulveda, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This study contributes to the body of research on the educational outcomes of young adults who were formerly placed in foster care. Telephone interviews were conducted with 359 young adults (a 54.6% response rate). Participants must have been served for at least one year by one private foster care agency in one of its twenty-two offices. Results…

  14. Acute undifferentiated febrile illness in adult hospitalized patients: the disease spectrum and diagnostic predictors - an experience from a tertiary care hospital in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrispal, Anugrah; Boorugu, Harikishan; Gopinath, Kango Gopal; Chandy, Sara; Prakash, John Antony Jude; Thomas, Elsa Mary; Abraham, Asha Mary; Abraham, O C; Thomas, Kurien

    2010-10-01

    Local prevalences of individual diseases influence the prioritization of the differential diagnoses of a clinical syndrome of acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AFI). This study was conducted in order to delineate the aetiology of AFI that present to a tertiary hospital in southern India and to describe disease-specific clinical profiles. An 1-year prospective, observational study was conducted in adults (age >16 years) who presented with an undifferentiated febrile illness of duration 5-21 days, requiring hospitalization. Blood cultures, malarial parasites and febrile serology (acute and convalescent), in addition to clinical evaluations and basic investigations were performed. Comparisons were made between each disease and the other AFIs. A total of 398 AFI patients were diagnosed with: scrub typhus (47.5%); malaria (17.1%); enteric fever (8.0%); dengue (7.0%); leptospirosis (3.0%); spotted fever rickettsiosis (1.8%); Hantavirus (0.3%); alternate diagnosis (7.3%); and unclear diagnoses (8.0%). Leucocytosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, aseptic meningitis, mild serum transaminase elevation and hypoalbuminaemia were independently associated with scrub typhus. Normal leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia, renal failure, splenomegaly and hyperbilirubinaemia with mildly elevated serum transaminases were associated with malaria. Rash, overt bleeding manifestations, normal to low leukocyte counts, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia and significantly elevated hepatic transaminases were associated with dengue. Enteric fever was associated with loose stools, normal to low leukocyte counts and normal platelet counts. It is imperative to maintain a sound epidemiological database of AFIs so that evidence-based diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines can be developed. PMID:20870680

  15. Diarrhea - what to ask your health care provider - adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your health care provider about diarrhea - adult; Loose stools - what to ask your health ... medicines, vitamins, herbs, or supplements I take cause diarrhea? Should I stop taking any of them? What ...

  16. Keep Your Mouth Healthy: Oral Care for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Keep Your Mouth Healthy Oral Care for Older Adults Oral health ... decay. You can take steps to keep your mouth healthy throughout your lifetime. And if you’re ...

  17. The patient experience of intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Lindahl, Berit;

    2015-01-01

    : Nordic intensive care units. PARTICIPANTS: Patients in Nordic intensive care units. METHODS: We performed a literature search of qualitative studies of the patient experience of intensive care based on Nordic publications in 2000-2013. We searched the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, and Psyc...

  18. Need for care from the patient perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.; Verhaak, P.; Bensing, J.M.; Meer, K. van der; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Only a small part of anxiety and depression patients receive care for their mental disorder and even less patients receive the care they wanted. People have different needs for care, so it is important to investigate the patient’s perspective. OBJECTIVES: To explore the specific needs

  19. Diabetes Self-Care and the Older Adult

    OpenAIRE

    Weinger, Katie; Beverly, Elizabeth A.; Smaldone, Arlene

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is highest in older adults, a population that is increasing. Diabetes self-care is complex with important recommendations for nutrition, physical activity, checking glucose levels, and taking medication. Older adults with diabetes have unique issues which impact self-care. As people age, their health status, support systems, physical and mental abilities, and nutritional requirements change. Furthermore, comorbidities, complications, and polypharmacy complicate diab...

  20. Care management: agreement between nursing prescriptions and patients' care needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeda, Marília Silveira; Perroca, Márcia Galan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: analyze agreement between nursing prescriptions recorded in medical files and patients' care needs; investigate the correlation between the nurses' professional background and agreement of prescriptions. Method: descriptive study with quantitative and documentary approach conducted in the medical clinic, surgical, and specialized units of a university hospital in the interior of São Paulo, Brazil. The new validated version of a Patient Classification Instrument was used and 380 nursing prescriptions written at the times of hospital admission and discharge were assessed. Results: 75% of the nursing prescriptions items were compatible with the patients' care needs. Only low correlation between nursing prescription agreement and professional background was found. Conclusion: the nursing prescriptions did not fully meet the care needs of patients. The care context and work process should be analyzed to enable more effective prescriptions, while strategies to assess the care needs of patients are recommended. PMID:27508902

  1. Oral care in patients on mechanical ventilation in intensive care unit: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Atay

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available intensive care patients needs to oral assessment and oral care for avoid complications caused by orafarengeal bacteria. In this literature review, it is aimed to determine the practice over oral hygiene in mechanical ventilator patients in intensive care unit. For the purpose of collecting data, Medline/pub MED and EBSCO HOST databases were searched with the keywords and lsquo;oral hygiene, oral hygiene practice, mouth care, mouth hygiene, intubated, mechanical ventilation, intensive care and critical care and rdquo; between the years of 2000- 2012. Inclusion criteria for the studies were being performed in adult intensive care unit patients on mechanical ventilation, published in peer-reviewed journals in English between the years of 2000-2012, included oral care practice and presence of a nurse among researchers. A total of 304 articles were identified. Six descriptive evaluation studies, three randomised controlled trials, four literature reviews, three meta-Analysis randomized clinical trials, one qualitative study and one semi-experimental study total 18 papers met all of the inclusion criteria. Oral care is emphasized as an infection control practice for the prevention of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP. In conclusion, we mention that oral care is an important nursing practice to prevent VAP development in intensive care unit patients; however, there is no standard oral evaluation tool and no clarity on oral care practice frequency, appropriate solution and appropriate material. It can be recommended that the study projects on oral care in intensive care patients to have high proof level and be experimental, and longitudinal. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(3.000: 822-829

  2. Dental Care among Young Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kancherla, Vijaya; Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Yeargin-Allsopp, Marshalyn

    2013-01-01

    Dental care among young adults with intellectual disability (ID) is poorly documented and largely unmet. By using population-based data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Follow-Up Study, we assessed factors associated with at least one or two dental visits per year among young adults with and without ID. Significantly fewer…

  3. Adult Patients’ Satisfaction with Inpatient Nursing Care and Associated Factors in an Ethiopian Referral Hospital, Northeast, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Kokeb Haile Eyasu; Akilew Awoke Adane; Fisseha Zewdu Amdie; Tesfaye Bisenebit Getahun; Mulunesh Abuhay Biwota

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Patient satisfaction with nursing care is considered as an important factor in explaining patients’ perceptions of service quality. Care assessed to be high quality according to clinical, economic, or other provider-defined criteria is far from ideal if as a result of that care the patient is unhappy or dissatisfied. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess adult patients’ satisfaction with inpatient nursing care and associated factors in Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeas...

  4. Many COPD Patients Have Trouble Finding Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158830.html Many COPD Patients Have Trouble Finding Care They can face ... first comprehensive look at chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) care in the United States. COPD is the ...

  5. Adult Day Care and Medical and Hospital Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Neena L.; Blandford, Audrey A.

    1987-01-01

    Examined effect of adult day care (ADC) on utilization of health care practitioner and inpatient hospital services. Data from three separate ADC studies revealed that, when operative for some time, ADC may result in dramatic decreases in hospital inpatient stays. Findings warrant further research. (Author/NB)

  6. Wound Care in Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Çizmeci

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Wound care in one of the most important prognostic factors in burn victims. Open wound carries risks for infection due to hypothermia, protein and fluid losses. In addition, unhealed wounds are the major risk factors for acute-subacute or chronic complications in burn patients. Although no exact algorithm exists for open wound treatment, early escarectomy or debridement together with grafting is the best option. Ointments together with topical epithelizing agents without dressings are genereally adequate for first-degree burns. However, topical antibacterial agents are usually required for second to third-degree wounds. Standart treatment for the open wound without epithelization is autologous skin grafting. In cases where more than 50% of the skin surface in affected, autologus donor skin may not be enough. For these cases, epidermal cell culture in vitro may be used. Mesenchymal stem cell applications which have immunosupressive effects should be utilized in cases where cells need to be prepared as allografts. (Journal of the Turkish Society intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 51-4

  7. Patient safety culture in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background A constructive patient safety culture is a main prerequisite for patient safety and improvement initiatives. Until now, patient safety culture (PSC) research was mainly focused on hospital care, however, it is of equal importance in primary care. Measuring PSC informs practices on their s

  8. Perioperative Care of the Transgender Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2016-02-01

    Transgender patients are individuals whose gender identity is not related to their biological sex. Assuming a new gender identity that does not conform to societal norms often results in discrimination and barriers to health care. The exact number of transgender patients is unknown; however, these patients are increasingly seen in health care. Transgender individuals may experience provider-generated discrimination in health care facilities, including refusal of service, disrespect, and abuse, which contribute to depression and low self-esteem. Transgender therapies include mental health counseling for depression and low self-esteem, hormone therapy, and sex reassignment surgery. Health care professionals require cultural competence, an understanding of the different forms of patient identification, and adaptive approaches to care for transgender patients. VA (Veterans Affairs) hospitals provide a model for the care for transgender patients and staff. PMID:26849981

  9. Individual and contextual-level factors associated with continuity of care for adults with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanella, Cynthia A; Guada, Joseph; Phillips, Gary; Ranbom, Lorin; Fortney, John C

    2014-09-01

    This retrospective cohort study examined rates of conformance to continuity of care treatment guidelines and factors associated with conformance for persons with schizophrenia. Subjects were 8,621 adult Ohio Medicaid recipients, aged 18-64, treated for schizophrenia in 2004. Information on individual-level (demographic and clinical characteristics) and contextual-level variables (county socio-demographic, economic, and health care resources) were abstracted from Medicaid claim files and the Area Resource File. Outcome measures captured four dimensions of continuity of care: (1) regularity of care; (2) transitions; (3) care coordination, and (4) treatment engagement. Multilevel modeling was used to assess the association between individual and contextual-level variables and the four continuity of care measures. The results indicated that conformance rates for continuity of care for adults with schizophrenia are below recommended guidelines and that variations in continuity of care are associated with both individual and contextual-level factors. Efforts to improve continuity of care should target high risk patient groups (racial/ethnic minorities, the dually diagnosed, and younger adults with early onset psychosis), as well as community-level risk factors (provider supply and geographic barriers of rural counties) that impede access to care.

  10. Self-Care Ability in Hemodialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Atashpeikar, Soulmaz; Jalilazar, Tahereh; Heidarzadeh, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Considering the numerous physical and psychological problems in hemo-dialysis patients, they are dependent on others in some daily activities and in fact, they do not have full self-care ability. A few studies have ever been done, particularly in Iran, on self-care ability of hemodialysis patients. The present study aimed to determine self-care ability of these patients in addition to evaluate its association with some demo-graphic characteristics. Methods: Thi...

  11. Care of patients with permanent tracheostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, Erica

    The third article in our series on tracheostomy care discusses the care of patients with a permanent tracheostomy. While these patients make up a small proportion of all patients who have a tracheostomy inserted, they have complex needs. This means they require practitioners in both acute and community settings, who have time, support and competent tracheostomy-care skills, to achieve a successful discharge and ongoing management of their tracheostomy. PMID:27396099

  12. Management of adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease: strategic issues for transition care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajro, Pietro; Ferrante, Lorenza; Lenta, Selvaggia; Mandato, Claudia; Persico, Marcello

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the management of children with chronic liver disease have enabled many to survive into adulthood with or without their native livers, so that the most common of these conditions are becoming increasingly common in adult hepatology practice. Because the aetiologies of chronic liver disease in children may vary significantly from those in adulthood, adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease may often present with clinical manifestations unfamiliar to their adulthood physician. Transition of medical care to adult practice requires that the adulthood medical staff (primary physicians and subspecialists) have a comprehensive knowledge of childhood liver disease and their implications, and of the differences in caring for these patients. Pending still unavailable Scientific Society guidelines, this article examines causes, presentation modes, evaluation, management, and complications of the main paediatric-onset chronic liver diseases, and discusses key issues to aid in planning a program of transition from paediatric to adult patients.

  13. The role of chiropractic care in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dougherty Paul E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are a rising number of older adults; in the US alone nearly 20% of the population will be 65 or older by 2030. Chiropractic is one of the most frequently utilized types of complementary and alternative care by older adults, used by an estimated 5% of older adults in the U.S. annually. Chiropractic care involves many different types of interventions, including preventive strategies. This commentary by experts in the field of geriatrics, discusses the evidence for the use of spinal manipulative therapy, acupuncture, nutritional counseling and fall prevention strategies as delivered by doctors of chiropractic. Given the utilization of chiropractic services by the older adult, it is imperative that providers be familiar with the evidence for and the prudent use of different management strategies for older adults.

  14. Care of Adult Refugees with Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaki, Genji; Ahrenholz, Nicole Chow; Haider, Mahri Z

    2015-09-01

    Refugees share a common experience of displacement from their country of origin, migration, and resettlement in an unfamiliar country. More than 17 million people have fled their home countries due to war, generalized violence, and persecution. US primary care physicians must care for their immediate and long-term medical needs. Challenges include (1) language and cultural barriers, (2) high rates of mental health disorders, (3) higher prevalence of latent infections, and (4) different explanatory models for chronic diseases. This article discusses management strategies for common challenges that arise in the primary care of refugees. PMID:26320045

  15. Care of Adult Refugees with Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaki, Genji; Ahrenholz, Nicole Chow; Haider, Mahri Z

    2015-09-01

    Refugees share a common experience of displacement from their country of origin, migration, and resettlement in an unfamiliar country. More than 17 million people have fled their home countries due to war, generalized violence, and persecution. US primary care physicians must care for their immediate and long-term medical needs. Challenges include (1) language and cultural barriers, (2) high rates of mental health disorders, (3) higher prevalence of latent infections, and (4) different explanatory models for chronic diseases. This article discusses management strategies for common challenges that arise in the primary care of refugees.

  16. Patient education for adults with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemsma, R.P.; Kirwan, J.R.; Taal, E.; Rasker, H.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Patient education shows short-term benefits for adults with rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of patient education interventions on health status (pain, functional disability, psychological well-being and disease activity) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

  17. 25 CFR 20.335 - What is the payment standard for Adult Care Assistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the payment standard for Adult Care Assistance... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.335 What is the payment standard for Adult Care Assistance? The approved payment for adult care assistance...

  18. 25 CFR 20.333 - How do I apply for Adult Care Assistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How do I apply for Adult Care Assistance? 20.333 Section... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.333 How do I apply for Adult Care Assistance? To apply for adult care assistance, you or someone acting on your behalf...

  19. 7 CFR 226.19a - Adult day care center provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adult day care center provisions. 226.19a Section 226..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM Operational Provisions § 226.19a Adult day care center provisions. (a) Adult day care centers may participate in the...

  20. Humidification during mechanical ventilation in the adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ashry, Haitham S; Modrykamien, Ariel M

    2014-01-01

    Humidification of inhaled gases has been standard of care in mechanical ventilation for a long period of time. More than a century ago, a variety of reports described important airway damage by applying dry gases during artificial ventilation. Consequently, respiratory care providers have been utilizing external humidifiers to compensate for the lack of natural humidification mechanisms when the upper airway is bypassed. Particularly, active and passive humidification devices have rapidly evolved. Sophisticated systems composed of reservoirs, wires, heating devices, and other elements have become part of our usual armamentarium in the intensive care unit. Therefore, basic knowledge of the mechanisms of action of each of these devices, as well as their advantages and disadvantages, becomes a necessity for the respiratory care and intensive care practitioner. In this paper, we review current methods of airway humidification during invasive mechanical ventilation of adult patients. We describe a variety of devices and describe the eventual applications according to specific clinical conditions.

  1. Humidification during Mechanical Ventilation in the Adult Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitham S. Al Ashry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Humidification of inhaled gases has been standard of care in mechanical ventilation for a long period of time. More than a century ago, a variety of reports described important airway damage by applying dry gases during artificial ventilation. Consequently, respiratory care providers have been utilizing external humidifiers to compensate for the lack of natural humidification mechanisms when the upper airway is bypassed. Particularly, active and passive humidification devices have rapidly evolved. Sophisticated systems composed of reservoirs, wires, heating devices, and other elements have become part of our usual armamentarium in the intensive care unit. Therefore, basic knowledge of the mechanisms of action of each of these devices, as well as their advantages and disadvantages, becomes a necessity for the respiratory care and intensive care practitioner. In this paper, we review current methods of airway humidification during invasive mechanical ventilation of adult patients. We describe a variety of devices and describe the eventual applications according to specific clinical conditions.

  2. Cognitive Performance Associated With Self-care Activities in Mexican Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Compeán Ortiz, Lidia Guadalupe; Gallegos Cabriales, Esther C; Gonzalez Gonzalez, Jose G; GÓMEZ MEZA, MARCO VINICIO; Therrien, Barbara; Salazar Gonzalez, Bertha C

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of memory-learning on self-care activities in adults with type 2 diabetes moderated by previous education/understanding in diabetes and to explore the explicative capacity of age, gender, schooling, diabetes duration, and glycemic control in memory-learning. METHODS: A descriptive correlational study was conducted in a randomized sample of 105 Mexican adult patients with type 2 diabetes at a community-based outpatient clinic. Eval...

  3. Supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Rahmani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A supportive needs assessment is an essential component of any care program. There is no research evidence regarding the supportive care needs of cancer patients in Iran or other Middle Eastern countries. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in a referral medical center in the northwest of Iran. A total of 274 cancer patients completed the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-59. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: In 18 items of the SCNS, more than 50% of the participants reported that their needs were unmet. Most frequently, unmet needs were related to the health system, information, physical, and daily living domains, and most met needs were related to sexuality, patient care, and support domains. Conclusions: Iranian cancer patients experience many unmet needs and there is an urgent need for establishing additional supportive care services in Iran.

  4. Preventive Care Recommendations for Adults with MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Examination Every 6 months. (Note: Make sure your dentist has a current list of all the medications ... care provider) Self Breast Exam Mammogram Prostate exam (digital rectal exam) PSA (prostate specific antigen) test Clinical ...

  5. Acute nursing care of the older adult with fragility hip fracture: An international perspective (Part 2)

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maher, Ann Butler

    2012-10-23

    The second part of this paper provides those who care for orthopaedic patients with evidence-supported international perspectives about acute nursing care of the older adult with fragility hip fracture. Developed by an international group of nurse experts and guided by a range of information from research and clinical practice, it focuses on nurse sensitive quality indicators during the acute hospitalisation for fragility hip fracture. Optimal care for the patient who has experienced such a fracture is the focus. This includes (in the first, earlier, part):\\r\

  6. QL-04FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH SUICIDAL IDEATION IN CLINICALLY DISTRESSED ADULT GLIOMA PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Pia; Cloughesy, Timothy; Cervantes, Sandra; Pham, Jennifer; Nghiemphu, Phioanh; Lai, Albert; Wellisch, David

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: During patient care, it is critical to identify the glioma patients who are experiencing suicidal ideation among those who present with elevated levels of psychological distress, so appropriate interventions can be implemented. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that differentiated adult glioma patients with possible suicidal ideation from those without suicidal ideation among patients experiencing psychological distress. METHODS: 317 adult patients with WHO Grade I...

  7. Primary care patient and provider preferences for diabetes care managers

    OpenAIRE

    DeJesus, Ramona

    2010-01-01

    Ramona S DeJesus1, Kristin S Vickers2, Robert J Stroebel1, Stephen S Cha31Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, MN, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAPurpose: The collaborative care model, using care managers, has been shown to be effective in achieving sustained treatment outcomes in chronic disease management. Little effort has been made to find out patient preferenc...

  8. Older patients' experiences during care transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustad EC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Else Cathrine Rustad,1–4 Bodil Furnes,1 Berit Seiger Cronfalk,2,5,6 Elin Dysvik1 1Department of Health Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway; 2Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Stord Haugesund University College, Stord, Norway; 3Research Network on Integrated Health Care in Western Norway, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Helse Fonna Local Health Authority, Haugesund, Norway; 5Palliative Research Center, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; 6Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Background: A fragmented health care system leads to an increased demand for continuity of care across health care levels. Research indicates age-related differences during care transition, with the oldest patients having experiences and needs that differ from those of other patients. To meet the older patients’ needs and preferences during care transition, professionals must understand their experiences.Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore how patients ≥80 years of age experienced the care transition from hospital to municipal health care services.Methods: The study has a descriptive, explorative design, using semistructured interviews. Fourteen patients aged ≥80 participated in the study. Qualitative content analysis was used to describe the individuals’ experiences during care transition.Results: Two complementary themes emerged during the analysis: “Participation depends on being invited to plan the care transition” and “Managing continuity of care represents a complex and challenging process”.Discussion: Lack of participation, insufficient information, and vague responsibilities among staff during care transition seemed to limit the continuity of care. The patients are the vulnerable part of the care transition process, although they possess important

  9. The neurologist's role in supporting transition to adult health care: A consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lawrence W; Camfield, Peter; Capers, Melissa; Cascino, Greg; Ciccarelli, Mary; de Gusmao, Claudio M; Downs, Stephen M; Majnemer, Annette; Miller, Amy Brin; SanInocencio, Christina; Schultz, Rebecca; Tilton, Anne; Winokur, Annick; Zupanc, Mary

    2016-08-23

    The child neurologist has a critical role in planning and coordinating the successful transition from the pediatric to adult health care system for youth with neurologic conditions. Leadership in appropriately planning a youth's transition and in care coordination among health care, educational, vocational, and community services providers may assist in preventing gaps in care, delayed entry into the adult care system, and/or health crises for their adolescent patients. Youth whose neurologic conditions result in cognitive or physical disability and their families may need additional support during this transition, given the legal and financial considerations that may be required. Eight common principles that define the child neurologist's role in a successful transition process have been outlined by a multidisciplinary panel convened by the Child Neurology Foundation are introduced and described. The authors of this consensus statement recognize the current paucity of evidence for successful transition models and outline areas for future consideration. PMID:27466477

  10. The experience of transition in adolescents and young adults transferring from paediatric to adult care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fegran, Liv; Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid; Aagaard, Hanne;

    : To synthesize qualitative studies on how adolescents and young adults with chronic diseases experience transition from paediatric to adult care. Methods: Literature search in major databases covering the years from 1999 to November 2010 was performed. Further forward citation snowballing search was conducted...... responsibility. Conclusion: Young adults’ transition experiences seem to be commensurable across diagnoses and cultures. Feelings of not belonging and being redundant during the transfer process moving from paediatric to adult ward, is striking. Appreciating young adults’ need to be acknowledged and valued......Introduction: Despite research and implementation of transition models in the last decades, transfer from paediatric to adult care still poses great challenges. Predominantly studies on health care transition have been based on the perspective of experts or health care professionals. Aim...

  11. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B and C virus in two institutions caring for mentally handicapped adults.

    OpenAIRE

    Cramp, M.E.; Grundy, H C; Perinpanayagam, R M; Barnado, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection is common in institutions caring for the mentally handicapped. Hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus share routes of transmission but the prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in this population is unknown. We have tested 101 patients from two institutions in South-East England caring for adults with mental handicap for the presence of hepatitis C antibody, hepatitis B core antibody, and if necessary hepatitis B surface antigen. None tested positive for hepat...

  12. Patient Preferences for Information on Post-Acute Care Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefcik, Justine S; Nock, Rebecca H; Flores, Emilia J; Chase, Jo-Ana D; Bradway, Christine; Potashnik, Sheryl; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore what hospitalized patients would like to know about post-acute care (PAC) services to ultimately help them make an informed decision when offered PAC options. Thirty hospitalized adults 55 and older in a Northeastern U.S. academic medical center participated in a qualitative descriptive study with conventional content analysis as the analytical technique. Three themes emerged: (a) receiving practical information about the services, (b) understanding "how it relates to me," and (c) having opportunities to understand PAC options. Study findings inform clinicians what information should be included when discussing PAC options with older adults. Improving the quality of discharge planning discussions may better inform patient decision making and, as a result, increase the numbers of patients who accept a plan of care that supports recovery, meets their needs, and results in improved quality of life and fewer readmissions. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2016; 9(4):175-182.]. PMID:26815304

  13. Advances in the Care of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Viviane G; Kussman, Barry D

    2015-09-01

    The significant decline in mortality among children and adolescents with congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with an increasing prevalence of CHD in adults, particularly those with moderate to severe defects. As a significant percentage of adolescents and young adults are lost to follow-up in the transition from pediatric to adult care, they may present for elective procedures with substantial CHD-associated morbidity. In addition to the specific cardiac defect, the procedures performed, and the current pathophysiological status, several factors should be considered when managing the adult with CHD. These include the type of setting (adult vs pediatric institution); surgeon (pediatric vs adult cardiac surgeon); coexisting diseases associated with CHD, such as coronary artery disease, hepatic dysfunction, renal dysfunction, cerebrovascular accidents, myopathy, and coagulation disorders; acquired diseases of aging; pregnancy; and psychosocial functioning. The current status of the management of common and important congenital cardiac defects is also described. PMID:25542866

  14. Incentivizing health care behaviors in emerging adults: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu CH

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Catherine H Yu,1,2 Giuliana Guarna,1 Pamela Tsao,3 Jude R Jesuthasan,1 Adrian NC Lau,3,4 Ferhan S Siddiqi,1 Julie Anne Gilmour,3 Danyal Ladha,1 Henry Halapy,5 Andrew Advani1–3 1Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael’s Hospital, 2Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, St Michael’s Hospital, University of Toronto, 3Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 4Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, University Health Network, 5Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Purpose: For emerging adults with chronic medical diseases, the transition from pediatric to adult health care is often a time of great upheaval, commonly associated with unhealthy self-management choices, loss to follow-up, and adverse outcomes. We conducted a systematic review to examine the use of incentive strategies to promote positive health-related behaviors in young adults with chronic medical diseases.Methods: The Medline, CINAHL, Embase, PsycInfo, and Cochrane databases were searched through June 2014. Studies of any design where an incentive was used to achieve a target behavior or outcome in a pediatric or emerging adult population (age <30 years with chronic medical conditions including addictions, were included.Results: A total of 26 studies comprising 10,880 patients met our inclusion criteria after screening 10,305 abstracts and 301 full-text articles. Of these studies, 20 examined the effects of behavioral incentives on cigarette smoking or substance abuse, including alcohol; four studies explored behavioral incentives in the setting of HIV or sexual health; and two articles studied individuals with other chronic medical conditions. Seventeen articles reported a statistically significant benefit of the behavioral incentive on one or more outcomes, although only half reported follow-up after the incentive period was terminated.Conclusion: While the majority of

  15. Using function-focused care to increase physical activity among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Barbara; Galik, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Despite the known benefits of physical activity for older adults, adherence to regular physical activity recommendations is poor. Less than half of adults in this country meet physical activity recommendations with reasons for lack of adherence including such things as access, motivation, pain, fear, comorbidities, among others. To overcome these challenges, function-focused care was developed. Function-focused care is a philosophy of care that focuses on evaluating the older adult's underlying capability with regard to function and physical activity and helping him or her optimize and maintain physical function and ability and continually increase time spent in physical activity. Examples of function-focused care include such things as using verbal cues during bathing, so the older individual performs the tasks rather than the caregiver bathing the individual; walking a resident or patient to the bathroom rather than using a urinal, or taking a resident to an exercise class. There are now over 20 studies supporting the benefits of function-focused care approaches across all settings and different types of patient groups (i.e, those with mild versus moderate-to-severe cognitive impairment). The approaches for implementation of function-focused care have also been well supported and have moved beyond establishing effectiveness to considering dissemination and implementation of this approach into real world clinical settings. The process of dissemination and implementation has likewise been articulated and supported, and ongoing work needs to continue in this venue across all care settings. PMID:24894140

  16. Activating Older Adults With Serious Mental Illness for Collaborative Primary Care Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Stephen J.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Rolin, Stephanie A.; Hendrick, Delia Cimpean; Naslund, John A.; Faber, Marjan J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Persons with serious mental illness frequently receive inadequate medical care and are more likely to experience difficulty navigating the health care system compared with the general population. To address this gap in quality, we developed a program of peer co-led collaborative activation training for primary care (CAT-PC) designed to improve “patient activation” and person-centered care in primary care visits for middle-aged and older adults with serious mental illness and cardiovascular risk. This report presents pilot study feasibility and participant outcomes for CAT-PC. Method A pre-post pilot evaluation of CAT-PC included N = 17 adults (age ≥ 50) with serious mental illness and cardiovascular health risk conditions, and N = 6 primary care providers. CAT-PC consists of 9 weekly peer co-led patient education and skills training sessions and a 45-min video-based training for primary care providers. Pre-post measures included the Patient Activation Measure (PAM), Perceived Efficacy in Patient-Physician Interactions (PEPPI), Autonomy Preference Index (API) for preferred role in primary care encounters, and Social Skills Performance Assessment (SSPA) role-play test for medical visits. Results All 17 participants attended 5 or more sessions. Post-intervention improvement was found for patient activation and simulated performance of medical visit communication skills. Trends were observed for improved self-efficacy in provider interactions and greater preference for a more collaborative role in decision-making. Conclusions and Implications CAT-PC is a brief, peer co-led education and skills training intervention potentially improving patient activation in primary care encounters and providing an important missing component in emerging models of “patient-centered behavioral health homes” for this high-risk group. PMID:24219769

  17. Psychiatric Nursing Care for Adult Survivors of Child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zalm, Yvonne van der; Nugteren, Willem; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra van der; Venne, Cokky van der; Kool, Nienke; Meijel, Berno van

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine what is known from the literature about nursing care of psychiatric patients with a history of child maltreatment. CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric nurses underline the importance of a routine inquiry of child abuse on admission of patients to psychiatric care, but are reluctant to as

  18. 优质护理服务在腹腔镜成人腹股沟疝修补术中的临床应用%Clinical application of high quality nursing care service in laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy for adult patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁宇红; 张和平

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the application method and effect of high quality nursing service in laparoscopic herniorrhaphy for adults.Methods 80 cases were randomly divided into two groups for preoperative period of observation and care,the control group (40 cases) was given the traditional nursing measures,the experiment group (40 cases) used high quality nursing care interventions,including detailed preoperative period health education,fine life care,restriction of venous transfusion volume,encouraging early feeding,early activity,and regular postoperation return visit.Results Compared with the control group,the high quality nursing service group had advancing the first anal exhaust time,shortened the wound pain time,reduced complications,and decreased the total length of hospital stay and the total hospital cost.Conclusion High quality of nursing measures applied in laparoscopic hernia repair in the adults can make discomfort and complications reduced,mental state of patients improved significantly,and the recovery of patients accelerated,patients' satisfaction degree also improved,it can obviously further promote the application of laparoscope in adult hernia operation.%目的 探讨优质护理在腹腔镜成人疝修补术中的应用方法与效果.方法 80例患者按开展优质护理前后随机分成两组进行围手术期的观察与护理,对照组(40例)采取传统护理措施,实验组(优质护理组40例)采取优质护理措施,包括详尽的围手术期健康宣教、细微的生活护理、限制静脉输液量、鼓励早期进食、早期活动,定期术后回访.结果 实验组与对照组患者相比,患者首次肛门排气时间提前,伤口疼痛感时间缩短,并发症减少,总住院天数与总住院费用减少.两组比较差异有显著性(P<0.05).结论 优质护理措施应用于腹腔镜成人疝修补术中,不适感及并发症减少,明显改善患者的心理状态,加速患者康复,提高病人满意度,进一步推

  19. Care of oral cavity in irradiated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procedures are reviewed of therapeutic and preventive care in patients with malignant tumours in the area of the head and neck during radiotherapy and during the subsequent follow-up of patients. As compared with previous views, the care is now more conservative, indications for tooth extractions are now limited, careful oral hygiene is emphasized and, in particular, the long-term use of fluorine gel is recommended. Surgery is only recommended where conservative treatment fails. (author)

  20. Psychosocial care to patients with Malignant Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Charlotte Brun

    Psychosocial care to patients with Malignant Melanoma Intensions: The intension of this project is to link new knowledge with the nurses experience based knowledge within the psychosocial care to patients, who have been diagnosed with Malignant Melanoma (MM), thereby improving the care...... to elaborate the care to these patients. Method: In 2007 the nurses from our ward gained experience from the psychosocial care to these patients. These experiences are a starting point to the study of literature the group has made. A group of five nurses have from this literature study, substantiated...... the psychosocial perspective. Results: After the literature review, the psychosocial aspects have been divided into five main areas: 1. Diagnosis, hospitalisation, and treatment 2. The body with cancer 3. Psychological 4. Social 5. Existential/spiritual Primary results show that patients with MM in general respond...

  1. Urine sampling techniques in symptomatic primary-care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anne; Aabenhus, Rune

    2016-01-01

    in primary care. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of urine culture from different sampling-techniques in symptomatic non-pregnant women in primary care. Methods: A systematic review was conducted by searching Medline and Embase for clinical studies conducted in primary care using...... a randomized or paired design to compare the result of urine culture obtained with two or more collection techniques in adult, female, non-pregnant patients with symptoms of urinary tract infection. We evaluated quality of the studies and compared accuracy based on dichotomized outcomes. Results: We included...... seven studies investigating urine sampling technique in 1062 symptomatic patients in primary care. Mid-stream-clean-catch had a positive predictive value of 0.79 to 0.95 and a negative predictive value close to 1 compared to sterile techniques. Two randomized controlled trials found no difference...

  2. Telemedicine: an enhanced emergency care program for older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi PY

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Paul Y Takahashi,1 Anupam Chandra,1 Frederick North,1 Jennifer L Pecina,2 Benjavan Upatising,3 Gregory J Hanson11Mayo Clinic Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, 2Mayo Clinic Department of Family Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA; 3Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USAAbstract: Recent changes and consolidations in health care systems have resulted in an increase in new health care delivery models. Telemedicine holds great promise as one of these models. There is a great potential for new patient evaluation and treatment models in emergency care (EC, especially when patients are miles away from a medical team. Evaluations can be performed in a patient's home, a nursing care facility, and in hospitals that focus on advanced subspecialty care. Due to rapid developments in this area, current care models are constantly being evaluated and modified. This review article outlines current telemedicine models for EC and summarizes their potential benefits to patients and the health care system. The review examines the role that the telephone, a fundamental tool of telemedicine, plays in these new models. The review also examines evidence of improved health care outcomes by highlighting the role of telemedicine in reducing hospitalizations. The patient is the primary focus; as a result, this review also examined patient experiences and satisfaction levels regarding telemedicine health care teams. The authors support these technological advances and their potential for information transfer. Health care providers need to continue developing these models by making use of increasing amounts of information. One of the main implementation barriers of these new models in the US and other countries is the issue of payment and reimbursement. Despite this, advancements in EC telemedicine continue.Keywords: telemedicine, emergency care, geriatric, patient evaluation models

  3. Cardiac arrhythmias in adult patients with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnier, Miriam J; Rutten, Frans H; Kors, Jan A;

    2012-01-01

    and electrocardiographic characteristics of arrhythmogenicity (ECG) and to explore the role of β2-mimetics. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 158 adult patients with a diagnosis of asthma and 6303 participants without asthma from the cohort of the Utrecht Health Project-an ongoing, longitudinal, primary...... more common (OR: 12.4 [95% CI: 4.7-32.8] and 3.7 [95% CI: 1.3-10.5], respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The adult patients with asthma more commonly show tachycardia and PVCs on the ECG than those without asthma. The patients with asthma received β2-mimetics; the risk of tachycardia and PVCs is even more...

  4. Motivational interviewing for older adults in primary care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purath, Janet; Keck, Annmarie; Fitzgerald, Cynthia E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic disease is now the leading cause of death and disability in United States. Many chronic illnesses experienced by older adults can be prevented or managed through behavior change, making patient counseling an essential component of disease prevention and management. Motivational Interviewing (MI), a type of conversational method, has been effective in eliciting health behavior changes in people in a variety of settings and may also be a useful tool to help older adults change. This review of the literature analyzes current research and describes potential biases of MI interventions that have been conducted in primary care settings with older adults. MI shows promise as a technique to elicit health behavior change among older adults. However, further study with this population is needed to evaluate efficacy of MI interventions in primary care settings.

  5. Transfer to Adult Care--Experiences of Young Adults with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asp, Ann; Bratt, Ewa-Lena; Bramhagen, Ann-Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    More than 90% of children born with congenital heart disease survive into adulthood due to successes of cardiac surgery and medical management. Interviews with 16 young adults with congenital heart disease to explore their experiences of transfer from pediatric to adult care were performed. The analysis identified five themes; Feeling secure during the transfer process, Experiencing trust in the care, Expecting to be involved, Assuming responsibility for one's health is a process and Lack of knowledge leads to uncertainty. In conclusion; a structured and gradual transfer process was necessary to enable the informants to shoulder the responsibility for self-care.

  6. Psychiatric Nursing Care for Adult Survivors of Child

    OpenAIRE

    Zalm, Yvonne van der; Nugteren, Willem; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra van der; Venne, Cokky van der; Kool, Nienke; van Meijel, Berno

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine what is known from the literature about nursing care of psychiatric patients with a history of child maltreatment. CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric nurses underline the importance of a routine inquiry of child abuse on admission of patients to psychiatric care, but are reluctant to ask about child abuse. They often feel insufficiently competent to respond effectively to patients with a history of child maltreatment. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Psychiatric nurses need training in how ...

  7. Self-care in heart failure patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Paula da Conceição; Mariana Alvina dos Santos; Bernardo dos Santos; Diná de Almeida Lopes Monteiro da Cruz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to describe self-care behavior and its associated factors in a sample of heart failure Brazilian patients. Method: descriptive cross-sectional study with non-probabilistic sample of 116 ambulatory patients undergoing heart failure treatment. Self-care was evaluated using the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index, (scores ≥70 points=appropriate self-care). Association tests were applied, considering a descriptive level of 0.05. Results: the mean age of participants was 57.7 (SD ...

  8. Providing Palliative Care to LGBTQ Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Nina; Wholihan, Dorothy

    2016-09-01

    Nurses should be familiar with and equipped to address the challenges that arise when caring for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer-identified (LGBTQ) patients. LGBTQ individuals have increased rates of certain physical diseases and are at greater risk of suffering from stress-sensitive mental health issues. Negative social attitudes, widespread discrimination and stigma, physical and psychological victimization, and less social support with aging contribute to the complexity of care for these individuals. Open communication, welcoming and accepting attitudes and environments, and sensitivity to unique multidimensional issues improve care to LGBTQ patients with serious advanced illness. Nursing can reach this vulnerable minority and positively impact the quality of care. PMID:27497022

  9. Experiences of critical care nurses caring for unresponsive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, N E

    1999-08-01

    Grounded theory methodology was utilized to explore the experiences of critical care nurses caring for patients who were unable to respond due to a traumatic brain injury or receiving neuromuscular blocking agents. The registered nurses participating in the study worked in a neuroscience intensive care unit. Saturation of the categories was achieved with 16 interviews. The core category that emerged from the study is Giving the Patient a Chance. The subcategories of Learning about My Patient, Maintaining and Monitoring, Talking to My Patient, Working with Families, Struggling with Dilemmas and Personalizing the Experience all centered upon the focus of doing everything to help the patient attain the best possible outcome. Factors influencing each of the subcategories were identified such as the acuity of the patient, experience level of the nurse and the presence or absence of family members or significant others. These factors accounted for the variations in the nurses' experience. Several reasons accounting for the variations were determined. The study identified areas that need to be addressed in both general nursing education and nursing practice, such as instruction on talking to comatose patients, working with families and orientation information for nurses new to caring for these populations. Recommendations for improvement in these areas, as well as for future studies are discussed. PMID:10553569

  10. Implementing the chronic care model for frail older adults in the Netherlands: study protocol of ACT (frail older adults: care in transition)

    OpenAIRE

    Muntinga Maaike E; Hoogendijk Emiel O; van Leeuwen Karen M; van Hout Hein PJ; Twisk Jos WR; van der Horst Henriette E; Nijpels Giel; Jansen Aaltje PD

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Care for older adults is facing a number of challenges: health problems are not consistently identified at a timely stage, older adults report a lack of autonomy in their care process, and care systems are often confronted with the need for better coordination between health care professionals. We aim to address these challenges by introducing the geriatric care model, based on the chronic care model, and to evaluate its effects on the quality of life of community-dwelling...

