WorldWideScience

Sample records for cardiovascular society consensus

  1. 2012 consensus document of the Italian Society of Hypertension (SIIA): strategies to improve blood pressure control in Italy: from global cardiovascular risk stratification to combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Massimo; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Ambrosioni, Ettore; Cottone, Santina; Cuspidi, Cesare; Borghi, Claudio; De Luca, Nicola; Fallo, Francesco; Ferri, Claudio; Morganti, Alberto; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Sarzani, Riccardo; Sechi, Leonardo; Virdis, Agostino; Tocci, Giuliano; Trimarco, Bruno; Filippi, Alessandro; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    Observational clinical studies have demonstrated that only 30-40% of patients with arterial hypertension achieve the recommended blood pressure goals (below 140/90 mmHg). In contrast, interventional trials consistently showed that it is possible to achieve effective blood pressure targets in about 70% of treated hypertensive patients with different cardiovascular risk profiles, especially through the use of rational, effective and well tolerated combination therapies. In order to bridge the gap between current and desired blood pressure control and to achieve more effective prevention of cardiovascular diseases, the Italian Society of Hypertension (SIIA) has developed an interventional strategy aimed at reaching nearly 70% of treated controlled hypertensive patients by 2015. This ambitious goal can be realistically achieved by a more rational use of modern tools and supports, and also through the use of combination therapy in hypertension in daily clinical practice, especially if this approach can be simplified into a single pill (fixed combination therapy), which is a therapeutic option now also available in Italy. Since about 70-80% of treated hypertensive patients require a combination therapy based on at least two classes of drugs in order to achieve the recommended blood pressure goals, it is of key importance to implement this strategy in routine clinical practice. Amongst the various combination therapies currently available for hypertension treatment and control, the use of those strategies based on drugs that antagonize the renin-angiotensin system, such as angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers) and ACE inhibitors, in combination with diuretics and/or calcium channel blockers, has been shown to significantly reduce the risk of major cardiovascular events and to improve patient compliance to treatment, resulting in a greater antihypertensive efficacy and better tolerability compared with monotherapy. The present document

  2. DACH-LIGA homocystein (german, austrian and swiss homocysteine society): consensus paper on the rational clinical use of homocysteine, folic acid and B-vitamins in cardiovascular and thrombotic diseases: guidelines and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger, Olaf; Herrmann, Wolfgang; Pietrzik, Klaus; Fowler, Brian; Geisel, Jürgen; Dierkes, Jutta; Weger, Martin

    2003-11-01

    About half of all deaths are due to cardiovascular disease and its complications. The economic burden on society and the healthcare system from cardiovascular disability, complications, and treatments is huge and getting larger in the rapidly aging populations of developed countries. As conventional risk factors fail to account for part of the cases, homocysteine, a "new" risk factor, is being viewed with mounting interest. Homocysteine is a sulfur-containing intermediate product in the normal metabolism of methionine, an essential amino acid. Folic acid, vitamin B12, and vitamin B6 deficiencies and reduced enzyme activities inhibit the breakdown of homocysteine, thus increasing the intracellular homocysteine concentration. Numerous retrospective and prospective studies have consistently found an independent relationship between mild hyperhomocysteinemia and cardiovascular disease or all-cause mortality. Starting at a plasma homocysteine concentration of approximately 10 micromol/l, the risk increase follows a linear dose-response relationship with no specific threshold level. Hyperhomocysteinemia as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease is thought to be responsible for about 10% of total risk. Elevated plasma homocysteine levels (>12 micromol/l; moderate hyperhomocysteinemia) are considered cytotoxic and are found in 5 to 10% of the general population and in up to 40% of patients with vascular disease. Additional risk factors (smoking, arterial hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia) may additively or, by interacting with homocysteine, synergistically (and hence over-proportionally) increase overall risk. Hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with alterations in vascular morphology, loss of endothelial anti-thrombotic function, and induction of a procoagulant environment. Most known forms of damage or injury are due to homocysteine-mediated oxidative stress. Especially when acting as direct or indirect antagonists of cofactors and enzyme