  11. Advance care planning: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials conducted with older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, Elizabeth; O'Caoimh, Rónán; Cornally, Nicola; Fitzgerald, Carol; Kearns, Tara; Coffey, Alice; Daly, Edel; O'Sullivan, Ronan; McGlade, Ciara; Molloy, D William

    2016-09-01

    Advance care planning (ACP), involving discussions between patients, families and healthcare professionals on future healthcare decisions, in advance of anticipated impairment in decision-making capacity, improves satisfaction and end-of-life care while respecting patient autonomy. It usually results in the creation of a written advanced care directive (ACD). This systematic review examines the impact of ACP on several outcomes (including symptom management, quality of care and healthcare utilisation) in older adults (>65years) across all healthcare settings. Nine randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were identified by searches of the CINAHL, PubMed and Cochrane databases. A total of 3646 older adults were included (range 72-88 years). Seven studies were conducted with community dwellers and the other two RCTs were conducted in nursing homes. Most studies did not implement a standardised ACD, or measure the impact on quality of end-of-life care or on the death and dying experience. All studies had some risk of bias, with most scoring poorly on the Oxford Quality Scale. While ACP interventions are well received by older adults and generally have positive effects on outcomes, this review highlights the need for well-designed RCTs that examine the economic impact of ACP and its effect on quality of care in nursing homes and other sectors. PMID:27451328

  12. Drug incompatibilities in the adult intensive care unit of a university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Marsilio, Naiane Roveda; da Silva, Daiandy; Bueno, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to identify the physical and chemical incompatibilities among the drugs administered intravenously to patients admitted to an adult intensive care unit. We also aimed to establish pharmaceutical guidelines for administering incompatible drugs. Methods This cross-sectional, prospective, and quantitative study was conducted from July to September 2015. Drug incompatibilities were identified based on an analysis of the patient prescriptions available in the hospital ...

  13. Alzheimer's disease care management plan: maximizing patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treinkman, Anna

    2005-03-01

    Nurse practitioners have the potential to significantly impact the care of patients with dementia. Healthcare providers can now offer patients medications that will control symptoms and prolong functioning. As a result of ongoing contact with patients, NPs play an important role in assessing and screening patients for AD and educating the patients, families, and caregivers about the disease. Alzheimer's disease is a chronic, progressive illness that requires long-term management. Nurse practitioners should be familiar with available medications and appreciate the need to individualize therapy to maximize efficacy and minimize potential adverse drug reactions.

  14. Adult Basic Education. Child Care, Transportation, Support Services Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Deborah; Morris, Jamie, Ed.

    This workbook focuses on two primary needs of adult basic education (ABE) students--child care and transportation--and provides ideas to assist program administrators (especially in Texas) to develop appropriate, workable, community-based strategies to meet these needs. The book contains five chapters. Each chapter addresses a particular aspect of…

  15. Management of Patients with Subclinical Hypothyroidism in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, E; Russell, A; Kearney, P M

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is defined as a raised serum thyroid stimulating hormone level with normal thyroxine. Despite a prevalence of up to 9% of the adult population there is widespread uncertainty on how to manage it. The aim of this study was to assess how older adults with SCH are managed in primary care. A retrospective case-note review was carried out on patients attending Mallow Primary Healthcare Centre. This study identified patients 65 years and over meeting the criteria for SCH in one year. The prevalence of SCH in this study was calculated as 2.9%. 22.2% of patients were treated with thyroxine. 6.1% of untreated patients progressed to clinical hypothyroidism within the study period while 18.2% spontaneously reverted to normal TSH levels.

  16. 重症加强治疗病房成人患者浅镇静治疗进展%The progress of light sedation for critically ill adult patients in intensive care unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李双玲; 王东信; 杨拔贤

    2016-01-01

    The latest advance of sedation for critically ill adult patients in intensive care unit (ICU) was reviewed in order to provide certain clinical information for the ICU physicians about sedation. Guidelines, clinical research, Meta-analysis, and reviews in recent years were collected using electronic data base. Discussions included: ① the definition of light sedation, and its effects on clinical outcome, stress, sleep and delirium; ② light sedation strategies included: the target population, the target sedation strategy and daily sedation interruption, clinical assessment and monitoring of sedation, selection of sedative drugs, light sedation extenuation; ③ light sedation strategies and pain, agitation, delirium control bundles; ④ the problems and prospects of light sedation. Light sedation is the main principle of currently ICU sedation strategy in critically ill adult patients. Goal-directed light sedation should be considered as a routine therapy in most clinical situation, and its goal should be achieved as early as possible in the early stage of sedation. Routine use of benzodiazepines should be avoided, especially in patients with or at a risk of delirium. Prevention and treatment of agitation with a combination of non-pharmacologic or pharmacologic methods; ICU specification rules for pain, agitation and delirium prevention and treatment should be made. Light sedation is the main ICU sedation strategy in adult patients now, but must be individualized for each patient.%对重症加强治疗病房(ICU)成人患者镇静方面的最新进展进行综述,强调浅镇静策略是目前ICU危重患者镇静的主要治疗原则,其主要内容包括:①目标导向的浅镇静应常规化,尽可能在镇静早期即达标;②应摒弃常规使用苯二氮类药物,尤其对有谵妄风险或已经有谵妄的患者;③联合药物或非药物的有效方法预防和治疗躁动;④制定纳入疼痛、躁动和谵

  17. Care in the perception of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Henriques

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Being a cancer patient is a unique and singular. The cancer disease associated with pain and suffering is a challenging process for the sufferer, for whom have around or for those caring for the sick. Pain, considered the 5 th vital sign, is often identified as the main complaint of our patients suffering from cancer. We dare to say that to explore the essence of the care provided by nurses and primary health care to cancer patients with prolonged pain at the time found in his home and family, we would be helping to build a know -how by itself, with positive externalities for patients, families, professionals and nursing itself. Methods: Ask "What does Care for Nurses and primary health care for cancer patients with prolonged pain in time for your family?" we may lead the cornerstone of our problems, by studying quantitative nature using a questionnaire and a significance level of care. Results: the average age is 59.27 years, mostly women, 51% are married and in 29.8% of studies has only completed the first cycle of education. The majority of cancer patients who participated in this study share a room with a relative. In regard to aspects of their pain, cancer patients referred to 47.1% of cases, that their pain started weeks ago and 38.5% even refers to the pain persists for months. The pain felt by these patients is not the severe type, in 68.3% of cases, and has an average intensity of 5, although we have 25% of these patients with pain greater than a 6.75. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of nurses who provide care at primary health reveals an alpha of 0.8857 and 0.9025 standardized alpha. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of cancer patients with prolonged pain at the time they are at home shows an alpha of 0.6672and 0.7374 standardized alpha. The Meaning of Caring scale applied to the group of cancer family patients with prolonged pain shows an alpha of 0.6712 and an alpha standardized 0

  18. Importance of patient centred care for various patient groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademakers, J.J.D.J.M.; Delnoij, D.M.J.; Boer, D. de

    2010-01-01

    Background: Though patient centred care is a somewhat ‘fuzzy’ concept, in general it is considered as something to strive for. However, preliminary evidence suggests that the importance of elements of patient-centred care (PCC), such as communication, information and shared decision making, may vary

  19. [Nursing diagnosis in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Luccas Melo; Gorini, Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho

    2006-09-01

    This case study aimed at identifying Nursing Diagnosis (ND) in adult patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, with the purpose of contributing to the Systematization of Nurse Care. Interviews and observation were used for data collection, in addition to Nursing Process application. During the three months of data collection, other NDs were obtained by searching the files of the 6 patients. The 32 ND found in this study were grouped according to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Out of these 32 ND, 15 corresponded to changes in Physiological Needs, and 10 to changes in Protection and Safety Needs.

  20. Patient involvement in Danish health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrangbaek, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    for analysis of patient involvement in health care. This framework is used to analyze key governance features of patient involvement in Denmark based on previous research papers and reports describing patient involvement in Danish health care. FINDINGS: Patient involvement is important in Denmark...... be identified when pursuing the strategies at the same time. RESEARCH LIMITATIONS/IMPLICATIONS: Because of the chosen research approach, the research results may lack generalizability. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed framework further. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: The paper includes...... implications for the development of patient involvement in health care. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: This paper fulfills a need to study different types of patient involvement and to develop a theoretical framework for characterizing and analyzing such involvement strategies....

  1. Effective Perioperative Communication to Enhance Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, J Hudson

    2016-08-01

    Breakdowns in health care communication are a significant cause of sentinel events and associated patient morbidity and mortality. Effective communication is a necessary component of a patient safety program, which enables all members of the interdisciplinary health care team to effectively manage their individual roles and responsibilities in the perioperative setting; set expectations for safe, high-reliability care; and measure and assess outcomes. To sustain a culture of safety, effective communication should be standardized, complete, clear, brief, and timely. Executive leadership and support helps remove institutional barriers and address challenges to support the engagement of patients in health care communication, which has been shown to improve outcomes, reduce costs, and improve the patient experience. PMID:27472971

  2. Partial Knee with Personalized Patient Care

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Oxford® Partial Knee with Signature™ Personalized Patient Care You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy and ...

  3. Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... view charts and maps. State Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care by ... U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 200 Independence Avenue, S.W. — Washington, D.C. 20201

  4. Caring for independent lives: geographies of caring for young adults with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Andrew

    2008-09-01

    This paper engages with the emerging disciplinary clash between 'care' and 'independence' within disability studies by examining the geography of home care for young adults with intellectual disabilities. The care system as a whole is viewed as central to disablist structures within disability studies (see Thomas, C. (2007). Sociologies of disability and illness: Contested ideas in disability studies and medical sociology. Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan.). However, despite the theorisation of dependency as being in antipathy to the goals of the disability movement, caregiving at home still continues to dominate community care. The paper attempts to address how family carers are 'caught-in-the-middle' between their 'duty' to care and at the same time, perpetuating dependency; the reality being that parents have to deal with issues of being overprotective and confronting various social assumptions about disability. It examines the narratives from 25 family caregivers in Ireland who provide personal assistance to young adults with intellectual disabilities. PMID:18573581

  5. Routine radiography does not have a role in the diagnostic evaluation of ambulatory adult febrile neutropenic cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, CSMO; Gietema, JA; Vellenga, E; Daenen, SMGJ; De Bont, ESJM; Kamps, WA; Groen, HJM; van der Jagt, EJ; van der Graaf, WTA

    2003-01-01

    Cancer patients treated with chemotherapy are susceptible to bacterial infections. When an adult patient presents with febrile neutropenia. standard diagnostic care includes physical examination, laboratory diagnostics, chest X-ray (CXR) and sinus radiography. However, the yield of routine radiograp

  6. Provision of Transition Education and Referral Patterns from Pediatric Cardiology to Adult Cardiac Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbison, Anna L; Grady, Stafford; Chi, Kevin; Fernandes, Susan M

    2016-02-01

    ACC/AHA guidelines recommend a structured preparation for and transfer to adult-oriented cardiac care for adult survivors of pediatric onset heart disease (POHD). Given this, we sought to describe the transition and transfer practices for a cohort of young adults with POHD and to determine factors associated with successful transfer to adult-oriented cardiac care. We performed a single-center, retrospective chart review on patients ≥18 years of age, with POHD likely to require lifelong cardiac care, who were seen in outpatient pediatric cardiology (PC) between 2008 and 2011. Successful transfer was defined as the subsequent attendance at adult cardiology (AC) within 2 years of PC visit. We identified 118 patients who met study criteria. Mean age 22.4 ± 2.0 years, 59 % male, 64 % white and 40 % Hispanic. Mean transition education topics noted was 3.3 ± 1.8 out of 20 and covered the underlying cardiac disease (89 %), follow-up and current medications (56 %) and exercise limitations (34 %). Recommendations for follow-up were AC (57 %) and PC (33 %). Of those told to transfer to AC, 79 % successfully transferred. Characteristics of successful transfer included: prior cardiac surgery (p = 0.008), cardiac medication use (p = 0.006) and frequency of follow-up ≤1 year (p = 0.037). One-quarter of all subjects did not follow-up within at least 2 years. Despite published guidelines, transition education appears lacking and the approach to transfer to adult cardiac care is not consistent. Given the increased risk of morbidity and mortality in this patient population, standardization of transition education and transfer processes appear warranted. PMID:26385471

  7. Dental care of patients with dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Nordenram, Gunilla

    1997-01-01

    Dental care of patients with dementia. Clinical and ethical considerations Gunilla Nordenram Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Family Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine Huddinge Hospital and School of Dentistry, Division of Geriatric Dentistry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, ISBN 91-628-2416-3 To establish guidelines for fair and proper oral care for patients with dementia, the following aims were specified: To develop an appropriate method for ana...

  8. Cancer patients, emergencies service and provision of palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Miranda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Objective: To describe the clinical and sociodemographic profile of cancer patients admitted to the Emergency Center for High Complexity Oncologic Assistance, observing the coverage of palliative and home care. Method: Cross sectional study including adult cancer patients admitted to the emergency service (September-December/2011 with a minimum length of hospital stay of two hours. Student’s t-test and Pearson chi-square test were used to compare the means. Results: 191 patients were enrolled, 47.6% elderly, 64.4% women, 75.4% from the city of Recife and greater area. The symptom prevalent at admission was pain (46.6%. 4.2% of patients were linked to palliative care and 2.1% to home care. The most prevalent cancers: cervix (18.3%, breast (13.6% and prostate (10.5%; 70.7% were in advanced stages (IV, 47.1%; 39.4% without any cancer therapy. Conclusion: Patients sought the emergency service on account of pain, probably due to the incipient coverage of palliative and home care. These actions should be included to oncologic therapy as soon as possible to minimize the suffering of the patient/family and integrate the skills of oncologists and emergency professionals.

  9. Family Violence Among Older Adult Patients Consulting in Primary Care Clinics: Results From the ESA (Enquête sur la santé des aînés) Services Study on Mental Health and Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Préville, Michel; Mechakra-Tahiri, Samia Djemaa; Vasiliadis, Helen-Maria; Mathieu, Véronique; Quesnel, Louise; Gontijo-Guerra, Samantha; Lamoureux-Lamarche, Catherine; Berbiche, Djamal

    2014-01-01

    Objective To document the reliability and construct validity of the Family Violence Scale (FVS) in the older adult population aged 65 years and older. Method: Data came from a cross-sectional survey, the Enquête sur la santé des aînés et l’utilisation des services de santé (ESA Services Study), conducted in 2011–2013 using a probabilistic sample of older adults waiting for medical services in primary care clinics (n = 1765). Family violence was defined as a latent variable, coming from a spou...

  10. Erectile dysfunction among diabetic patients in Saudi Arabia: A hospital-based primary care study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef A Al-Turki

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions: Complete (severe and partial erectile dysfunction was quite common among adult diabetic patients in a hospital-based primary care setting in Saudi Arabia. It is important for primary care physicians to diagnose erectile dysfunction in diabetic patients, and to counsel them early, as most patients are hesitant to discuss their concern during a consultation. Further studies are recommended to evaluate the effect of other risk factors on erectile dysfunction in diabetic patients.

  11. Patient satisfaction with nursing care at a university hospital in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, O

    2001-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important measure of service quality (SQ) in health care organizations. Patients' satisfaction and their expectations of care are valid indicators of quality nursing care. This article reports the results of a survey patient satisfaction with nursing care, administered by interview to 422 adults discharged from a university hospital in Turkey. The direct measurement of patient satisfaction with nursing care is a new phenomenon for this university hospital, and this was the first time that such an evaluation had been done in this particular hospital. In this study, SERVQUAL scale was used for determining patient satisfaction with nursing care. Weighted scores in dimensions of SERVQUAL were generally low, and there were statistically significant differences in means paired t-tests (p SERVQUAL (p assurance, and empathy indicate areas needing improvement. In this hospital, results of this study support the need for nurses to take steps to improve patient satisfaction with nursing care. PMID:11668854

  12. Patient satisfaction with nursing care at a university hospital in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, O

    2001-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important measure of service quality (SQ) in health care organizations. Patients' satisfaction and their expectations of care are valid indicators of quality nursing care. This article reports the results of a survey patient satisfaction with nursing care, administered by interview to 422 adults discharged from a university hospital in Turkey. The direct measurement of patient satisfaction with nursing care is a new phenomenon for this university hospital, and this was the first time that such an evaluation had been done in this particular hospital. In this study, SERVQUAL scale was used for determining patient satisfaction with nursing care. Weighted scores in dimensions of SERVQUAL were generally low, and there were statistically significant differences in means paired t-tests (p SERVQUAL (p reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and empathy indicate areas needing improvement. In this hospital, results of this study support the need for nurses to take steps to improve patient satisfaction with nursing care.

  13. Identifying the Unique Aspects of Adolescent and Young Adult Palliative Care: A Case Study to Propel Programmatic Changes in Pediatric Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Lisa; Dell, Mary Lynn

    2015-09-01

    Using a case study, in this article we seek to highlight how the distinct developmental needs of adolescent and young adult patients facing a life-threatening condition require a different approach to patient care by pediatric health care workers. The case underscores pitfalls in using a pediatric construct of care in areas of pain management, social stressors, and advanced care planning, and suggests programs to implement for improvement, including partnership with psychiatry, substance abuse, and palliative care specialists.

  14. Intensive care patient diaries in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Storli, Sissel Lisa; Åkerman, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness and intensive care therapy are often followed by psychological problems such as nightmares, hallucinations, delusions, anxiety, depression, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress. Intensive care patient diaries have been kept by nurses and the patients' family since the early 1990s...... from a pragmatic practice to an evidence-based domain of inquiry propelled by academically prepared nurses. Several schools of thought were identified in our study: diaries as (i) a therapeutic instrument, (ii) an act of caring, (iii) an expression of empathy, and (iv) a hybrid of the above. Diaries...

  15. Developing Navigation Competencies to Care for Older Rural Adults with Advanced Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggleby, Wendy; Robinson, Carole A; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Pesut, Barbara; Nekolaichuk, Cheryl; MacLeod, Roderick; Keating, Norah C; Santos Salas, Anna; Hallstrom, Lars K; Fraser, Kimberly D; Williams, Allison; Struthers-Montford, Kelly; Swindle, Jennifer

    2016-06-01

    Navigators help rural older adults with advanced illness and their families connect to needed resources, information, and people to improve their quality of life. This article describes the process used to engage experts - in rural aging, rural palliative care, and navigation - as well as rural community stakeholders to develop a conceptual definition of navigation and delineate navigation competencies for the care of this population. A discussion paper on the important considerations for navigation in this population was developed followed by a four-phased Delphi process with 30 expert panel members. Study results culminated in five general navigation competencies for health care providers caring for older rural persons and their families at end of life: provide patient/family screening; advocate for the patient/family; facilitate community connections; coordinate access to services and resources; and promote active engagement. Specific competencies were also developed. These competencies provide the foundation for research and curriculum development in navigation. PMID:27093177

  16. [Teaching patient-centered holistic care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wung, Hwang-Ling; Chen, Huei-Ling; Hwu, Yueh-Juen

    2007-06-01

    Nursing education aims to help students understand concepts and gain competencies in holistic care. The purpose of this paper was to present a nursing curriculum that adapted and introduced holistic care into an adult nursing curriculum taught at a university of science and technology. The course framework included both holistic and nursing domains. The holistic aspect addressed client physical psychological-spiritual needs and related factors, health related factors, and the status of Maslow's hierarchy of needs and related factors. The nursing aspect addressed the way in which nursing was applied to identify client problems and provide individualized, integrated and continuous care in hospital, family or community based settings employing primary, secondary, or tertiary prevention. Scenario with problem based learning and concept mapping were used in class to guide students to consider in depth the concepts that underpin holistic care.

  17. Suicide risk in primary care: identification and management in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raue, Patrick J; Ghesquiere, Angela R; Bruce, Martha L

    2014-09-01

    The National Strategy for Suicide Prevention (2012) has set a goal to reduce suicides by 20% within 5 years. Suicide rates are higher in older adults compared to most other age groups, and the majority of suicide completers have visited their primary care physician in the year before suicide. Primary care is an ideal setting to identify suicide risk and initiate mental health care. We review risk factors for late-life suicide; methods to assess for different levels of suicidality; and recent research developments regarding both effective assessment and management of suicide risk among older primary care patients. We highlight that broader scale screening of suicide risk may be considered in light of findings that suicidality can occur even in the absence of major risk factors like depression. We also highlight collaborative care models targeting suicide risk, and recent innovative interventions that aim to prevent the development of suicidal ideation and suicidal behavior.

  18. Critical paths: maximizing patient care coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spath, P L

    1995-01-01

    1. With today's emphasis on horizontal and vertical integration of patient care services and the new initiatives prompted by these challenges, OR nurses are considering new methods for managing the perioperative period. One such method is the critical path. 2. A critical path defines an optimal sequencing and timing of interventions by physicians, nurses, and other staff members for a particular diagnosis or procedure, designed to better use resources, maximize quality of care, and minimize delays. 3. Hospitals implementing path-based patient care have reported cost reductions and improved team-work. Critical paths have been shown to reduce patient care costs by improving hospital efficiency, not merely by reducing physician practice variations.

  19. Patient satisfaction with in-centre haemodialysis care: an international survey

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Suetonia C; De Berardis, Giorgia; Craig, Jonathan C; Tong, Allison; Tonelli, Marcello; Pellegrini, Fabio; Ruospo, Marinella; Hegbrant, Jörgen; Wollheim, Charlotta; Celia, Eduardo; Gelfman, Ruben; Ferrari, Juan Nin; Törok, Marietta; Murgo, Marco; Leal, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate patient experiences of specific aspects of haemodialysis care across several countries. Design Cross-sectional survey using the Choices for Healthy Outcomes in Caring for End-Stage Renal Disease (CHOICE) questionnaire. Setting Haemodialysis clinics within a single provider in Europe and South America. Participants 2748 adults treated in haemodialysis. Primary and secondary outcomes The primary outcome was patient satisfaction with overall care. Secondary outcomes includ...

  20. Yoga in adult cancer: an exploratory, qualitative analysis of the patient experience

    OpenAIRE

    McCall, Marcy; Thorne, Sally; Ward, Alison; Heneghan, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Background Some patients receiving treatment in conventional health care systems access therapeutic yoga outside their mainstream care to improve cancer symptoms. Given the current knowledge gap around patient preferences and documented experiences of yoga in adult cancer, this study aimed to describe patient-reported benefits, barriers and characteristics of programming for yoga practice during conventional treatment. Methods In depth semi-structured interviews (n = 10) were conducted in men...

  1. Digital subtraction angiography: patient preparation and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, A H

    1987-08-01

    The use of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is increasing. Nurses must be prepared to provide quality care to patients who have this relatively new method for radiographically studying the blood vessels. A description of DSA and its applications is provided. Patient preparation, assessment, teaching, and management are described. Complications of the procedure and their management are presented. PMID:2958568

  2. Care plan for prediabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Nieves Pino Escudero

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus type 2 has a growing impact in the survival and well-being of the population. In recent years its incidence has progressively increased at an alarming rate. However, there are some modifiable risks factors directly related with life styles. Nurse plays a fundamental role in the identification of such factors as well as promoting healthy habits for the prevention of the Diabetes Mellitus type 2.This works presents a standardized care plan for prediabetic state, for this, it had been used the NANDA, NOC, NIC classifications.

  3. Primary care providers' judgments of opioid analgesic misuse in a community-based cohort of HIV-infected indigent adults

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayaraghavan, M.; Penko, J; D. Guzman; Miaskowski, C; Kushel, MB

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care providers (PCPs) must balance treatment of chronic non-cancer pain with opioid analgesics with concerns about opioid misuse. OBJECTIVE: We co-enrolled community-based indigent adults and their PCPs to determine PCPs' accuracy of estimating opioid analgesic misuse and illicit substance use. DESIGN: Patient-provider dyad study. PARTICIPANTS: HIV-infected, community-based indigent adults ('patients') and their PCPs. MAIN MEASURES: Using structured interviews, we queried ...

  4. Performance of the measures of processes of care for adults and service providers in rehabilitation settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamm EL

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Elena L Bamm,1 Peter Rosenbaum,1,2 Seanne Wilkins,1 Paul Stratford11School of Rehabilitation Science, 2CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, CanadaIntroduction: In recent years, client-centered care has been embraced as a new philosophy of care by many organizations around the world. Clinicians and researchers have identified the need for valid and reliable outcome measures that are easy to use to evaluate success of implementation of new concepts.Objective: The current study was developed to complete adaptation and field testing of the companion patient-reported measures of processes of care for adults (MPOC-A and the service provider self-reflection measure of processes of care for service providers working with adult clients (MPOC-SP(A.Design: A validation studySettings: In-patient rehabilitation facilities.Main outcome measures: MPOC-A and measure of processes of care for service providers working with adult clients (MPOC-SP(A.Results: Three hundred and eighty-four health care providers, 61 patients, and 16 family members completed the questionnaires. Good to excellent internal consistency (0.71–0.88 for health care professionals, 0.82–0.90 for patients, and 0.87–0.94 for family members, as well as moderate to good correlations between domains (0.40–0.78 for health care professionals and 0.52–0.84 for clients supported internal reliability of the tools. Exploratory factor analysis of the MPOC-SP(A responses supported the multidimensionality of the questionnaire.Conclusion: MPOC-A and MPOC-SP(A are valid and reliable tools to assess patient and service-provider accounts, respectively, of the extent to which they experience, or are able to provide, client-centered service. Research should now be undertaken to explore in more detail the relationships between client experience and provider reports of their own behavior.Keywords: client-centered care, service evaluation, MPOC, models of

  5. Triage in an adult emergency service: patient satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollyane Liliane Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE Assess the degree of patient satisfaction with triage in the adult emergency service of a public hospital. METHOD Exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach. Three hundred patients were interviewed and the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics based on sociodemographic variables and those related to patient satisfaction. RESULTS There was a predominance of women, with elementary education and a mean age of 41 years. Most of the interviewees reported being satisfied in regard to the following items: timely service, embracement, trust, environment (comfort, cleanliness and signage, humanization (courtesy, respect, and interest, timely referral/scheduling of appointments and care expectations. CONCLUSION There was a high level of patient satisfaction, evidenced by the strong association of user satisfaction with the items investigated.

  6. [Institutional psychotherapy, caring for patients and the place of care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drogoul, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Institutional psychotherapy was developed in the specific context of the "assassination" of the Spanish revolution. There are two distinct movements or two periods. The first, based around Georges Daumézon and Henri Ey gave birth to the sector. The second, around FrançoisTosquelles and Jean Oury emphasised the asylum as the place of care. The function of institutional psychotherapy is to care not only for the patients but also the place of treatment. To fulfil this function, it has a tool box: transfer, the fight against the overvaluation of hierarchy as well as the function of the therapeutic club.

  7. Evaluating components of dental care utilization among adults with diabetes and matched controls via hurdle models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhari Monica

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About one-third of adults with diabetes have severe oral complications. However, limited previous research has investigated dental care utilization associated with diabetes. This project had two purposes: to develop a methodology to estimate dental care utilization using claims data and to use this methodology to compare utilization of dental care between adults with and without diabetes. Methods Data included secondary enrollment and demographic data from Washington Dental Service (WDS and Group Health Cooperative (GH, clinical data from GH, and dental-utilization data from WDS claims during 2002–2006. Dental and medical records from WDS and GH were linked for enrolees continuously and dually insured during the study. We employed hurdle models in a quasi-experimental setting to assess differences between adults with and without diabetes in 5-year cumulative utilization of dental services. Propensity score matching adjusted for differences in baseline covariates between the two groups. Results We found that adults with diabetes had lower odds of visiting a dentist (OR = 0.74, p  0.001. Among those with a dental visit, diabetes patients had lower odds of receiving prophylaxes (OR = 0.77, fillings (OR = 0.80 and crowns (OR = 0.84 (p 0.005 for all and higher odds of receiving periodontal maintenance (OR = 1.24, non-surgical periodontal procedures (OR = 1.30, extractions (OR = 1.38 and removable prosthetics (OR = 1.36 (p  Conclusions Patients with diabetes are less likely to use dental services. Those who do are less likely to use preventive care and more likely to receive periodontal care and tooth-extractions. Future research should address the possible effectiveness of additional prevention in reducing subsequent severe oral disease in patients with diabetes.

  8. Preventive care delivered within Public Dental Service after caries risk assessment of young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hänsel Petersson, G; Ericson, E; Twetman, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study preventive care provided to young adults in relation to their estimated risk category over a 3-year period. METHODS: The amount and type of preventive treatment during 3 years was extracted from the digital dental records of 982 patients attending eight public dental clinics...... adults attending public dental service. Further research is needed how to reach those with the greatest need of primary and secondary prevention....... score was constructed and dichotomized to 'basic prevention' and 'additional prevention'. RESULTS: More additional preventive care was provided to the patients in the 'low-risk' and 'some risk' categories than to those classified as 'high' or 'very high' risk (OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.4-3.0; P

  9. Children as partners with adults in their medical care

    OpenAIRE

    Alderson, P.; Sutcliffe, K; Curtis, K.

    2006-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the seldom published views of children with type 1 diabetes about their condition and ways in which they share in managing their medical and health care with adults. Methods: Semi-structured, tape recorded interviews, during 2003, with a purposive sample of 24 children aged 3–12 years who have type I diabetes and who attend two inner London hospitals and one hospital in a commuter town. Results: The children reported high levels of understanding, knowledge, and ...

  10. Accessibility of mental health care for adults with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Pihlaja, Kimmo; Päivärinta, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to describe the accessibility in mental health care from the point of view of an adult with cerebral palsy. The theoretical framework of this thesis is constructed from the related literature and previous studies closely linked to the topic. Research was done to clarify the concepts of disability, cerebral palsy, and mental health. The research showed cerebral palsy as a multidimensional physical disability which may include different types of accompanying im...

  11. [Enriching patient care with aromatherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogno-Lalloz, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    There are increasing numbers of initiatives in healthcare institutions focusing on the benefits of essential oils. Received positively by patients who appreciate the resulting wellbeing, these innovative approaches around aromatherapy are based on the initiative of pioneering caregivers. Following on from an international congress held each year in Grasse, this article presents some example schemes. PMID:25065196

  12. Regulatory focus and adherence to self-care behaviors among adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraham, Rinat; Van Dijk, Dina; Simon-Tuval, Tzahit

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were, first, to test the association between regulatory focus of adults with type 2 diabetes and their adherence to two types of self-care behaviors - lifestyle change (e.g. physical activity and diet) and medical care regimens (blood-glucose monitoring, foot care and medication usage). Second, to explore whether a fit between the message framing and patients' regulatory focus would improve their intentions to adhere specifically when the type of behavior fits the patients' regulatory focus as well. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 130 adults with type 2 diabetes who were hospitalized in an academic medical center. The patients completed a set of questionnaires that included their diabetes self-care activities, regulatory focus, self-esteem and demographic, socioeconomic and clinical data. In addition, participants were exposed to either a gain-framed or a loss-framed message, and were then asked to indicate their intention to improve adherence to self-care behaviors. A multivariable linear regression model revealed that promoters reported higher adherence to lifestyle change behaviors than preventers did (B = .60, p = .028). However, no effect of regulatory focus on adherence to medical care regimens was found (B = .46, p = .114). In addition, preventers reported higher intentions to adhere to medical care behaviors when the message framing was congruent with prevention focus (B = 1.16, p = .023). However, promoters did not report higher intentions to adhere to lifestyle behaviors when the message framing was congruent with promotion focus (B = -.16, p = .765). These findings justify the need to develop tailor-made interventions that are adjusted to both patients' regulatory focus and type of health behavior. PMID:26576471

  13. Patient Care Partnership: Understanding Expectations, Rights and Responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ` e Patient Care Partnership Understanding Expectations, Rights and Responsibilities What to expect during your hospital stay: • High ... e Patient Care Partnership Understanding Expectations, Rights and Responsibilities W hen you need hospital care, your doctor ...

  14. Pediatric Patient Blood Management Programs: Not Just Transfusing Little Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ruchika; Cushing, Melissa M; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell transfusions are a common life-saving intervention for neonates and children with anemia, but transfusion decisions, indications, and doses in neonates and children are different from those of adults. Patient blood management (PBM) programs are designed to assist clinicians with appropriately transfusing patients. Although PBM programs are well recognized and appreciated in the adult setting, they are quite far from standard of care in the pediatric patient population. Adult PBM standards cannot be uniformly applied to children, and there currently is significant variation in transfusion practices. Because transfusing unnecessarily can expose children to increased risk without benefit, it is important to design PBM programs to standardize transfusion decisions. This article assesses the key elements necessary for a successful pediatric PBM program, systematically explores various possible pediatric specific blood conservation strategies and the current available literature supporting them, and outlines the gaps in the evidence suggesting need for further/improved research. Pediatric PBM programs are critically important initiatives that not only involve a cooperative effort between pediatric surgery, anesthesia, perfusion, critical care, and transfusion medicine services but also need operational support from administration, clinical leadership, finance, and the hospital information technology personnel. These programs also expand the scope for high-quality collaborative research. A key component of pediatric PBM programs is monitoring pediatric blood utilization and assessing adherence to transfusion guidelines. Data suggest that restrictive transfusion strategies should be used for neonates and children similar to adults, but further research is needed to assess the best oxygenation requirements, hemoglobin threshold, and transfusion strategy for patients with active bleeding, hemodynamic instability, unstable cardiac disease, and cyanotic cardiac

  15. Perioperative Care of the Liver Transplant Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Mark T; Kramer, David J

    2016-07-01

    With the evolution of surgical and anesthetic techniques, liver transplantation has become "routine," allowing for modifications of practice to decrease perioperative complications and costs. There is debate over the necessity for intensive care unit admission for patients with satisfactory preoperative status and a smooth intraoperative course. Postoperative care is made easier when the liver graft performs optimally. Assessment of graft function, vigilance for complications after the major surgical insult, and optimization of multiple systems affected by liver disease are essential aspects of postoperative care. The intensivist plays a vital role in an integrated multidisciplinary transplant team. PMID:27339683

  16. A qualitative study of patient and family perceptions of chaplain presence during post-trauma care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Steven C; Hildebrand, Alice A

    2015-01-01

    Improving the provision of spiritual care to hospitalized patients requires understanding what patients look for from a hospital chaplain, and why. This qualitative study uses grounded theory methodology to analyze data from 25 interviews with adult patients and/or adult family members who received spiritual care in a large tertiary care hospital. Analysis reveals three key themes in chaplaincy care: the attributes valued in the chaplain's presence, the elements necessary to form relationship with the chaplain, and the role of the chaplain in helping patients to discover and express meaning in their experiences. The authors weave these three themes together into a grounded theory and propose an assessment model that incorporates psychological theory about human motivation, faith development, and the development of autonomy. An understanding of the proposed assessment model can guide chaplain interventions and benefit all members of the clinical care team. PMID:25793422

  17. Constraints faced by urban poor in managing diabetes care: patients' perspectives from South India

    OpenAIRE

    Bhojani, Upendra; Mishra, Arima; Amruthavalli, Subramani; Devadasan, Narayanan; Kolsteren, Patrick; De Henauw, Stefaan; Criel, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Background: Four out of five adults with diabetes live in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). India has the second highest number of diabetes patients in the world. Despite a huge burden, diabetes care remains suboptimal. While patients (and families) play an important role in managing chronic conditions, there is a dearth of studies in LMIC and virtually none in India capturing perspectives and experiences of patients in regard to diabetes care.Objective: The objective of this study was...

  18. A review of statistical estimators for risk-adjusted length of stay: analysis of the Australian and new Zealand intensive care adult patient data-base, 2008–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran John L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the analysis of length-of-stay (LOS data, which is characteristically right-skewed, a number of statistical estimators have been proposed as alternatives to the traditional ordinary least squares (OLS regression with log dependent variable. Methods Using a cohort of patients identified in the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database, 2008–2009, 12 different methods were used for estimation of intensive care (ICU length of stay. These encompassed risk-adjusted regression analysis of firstly: log LOS using OLS, linear mixed model [LMM], treatment effects, skew-normal and skew-t models; and secondly: unmodified (raw LOS via OLS, generalised linear models [GLMs] with log-link and 4 different distributions [Poisson, gamma, negative binomial and inverse-Gaussian], extended estimating equations [EEE] and a finite mixture model including a gamma distribution. A fixed covariate list and ICU-site clustering with robust variance were utilised for model fitting with split-sample determination (80% and validation (20% data sets, and model simulation was undertaken to establish over-fitting (Copas test. Indices of model specification using Bayesian information criterion [BIC: lower values preferred] and residual analysis as well as predictive performance (R2, concordance correlation coefficient (CCC, mean absolute error [MAE] were established for each estimator. Results The data-set consisted of 111663 patients from 131 ICUs; with mean(SD age 60.6(18.8 years, 43.0% were female, 40.7% were mechanically ventilated and ICU mortality was 7.8%. ICU length-of-stay was 3.4(5.1 (median 1.8, range (0.17-60 days and demonstrated marked kurtosis and right skew (29.4 and 4.4 respectively. BIC showed considerable spread, from a maximum of 509801 (OLS-raw scale to a minimum of 210286 (LMM. R2 ranged from 0.22 (LMM to 0.17 and the CCC from 0.334 (LMM to 0.149, with MAE 2.2-2.4. Superior residual behaviour was

  19. Acute nursing care of the older adult with fragility hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maher, A.B.; Meehan, A.J.; Hertz, K.;

    2013-01-01

    The second part of this paper provides those who care for orthopaedic patients with evidence-supported international perspectives about acute nursing care of the older adult with fragility hip fracture. Developed by an international group of nurse experts and guided by a range of information from....... Pressure Ulcers. Fluid Balance/Nutrition. Constipation/Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infection. Vigilant nursing assessment and prompt intervention may prevent the development of the complications we discuss. If they do occur and are identified early on, they may resolve with appropriate and timely...

  20. Integration of Early Specialist Palliative Care in Cancer Care and Patient Related Outcomes: A Critical Review of Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salins, Naveen; Ramanjulu, Raghavendra; Patra, Lipika; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: World Health Organization and American Society of Clinical Oncology recommend early integration of specialist palliative care in patients with cancer. This paper focuses on critical review of evidence on integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient-related outcomes. Methods: The question for the literature search was – Does integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care influences patient-related outcomes? 31 articles related to literature search review question were included in this paper. Results: Ten patient-related outcomes of early specialist palliative care in adult cancer care was studied. Studies by Temel et al. (2012), Bakitas et al. (2009), Zimmermann et al. (2014), Rugno et al. (2014), Lowery et al. (2013) and Walker et al. (2014) showed early specialist palliative care improves health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Studies by Pirl et al. (2012), Lowery et al. (2013), and Walker et al. (2014) showed early specialist palliative care improved mood depression and anxiety. Studies by Zimmermann et al. and Rugno et al. (2014) showed symptom control benefit of early specialist palliative care. Studies by Temel (2010), Bakitas (2015) and Rugno et al. (2014) showed survival improvement with early specialist palliative care. All these studies were carried in ambulatory palliative care setting. No survival benefit of palliative care intervention was seen in inpatient palliative care setting. The studies by Geer et al. (2012), Rugno et al. (2014), and Lowery et al. (2013) showed that early palliative care intervention positively influences treatment decision making. All the studies showed that palliative care intervention group received less intravenous chemotherapy in last few weeks of life. Studies by Yoong et al. and Temel et al. (2011) shows early specialist palliative care improves advanced care planning. Studies by Temel et al. (2010), Greer et al. (2012), McNamara et al. (2013), Hui et al. (2014

  1. Assessing the Quality of Diabetic Patients Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkis Vicente Sánchez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the actions of family doctors and nurses in this area is an indispensable requisite in order to achieve a comprehensive health care. Objective: to assess the quality of health care provided to diabetic patients by the family doctor in Abreus health area. Methods: a descriptive and observational study based on the application of tools to assess the performance of family doctors in the treatment of diabetes mellitus in the five family doctors consultation in Abreus health area from January to July 2011 was conducted. The five doctors working in these consultations, as well as the 172 diabetic patients were included in the study. At the same time, 172 randomly selected medical records were also revised. Through observation, the existence of some necessary material resources and the quality of their performance as well as the quality of medical records were evaluated. Patient criteria served to assess the quality of the health care provided. Results: scientific and technical training on diabetes mellitus has been insufficient; the necessary equipment for the appropriate care and monitoring of patients with diabetes is available; in 2.9% of medical records reviewed, interrogation appears in its complete form including the complete physical examination in 12 of them and the complete medical indications in 26. Conclusions: the quality of comprehensive medical care to diabetic patients included in the study is compromised. Doctors interviewed recognized the need to be trained in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetes in order to improve their professional performance and enhance the quality of the health care provided to these patients.

  2. Care of patients undergoing external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anxiety and associated depression suffered by most patients undergoing radiotherapy is discussed and the possibilities open to the nurse to encourage and reassure patients thus facilitating physical care are considered. The general symptoms of anorexia, nausea, tiredness, skin problems, alopecia, bonemarrow depresssion and rapid tumour destruction are described and nursing care prescribed. The side-effects which may occur following radiation of the brain, head and neck region, eyes, oesophagus, lung, abdomen, pelvis, bones, skin, spine, and spinal cord are considered from the nursing standpoint. The specialised subject of radiotherapy in children is discussed briefly. (U.K.)

  3. Anticoagulated patient management in primary care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Zapata Sampedro

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Out-patients undergoing anticoagulant treatment are attended by nursing staff, working with doctors.To be able to provide adequate medical care, nurses must have the minimum knowledge and skills needed to work with the programme described in this article. These include basic and specific knowledge of anticoagulation. The correct functioning of the service will help provide an optimum control of the INR (International Normalized Ratio and reduce the complications of bleeding, both of which are the main objectives of the nursing care of these patients.

  4. Patient care: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twycross, Robert

    The 40 years since St Christopher's Hospice opened has witnessed a burgeoning international interest in palliative care. Its key characteristics comprise a focus on the whole-person (physical, psychological, social, and spiritual), patient-centeredness (partnership with and empowerment of the patient and family), openness and honesty in communication, an acceptance of the inevitability of death coupled with improvement in the quality of life, multi-professional teamwork integrated with community (volunteer) involvement. Although much has been achieved, much remains to be done. Both in resource-poor countries and in more wealthy ones, the scope of palliative care has changed. Initially in the United Kingdom, palliative care was mostly limited to cancer patients but now strenuous efforts are being made to extend coverage to other patient groups, e.g., those with end-stage heart disease or renal failure. In India, with a dearth of chronic care facilities, palliative care services increasingly embrace those with chronic disability as well as progressive end-stage disease. In Sub-Saharan Africa, the devastating impact of AIDS is having a major impact on the development and delivery of palliative care. To maximize the benefits of limited financial and other resources, a strategic approach is necessary. The World Health Organization emphasizes three essential foundation measures: health service policy, public awareness and professional education, and drug availability. However, at the end of the day, if we are truly to honor Cicely Saunders, palliative care must remain a movement with momentum, combining creative charisma with inevitable bureaucratic routinization. PMID:18051016

  5. Rhetoric and reality in stroke patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, P; Ebrahim, S

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify aspects of the process of care that might help explain the improved outcomes associated with stroke units. Three different care settings for stroke patients, an elderly care unit and general medical ward in an inner-city teaching hospital and a stroke unit in another teaching hospital in the same city, were compared using non-participant observational methods. Nurses on the stroke unit and general medical ward usually engaged in standardised and functional interaction with patients, while nurses on the elderly care unit were observed to adopt a more personal and attentive approach with patients. Rehabilitation nursing was rarely observed on the stroke unit, never on the general medical ward but always on the elderly care unit. There was evidence of effective communication between nurses and therapists on the elderly care unit but this was not observed on the stroke unit. On the elderly care unit the team appeared divided, with therapists and nurses on one side and medicine on the other, while on the stroke unit the divide was between doctors and therapists on one hand and nurses the other. On the general medical ward there was no team working. The observed lack of rehabilitation nursing, nurses' disengagement from the team and nurses' observed lack of warmth towards patients on the stroke unit were all surprising findings. Further research needs to examine whether such findings would be reproduced in stroke units elsewhere. If so, it might be that the better outcomes achieved on stroke units are despite rather than because of the nursing they receive there. PMID:11077948

  6. Screening for alcohol and drug use disorders among adults in primary care: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilowsky DJ

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Daniel J Pilowsky1, Li-Tzy Wu21Departments of Epidemiology and Psychiatry, Columbia University, and the New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York City, NY, 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USABackground: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 supports integration of substance abuse interventions and treatments into the mainstream health care system. Thus, effective screening and intervention for substance use disorders in health care settings is a priority.Objective: This paper reviews the prevalence of alcohol and drug use disorders (abuse or dependence in primary care settings and emergency departments, as well as current screening tools and brief interventions.Methods: MEDLINE was searched using the following keywords: alcohol use, alcohol use disorder, drug use, drug use disorder, screening, primary care, and emergency departments. Using the related-articles link, additional articles were screened for inclusion. This review focuses on alcohol and drug use and related disorders among adults in primary care settings.Conclusion: Screening, brief intervention, and referral for treatment are feasible and effective in primary care settings, provided that funding for screening is available, along with brief interventions and treatment facilities to which patients can be referred and treated promptly.Keywords: brief intervention, emergency departments

  7. Meaning and Practice of Palliative Care for Hospitalized Older Adults with Life Limiting Illnesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethel Ann Powers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To illustrate distinctions and intersections of palliative care (PC and end-of-life (EOL services through examples from case-centered data of older adults cared for during a four-year ethnographic study of an acute care hospital palliative care consultation service. Methods. Qualitative narrative and thematic analysis. Results. Description of four practice paradigms (EOL transitions, prognostic uncertainty, discharge planning, and patient/family values and preferences and identification of the underlying structure and communication patterns of PC consultation services common to them. Conclusions. Consistent with reports by other researchers, study data support the need to move beyond equating PC with hospice or EOL care and the notion that EOL is a well-demarcated period of time before death. If professional health care providers assume that PC services are limited to assisting with and helping patients and families prepare for dying, they miss opportunities to provide care considered important to older individuals confronting life-limiting illnesses.

  8. Integrated Care for Older Adults Improves Perceived Quality of Care : Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Embrace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uittenbroek, Ronald J; Kremer, Hubertus P H; Spoorenberg, Sophie L W; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Wynia, Klaske

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: All community-living older adults might benefit from integrated care, but evidence is lacking on the effectiveness of such services for perceived quality of care. OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of Embrace, a community-based integrated primary care service, on perceived quality of care.

  9. Effective dose conversion coefficients for health care provider exposed to pediatric and adult victims in radiological dispersal device incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an incident of radiological dispersal devices (RDD), health care providers will be exposed to the contaminated patients in the extended medical treatments. Assessment of potential radiation dose to the health care providers will be crucial to minimize their health risk. In this study, we compiled a set of conversion coefficients (mSv MBq−1 s−1) to readily estimate the effective dose from the time-integrated activity for the health care providers while they deal with internally contaminated patients at different ages. We selected Co-60, Ir-192, Am-241, Cs-137, and I-131 as the major radionuclides that may be used for RDD. We obtained the age-specific organ burdens after the inhalation of those radionuclides from the Dose and Risk Calculation Software (DCAL) program. A series of hybrid computational phantoms (1-, 5-, 10-, and 15 year-old, and adult males) were implemented in a general purpose Monte Carlo (MC) transport code, MCNPX v 2.7, to simulate an adult male health care provider exposed to contaminated patients at different ages. Two exposure scenarios were taken into account: a health care provider (a) standing at the side of patients lying in bed and (b) sitting face to face with patients. The conversion coefficients overall depended on radionuclides, the age of the patients, and the orientation of the patients. The conversion coefficient was greatest for Co-60 and smallest for Am-241. The dose from the 1 year-old patient phantom was up to three times greater than that from the adult patient phantom. The conversion coefficients were less dependent on the age of the patients in the scenario of a health care provider sitting face to face with patients. The dose conversion coefficients established in this study will be useful to readily estimate the effective dose to the health care providers in RDD events. (paper)

  10. [Care for patients with rare diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetsers, Stephanie E; Takkenberg, J J M Hanneke; Bierings, Marc B

    2014-01-01

    A rare disease usually concerns only a handful of patients, but all patients with a rare disease combined represent a significant health burden. Due to limited knowledge and the absence of treatment guidelines, patients with rare diseases usually experience delayed diagnosis and suboptimal treatment. Historically, rare diseases have never been considered a major health problem. However, rare diseases have recently been receiving increased attention. In the Netherlands, a national plan for rare diseases was published in late 2013, with recommendations on how to improve the organisation of healthcare for people with rare diseases. Using the example of the rare disease Fanconi anemia, this paper describes the challenges and opportunities in organising healthcare for rare diseases. Two critical steps in optimising healthcare for rare diseases are developing multidisciplinary healthcare teams and stimulating patient empowerment. Optimal cooperation between patients, patient organisations, multidisciplinary healthcare teams and scientists is of great importance. In this respect, transition to adult healthcare requires special attention.

  11. Changing the world of patient care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Bettan; Poulsen, Dorthe Varning; Hørdam, Britta

    2013-01-01

    Political and cultural visions for health care necessitate the need for transnational resources and services optimizing and supporting patients and their families. The project has its approach in an Interregional Project named Pro-hip. Lead partner is University College Zealand collaborating...... borders - Developing new health technology information to hip surgery patients and their relatives - Innovating an interactive media directed to the target group (ex. age and competencies) Methodology: Identifying the field - Literature study - Interviews for identifying needs for the target groups...

  12. Managing the Patient with Pulmonary Hypertension: Specialty Care Centers, Coordinated Care, and Patient Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakinala, Murali M; Duncan, Maribeth; Wirth, Joel

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension remains a challenging condition to diagnose and manage. Decentralized care for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has led to shortcomings in the diagnosis and management of PAH. The Pulmonary Hypertension Association-sponsored Pulmonary Hypertension Care Center program is designed to recognize specialty centers capable of providing multidisciplinary and comprehensive care of PAH. Ideally, Pulmonary Hypertension Care Centers will comanage PAH patients with community-based practitioners and address the growing needs of this emerging population of long-term PAH patients. PMID:27443143

  13. Loss of relational continuity of care in schizophrenia: associations with patient satisfaction and quality of care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanatinia, Rahil; Cowan, Violet; Barnicot, Kirsten; Zalewska, Krysia; Shiers, David; Cooper, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Users of mental health service are concerned about changes in clinicians providing their care, but little is known about their impact. Aims To examine associations between changes in staff, and patient satisfaction and quality of care. Method A national cross-sectional survey of 3379 people aged 18 or over treated in secondary care for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Results Nearly 41.9% reported at least one change in their key worker during the previous 12 months and 10.5% reported multiple changes. Those reporting multiple changes were less satisfied with their treatment and less likely to report having a care plan, knowing how to obtain help when in a crisis or to have had recommended physical health assessments. Conclusions Frequent changes in staff providing care for people with psychosis are associated with poorer quality of care. Greater efforts need to be made to protect relational continuity of care for such patients. Declaration of interest M.J.C. was co-chair of the expert advisory group on the NICE quality standard on Service User Experience in Adult Mental Health. S.J.C. has previously been a member of the Health and Social Care Board Northern Ireland Formulary Committee. D.S. received a speaker’s fee from Janssen Cilag in 2011. He is a topic expert on NICE guideline for psychosis and schizophrenia in children and young people and a board member of National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:27713834

  14. Ab interno trabeculectomy in the adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Seibold, Leonard K; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient.

  15. [Adult patients with congenital heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabitz, R G; Kaemmerer, H; Mohr, F-W

    2013-01-01

    Unlike a few decades ago, today most patients with congenital heart disease reach adulthood after intervention or reparative surgery. As complete correction is generally not possible, a patient population with great complexity and a particular challenge to medical management is rising and a regular follow-up is mandatory. The aim of care is the timely recognition of residual or associated problems. Frequency and intensity of follow-up examinations depend on type and complexity of the lesion. The standard repertoire at follow-up consists of a specific history, clinical examination, ECG, Holter-monitoring, exercise tests, and echocardiography. Depending on the indication, cardio-MRI, CT scan, and sophisticated cardiac catheterization may become necessary. Long-term complications like rhythm disturbances, pulmonary hypertension, or heart failure are frequent, despite optimal care. Acute complications like arrhythmias, infective endocarditis, cerebral events, cerebral abscesses, aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and bleeding have to be recognized early and treated appropriately. Additional focus has to be placed on counseling and management of noncardiac disease and surgery, pregnancy and delivery, exercise at work and in private life, driving, and insurance issues. Training and certification of physicians as well as the establishment of specialized centers will help to ensure high quality health care for the affected patient population. PMID:23318541

  16. HOME CARE IN CYSTIC-FIBROSIS PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANAALDEREN, WMC; MANNES, GPM; BOSMA, ES; ROORDA, RJ; HEYMANS, HSA

    1995-01-01

    Intravenous antibiotics and enteral tube feeding at home for the treatment of pulmonary exacerbations and underweight condition in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have become tools that are used in many cystic fibrosis centres, The experience with home care programmes from different countries is quite

  17. Cranial CT of the unconscious adult patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harden, S.P. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Dey, C. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Gawne-Cain, M.L. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: mary.gawne@suht.swest.nhs.uk

    2007-05-15

    Unconscious patients are frequently referred to radiology departments for computed tomography (CT) of the brain. The objectives of these examinations are to define the underlying cause of impaired consciousness and in some cases to determine the severity of associated brain injury. There is often little history available to guide the clinician or radiologist, particularly in patients referred from the casualty department. In this review, we present the typical CT appearances of adult patients presenting with loss of consciousness for CT examination. We focus on the most common abnormalities that are identified in everyday radiological practice, emphasize important diagnostic signs that may enable a confident diagnosis to be made and discuss when further imaging may be warranted.

  18. [Self-care and the asthmatic adult: systematization of nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Estela Maria Leite Meirelles; da Nóbrega, Maria Miriam Lima; de Lima, Luciane Soares

    2002-01-01

    This research aims at the systematization of nursing assistance under Orem's nursing theory of self-care deficit. In order to conduct this study, the convergent approach was used through the performance of the nursing processes in an adult with asthma. Interviews, physical examinations, observations, data record, observation of nursing assistance in policlinics along with home visits were the techniques used to gather data. After the observation of the nursing assistance, self-care deficits were identified and a new assistance plan and objectives were established, as well as a system and methods of support. The assistance plan was performed through the implementation of nursing assistance, prioritizing educational support. Based on the results, it was concluded that the application of the nursing processes through Orem's self-care referential is feasible and necessary for the engagement of clients and their family in self-care.

  19. Prevalence of oral pain and barriers to use of emergency oral care facilities among adult Tanzanians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahabuka Febronia

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral pain has been the major cause of the attendances in the dental clinics in Tanzania. Some patients postpone seeing the dentist for as long as two to five days. This study determines the prevalence of oral pain and barriers to use of emergency oral care in Tanzania. Methods Questionnaire data were collected from 1,759 adult respondents aged 18 years and above. The study area covered six urban and eight rural study clusters, which had been selected using the WHO Pathfinder methodology. Chi-square tests and logistic regression analyses were performed to identify associations. Results Forty two percent of the respondents had utilized the oral health care facilities sometimes in their lifetime. About 59% of the respondents revealed that they had suffered from oral pain and/or discomfort within the twelve months that preceded the study, but only 26.5% of these had sought treatment from oral health care facilities. The reasons for not seeking emergency care were: lack of money to pay for treatment (27.9%; self medication (17.6%; respondents thinking that pain would disappear with time (15.7%; and lack of money to pay for transport to the dental clinic (15.0%. Older adults were more likely to report that they had experienced oral pain during the last 12 months than the younger adults (OR = 1.57, CI 1.07–1.57, P dental clinics far from home (OR = 5.31, CI = 2.09–13.54, P and being treated by traditional healer (OR = 5.31, CI = 2.25–12.49, P as reasons for not seeking emergency care from the oral health care facilities than their counterparts from urban areas. Conclusion Oral pain and discomfort were prevalent among adult Tanzanians. Only a quarter of those who experienced oral pain or discomfort sought emergency oral care from oral health care facilities. Self medication was used as an alternative to using oral care facilities mainly by rural residents. Establishing oral care facilities in rural areas is recommended.

  20. Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goertz, Christine M; Salsbury, Stacie A; Vining, Robert D;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition that affects the health and quality of life of older adults. Older people often consult primary care physicians about back pain, with many also receiving concurrent care from complementary and alternative medicine providers, most...... commonly doctors of chiropractic. However, a collaborative model of treatment coordination between these two provider groups has yet to be tested. The primary aim of the Collaborative Care for Older Adults Clinical Trial is to develop and evaluate the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of a patient......-centered, collaborative care model with family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic for the treatment of low back pain in older adults. METHODS/DESIGN: This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial will enroll 120 participants, age 65 years or older with subacute or chronic low back pain lasting at least...

  1. Willingness to Favor Aggressive Care and Live with Disability Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Survey of Healthy Young Adults in Hawai‘i

    OpenAIRE

    Nakagawa, Kazuma; Obana, Kyle K

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health problem that significantly impacts young adults. Since severe TBI patients lack decision-making capacity, the providers and patient surrogates are often faced with the challenging task of deciding whether to continue with aggressive life-prolonging care or to transition to comfort-focused care with an expected outcome of natural death. The assumption is often made that aggressive care is appropriate for young patients who suffer severe TBI...

  2. 76 FR 43254 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ..., 2010, at 75 FR 41793. Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) [Per meal rates in whole or fractions... 48 FR 29114, June 24, 1983.) This notice has been determined to be not significant and was reviewed... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day...

  3. 75 FR 41793 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ..., 2009, at 74 FR 34295. Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Lunch and Centers Breakfast supper \\1... related notice published at 48 FR 29114, June 24, 1983.) This notice has been determined to be not... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day...

  4. Objectively Measured Activity Patterns among Adults in Residential Aged Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Reid

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the feasibility of using the activPAL3TM activity monitor, and, to describe the activity patterns of residential aged care residents. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Randomly selected aged care facilities within 100 km of the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. Participants: Ambulatory, older (≥60 years residential aged care adults without cognitive impairment. Measurements: Feasibility was assessed by consent rate, sleep/wear diary completion, and through interviews with staff/participants. Activity patterns (sitting/lying, standing, and stepping were measured via activPAL3TM monitors worn continuously for seven days. Times spent in each activity were described and then compared across days of the week and hours of the day using linear mixed models. Results: Consent rate was 48% (n = 41. Activity patterns are described for the 31 participants (mean age 84.2 years who provided at least one day of valid monitor data. In total, 14 (45% completed the sleep/wear diary. Participants spent a median (interquartile range of 12.4 (1.7 h sitting/lying (with 73% of this accumulated in unbroken bouts of ≥30 min, 1.9 (1.3 h standing, and 21.4 (36.7 min stepping during their monitored waking hours per day. Activity did not vary significantly by day of the week (p ≥ 0.05; stepping showed significant hourly variation (p = 0.018. Conclusions: Older adults in residential aged care were consistently highly sedentary. Feasibility considerations for objective activity monitoring identified for this population include poor diary completion and lost monitors.

  5. [Oncologic after-care--a patient-oriented concept. Basic diagnostic plan for pediatric oncology patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffner, U; Sauter, S; Bergsträsser, E; Brandis, M; Niemeyer, C

    1995-01-01

    With intensive treatment many children and young adults with cancer can be cured of their disease. Therefore, the recognition of late effects of therapy will become increasingly important. Future concepts of follow-up care in pediatric oncology will have to serve two purposes: First, to determine the status of the malignant disease with early diagnosis of relapse and second, to recognize relevant side effects of treatment. We present a comprehensive approach of follow-up care which is primarily based on the definition of risk criteria for the development of relevant organ toxicity after different treatment modalities. For each patient a standardized summary of therapy delivered is documented. According to the definition of the risk criteria an individualized schedule for follow-up is decided upon. We hope that this structured concept will result in appropriate patient care while keeping the diagnostic efforts and costs limited. PMID:7564151

  6. Carepaths: a framework for quality patient care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: The goals of a carepath are to provide a framework for quality patient care, enhance collaborative practice, improve resource utilization, and increase patient satisfaction. Carepaths are designed to move the patient toward specific clinical outcomes, which have been defined by a multidisciplinary team. Carepaths enhance the quality improvement process by tracking clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. The purpose of this report is to share the 1996 results of our breast cancer carepath. Methods: In 1994 the multidisciplinary Quality Improvement Committee of the Division of Radiation Oncology constructed a carepath for women with breast cancer receiving breast or chest wall radiation. Eleven clinical outcomes were defined which reflected the educational and selfcare focus of the carepath. Recording on the carepath of patient attainment of the outcomes was done by the RN, RTT and MD. Patient satisfaction tools were designed by the quality improvement committee in conjunction with the Department of Marketing Support. Each patient was given a written survey at two points along the carepath: post simulation and post treatment. Results: Ninety-five women were placed on the breast carepath in 1996. Outcomes were reviewed for 40 of these carepaths. The return rate of patient satisfaction surveys post simulation and post treatment approached 99%. Overall satisfaction was high with 76% of patients feeling 'very satisfied' with the simulation process and 93% 'very satisfied' with the treatment experience. Common themes noted in anecdotes related to comfort and privacy issues. Conclusions: Based on our experience, carepaths facilitated the structuring of a comprehensive and collaborative approach to patient care. Strategies for process improvement were guided by the ongoing surveillance of clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction

  7. 7 CFR 240.4 - Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and adult care institutions. 240.4 Section 240.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... LIEU OF DONATED FOODS § 240.4 Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care... or adult care institutions participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. FNS shall pay...

  8. [Semiotic Studies Lab for Patient Care Interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Dulce Maria; Portella, Jean Cristtus; Bianchi e Silva, Laura

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this experience report is to present the Semiotic Studies Lab for Patient Care Interactions (Laboratório de Estudos Semióticos nas Interações de Cuidado - LESIC). The lab was set up at the Nursing School of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Brazil in 2010. It has the purpose of providing didactic and pedagogical updates, based on the Theory developed by the Paris School of Semiotics, that enable the increase of knowledge and interactive/observational skills regarding the nature and mastery of human care.

  9. Promoting Patient- and Family-Centered Care Through Personal Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Beverley H

    2016-03-01

    Patient- and family-centered care is an approach to the planning, delivery, and evaluation of health care that is grounded in mutually beneficial partnerships among patients, their families, and health care professionals. It redefines the relationships in health care by placing an emphasis on collaborating with patients of all ages, and their families, at all levels of care, in all health care settings, and in organizational change and improvement. This collaboration ensures that health care is responsive to an individual's priorities, preferences, and values. In patient- and family-centered care, patients define their "family" and determine how they and their family will participate in care and decision making. While patient- and family-centered care can improve the experience of care, safety, and quality, it also can improve the learning environment for students and trainees. The author shares personal stories to illustrate the core concepts of patient- and family-centered care, when they are present in health care interactions, and when they are not. Drawing from these stories and the author's experience in working with academic medical centers and other health care organizations over many decades, recommendations for changes in medical education are suggested that can contribute to the development of a health care workforce with the skills and commitment to partner respectfully, effectively, and authentically with patients and families. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act gives new impetus for building a health care delivery system and related educational programs to support patient- and family-centered practice. PMID:26796094

  10. Who Are the Clients?: Goal Displacement in an Adult Care Center for Elders with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Corey M.

    2009-01-01

    This ethnographic study of "goal displacement" in an adult day care center explains how and why certain goals come to surpass others in the organizational practices of elder day care settings. Adult day care is often oriented towards providing family caregivers with respite rather than attempting to directly improve the lives of the elders…

  11. Brief Report: The Medical Care of Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders--Identifying the Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Mary Beth; Kerins, Gerard; Mazzarella, Cynthia; Sims, Jessica; Stein, Neil

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of information concerning adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), especially with regards to their access to health care. A paper and electronic survey was sent to 1,580 primary care physicians in Connecticut. 346 respondents returned a survey and provided care to adults with an ASD. This physician survey provides data on…

  12. Characterization of care for patients with wounds in Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Ramos Vieira Santos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe the treatment of patients with wounds in the Primary Health Care. A descriptive research with quantitative approach. Ninety-three Family Health Units of the city of Recife-PE, Brazil, were selected, and 112 nurses were interviewed from July to December 2011. The record book of bandages and procedures and the dressing form were used as an additional source of data. Frequencies, measures of central tendency and dispersion, prevalence and, for continuous variables, the analysis of variance were estimated. The prevalence of patients with wounds was 1.9% of the estimated covered population. Vascular ulcers accounted for 74.1% of the treated wounds. The dressing was predominantly performed by Nursing technicians, and the products available for this procedure did not match the current technological development.

  13. Nursing care mapping for patients at risk of falls in the Nursing Interventions Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa de Freitas Luzia; Miriam de Abreu Almeida; Amália de Fátima Lucena

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Identifying the prescribed nursing care for hospitalized patients at risk of falls and comparing them with the interventions of the Nursing Interventions Classifications (NIC). Method: A cross-sectional study carried out in a university hospital in southern Brazil. It was a retrospective data collection in the nursing records system. The sample consisted of 174 adult patients admitted to medical and surgical units with the Nursing Diagnosis of Risk for falls. The prescribed care we...

  14. Mapping the nursing care with the NIC for patients in risk for pressure ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Gabriela Silva Pereira; Cássia Teixeira dos Santos; Dóris Baratz Menegon; Bruna Schroeder Mello; Fernanda Azambuja; Amália de Fátima Lucena

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To identify the nursing care prescribed for patients in risk for pressure ulcer (PU) and to compare those with the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) interventions. Method: Cross mapping study conducted in a university hospital. The sample was composed of 219 adult patients hospitalized in clinical and surgical units. The inclusion criteria were: score ≤ 13 in the Braden Scale and one of the nursing diagnoses, Self-Care deficit syndrome, Impaired physical mobility, Impaired ...

  15. Appropriate Application of Evidence to the Care of Elderly Patients with Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Elbert S.

    2007-01-01

    Modern diabetes care may benefit a significant proportion of adults living with diabetes; however, these benefits may not be consistently realized among the heterogeneous subpopulation of elderly patients over 65 years of age. There are three clinical constraints that have been proposed as important considerations for individualizing diabetes care among elderly patients. Life expectancy should be an important determinant of the intensity of glucose control because intensive control has been f...

  16. Rheumatoid arthritis patients' experience of climate care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaks, Katrin; Sjöström, Rita

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand and examine how patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience climate care and its effects. A qualitative approach was chosen for the study. Two men and six women were interviewed according to a semistructured interview guide. The text was analyzed using a manifest content analysis. The analysis resulted in four categories and 10 subcategories. The interviewees experienced climate care positively. The training was perceived increasing gradually. The patients felt that they performed to a maximum capacity during training and were impressed by the staff's enthusiasm and encouragement. The patients felt that they were involved in the goal setting and the choice of treatment, and the staff noticed individual needs. There was a feeling among the patients of being acknowledged by the staff. Information about the disease was perceived as individualized. The climate and beautiful surroundings were viewed as encouraging physical activity and a feeling of well-being. Patients made new friends, had fun together and also shared experiences about their disease. Furthermore, the patients described a sense of belonging to a group as well as a feeling of not being the only one that was sick among the healthy. Not having to do everyday tasks and having time to themselves were perceived positively. Several factors contributed to the positive experiences of climate care; climate, environment, physical activity, social context, staff involvement, and information about the disease were described as interacting together and resulting in a sense of well-being. A proposal for future research would be to examine if/how the various factors might interact and affect the RA patients' illness and quality of life. PMID:26730385

  17. Clowning in Health Care Settings: The Point of View of Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionigi, Alberto; Canestrari, Carla

    2016-08-01

    Within the past decade, there has been a surge of interest in investigating the effects of clown intervention in a large variety of clinical settings. Many studies have focused on the effects of clown intervention on children. However, few studies have investigated clowning effects on adults. This paper presents an overview of the concept of medical clowning followed by a literature review conducted on the empirical studies drawn from three data bases (PubMed, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar), with the aim of mapping and discussing the evidence of clowning effects on non-children, namely adults. The following areas were investigated: Adult and elderly patients (mainly those with dementia), observers of clowning, namely non-hospitalized adults who are at the hospital as relatives of patients or health-care staff, and finally clowns themselves. The main results are that 1) clown intervention induces positive emotions, thereby enhancing the patient's well-being, reduces psychological symptoms and emotional reactivity, and prompts a decrease in negative emotions, such as anxiety and stress; 2) clown doctors are also well-perceived by relatives and healthcare staff and their presence appears to be useful in creating a lighter atmosphere in the health setting; 3) few pilot studies have been conducted on clown doctors and this lacuna represents a subject for future research. PMID:27547261

  18. Learning Motivational Interviewing: A Pathway to Caring and Mindful Patient Encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Diane; Apodaca, Timothy; Trowbridge, Kelly; Hafeman, Carol; Roderick, Edith; Modrcin, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We designed our project to explore the experience of learning motivational interviewing (MI). The project impetus came from a desire to improve our skill in communicating with patients. We created a curriculum led by an MI specialist that provided didactic sessions, discussions and individual feedback. In evaluating our audio-taped MI encounters, we approached beginner proficiency. Also, we recognized the need for formal MI education and practice to fully develop the interventionist skills needed for clinical work and our next research project about preparing patients for transition to adult health care. Lastly, we realized that MI strategies reflect aspects of caring theory and mindfulness, important components of patient-centered care.

  19. Caring for risky patients: duty or virtue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, T

    2008-06-01

    The emergence several years ago of SARS, with its high rate of infection and death among healthcare workers, resurrected a recurring ethical question: do health professionals have a duty to provide care to patients with deadly infectious diseases, even at some substantial risk to themselves and their families? The conventional answer, repeated on the heels of the SARS epidemic, is that they do. In this paper, I argue that the arguments in support of such a duty are wanting in significant respects, and that the language of duty is simply not adequate to an understanding of all the moral dimensions of professional responses to the care of risky patients. Instead, we should speak the language of virtues and ideals if we want to do justice to the complexity of such harrowing circumstances. PMID:18511620

  20. Specialised care in patients undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Gouma, D. J.; Busch, O.R.C.; Tol, J.A.M.G.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies the controversies in the management of patients with pancreatic cancer undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy and determines different factors that will improve this management and thereby the postoperative outcomes. The studies were performed in both the pre-, peri- and postoperative phase. The improvement of preoperative care is analysed by studying the impact of preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) by using metal stents instead of plastic stents, whether the type of stent infl...

  1. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Older Adults with Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Therapist Manual for Primary Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Melinda A.; Diefenbach, Gretchen J.; Hopko, Derek R.

    2004-01-01

    At least four academic clinical trials have demonstrated the utility of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). These data may not generalize, however, to more heterogeneous and functionally impaired patients and the medical settings in which they typically receive care. A recent pilot project…

  2. What is supportive when an adult next-of-kin is in critical care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Ingrid; Fridlund, Bengt; Hildingh, Cathrine

    2005-01-01

    There is little documented knowledge about what is supportive from the perspective of relatives with a critically ill next-of-kin in the intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of the present study was to generate a theoretical understanding of what relatives experience as supportive when faced with the situation of having an adult next-of-kin admitted to critical care. The study was designed using a grounded theory methodology. Interviews were conducted with 29 adult relatives of adult ICU patients in southwest Sweden. Relatives described the need to be empowered and that support was needed to enable them to use both internal and external resources to cope with having a next-of-kin in critical care. To achieve empowerment, the relatives described the need to trust in oneself, to encounter charity and to encounter professionalism. The findings can contribute understanding and sensitivity to the situation of the relatives as well as indicating what form social support should take. It is essential that healthcare professionals understand how important it is for relatives to have control over their vulnerable situation and that they also reflect upon how they would like to be treated themselves in a similar situation. Recommendations for future practice are presented. PMID:16255336

  3. Nursing care of patients with cataract

    OpenAIRE

    VESELÁ, Markéta

    2012-01-01

    This Bachelor´s thesis focuses on caring for cataract patients. Cataract is one of the leading causes of blindness in the world and the surgery for its correction is the most common surgery in the developed countries. 80 % of all that people perceive comes to them through their eyes; that´s why deteorating vision may mean limited self-sufficiency or even a complete loss of thereof; patients may then find it difficult to look after themselves. This Bachelor´s thesis consists of both theoretica...

  4. Crew Management Processes Revitalize Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, two physicians, former NASA astronauts, created LifeWings Partners LLC in Memphis, Tennessee and began using Crew Resource Management (CRM) techniques developed at Ames Research Center in the 1970s to help improve safety and efficiency at hospitals. According to the company, when hospitals follow LifeWings? training, they can see major improvements in a number of areas, including efficiency, employee satisfaction, operating room turnaround, patient advocacy, and overall patient outcomes. LifeWings has brought its CRM training to over 90 health care organizations and annual sales have remained close to $3 million since 2007.

  5. Primary health care to patients with gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vladimirovna Sklyanova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gout is a systemic tophaceous disease that is becoming more and more prevalent. If untreated or poorly managed, gout can result in disability. The possible reason for inadequate gout control may be that the primary care physicians are unaware of diagnostic criteria and clinical guidelines for the management of these patients and diagnostic errors. Objective: to estimate the level of gout knowledge in primary care physicians. Subjects and methods. Fifty Irkutsk local therapists were questioned. A specially developed anonymous questionnaire included items on sex, age, work experience, and the principles of gout diagnosis and treatment. Results. Only 42% of the therapists know that the gold standard for diagnosis of gout is identification of monosodium urate crystals by polarizing microscopy. Only 6% of the therapists use the Wallace classification criteria for the early diagnosis of gout. 56 % of the physicians consider it possible to prescribe allopurinol in the acute period of the disease 26% think that allopurinol intake can be stopped after normouricemia is achieved; 10% of the physicians do not prescribe allopurinol for gout patients. These widespread errors lead to worsening arthritis and a negative attitude of patients towards allopurinol treatment in future. Conclusion. The findings suggest that the level of gout knowledge should be increased in primary care physicians.

  6. Primary health care to patients with gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vladimirovna Sklyanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gout is a systemic tophaceous disease that is becoming more and more prevalent. If untreated or poorly managed, gout can result in disability. The possible reason for inadequate gout control may be that the primary care physicians are unaware of diagnostic criteria and clinical guidelines for the management of these patients and diagnostic errors. Objective: to estimate the level of gout knowledge in primary care physicians. Subjects and methods. Fifty Irkutsk local therapists were questioned. A specially developed anonymous questionnaire included items on sex, age, work experience, and the principles of gout diagnosis and treatment. Results. Only 42% of the therapists know that the gold standard for diagnosis of gout is identification of monosodium urate crystals by polarizing microscopy. Only 6% of the therapists use the Wallace classification criteria for the early diagnosis of gout. 56 % of the physicians consider it possible to prescribe allopurinol in the acute period of the disease 26% think that allopurinol intake can be stopped after normouricemia is achieved; 10% of the physicians do not prescribe allopurinol for gout patients. These widespread errors lead to worsening arthritis and a negative attitude of patients towards allopurinol treatment in future. Conclusion. The findings suggest that the level of gout knowledge should be increased in primary care physicians.

  7. Transitions of care in anticoagulated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michota F

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Franklin Michota Department of Hospital Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Anticoagulation is an effective therapeutic means of reducing thrombotic risk in patients with various conditions, including atrial fibrillation, mechanical heart valves, and major surgery. By its nature, anticoagulation increases the risk of bleeding; this risk is particularly high during transitions of care. Established anticoagulants are not ideal, due to requirements for parenteral administration, narrow therapeutic indices, and/or a need for frequent therapeutic monitoring. The development of effective oral anticoagulants that are administered as a fixed dose, have low potential for drug-drug and drug-food interactions, do not require regular anticoagulation monitoring, and are suitable for both inpatient and outpatient use is to be welcomed. Three new oral anticoagulants, the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate, and the factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, have been approved in the US for reducing the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation; rivaroxaban is also approved for prophylaxis and treatment of deep vein thrombosis, which may lead to pulmonary embolism in patients undergoing knee or hip replacement surgery. This review examines current options for anticoagulant therapy, with a focus on maintaining efficacy and safety during transitions of care. The characteristics of dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are discussed in the context of traditional anticoagulant therapy. Keywords: hemorrhagic events, oral anticoagulation, parenteral anticoagulation, stroke, transitions of care

  8. Effect of Organizational Culture on Patient Access, Care Continuity, and Experience of Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Dorothy; Chung, Sukyung; Martinez, Meghan; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined relationships between organizational culture and patient-centered outcomes in primary care. Generalized least squares regression was used to analyze patient access, care continuity, and reported experiences of care among 357 physicians in 41 primary care departments. Compared with a "Group-oriented" culture, a "Rational" culture type was associated with longer appointment wait times, and both "Hierarchical" and "Developmental" culture types were associated with less care continuity, but better patient experiences with care. Understanding the unique effects of organizational culture can enhance the delivery of more patient-centered care. PMID:27232685

  9. Effect of Organizational Culture on Patient Access, Care Continuity, and Experience of Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Dorothy; Chung, Sukyung; Martinez, Meghan; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined relationships between organizational culture and patient-centered outcomes in primary care. Generalized least squares regression was used to analyze patient access, care continuity, and reported experiences of care among 357 physicians in 41 primary care departments. Compared with a "Group-oriented" culture, a "Rational" culture type was associated with longer appointment wait times, and both "Hierarchical" and "Developmental" culture types were associated with less care continuity, but better patient experiences with care. Understanding the unique effects of organizational culture can enhance the delivery of more patient-centered care.

  10. Patient Navigation Through the Cancer Care Continuum: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins, Janice; Mumber, Matthew P.

    2009-01-01

    Technologic advances, medical specialization, novel payment structures, and an increased scientific knowledge base have resulted in a health care system requiring trained experts to deliver guidance as patients complete care plans: Enter the concept of patient navigation.

  11. Is personality a determinant of patient satisfaction with hospital care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.J. Hendriks; E.M.A. Smets; M.R. Vrielink; S.Q. van Es; J.C.J.M. de Haes

    2006-01-01

    Objective. We investigated to what extent personality is associated with patient satisfaction with hospital care. A sizeable association with personality would render patient satisfaction invalid as an indicator of hospital care quality. Design. Overall satisfaction and satisfaction with aspects of

  12. Optimization of health-care organization and perceived improvement of patient comfort by switching from intra-venous BU four-times-daily infusions to a once-daily administration scheme in adult hematopoietic stem cell recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhaard, A; Rzepecki, P; Valcarcel, D; Santarone, S; Fürst, S; Serrano, D; De Angelis, G; Krüger, W; Scheid, C

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have shown an equivalent pharmacokinetic profile between four-times-daily (4QD) and once-daily (QD) administration of intra-venous (IV) BU, without increased toxicity. We assess the impact of a switch in IV BU from a 4QD to a QD schedule, in terms of health-care organization, staff working conditions, quality of care dispensed and perceived patient comfort. Clinicians, nurses and pharmacists from nine allogeneic transplantation units in five European countries were interviewed face to face. Overall perception of QD versus 4QD BU was very positive. Both administration schemes were evaluated to be equally efficaciousZ. QD BU was perceived to be safer and more convenient. Clinicians and nurses perceived that patient comfort was improved, due to fewer complications associated with repeated infusions, and avoiding night infusions associated with stress, anxiety and decreased quality of sleep. Switching from 4QD to QD BU had a significant impact on health-care organization, with a better integration in the overall management and usual timelines in the pharmacies and transplantation units. Time spent to prepare and administer BU was significantly reduced, leading to potential financial savings that merit further assessment and would be of particular interest in the current economic climate. PMID:24419513

  13. An audit of the quality of inpatient care for adults with learning disability in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Rory; Gandesha, Aarti; Hassiotis, Angela; Gallagher, Pamela; Burnell, Matthew; Jones, Glyn; Kerr, Michael; Hall, Ian; Chaplin, Robert; Crawford, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To audit patient hospital records to evaluate the performance of acute general and mental health services in delivering inpatient care to people with learning disability and explore the influence of organisational factors on the quality of care they deliver. Setting Nine acute general hospital Trusts and six mental health services. Participants Adults with learning disability who received inpatient hospital care between May 2013 and April 2014. Primary and secondary outcome measures Data on seven key indicators of high-quality care were collected from 176 patients. These covered physical health/monitoring, communication and meeting needs, capacity and decision-making, discharge planning and carer involvement. The impact of services having an electronic system for flagging patients with learning disability and employing a learning disability liaison nurse was assessed. Results Indicators of physical healthcare (body mass index, swallowing assessment, epilepsy risk assessment) were poorly recorded in acute general and mental health inpatient settings. Overall, only 34 (19.3%) patients received any assessment of swallowing and 12 of the 57 with epilepsy (21.1%) had an epilepsy risk assessment. For most quality indicators, there was a non-statistically significant trend for improved performance in services with a learning disability liaison nurse. The presence of an electronic flagging system showed less evidence of benefit. Conclusions Inpatient care for people with learning disability needs to be improved. The work gives tentative support to the role of a learning disability liaison nurse in acute general and mental health services, but further work is needed to confirm these benefits and to trial other interventions that might improve the quality and safety of care for this high-need group. PMID:27091821

  14. Appropriateness of cardiovascular care in elderly adult cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Winson Y; Levin, Raisa; Setoguchi, Soko

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that the quality of non-cancer-related care among cancer survivors (CS) is suboptimal. Secondary disease prevention is an important component of survivorship care that has not been previously evaluated. Our aims were (1) to assess the utilization of and adherence to medications and treatments for the secondary prevention of myocardial infarction (MI) in CS versus non-cancer patients (NCP) and (2) to compare temporal trends in cardiovascular care between these two patient cohorts. Linking data from Medicare, pharmacy assistance programs, and cancer registries, we calculated the percentage of individuals receiving preventive medications (statins, β-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors) and revascularization interventions (angioplasty, stent, bypass surgery) within 90 days after acute MI in CS and propensity score-matched NCP. We assessed trends over time and determined predictors of appropriate preventive care using modified Poisson regression. We identified 1,119 CS and 7,886 NCP. Compared to NCP, more survivors received statins (38 vs. 31 %) and β-blockers (67 vs. 59 %), but fewer underwent bypass surgery (1.5 vs. 2.8 %) after MI. From 1997 to 2004, both survivors and NCP were increasingly prescribed medications to prevent future coronary events. Over the same time period, receipt of bypass surgery was significantly lower among survivors. Co-morbidities, such as depression and lung disease, and demographic factors, such as advanced age and female, were associated with underuse of preventive care among survivors when compared to NCP. Use of preventive medications and procedures has generally improved, but uptake of bypass surgery among CS still lags behind NCP.