  3. Consensus statement on surgical pathology of the aorta from the Society for Cardiovascular Pathology and the Association For European Cardiovascular Pathology: II. Noninflammatory degenerative diseases - nomenclature and diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halushka, Marc K; Angelini, Annalisa; Bartoloni, Giovanni; Basso, Cristina; Batoroeva, Lubov; Bruneval, Patrick; Buja, L Maximilian; Butany, Jagdish; d'Amati, Giulia; Fallon, John T; Gallagher, Patrick J; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C; Gouveia, Rosa H; Kholova, Ivana; Kelly, Karen L; Leone, Ornella; Litovsky, Silvio H; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Miller, Dylan V; Mitchell, Richard N; Preston, Stephen D; Pucci, Angela; Radio, Stanley J; Rodriguez, E Rene; Sheppard, Mary N; Stone, James R; Suvarna, S Kim; Tan, Carmela D; Thiene, Gaetano; Veinot, John P; van der Wal, Allard C

    2016-01-01

    Surgical aortic specimens are usually examined in Pathology Departments as a result of treatment of aneurysms or dissections. A number of diseases, genetic syndromes (Marfan syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, etc.), and vasculopathic aging processes involved in vascular injury can cause both distinct and nonspecific histopathologic changes with degeneration of the media as a common denominator. Terminology for these changes has varied over time leading to confusion and inconsistencies. This consensus document has established a revised, unified nomenclature for the variety of noninflammatory degenerative aortic histopathologies seen in such specimens. Older terms such as cystic medial necrosis and medionecrosis are replaced by more technically accurate terms such as mucoid extracellular matrix accumulation (MEMA), elastic fiber fragmentation and/or loss, and smooth muscle cell nuclei loss. A straightforward system of grading is presented to gauge the extent of medial degeneration and synoptic reporting tables are provided. Herein we present a standardized nomenclature that is accessible to general pathologists and useful for future publications describing these entities. PMID:27031798

  4. Consensus Building: the Democracy which Works Properly in Complex Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Susskind

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available “Quality of life and governance are more and more related. The Consensus Building method is the “other” democracy, the one which works in complex societies. This approach has old roots, but its current success born in the last years due to two phenomenon’s; the great crisis in traditional governance in particular in western societies from 70’s until nowadays, and the inadequate local answers to this problems. On one hand some governments try to solve it with more restrict places of power, that take decisions on their own, on the other hand or they try to solve it with naïve participation, open new moments of decision without specific methods, thinking that differences could be solve with “good will” and  voting. (From the introduction“Confronto Creativo; dal diritto alla parola al diritto di essere ascoltati” Lawrence Susskind- Marianella Sclavi 2011On September 2011 Lawrence Susskind came to Italy in order to presents his book “Confronto Creativo, dal diritto di parola al diritto di essere ascoltati”, wrote with Marianella Sclavi. This book has been published in more than 20 countries, from China, to Japan. The authors underline the idea that globalization is, in certain way, helping the born of a different governance, which makes democracy and new ways of participation been closer than in the past. This interview tries to answer some questions of participatory urban planning in Italy nowadays. As for example; can consensus building help to deal with complex cities nowadays? Who should promote consensus building approach: governments, citizens, private entrepreneurships? Which are the obstacles, and the methodologies to solve them? Once urban planners finish their work, who implement the projects? What are the new languages that urban planning should find in order to create local processes?

  5. Modelling Adaptive Learning Behaviours for Consensus Formation in Human Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Tan, Guozhen; Lv, Hongtao; Wang, Zhen; Meng, Jun; Hao, Jianye; Ren, Fenghui

    2016-06-01

    Learning is an important capability of humans and plays a vital role in human society for forming beliefs and opinions. In this paper, we investigate how learning affects the dynamics of opinion formation in social networks. A novel learning model is proposed, in which agents can dynamically adapt their learning behaviours in order to facilitate the formation of consensus among them, and thus establish a consistent social norm in the whole population more efficiently. In the model, agents adapt their opinions through trail-and-error interactions with others. By exploiting historical interaction experience, a guiding opinion, which is considered to be the most successful opinion in the neighbourhood, can be generated based on the principle of evolutionary game theory. Then, depending on the consistency between its own opinion and the guiding opinion, a focal agent can realize whether its opinion complies with the social norm (i.e., the majority opinion that has been adopted) in the population, and adapt its behaviours accordingly. The highlight of the model lies in that it captures the essential features of people’s adaptive learning behaviours during the evolution and formation of opinions. Experimental results show that the proposed model can facilitate the formation of consensus among agents, and some critical factors such as size of opinion space and network topology can have significant influences on opinion dynamics.

  6. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines for reporting cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations

    OpenAIRE

    van Rossum Albert C; Raman Subha V; McConnell Michael V; Lawson Mark A; Higgins Charles B; Friedrich Matthias G; Bogaert Jan G; Bluemke David; Hundley W Gregory; Flamm Scott; Kramer Christopher M; Nagel Eike; Neubauer Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract These reporting guidelines are recommended by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) to provide a framework for healthcare delivery systems to disseminate cardiac and vascular imaging findings related to the performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) examinations.

  7. Consensus on the detection and management of prediabetes. Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Cases, M; Artola, S; Escalada, J; Ezkurra-Loyola, P; Ferrer-García, J C; Fornos, J A; Girbés, J; Rica, I

    2015-03-01

    In Spain, according to the Di@bet.es study, 13.8% of the adult population suffers from diabetes and 14.8% from some form of prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose or both). Since early detection of prediabetes can facilitate the implementation of therapeutic measures to prevent its progression to diabetes, we believe that preventive strategies in primary care and specialized clinical settings should be agreed. Screening for diabetes and prediabetes using a specific questionnaire (FINDRISC) and/or the measurement of fasting plasma glucose in high risk patients leads to detecting patients at risk of developing diabetes and it is necessary to consider how they should be managed. The intervention in lifestyle can reduce the progression to diabetes and reverse a prediabetic state to normal and is a cost-effective intervention. Some drugs, such as metformin, have also been shown effective in reducing the progression to diabetes but are not superior to non-pharmacological interventions. Finally, an improvement in some cardiovascular risk factors has been observed although there is no strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of screening in terms of morbility and mortality. The Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society has issued some recommendations that have been agreed by the Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Sociedad Española de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Farmacia Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna, Asociación de Enfermería Comunitaria and Red de Grupos de Estudio de la Diabetes en Atención Primaria.

  8. [Consensus on the detection and management of prediabetes. Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Cases, M; Artola, S; Escalada, J; Ezkurra-Loyola, P; Ferrer-García, J C; Fornos, J A; Girbés, J; Rica, I

    2015-01-01

    In Spain, according to the Di@bet.es study, 13.8% of the adult population suffers from diabetes and 14.8% from some form of prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose or both). Since early detection of prediabetes can facilitate the implementation of therapeutic measures to prevent its progression to diabetes, we believe that preventive strategies in primary care and specialized clinical settings should be agreed. Screening for diabetes and prediabetes using a specific questionnaire (FINDRISC) and/or the measurement of fasting plasma glucose in high risk patients leads to detecting patients at risk of developing diabetes and it is necessary to consider how they should be managed. The intervention in lifestyle can reduce the progression to diabetes and reverse a prediabetic state to normal and is a cost-effective intervention. Some drugs, such as metformin, have also been shown effective in reducing the progression to diabetes but are not superior to non-pharmacological interventions. Finally, an improvement in some cardiovascular risk factors has been observed although there is no strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of screening in terms of morbility and mortality. The Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society has issued some recommendations that have been agreed by the Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Sociedad Española de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Farmacia Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna, Asociación de Enfermería Comunitaria and Red de Grupos de Estudio de la Diabetes en Atención Primaria.

  9. [Consensus on the detection and management of prediabetes. Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Cases, M; Artola, S; Escalada, J; Ezkurra-Loyola, P; Ferrer-García, J C; Fornos, J A; Girbés, J; Rica, I

    2015-03-01

    In Spain, according to the Di@bet.es study, 13.8% of the adult population suffers from diabetes and 14.8% from some form of prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose or both). Since early detection of prediabetes can facilitate the implementation of therapeutic measures to prevent its progression to diabetes, we believe that preventive strategies in primary care and specialized clinical settings should be agreed. Screening for diabetes and prediabetes using a specific questionnaire (FINDRISC) and/or the measurement of fasting plasma glucose in high risk patients leads to detecting patients at risk of developing diabetes and it is necessary to consider how they should be managed. The intervention in lifestyle can reduce the progression to diabetes and reverse a prediabetic state to normal and is a cost-effective intervention. Some drugs, such as metformin, have also been shown effective in reducing the progression to diabetes but are not superior to non-pharmacological interventions. Finally, an improvement in some cardiovascular risk factors has been observed although there is no strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of screening in terms of morbility and mortality. The Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society has issued some recommendations that have been agreed by the Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Sociedad Española de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Farmacia Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna, Asociación de Enfermería Comunitaria and Red de Grupos de Estudio de la Diabetes en Atención Primaria.

  10. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines for reporting cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rossum Albert C

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract These reporting guidelines are recommended by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR to provide a framework for healthcare delivery systems to disseminate cardiac and vascular imaging findings related to the performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR examinations.