  15. Dental care of patients with substance abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, K

    1999-07-01

    Patients who abuse alcohol, crack, heroin or prescription drugs, are likely to interact with the dental professional. The dentist should therefore be able to identify problems of abuse and provide informed care and referral. Substance abuse should be a consideration in all patients who present with dental trauma and those who present with frequent vague complaints, multiple pain medication allergies, and regimens with multiple narcotic medications. Polydrug use, either prescription or illicit, is also a possibility, and effective treatment requires prompt recognition. Dentists should be alert to drug-seeking behavior within the context of pain management, and because pain severity is an objective experience, each patient must be treated carefully and sensitively. Unrelieved or unremitting pain can be a relapse trigger and therefore adequate pain control is a necessity in the recovering chemically dependent patient. New modalities, such as coanalgesia with low-dose ketamine in the opioid addicted have been shown to work effectively. In the post-dental surgical patient with chemical dependency, agents with less psychoactive activity than their drugs of abuse, such as extended-release morphine (MS Contin) have been tried with variable success. An informed treatment plan includes recognition of substance abuse, appropriate intervention, and referral. This plan may include universal screening, followed by brief interventional therapy for positive patients and in some cases, pharmacological pain control. On discharge from the office, instructions concerning referral to a substance abuse program or, in the case of the patient who may require more immediate treatment, to the emergency department are important. PMID:10516924

  16. Determinants of mortality for adults with cystic fibrosis admitted in Intensive Care Unit: a multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabbat Antoine

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensive care unit (ICU admission of adults with cystic fibrosis (CF is controversial because of poor outcome. This appraisal needs re-evaluation following recent changes in both CF management and ICU daily practice. Objectives were to determine long-term outcome of adults with CF admitted in ICU and to identify prognostic factors. Methods Retrospective multicenter study of 60 ICU hospitalizations for 42 adult CF patients admitted between 2000 and 2003. Reason for ICU admission, ventilatory support provided and one-year survival were recorded. Multiple logistic analysis was used to determine predictors of mortality. Results Prior to ICU admission, all patients (mean age 28.1 ± 8 yr had a severe lung disease (mean FEV1 28 ± 12% predicted; mean PaCO2 47 ± 9 mmHg. Main reason for ICU hospitalization was pulmonary infective exacerbation (40/60. At admission, noninvasive ventilation was used in 57% of cases and was successful in 67% of patients. Endotracheal intubation was implemented in 19 episodes. Overall ICU mortality rate was 14%. One year after ICU discharge, 10 of the 28 survivors have been lung transplanted. Among recognized markers of CF disease severity, only the annual FEV1 loss was associated with a poor outcome (HR = 1.47 [1.18–1.85], p = 0.001. SAPSII (HR = 1.08 [1.03–1.12], p Conclusion Despite advanced lung disease, adult patients with CF admitted in ICU have high survival rate. Endotracheal intubation is associated with a poor prognosis and should be used as the last alternative. Although efforts have to be made in selecting patients with CF likely to benefit from ICU resources, ICU admission of these patients should be considered.

  17. Care of the patient with a tracheotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobillo-De Lamo F

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A tracheostomy is a hole coming through the neck into the trachea, allowing the placement of a tube. Tracheotomy: Temporary opening in the trachea. Tracheostomy: Permanent opening (total laryngectomy. The opening of the trachea modifies the physiology of the aerodigestive tract: you need to humidify inspired air; lost sense of smell and as a result taste (decreasing appetite; disappears the phonation (in the case of tracheostomy spoken with oesophageal voice or through prosthesis phonatory; altered swallowing; lost the protection of the airway and sphincter function, decreasing the abdominal press (cough, defecation childbirth.... The care of the patient with a tracheotomy involves treatment of respiratory secretions, humidification and heating of inspired air, tracheal suction procedures and care and cleaning of the tracheal stoma. But it is also necessary to know and know to solve the complications that may arise, such as: obstruction of the tracheotomy tube, the bleeding of the stoma or spontaneous decannulation. Otolaryngology and the intensive care unit nurses, explain what you need to know of the patient with a tracheotomy that it is driven to plant from these services.

  18. Caring for the elderly female psychiatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Mudhasir; Holroyd, Suzanne

    2010-06-01

    With the growth of the elderly population, and the female elderly population in particular, healthcare providers will see increasing numbers of elderly women with psychiatric disorders. To properly care for this group of patients, better understanding is needed not only of group differences in this patient population but also of the differences in each individual, as they age, given their unique life experiences, cohort effects, medical comorbidity, social situation, and personality traits. Understandably, these characteristics will interact with psychiatric disorders in ways that may increase the challenge to correctly diagnose and treat these patients. In addition, understanding late life changes, the prevalence of various mental disorders and the sometimes unique presentation of mental disorders in this age group is required to better diagnose and treat this population.

  19. Modeling Safety Outcomes on Patient Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Anita; Effken, Judith; Carley, Kathleen; Lee, Ju-Sung

    In its groundbreaking report, "To Err is Human," the Institute of Medicine reported that as many as 98,000 hospitalized patients die each year due to medical errors (IOM, 2001). Although not all errors are attributable to nurses, nursing staff (registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and technicians) comprise 54% of the caregivers. Therefore, it is not surprising, that AHRQ commissioned the Institute of Medicine to do a follow-up study on nursing, particularly focusing on the context in which care is provided. The intent was to identify characteristics of the workplace, such as staff per patient ratios, hours on duty, education, and other environmental characteristics. That report, "Keeping Patients Safe: Transforming the Work Environment of Nurses" was published this spring (IOM, 2004).

  20. Clowning in Health Care Settings: The Point of View of Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionigi, Alberto; Canestrari, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Within the past decade, there has been a surge of interest in investigating the effects of clown intervention in a large variety of clinical settings. Many studies have focused on the effects of clown intervention on children. However, few studies have investigated clowning effects on adults. This paper presents an overview of the concept of medical clowning followed by a literature review conducted on the empirical studies drawn from three data bases (PubMed, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar), with the aim of mapping and discussing the evidence of clowning effects on non-children, namely adults. The following areas were investigated: Adult and elderly patients (mainly those with dementia), observers of clowning, namely non-hospitalized adults who are at the hospital as relatives of patients or health-care staff, and finally clowns themselves. The main results are that 1) clown intervention induces positive emotions, thereby enhancing the patient’s well-being, reduces psychological symptoms and emotional reactivity, and prompts a decrease in negative emotions, such as anxiety and stress; 2) clown doctors are also well-perceived by relatives and healthcare staff and their presence appears to be useful in creating a lighter atmosphere in the health setting; 3) few pilot studies have been conducted on clown doctors and this lacuna represents a subject for future research. PMID:27547261

  1. Clowning in Health Care Settings: The Point of View of Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Dionigi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the past decade, there has been a surge of interest in investigating the effects of clown intervention in a large variety of clinical settings. Many studies have focused on the effects of clown intervention on children. However, few studies have investigated clowning effects on adults. This paper presents an overview of the concept of medical clowning followed by a literature review conducted on the empirical studies drawn from three data bases (PubMed, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar, with the aim of mapping and discussing the evidence of clowning effects on non-children, namely adults. The following areas were investigated: Adult and elderly patients (mainly those with dementia, observers of clowning, namely non-hospitalized adults who are at the hospital as relatives of patients or health-care staff, and finally clowns themselves. The main results are that 1 clown intervention induces positive emotions, thereby enhancing the patient’s well-being, reduces psychological symptoms and emotional reactivity, and prompts a decrease in negative emotions, such as anxiety and stress; 2 clown doctors are also well-perceived by relatives and healthcare staff and their presence appears to be useful in creating a lighter atmosphere in the health setting; 3 few pilot studies have been conducted on clown doctors and this lacuna represents a subject for future research.

  2. Consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux-Charles Louise

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensivists must provide enough analgesia and sedation to ensure dying patients receive good palliative care. However, if it is perceived that too much is given, they risk prosecution for committing euthanasia. The goal of this study is to develop consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients that help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia. Methods Using the Delphi technique, panelists rated levels of agreement with statements describing how analgesics and sedatives should be given to dying ICU patients and how palliative care should be distinguished from euthanasia. Participants were drawn from 3 panels: 1 Canadian Academic Adult Intensive Care Fellowship program directors and Intensive Care division chiefs (N = 9; 2 Deputy chief provincial coroners (N = 5; 3 Validation panel of Intensivists attending the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group meeting (N = 12. Results After three Delphi rounds, consensus was achieved on 16 statements encompassing the role of palliative care in the intensive care unit, the management of pain and suffering, current areas of controversy, and ways of improving palliative care in the ICU. Conclusion Consensus guidelines were developed to guide the administration of analgesics and sedatives to dying ICU patients and to help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia.

  3. Guiding Hypertensive Adult Patients : A Literature Review of Evidence- Based Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Afolabi, Joshua; Guo, Haochuan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract of Thesis LAPLAND UNIVERSITY OF APPLIED SCIENCES Health Care And Social Services Degree Programme in Nursing Bachelor’s Thesis________________________________________ Authors Guo Haochuan And Joshua Afolabi Year 2014 Advisors Mirja Anttila And Seppo Kilpiäinen Title Guiding Hypertensive Adult Patients Pages 47pages________________________________________ This thesis dealt with the guida...

  4. Waterborne Elizabethkingia meningoseptica in Adult Critical Care1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Daniel S.; Jepson, Annette; Turton, Jane F.; Ashworth, Simon; Donaldson, Hugo; Holmes, Alison H.

    2016-01-01

    Elizabethkingia meningoseptica is an infrequent colonizer of the respiratory tract; its pathogenicity is uncertain. In the context of a 22-month outbreak of E. meningoseptica acquisition affecting 30 patients in a London, UK, critical care unit (3% attack rate) we derived a measure of attributable morbidity and determined whether E. meningoseptica is an emerging nosocomial pathogen. We found monomicrobial E. meningoseptica acquisition (n = 13) to have an attributable morbidity rate of 54% (systemic inflammatory response syndrome >2, rising C-reactive protein, new radiographic changes), suggesting that E. meningoseptica is a pathogen. Epidemiologic and molecular evidence showed acquisition was water-source–associated in critical care but identified numerous other E. meningoseptica strains, indicating more widespread distribution than previously considered. Analysis of changes in gram-negative speciation rates across a wider London hospital network suggests this outbreak, and possibly other recently reported outbreaks, might reflect improved diagnostics and that E. meningoseptica thus is a pseudo-emerging pathogen. PMID:26690562

  5. Patients from across Europe have similar views on patient-centred care: an international multilingual qualitative study in infertility care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dancet, E.A.; D'Hooghe, T.M.; Sermeus, W.; Empel, I. van; Strohmer, H.; Wyns, C.; Santa-Cruz, D.; Nardo, L.G.; Kovatchki, D.; Vanlangenakker, L.; Garcia-Velasco, J.; Mulugeta, B.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.; Kremer, J.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: International patient centredness concepts were suggested but never conceptualized from the patients' perspective. Previously, a literature review and a monolingual qualitative study defined 'patient-centred infertility care' (PCIC). The present study aimed to test whether patients from

  6. Alternate Level of Care Patients in Hospitals: What Does Dementia Have To Do With This?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Rose; Jarrett, Pamela; Stewart, Connie; Nicholson, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients in acute care hospitals no longer in need of acute care are called Alternate Level of Care (ALC) patients. This is growing and common all across Canada. A better understanding of this patient population would help to address this problem. Methods A chart review was conducted in two hospitals in New Brunswick. All patients designated as ALC on July 1, 2009 had their charts reviewed. Results Thirty-three per cent of the hospital beds were occupied with ALC patients; 63% had a diagnosis of dementia. The mean length of stay was 379.6 days. Eighty-six per cent were awaiting a long-term care bed in the community. Most patients experienced functional decline during their hospitalization. One year prior to admission, 61% had not been admitted to hospital and 59.2% had had at least one visit to the emergency room. Conclusions The majority of the ALC patients in hospital have a diagnosis of dementia and have been waiting in hospital for over one year for a long-term care bed in the community. Many participants were recipients of maximum home care in the community, suggesting home maker services alone may not be adequate for some community-dwelling older adults. Early diagnosis of dementia, coupled with appropriate care in the community, may help to curtail the number of patients with dementia who end up in hospital as ALC patients. PMID:25232367

  7. Care of Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Benjamin; Jones, Kyle Bradford; Weedon, Dean; Bilder, Deborah

    2015-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic disorder involving excess genetic material from chromosome 21. The incidence of DS is increasing, and the life expectancy for individuals with DS has increased to a median age of 55 years. Adults with DS are at increased risk of several conditions, including significant neurologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, endocrine, psychiatric, hematologic, and social comorbidities, and additional screening or monitoring may be needed. Additional preventive measures for patients with DS include regular screening for thyroid dysfunction, hearing loss, eye disorders, heart disease, osteoporosis, and dementia, and one-time vaccination with the polyvalent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23). Quality of life should be the main focus of treatment, with patients being involved in medical decisions as much as possible.

  8. Palliative care among heart failure patients in primary care: a comparison to cancer patients using English family practice data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Gadoud

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with heart failure have a significant symptom burden and other palliative care needs often over a longer period than patients with cancer. It is acknowledged that this need may be unmet but by how much has not been quantified in primary care data at the population level. METHODS: This was the first use of Clinical Practice Research Datalink, the world's largest primary care database to explore recognition of the need for palliative care. Heart failure and cancer patients who had died in 2009 aged 18 or over and had at least one year of primary care records were identified. A palliative approach to care among patients with heart failure was compared to that among patients with cancer using entry onto a palliative care register as a marker for a palliative approach to care. RESULTS: Among patients with heart failure, 7% (234/3 122 were entered on the palliative care register compared to 48% (3 669/7 608 of cancer patients. Of heart failure patients on the palliative care register, 29% (69/234 were entered onto the register within a week of their death. CONCLUSIONS: This confirms that the stark inequity in recognition of palliative care needs for people with heart failure in a large primary care dataset. We recommend a move away from prognosis based criteria for palliative care towards a patient centred approach, with assessment of and attention to palliative needs including advance care planning throughout the disease trajectory.

  9. [Chemotherapy for brain tumors in adult patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, M

    2008-02-01

    Chemotherapy has become a third major treatment option for patients with brain tumors, in addition to surgery and radiotherapy. The role of chemotherapy in the treatment of gliomas is no longer limited to recurrent disease. Temozolomide has become the standard of care in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Several ongoing trials seek to define the role of chemotherapy in the primary care of other gliomas. Some of these studies are no longer only based on histological diagnoses, but take into consideration molecular markers such as MGMT promoter methylation and loss of genetic material on chromosomal arms 1p and 19q. Outside such clinical trials chemotherapy is used in addition to radiotherapy, e.g., in anaplastic astrocytoma, medulloblastoma or germ cell tumors, or as an alternative to radiotherapy, e.g., in anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors or low-grade gliomas. In contrast, there is no established role for chemotherapy in other tumors such as ependymomas, meningiomas or neurinomas. Primary cerebral lymphomas are probably the only brain tumors which can be cured by chemotherapy alone and only by chemotherapy. The chemotherapy of brain metastases follows the recommendations for the respective primary tumors. Further, strategies of combined radiochemotherapy using mainly temozolomide or topotecan are currently explored. Leptomeningeal metastases are treated by radiotherapy or systemic or intrathecal chemotherapy depending on their pattern of growth. PMID:18253773

  10. Experiences of nursing staff on psychiatric care of depressed patients

    OpenAIRE

    Suutarinen, Kreetta-Maija

    2012-01-01

    The thesis researched the views and experiences of nursing staff of psychiatric special care ward on psychiatric care of depressed patients. Because caring is patient/client oriented profession, it is essential to include patients and nursing staff in the development work. This assumption was basis for the thesis. The thesis aimed to add knowledge on the views of the nursing staff and to show how this knowledge can be used in development of psychiatric care. The thesis also pursue...

  11. Primary Care Use before Cancer Diagnosis in Adolescents and Young Adults - A Nationwide Register Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrensberg, Jette Møller; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Vedsted, Peter

    2016-01-01

    with cancer during 2002-2011 in the age group 15-39 years were included (N = 12,306); each participant was matched on gender, age and general practice with 10 randomly selected references (N = 123,060). The use of primary healthcare services (face-to-face contacts, blood tests and psychometric tests......) was measured during the two years preceding the diagnosis (index date), and collected data were analysed in a negative binomial regression model. RESULTS: The cases generally increased their use of primary care already from 8 months before a cancer diagnosis, whereas a similar trend was not found for controls......INTRODUCTION: Survival rates of cancer patients have generally improved in recent years. However, children and older adults seem to have experienced more significant clinical benefits than adolescents and young adults (AYAs). Previous studies suggest a prolonged diagnostic pathway in AYAs...

  12. Experiences of Community-Living Older Adults Receiving Integrated Care Based on the Chronic Care Model : A Qualitative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoorenberg, Sophie L. W.; Wynia, Klaske; Fokkens, Andrea S.; Slotman, Karin; Kremer, Hubertus P. H.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrated care models aim to solve the problem of fragmented and poorly coordinated care in current healthcare systems. These models aim to be patient-centered by providing continuous and coordinated care and by considering the needs and preferences of patients. The objective of this stu

  13. From Practice Culture to Patient Outcomes: Improving Primary Care Through Interdisciplinary Health Care Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Grace, Sherry M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2011, a large integrated healthcare organization implemented a primary care team redesign in five pilot practices to improve the delivery of patient-centered chronic illness care and augment the physician-medical assistant dyads by adding two new primary care team roles for each practice - a nurse care manager (NCM) and a patient health coach (PHC). This work examines three aspects of implementing the care team redesign: 1) The facilitators and barriers of implementation, 2) Th...

  14. Medical Assistant-based care management for high risk patients in small primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M.;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk of potentially avoidable hospital admissions, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. Objective......: To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves patient care in patients at high risk of future hospitalization in primary care. Design: Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. Setting: 115 primary care practices in Germany. Patients: 2,076 patients with type 2...... diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or chronic heart failure and a likelihood of hospitalization in the upper quartile of the population, as predicted by insurance data analysis. Intervention: We compared protocol-based care management including structured assessment, action planning...

  15. Separate and Cumulative Effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences in Predicting Adult Health and Health Care Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Mariette J.; Walker, John R.; Naimark, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Objectives of this population-based study were: (1) to examine the relative contribution of childhood abuse and other adverse childhood experiences to poor adult health and increased health care utilization and (2) to examine the cumulative effects of adverse childhood experiences on adult health and health care utilization. Methods:…

  16. Bioética e nutrição em cuidados paliativos oncológicos em adultos Bioethics and nutrition in adult patients with cancer in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica de Oliveira Benarroz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O câncer vem se destacando entre as doenças crônicas, sendo a segunda causa de morte em países desenvolvidos. Os cuidados paliativos se propõem a oferecer cuidados de suporte global, visando ao controle de sintomas e à melhora da qualidade de vida dos pacientes e de seus familiares. A nutrição é uma ferramenta importante nos cuidados paliativos, podendo ajudar o paciente nos aspectos físico, psicológico e social, além de promover o bem-estar e a qualidade de vida. Entretanto, a nutrição raramente poderá cumprir seu papel de recuperar e garantir o estado nutricional. Nesse momento, a intervenção do nutricionista é considerar as necessidades do indivíduo, preferências e hábitos alimentares, fundamentais tanto para o controle dos sintomas, quanto para garantir satisfação e conforto. A impossibilidade do exercício convencional das condutas já estabelecidas e o desenvolvimento de uma nova percepção do doente muitas vezes produzem dilemas para o profissional nutricionista.Cancer constitutes a major group of chronic diseases and is the second leading cause of death in the developed countries. Palliative care proposes to offer comprehensive support to control symptoms and improve quality of life for patients and their families. Nutrition is an important tool in palliative care, helping patients with their physical, psychological, and social issues and promoting comfort and quality of life. However, in the context of palliative care, nutritional support rarely achieves its role of fully recovering and assuring nutritional status. At this point, the nutritionist must consider the individual patient's needs, preferences, and eating habits, which are essential both for controlling symptoms and assuring satisfaction and comfort. The impossibility of conventionally applying established management and the development of a new perception of the patient often raise dilemmas for professional nutritionists.

  17. The survey of the knowledge,attitude and behavior about the self-care products of oral health of adult patients with oral disease%成年口腔疾病患者对自我口腔保健产品知识、态度、行为调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秀如; 张秀军; 赵春晖; 张秀梅; 罗勇

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To understand the knowledge and behavior of adult patients with oral disease about the toothbrush,toothpaste, solutions of mouth rinsing, interdental embrasure cleaning tool and sugar-free chewing gum. Methods:The adult patients with oral disease from the 2nd level hospital in Anhui province were investigated by a cluster random ampling method. Results:There were 44. 7% of patients knew the health care toothbrush,and 23. 0% of patients randomly chose toothbrush;71. 4% of patients knew the fluoride toothpaste,22. 3% of patients used it for long-term,and 39. 3% of patients randomly chose a toothpaste;41. 5% of patients knew the dental floss, and 11. 7% of patients regularly used it;20. 6% of patients knew the interdental toothbrush, and 3. 1% of patients regularly used it;51. 7% of patients knew the mouth rinsing,and 8. 0% of patients regularly used it;47. 5% of patients knew the sugar-free gum,and 35. 2% of patients frequently chewed it for strengthening oral health. There was not statistically significant difference in gender cognitive behavior of all cases(P>0. 05). The cognitive level of the patients with high education level was high, and the cognitive levels of the patients from city and enterprises were higher than that of rural residents(P0.05),相对较高文化教育程度者具有较高认知水平,城市、企事业工作人员认知水平均高于农村居民(P<0.01)。结论:患者对基本口腔自我保健产品的知识行为普遍不足;应重点加强含氟牙膏、牙线等牙间隙清洁工具以及漱口液的认知宣教;低教育水平、农村居民应是今后口腔自我保健健康教育的重点人群;应建立以刷牙和牙线清洁牙间隙作为最基本的口腔自我保健方式,辅以咀嚼无糖口香糖、漱口液漱口的系统性口腔自我保健模式和平衡发展的口腔护理产品市场体系。

  18. Very old patients admitted to intensive care in Australia and New Zealand: a multi-centre cohort analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sean M Bagshaw; Webb, Steve AR; Delaney, Anthony; George, Carol; Pilcher, David; Hart, Graeme K; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Older age is associated with higher prevalence of chronic illness and functional impairment, contributing to an increased rate of hospitalization and admission to intensive care. The primary objective was to evaluate the rate, characteristics and outcomes of very old (age ≥ 80 years) patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs). Methods Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from the Australian New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database. Data we...

  19. Care provided by general practitioners to patients with psychotic disorders: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slooff Cees J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients suffering from psychotic disorders have an increased risk of comorbid somatic diseases such as cardiovascular disorders and diabetes mellitus. Doctor-related factors, such as unfamiliarity with these patients, as well as patient-related factors, such as cognitive disturbance and negative symptoms, contribute to suboptimal health care for these patients. General practitioners (GPs could play a key role in diagnosing and treating this somatic comorbidity as in the Netherlands, almost all residents are registered at a general practice. This study aims to find out whether there are any differences between the levels of health care provided by GPs to patients with psychotic disorders, compared to other types of patients. Methods A cohort of patients with an ICPC code of psychosis and two matched control groups, one consisting of patients with other mental problems and the other one of patients without any mental problems, were followed over a period of 5 years. Results Patients with psychotic disorders (N = 734 contacted the GP practice more often than patients in the control groups. These patients, both adults (p = 0.051 and the elderly (p 65 years old (p = 0.007. With regard to chronic illnesses, elderly psychosis patients had fewer contacts related to cardiovascular diseases or chronic lung diseases. Conclusion Patients with psychotic disorders contact the GP practice more frequently than other types of patients. Adult psychosis patients with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases or chronic lung diseases receive the same amount of health care for these diseases as other primary care patients. The finding that older patients with psychotic disorders are diagnosed with cardiovascular diseases and obstructive lung diseases less frequently than other types of elderly patients requires further study.

  20. Living with and Caring for Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease in Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Yektatalab

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many of the patients with Alzheimer disease are taken care of in nursing homes. However the literature on the experiences of Iranian formal caregivers of older adults with Alzheimer disease is scarce. This qualitative study explored the caring experiences of formal caregivers in nursing homes that can improve the quality of care and patient’s quality of life. Methods: This qualitative study used the principles of descriptive content analysis to analyze these data. Our participants included 11 female and 3 male caregivers aged 25 to 38 years who were selected for interviewing based on a purposive sampling method. The data were analyzed with a content analysis method. Results: Nearly 900 initial codes were extracted and categorized into 6 main themes including "managing difficult behaviors", "dependence on familial care", "continuum of different feelings", "care for a child", "living with the patients" and "not understanding the patients", which was further analyzed in the two subcategories "caring without enough information" and " a dead man moving". Conclusion: The care provided by our informants was mainly influenced by attitudes, culture and religious beliefs of caregivers about family attachment and ample driven reward of helping and caring frail or old people in Islam. These cultural and religious beliefs could facilitate provision of care and confrontation with patients’ child-like behaviors. It is suggested that employment of trained staff and plans for their continued education can improve the quality of care and the quality of the patient's life.

  1. Prevalence of insomnia and its impact on daily function amongst Malaysian primary care patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zailinawati Abu-Hassan; Mazza Danielle; Teng Cheong Lieng

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Insomnia is a common public health problem and the prevalence and impact of insomnia in primary care attendees is not well documented in the Asian population. Objectives To determine the prevalence of self-reported insomnia symptoms amongst adult primary care attendees and the association with socio-demographic factors; to ascertain the impact of insomnia on daily functioning and to describe the psychological profile of patients with insomnia. Methods In this cross-section...

  2. Physical Function and Mental Health in Trauma Intensive Care Patients: A 2-Year Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Aitken, L.M.; Macfarlane, B.; Chaboyer, W; Schuetz, M.; Joyce, C.; Barnett, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:: This study was designed to examine changes in function over time after injury and to identify factors associated with long-term recovery that may be amenable to change through intervention. DESIGN:: Prospective cohort study. SETTING:: Intensive care in a tertiary hospital in Queensland, Australia. PATIENTS:: Adult (n = 123) admitted to intensive care for treatment of injury. INTERVENTIONS:: Data were collected prior to hospital discharge and 1, 6, 12, and 24 months post injury. D...

  3. Health care practitioners and dying patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Pentaris

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A full understanding of and a competent approach to dying patients may lead to a more qualitative service delivery, an enhanced quality of life paradigms, and the patients’ wellbeing, all of which remain the ultimate goal of health care practice. The modern world has developed in parallel with secularism and religious diversity. This paper aims to illustrate the secularization process in Britain (with indications of generalized meanings and juxtaposes it with a description of the needs of dying patients regarding the meanings of religion and nonreligion. Although this paper draws on and provides a review of selected theoretical literature, it also addresses a significant challenge: the lack of scientifi c research on the subject. Hence, this paper aims to give an overview of the issues, but not synthesise them. The arguments that are elaborated in the paper are also supported by the author’s current research project in the city of London. The approach here is client oriented, and concerns social and health care. Practitioners ought to become competent, and maintain their competence throughout their professional career. Religious competence seems to have not been at the centre of discussions, regardless of the historical pathway that religious discourse has drawn since the beginnings of humanity. The paper concludes with certain suggestions for future research and inclusive approaches regarding religious matters.

  4. Attaining baccalaureate competencies for nursing care of older adults through curriculum innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Ann Marie P; Hickey, Mary T; McCabe, Donna E; Ea, Emerson

    2012-01-01

    This new curriculum promotes up-to-date, evidence-based plans of care for older adults in acute care, long-term care, and community settings. Geriatric-specific content is a curricular thread and strong focus. Students have responded positively to the many opportunities they have to learn about the unique needs of older adults in multiple settings. Fortunately, we have several geriatric nurse practitioners on faculty along. Our students observe experts who are committed to promoting safe, quality, compassionate care to older adults in action on a daily basis.

  5. Adult Patients’ Satisfaction with Inpatient Nursing Care and Associated Factors in an Ethiopian Referral Hospital, Northeast, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokeb Haile Eyasu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patient satisfaction with nursing care is considered as an important factor in explaining patients’ perceptions of service quality. Care assessed to be high quality according to clinical, economic, or other provider-defined criteria is far from ideal if as a result of that care the patient is unhappy or dissatisfied. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess adult patients’ satisfaction with inpatient nursing care and associated factors in Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeast Ethiopia. Methods. Institution based quantitative cross-sectional study was conducted among patients admitted in medical, surgical, orthopedics, gynecology, and ophthalmology wards of the hospital from March 24 to April 30, 2013. All admitted patients who stayed in the study wards for at least two days during the data collection time were interviewed. Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scale questionnaire was used to collect the data and was analyzed using SPSS version 20. Odds ratios with their 95% confidence intervals and p values in a multiple logistic regression were used to identify factors associated with patient satisfaction with nursing care. Result. The overall patient satisfaction was 52.5%. Respondents’ sex, age, admission ward, self-reported health status, and class of admission were the variables significantly associated with patient satisfaction with nursing care. Conclusion and Recommendation. The rate of patient satisfaction with nursing care was found to be low in this study. Being female, younger age group (18–30 years, good self-reported current health status, being admitted in ophthalmology ward, and first class of admission were significantly associated with better patient satisfaction with nursing care. In-service training programs for nurses, with special emphasis on communication skills, are recommended.

  6. Procalcitonin versus C-reactive protein for predicting pneumonia in adults with lower respiratory tract infection in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anette; Pedersen, Svend S; Nexoe, Joergen;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of procalcitonin in diagnosing bacterial infection has mainly been studied in patients with severe infections. There is no study on the value of procalcitonin measurements in adults with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) treated in primary care. AIM: To evaluate the...... accuracy of plasma procalcitonin in predicting radiographic pneumonia, bacterial infection, and adverse outcome in a population of adults with LRTI treated in primary care. DESIGN OF STUDY: Prospective, observational study. SETTING: Forty-two general practices and an outpatient clinic at the Department of...... Infectious Diseases, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. METHOD: A total of 364 patients with LRTI were prospectively enrolled from 42 general practices. Patients were examined with chest radiography, microbiological analyses, and measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin. The outcome...

  7. Contributors to Adult Sibling Relationships and Intention to Care of Siblings of Individuals with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuskelly, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of childhood sibling relationships to adult sibling relationships and intention to provide care was investigated in a sample in which one member of each dyad had Down syndrome. Thirty-nine adult siblings of an adult with Down syndrome who had participated in a study of sibling relationships in childhood/adolescence provided data…

  8. Young Cancer Patients' Perceptions of a Video Game Used to Promote Self Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, Ivan L.; Marin-Bowling, Veronica M.; Guthrie, Nicole: Kato, Pamela M.

    2006-01-01

    A video game called "Re-Mission" has recently been investigated with adolescent and young adult cancer patients enrolled in a multi-site randomized controlled evaluation of the game as a psycho-educational intervention. The main focus of the trial was to determine effects of the game on self-care and other health-related outcomes. It was also…

  9. Uptake of health monitoring and disease self-management in Australian adults with neurofibromatosis type 1: strategies to improve care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, H A; Barton, B; Wilson, M J; Berman, Y; McKelvey-Martin, V J; Morrison, P J; North, K N

    2016-03-01

    Lifelong health monitoring is recommended in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) because of the progressive and unpredictable range of disabling and potentially life-threatening symptoms that arise. In Australia, strategies for NF1 health surveillance are less well developed for adults than they are for children, resulting in inequalities between pediatric and adult care. The aims of this study were to determine the uptake of health monitoring and capacity of adults with NF1 to self-manage their health. Australian adults with NF1 (n = 94, 18-40 years) participated in a semi-structured interview. Almost half reported no regular health monitoring. Thematic analysis of interviews identified four main themes as to why: (i) did not know where to seek care, (ii) unaware of the need for regular monitoring, (iii) futility of health monitoring as nothing can be done for NF1, and (iv) feeling healthy, therefore monitoring unnecessary. Overall, there were low levels of patient activation, indicating that adults with NF1 lacked knowledge and confidence to manage their health and health care. Findings are discussed in the context of service provision for adults with NF1 in New South Wales, Australia.

  10. Evaluating Adult Cystic Fibrosis Care in BC: Disparities in Access to a Multidisciplinary Treatment Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Roberts

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cystic fibrosis (CF care that is delivered through dedicated, multidisciplinary CF clinics is believed to be partly responsible for improvements in the length and quality of life of persons with CF. We hypothesized patients living farthest from a CF clinic would be seen less frequently than recommended, which would result in reduced access to guideline-recommended care and poorer health outcomes. Methods. We performed a retrospective chart review of 168 patients who accessed CF care primarily through the St. Paul’s Hospital Adult CF Clinic. Subjects were stratified into four geographical groups according to the estimated one-way travel time by automobile from their home address to the clinic (360 mins. Results. There were no significant differences in pulmonary function, nutritional status, CF-related complications, or access to guideline-recommended CF pulmonary therapies between the four groups. Compared to the reference (150 mins were less likely to be seen in the clinic quarterly as recommended by current CF care guidelines (p=0.002. Those in the farthest group (>360 mins were at risk for more rapid decline in lung function compared to the reference group (FEV1% predicted annual change: −3.1%/year [95% CI −5.1 to −1.1] versus −0.9%/year [95% CI −1.6 to 0.1], resp., p=0.04. Conclusions. Access to CF care is a challenge for individuals who live outside Metro Vancouver and has health policy implications. Further initiatives should be undertaken to ensure equitable care for people living with CF.

  11. Evaluating Adult Cystic Fibrosis Care in BC: Disparities in Access to a Multidisciplinary Treatment Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James M; Wilcox, Pearce G; Quon, Bradley S

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cystic fibrosis (CF) care that is delivered through dedicated, multidisciplinary CF clinics is believed to be partly responsible for improvements in the length and quality of life of persons with CF. We hypothesized patients living farthest from a CF clinic would be seen less frequently than recommended, which would result in reduced access to guideline-recommended care and poorer health outcomes. Methods. We performed a retrospective chart review of 168 patients who accessed CF care primarily through the St. Paul's Hospital Adult CF Clinic. Subjects were stratified into four geographical groups according to the estimated one-way travel time by automobile from their home address to the clinic (360 mins). Results. There were no significant differences in pulmonary function, nutritional status, CF-related complications, or access to guideline-recommended CF pulmonary therapies between the four groups. Compared to the reference (150 mins) were less likely to be seen in the clinic quarterly as recommended by current CF care guidelines (p = 0.002). Those in the farthest group (>360 mins) were at risk for more rapid decline in lung function compared to the reference group (FEV1% predicted annual change: -3.1%/year [95% CI -5.1 to -1.1] versus -0.9%/year [95% CI -1.6 to 0.1], resp., p = 0.04). Conclusions. Access to CF care is a challenge for individuals who live outside Metro Vancouver and has health policy implications. Further initiatives should be undertaken to ensure equitable care for people living with CF. PMID:27445568

  12. Advancing patient-centered care through transformative educational leadership: a critical review of health care professional preparation for patient-centered care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lévesque MC

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Martine C Lévesque,1,2 Richard Bruce Hovey,2,3 Christophe Bedos2,4 1Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; 2Division of Oral Health and Society, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 4Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Faculté de médicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada Abstract: Following a historical brief on the development of patient-centered care (PCC, we discuss PCC's value and role in counterbalancing the evidence-based movement in health care. We in turn make a case for a philosophical shift in thinking about the PCC concept, one based on a consideration for how knowledge is produced, used, and valued within care provision processes. A “shared epistemology” foundation is presented, defined, and promoted as essential to the authentic and ethical realization of “shared decision making” between patient and health care provider, and, more generally, of PCC. In accordance with these views, this article critically reviews the literature on health care professional education for the development of PCC. We uncover the disturbing ways in which education frequently undermines the development of patient centeredness, despite curricular emphasis on professionalism and ethical PCC. We also establish the need to raise awareness of how dominant approaches to evaluating student or practitioner performance often fail to reinforce or promote patient centeredness. Finally, we identify successful and inspiring cases of teaching and learning experiences that have achieved perspective transformation on PCC and on new ways of providing care. The pertinence of adopting the theoretical foundations of adult transformative learning is argued, and a call to action is proposed to the leadership of health professional educators across all disciplines. Keywords: patient-centered care, health professional

  13. 76 FR 44573 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service Payment Rates, and Administrative Reimbursement Rates for Sponsoring Organizations...

  14. Creating and Maintaining a Wellness Environment in Child Care Centers Participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofton, Kristi L.; Carr, Deborah H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study identifies issues associated with creating and maintaining a wellness environment in child care centers (CCCs) participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Methods: Structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with CCC professionals and state agency personnel to develop a survey to assess…

  15. Functional prognosis of dizziness in older adults in primary care: a prospective cohort study.

    OpenAIRE

    Dros, J.; Maarsingh, O.R.; Beem, L.; van der Horst, H.E.; Riet, G. ter; Schellevis, F G; van Weert, H.C.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the 6-month functional prognosis of dizziness in older adults in primary care, to identify important predictors of dizziness-related impairment, and to construct a score to assist risk prediction. Design: Prospective cohort study with 6-month follow-up. Setting: Twenty-four primary care practices in the Netherlands. Participants: Four hundred seventeen older adults (mean age 78.5, range 65–95, 74% female) presenting consecutively to primary care with dizziness. Meas...

  16. The provision of staff development programs in Virginia adult day care centers

    OpenAIRE

    Hensley, A. Dawn

    1994-01-01

    This study examined a neglected area in long term care and adult day care research: staff development. The specific purposes of this study were to describe the provision of a comprehensive staff development program in adult day care centers in Virginia in order to (a) differentiate those centers providing only the minimum required inservice training from those centers providing more comprehensive staff development programs and (b) define what meaning is placed upon sta...

  17. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care: Survey of oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Salins

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients felt that integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer improves symptom control, end-of-life care, health-related communication, and continuity of care. The perceptions of benefit of the palliative care intervention in the components surveyed, differed among the three groups.

  18. Frailty screening in older patients in primary care using routine care data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drubbel, I.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Primary care for frail older people is reported to be suboptimal. A transition toward proactive patient-centred care is needed. We investigated the effectiveness of U-PRIM, a frailty screening intervention based on routine care data, and of U-PRIM followed by U-CARE, a nurse-led personal

  19. Nursing care for adolescents and young adults with cancer: literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Juliet; Schwartz-Attias, Irit

    2014-01-01

    Cancer patients belonging to the adolescent and young adult (AYA) age group have unique and very specific needs, which require special attention from the caring staff. The difficulty in maintaining the personal and professional development at this age is both natural and normal. Adding to this, coping with a life-threatening disease turns this stage in life into a period with many dilemmas and challenges of quite a complex nature. AYA patients have to deal with issues above and beyond the disease itself, which create a very complex coping picture. On top of that, prognosis for this age group has not improved in recent years, unlike the situation in other age groups like children and adults. The literature on this subject is extensive and comprehensive. However, most of the papers on this subject are very specific and narrow in their approach, each dealing with a specific topic. In this article, we bring together many different papers which make a wide and comprehensive picture of the subject of AYAs coping with cancer, coupled with recommendations for the caring staff. In this review we focus on the various aspects of the disease and treatments in AYAs, based on the conceptual model of quality of life proposed by Ferrell and colleagues [Cancer Nurs 1992;15:153-160; Cancer Nurs 1992;15:247-253], including physical, social, emotional and spiritual aspects. From the psychological standpoint, most of the papers discuss the negative aspects; however, in this article we try to include some articles from the positive psychology school of thought. From our findings it is apparent that there is an opportunity and need to further explore research in this regard. It is apparent that taking a unique approach to AYA cancer patients is needed in order to deal with the unique needs of this age group. This article aims at putting a framework around this issue, with actionable recommendations for the caring staff.

  20. Defining and measuring integrated patient care: promoting the next frontier in health care delivery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singer, S.J.; Burgers, J.S.; Friedberg, M.; Rosenthal, M.B.; Leape, L.; Schneider, E.