  11. Consensus document regarding cardiovascular safety at sports arenas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borjesson, Mats; Serratosa, Luis; Carre, Francois;

    2011-01-01

    Mass gathering events in sports arenas create challenges regarding the cardiovascular safety of both athletes and spectators. A comprehensive medical action plan, to ensure properly applied cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and wide availability and use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs......), is essential to improving survival from sudden cardiac arrest at sporting events. This paper outlines minimum standards for cardiovascular care to assist in the planning of mass gathering sports events across Europe with the intention of local adaptation at individual sports arenas, to ensure the full...

  12. Interassociation Consensus Statement on Cardiovascular Care of College Student-Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainline, Brian; Drezner, Jonathan; Baggish, Aaron; Harmon, Kimberly G; Emery, Michael S; Myerburg, Robert J; Sanchez, Eduardo; Molossi, Silvana; Parsons, John T; Thompson, Paul D

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular evaluation and care of college student-athletes is gaining increasing attention from both the public and medical communities. Emerging strategies include screening of the general athlete population, recommendations of permissible levels of participation by athletes with identified cardiovascular conditions, and preparation for responding to unanticipated cardiac events in athletic venues. The primary focus has been sudden cardiac death and the utility of screening with or without advanced cardiac screening. The National Collegiate Athletic Association convened a multidisciplinary task force to address cardiovascular concerns in collegiate student-athletes and to develop consensus for an interassociation statement. This document summarizes the task force deliberations and follow-up discussions, and includes available evidence on cardiovascular risk, pre-participation evaluation, and the recognition of and response to cardiac arrest. Future recommendations for cardiac research initiatives, education, and collaboration are also provided. (J Am Coll Cardiol 2016;doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2016.03.527.)

  13. Interassociation Consensus Statement on Cardiovascular Care of College Student-Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainline, Brian; Drezner, Jonathan A; Baggish, Aaron; Harmon, Kimberly G; Emery, Michael S; Myerburg, Robert J; Sanchez, Eduardo; Molossi, Silvana; Parsons, John T; Thompson, Paul D

    2016-06-28

    Cardiovascular evaluation and care of college student-athletes is gaining increasing attention from both the public and medical communities. Emerging strategies include screening of the general athlete population, recommendations of permissible levels of participation by athletes with identified cardiovascular conditions, and preparation for responding to unanticipated cardiac events in athletic venues. The primary focus has been sudden cardiac death and the utility of screening with or without advanced cardiac screening. The National Collegiate Athletic Association convened a multidisciplinary task force to address cardiovascular concerns in collegiate student-athletes and to develop consensus for an interassociation statement. This document summarizes the task force deliberations and follow-up discussions, and includes available evidence on cardiovascular risk, pre-participation evaluation, and the recognition of and response to cardiac arrest. Future recommendations for cardiac research initiatives, education, and collaboration are also provided.

  14. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines for Evaluation and Management of Cardiovascular Complications of Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virani, Sean A; Dent, Susan; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Clarke, Brian; Davis, Margot K; Jassal, Davinder S; Johnson, Christopher; Lemieux, Julie; Paterson, Ian; Sebag, Igal A; Simmons, Christine; Sulpher, Jeffrey; Thain, Kishore; Thavendiranathan, Paaldinesh; Wentzell, Jason R; Wurtele, Nola; Côté, Marc André; Fine, Nowell M; Haddad, Haissam; Hayley, Bradley D; Hopkins, Sean; Joy, Anil A; Rayson, Daniel; Stadnick, Ellamae; Straatman, Lynn

    2016-07-01

    Modern treatment strategies have led to improvements in cancer survival, however, these gains might be offset by the potential negative effect of cancer therapy on cardiovascular health. Cardiotoxicity is now recognized as a leading cause of long-term morbidity and mortality among cancer survivors. This guideline, authored by a pan-Canadian expert group of health care providers and commissioned by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society, is intended to guide the care of cancer patients with established cardiovascular disease or those at risk of experiencing toxicities related to cancer treatment. It includes recommendations and important management considerations with a focus on 4 main areas: identification of the high-risk population for cardiotoxicity, detection and prevention of cardiotoxicity, treatment of cardiotoxicity, and a multidisciplinary approach to cardio-oncology. All recommendations align with the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Key recommendations for which the panel provides a strong level of evidence include: (1) that routine evaluation of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and optimal treatment of preexisting cardiovascular disease be performed in all patients before, during, and after receiving cancer therapy; (2) that initiation, maintenance, and/or augmentation of antihypertensive therapy be instituted per the Canadian Hypertension Educational Program guidelines for patients with preexisting hypertension or for those who experience hypertension related to cancer therapy; and (3) that investigation and management follow current Canadian Cardiovascular Society heart failure guidelines for cancer patients who develop clinical heart failure or an asymptomatic decline in left ventricular ejection fraction during or after cancer treatment. This guideline provides guidance to clinicians on contemporary best practices for the cardiovascular care of cancer patients. PMID:27343741

  15. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure Companion: Bridging Guidelines to Your Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Jonathan G; Chan, Michael; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Harkness, Karen; Heckman, George A; Kouz, Simon; Leblanc, Marie-Hélène; Moe, Gordon W; O'Meara, Eileen; Abrams, Howard; Ducharme, Anique; Grzeslo, Adam; Hamilton, Peter G; Koshman, Sheri L; Lepage, Serge; McDonald, Michael; McKelvie, Robert; Rajda, Miroslaw; Swiggum, Elizabeth; Virani, Sean; Zieroth, Shelley

    2016-03-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure (HF) Guidelines Program has generated annual HF updates, including formal recommendations and supporting Practical Tips since 2006. Many clinicians indicate they routinely use the Canadian Cardiovascular Society HF Guidelines in their daily practice. However, many questions surrounding the actual implementation of the Guidelines into their daily practice remain. A consensus-based approach was used, including feedback from the Primary and Secondary HF Panels. This companion is intended to answer several key questions brought forth by HF practitioners such as appropriate timelines for initial assessments and subsequent reassessments of patients, the order in which medications should be added, how newer medications should be included in treatment algorithms, and when left ventricular function should be reassessed. A new treatment algorithm for HF with reduced ejection fraction is included. Several other practical issues are addressed such as an approach to management of hyperkalemia/hypokalemia, treatment of gout, when medications can be stopped, and whether a target blood pressure or heart rate is suggested. Finally, elements and teaching of self-care are described. This tool will hopefully function to allow better integration of the HF Guidelines into clinical practice.

  16. [Dyslipidemias: a pending challenge in cardiovascular prevention. Consensus document from CEIPC/SEA Committee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royo Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Lobos Bejarano, José María; Millán Núñez-Cortés, Jesús; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Guijarro Herráiz, Carlos; de Pablo Zarzosa, Carmen; Pedro-Botet Montoya, Juan; Santiago Nocito, Ana de

    2011-06-11

    In Spain, where cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death, hypercholesterolemia, one of the most prevalent risk factors in adults, is poorly controlled. Dyslipidemia should not be approached in isolation, but in the context of overall cardiovascular risk (CVR). Measurement of CVR facilitates decision making, but should not be the only tool nor should it take the place of clinical judgment, given the limitations of the available calculation methods. This document, prepared by the Interdisciplinary Spanish Committee on Cardiovascular Prevention, at the proposal of the Spanish Society of Arteriosclerosis, reviews the cardiovascular prevention activities of the regional health authorities, scientific societies and medical professionals. An initiation of a national strategy on cardiovascular prevention is proposed based on lifestyle modification (healthy diet, physical activity and smoking cessation) through actions in different settings. At the population level, regulation of food advertising, elimination of trans fats and reduction of added sugar are feasible and cost-effective interventions to help control dyslipidemias and reduce CVR. In the health setting, it is proposed to facilitate the application of guidelines, improve training for medical professionals, and include CVR assessment among the quality indicators. Scientific societies should collaborate with the health authorities and contribute to the generation and transmission of knowledge. Finally, it is in the hands of professionals to apply the concept of CVR, promote healthy lifestyles, and make efficient use of available pharmacological treatments.

  17. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Quality Indicators for Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvie, Robert S; Heckman, George A; Blais, Claudia; Cox, Jafna L; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Gong, Yanyan; Harkness, Karen; Moe, Gordon; Dai, Sulan; Dorian, Paul; Johnstone, David E; McGeachie, Erin C; Tu, Jack V; Lambert, Laurie J