    2011-01-01

    Integration of care is emerging as a central challenge of health care delivery, particularly for patients with multiple, complex chronic conditions. The authors argue that the concept of "integrated patient care" would benefit from further clarification regarding (a) the object of integration and (b

  1. Shared Care Contributions to Self-Care and Quality of Life in Chronic Cardiac Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebern, Margaret; Brown, Roger; Flatley-Brennan, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    Shared care is an interpersonal interaction system composed of communication, decision making, and reciprocity; it is used by patients and family caregivers (care dyads) to exchange social support. This study's purpose was to describe the contributions of shared care to outcomes for individuals with cardiac disease. A secondary data analysis was used to answer the following questions. What is the association between elements of shared care and patient outcomes? Do dyad perceptions of shared care differentially contribute to patient outcomes? Participants in this study were 93 individuals with a cardiac disease and 93 family caregivers. Composite index structured equation modeling was the analytic tool. Caregiver communication and reciprocity were related to patient mental quality of life. Patient communication and reciprocity were related to their own mental and physical quality of life and self-care confidence. Findings from this study contribute a better understanding of how care dyads are integral to patient outcomes. PMID:26864996

  2. High-quality chronic care delivery improves experiences of chronically ill patients receiving care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Cramm (Jane); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Objective. Investigate whether high-quality chronic care delivery improved the experiences of patients. Design. This study had a longitudinal design. Setting and Participants. We surveyed professionals and patients in 17 disease management programs targeting patients wi

  3. Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever. Clinical Study of Hospitalized Adult Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Espinosa Brito

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: the description of an epidemic is crucial from a clinical and epidemiological point of view.Objective: to identify the main clinical characteristics of hospitalized adult patients diagnosed with dengue hemorrhagic fever. Methods: a prospective case series study was conducted in 997 patients who met the diagnostic criteria for dengue hemorrhagic fever and were discharged from the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima Hospital from June 1st. to August 31, 1981. An automated database was developed based on the information collected from medical records using forms designed for the purpose. Results: forty eight point seven percent of the patients were in the third and fourth decades of life; females predominated (60.1 %. General symptoms were fever (97.4 %, asthenia (78.6 %, headache (76.4 %, anorexia (75.9 %, myalgia (62.1 % and sweating (37.2 %. The digestive symptoms included: nausea (57.8 %, vomiting (46.2 %, abdominal pain (31.6 % and diarrhea (14.1 %. The rash was developed by 32.5 % of the patients. Among the hemorrhagic manifestations were: petechiae (31.2 %, ecchymosis (11.5 %, epistaxis (7.6 %, hematemesis (6.2 %, hematuria (5.5 %, melena (3.4 %, gingival bleeding (3.4 %, enterorrhagia (2.2 %, metrorrhagia (2.1 %. The signs included: abdominal tenderness (53.6 %, tachycardia (25.9 %, lymphadenopathy (22.1 %, hypotension (12.0 %, pharyngeal redness (11.7 %, hepatomegaly (8.3 %, shock or "pre-shock" (6.9 % and splenomegaly (6.2%. Symptoms and signs were more frequent and severe among women. Eighty one point five percent of the patients were admitted one to three days after developing the symptoms. Thrombocytopenia (less than 100 000 platelets per mm3 was found in all cases and leukopenia was observed in 38.9 % of females and 20.6 % of men. Fourteen patients were admitted to intensive care, mostly due to shock; four of them with severe hemorrhagic manifestations. Only one patient died. Conclusions: the high morbidity due to dengue

  4. Overlap between empathy, teamwork and integrative approach to patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Bianco, Joseph A; Mann, Douglas; Massello, David; Calabrese, Leonard H

    2014-10-14

    Abstract Background: Empathy, teamwork and an integrative approach to patient care share common denominators such as interpersonal skills and understanding patients' concerns. Thus, a significant overlap among measures of empathy, teamwork and integrative approach to patient care is expected. Aim: This study examined the magnitude of overlap (shared variance) among three measures of empathy, teamwork and an integrative approach to patient care. Methods: Three-hundred seventy-three medical students completed the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE), the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration (JSAPNC) and Integrative Patient Care (IPC). Results: Significant overlaps were found among the three measures (p teamwork and IPC support the common denominator assumption. The findings that IPC shares common variance with empathy and teamwork have implications for medical education curriculum, suggesting that implementation of integrative patient care can improve empathic engagement in patient care and orientation toward teamwork.

  5. Medication transitions and polypharmacy in older adults following acute care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamble JM

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available John-Michael Gamble,1,* Jill J Hall,2,* Thomas J Marrie,3 Cheryl A Sadowski,2 Sumit R Majumdar,4 Dean T Eurich5 1School of Pharmacy, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's, NL, 2Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, 3Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, 4Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, 5School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada *These authors contributed equally to this work Background/objective: Medication changes at transitions of care and polypharmacy are growing concerns that adversely impact optimal drug use. We aimed to describe transitions and patterns of medication use before and 1 year after older patients were hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia, the second-most common reason for admission in North America. Materials and methods: This was an analysis of a population-based clinical registry of patients treated in any of the six hospitals or seven emergency departments in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, comprising 2,105 patients 65 years and older with community-acquired pneumonia who had survived at least 1 year. The prevalence of polypharmacy (five or more unique prescription drugs, as well as new use and persistence of common drug classes were assessed. Results: The mean age was 78 years (standard deviation 8 years, 50% were female, 62% were hospitalized, and 58% had severe pneumonia. Among the 2,105 patients, 949 (45% were using five or more medications prior to hospitalization, increasing to 1,559 (74% within 90 days postdischarge and remaining over 70% at 1 year. Overall, 1,690 (80% patients newly started and 1,553 (74% patients stopped at least one medication in the first 90 days of follow-up. The prevalence of the most common drug classes (ie, cardiovascular, alimentary/metabolism remained stable, with the exception of anti-infective agents, whereby 25% of patients were dispensed an anti-infective agent 3 months to 1 year

  6. Improving stroke care for patients at Cavan hospital [poster

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murugasu, G Dr.

    2013-07-01

    Under the Quality and Continuing Care Directorate (QCCD) in stroke care Cavan General Hospital was identified as a hospital that received a large number of stroke and TIA patients. A programme was established to improve services to this population.

  7. Transitions to Adult Care for Rhode Island Youth with Special Healthcare Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Suzanne; Terry, Christopher; Neukirch, Jodie; Garneau, Deborah; Golding, Deb; Brown, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The transitioning of youth from pediatric to adult care systems is often fraught with discontinuity, miscommunication and gaps in care. This is most significant for youth with special health care needs. A panel discussion on transitioning youth to adult care systems that was part of a learning collaborative held by The RI Care Transformation Collaborative (CTC) is presented here, illustrated by a pertinent case of a youth with type 1 diabetes. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-08.asp, free with no login]. PMID:27472770

  8. Patient involvement in diabetes care: experiences in nine diabetes care groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidwien Lemmens

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the expected beneficial effects on quality of care, patient involvement in diabetes care groups, which deliver a bundled paid integrated care programme for diabetes type 2, seems to be limited. The aim of this study was to gain insight into levels and methods of patient involvement, into facilitators and barriers, and into the future preferences of care groups and patient representatives.Theory and methods: Semi-structured interviews were held with 10 representatives of care groups and 11 representatives of patient advocacy groups. An adapted version of Arnstein's ladder of citizen participation was used to define five levels of patient involvement.Results: Patient involvement in care groups was mostly limited to informing and consulting patients. Higher levels, i.e., advising, co-producing and decision-making, were less frequently observed. Care groups and patient representatives perceived largely the same barriers and facilitators and had similar preferences regarding future themes and design of patient involvement.Conclusion: Constructive collaboration between diabetes care groups and patient representatives to enhance patient involvement in the future seems viable. Several issues such as the lack of evidence for effectiveness of patient involvement, differences in viewpoints on the role and responsibilities of care groups and perceived barriers need to be addressed.

  9. Effectiveness the pharmaceutical care in diabetic patients*

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    Jorge E Machado -Alba

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the effectiveness of pharmaceutical care to improve control of type-2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: We carried out pharmacotherapeutical intervention during 19 months on patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus who were affiliate members of the contributive regime of the General System for Healthcare and Social Security in  Bogotá and Cartagena. Through an interview and evaluation of medical records, we obtained information about antidiabetic medications used, doses, other medications, along with Hemoglobin A1c level, arterial pressure, serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, nephropathy screening, retinal screening, foot exams in the last year and problems associated with medication use by means of the DADER method Negative Outcomes Associated with Medication (NOM. Results: The study had a sample of 143 patients (64 intervened and 79 controls with female predominance (67.1% and 53.1%, respectively, mean age of 63.9±11.2 years. The patients in both groups were taking an average of 6.0±2.7 medications. Initial HbA1c mean was 7.7% and 7.8%, without improvement by the end of the study (7.4% for those intervened and 7.8% for the control group. Hypertension (81.1% and dyslipidemia (62.9% were the most important comorbidities. About 50.4% of NOM were of effectiveness, follows 31.3% of necessity. The mean cost per patient in controls was 1.4 greater than for the intervened group. Conclusions: Increased effectiveness of the antidiabetic therapy was not demonstrated in patients intervened with pharmacotherapeutical monitoring, but we did obtain a reduction in healthcare costs.

  10. Fatigue in Family Caregivers of Adult Intensive Care Unit Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, JiYeon; Tate, Judith A.; Hoffman, Leslie A.; Schulz, Richard; Ren, Dianxu; Donahoe, Michael P.; Given, Barbara A.; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Context Family caregivers are a vital resource in the recovery of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. Of concern, the stress associated with this role can negatively affect caregiver health. Fatigue, an important health indicator, has been identified as a predictor of various illnesses, greater use of health services, and early mortality. Examining the impact of fatigue on caregivers’ physical health can assist in identifying critical time points and potential targets for intervention. Objectives To describe self-reported fatigue in caregivers of ICU survivors from patients’ ICU admission to ≤ two weeks, two- and four-months post-ICU discharge. Methods Patient-caregiver pairs were enrolled from a medical ICU. Caregiver fatigue was measured using the Short-Form-36 Health Survey Vitality subscale (SF-36 Vitality). Caregiver psychobehavioral stress responses included depressive symptoms, burden, health risk behaviors, and sleep quality. Patient data included self-reported physical symptoms and disposition (home vs. institution). Results Forty seven patient-caregiver pairs were initially enrolled. Clinically significant fatigue (SF-36 Vitality ≤ 45) was reported by 43% to 53% of caregivers across the time points and these caregivers reported worse scores in measures of depressive symptoms, burden, health risk behaviors and sleep quality, and patients’ symptom burden. In 26 caregivers with data for all time points (55% of the total sample), SF-36 Vitality scores showed trends of improvement when the patient returned home and greater impairment when institutionalization continued. Conclusion In caregivers of ICU survivors, fatigue is common and potentially linked with poor psychobehavioral responses. Worsening fatigue was associated with greater symptom distress and long-term patient institutionalization. PMID:24439845

  11. Ketamine in adult cardiac surgery and the cardiac surgery Intensive Care Unit: An evidence-based clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mazzeffi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine is a unique anesthetic drug that provides analgesia, hypnosis, and amnesia with minimal respiratory and cardiovascular depression. Because of its sympathomimetic properties it would seem to be an excellent choice for patients with depressed ventricular function in cardiac surgery. However, its use has not gained widespread acceptance in adult cardiac surgery patients, perhaps due to its perceived negative psychotropic effects. Despite this limitation, it is receiving renewed interest in the United States as a sedative and analgesic drug for critically ill-patients. In this manuscript, the authors provide an evidence-based clinical review of ketamine use in cardiac surgery patients for intensive care physicians, cardio-thoracic anesthesiologists, and cardio-thoracic surgeons. All MEDLINE indexed clinical trials performed during the last 20 years in adult cardiac surgery patients were included in the review.

  12. [The Nutrition Care of Severe Burn Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Hsiu

    2016-02-01

    In addition to recent advances in burn patient care techniques such as maintaining warm circumambient temperature, the early excision of wounds, and the use of closed dressing, providing nutrition support through early feeding has proven instrumental in greatly increasing the survival rate of burn patients. Severe burns complicated by many factors initiate tremendous physiological stress that leads to postburn hypermetabolism that includes enhanced tissue catabolism, the loss of muscle mass, and decreases in the body's reservoirs of protein and energy. These problems have become the focus of burn therapy. Treating severe burns aims not only to enhance survival rates but also to restore normal bodily functions as completely as possible. Recent research evaluating the application of anabolic agents and immune-enhance formula for severe burns therapy has generated significant controversy. Inadequate caloric intake is one of the main differences among the related studies, with the effect of many special nutrients such as bran acid amides not taken into consideration. Therefore, considering the sufficiency of caloric and protein intake is critical in assessing effectiveness. Only after patients receive adequate calories and protein may the effect of special nutrients such as glutamine and supplements be evaluated effectively. PMID:26813059

  13. [Breast cancer: patient care, rehabilitation, psychooncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Szántó, István; Molnár, Mária; Rohánszky, Magda; Koncz, Zsuzsa; Mailáth, Mónika; Kapitány, Zsuzsanna; Dudás, Rita

    2016-09-01

    The development of a recommendation was intended for the follow-up of breast cancer patients treated with curative intent in Hungary. Follow-up includes the permanent contact with and health education of the patient, the surveillance and control of the adverse effects of oncological therapies or radiotherapy, the screening of metachron cancers, and the comprehensive (physical, psychological and social) rehabilitation of the patient. The early detection of local/regional tumor relapse is essential with careful follow-up, but there is no need for screening of distant metastases by means of imaging studies or tumor marker tests. If adjuvant endocrine therapy is needed, optimal adherence should be ensured with supportive therapy. In rare cases, special issues such as breast cancer risk/genetic mutation, pregnancy are raised, which should be thoughtfully discussed in view of recent advances in oncology. Follow-up is generally practised by the oncologist, however, in some cases the social worker, the physiotherapist, the psychooncologist, or in special cases, the lymphoedema expert is to be involved. The follow-up approach should be comprehensive and holistic. PMID:27579724

  14. Involvement of the family members in caring of patients an acute care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bhalla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Family members are critical partners in the plan of care for patients both in the hospital and at home. Involving the members of the family in acute care can help the nursing staff in emergency. The present study was aimed to find out the role of the family members while caring for the patients admitted in emergency unit of a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: A total of 400 family members of the patients were conveniently selected. Only one member per family was interviewed and their role in taking care of the patient in acute care setting was evaluated. Results: The mean age of patients admitted in acute care setting was 46.6 yrs ± 18.8 with the age range of 18-84 years. Majority (39% of the patients were in the age group of 31-60 years. More than half of the caregivers of patients were males and 88% of them were first-degree relatives. The major tasks performed by the caregivers during the patient care was communicating with doctors/ nursing staff (98%, cleaning and dressing the patient (94%, feeding the patient (90%, procuring medication and other supplies (88%, administering oral medications (74%, changing position and helping for back care (65%, shifting the patients for investigations (60%, collecting reports (35% and providing physiotherapy (25%. Conclusions: The results of the study concluded that family involvement in acute care setting can help the nursing staff in taking care of the patient in acute care setting and it also provides the opportunity for preparing them for after care of the patients at home following discharge.

  15. Comparison of Nutritional Parameters among Adult and Elderly Hemodialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gülperi Çelik, Bahar Oc, Inci Kara, Mümtaz Yılmaz, Ali Yuceaktas, Seza Apiliogullari

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the nutritional biochemical parameters, prealbumin levels, and bioimpedance analysis parameters of adult and elderly hemodialysis (HD) patients.Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study included 50 adult HD patients (42.0 % female). Nutritional status was assessed by post-dialysis multifrequency bioimpedance analysis (BIA), serum prealbumin and other nutritional biochemical parameters.Results: Mean age of patients was 57.4±15.1 years (range...

  16. Comparison of Nutritional Parameters among Adult and Elderly Hemodialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Çelik, Gülperi; Oc, Bahar; Kara, Inci; Yılmaz, Mümtaz; Yuceaktas, Ali; Apiliogullari, Seza

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the nutritional biochemical parameters, prealbumin levels, and bioimpedance analysis parameters of adult and elderly hemodialysis (HD) patients. Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study included 50 adult HD patients (42.0 % female). Nutritional status was assessed by post-dialysis multifrequency bioimpedance analysis (BIA), serum prealbumin and other nutritional biochemical parameters. Results: Mean age of patients was 57.4±15.1 years (range: 3...

  17. Examining the link between patient satisfaction and adherence to HIV care: a structural equation model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bich N Dang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Analogous to the business model of customer satisfaction and retention, patient satisfaction could serve as an innovative, patient-centered focus for increasing retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, and ultimately HIV suppression. OBJECTIVE: To test, through structural equation modeling (SEM, a model of HIV suppression in which patient satisfaction influences HIV suppression indirectly through retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of adults receiving HIV care at two clinics in Texas. Patient satisfaction was based on two validated items, one adapted from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey ("Would you recommend this clinic to other patients with HIV? and one adapted from the Delighted-Terrible Scale, ("Overall, how do you feel about the care you got at this clinic in the last 12 months?". A validated, single-item question measured adherence to HAART over the past 4 weeks. Retention in HIV care was based on visit constancy in the year prior to the survey. HIV suppression was defined as plasma HIV RNA <48 copies/mL at the time of the survey. We used SEM to test hypothesized relationships. RESULTS: The analyses included 489 patients (94% of eligible patients. The patient satisfaction score had a mean of 8.5 (median 9.2 on a 0- to 10- point scale. A total of 46% reported "excellent" adherence, 76% had adequate retention, and 70% had HIV suppression. In SEM analyses, patient satisfaction with care influences retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, which in turn serve as key determinants of HIV suppression (all p<.0001. CONCLUSIONS: Patient satisfaction may have direct effects on retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Interventions to improve the care experience, without necessarily targeting objective clinical performance measures, could serve as an innovative method for optimizing HIV outcomes.

  18. Reconciliation of work and care among lone mothers of adults with intellectual disabilities: the role and limits of care capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Kröger, Teppo

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the concept of social capital is applied to an exploration of Guanxi (social networking to create good relationships) among working lone mothers of adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) in Taiwan. Using in-depth interviews, this study explores the role of social capital, here referred to as 'care capital', in making it possible for working lone mothers to combine their roles as family carers and workers. Eleven divorced or widowed mothers combining their paid work with long-term care responsibilities were recruited from a survey or through NGOs and were interviewed at their home between October 2008 and July 2010. An interpretative phenomenological approach was adopted for data analysis. The findings revealed that the mothers' care capital was extremely limited and was lost, gained and lost again during their life-cycles of long-term care-giving. Guanxi, especially in relation to their employers, proved to be the sole source of care capital for these mothers, making reconciliation between work and care responsibilities possible. In the absence of formal or informal support, religion and the mother-child relationship seemed also to become a kind of care capital for these lone mothers, helping them to get by with their life-long care responsibilities. For formal social and healthcare services, not just in Taiwan but in every country, it is important to develop support for lone mothers of adults with ID who have long-term care responsibilities and low levels of care capital and thus face care poverty.

  19. Shortfalls identified in the management of tuberculosis for Mozambican patients obtaining health care services in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muula, Adamson S; Nyasulu, Yohane; Feluzi, Henry; Magalasi, Collins

    2003-06-01

    We report findings of a pilot qualitative study in which we aimed to determine management gaps among TB patients from Mozambique obtaining health care services in Malawi. The study was conducted between April and May 2002 involved twelve health workers and 4 Mozambican patients. Semi-structured questionnaires were used and responses were followed up with in-depth interviews. Several areas of management gaps were identified. These included; language barrier if patients are formally referred with documents in Portuguese; lack of follow-up system in case of patients defaulting; no structured contact-tracing possibilities and no initiation of Isoniazid prophylaxis in the case of children living in households with a sputum smear positive adult case. We conclude that logistical management gaps exist in the management of TB patients from Mozambique obtaining care in Malawian health care facilities.

  20. Norovirus epidemiology in community and health care settings and association with patient age, denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franck, Kristina T; Fonager, Jannik; Ersbøll, Annette K;

    2014-01-01

    . In community and health care settings, we found an association between infection with GII.4 and increasing age. Norovirus GII.4 predominated in patients ≥60 years of age and in health care settings. A larger proportion of children than adults were infected with NoV GII.3 or GII.P21. Susceptibility to No......Norovirus (NoV) is a major cause of gastroenteritis. NoV genotype II.4 (GII.4) is the predominant genotype in health care settings but the reason for this finding is unknown. Stool samples containing isolates with a known NoV genotype from 2,109 patients in Denmark (patients consulting a general...... practitioner or outpatient clinic, inpatients, and patients from foodborne outbreaks) were used to determine genotype distribution in relation to age and setting. NoV GII.4 was more prevalent among inpatients than among patients in community settings or those who became infected during foodborne outbreaks...

  1. [Interdisciplinary care for a patient suffering from Diogenes syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggah-Alioua, Sabah; Berger, Jérôme; Cheseaux, Michel

    2014-06-25

    Interdisciplinarity is the combined care of a patient by two or more healthcare professionals. Taking into account the contribution of the different healthcare partners improves patient follow-up, quality of the care and use of resources. General practitioner (GP) becomes the pivot of a combined interdisciplinary ambulatory care allowing a prolonged staying at home and avoiding the multiplication of care offers. This paper, by the clinical description of a patient suffering from Diogenes Syndrome, allows a cross of the care between the GP, home nurse and pharmacist. It deals with follow-up questions, acceptance, objectives of treatment, communication between healthcare partners and "false notes" in the follow-up. PMID:25055477

  2. Patients’ perceptions of actual care conditions and patient satisfaction with care quality in hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Abrahamsen Grøndahl, Vigdis

    2012-01-01

    There are theoretical and methodological difficulties in measuring the concepts of quality of care and patient satisfaction, and the conditions associated with these concepts. A theoretical framework of patient satisfaction and a theoretical model of quality of care have been used as the theoretical basis in this thesis. Aim. The overall aim was to describe and explore relationships between person-related conditions, external objective care conditions, patients’ perceptions of quality of care...

  3. Assessment of spontaneous pneumothorax in adults in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparup Dhua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Pneumothorax continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality among respiratory patients, but there is a paucity of data regarding etiology, clinical profile, management, and outcome of spontaneous pneumothorax (SP, from this part of the world. Aims: To assess the patients of spontaneous pneumothorax in adults with special reference to the etiology, clinical presentation, management, and outcome of SP. Settings and Design: Prospective, observational study conducted in a tertiary care institution over a period of one year. Materials and Methods: All adult patients of SP attending the department of pulmonary medicine in a tertiary hospital were studied and detailed clinical, radiological, and management data were recorded and analyzed. Results: Sixty consecutive patients, who satisfied the inclusion criteria were included in the study. Among them 10 had primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP and 50 had secondary spontaneous pneumothorax (SSP. The overall male to female ratio was 4:1. The mean age of the PSP patients was 26.3 ± 2.19 years, whereas, that of the SSP patients was 53.42 ± 2.07 years (P < 0.0001. Seventy percent of the patients were smokers. The most common clinical manifestation of PSP was chest pain (80% in contrast to dyspnea in SSP (96%. The most common cause of SSP (42% was found to be chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD followed by pulmonary tuberculosis (30%. The cases were managed with intercostal tube drainage (85%, simple aspiration (8.33%, and observation (6.67%. Full expansion of the lung was noted in 91.67% of the cases. Conclusion: Spontaneous pneumothorax was more common in men. SSP was far more common in this study, and the predominant underlying cause of SSP was COPD, which surpassed tuberculosis as the leading cause of SSP. This is in contrast to the results from previous studies done in our country. Intercostal tube drainage was the mainstay of treatment and the response was good.

  4. Adult patients with Fontan circulation: What we know and how to manage adults with Fontan circulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohuchi, Hideo

    2016-09-01

    Most of patients after the Fontan operation can reach their adulthood, however, the management strategy for this complex pathophysiology has not been yet established. In general, elevated central venous pressure (CVP) and low cardiac output (CO) due to impaired ventricular preload characterize the Fontan circulation and the ideal hemodynamics could be a combination of a lower CVP with a higher CO. Thus, preserved functional systemic ventricle with low pulmonary artery resistance is thought to be crucial for better long-term outcome. However, on the other hand, because of the unique hemodynamics, these patients have significantly higher incidence of complications, sequelae, and even mortality. The major complications are supraventricular arrhythmias, heart failure, and Fontan-related problems, including protein-losing enteropathy and pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae, both of which are refractory to the treatments, and most of these "Fontan inconveniences" increase as patients age. In addition, one of the recent emerging problems is Fontan-associated liver disease that includes liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, women with Fontan circulation also reach childbearing age and there have been increasing numbers of reports showing a high incidence of pregnancy-associated complications. All these problems may be a part of "Fontan inconveniences" because most of the current Fontan patients are still "young" i.e. in their twenties or thirties and it may be not surprising that more new Fontan-associated pathophysiology emerges as patients age. Recent evidence reminds us of the concept that adult Fontan pathophysiology is not just a cardiovascular disease, rather, a multiorgan disease with many interactions between cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular organs. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is mandatory to take care of and anticipate the better long-term outcome. PMID:27134136

  5. Social support, self-care, and quality of life in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was two-fold: (1) to examine the relationships among self-care, social support, and quality of life in adult cancer patients receiving radiotherapy while the selected basic conditioning factors of age, marital and socio-economic status, living arrangement, stage and site of cancer were statistically controlled; and (2) to test a theoretical model which postulated that (a) quality of life was predicted jointly by the selected basic conditioning factors, social support and self-care, and (b) self-care was predicted jointly by the selected basic conditioning factors and social support. A convenience sample of 112 adult cervical and head/neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy was obtained from radiotherapy outpatient clinic in three hospitals located in Bangkok, Thailand. Results of the study indicated positive relationships among self-care, social support, and quality of life. Socio-economic status, site of cancer, and self-care were significant predictors for reported quality of life. Social support appeared to be a significant predictor of quality of life indirectly through self-care. Socio-economic status and social support were also significant predictors of self-care, whereas, stage and site of cancer seemed to predict self-care indirectly through social support

  6. A primer to natural hair care practices in black patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosley, Rawn E; Daveluy, Steven

    2015-02-01

    Natural hairstyles have increased in popularity in the United States among individuals of African and Afro-Caribbean descent. Dermatologists should be aware of general principles of natural hair care in this patient population, including basic hair care terminology, types of natural hairstyles, methods of washing, and product selection. A basic knowledge of natural hair care practices in black patients will assist dermatologists in the management and treatment of many conditions associated with traumatic hairstyling in this patient population.

  7. Identifying drivers of overall satisfaction in patients receiving HIV primary care: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bich N Dang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study seeks to understand the drivers of overall patient satisfaction in a predominantly low-income, ethnic-minority population of HIV primary care patients. The study's primary aims were to determine 1 the component experiences which contribute to patients' evaluations of their overall satisfaction with care received, and 2 the relative contribution of each component experience in explaining patients' evaluation of overall satisfaction. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 489 adult patients receiving HIV primary care at two clinics in Houston, Texas, from January 13-April 21, 2011. The participation rate among eligible patients was 94%. The survey included 15 questions about various components of the care experience, 4 questions about the provider experience and 3 questions about overall care. To ensure that the survey was appropriately tailored to our clinic population and the list of component experiences reflected all aspects of the care experience salient to patients, we conducted in-depth interviews with key providers and clinic staff and pre-tested the survey instrument with patients. RESULTS: Patients' evaluation of their provider correlated the strongest with their overall satisfaction (standardized β = 0.445, p<0.001 and accounted for almost half of the explained variance. Access and availability, like clinic hours and ease of calling the clinic, also correlated with overall satisfaction, but less strongly. Wait time and parking, despite receiving low patient ratings, did not correlate with overall satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: The patient-provider relationship far exceeds other component experiences of care in its association with overall satisfaction. Our study suggests that interventions to improve overall patient satisfaction should focus on improving patients' evaluation of their provider.

  8. Value Based Care and Patient-Centered Care: Divergent or Complementary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Eric K; Hicks, Lisa K

    2016-08-01

    Two distinct but overlapping care philosophies have emerged in cancer care: patient-centered care (PCC) and value-based care (VBC). Value in healthcare has been defined as the quality of care (measured typically by healthcare outcomes) modified by cost. In this conception of value, patient-centeredness is one important but not necessarily dominant quality measure. In contrast, PCC includes multiple domains of patient-centeredness and places the patient and family central to all decisions and evaluations of quality. The alignment of PCC and VBC is complicated by several tensions, including a relative lack of patient experience and preference measures, and conceptions of cost that are payer-focused instead of patient-focused. Several strategies may help to align these two philosophies, including the use of patient-reported outcomes in clinical trials and value determinations, and the purposeful integration of patient preference in clinical decisions and guidelines. Innovative models of care, including accountable care organizations and oncology patient-centered medical homes, may also facilitate alignment through improved care coordination and quality-based payment incentives. Ultimately, VBC and PCC will only be aligned if patient-centered outcomes, perspectives, and preferences are explicitly incorporated into the definitions and metrics of quality, cost, and value that will increasingly influence the delivery of cancer care.

  9. Person-Centered Care for Older Adults with Chronic Conditions and Functional Impairment: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Alexis Coulourides; Wilber, Kathleen; Mosqueda, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Person-centered care (PCC) shifts focus away from the traditional biomedical model in favor of embracing personal choice and autonomy for people receiving health services. It has become an important avenue for improving primary care, and older adults remain a priority target for PCC because they are more likely to have complex care needs than younger individuals. Nevertheless, despite a growing body of evidence regarding its use, PCC still lacks an agreed-upon definition. A literature review was conducted to explore extant scholarship on PCC for older adults, assess corresponding definitions of PCC, and identify important elements of quality PCC. Nearly 3,000 articles published between 1990 and 2014 were identified. Excluding search results outside the parameters of this study, the final review comprised 132 nonduplicate sources focused on patient-centered care or PCC in older adults. Fifteen descriptions of PCC were identified, addressing 17 central principles or values. The six most-prominent domains of PCC were holistic or whole-person care, respect and value, choice, dignity, self-determination, and purposeful living. The body of evidence reviewed suggests that PCC is an important area of growing interest. Although multiple definitions and elements of PCC abound-with many commonalities and some overlap-the field would benefit from a consensus definition and list of essential elements to clarify how to operationalize a PCC approach to health care and services for older adults. This work guided the development of a separate American Geriatrics Society expert panel statement presenting a standardized definition and a list of PCC elements for older adults with chronic conditions or functional impairment. PMID:26626408

  10. Transforming care teams to provide the best possible patient-centered, collaborative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevin, Cory; Moore, Gordon; Shepherd, John; Jacobs, Tracy; Hupke, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Patient experience of care is now a crucial parameter in assessing the quality of healthcare delivered in the United States. Continuity, patient-driven access to care, and being "known" by a provider or practice, particularly for patients with chronic diseases, have been shown to enhance patient satisfaction with care and health outcomes. Healthcare systems are challenged to effectively meet the wants and needs of patients by tailoring interventions based on each person's unique set factors-his or her strengths, preferences, and personal and social context. Creating care teams, a coordinated multidisciplinary group of healthcare professionals, enables a practice to take advantage of the skill sets represented and redesign care delivery with the patient and community as the focal point. This article describes the attributes of highly functioning care teams, how to measure them, and guidance on creating them. A case example illustrates how these ideas work in practice.

  11. Antiretroviral therapy outcome in human immuno-deficiency virus infected patients in a tertiary care hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Hasitha Diana Manohar; Smita Shenoy; Muralidhar Varma; Asha Kamath; Chaithanya Malalur; Kurady Laxminarayana Bairy; Amod Tilak; Kavitha Saravu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) presently accounts for the highest number of deaths due to any infective agent in the world. The present study assessed the one year treatment outcome following antiretroviral therapy in HIV positive, treatment na and iuml;ve patients in a tertiary care hospital. Methods: Adult HIV positive, antiretroviral treatment naive patients who were started on antiretroviral therapy (ART) between 1st January 2011 and 31st May 2013 were included in the s...

  12. Caring for the brain tumor patient: Family caregiver burden and unmet needs

    OpenAIRE

    Schubart, Jane R.; Kinzie, Mable B.; Farace, Elana

    2008-01-01

    The rapid onset and progression of a brain tumor, cognitive and behavioral changes, and uncertainty surrounding prognosis are issues well known to health practitioners in neuro-oncology. We studied the specific challenges that family caregivers face when caring for patients experiencing the significant neurocognitive and neurobehavioral disorders associated with brain tumors. We selected 25 family caregivers of adult brain tumor patients to represent the brain tumor illness trajectory (crisis...

  13. HIV Care and Treatment Beliefs among Patients Initiating Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) in Oromia, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymejczyk, Olga; Hoffman, Susie; Kulkarni, Sarah Gorrell; Gadisa, Tsigereda; Lahuerta, Maria; Remien, Robert H; Elul, Batya; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Melaku, Zenebe; Nash, Denis

    2016-05-01

    To better understand patient beliefs, which may influence adherence to HIV care and treatment, we examined three dimensions of beliefs among Ethiopian adults (n = 1177) initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART). Beliefs about benefits of ART/HIV clinical care were largely accurate, but few patients believed in the ability of ART to prevent sexual transmission and many thought Holy Water could cure HIV. Factors associated with lower odds of accurate beliefs included advanced HIV, lack of formal education, and Muslim religion (benefits of ART/clinical care); secondary or university education and more clinic visits (ART to prevent sexual transmission); and pregnancy and Orthodox Christian religion (Holy Water). Assessment of patient beliefs may help providers identify areas needing reinforcement. In this setting, counselors also need to stress the benefits of ART as prevention and that Holy Water should not be used to the exclusion of HIV care and ART.

  14. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S; Abdulhadi, Nadia N; Coppell, Kirsten J

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002-2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman. PMID:27606104

  15. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S.; Abdulhadi, Nadia N.; Coppell, Kirsten J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002–2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman. PMID:27606104

  16. Self-assessment in cancer patients referred to palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strömgren, Annette S; Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research in palliative care is considered difficult due to the poor health of patients. However, patient-provided data are essential for a thorough description of patient symptomatology and for the evaluation of care. METHODS: The authors examined the feasibility of a questionnaire......-based study using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality-of-life instrument EORTC QLQ-C30, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in cancer patients who were receiving palliative care. This report describes...... the symptomatology of participating patients and examines differences in symptomatology between patients in three palliative care functions: inpatient, outpatient, and palliative home care. RESULTS: Of 267 eligible patients who were referred to a department of palliative medicine, initial self...

  17. Family Involvement in the Care of Hospitalized Elderly Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Gholizadeh, Leila; Mohammadi, Eesa; Yazdi, Khadijeh

    2015-09-01

    Family participation in caregiving to elderly inpatients is likely to improve the quality of care to older patients. This qualitative design study applied semi-structured interviews to elicit experiences from nurses, families, and patients on the notion of family participation in the care of elderly patients in two general teaching hospitals in Iran. Data were gathered using individual interviews, field notes, and participant observations. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis. The following main themes emerged through the data analysis process: (a) safety and quality in patient care and (b) unplanned and unstructured patient care participation. The study concludes that family involvement in caregiving to elderly patients is important, yet the participation should be based upon a planned and structured framework to ensure a safe and satisfying experience for patients, families, and health care team. PMID:24652880

  18. Experiences of adult patients hearing loss postlingually with Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa María Lizcano Tejado

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is a significant public health problem. The incidence is difficult to establish because of the lack of data in people under age three, but is estimated about 1 per thousand for severe and profound hearing loss.A cochlear implant (CI is a device that converts sounds into electrical energy that triggers a sensation of hearing. The IC is indicated in patients with severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with null or poor benefit use of hearing aids.The general objective of this project is to understand the experiences of adult patients with severe-profound sensorineural hearing loss with IC postlingually throughout the implementation process.A personal vision of those implemented will allow us to learn how to face the possibility to hear and interact with their environment, applying this information to improve health care provided to them and identifying those areas where such assistance should be improved. Also allow us to compare the initial expectations and have been achieved, creating realistic expectations for future candidates.For its development we have designed a qualitative study, based on the principles and procedures of grounded theory, semistructured interviews, participant observation and discussion groups.The data will be analyzed using the software Nudist ViVo 9.

  19. Intensive care nurses′ opinions and practice for oral care of mechanically ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Adib-Hajbaghery

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Oral care is an essential aspect of critical care nursing. However, no study has been published on oral care practice of Iranian and Asian nurses. The majority of published studies were conducted in western and European countries. Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the nurses′ opinions and practice about oral care in patients under mechanical ventilation. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 130 intensive care nurses from 6 intensive care units in the university hospitals of Iran. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was used to gather the data and charts of 45 patients were evaluated. Statistical analysis: Descriptive statistical analysis are presented. Results: Oral care obtained the 7 th rank in prority and a mean score of 5.7 on a scale of 1-10. More than 21% of subjects did not perform oral care in their usual duties. High load of writing tasks and personnel shortages were the major barriers to oral care. Only 20% of the patients′ charts contained a report on oral care. Conclusions: Nurses did not consider oral care in intensive care patients as a high priority. This result highlights the need to continue education programs on oral care for improving the knowledge and attitude of intensive care nurses with respect to oral care.

  20. Identification and characteristics of patients with palliative care needs in Brazilian primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Marcucci, Fernando C. I.; Cabrera, Marcos A. S.; Perilla, Anamaria Baquero; Brun, Marilia Maroneze; de Barros, Eder Marcos L.; Martins, Vanessa M.; Rosenberg, John P.; Yates, Patsy

    2016-01-01

    Background The Brazilian healthcare system offers universal coverage but lacks information about how patients with PC needs are serviced by its primary care program, Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF). Methods Cross-sectional study in community settings. Patients in ESF program were screened using a Palliative Care Screening Tool (PCST). Included patients were assessed with Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS), Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) and Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS). Res...

  1. Promoting advance planning for health care and research among older adults: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravo Gina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family members are often required to act as substitute decision-makers when health care or research participation decisions must be made for an incapacitated relative. Yet most families are unable to accurately predict older adult preferences regarding future health care and willingness to engage in research studies. Discussion and documentation of preferences could improve proxies' abilities to decide for their loved ones. This trial assesses the efficacy of an advance planning intervention in improving the accuracy of substitute decision-making and increasing the frequency of documented preferences for health care and research. It also investigates the financial impact on the healthcare system of improving substitute decision-making. Methods/Design Dyads (n = 240 comprising an older adult and his/her self-selected proxy are randomly allocated to the experimental or control group, after stratification for type of designated proxy and self-report of prior documentation of healthcare preferences. At baseline, clinical and research vignettes are used to elicit older adult preferences and assess the ability of their proxy to predict those preferences. Responses are elicited under four health states, ranging from the subject's current health state to severe dementia. For each state, we estimated the public costs of the healthcare services that would typically be provided to a patient under these scenarios. Experimental dyads are visited at home, twice, by a specially trained facilitator who communicates the dyad-specific results of the concordance assessment, helps older adults convey their wishes to their proxies, and offers assistance in completing a guide entitled My Preferences that we designed specifically for that purpose. In between these meetings, experimental dyads attend a group information session about My Preferences. Control dyads attend three monthly workshops aimed at promoting healthy behaviors. Concordance

  2. Perception of Cataract Patients Regarding Health Care Services at Tertiary Care Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunjan J Patel, Priti R Kapadia, Vipul P Chaudhari, Nikunj V Patel, Shivani D Patel, Akshita R Jindal

    2015-01-01

    Results: 52.3% patients came here due to good quality service. Improved visual acuity is not necessarily the most important factor for patient satisfaction after cataract surgery as many patients are influenced by the care that is provided by medical (77.7% and paramedical staff (57.6%. The out-patient department significantly affected the level of patient satisfaction. 80%were satisfied with overall eye care services provide at hospital and 88.3% cases would recommend others to take eye care services at this centre. Conclusions: Highly competent and professional healthcare personnel are required for providing highest quality and satisfaction to the patients."

  3. Negative health care experiences of immigrant patients: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stronks Karien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Negative events are abusive, potentially dangerous or life-threatening health care events, as perceived by the patient. Patients' perceptions of negative events are regarded as a potentially important source of information about the quality of health care. We explored negative events in hospital care as perceived by immigrant patients. Methods Semi-structured individual and group interviews were conducted with respondents about negative experiences of health care. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using a framework method. A total of 22 respondents representing 7 non-Dutch ethnic origins were interviewed; each respondent reported a negative event in hospital care or treatment. Results Respondents reported negative events in relation to: 1 inadequate information exchange with care providers; 2 different expectations between respondents and care providers about medical procedures; 3 experienced prejudicial behavior on the part of care providers. Conclusions We identified three key situations in which negative events were experienced by immigrant patients. Exploring negative events from the immigrant patient perspective offers important information to help improve health care. Our results indicate that care providers need to be trained in adequately exchanging information with the immigrant patient and finding out specific patient needs and perspectives on illness and treatment.