    2016-08-01

    A working group was convened by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) in 2010 to identify quality indicators (QIs) for heart failure (HF). Using the CCS "Best Practices for Developing Cardiovascular Quality Indicators" methodology, a total of 49 "long-list" QIs was identified and rated. Subsequent ranking and discussion led to the selection of an initial "short-list" of 6 QIs to evaluate quality care, including daily assessment of blood chemistry indicators, chest radiography, patient education, in-hospital use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers, assessment of left ventricular function, and 30-day hospital readmission. The short-list QIs were selected as being important for quality assurance and because the patient information, for the most part, can be captured during the inpatient setting, which would allow these QIs to be adopted more easily. These 6 QIs were subjected to a feasibility test that found that even within the inpatient setting, there is a significant gap between the existing knowledge infrastructure and the necessary information-tracking processes to measure QIs. Only 1 QI (30-day hospital readmission) can currently be measured comparatively across Canada, although the other 5 of 6 short-list QIs can be measured using other data collected by jurisdictions. Standardization and enhancements to knowledge infrastructure are essential to provide the comprehensive patient data necessary to evaluate the quality of HF care across Canada. PMID:26968392

  18. Evaluation and management of hemorrhoids: Italian society of colorectal surgery (SICCR) consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompetto, M; Clerico, G; Cocorullo, G F; Giordano, P; Marino, F; Martellucci, J; Milito, G; Mistrangelo, M; Ratto, C

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhoids are one of the most common medical and surgical diseases and the main reason for a visit to a coloproctologist. This consensus statement was drawn up by the Italian society of colorectal surgery in order to provide practice parameters for an accurate assessment of the disease and consequent appropriate treatment. The authors made a careful search in the main databases (MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase and Cochrane), and all results were classified on the basis of the grade of recommendation (A-C) of the American College of Chest Physicians.

  19. [Diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk: Working group recommendations of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease of the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED, 2015)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Francisco; Iglesias, Pedro; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Tébar, Francisco Javier; Ortega, Emilio; Nubiola, Andreu; Pardo, Jose Luis; Maldonado, Gonzálo Fernando; Obaya, Juan Carlos; Matute, Pablo; Petrecca, Romina; Alonso, Nuria; Sarabia, Elena; Sánchez-Margalet, Victor; Alemán, José Juan; Navarro, Jorge; Becerra, Antonio; Duran, Santiago; Aguilar, Manuel; Escobar-Jiménez, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    The present paper updates the Clinical Practice Recommendations for the management of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in diabetes mellitus. This is a medical consensus agreed by an independent panel of experts from the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED). Several consensuses have been proposed by scientific and medical Societies to achieve clinical goals. However, the risk score for general population may lack sensitivity for individual assessment or for particular groups at risk, such as diabetics. Traditional risk factors together with non-traditional factors are reviewed throughout this paper. Intervention strategies for managing CVRF in the diabetic patient are reviewed in detail: balanced food intake, weight reduction, physical exercise, smoking cessation, reduction in HbA1c, therapy for high blood pressure, obesity, lipid disorders, and platelet anti-aggregation. It is hoped that these guidelines can help clinicians in the decisions of their clinical activity. This regular update by the SED Cardiovascular Disease Group of the most relevant concepts, and of greater practical and realistic clinical interest, is presented in order to reduce CVR of diabetics. PMID:26031458

  20. [Diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk: Working group recommendations of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease of the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED, 2015)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Francisco; Iglesias, Pedro; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Tébar, Francisco Javier; Ortega, Emilio; Nubiola, Andreu; Pardo, Jose Luis; Maldonado, Gonzálo Fernando; Obaya, Juan Carlos; Matute, Pablo; Petrecca, Romina; Alonso, Nuria; Sarabia, Elena; Sánchez-Margalet, Victor; Alemán, José Juan; Navarro, Jorge; Becerra, Antonio; Duran, Santiago; Aguilar, Manuel; Escobar-Jiménez, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    The present paper updates the Clinical Practice Recommendations for the management of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in diabetes mellitus. This is a medical consensus agreed by an independent panel of experts from the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED). Several consensuses have been proposed by scientific and medical Societies to achieve clinical goals. However, the risk score for general population may lack sensitivity for individual assessment or for particular groups at risk, such as diabetics. Traditional risk factors together with non-traditional factors are reviewed throughout this paper. Intervention strategies for managing CVRF in the diabetic patient are reviewed in detail: balanced food intake, weight reduction, physical exercise, smoking cessation, reduction in HbA1c, therapy for high blood pressure, obesity, lipid disorders, and platelet anti-aggregation. It is hoped that these guidelines can help clinicians in the decisions of their clinical activity. This regular update by the SED Cardiovascular Disease Group of the most relevant concepts, and of greater practical and realistic clinical interest, is presented in order to reduce CVR of diabetics.

  1. Korean Society of Cardiovascular Imaging Guidelines for Cardiac Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Korean Society of Cardiovascular Imaging (KOCSI) has issued a guideline for the use of cardiac CT imaging in order to assist clinicians and patients in providing adequate level of medical service. In order to establish a guideline founded on evidence based medicine, it was designed based on comprehensive data such as questionnaires conducted in international and domestic hospitals, intensive journal reviews, and with experts in cardiac radiology. The recommendations of this guideline should not be used as an absolute standard and medical professionals can always refer to methods non-adherent to this guideline when it is considered more reasonable and beneficial to an individual patient's medical situation. The guideline has its limitation and should be revised appropriately with the advancement medical equipment technology and public health care system. The guideline should not be served as a measure for standard of care. KOCSI strongly disapproves the use of the guideline to be used as the standard of expected practice in medical litigation processes.

  2. 'Treatment of the Sportsman's groin': British Hernia Society's 2014 position statement based on the Manchester Consensus Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Sheen, Aali J; Stephenson, B. M.; Lloyd, D. M., Coates, A., Knopp, J., Oram, S., & Rowbotham, S.; Robinson, P.; Fevre, D; Paajanen, H.; de Beaux, A; Kingsnorth, A.; Gilmore, O. J.; Bennett, D; Maclennan, I; O'Dwyer, P; Sanders, D.; Kurzer, M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim was to produce a multidisciplinary consensus to determine the current position on the nomenclature, definition, diagnosis, imaging modalities and management of Sportsman's groin (SG). Methods Experts in the diagnosis and management of SG were invited to participate in a consensus conference held by the British Hernia Society in Manchester, UK on 11–12 October 2012. Experts included a physiotherapist, a musculoskeletal radiologist and surgeons with a proven track recor...

  3. The first Research Consensus Summit of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare: conduction and a synthesis of the results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieckmann, Peter; Phero, James C; Issenberg, S Barry;

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we describe the preparation and execution of the first Research Consensus Summit (Summit) of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSH) held in January 2011 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The goals of the Summit were to provide guidance for better simulation-related research, to ...

  4. Consensus Statement on medication use in multiple sclerosis by the Spanish Society of Neurology's study group for demyelinating diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Merino, A; Fernández, O; Montalbán, X; de Andrés, C; Oreja-Guevara, C; Rodríguez-Antigüedad, A; Arbizu, T

    2013-01-01

    Treatments for multiple sclerosis therapy are rapidly evolving. It is believed that new drugs will be approved in the near future, thereby changing current indications for treatment. In this context, the Spanish Society of Neurology's study group on demyelinating diseases, which evaluates medication use in MS, has decided to draw up a consensus statement on the current indications and guidelines for multiple sclerosis treatment.

  5. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care (Endorsed by the American Heart Association, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiología Intervencionista; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    This article provides a brief summary of the relevant recommendations and references related to percutaneous mechanical circulatory support. The goal was to provide the clinician with concise, evidence-based contemporary recommendations, and the supporting documentation to encourage their application. The full text includes disclosure of all relevant relationships with industry for each writing committee member. A fundamental aspect of all expert consensus statements is that these carefully developed, evidence-based documents can neither encompass all clinical circumstances, nor replace the judgment of individual physicians in management of each patient. The science of medicine is rooted in evidence, and the art of medicine is based on the application of this evidence to the individual patient. This expert consensus statement has adhered to these principles for optimal management of patients requiring percutaneous mechanical circulatory support.

  6. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of thyroid nodules: A consensus statement by the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasound (US)-guided fine needle aspiration (US-FNA) has played a crucial role in managing patients with thyroid nodules, owing to its safety and accuracy. However, even with US guidance, nondiagnostic sampling and infrequent complications still occur after FNA. Accordingly, the Task Force on US-FNA of the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology has provided consensus recommendations for the US-FNA technique and related issues to improve diagnostic yield. These detailed procedures are based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature and from the consensus of experts.

  7. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of thyroid nodules: A consensus statement by the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Hen; Baek, Jung Hwan [Dept. of Radiology, Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Jung, So Lyoung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Jin Young [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jung Hee [Dept. of Radiology, and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Ultrasound (US)-guided fine needle aspiration (US-FNA) has played a crucial role in managing patients with thyroid nodules, owing to its safety and accuracy. However, even with US guidance, nondiagnostic sampling and infrequent complications still occur after FNA. Accordingly, the Task Force on US-FNA of the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology has provided consensus recommendations for the US-FNA technique and related issues to improve diagnostic yield. These detailed procedures are based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature and from the consensus of experts.