  4. A study assessing patient satisfaction in a tertiary care hospital in India: the changing healthcare scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Aashima; Garg, Shalini; Pareek, Udai

    2009-06-01

    The healthcare service scenario in India is expected to evolve into a more developed stage. More emphasis has been given on patient satisfaction as this is an important consideration for the assessment of the hospital services. The concept of patient satisfaction is also rapidly changing and the hospitals are using variety of techniques to improve patient care and organizational efficiency. Patient satisfaction questionnaire is a validated instrument to assess the level of the satisfaction of adult patients. The questionnaire was administered on those patients who were admitted in hospital for at least three days. In our study 88% patients were satisfied with treatment and medical care they had received. About 86% patients found that the hospital services were excellent. However, it is felt that patient values and culture should be explored for further improving patient doctor communication. There is hence a scope for improvement in meeting patient's needs and preferences and rendering hospital services. This can be achieved by some feedback system which could be available to the patients and later worked upon by the management, to improve the patient care by bridging the gap between senior management and patients. PMID:22010498

  5. A patient perspective in research on intercultural caring in maternity care: A meta-ethnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Wikberg

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore and describe a patient perspective in research on intercultural caring in maternity care. In total, 40 studies are synthesized using Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnography method. The following opposite metaphors were found: caring versus non-caring; language and communication problems versus information and choice; access to medical and technological care versus incompetence; acculturation: preserving the original culture versus adapting to a new culture; professional caring relationship versus family and community involvement; caring is important for well-being and health versus conflicts cause interrupted care; vulnerable women with painful memories versus racism. Alice in Wonderland emerged as an overarching metaphor to describe intercultural caring in maternity care. Furthermore, intercultural caring is seen in different dimensions of uniqueness, context, culture, and universality. There are specific cultural and maternity care features in intercultural caring. There is an inner core of caring consisting of respect, presence, and listening as well as external factors such as economy and organization that impact on intercultural caring. Moreover, legal status of the patient, as well as power relationships and racism, influences intercultural caring. Further meta-syntheses about well-documented intercultural phenomena and ethnic groups, as well as empirical studies about current phenomena, are suggested.

  6. A patient perspective in research on intercultural caring in maternity care: A meta-ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikberg, Anita; Bondas, Terese

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore and describe a patient perspective in research on intercultural caring in maternity care. In total, 40 studies are synthesized using Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnography method. The following opposite metaphors were found: caring versus non-caring; language and communication problems versus information and choice; access to medical and technological care versus incompetence; acculturation: preserving the original culture versus adapting to a new culture; professional caring relationship versus family and community involvement; caring is important for well-being and health versus conflicts cause interrupted care; vulnerable women with painful memories versus racism. Alice in Wonderland emerged as an overarching metaphor to describe intercultural caring in maternity care. Furthermore, intercultural caring is seen in different dimensions of uniqueness, context, culture, and universality. There are specific cultural and maternity care features in intercultural caring. There is an inner core of caring consisting of respect, presence, and listening as well as external factors such as economy and organization that impact on intercultural caring. Moreover, legal status of the patient, as well as power relationships and racism, influences intercultural caring. Further meta-syntheses about well-documented intercultural phenomena and ethnic groups, as well as empirical studies about current phenomena, are suggested. PMID:20640028

  7. Towards better patient care: drugs to avoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Common sense dictates that one should choose tried and tested drugs with proven, concrete benefits that outweigh their adverse effects. Many new drugs are approved each year, often despite a lack of solid evidence that they are any better than existing treatments. Worse, some are approved despite being less effective or more harmful than current options. Massive promotion is used to ensure that such drugs achieve a positive image in the eyes of healthcare professionals and patients. Renowned "opinion leaders" intervene in their favour at conferences and in specialist media, and their opinions are further propagated by specialists in the field. Finally, campaigns in the lay media are used to highlight the target illness, encouraging patients to request a prescription. New data sometimes show that older, initially promising drugs are less effective or more harmful than first thought. For all these reasons, many drugs that are now present on the market are more harmful than beneficial and should be avoided. Unfortunately, negative assessment data and warnings are often drowned in the flood of promotion and advertising. Front-line healthcare professionals who are determined to act in their patients' best interests can find themselves swimming against a tide of specialist opinion, marketing authorisation, and reimbursement decisions. By leaving drugs that are more harmful than beneficial on the market and contenting themselves with simple half-measures, healthcare authorities are failing in their duty to protect patients. Prescrire, a journal funded solely by its subscribers, does not seek to do the work of health authorities, and does not have the means to do so. Prescrire's goal is simply to help healthcare professionals provide better care. The following text lists the principal drugs that we consider more harmful than beneficial, based on our reviews published between 2010 and 2012 in our French edition. These drugs should not be used. Patients and healthcare

  8. Towards better patient care: drugs to avoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Common sense dictates that one should choose tried and tested drugs with proven, concrete benefits that outweigh their adverse effects. Many new drugs are approved each year, often despite a lack of solid evidence that they are any better than existing treatments. Worse, some are approved despite being less effective or more harmful than current options. Massive promotion is used to ensure that such drugs achieve a positive image in the eyes of healthcare professionals and patients. Renowned "opinion leaders" intervene in their favour at conferences and in specialist media, and their opinions are further propagated by specialists in the field. Finally, campaigns in the lay media are used to highlight the target illness, encouraging patients to request a prescription. New data sometimes show that older, initially promising drugs are less effective or more harmful than first thought. For all these reasons, many drugs that are now present on the market are more harmful than beneficial and should be avoided. Unfortunately, negative assessment data and warnings are often drowned in the flood of promotion and advertising. Front-line healthcare professionals who are determined to act in their patients' best interests can find themselves swimming against a tide of specialist opinion, marketing authorisation, and reimbursement decisions. By leaving drugs that are more harmful than beneficial on the market and contenting themselves with simple half-measures, healthcare authorities are failing in their duty to protect patients. Prescrire, a journal funded solely by its subscribers, does not seek to do the work of health authorities, and does not have the means to do so. Prescrire's goal is simply to help healthcare professionals provide better care. The following text lists the principal drugs that we consider more harmful than beneficial, based on our reviews published between 2010 and 2012 in our French edition. These drugs should not be used. Patients and healthcare

  9. Do health literacy and patient empowerment affect self-care behaviour? A survey study among Turkish patients with diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyüboğlu, Ezgi; Schulz, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the impact of health literacy and patient empowerment on diabetes self-care behaviour in patients in metropolitan Turkish diabetes centres. The conceptual background is provided by the psychological health empowerment model, which holds that health literacy without patient empowerment comes down to wasting health resources, while empowerment without health literacy can lead to dangerous or suboptimal health behaviour. Design, setting and participants A cross-sectional study was conducted with 167 patients over the age of 18 from one of two diabetes clinics in a major Turkish City. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to eligible outpatients who had an appointment in one of the clinics. Health literacy was measured by a newly translated Turkish version of the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA) and the Chew self-report scale. Patient empowerment was measured by a 12-item scale based on Spreitzer's conceptualisation of psychological empowerment in the workplace. Self-care behaviour was measured by the Self-care behaviours were measured by the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Measure (SDSCA). Level of diabetes knowledge was measured by Diabetes Knowledge Test. Results Two subscales of empowerment, impact and self-determination, predicted self-reported frequency of self-care behaviours. Neither health literacy nor diabetes knowledge had an effect on self-care behaviours. Conclusions Health literacy might be more effective in clinical decisions while empowerment might exert a stronger influence on habitual health behaviours. PMID:26975936

  10. Burden of Hospital Acquired Infections and Antimicrobial Use in Vietnamese Adult Intensive Care Units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Dinh Phu

    Full Text Available Vietnam is a lower middle-income country with no national surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections (HAIs. We assessed the prevalence of hospital-acquired infections and antimicrobial use in adult intensive care units (ICUs across Vietnam.Monthly repeated point prevalence surveys were systematically conducted to assess HAI prevalence and antimicrobial use in 15 adult ICUs across Vietnam. Adults admitted to participating ICUs before 08:00 a.m. on the survey day were included.Among 3287 patients enrolled, the HAI prevalence was 29.5% (965/3266 patients, 21 missing. Pneumonia accounted for 79.4% (804/1012 of HAIs Most HAIs (84.5% [855/1012] were acquired in the survey hospital with 42.5% (363/855 acquired prior to ICU admission and 57.5% (492/855 developed during ICU admission. In multivariate analysis, the strongest risk factors for HAI acquired in ICU were: intubation (OR 2.76, urinary catheter (OR 2.12, no involvement of a family member in patient care (OR 1.94, and surgery after admission (OR 1.66. 726 bacterial isolates were cultured from 622/1012 HAIs, most frequently Acinetobacter baumannii (177/726 [24.4%], Pseudomonas aeruginosa (100/726 [13.8%], and Klebsiella pneumoniae (84/726 [11.6%], with carbapenem resistance rates of 89.2%, 55.7%, and 14.9% respectively. Antimicrobials were prescribed for 84.8% (2787/3287 patients, with 73.7% of patients receiving two or more. The most common antimicrobial groups were third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, and carbapenems (20.1%, 19.4%, and 14.1% of total antimicrobials, respectively.A high prevalence of HAIs was observed, mainly caused by Gram-negative bacteria with high carbapenem resistance rates. This in combination with a high rate of antimicrobial use illustrates the urgent need to improve rational antimicrobial use and infection control efforts.

  11. Burden of Hospital Acquired Infections and Antimicrobial Use in Vietnamese Adult Intensive Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Mattias; Nadjm, Behzad; Dinh, Quynh-Dao; Nilsson, Lennart E.; Rydell, Ulf; Le, Tuyet Thi Diem; Trinh, Son Hong; Pham, Hung Minh; Tran, Cang Thanh; Doan, Hanh Thi Hong; Tran, Nguyen Thua; Le, Nhan Duc; Huynh, Nhuan Van; Tran, Thao Phuong; Tran, Bao Duc; Nguyen, Son Truong; Pham, Thao Thi Ngoc; Dang, Tam Quang; Nguyen, Chau Van Vinh; Lam, Yen Minh; Thwaites, Guy; Van Nguyen, Kinh; Hanberger, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Vietnam is a lower middle-income country with no national surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections (HAIs). We assessed the prevalence of hospital-acquired infections and antimicrobial use in adult intensive care units (ICUs) across Vietnam. Methods Monthly repeated point prevalence surveys were systematically conducted to assess HAI prevalence and antimicrobial use in 15 adult ICUs across Vietnam. Adults admitted to participating ICUs before 08:00 a.m. on the survey day were included. Results Among 3287 patients enrolled, the HAI prevalence was 29.5% (965/3266 patients, 21 missing). Pneumonia accounted for 79.4% (804/1012) of HAIs Most HAIs (84.5% [855/1012]) were acquired in the survey hospital with 42.5% (363/855) acquired prior to ICU admission and 57.5% (492/855) developed during ICU admission. In multivariate analysis, the strongest risk factors for HAI acquired in ICU were: intubation (OR 2.76), urinary catheter (OR 2.12), no involvement of a family member in patient care (OR 1.94), and surgery after admission (OR 1.66). 726 bacterial isolates were cultured from 622/1012 HAIs, most frequently Acinetobacter baumannii (177/726 [24.4%]), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (100/726 [13.8%]), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (84/726 [11.6%]), with carbapenem resistance rates of 89.2%, 55.7%, and 14.9% respectively. Antimicrobials were prescribed for 84.8% (2787/3287) patients, with 73.7% of patients receiving two or more. The most common antimicrobial groups were third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, and carbapenems (20.1%, 19.4%, and 14.1% of total antimicrobials, respectively). Conclusion A high prevalence of HAIs was observed, mainly caused by Gram-negative bacteria with high carbapenem resistance rates. This in combination with a high rate of antimicrobial use illustrates the urgent need to improve rational antimicrobial use and infection control efforts. PMID:26824228

  12. A scoping review of the implications of adult obesity in the delivery and acceptance of dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, A; Loescher, A; Marshman, Z

    2016-09-01

    Background Due to the increasing prevalence of obesity within the general population it is presumed that the prevalence of overweight and obese adults accessing dental services will also increase. For this reason dentists need to be aware of implications of managing such patients.Methods A scoping review was carried out. Both Medline via OVID and Scopus databases were searched along with grey literature databases and the websites of key organizations. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were established. The data were collected on a purpose-made data collection form and analysed descriptively.Results The review identified 28 relevant published articles and two relevant items of grey literature. Following review of this literature three themes relating to adult obesity in the delivery and acceptance of dental care emerged; clinical, service delivery and patient implications. The majority of the papers focused on the clinical implications.Conclusion On the topic of adult obesity and dental care, the majority of published and grey literature focuses on the clinical implications. Further research is needed on both the patients' perspectives of being overweight or obese and the delivery and acceptance of dental care and the service delivery implications. PMID:27608579

  13. Early Palliative Care Improves Patients' Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_160885.html Early Palliative Care Improves Patients' Quality of Life Also increases chances of having end-of-life ... incurable cancer helps patients cope and improves their quality of life, a new study shows. It also leads to ...

  14. Obstetrics Patients' Assessment of Medical Students' Role in Their Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrane, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Obstetric patients rated the skills and assessed the roles of students caring for them during a clinical clerkship. They rated skills and attitudes high, generally, with lower ratings for their ability to answer questions and preparation to participate in care. Most felt students improved their care, primarily in supportive ways. (Author/MSE)

  15. Impact of Physician Asthma Care Education on Patient Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, Michael D.; Slish, Kathryn K.; Evans, David; Mellins, Robert B.; Brown, Randall W.; Lin, Xihong; Kaciroti, Niko; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of a continuing medical education program, Physician Asthma Care Education, in improving pediatricians' asthma therapeutic and communication skills and patients' health care utilization for asthma. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 10 regions in the United States. Primary care providers…

  16. Decentralization of care for adults with congenital heart disease in the United States: a geographic analysis of outpatient surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan G Maxwell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend that adults with congenital heart disease (CHD undergo noncardiac surgery in regionalized centers of expertise, but no studies have assessed whether this occurs in the United States. We hypothesized that adults with CHD are less likely than children to receive care at specialized CHD centers. METHODS: Using a comprehensive state ambulatory surgical registry (California Ambulatory Surgery Database, 2005-2011, we calculated the proportion of adult and pediatric patients with CHD who had surgery at a CHD center, distance to the nearest CHD center, and distance to the facility where surgery was performed. RESULTS: Patients with CHD accounted for a larger proportion of the pediatric population (n = 11,254, 1.0% than the adult population (n = 10,547, 0.07%. Only 2,741 (26.0% adults with CHD had surgery in a CHD center compared to 6,403 (56.9% children (p<0.0001. Adult CHD patients who had surgery at a non-specialty center (11.9 ± 15.4 miles away lived farther from the nearest CHD center (37.9 ± 43.0 miles than adult CHD patients who had surgery at a CHD center (23.2 ± 28.4 miles; p<0.0001. Pediatric CHD patients who had surgery at a non-specialty center (18.0 ± 20.7 miles away lived farther from the nearest CHD center (35.7 ± 45.2 miles than pediatric CHD patients who had surgery at a CHD center (22.4 ± 26.0 miles; p<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: Unlike children with CHD, most adults with CHD (74% do not have outpatient surgery at a CHD center. For both adults and children with CHD, greater distance from a CHD center is associated with having surgery at a non-specialty center. These results have significant public health implications in that they suggest a failing to achieve adequate regional access to specialized ACHD care. Further studies will be required to evaluate potential strategies to more reliably direct this vulnerable population to centers of expertise.

  17. Cancer patients' use of family practice and secondary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokolowski, Ineta; Kjeldgaard, Anette Hvenegaard; Olesen, Frede;

    recently diagnosed with cancer and among previous cancer patients. Materials and methods: In a nationwide database in Denmark (population 5.5 million) all contacts to the health care system are registered. We describe the pattern of contact with all parts of the health care system for a) the total...... who have recently undergone treatment and patients in the survivorship phase of cancer use different parts of the health care system, and how much they use FP. Information about this will enable us to discuss the need for shared care, integrated care and information exchange and create a platform for......Aims: We know that in Denmark some 90% of citizens have contact with family practice (FP) during a year and around 40% has contact with secondary care.  This demands efforts to create integrated and shared care. The aim of this study is to document the pattern of contacts with FP among patients...

  18. Patient and health care professional views and experiences of computer agent-supported health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Neville

    2006-03-01

    Conclusions Patients and HCPs welcomed the introduction of agent technology to the delivery of health care. Widespread use will depend more on the trust patients place in their own GP than on technological issues.

  19. Providing care for critically ill surgical patients: challenges and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisherman, Samuel A; Kaplan, Lewis; Gracias, Vicente H; Beilman, Gregory J; Toevs, Christine; Byrnes, Matthew C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2013-07-01

    Providing optimal care for critically ill and injured surgical patients will become more challenging with staff shortages for surgeons and intensivists. This white paper addresses the historical issues behind the present situation, the need for all intensivists to engage in dedicated critical care per the intensivist model, and the recognition that intensivists from all specialties can provide optimal care for the critically ill surgical patient, particularly with continuing involvement by the surgeon of record. The new acute care surgery training paradigm (including trauma, surgical critical care, and emergency general surgery) has been developed to increase interest in trauma and surgical critical care, but the number of interested trainees remains too few. Recommendations are made for broadening the multidisciplinary training and practice opportunities in surgical critical care for intensivists from all base specialties and for maintaining the intensivist model within acute care surgery practice. Support from academic and administrative leadership, as well as national organizations, will be needed. PMID:23754675

  20. The Integrated Patient's Self-Care Process Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milavec Kapun, Marija; Šusteršič, Olga; Rajkovič, Vladislav

    2016-01-01

    Long-term care is more efficient and effective when it involves the active participation of the empowered patient and informal caregivers. To achieve this, it is necessary to guide the patient and informal caregivers through the systematic process of self-care. Well-documented observations and assessments are fundamental to plan further interventions of the interdisciplinary team. A systematic literature review revealed that the self-care process and the support of information technology are focused on just one chronic disease. Defined self-care process has a positive impact on the functionality and satisfaction of patients with comorbidity and on their caregivers. The model of the patient's self-care process should be an integral part of the long-term care. PMID:27332172

  1. Is older adult care mediated by caregivers’ cultural stereotypes? The role of competence and warmth attribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío; Bustillos, Antonio; Santacreu, Marta; Schettini, Rocio; Díaz-Veiga, Pura; Huici, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to examine, from the stereotype content model (SCM) perspective, the role of the competence and warmth stereotypes of older adults held by professional caregivers. Methods A quasi-experimental design, ex post facto with observational analyses, was used in this study. The cultural view on competence and warmth was assessed in 100 caregivers working in a set of six residential geriatric care units (three of them organized following a person-centered care approach and the other three providing standard geriatric care). In order to assess caregivers’ cultural stereotypical views, the SCM questionnaire was administered. To evaluate the role of caregivers’ cultural stereotypes in their professional performance as well as in older adult functioning, two observational scales from the Sistema de Evaluación de Residencias de Ancianos (assessment system for older adults residences)-RS (staff functioning and residents’ functioning) were applied. Results Caregivers’ cultural views of older adults (compared to young people) are characterized by low competence and high warmth, replicating the data obtained elsewhere from the SCM. Most importantly, the person-centered units predict better staff performance and better resident functioning than standard units. Moreover, cultural stereotyping of older adult competence moderates the effects of staff performance on resident functioning, in line with the findings of previous research. Conclusion Our results underline the influence of caregivers’ cultural stereotypes on the type of care, as well as on their professional behaviors and on older adult functioning. Caregivers’ cultural stereotypes could be considered as a central issue in older adult care since they mediate the triangle of care: caregivers/older adults/type of care; therefore, much more attention should be paid to this psychosocial care component. PMID:27217736

  2. In Sickness and in Health: Health Care Experiences of Korean Immigrant Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Juhn, Erica

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the health care experiences of Korean immigrant older adults, 65 years of age or older, living in Los Angeles County, who have health care access through Medicare and/or Medi-Cal, access to a large Korean ethnic enclave, and a diverse social support network. Twelve Korean immigrant older adults were recruited through word-of-mouth via community contacts. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with individual seniors, with the help of ...

  3. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application

  4. A patient-centered care ethics analysis model for rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Matthew R; Ells, Carolyn

    2013-09-01

    There exists a paucity of ethics resources tailored to rehabilitation. To help fill this ethics resource gap, the authors developed an ethics analysis model specifically for use in rehabilitation care. The Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation is a process model to guide careful moral reasoning for particularly complex or challenging matters in rehabilitation. The Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation was developed over several iterations, with feedback at different stages from rehabilitation professionals and bioethics experts. Development of the model was explicitly informed by the theoretical grounding of patient-centered care and the context of rehabilitation, including the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Being patient centered, the model encourages (1) shared control of consultations, decisions about interventions, and management of the health problems with the patient and (2) understanding the patient as a whole person who has individual preferences situated within social contexts. Although the major process headings of the Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation resemble typical ethical decision-making and problem-solving models, the probes under those headings direct attention to considerations relevant to rehabilitation care. The Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation is a suitable tool for rehabilitation professionals to use (in real time, for retrospective review, and for training purposes) to help arrive at ethical outcomes.

  5. Use of Care Paths to Improve Patient Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Suzann K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this special issue of Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics is to present an evidence-based system to guide the physical therapy management of patients in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Two systematic guides to patient management will be presented. The first is a care path intended primarily for use by physical…

  6. Perioperative Care Coordination Measurement: A Tool to Support Care Integration of Pediatric Surgical Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Lynne R; Ziniel, Sonja I; Antonelli, Richard C

    2016-03-01

    The relationship of care coordination activities and outcomes to resource utilization and personnel costs has been evaluated for a number of pediatric medical home practices. One of the first tools designed to evaluate the activities and outcomes for pediatric care coordination is the Care Coordination Measurement Tool (CCMT). It has become widely used as an instrument for health care providers in both primary and subspecialty care settings. This tool enables the user to stratify patients based on acuity and complexity while documenting the activities and outcomes of care coordination. We tested the feasibility of adapting the CCMT to a pediatric surgical population at Boston Children's Hospital. The tool was used to assess the preoperative care coordination activities. Care coordination activities were tracked during the interval from the date the patient was scheduled for a surgical or interventional procedure through the day of the procedure. A care coordination encounter was defined as any task, whether face to face or not, supporting the development or implementation of a plan of care. Data were collected to enable analysis of 5675 care coordination encounters supporting the care provided to 3406 individual surgical cases (patients). The outcomes of care coordination, as documented by the preoperative nursing staff, included the elaboration of the care plan through patient-focused communication among specialist, facilities, perioperative team, and primary care physicians in 80.5% of cases. The average time spent on care coordination activities increased incrementally by 30 minutes with each additional care coordination encounter for a surgical case. Surgical cases with 1 care coordination encounter took an average of 35.7 minutes of preoperative care coordination, whereas those with ≥4 care coordination encounters reported an average of 121.6 minutes. We successfully adapted and implemented the CCMT for a pediatric surgical population and measured nonface

  7. Translating personality psychology to help personalize preventive medicine for young adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Salomon; Moffitt, Terrie E; Belsky, Daniel W; Hancox, Robert J; Poulton, Richie; Roberts, Brent; Thomson, W Murray; Caspi, Avshalom

    2014-03-01

    The rising number of newly insured young adults brought on by health care reform will soon increase demands on primary care physicians. Physicians will face more young adult patients, which presents an opportunity for more prevention-oriented care. In the present study, we evaluated whether brief observer reports of young adults' personality traits could predict which individuals would be at greater risk for poor health as they entered midlife. Following the cohort of 1,000 individuals from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study (Moffitt, Caspi, Rutter, & Silva, 2001), we show that very brief measures of young adults' personalities predicted their midlife physical health across multiple domains (metabolic abnormalities, cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function, periodontal disease, and systemic inflammation). Individuals scoring low on the traits of Conscientiousness and Openness to Experience went on to develop poorer health even after accounting for preexisting differences in education, socioeconomic status, smoking, obesity, self-reported health, medical conditions, and family medical history. Moreover, personality ratings from peer informants who knew participants well, and from a nurse and receptionist who had just met participants for the first time, predicted health decline from young adulthood to midlife despite striking differences in level of acquaintance. Personality effect sizes were on par with other well-established health risk factors such as socioeconomic status, smoking, and self-reported health. We discuss the potential utility of personality measurement to function as an inexpensive and accessible tool for health care professionals to personalize preventive medicine. Adding personality information to existing health care electronic infrastructures could also advance personality theory by generating opportunities to examine how personality processes influence doctor-patient communication, health service use, and patient

  8. An Integrated Care Initiative to Improve Patient Outcome in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Norbert eMayer-Amberg; Rainer eWoltmann; Stefanie eWalther

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment of schizophrenia patients requires integration of medical and psychosocial inputs. In Germany, various healthcare service providers and institutions are involved in the treatment process. Early and continuous treatment is important but often not possible because of the fragmented medical care system in Germany. The current work is a quality monitoring report of a novel care setting, called Integrated Care Initiative Schizophrenia. It has implemented a networked care con...

  9. Musculoskeletal problems in intensive care unit patients post discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Devine, H.; MacTavish, P.; Quasim, T.; Kinsella, J; McPeake, J.; Daniel, M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to examine the incidence of musculoskeletal problems (i.e. pain, weakness, decreased joint range of movement) in critical care patients post discharge. Post intensive care syndrome (PICS) is now a widely used term to describe the collection of problems patients develop due to their stay in intensive care. ICU survivors have been found to have a high risk of developing not only psychological problems but physical problems such as Int...

  10. Improving organizational climate for excellence in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    Managers in health care organizations today are expected to achieve higher-quality patient care at a lower cost. Developing and maintaining a positive organizational climate can help improve motivation and foster higher employee performance. In turn, this will help the organization deliver better patient care at a lower cost. This article offers metrics for assessing organizational climate, analyzes barriers to a positive climate, and explores strategies that managers can use to build the type of climate that fosters high performance. PMID:23903945

  11. Patient Activation and Mental Health Care Experiences Among Women Veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Kimerling, Rachel; Pavao, Joanne; Wong, Ava

    2016-01-01

    We utilized a nationally representative survey of women veteran primary care users to examine associations between patient activation and mental health care experiences. A dose–response relationship was observed, with odds of high quality ratings significantly greater at each successive level of patient activation. Higher activation levels were also significantly associated with preference concordant care for gender-related preferences (use of female providers, women-only settings, and women-...

  12. Improving organizational climate for excellence in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    Managers in health care organizations today are expected to achieve higher-quality patient care at a lower cost. Developing and maintaining a positive organizational climate can help improve motivation and foster higher employee performance. In turn, this will help the organization deliver better patient care at a lower cost. This article offers metrics for assessing organizational climate, analyzes barriers to a positive climate, and explores strategies that managers can use to build the type of climate that fosters high performance.

  13. Health care professional development: Working as a team to improve patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, Amir; El Husseini, Maha; Al Nemri, Abdurrahman; Al Frayh, Abdurrahman; Al Juryyan, Nasir; Faki, Mohamed O; Assiri, Asaad; Al Saadi, Muslim; Shaikh, Farheen; Al Zamil, Fahad

    2014-01-01

    In delivering health care, an effective teamwork can immediately and positively affect patient safety and outcome. The need for effective teams is increasing due to increasing co-morbidities and increasing complexity of specialization of care. Time has gone when a doctor or a dentist or any other health practitioner in whatsoever health organization would be able to solely deliver a quality care that satisfies his or her patients. The evolution in health care and a global demand for quality patient care necessitate a parallel health care professional development with a great focus on patient centred teamwork approach. This can only be achieved by placing the patient in the centre of care and through sharing a wide based culture of values and principles. This will help forming and developing an effective team able to deliver exceptional care to the patients. Aiming towards this goal, motivation of team members should be backed by strategies and practical skills in order to achieve goals and overcome challenges. This article highlights values and principles of working as a team and principles and provides team players with a practical approach to deliver quality patient care.

  14. The Perceived Needs and Availability of Eye Care Services for Older Adults in Long-term Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kergoat, Hélène; Boisjoly, Hélène; Freeman, Ellen E.; Monette, Johanne; Roy, Sylvie; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective was to evaluate the eye care services offered to older residents living in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Methods A questionnaire targeting residents aged ≥65 years was sent to all LTCFs in Quebec. Questions related to the institution’s characteristics, demographic data related to residents, oculovisual health of residents and barriers to eye care, eye care services offered within and outside the institution, and degree of satisfaction regarding the eye care services offered to residents. Results 196/428 (45.8%) LTCFs completed the questionnaire. Participating LTCFs had an average of 97.0 ± 5.1 residents with a mean age of 82.8 ± 3.0 yrs and 69% women. Eye care services were mostly offered outside the institution, on a “per request” basis. The main barriers to eye care were the perception that residents could not cooperate and the lack of eye care professionals. Most LTCFs were satisfied with the eye care services offered to residents. Conclusions The fact that the LTCFs were satisfied with the eye care services offered to their residents, although it was neither provided on a regular basis nor to all residents, suggests that eye care professionals should take a proactive educational role for improving services to older institutionalized adults. PMID:25232370

  15. Hypertensive patients in primary health care: access, connection and care involved in spontaneous demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girão, Ana Lívia Araújo; Freitas, Consuelo Helena Aires de

    2016-06-01

    Objective To assess the impacts of inclusion of care for spontaneous demands in the treatment of hypertensive patients in primary health care. Methods Third generation qualitative assessment survey conducted with 16 workers in a Primary Care Health Unit (PHCU) of the city of Fortaleza, state of Ceara, in the period between July and September of 2015. To collect data, systematic field observation and semi-structured interviews were used, and the stages of thematic content analysis were adopted for data analysis. Results Participants revealed that access, connection and care are fundamental to the treatment of hypertension. However, they said that the introduction of free access for spontaneous demands compromised the flow of care in the hypertension programs. Conclusion A dichotomy between the practice of care recommended by health policies and the one existing in the reality of PHCUs was shown, causing evident losses to the care of hypertensive patients in primary care. PMID:27253602

  16. Prader–Willi syndrome: clinical problems in transition from pediatric to adult care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crinò A

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Antonino Crinò,1 Danilo Fintini,1 Sarah Bocchini,1 Chiara Carducci,1 Graziano Grugni,2 1Autoimmune Endocrine Diseases Unit, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, Research Institute, Palidoro, Rome, 2Division of Auxology, Italian Auxological Institute, Research Institute, Piancavallo, Verbania, Italy Abstract: Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS represents the most common form of genetic obesity. Thanks to the advances in medical care and technology, many persons with PWS live longer and survive to adulthood. Currently, because of the many physical and behavioral manifestations, transitional health care is not easy for these patients and is considered a very important issue. Moreover, very few studies have examined these transitional problems in young adults with PWS. In recent years, there has been great interest in improving transition planning and support for young people with PWS reaching adulthood. In this article, we underline the main clinical problems in transition and give some advice to make this period less difficult and easier for adolescents with PWS. Special attention should be paid to obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, osteoporosis, and sleep apnea during the period of transition. In PWS, for an effective transition from childhood to adulthood, a multidisciplinary team is needed, and should maintain the same approach to food, environment, and psychiatric issues. For comprehensive care, it is necessary to involve adult endocrinologists and other medical specialists in conjunction with the pediatric team. Parental involvement is, however, a great help for supervising adolescents with PWS during this particular period. Keywords: Prader–Willi, transition period, intellectual disabilities

  17. Responding to vulnerability in old age: patient-centred care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abley, Clare

    Patient-centred care is a term widely used in health policy and is familiar to staff as a principle or commonly agreed approach to care. However, nursing and multidisciplinary teams often do not agree how it should be provided for older patients. This article outlines three different models of patient-centred care applicable to the care of older people. The article also explores the concept of vulnerability in old age, highlighting differences between the perspectives of older people and those of professionals and how clinical practice can be improved to achieve a more patient-centred approach. The links between patient-centred care and vulnerability in old age are considered along with the implications of this for clinical practice. PMID:23240515

  18. Measuring health-related quality of life in adults with chronic conditions in primary care settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Carri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe health-related quality of life (HRQOL) conceptual frameworks, critically review 3 commonly used HRQOL scales relevant to adults with chronic conditions in primary care settings, and make recommendations for using HRQOL scales in primary care practice. Data sources Information was accessed regarding HRQOL conceptual and theoretical approaches. A comprehensive search strategy identified 3 commonly used scales that met the review criteria and evidence regarding use of the scales in adults with chronic conditions in community settings. Scale selection Scales were selected if they were designed for clinical use; were easy to administer; were generic and broad in content areas; and contained some individualized items. Scales were critiqued according to content development, theoretical basis, psychometric properties, scoring, feasibility, the concepts being measured, and the number of items that measured an individualized concept. Synthesis Early HRQOL approaches focused on health and functional status while recent approaches incorporate individualized concepts such as the person’s own values and the environment. The abbreviated World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale (WHOQOL-BREF), the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Duke Health Profile were critiqued. All address physical, mental, and social domains, while the WHOQOL-BREF also addresses environment. Psychometric evidence supports use of the SF-36 and WHOQOL-BREF with this population. The SF-36 has the most evidence of responsiveness but has some floor and ceiling effects, while the WHOQOL-BREF does not appear to have floor or ceiling effects but has limited evidence of responsiveness. The WHOQOL-BREF has the highest proportion of individualized items. Conclusion Measurement of HRQOL in adults with chronic conditions can support patient management and contribute to primary care service evaluation. Scales that are based on a broad definition of health and that

  19. Patients' experiences of postoperative intermediate care and standard surgical ward care after emergency abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Vester-Andersen, Morten; Nielsen, Martin Vedel;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how...... patients experience postoperative care. The patient population is generally older with multiple comorbidities, and the short-term postoperative mortality rate is 15-20%. Thus, vigilant surgeon and nursing attention is essential. The present study is a qualitative sub-study of a randomised trial evaluating...... postoperative intermediate care after emergency abdominal surgery, the InCare trial. DESIGN: A qualitative study with individual semi-structured interviews. METHODS: We analysed interviews using Systematic Text Condensation. RESULTS: Eighteen patients (nine intervention/nine controls) were strategically sampled...

  20. Quality Outcomes in Group Home Dementia Care for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dementia, as a public health challenge, is a phenomenon vexing many care organisations providing specialised residential and family supports for older adults with intellectual disabilities. With increasing survivorship to ages when risk is greatest, expectations are that many more adults in service will present with cognitive decline…

  1. Making Work Fit Care: Reconciliation Strategies Used by Working Mothers of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Fu, Li-yeh; Chang, Heng-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study explored the experiences of working mothers with an adult child with intellectual disabilities to understand how they reconcile paid work and care responsibilities. Methods: Fifteen working mothers in Taiwan with an adult child with intellectual disabilities were interviewed, and an interpretative phenomenological approach…

  2. Prognostic Patterns in Self-Report, Relative Report, and Professional Evaluation Measures for Hospitalized and Day-Care Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappington, A. A.; Michaux, Mary H.

    1975-01-01

    This study attempted to determine differences between patients who relapse and those who do not in both hospital and day-care settings. Subjects were 142 adult psychiatric patients. Three groups of measures were used: one based on professional evaluation, one based on self-report, and one based on relative report. (Author)

  3. Being Overweight Is Associated With Greater Survival in ICU Patients: Results From the Intensive Care Over Nations Audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakr, Y.; Alhussami, I.; Nanchal, R.; Wunderink, R.G.; Pellis, T.; Wittebole, X.; Martin-Loeches, I.; Francois, B.; Leone, M.; Vincent, J.L.; Pickkers, P.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of body mass index on ICU outcome and on the development of ICU-acquired infection. DESIGN: A substudy of the Intensive Care Over Nations audit. SETTING: Seven hundred thirty ICUs in 84 countries. PATIENTS: All adult ICU patients admitted between May 8 and 18, 2012, e

  4. Being Overweight Is Associated With Greater Survival in ICU Patients : Results From the Intensive Care Over Nations Audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakr, Yasser; Alhussami, Ilmi; Nanchal, Rahul; Wunderink, Richard G; Pellis, Tommaso; Wittebole, Xavier; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; François, Bruno; Leone, Marc; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Kesecioglu, J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of body mass index on ICU outcome and on the development of ICU-acquired infection. DESIGN: A substudy of the Intensive Care Over Nations audit. SETTING: Seven hundred thirty ICUs in 84 countries. PATIENTS: All adult ICU patients admitted between May 8 and 18, 2012, e

  5. Prevalence and associated factors of polypharmacy among adult Saudi medical outpatients at a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Bin Salih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of polypharmacy (PP and the associated factors in medical outpatients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, observational, descriptive study was carried out in adult medical outpatients attending internal medicine clinics at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from 1 March 2009 to 31 December 2009. PP was defined as the concomitant use of ≥5 medications daily. The number of medications being currently taken by patient was recorded. Effect of patients′ age, gender, educational level, number of prescribers, disease load and disease type on PP was assessed by multivariate analysis using Statistical Package for Social Sciences Incorporated (SPSS Inc Version 18. Results: Out of 766 patients included in the study, 683 (89% had PP. The mean number of prescribed medications, oral pills and doses was 8.8, 9.6 and 12.1, respectively. Factors significantly associated with PP included age (≥61 years, disease load and the number of prescribers. Gender had no impact on PP while education beyond primary education significantly decreased PP. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia alone and as a cluster increased PP. Conclusion: We found an extremely high level of PP in medical outpatients at our tertiary care center. The impact of PP on medication compliance and control of underlying diseases in Saudi Arabia is unknown and needs to be studied at different levels of care.

  6. Mapping the nursing care with the NIC for patients in risk for pressure ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gabriela Silva Pereira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To identify the nursing care prescribed for patients in risk for pressure ulcer (PU and to compare those with the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC interventions. Method: Cross mapping study conducted in a university hospital. The sample was composed of 219 adult patients hospitalized in clinical and surgical units. The inclusion criteria were: score ≤ 13 in the Braden Scale and one of the nursing diagnoses, Self-Care deficit syndrome, Impaired physical mobility, Impaired tissue integrity, Impaired skin integrity, Risk for impaired skin integrity. The data were collected retrospectively in a nursing prescription system and statistically analyzed by crossed mapping. Result: It was identified 32 different nursing cares to prevent PU, mapped in 17 different NIC interventions, within them: Skin surveillance, Pressure ulcer prevention and Positioning. Conclusion: The cross mapping showed similarities between the prescribed nursing care and the NIC interventions.

  7. Socioeconomic status and glycemic control in adult patients with type 2 diabetes: a mediation analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Houle, Janie; Lauzier-Jobin, François; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; MEUNIER, Sophie; Coulombe, Simon; Côté, José; Lespérance, François; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Bherer, Louis; Lambert, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to examine the contribution of health behaviors (self-management and coping), quality of care, and individual characteristics (depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, illness representations) as mediators in the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and glycemic control. Methods A sample of 295 adult patients with type 2 diabetes was recruited at the end of a diabetes education course. Glycemic control was evaluated through glycosylated hemoglobin ...

  8. Antidepressant or Antipsychotic Overdose in the Intensive Care Unit - Identification of Patients at Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Linda; Julkunen, Anna; Rørbaek Madsen, Kristian; Strøm, Thomas; Toft, Palle

    2016-07-01

    It is often advised that patients who have ingested an overdose of antidepressants (AD) or antipsychotics (AP) are monitored with continuous ECG for minimum of 12-24 hr. These patients are often observed in an ICU. Our aim was to identify the number of patients with AD and/or AP overdose without adverse signs at hospital admission that turned out to need intensive care treatment. The effect of the antidepressants overdose risk assessment (ADORA) system was evaluated in patients with antidepressant as well as antipsychotic overdose. Our hypothesis was that patients with low ADORA do not need intensive care treatment. This retrospective study was conducted in adult patients admitted to the ICU at Odense University Hospital after an overdose with AP and/or AD between 1 January 2009 and 1 September 2014. Patients with predefined adverse signs in the emergency department were excluded due to obvious need of intensive care. Of the 157 patients included, 12 patients (8%) developed events during the ICU stay. Only 3 patients received intubation, vasoactive drugs and/or dialysis. None developed ventricular dysrhythmias. There were no fatalities. All the patients with low-risk assessment by ADORA within the first 6 hr did not develop events within the first 24 hr after hospital admission. The vast majority of patients with AD and/or AP overdose and no adverse signs at admission did not require intensive care treatment. Low-risk ADORA identified patients with antidepressant as well as antipsychotic overdose who would not require initial intensive care treatment. This is the first time the ADORA system has been evaluated in patients with antidepressant as well as antipsychotic overdose. PMID:26663682

  9. Innovative Strategies Designed to Improve Adult Pneumococcal Immunizations in Safety Net Patient-Centered Medical Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Nina J; Sklaroff, Laura Myerchin; Gross-Schulman, Sandra; Hoang, Khathy; Tran, Helen; Campa, David; Scheib, Geoffrey; Guterman, Jeffrey J

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a principal cause of serious illness, including bacteremia, meningitis, and pneumonia, worldwide. Pneumococcal immunization is proven to reduce morbidity and mortality in high-risk adult and elderly populations. Current pneumococcal vaccination practices are suboptimal in part because of recommendation complexity, the high cost of provider-driven immunization interventions, and outreach methods that are not patient-centric. These barriers are amplified within the safety net. This paper identifies efforts by the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services to increase pneumococcal immunization rates for adult indigent patient populations. A 4-part approach will be used to increase vaccination rates: (1) protocol driven care, (2) staff education, (3) electronic identification of eligible patients, and (4) automated patient outreach and scheduling. The proposed analytics plan and potential for scalability are described. (Population Health Management 2016;19:240-247). PMID:26824148

  10. The emotional experience of patient care: a case for innovation in health care design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altringer, Beth

    2010-07-01

    This paper considers recent developments in health care facility design and in the psychology literature that support a case for increased design sensitivity to the emotional experience of patient care. The author discusses several examples of innovative patient-centred health care design interventions. These generally resulted in improvements in the patient and staff experience of care, at less cost than major infrastructural interventions. The paper relates these developments in practice with recent neuroscience research, illustrating that the design of the built environment influences patient emotional stress. In turn, patient emotional stress appears to influence patient satisfaction, and in some instances, patient outcomes. This paper highlights the need for further research in this area.

  11. Patient-, organization-, and system-level barriers and facilitators to preventive oral health care: a convergent mixed-methods study in primary dental care

    OpenAIRE

    Templeton, Anna Rose; Young, Linda; Bish, Alison; Gnich, Wendy; Cassie, Heather; Treweek, Shaun; Bonetti, Debbie; Stirling, Douglas; Macpherson, Lorna; McCann, Sharon; Clarkson, Jan; Ramsay, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Background Dental caries is the most common chronic disease of adult and childhood, a largely preventable yet widespread, costly public health problem. This study identified patient-, organization-, and system-level factors influencing routine delivery of recommended care for prevention and management of caries in primary dental care. Methods A convergent mixed-methods design assessed six guidance-recommended behaviours to prevent and manage caries (recording risk, risk-based recall intervals...

  12. Quality of Cancer Care Among Foreign-Born and US-Born Patients With Lung or Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Smith; He, Yulei; Ayanian, John Z.;

    2010-01-01

      BACKGROUND: Disparities in care have been documented for foreign-born cancer patients in the United States. However, few data are available regarding patients with lung and colorectal cancer. In the current study, the authors assessed whether patient-reported quality and receipt of recommended ....... Better coordination of care and communication regarding cancer treatments and expanded use of interpreters may lessen these disparities.......  BACKGROUND: Disparities in care have been documented for foreign-born cancer patients in the United States. However, few data are available regarding patients with lung and colorectal cancer. In the current study, the authors assessed whether patient-reported quality and receipt of recommended...... care differed between US-born and foreign-born cancer patients. METHODS: The authors collected surveys and medical records for a population-based cohort including white, Hispanic, and Asian adults (2205 US-born and 890 foreign-born individuals) with lung or colorectal cancer diagnosed in California...

  13. Promoting patient-centred fundamental care in acute healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feo, Rebecca; Kitson, Alison

    2016-05-01

    Meeting patients' fundamental care needs is essential for optimal safety and recovery and positive experiences within any healthcare setting. There is growing international evidence, however, that these fundamentals are often poorly executed in acute care settings, resulting in patient safety threats, poorer and costly care outcomes, and dehumanising experiences for patients and families. Whilst care standards and policy initiatives are attempting to address these issues, their impact has been limited. This discussion paper explores, through a series of propositions, why fundamental care can be overlooked in sophisticated, high technology acute care settings. We argue that the central problem lies in the invisibility and subsequent devaluing of fundamental care. Such care is perceived to involve simple tasks that require little skill to execute and have minimal impact on patient outcomes. The propositions explore the potential origins of this prevailing perception, focusing upon the impact of the biomedical model, the consequences of managerial approaches that drive healthcare cultures, and the devaluing of fundamental care by nurses themselves. These multiple sources of invisibility and devaluing surrounding fundamental care have rendered the concept underdeveloped and misunderstood both conceptually and theoretically. Likewise, there remains minimal role clarification around who should be responsible for and deliver such care, and a dearth of empirical evidence and evidence-based metrics. In explicating these propositions, we argue that key to transforming the delivery of acute healthcare is a substantial shift in the conceptualisation of fundamental care. The propositions present a cogent argument that counters the prevailing perception that fundamental care is basic and does not require systematic investigation. We conclude by calling for the explicit valuing and embedding of fundamental care in healthcare education, research, practice and policy. Without this

  14. Evaluation of the predictive indices for candidemia in an adult intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Gambero Gaspar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: To evaluate predictive indices for candidemia in an adult intensive care unit (ICU and to propose a new index. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted between January 2011 and December 2012. This study was performed in an ICU in a tertiary care hospital at a public university and included 114 patients staying in the adult ICU for at least 48 hours. The association of patient variables with candidemia was analyzed. RESULTS: There were 18 (15.8% proven cases of candidemia and 96 (84.2% cases without candidemia. Univariate analysis revealed the following risk factors: parenteral nutrition, severe sepsis, surgical procedure, dialysis, pancreatitis, acute renal failure, and an APACHE II score higher than 20. For the Candida score index, the odds ratio was 8.50 (95% CI, 2.57 to 28.09; the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 0.78, 0.71, 0.33, and 0.94, respectively. With respect to the clinical predictor index, the odds ratio was 9.45 (95%CI, 2.06 to 43.39; the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 0.89, 0.54, 0.27, and 0.96, respectively. The proposed candidemia index cutoff was 8.5; the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 0.77, 0.70, 0.33, and 0.94, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The Candida score and clinical predictor index excluded candidemia satisfactorily. The effectiveness of the candidemia index was comparable to that of the Candida score.

  15. Implementing Patient Family-Centered Care Grand Rounds Using Patient/Family Advisor Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen B Fagan DNP, MHA, FNP-BC

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available With the emerging trend of patient family–centered care in health care, it is essential that physicians be exposed to patient and family perspectives of care during medical education and training. Grand Rounds provides an ideal format for physicians to learn about patient family–centered care. At Brigham and Women’s Hospital, we sought to bring the voice of the patient to Patient Family–Centered Grand Rounds in order to expose clinicians to rich narratives describing the medical care received by patients/families and to ultimately change physician practice to reflect patient family–centered principles. We conducted a clinician survey and found promising results indicating that patient/family narratives can be effective at educating physicians about patient family–centered care.

  16. Identifying Care Coordination Interventions Provided to Community-Dwelling Older Adults Using Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Youn; Marek, Karen D; Coenen, Amy

    2016-07-01

    Although care coordination is a popular intervention, there is no standard method of delivery. Also little is known about who benefits most, or characteristics that predict the amount of care coordination needed, especially with chronically ill older adults. The purpose of this study was to identify types and amount of nurse care coordination interventions provided to 231 chronically ill older adults who participated in a 12-month home care medication management program in the Midwest. For each participant, the nurse care coordinator spent an average of 134 min/mo providing in-person home care, 48 min/mo of travel, and 18 min/mo of indirect care occurring outside the home visit. This accounted for 67.2%, 23.8%, and 9.0% of nursing time, respectively, for home visits, travel, and indirect care. Four of 11 nursing interventions focused on medication management were provided to all participants. Seven of the 11 main interventions were individualized according to each person's special needs. Wide variations were observed in time provided with in-person home care and communications with multiple stakeholders. Study findings indicate the importance of individualizing interventions and the variability in the amount of nursing time needed to provide care coordination to chronically ill older adults.

  17. Identifying Care Coordination Interventions Provided to Community-Dwelling Older Adults Using Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Youn; Marek, Karen D; Coenen, Amy

    2016-07-01

    Although care coordination is a popular intervention, there is no standard method of delivery. Also little is known about who benefits most, or characteristics that predict the amount of care coordination needed, especially with chronically ill older adults. The purpose of this study was to identify types and amount of nurse care coordination interventions provided to 231 chronically ill older adults who participated in a 12-month home care medication management program in the Midwest. For each participant, the nurse care coordinator spent an average of 134 min/mo providing in-person home care, 48 min/mo of travel, and 18 min/mo of indirect care occurring outside the home visit. This accounted for 67.2%, 23.8%, and 9.0% of nursing time, respectively, for home visits, travel, and indirect care. Four of 11 nursing interventions focused on medication management were provided to all participants. Seven of the 11 main interventions were individualized according to each person's special needs. Wide variations were observed in time provided with in-person home care and communications with multiple stakeholders. Study findings indicate the importance of individualizing interventions and the variability in the amount of nursing time needed to provide care coordination to chronically ill older adults. PMID:26985762

  18. Transition from Hospital to Community Care: The Experience of Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Admi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study examines care transition experiences of cancer patients and assesses barriers to effective transitions.Methods: Participants were adult Hebrew, Arabic, or Russian speaking oncology patients and health care providers from hospital and community settings. Qualitative (n=77 and quantitative (n=422 methods such as focus groups, interviews and self-administered questionnaires were used. Qualitative analysis showed that patients faced difficulties navigating a complex and fragmented healthcare system.Results: Mechanisms to overcome barriers included informal routes such as personal relationships, coordinating roles by nurse coordinators and the patients' general practitioners (GPs. The most significant variable was GPs involvement, which affected transition process quality as rated on the CTM (p<0.001. Our findings point to the important interpersonal role of oncology nurses to coordinate and facilitate the care transition process.Conclusion: Interventions targeted towards supporting the care transition process should emphasize ongoing counseling throughout a patient’s care, during and after hospitalization.-----------------------------------------Cite this article as:  Admi H, Muller E, Shadmi E. Transition from Hospital to Community Care: The Experience of Cancer Patients. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2015; 3(4:34011.[This abstract was presented at the BIT’s 8th Annual World Cancer Congress, which was held from May 15-17, 2015 in Beijing, China.

  19. Adapting evidence-based, cognitive-behavioral interventions for anxiety for use with adults in integrated primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepardson, Robyn L; Funderburk, Jennifer S; Weisberg, Risa B

    2016-06-01

    Evidence-based treatments for adult patients with anxiety are greatly needed within primary care settings. Psychotherapy protocols, including those for cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), are often disorder-specific and were developed for specialty mental health settings, rendering them infeasible in primary care. Behavioral health consultants (BHCs) integrated into primary care settings are uniquely positioned to provide anxiety treatment. However, due to the dearth of empirically supported brief treatments for anxiety, BHCs are tasked with adapting existing treatments for use in primary care, which is quite challenging due to the abbreviated format and population-based approach to care. CBT protocols are highly effective in the treatment of anxiety and fit well with the self-management emphasis of integrated primary care. We review the rationale and procedure for 6 evidence-based CBT intervention techniques (psycho-education, mindfulness and acceptance-based behavioral techniques, relaxation training, exposure, cognitive restructuring, and behavioral activation) that can be adapted for use in the brief format typical of integrated primary care. We offer tips based on our clinical experience, highlight resources (e.g., handouts, websites, apps), and discuss 2 case examples to aid BHCs in their everyday practice. Our goal is to provide BHCs with practical knowledge that will facilitate the use of evidence-based interventions to improve the treatment of anxiety in primary care settings. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27064434

  20. Primary care practice-based care management for chronically ill patients (PraCMan: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN56104508

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldauf Annika

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care management programmes are an effective approach to care for high risk patients with complex care needs resulting from multiple co-occurring medical and non-medical conditions. These patients are likely to be hospitalized for a potentially "avoidable" cause. Nurse-led care management programmes for high risk elderly patients showed promising results. Care management programmes based on health care assistants (HCAs targeting adult patients with a high risk of hospitalisation may be an innovative approach to deliver cost-efficient intensified care to patients most in need. Methods/Design PraCMan is a cluster randomized controlled trial with primary care practices as unit of randomisation. The study evaluates a complex primary care practice-based care management of patients at high risk for future hospitalizations. Eligible patients either suffer from type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic heart failure or any combination. Patients with a high likelihood of hospitalization within the following 12 months (based on insurance data will be included in the trial. During 12 months of intervention patients of the care management group receive comprehensive assessment of medical and non-medical needs and resources as well as regular structured monitoring of symptoms. Assessment and monitoring will be performed by trained HCAs from the participating practices. Additionally, patients will receive written information, symptom diaries, action plans and a medication plan to improve self-management capabilities. This intervention is addition to usual care. Patients from the control group receive usual care. Primary outcome is the number of all-cause hospitalizations at 12 months follow-up, assessed by insurance claims data. Secondary outcomes are health-related quality of life (SF12, EQ5D, quality of chronic illness care (PACIC, health care utilisation and costs, medication adherence (MARS, depression

  1. Patient characteristics and clinical management of patients with shoulder pain in U.S. primary care settings: Secondary data analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansfield Richard J

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although shoulder pain is a commonly encountered problem in primary care, there are few studies examining its presenting characteristics and clinical management in this setting. Methods We performed secondary data analysis of 692 office visits for shoulder pain collected through the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (Survey years 1993–2000. Information on demographic characteristics, history and place of injury, and clinical management (physician order of imaging, physiotherapy, and steroid intraarticular injection were examined. Results Shoulder pain was associated with an injury in one third (33.2% (230/692 of office visits in this population of US primary care physicians. Males, and younger adults (age ≤ 52 more often associated their shoulder pain with previous injury, but there were no racial differences in injury status. Injury-related shoulder pain was related to work in over one-fifth (21.3% (43/202 of visits. An x-ray was performed in 29.0% (164/566 of office visits, a finding that did not differ by gender, race, or by age status. Other imaging (CT scan, MRI, or ultrasound was infrequently performed (6.5%, 37/566. Physiotherapy was ordered in 23.9% (135/566 of visits for shoulder pain. Younger adults and patients with a history of injury more often had physiotherapy ordered, but there was no significant difference in the ordering of physiotherapy by gender or race. Examination of the use of intraarticular injection was not possible with this data set. Conclusion These data from the largest sample of patients with shoulder pain presenting to primary care settings offer insights into the presenting characteristics and clinical management of shoulder pain at the primary care level. The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey is a useful resource for examining the clinical management of specific symptoms in U.S. primary care offices.

  2. Stressors in the relatives of patients admitted to an intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Angélica Adam; Weigel, Bruna Dorfey; Dummer, Claus Dieter; Machado, Kelly Campara; Tisott, Taís Montagner

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify and stratify the main stressors for the relatives of patients admitted to the adult intensive care unit of a teaching hospital. Methods Cross-sectional descriptive study conducted with relatives of patients admitted to an intensive care unit from April to October 2014. The following materials were used: a questionnaire containing identification information and demographic data of the relatives, clinical data of the patients, and 25 stressors adapted from the Intensive Care Unit Environmental Stressor Scale. The degree of stress caused by each factor was determined on a scale of values from 1 to 4. The stressors were ranked based on the average score obtained. Results The main cause of admission to the intensive care unit was clinical in 36 (52.2%) cases. The main stressors were the patient being in a state of coma (3.15 ± 1.23), the patient being unable to speak (3.15 ± 1.20), and the reason for admission (3.00 ± 1.27). After removing the 27 (39.1%) coma patients from the analysis, the main stressors for the relatives were the reason for admission (2.75 ± 1.354), seeing the patient in the intensive care unit (2.51 ± 1.227), and the patient being unable to speak (2.50 ± 1.269). Conclusion Difficulties in communication and in the relationship with the patient admitted to the intensive care unit were identified as the main stressors by their relatives, with the state of coma being predominant. By contrast, the environment, work routines, and relationship between the relatives and intensive care unit team had the least impact as stressors.

  3. [Strategies for improving care of oncologic patients: SHARE Project results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reñones Crego, María de la Concepción; Fernández Pérez, Dolores; Vena Fernández, Carmen; Zamudio Sánchez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cancer treatment is a major burden for the patient and its family that requires an individualized management by healthcare professionals. Nurses are in charge of coordinating care and are the closest healthcare professionals to patient and family; however, in Spain, there are not standard protocols yet for the management of oncology patients. The Spanish Oncology Nursing Society developed between 2012 and 2014 the SHARE project, with the aim of establishing strategies to improve quality of life and nursing care in oncology patients. It was developed in 3 phases. First, a literature search and review was performed to identify nursing strategies, interventions and tools to improve cancer patients' care. At the second stage, these interventions were agreed within a group of oncology nursing experts; and at the third phase, a different group of experts in oncology care categorized the interventions to identify the ones with highest priority and most feasible to be implemented. As a result, 3 strategic actions were identified to improve nursing care during cancer treatment: To provide a named nurse to carry out the follow up process by attending to the clinic or telephonic consultation, develop therapeutic education with adapted protocols for each tumor type and treatment and ensure specific training for nurses on the management of the cancer patients. Strategic actions proposed in this paper aim to improve cancer patients' healthcare and quality of life through the development of advanced nursing roles based on a higher level of autonomy, situating nurses as care coordinators to assure an holistic care in oncology patients.

  4. SSUES OF THE CARE OF PATIENTS WITH SYNDROM OF DEMENTIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jedlinská Martina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to acquaint the reader with the characteristics and problems of care for patients with dementia and options selected inpatient care for these patients in the Pardubice region. The theoretical part provides an overview of the issue of care for patients with dementia or dementia. The empirical part focuses on the description of selected characteristics of clients in the health-care facility, which is an example of good practice care for the elderly. In these age group is the greatest prevalence of dementia and syndrom of dementia as diagnosed disease. The discussion paper presents a reflection on the possible reasons for placing these clients in various types of inpatient facilities after discharge from aftercare and the circumstances of care for these clients.

  5. The palliative care needs of ethnic minority patients: staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diver, Fiona; Molassiotis, Alexander; Weeks, Les

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess palliative care staff's perceptions of multicultural care provision and explore the barriers and facilitators to culturally sensitive care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews with five palliative care staff were conducted. Staff showed awareness of inter-cultural diversity and the importance of individualized care. It also became apparent that staff did not possess ethnocentric attitudes. Facilitators of multicultural care that emerged from the data included training, learning from experience, the use of culturally specific literature and resources, and effective communication channels in the team. However, barriers were present, including limited interpreting services, and some staff and other patients' negative behaviours towards ethnic minority patients. The findings lead to recommendations for better resourcing and expansion of interpreting services, and for more training, based on staff's desire for limited culturally specific knowledge in sensitive combination with an individualized care philosophy. PMID:12968120

  6. ABC for Nursing Care to Terminal Patients in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelina Basilia Estela Díaz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Terminal patients suffer from an acute or chronic process that immerses them in a critical situation leading to death. When providing a cure is no longer possible, the focus is on providing comfort and relief for the dying. Therefore, it is very important to provide an appropriate orientation to the staff nurses taking care of these patients. Objective: To develop an ABC for nursing care to terminally ill patients in Primary Health Care. Methods: A research was conducted in Area VI Polyclinic, in the municipality of Cienfuegos, from January to June 2012, in order to conform the ABC for nursing care to terminally ill patients in Primary Health Care. Theoretical methods of analysis and synthesis and induction-deduction as well as empirical methods were used: document analysis and brainstorming. Results: The ABC for nursing care to terminal patients was conformed for the following stages: initial or stability, symptomatic or state, and decline and final agony. In each of them possible diagnoses, objectives and actions were included. The document was created in such a way that it can be used by all nurses who attend these patients, regardless of their occupational category. Conclusions: This ABC could be useful to facilitate nursing care to terminally ill patients in primary health care.

  7. Integrated patient unit care in schizophrenia population vs a non-integrated patient unit care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waago-Hansen C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have described the benefits of integrated care in chronic conditions. Keeping the patients out of hospital is considered to increase value to the patient and is also benefit to the society and the healthcare provider.As we have an increase in the treatment options, costs, age and demand, an optimized treatment model is required if we want to maintain or obtain a sustainable system. The objective of this study was to describe how costs of treatment and value to the patient, to the hospital and the society differs in a non integrated patient unit (IPU vs an IPU system.Methods: Contact data of schizophrenic patients (n=51 from the hospital's electronic medical records (EMRs was accessed (from October 2010 till March 2012 and analyzed. All financial data was obtained from the finance department. Time driven activity based costing (TDABC as used to calculate the costs.Results: The study examined 1,149 out-patient consultations and 4,386 days of occupancy. By adopting an IPU approach, the costs were significantly reduced compared to the non-IPU approach. Increased complexity benefitted significantly from IPU. These patients had a higher frequency of contact but lower degrees of admission, whilst the non-IPU had significantly higher admission rates and duration of stay.Conclusions: This study shows a striking difference in the resources used on patients treated with an IPU vs a non-IPU approach. In almost every aspect, the IPU approach is by far superior to the non-IPU approach.

  8. Best Practice in Basic Oral Care among Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Wanyonyi, Celestine; Suila, Jennibeth

    2015-01-01

    Basic oral care maintains oral cleanliness, reduces the impact of oral microbial flora, prevents infections in the oral cavity, thereby preventing cancer treatment complications. Nurses caring for cancer patients are well situated to perform various roles that affect the patients’ oral health such as identifying patients at risk of developing oral complications, and educating cancer patients about the importance and means of having good oral health throughout their treatment to prevent, ...

  9. Patient Care, Communication, and Safety in the Mammography Suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Leisa

    2016-09-01

    Producing high-quality mammograms requires excellent technical skills along with exemplary communication. Mammographers must be able to address differences in patients' mental states, body habitus, and physical ability to obtain an optimal examination. In addition, every mammographer must practice consistently with patient safety, care, and satisfaction in mind. This article discusses verbal and nonverbal communication strategies, barriers to communication, and the care and safety of patients in the mammography suite who present special challenges. PMID:27601710

  10. Scoping review of patient-centered care approaches in healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Constand, Marissa K; MacDermid, Joy C; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Law, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this scoping review was to describe how three tenants of patient-centered care provision: communication, partnership, and health promotion are addressed in patient-centered care models/frameworks across the literature. Methods A scoping review of literature published in English since 1990 was conducted using Medline, CINAHL, and EMBASE. A key term search strategy was employed using “patient-centered care”, “client-centered care”, “framework” and “model” to identify r...

  11. Monitoring patients with rheumatoid arthritis in routine care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund; Jensen, Dorte Vendelbo; Krogh, Niels Steen

    2014-01-01

    , little is known about the feasibility of a T2T strategy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated in routine care. The aim of the present study was to (i) present the annual number of patients included in DANBIO between 2006 and 2013 and their disease characteristics and (ii) estimate coverage......-time feedback to the physician is feasible, although the goal of treat-to-target is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients in routine care....

  12. Comparison of Nutritional Parameters among Adult and Elderly Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülperi Çelik, Bahar Oc, Inci Kara, Mümtaz Yılmaz, Ali Yuceaktas, Seza Apiliogullari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the nutritional biochemical parameters, prealbumin levels, and bioimpedance analysis parameters of adult and elderly hemodialysis (HD patients.Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study included 50 adult HD patients (42.0 % female. Nutritional status was assessed by post-dialysis multifrequency bioimpedance analysis (BIA, serum prealbumin and other nutritional biochemical parameters.Results: Mean age of patients was 57.4±15.1 years (range: 30-83 years and mean dialysis duration was 68.3 ± 54.5 months (range: 3-240 months. When the patients were divided into two groups according to age of patients (<65 and ≥65, prealbumin (p=0.003, blood urea nitrogen (BUN (p=0.000, serum creatinine (p=0.013, albumin (p=0.016, protein catabolic rate per normalized body weight (nPCR (p=0.001, intracellular water (ICW/total body weight (0.003 , body fat mass (p00.000, lean body mass (p=0.031, lean dry mass (p=0.001, illness marker (p=0.005, basal metabolism (p=0.007, body mass index (BMI (p=0.028, body fat mass index (BFMI (p=0.000, fat free mass index (FFMI (p=0.040 values were significantly different between the groups. In the elderly patients (age ≥65, body fat mass, illness marker, BMI, BFMI were higher compared to adult patients (age <65. Additionally, in the elderly patients, prealbumin, BUN, creatinine, albumin, nPCR, ICW/ total body weight, lean body weight, lean dry weight, basal metabolism and FFMI were lower than adult patients.Conclusions: Our results indicate that BFMI were higher, albumin, prealbumin, nPCR and lean body mass and FFMI were lower in elderly patients compared to adults. These results imply that elderly HD patients may be prone sarcopenic obesity and may require special nutritional support.

  13. Primary Care of Adult Women: Common Dermatologic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Luzuriaga, Arlene M; Mhlaba, Julie; Roman, Carly

    2016-06-01

    Dermatologic disease often presents in the primary care setting. Therefore, it is important for the primary care provider to be familiar with the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of common skin conditions. This article provides an overview of acne, rosacea, melasma, vitiligo, alopecia, nonmelanoma, and melanoma skin cancer, dermatitis, and lichen sclerosus. PMID:27212088

  14. Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment and Transitional Care in Acutely Hospitalized Patients The Transitional Care Bridge Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurman, Bianca M.; Parlevliet, Juliette L.; Allore, Heather G.; Blok, Willem; van Deelen, Bob A. J.; van Charante, Eric P. Moll; de Haan, Rob J.; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Older adults acutely hospitalized are at risk of disability. Trials on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) and transitional care present inconsistent results. OBJECTIVE To test whether an intervention of systematic CGA, followed by the transitional care bridge program, improved activ

  15. Palliative care provision for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohannes Abebaw

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality in old age. Patients with advanced stage COPD are most likely to be admitted three to four times per year with acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD which are costly to manage. The adverse events of AECOPD are associated with poor quality of life, severe physical disability, loneliness, and depression and anxiety symptoms. Currently there is a lack of palliative care provision for patients with advanced stage COPD compared with cancer patients despite having poor prognosis, intolerable dyspnoea, lower levels of self efficacy, greater disability, poor quality of life and higher levels of anxiety and depression. These symptoms affect patients' quality of life and can be a source of concern for family and carers as most patients are likely to be housebound and may be in need of continuous support and care. Evidence of palliative care provision for cancer patients indicate that it improves quality of life and reduces health care costs. The reasons why COPD patients do not receive palliative care are complex. This partly may relate to prognostic accuracy of patients' survival which poses a challenge for healthcare professionals, including general practitioners for patients with advanced stage COPD, as they are less likely to engage in end-of-life care planning in contrast with terminal disease like cancer. Furthermore there is a lack of resources which constraints for the wider availability of the palliative care programmes in the health care system. Potential barriers may include unwillingness of patients to discuss advance care planning and end-of-life care with their general practitioners, lack of time, increased workload, and fear of uncertainty of the information to provide about the prognosis of the disease and also lack of appropriate tools to guide general practitioners when to refer patients for palliative care. COPD is a chronic

  16. 78 FR 45176 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... June 30, 2013, on July 24, 2012, in the Federal Register at 77 FR 43229. Adjusted Payments The... related notice published at 48 FR 29114, June 24, 1983.) This notice has been determined to be not... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day...

  17. Predicting self-care practices and glycaemic control using health belief model (HBM) in patients with insulin-treated diabetes in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Aris, Aishairma

    2016-01-01

    Background: The practice of diabetes self-care plays an important role in glycaemic control. However, not all patients with insulin-treated diabetes engage in their self-care activities. Although there is evidence that self-care practices in patients with insulin-treated diabetes can be understood and predicted by health beliefs proposed by Health Belief Model (HBM), little is known about adult patients due to several methodological weaknesses of previous studies. Furthermore, knowledge is la...

  18. Patient satisfaction and side effects in primary care: An observational study comparing homeopathy and conventional medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thurneysen André

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study is part of a nationwide evaluation of complementary medicine in Switzerland (Programme Evaluation of Complementary Medicine PEK and was funded by the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health. The main objective of this study is to investigate patient satisfaction and perception of side effects in homeopathy compared with conventional care in a primary care setting. Methods We examined data from two cross-sectional studies conducted in 2002–2003. The first study was a physician questionnaire assessing structural characteristics of practices. The second study was conducted on four given days during a 12-month period in 2002/2003 using a physician and patient questionnaire at consultation and a patient questionnaire mailed to the patient one month later (including Europep questionnaire. The participating physicians were all trained and licensed in conventional medicine. An additional qualification was required for medical doctors providing homeopathy (membership in the Swiss association of homeopathic physicians SVHA. Results A total of 6778 adult patients received the questionnaire and 3126 responded (46.1%. Statistically significant differences were found with respect to health status (higher percentage of chronic and severe conditions in the homeopathic group, perception of side effects (higher percentage of reported side effects in the conventional group and patient satisfaction (higher percentage of satisfied patients in the homeopathic group. Conclusion Overall patient satisfaction was significantly higher in homeopathic than in conventional care. Homeopathic treatments were perceived as a low-risk therapy with two to three times fewer side effects than conventional care

  19. What Is Known About the Benefits of Patient-Centered Care in Patients with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulin, Kerstin; Malm, Dan; Nygårdh, Annette

    2015-12-01

    Treatment for chronic heart failure (CHF) has improved, and symptom burden has been identified as an important treatment goal. Because patient-centered care may ease the burden, we need to know its benefits for patients with CHF, hence this systematic literature review. We found that one benefit of person-centered care is an increase in quality of life in patients with CHF. Improvements were found in self-care, physical and mental status, health care costs, general uncertainty regarding illness and recovery, patient dignity, treatment, and systems of care. Improvements also were observed in symptom burden, self-efficacy, and quality of life. These findings indicate that person-centered care is a powerful approach to current and future health care. However, because an appropriate tool to measure person-centered care does not yet exist, it will be a challenge to determine whether the goal has been reached from a long-term and patient perspective. PMID:26497193

  20. Integrating Spirituality as a Key Component of Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzette Brémault-Phillips

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Patient care frequently focuses on physical aspects of disease management, with variable attention given to spiritual needs. And yet, patients indicate that spiritual suffering adds to distress associated with illness. Spirituality, broadly defined as that which gives meaning and purpose to a person’s life and connectedness to the significant or sacred, often becomes a central issue for patients. Growing evidence demonstrates that spirituality is important in patient care. Yet healthcare professionals (HCPs do not always feel prepared to engage with patients about spiritual issues. In this project, HCPs attended an educational session focused on using the FICA Spiritual History Tool to integrate spirituality into patient care. Later, they incorporated the tool when caring for patients participating in the study. This research (1 explored the value of including spiritual history taking in clinical practice; (2 identified facilitators and barriers to incorporating spirituality into person-centred care; and (3 determined ways in which HCPs can effectively utilize spiritual history taking. Data were collected using focus groups and chart reviews. Findings indicate positive impacts at organizational, clinical/unit, professional/personal and patient levels when HCPs include spirituality in patient care. Recommendations are offered.

  1. Bi-parental care contributes to sexually dimorphic neural cell genesis in the adult mammalian brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria K Mak

    Full Text Available Early life events can modulate brain development to produce persistent physiological and behavioural phenotypes that are transmissible across generations. However, whether neural precursor cells are altered by early life events, to produce persistent and transmissible behavioural changes, is unknown. Here, we show that bi-parental care, in early life, increases neural cell genesis in the adult rodent brain in a sexually dimorphic manner. Bi-parentally raised male mice display enhanced adult dentate gyrus neurogenesis, which improves hippocampal neurogenesis-dependent learning and memory. Female mice display enhanced adult white matter oligodendrocyte production, which increases proficiency in bilateral motor coordination and preference for social investigation. Surprisingly, single parent-raised male and female offspring, whose fathers and mothers received bi-parental care, respectively, display a similar enhancement in adult neural cell genesis and phenotypic behaviour. Therefore, neural plasticity and behavioural effects due to bi-parental care persist throughout life and are transmitted to the next generation.

  2. Self-care of patients with diabetes mellitus cared for at an emergency service in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquedano, Irasema Romero; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Martins, Tatiane Aparecida; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the self-care ability of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and relates it to sociodemographic and clinical variables. The study included 251 patients who were cared for by an emergency service in Mexico, in 2007. Data were obtained through structured interviews held at participants' households, through a form, a questionnaire and the Self-Care Ability Scale. Descriptive and correlation statistics were used for data analysis. The results show that 83 (33.5%) individuals displayed good self-care ability and 168 (66.5%) individuals displayed regular ability. A directly proportional correlation was found between self-care ability and schooling (r=0.124; pdiabetes mellitus displayed regular ability for self-care. Self-care ability is related to multiple variables that should be taken into account by health professionals when suggesting educational programs.

  3. Self-care practice of patients with arterial hypertension in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Rayanna Silva Mendes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the practice of self-care performed by patients with systemic arterial hypertension in primary health care. Methods: this is a descriptive and cross-sectional study, conducted with 92 individuals with arterial hypertension in a primary care unit. The data collection occurred through script and data analyzed using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean and standard deviation and through the understanding of the adaption between capacity and self-care demand. Results: it was identified as a practice of self-care: adequate water intake, salt intake and restricted coffee, satisfactory sleep period, abstinence from smoking and alcoholism, continuing pharmacological treatment and attending medical appointments. As the demands: inadequate feeding, sedentary lifestyle, had no leisure activities, self-reported stress, and limited knowledge. Conclusion: although patients performed treatment a few years ago, still showed up self-care deficits, highlighting the need for nurses to advise and sensitize about the importance of self-care practice.

  4. Co-morbidity in adult haemophilia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen van de Putte, D.E.

    2012-01-01

    Haemophilia is an X-linked inherited bleeding disorder, caused by a deficiency of clotting factor VIII or IX. Due to the availability of treatment with clotting factor concentrates, life expectancy of haemophilia patients is now approaching that of the general population. Haemophilia patients are th

  5. Palliative care in advanced cancer patients in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand

    OpenAIRE

    Manisha Bisht; Bist, S. S.; Dhasmana, D. C.; Sunil Saini

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Advanced cancer, irrespective of the site of the cancer, is characterized by a number of associated symptoms that impair the quality of life of patients. The management of these symptoms guides palliative care. The present study aims to describe the symptoms and appropriate palliation provided in patients with advanced cancer in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand. Methods: This was an observational study. A total of 100 patients with advanced cancer were included in the study. T...

  6. Food Insecurity and Health Care Utilization Among Older Adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Vibha; Lee, Jung Sun

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between food insecurity and utilization of four health services among older Americans: office visits, inpatient hospital nights, emergency department visits, and home health care. Nationally representative data from the 2011 and 2012 National Health Interview Survey were used (N = 13,589). Nearly 83.0% of the sample had two or more office visits, 17.0% reported at least one hospital night, 23.0% had at least one emergency room visit, and 8.1% used home health care during the past 12 months. Adjusting for confounders, food-insecure older adults had higher odds of using more office visits, inpatient hospital nights, and emergency department visits than food-secure older adults, but similar odds of home health care utilization. The findings of this study suggest that programs and policies aimed at reducing food insecurity among older adults may have a potential to reduce utilization of health care services.

  7. The Effect of Free Adult Preventive Care Services on Subsequent Utilization of Inpatient Services in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wei-Hua

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate the relationship between the utilization of free adult preventive care services and subsequent utilization of inpatient services among elderly people under the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan. The study used secondary data from the 2005 Taiwan National Health Interview Survey and claim data from the 2006 Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database for the elderly aged 65 or over. A bivariate probit model was used to avoid the possible endogeneity in individuals' utilization of free adult preventive care and inpatient services. This study finds that, when individuals had utilized the preventive care services in 2005, the probability that they utilized inpatient services in 2006 was significantly reduced by 13.89%. The findings of this study may provide a good reference for policy makers to guide the efficient allocation of medical resources through the continuous promotion of free adult preventive care services under the National Health Insurance program. PMID:27287671

  8. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Mental Health Care for Children and Young Adults: A National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrast, Lyndonna; Himmelstein, David U; Woolhandler, Steffie

    2016-10-01

    Psychiatric and behavior problems are common among children and young adults, and many go without care or only receive treatment in carceral settings. We examined racial and ethnic disparities in children's and young adults' receipt of mental health and substance abuse care using nationally representative data from the 2006-2012 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys. Blacks' and Hispanics' visit rates (and per capita expenditures) were about half those of non-Hispanic whites for all types and definitions of outpatient mental health services. Disparities were generally larger for young adults than for children. Black and white children had similar psychiatric inpatient and emergency department utilization rates, while Hispanic children had lower hospitalization rates. Multivariate control for mental health impairment, demographics, and insurance status did not attenuate racial/ethnic disparities in outpatient care. We conclude that psychiatric and behavioral problems among minority youth often result in school punishment or incarceration, but rarely mental health care. PMID:27520100

  9. Selecting process quality indicators for the integrated care of vulnerable older adults affected by cognitive impairment or dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebel Paule

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed at evaluating face and content validity, feasibility and reliability of process quality indicators developed previously in the United States or other countries. The indicators can be used to evaluate care and services for vulnerable older adults affected by cognitive impairment or dementia within an integrated service system in Quebec, Canada. Methods A total of 33 clinical experts from three major urban centres in Quebec formed a panel representing two medical specialties (family medicine, geriatrics and seven health or social services specialties (nursing, occupational therapy, psychology, neuropsychology, pharmacy, nutrition, social work, from primary or secondary levels of care, including long-term care. A modified version of the RAND®/University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA appropriateness method, a two-round Delphi panel, was used to assess face and content validity of process quality indicators. The appropriateness of indicators was evaluated according to a agreement of the panel with three criteria, defined as a median rating of 7–9 on a nine-point rating scale, and b agreement among panellists, judged by the statistical measure of the interpercentile range adjusted for symmetry. Feasibility of quality assessment and reliability of appropriate indicators were then evaluated within a pilot study on 29 patients affected by cognitive impairment or dementia. For measurable indicators the inter-observer reliability was calculated with the Kappa statistic. Results Initially, 82 indicators for care of vulnerable older adults with cognitive impairment or dementia were submitted to the panellists. Of those, 72 (88% were accepted after two rounds. Among 29 patients for whom medical files of the preceding two years were evaluated, 63 (88% of these indicators were considered applicable at least once, for at least one patient. Only 22 indicators were considered applicable at least once for ten or more out

  10. Developing patient-centered teams: The role of sharing stories about patients and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Ariana H; Hassinger, Jane A; Martin, Lisa A; Harris, Lisa H; Gold, Marji

    2015-09-01

    Research indicates that health care teams are good for staff, patients, and organizations. The characteristics that make teams effective include shared objectives, mutual respect, clarity of roles, communication, trust, and collaboration. We were interested in examining how teams develop these positive characteristics. This paper explores the role of sharing stories about patients in developing patient-centered teams. Data for this paper came from 1 primary care clinic as part of a larger Providers Share Workshop study conducted by the University of Michigan. Each workshop included 5 facilitated group sessions in which staff met to talk about their work. This paper analyzes qualitative data from the workshops. Through an iterative process, research team members identified major themes, developed a coding scheme, and coded transcripts for qualitative data analysis. One of the most powerful ways group members connected was through sharing stories about their patients. Sharing clinical cases and stories helped participants bond around their shared mission of patient-centered care, build supportive relationships, enhance compassion for patients, communicate and resolve conflict, better understand workflows and job roles, develop trust, and increase morale. These attributes highlighted by participants correspond to those documented in the literature as important elements of teambuilding and key indicators of team effectiveness. The sharing of stories about patients seems to be a promising tool for positive team development in a primary care clinical setting and should be investigated further. PMID:26348238

  11. Prevalence of physical and verbal aggressive behaviours and associated factors among older adults in long-term care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desrosiers Johanne

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Verbal and physical aggressive behaviours are among the most disturbing and distressing behaviours displayed by older patients in long-term care facilities. Aggressive behaviour (AB is often the reason for using physical or chemical restraints with nursing home residents and is a major concern for caregivers. AB is associated with increased health care costs due to staff turnover and absenteeism. Methods The goals of this secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study are to determine the prevalence of verbal and physical aggressive behaviours and to identify associated factors among older adults in long-term care facilities in the Quebec City area (n = 2 332. Results The same percentage of older adults displayed physical aggressive behaviour (21.2% or verbal aggressive behaviour (21.5%, whereas 11.2% displayed both types of aggressive behaviour. Factors associated with aggressive behaviour (both verbal and physical were male gender, neuroleptic drug use, mild and severe cognitive impairment, insomnia, psychological distress, and physical restraints. Factors associated with physical aggressive behaviour were older age, male gender, neuroleptic drug use, mild or severe cognitive impairment, insomnia and psychological distress. Finally, factors associated with verbal aggressive behaviour were benzodiazepine and neuroleptic drug use, functional dependency, mild or severe cognitive impairment and insomnia. Conclusion Cognitive impairment severity is the most significant predisposing factor for aggressive behaviour among older adults in long-term care facilities in the Quebec City area. Physical and chemical restraints were also significantly associated with AB. Based on these results, we suggest that caregivers should provide care to older adults with AB using approaches such as the progressively lowered stress threshold model and reactance theory which stress the importance of paying attention to the severity of cognitive

  12. Is older adult care mediated by caregivers' cultural stereotypes? The role of competence and warmth attribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Ballesteros R

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rocío Fernández-Ballesteros,1 Antonio Bustillos,2 Marta Santacreu,1,3 Rocio Schettini,1 Pura Díaz-Veiga,4 Carmen Huici2 1Clinical and Health Psychology, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM, 2Social Psychology, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED, 3Psychology Department, Universidad Europea de Madrid (UEM, 4Matia Instituto Gerontológico, Madrid, Spain Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine, from the stereotype content model (SCM perspective, the role of the competence and warmth stereotypes of older adults held by professional caregivers.Methods: A quasi-experimental design, ex post facto with observational analyses, was used in this study. The cultural view on competence and warmth was assessed in 100 caregivers working in a set of six residential geriatric care units (three of them organized following a person-centered care approach and the other three providing standard geriatric care. In order to assess caregivers’ cultural stereotypical views, the SCM questionnaire was administered. To evaluate the role of caregivers’ cultural stereotypes in their professional performance as well as in older adult functioning, two observational scales from the Sistema de Evaluación de Residencias de Ancianos (assessment system for older adults residences-RS (staff functioning and residents’ functioning were applied.Results: Caregivers’ cultural views of older adults (compared to young people are characterized by low competence and high warmth, replicating the data obtained elsewhere from the SCM. Most importantly, the person-centered units predict better staff performance and better resident functioning than standard units. Moreover, cultural stereotyping of older adult competence moderates the effects of staff performance on resident functioning, in line with the findings of previous research.Conclusion: Our results underline the influence of caregivers’ cultural stereotypes on the type of care, as well as on their

  13. Quality of care for patients with non-communicable diseases in the Dedza District, Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Wood

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Malawi, non-communicable diseases (NCDs are thought to cause 28% of deaths in adults. The aim of this study was to establish the extent of primary care morbidity related to NCDs, as well as to audit the quality of care, in the primary care setting of Dedza District, central Malawi.Methods: This study was a baseline audit using clinic registers and a questionnaire survey of senior health workers at 5 clinics, focusing on care for hypertension, diabetes, asthma and epilepsy.Results: A total of 82 581 consultations were recorded, of which 2489 (3.0% were for the selected NCDs. Only 5 out of 32 structural criteria were met at all 5 clinics and 9 out of 29process criteria were never performed at any clinic. The only process criteria performed at all five clinics was measurement of blood pressure. The staff’s knowledge on NCDs was basic and the main barriers to providing quality care were lack of medication and essential equipment, inadequate knowledge and guidelines, fee-for-service at two clinics, geographic inaccessibility and lack of confidence in the primary health care system by patients.Conclusion: Primary care morbidity from NCDs is currently low, although other studies suggest a significant burden of disease. This most likely represents a lack of utilisation, recognition, diagnosis and ability to manage patients with NCDs. Quality of care is poor due to a lack of essential resources, guidelines, and training.

  14. Outpatient percutaneous renal biopsy in adult patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the safety and efficacy of performing percutanaeous renal biopsy in the outpatient department compared to the traditional inpatient policy, we studied 44 consecutive patients with proteinuria and other urinary sediment abnormalities, at King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, during the period from September 2004 to August 2006. The patients were divided into two groups: group I, in whom kidney biopsy was performed and followed by 1-day hospital admission; and group II, in whom renal biopsy was performed in the outpatient department and followed by 6 hours observation period and then by regular outpatient visits. All biopsies were performed with the use of real-time ultrasound and automated biopsy needle. Patients with a history of bleeding diathesis or abnormal coagulation profile and those receiving warfarin, heparin, aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were excluded from the study. Only minor biopsy-related complications such as gross hematuria, perinephric hematoma that resolved without the need for blood transfusion or surgical intervention occurred in three (13.6%) patients in group I and in two (9.1%) patients in group II. The complications were apparent within 6 hours in all but one patient (97.7%). Overall, hematuria was identified in 52% of patients at <-72 hours, 85% at <-4 hours and 97.7% at <- 6 hours. The 24-hour hematocrit levels were not significantly different between the study groups. One (4.5%) patient from group II had a small perinephric hematoma, which was detected by ultrasound examination at 24 hours but not at 6 hours post biopsy period; it resolved spontaneously without intervention. We conclude that in selected patients, same day discharge after 6 hours of renal biopsy may be given safety without increased risk of complications. (author)

  15. Impact of advance care planning on the care of patients with heart failure: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra, Chetna; Sim, David Kheng Leng; Jaufeerally, Fazlur; Vikas, Nivedita Nadkarni; Sim, Genevieve Wong Cheng; Tan, Boon Cheng; Ng, Clarice Shu Hwa; Tho, Pei Leng; Lim, Jingfen; Chuang, Claire Ya-Ting; Fong, Florence Hui Mei; Liu, Joy; Finkelstein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the promise and popularity of advance care planning, there is insufficient evidence that advance care planning helps patients to meet their end-of-life care preferences, especially in Asian settings. Thus, the proposed study aims to assess whether patients with advanced heart failure who are receiving advance care planning have a greater likelihood of receiving end-of-life care consistent with their preferences compared to patients receiving usual care. Secondary objectives...

  16. [Nursing care systematization for outpatient treatment care of patients with multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Nair Assunta Antônia; Gondim, Ana Paula Soares; Dalmeida, Patrícia Chagas Rocha; Albuquerque, Maria Girlene de Freitas

    2013-06-01

    An experience report of nurses in the implementation of care systematization in ambulatory care in an interdisciplinary care center for patients with multiple sclerosis of a public hospital in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. This implementation is based on the NANDA International, Inc., Nursing Interventions Classification, and Nursing Outcomes Classifications. One of the results concerns systemized nursing care, which has enabled the identification and understanding of the responses of MS patients to potential and current health problems. Systematization entails expanding knowledge through a practice based on approach and encourage further research scientific evidence, in addition to promoting the role of the nurse in acomprehensive approachand encourage further research.

  17. Care of patients with alzheimer and their skills in caring, in the city of cartagena

    OpenAIRE

    MONTALVO PRIETO, AMPARO ASTRID

    2010-01-01

    The study established the characteristics and the skills in caring for an Alzheimer's patient, by the main family care provider in Cartagena. We carried out a descriptive quantitative study of 84 care providers for Alzheimer patients, in Cartagena and neighboring towns, of different gender and social level, who came to the hospital institution, i.e. the "Fundación Instituto de Rehabilitación del Epiléptico (FIRE)". The instruments used was care ability index or, "Inventario de la habilidad de...

  18. Shared Decision Making and Effective Physician-Patient Communication: The Quintessence of Patient-Centered Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huy Ming Lim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Institute of Medicine’s (IOM 2001 landmark report, Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, identified patient-centeredness as one of the fundamental attributes of quality health care, alongside safety, effectiveness, timeliness, efficiency, and equity. The IOM defined patient-centeredness as “providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions.” This concept of patient-centered care represents a paradigm shift from the traditional disease-oriented and physician-centered care, grounding health care in the subjective experience of illness and the needs and preferences of individual patients rather than the evaluation and treatment of diseases which emphasizes on leveraging clinical expertise and evidence derived from population-based studies. Regrettably, despite the ubiquitous talk about patient-centered care in modern health care, shared decision-making and effective physician-patient communication—the two cruxes of patient-centered care—are yet to become the norms. Strategies to promote and enhance shared decision-making and effective communication between clinicians and patients should be rigorously implemented to establish a health care system that truly values patients as individuals and turn the rhetoric of patient-centered care into reality.

  19. The metabolic consequences of thyroxine replacement in adult hypopituitary patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filipsson Nyström, Helena; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Kourides, Ione;

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic consequences of thyroxine replacement in patients with central hypothyroidism (CH) need to be evaluated. The aim was to examine the outcome of thyroxine replacement in CH. Adult hypopituitary patients (n = 1595) with and without CH from KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database...... physiological. This is equivalent to 70, 100, 125 μg thyroxine/day for hypopituitary patients of 50, 70 or 90 kg weight, respectively....

  20. [Music therapy, a partner in patient care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métayer, Sabine

    2012-10-01

    Long time the preserve of psychiatry, music therapy is today used in general care. At Necker University Children's Hospital in Paris, it forms part of the treatment of multifactorial pain, with the collaboration of nursing teams. PMID:23092083

  1. Patient satisfaction with emergency oral health care in rural Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntabaye, M K; Scheutz, F; Poulsen, S

    1998-10-01

    Emergency oral health care, as conceived in Tanzania, is an on-demand service provided at a rural health center or dispensary by a Rural Medical Aide. The service includes: simple tooth extraction under local anesthesia, draining of abscesses, control of acute oral infection with appropriate drug therapy, first aid for maxillo-facial trauma, and recognition of oral conditions requiring patient referral for further care at the district or regional hospital dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to describe patient satisfaction with emergency oral health care services in rural Tanzania and determine the relative importance of factors influencing patient satisfaction. The study was carried out as a cross-sectional interview survey between April 1993 and May 1994 using a patient satisfaction questionnaire in rural villages in the Rungwe district of Tanzania. It included 206 patients aged 18 years or more who had received emergency oral health care between April 1993 and March 1994. Overall, 92.7% of the respondents reported that they were satisfied with the service. Patients who were married, had no formal education and lived more than 3 km from the dispensary were more likely to be satisfied with treatment. In a logistic regression model, a good working atmosphere at the dispensary, a good relationship between care provider and patients (art of care) and absence of post-treatment complications significantly influenced patient satisfaction with odds ratios of 10.3, 17.4 and 6.2, respectively. PMID:9792119

  2. Skin care of the pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallija, G; Mondozzi, M; Webb, A A

    1999-04-01

    Several factors influence the chronically ill child's susceptibility for skin breakdown. Nurses are an integral part of the care team that has the responsibility for identification of these factors, as well as pressure ulcer prevention and early intervention. An important aspect of this responsibility is identification of individuals at risk. This article provides a guide for assessment and early intervention for skin breakdown in chronically ill children. A care plan and consultation recommendations are included. PMID:10337118

  3. Crisis homes for adult psychiatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Freiesleben, Michael; Foldager, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Inspired by the Crisis Home programme in Madison, we have adapted and evaluated the programme at the Community Mental Health (CMH) Centre in Tønder, Denmark. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Procedures and schedules from the Crisis Home programme were applied in this open trial. Questionnaire...... data concerning satisfaction with the stay and registration data concerning the admissions and bed days two years before and two years after the first stay were obtained. RESULTS: During four years, 52 different patients had a total of 187 stays in a crisis home. Twenty (38.5%) of the patients were...... attached to the ACT team. The average duration of the stays was 4.0 days. The number of readmissions and bed days after the first stay showed a significant downward tendency for the subgroup of patients with a more severe mental disorder, but not for the whole group. The patients, the crisis homes families...

  4. Serum 25 Hydroxy Vitamin D Levels In Adult Asthmatic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa M. Shaaban*, Manal Hashem

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with chronic lung disease as asthma appear to be at increased risk for vitamin D deficiency for reasons that are not clear. Methods: A cross sectional study including 75 asthmatic adults aged older than 18 years and 75 adults healthy control aged older than 18 years (35 males and 40 females for both groups) assessing the relationship between serum 25 hydroxy vitamin D levels and lung function. Result: In our study only (12٫31%) of our asthmatic adults had sufficient vitamin...

  5. [Mesial temporal sclerosis syndrome in adult patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consalvo, D; Giobellina, R; Silva, W; Rugilo, C; Saidón, P; Schuster, G; Kochen, S; Sica, R

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential tool in the work-up of epilepsy. Since its appearance it has been possible to identify pathologies, such as hippocampal sclerosis (HS), that had previously only been detected by histopathological assays. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical manifestations, EEG and the outcome of patients with HS as shown by MRI. We revised the clinical histories of 384 outpatients from the Epilepsy Center, Ramos Mejía Hospital, who had been studied by MRI. Thirty five of them (15.5%) had a diagnosis of HS, based on the structural changes observed on the images. Six patients were excluded because of incomplete clinical data. Therefore, we studied 29 patients including 15 men. The mean age was 32.7 +/- 10.2 years (range: 19-58). All of them had partial seizures. Ten subjects had had febrile convulsions (34.5%) in childhood. Neurological examination was normal in all subjects. Interictal EEG showed focal abnormalities that were coincident in their location with the MRI abnormalities in 16 patients (55.1%). Fourteen patients (48.3%) showed right side hippocampal lesions on MRI, thirteen on the left side (44.9%) and 2 bilateral HS (6.8%). Twenty-seven patients (93.1%) had intractable epilepsy. Anterior temporal lobectomy was performed in 3 subjects with good outcome. The identification of these patients who present certain clinical and MRI characteristics, provides an opportunity to define the mesial temporal sclerosis syndrome. This could benefit patients in their prognosis and for specific treatments. PMID:10962804

  6. Making Sense of Varying Standards of Care: The Experiences of Staff Working in Residential Care Environments for Adults with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Andrew; Kroese, Biza Stenfert

    2016-01-01

    Research evidence reveals that adults with learning disabilities who live in residential care facilities are being exposed to considerable variation in the standards of care they receive. High profile cases of substandard care have also raised concerns regarding the appropriateness of existing care provisions and practices. While attempts have…

  7. Multidisciplinary Comprehensive Care for Early Recommencement of Oral Intake in Older Adults With Severe Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Tamami; Shamoto, Hiroshi; Anzai, Hideaki; Koganei, Yutaka; Maeda, Keisuke; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka

    2016-10-01

    (MDCC) on oral intake in older adults with severe pneumonia at the time of discharge. 2. Explore the impact of MDCC on the length of stay for hospitalized older adults with severe pneumonia. DISCLOSURE STATEMENT Neither the planners nor the authors have any conflicts of interest to disclose. The current study was designed to assess the effect of multidisciplinary comprehensive care (MDCC) on (a) oral intake at discharge and (b) hospital stay duration in older adult patients with severe pneumonia. Participants were divided into two groups: receiving and not receiving MDCC. MDCC comprises regular assessment of swallowing ability, aspiration risk management, improvement of oral hygiene, serving of nutritious texture-modified foods, and encouragement of early mobilization. The MDCC group (164 women, 206 men; mean age = 82.7, SD = 8.4 years) had severe pneumonia as well as high proportions of poor premorbid physical function and consciousness disturbance compared to the non-MDCC group (45 women, 56 men; mean age = 81.1, SD = 8.6 years). Nevertheless, MDCC was an independent determinant of hospital stay duration and oral intake (Functional Oral Intake Scale score ≥4) at discharge with Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio = 1.42, 95% confidence interval [1.09, 1.85]). MDCC may promote early oral intake and hospital discharge in older adults with severe pneumonia. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(10), 21-29.]. PMID:27668440

  8. Multidisciplinary Comprehensive Care for Early Recommencement of Oral Intake in Older Adults With Severe Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Tamami; Shamoto, Hiroshi; Anzai, Hideaki; Koganei, Yutaka; Maeda, Keisuke; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka

    2016-10-01

    (MDCC) on oral intake in older adults with severe pneumonia at the time of discharge. 2. Explore the impact of MDCC on the length of stay for hospitalized older adults with severe pneumonia. DISCLOSURE STATEMENT Neither the planners nor the authors have any conflicts of interest to disclose. The current study was designed to assess the effect of multidisciplinary comprehensive care (MDCC) on (a) oral intake at discharge and (b) hospital stay duration in older adult patients with severe pneumonia. Participants were divided into two groups: receiving and not receiving MDCC. MDCC comprises regular assessment of swallowing ability, aspiration risk management, improvement of oral hygiene, serving of nutritious texture-modified foods, and encouragement of early mobilization. The MDCC group (164 women, 206 men; mean age = 82.7, SD = 8.4 years) had severe pneumonia as well as high proportions of poor premorbid physical function and consciousness disturbance compared to the non-MDCC group (45 women, 56 men; mean age = 81.1, SD = 8.6 years). Nevertheless, MDCC was an independent determinant of hospital stay duration and oral intake (Functional Oral Intake Scale score ≥4) at discharge with Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio = 1.42, 95% confidence interval [1.09, 1.85]). MDCC may promote early oral intake and hospital discharge in older adults with severe pneumonia. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(10), 21-29.].

  9. The effect of pharmacist-led interventions in optimising prescribing in older adults in primary care: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David O Riordan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate studies of pharmacist-led interventions on potentially inappropriate prescribing among community-dwelling older adults receiving primary care to identify the components of a successful intervention. Data sources: An electronic search of the literature was conducted using the following databases from inception to December 2015: PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE (through Ovid, Trip, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ISI Web of Science, ScienceDirect, ClinicalTrials.gov, metaRegister of Controlled Trials, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database (Theses in Great Britain, Ireland and North America. Review methods: Studies were included if they were randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised studies involving a pharmacist-led intervention compared to usual/routine care which aimed to reduce potentially inappropriate prescribing in older adults in primary care. Methodological quality of the included studies was independently assessed. Results: A comprehensive literature search was conducted which identified 2193 studies following removal of duplicates. Five studies met the inclusion criteria. Four studies involved a pharmacist conducting a medication review and providing feedback to patients or their family physician. One randomised controlled trial evaluated the effect of a computerised tool that alerted pharmacists when elderly patients were newly prescribed potentially inappropriate medications. Four studies were associated with an improvement in prescribing appropriateness. Conclusion: Overall, this review demonstrates that pharmacist-led interventions may improve prescribing appropriateness in community-dwelling older adults. However, the quality of evidence is low. The role of a pharmacist working as part of a multidisciplinary primary care team requires further investigation to optimise prescribing in this group of

  10. The effect of pharmacist-led interventions in optimising prescribing in older adults in primary care: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, David O; Walsh, Kieran A; Galvin, Rose; Sinnott, Carol; Kearney, Patricia M; Byrne, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate studies of pharmacist-led interventions on potentially inappropriate prescribing among community-dwelling older adults receiving primary care to identify the components of a successful intervention. Data sources: An electronic search of the literature was conducted using the following databases from inception to December 2015: PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE (through Ovid), Trip, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ISI Web of Science, ScienceDirect, ClinicalTrials.gov, metaRegister of Controlled Trials, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database (Theses in Great Britain, Ireland and North America). Review methods: Studies were included if they were randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised studies involving a pharmacist-led intervention compared to usual/routine care which aimed to reduce potentially inappropriate prescribing in older adults in primary care. Methodological quality of the included studies was independently assessed. Results: A comprehensive literature search was conducted which identified 2193 studies following removal of duplicates. Five studies met the inclusion criteria. Four studies involved a pharmacist conducting a medication review and providing feedback to patients or their family physician. One randomised controlled trial evaluated the effect of a computerised tool that alerted pharmacists when elderly patients were newly prescribed potentially inappropriate medications. Four studies were associated with an improvement in prescribing appropriateness. Conclusion: Overall, this review demonstrates that pharmacist-led interventions may improve prescribing appropriateness in community-dwelling older adults. However, the quality of evidence is low. The role of a pharmacist working as part of a multidisciplinary primary care team requires further investigation to optimise prescribing in this group of patients. PMID

  11. Gender differences among young adult cancer patients: a study of blogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bora; Gillham, David

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has increasing relevance and practical use as a tool to support cancer care. For example, health support Web sites are now widely used to connect specific groups of patients who may otherwise have remained isolated, and understanding their health-related online behaviors will help in the development of more effective health support Web sites. This article examined blogs written by young adults affected by cancer and in particular examined the gender differences in these blog entries through content analysis. The results showed there is little difference in blog content between genders. This suggests that the blog environment could lessen the gender-typical behaviors often expected by society and may provide an outlet for young adult cancer patients to more freely share their cancer-related experiences, at the same time providing an opportunity for social connection. This is particularly significant for male patients who are known to inhibit their emotions as well as the expression of their health concerns.

  12. Caring for cancer patients on non-specialist wards.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Finola

    2012-02-01

    As cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide, every nurse will be required to care for patients with the condition at some point in his\\/her career. However, non-specialized oncology nurses are often ill-prepared to nurse patients suffering from cancer. This literature review aims to provide an overview of current trends and developments in cancer care nursing in an attempt to identify the range of previous research pertaining to caring for patients with cancer on non-specialist wards. The review finds that non-specialized cancer nurses report a lack of education and training with regard to cancer care and cancer treatments, which acts as a barrier to providing quality nursing care. Emotional and communication issues with patients and their families can also cause non-specialist nurses significant distress. International research has shown that specialist oncology nurses make a considerable difference to physical and psychosocial patient care. It is therefore paramount that non-speciality nurses\\' educational needs are met to develop clinical competence and to provide supportive holistic care for both patients and their families.

  13. Universal tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccination of adults: What Canadian health care providers know and need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, D; Halperin, B A; MacKinnon-Cameron, D; Li, L; McNeil, S A; Langley, J M; Halperin, S A

    2015-01-01

    The tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) is recommended for all adults in both Canada and the United States. There are few data on the proportion of Canadian adults vaccinated with Tdap; however, anecdotal reports indicate that uptake is low. This study aimed to explore the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors of Canadian health care providers (HCPs) in an attempt to identify potential barriers and facilitators to Tdap uptake. HCPs were surveyed and a geographic and practice representative sample was obtained (N =1,167). In addition, 8 focus groups and 4 interviews were conducted nationwide. Results from the survey indicate that less than half (47.5%) of all respondents reported being immunized with Tdap themselves, while 58.5% routinely offer Tdap to their adult patients. Knowledge scores were relatively low (63.2% correct answers). The best predictor of following the adult Tdap immunization guidelines was awareness of and agreement with those recommendations. Respondents who were aware of the recommendations were more likely to think that Tdap is safe and effective, that their patients are at significant risk of getting pertussis, and to feel that they have sufficient information (p vaccine, and vaccine hesitancy were identified as barriers to compliance with the national recommendations for universal adult immunization, and suggestions were provided to better translate recommendations to front-line practitioners.

  14. Assessments of urine cofilin-1 in patients hospitalized in the intensive care units with acute kidney injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Jang; Chao, Cheng-Han; Chang, Ying-Feng; Chou, Chien

    2013-02-01

    The actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family has been reported to be associated with ischemia induced renal disorders. Here we examine if cofilin-1 is associated with acute kidney injury (AKI). We exploited a 96-well based fiber-optic biosensor that uses conjugated gold nanoparticles and a sandwich immunoassay to detect the urine cofilin-1 level of AKI patients. The mean urine cofilin-1 level of the AKI patients was two-fold higher than that of healthy adults. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve showed that cofilin-1 is a potential biomarker for discriminating AKI patients from healthy adults for intensive care patients.

  15. Clinician styles of care: transforming patient care at the intersection of leadership and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Ho P; Sweeny, Kate

    2014-11-01

    A key role of clinicians is to motivate their patients to initiate and maintain beneficial health behaviors. This article integrates research on transformational leadership, clinician-patient communication, and health behavior to introduce a novel approach to understanding and improving clinicians' effectiveness as motivators. We describe three dominant clinician styles or patterned approaches to patient care that derive from leadership theory (in order of least to most effective): laissez-faire, transactional, and transformational. Additionally, we suggest potential mediators and effects of the transformational style of care. Finally, we discuss future research directions for the study of clinician styles of care.

  16. Clinician styles of care: transforming patient care at the intersection of leadership and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Ho P; Sweeny, Kate

    2014-11-01

    A key role of clinicians is to motivate their patients to initiate and maintain beneficial health behaviors. This article integrates research on transformational leadership, clinician-patient communication, and health behavior to introduce a novel approach to understanding and improving clinicians' effectiveness as motivators. We describe three dominant clinician styles or patterned approaches to patient care that derive from leadership theory (in order of least to most effective): laissez-faire, transactional, and transformational. Additionally, we suggest potential mediators and effects of the transformational style of care. Finally, we discuss future research directions for the study of clinician styles of care. PMID:23864074

  17. Mixed care networks of community-dwelling older adults with physical health impairments in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broese van Groenou, Marjolein; Jacobs, Marianne; Zwart-Olde, Ilse; Deeg, Dorly J H

    2016-01-01

    As part of long-term care reforms, home-care organisations in the Netherlands are required to strengthen the linkage between formal and informal caregivers of home-dwelling older adults. Information on the variety in mixed care networks may help home-care organisations to develop network type-dependent strategies to connect with informal caregivers. This study first explores how structural (size, composition) and functional features (contact and task overlap between formal and informal caregivers) contribute to different types of mixed care networks. Second, it examines to what degree these network types are associated with the care recipients' characteristics. Through home-care organisations in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, we selected 74 frail home-dwelling clients who were receiving care in 2011-2012 from both informal and formal caregivers. The care networks of these older adults were identified by listing all persons providing help with five different types of tasks. This resulted in care networks comprising an average of 9.7 caregivers, of whom 67% were formal caregivers. On average, there was contact between caregivers within 34% of the formal-informal dyads, and both caregivers carried out at least one similar type of task in 29% of these dyads. A principal component analysis of size, composition, contact and task overlap showed two distinct network dimensions from which four network types were constructed: a small mixed care network, a small formal network, a large mixed network and a large formal network. Bivariate analyses showed that the care recipients' activities of daily living level, memory problems, social network, perceived control of care and level of mastery differed significantly between these four types. The results imply that different network types require different actions from formal home-care organisations, such as mobilising the social network in small formal networks, decreasing task differentiation in large formal networks and assigning

  18. Care of Patients at the End of Life: Advance Care Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Richard J

    2016-08-01

    Advance directives are legal documents that give instructions about how to provide care when patients develop life-threatening illnesses and can no longer communicate their wishes. Two types of documents are widely used-a living will and a durable power of attorney for health care. Most states also authorize physician orders for life-sustaining treatment. Physicians should encourage patients, particularly those with severe chronic or terminal conditions, to prepare advance directives. Medicare now reimburses billing codes for advance care consultations. Directions regarding cardiopulmonary resuscitation and artificial ventilation often are included in advance care plans, and use of artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH) also should be addressed, particularly for patients with advanced dementia. Evidence shows that in such patients, ANH does not prolong survival, increase comfort, or improve quality of life. Given the lack of benefit, physicians should recommend against use of ANH for patients with dementia. Finally, physicians should encourage use of hospice services by patients whose life expectancy is 6 months or less. Although Medicare and most other health care insurers cover hospice care, and despite evidence that patient and family satisfaction increase when hospice services are used, many patients do not use these services. PMID:27490070

  19. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tralongo, Paolo; Ferraù, Francesco; Borsellino, Nicolò; Verderame, Francesco; Caruso, Michele; Giuffrida, Dario; Butera, Alfredo; Gebbia, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients’ needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients’ needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective. PMID:21941445

  20. Hematological abnormalities in adult patients with Down's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McLean, S

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a paucity of data regarding hematological abnormalities in adults with Down\\'s syndrome (DS). AIMS: We aimed to characterize hematological abnormalities in adult patients with DS and determine their long-term significance. METHODS: We retrospectively studied a cohort of nine DS patients referred to the adult hematology service in our institution between May 2001 and April 2008. Data collected were: full blood count (FBC), comorbidities, investigations performed, duration of follow-up and outcome to most recent follow-up. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 26 months (9-71). Of the nine patients, two had myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) at presentation. Of these, one progressed, with increasing marrow failure, and requiring support with transfusions and gCSF. The remaining eight patients, with a variety of hematological abnormalities including leukopenia, macrocytosis, and thrombocytopenia, had persistently abnormal FBCs. However there was no evidence of progression, and no patient has evolved to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). CONCLUSIONS: MDS is a complication of DS and may require supportive therapy. However, minor hematological abnormalities are common in adult DS patients, and may not signify underlying marrow disease.

  1. Environmental Design for Patient Families in Intensive Care Units

    OpenAIRE

    Rashid, Mahbub

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to define the role of environmental design in improving family integration with patient care in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). It argues that it is necessary to understand family needs, experience and behavioral responses in ICUs to develop effective models for family integration. With its two components—the “healing culture” promoting effective relationships between caregivers and care seekers, and the “environmental design” supporting the healing culture—a “healin...

  2. Improving haemophilia patient care through sharing best practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moerloose, Philippe; Arnberg, Daniel; O'Mahony, Brian; Colvin, Brian

    2015-10-01

    At the 2014 Annual Congress of the European Haemophilia Consortium (EHC) held in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Pfizer initiated and funded a satellite symposium entitled: 'Improving Patient Care Through Sharing Best Practice'. Co-chaired by Brian Colvin (Pfizer Global Innovative Pharma Business, Rome, Italy) and Brian O'Mahony [President of the EHC, Brussels, Belgium], the symposium provided an opportunity to consider patient care across borders, to review how patient advocacy groups can successfully engage with policymakers in healthcare decision-making and to discuss the importance of patient involvement in data collection to help shape the future environment for people with haemophilia. Professor Philippe de Moerloose (University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine of Geneva, Switzerland) opened the session by discussing the gap between the haemophilia management guidelines and the reality of care for many patients living in Europe, highlighting the importance of sharing of best practice and building a network of treaters and patient organisations to support the improvement of care across Europe. Daniel Arnberg (SCISS AB, Hägersten, Sweden) reviewed the health technology assessment process conducted in Sweden, the first for haemophilia products, as a case study, focusing on the role of the patient organisation. Finally, Brian O'Mahony reflected on the central role of patients as individuals and also within patient organisations in shaping the future of haemophilia care. PMID:26338268

  3. Development of a survey instrument to measure patient experience of integrated care

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Kara Odom; Stewart, Anita L; Grumbach, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background Healthcare systems are working to move towards more integrated, patient-centered care. This study describes the development and testing of a multidimensional self-report measure of patients’ experiences of integrated care. Methods Random-digit-dial telephone survey in 2012 of 317 adults aged 40 years or older in the San Francisco region who had used healthcare at least twice in the past 12 months. One-time cross-sectional survey; psychometric evaluation to confirm dimensions and cr...

  4. Mental health system historians: adults with schizophrenia describe changes in community mental health care over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Catherine H; Leith, Jaclyn E; Osborn, Lawrence A; Greenberg, Sarah; Petrowski, Catherine E; Jesse, Samantha; Kraus, Shane W; May, Michael C

    2015-03-01

    This qualitative study examined changes in community mental health care as described by adults diagnosed with schizophrenia with long-term involvement in the mental health system to situate their experiences within the context of mental health reform movements in the United States. A sample of 14 adults with schizophrenia who had been consumers of mental health services from 12 to 40 years completed interviews about their hospital and outpatient experiences over time and factors that contributed most to their mental health. Overall, adults noted gradual changes in mental health care over time that included higher quality of care, more humane treatment, increased partnership with providers, shorter hospital stays, and better conditions in inpatient settings. Regardless of the mental health reform era in which they were hospitalized, participants described negative hospitalization experiences resulting in considerable personal distress, powerlessness, and trauma. Adults with less than 27 years involvement in the system reported relationships with friends and family as most important to their mental health, while adults with more than 27 years involvement reported mental health services and relationships with professionals as the most important factors in their mental health. The sample did not differ in self-reported use of services during their initial and most recent hospitalization experiences, but differences were found in participants' reported use of outpatient services over time. Findings underscore the importance of the lived experience of adults with schizophrenia in grounding current discourse on mental health care reform.

  5. Surgical patients' and nurses' opinions and expectations about privacy in care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyüz, Elif; Erdemir, Firdevs

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the opinions and expectations of patients and nurses about privacy during a hospital admission for surgery. The study explored what enables and maintains privacy from the perspective of Turkish surgical patients and nurses. The study included 102 adult patients having surgery and 47 nurses caring for them. Data were collected via semistructured questionnaire by face-to-face interviews. The results showed that patients were mostly satisfied by the respect shown to their privacy by the nurses but were less confident of the confidentiality of their personal data. It was found that patients have expectations regarding nursing approaches and attitudes about acknowledging and respecting patient autonomy and confidentiality. It is remarkable that while nurses focused on the physical dimension of privacy, patients focused on informational and psychosocial dimensions of privacy, as well as its physical dimension.

  6. Pyridoxine deficiency in adult patients with status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Hina N; Eugene Ramsay, Richard; Khan, Fawad; Sabharwal, Vivek; Irland, Megan

    2015-11-01

    An 8-year-old girl treated at our facility for superrefractory status epilepticus was found to have a low pyridoxine level at 5 μg/L. After starting pyridoxine supplementation, improvement in the EEG for a 24-hour period was seen. We decided to look at the pyridoxine levels in adult patients admitted with status epilepticus. We reviewed the records on patients admitted to the neurological ICU for status epilepticus (SE). Eighty-one adult patients were identified with documented pyridoxine levels. For comparison purposes, we looked at pyridoxine levels in outpatients with epilepsy (n=132). Reported normal pyridoxine range is >10 ng/mL. All but six patients admitted for SE had low normal or undetectable pyridoxine levels. A selective pyridoxine deficiency was seen in 94% of patients with status epilepticus (compared to 39.4% in the outpatients) which leads us to believe that there is a relationship between status epilepticus and pyridoxine levels.

  7. Clinical care of adult Turner syndrome--new aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian Havmand; Hjerrild, Britta E;

    2012-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is characterized by numerous medical challenges during adolescence and adulthood. Puberty has to be induced in most cases, and female sex hormone replacement therapy (HRT) should continue during adult years. These issues are normally dealt with by the paediatrician, but once...

  8. Fetal Programming of Adult Disease: Implications for Prenatal Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    The obesity epidemic, including a marked increase in the prevalence of obesity among pregnant women, represents a critical public health problem in the United States and throughout the world. Over the past two decades, it has been increasingly recognized that the risk of adult ...

  9. When Residents Need Health Care: Stigma of the Patient Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutier, Christine; Cornette, Michelle; Lehrmann, Jon; Geppert, Cynthia; Tsao, Carol; DeBoard, Renee; Hammond, Katherine Green; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Whether and under what circumstances medical residents seek personal health care is a growing concern that has important implications for medical education and patient welfare, but has not been thoroughly investigated. Barriers to obtaining care have been previously documented, but very little empirical work has focused on trainees who…

  10. Supporting shared care for diabetes patients. The synapses solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, P. J.; Kalshoven, M.; Ros, M.; van der Kolk, H.; Weier, O.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the construction of a Federated Health Care Record server within the context of the European R&D project Synapses. We describe the system using the five ODP viewpoints. From an analysis of the business process to be supported by the distributed system (the shared care for diabetes patients) requirements for the server are derived. PMID:9357655

  11. 42 CFR 494.90 - Condition: Patient plan of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... personal care, home dialysis and self-care, quality of life, rehabilitation, transplantation, and the... achieve and sustain the prescribed dose of dialysis to meet a hemodialysis Kt/V of at least 1.2 and a... appropriate, timely referrals to achieve and sustain vascular access. The hemodialysis patient must...

  12. Income Inequities in Health Care Utilization among Adults Aged 50 and Older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, Margaret J; Zheng, Chi

    2016-03-01

    Equitable access to and utilization of health services is a primary goal for many health care systems, particularly in countries with universal publicly funded systems. Despite concerns regarding potentially adverse implications of the 1990s' health care policy and other reforms, whether and how income inequalities in service utilization changed remains unclear. This study addressed the impact of income on physician and hospital utilization from 1992-2002 among adults aged 50 and older in British Columbia. Those with lower incomes were found less likely to access general practitioner and specialist services but more likely to access hospital services. Income-related disparities in physician care increased over time; hospital care declined. Volume of GP and hospital care was inversely associated with income; these differences increased regarding GP services only. Findings of declines in hospital-care access, accompanied by increasing income-related disparities in physician-services access, show that inequities are increasing within Canada's health care system. PMID:26757886

  13. PRIMARY PALLIATIVE CARE? - Treating terminally ill cancer patients in the primary care sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Olesen, Frede;

    sectors.METHOD. A number of focus group interviews were conducted with three types of subgroups: 1) Bereaved relatives, 2) GPs and 3) Various health-care-professionals, namely community nurses, hospital physicians and GPs. The interviews were transcribed and analysed according to a phenomenological......BACKGROUND. Palliative care for cancer patients is an important part of a GP's work. Although every GP is frequently involved in care for terminally ill cancer patients, only little is known about how these palliative efforts are perceived by the patients and their families, a knowledge...... approach.RESULTS. The analyses revealed several key areas, e.g.: 1) How to take, give and maintain professional responsibility for palliative home care. 2) A need for transparent communication both among primary care professionals and among professionals across the primary/secondary interface. 3...

  14. The impact of managed care on patients' trust in medical care and their physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanic, D; Schlesinger, M

    1996-06-01

    Social trust in health care organizations and interpersonal trust in physicians may be mutually supportive, but they also diverge in important ways. The success of medical care depends most importantly on patients' trust that their physicians are competent, take appropriate responsibility and control, and give their patients' welfare the highest priority. Utilization review and structural arrangements in managed care potentially challenge trust in physicians by restricting choice, contradicting medical decisions and control, and restricting open communication with patients. Gatekeeping and incentives to limit care also raise serious trust issues. We argue that managed care plans rather than physicians should be required to disclose financial arrangements, that limits be placed on incentives that put physicians at financial risk, and that professional norms and public policies should encourage clear separation of interests of physicians from health plan organization and finance. PMID:8637148

  15. Assessing Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care: Stakeholder Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Gaglio, Bridget; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Alexander, Gwen L.; Stark, Azadeh; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Walsh, Kathleen; Boggs, Jennifer; Lemay, Celeste A.; Firneno, Cassandra; Biggins, Colleen; Blosky, Mary Ann; Arora, Neeraj K.

    2013-01-01

    Patient reports of their communication experiences during cancer care could increase understanding of the communication process, stimulate improvements, inform interventions, and provide a basis for evaluating changes in communication practices.

  16. The use of flange extenders to support patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Pat

    Pat Black, Senior Lecturer, St Mark's Institute of GI Nursing, St Mark's Hospital, explores one option for stoma care nurses to consider that could help improve patient confidence and comfort. PMID:26973006

  17. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and Utilization of Preventive Health Care Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Eno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We examined how (a health insurance coverage, and (b familiarity with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA’s or ObamaCare mandate of cost-free access to preventive health services, affect the use of preventive services by residents of a minority community. It was based on primary data collected from a survey conducted during March to April 2012 among a sample of self-identified African American adults in Tallahassee-Leon County area of northwest Florida. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS Version 22 was used for running frequency analysis on the data set and multivariable regression modeling. The results showed that of 524 respondents, 382 (73% had health insurance while 142 (27% lacked insurance. Majority of insured respondents, 332 (87%, used preventive health services. However, the remaining 13% of respondents did not use preventive services because they were unfamiliar with the ACA provision of free access to preventive services for insured people. Regression analysis showed a high (91.04% probability that, among the insured, the use of preventive health services depended on the person’s age, income, and education. For uninsured residents, the lack of health insurance was the key reason for non-use of preventive health services, while among the insured, lack of knowledge about the ACA benefit of free access contributed to non-use of preventive services. Expansion of Medicaid eligibility can increase insurance coverage rates among African Americans and other minority populations. Health promotion and awareness campaigns about the law’s benefits by local and state health departments can enhance the use of preventive services.

  18. The influence of care interventions on the continuity of sleep of intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Luiza Hamze

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify care interventions, performed by the health team, and their influence on the continuity of sleep of patients hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit.Method: descriptive study with a sample of 12 patients. A filming technique was used for the data collection. The awakenings from sleep were measured using the actigraphy method. The analysis of the data was descriptive, processed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software.Results: 529 care interventions were identified, grouped into 28 different types, of which 12 (42.8% caused awakening from sleep for the patients. A mean of 44.1 interventions/patient/day was observed, with 1.8 interventions/patient/hour. The administration of oral medicine and food were the interventions that caused higher frequencies of awakenings in the patients.Conclusion: it was identified that the health care interventions can harm the sleep of ICU patients. It is recommended that health professionals rethink the planning of interventions according to the individual demand of the patients, with the diversification of schedules and introduction of new practices to improve the quality of sleep of Intensive Care Unit patients.

  19. Effects of an implemented care policy on patient and personnel experiences of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövgren, Gunvor; Eriksson, S; Sandman, P-O

    2002-03-01

    A care policy was implemented within health care in the county of Västerbotten, Sweden. A questionnaire was administered before and after the implementation of the care policy to assess its effects. Patients within hospital care and primary health care described their experiences in a base-line study (n=3950) in 1994 and a follow-up study (n=2941) in 1996. On the same occasions personnel (n=2362 and 2310, respectively) answered the same questionnaire assessing what they thought their patients experienced. No significant positive effects of the implementation were seen by the patients. Fewer patients felt that they were understood when they talked about their problems, dared to express criticism or denied they were treated nonchalantly in the follow-up study. The experiences of the personnel were in line with those of the patients concerning nonchalant treatment in the follow-up study. Furthermore, fewer staff members thought that their patients felt they had adequate help with hygiene whilst more thought that their patients felt they were responded to in a loving way. One interpretation of the negative outcome is that organizational changes, strained resources and cuts in staffing during the 90s may have reduced the possibility of integrating the care policy in spite of an ambitious and extensive intervention. PMID:11985743

  20. Accelerating patient-care improvement in the ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Nancy E

    2003-08-01

    Quality improvement is always in the best interest of healthcare providers. One hospital examined the patient-care delivery process used in its emergency department to determine ways to improve patient satisfaction while increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare delivery. The hospital used activity-based costing (ABC) plus additional data related to rework, information opportunity costs, and other effectiveness measures to create a process map that helped it accelerate diagnosis and improve redesign of the care process. PMID:12938618