  8. Highlights of the 16th annual scientific sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, John-Paul; Patel, Amit R; Fernandes, Juliano Lara

    2013-07-19

    The 16th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) took place in San Francisco, USA at the end of January 2013. With a faculty of experts from across the world, this congress provided a wealth of insight into cutting-edge research and technological development. This review article intends to provide a highlight of what represented the most significant advances in the field of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) during this year's meeting.

  9. Preoperative assessment and classification of benign laryngotracheal stenosis : a consensus paper of the European Laryngological Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monnier, Ph.; Dikkers, F. G.; Eckel, H.; Sittel, C.; Piazza, C.; Campos, G.; Remacle, M.; Peretti, G.

    2015-01-01

    Adult and pediatric laryngotracheal stenoses (LTS) comprise a wide array of various conditions that require precise preoperative assessment and classification to improve comparison of different therapeutic modalities in a matched series of patients. This consensus paper of the European Laryngologica

  10. Endovascular interventions for TransAtlantic InterSociety Consensus Ⅱ C and D femoropopliteal lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Min-yi; JIANG Mi-er; HUANG Xin-tian; LU Min; LU Xin-wu; HUANG Ying; LI Wei-min

    2013-01-01

    Background Peripheral artery disease accounts for more than 400 000 hospitalizations in the USA and results in symptoms ranging from claudication to gangrene.Recent advances in endovascular techniques have led to a more aggressive approach for treating peripheral artery disease.The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the outcomes of endovascular interventions on TransAtlantic InterSociety Consensus (TASC) Ⅱ C and D femoropopliteal occlusive disease.Methods Data for all patients undergoing endovascular interventions for femoropopliteal occlusive disease from December 2007 through December 2010 were reviewed.Demographic data,risk factor data,preprocedural and postprocedural ankle-brachial indices,technical success rates,and complication rates were obtained.Primary,assisted primary,and secondary patency were determined by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis.Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify factors adversely affecting primary patency.Results The study group included 52 TASC Ⅱ C and 106 TASC Ⅱ D limbs in 126 patients (mean age,(68.0±18.0) years).The technical success rate was 91.1%.Complications occurred in 19 limbs (12.0%),including 8 (5.1%) major complications.The mean follow-up period was (17.6±5.1) months (range,12.0-48.0 months).Primary patency rates at 1,2,3,and 4 years were 95%,78%,74%,and 74% in TASC Ⅱ C lesions and 89%,62%,52%,and 52% in TASC Ⅱ D lesions,respectively.Secondary patency rates at 1,2,3,and 4 years were 97%,94%,94%,and 94% in TASC Ⅱ C lesions and 97%,95%,83%,and 83% in TASC Ⅱ D lesions,respectively.It is significantly different between primary patency rates (P <0.05) but not secondary patency rates of TASC Ⅱ C and D groups (P >0.05).Predictors of restenosis/occlusion included hyperlipidemia,lesion length,and popliteal artery involvement.Conclusions Endovascular treatment of TASC Ⅱ C and D femoropopliteal artery occlusion has a high technical success

  11. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 1: specimen handling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samaratunga, H.; Montironi, R.; True, L.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.F.; Humphrey, P.A.; Kwast, T. van der; Wheeler, T.M.; Srigley, J.R.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the handling and processing of radical prostatectomy specimens were coordinated by wo

  12. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 4: seminal vesicles and lymph nodes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berney, D.M.; Wheeler, T.M.; Grignon, D.J.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.F.; Humphrey, P.A.; Kwast, T. van der; Montironi, R.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Srigley, J.R.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the infiltration of tumor into the seminal vesicles and regional lymph nodes were coo

  13. Guidelines for biomarker testing in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a national consensus of the Spanish Society of Pathology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Carbonero, R; Vilardell, F; Jiménez-Fonseca, P; González-Campora, R; González, E; Cuatrecasas, M; Capdevila, J; Aranda, I; Barriuso, J; Matías-Guiu, X

    2014-03-01

    The annual incidence of neuroendocrine tumours in the Caucasian population ranges from 2.5 to 5 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours is a family of neoplasms widely variable in terms of anatomical location, hormone composition, clinical syndromes they cause and in their biological behaviour. This high complexity and clinical heterogeneity, together with the known difficulty of predicting their behaviour from their pathological features, are reflected in the many classifications that have been developed over the years in this field. This article reviews the main tissue and clinical biomarkers and makes recommendations for their use in medical practice. This document represents a consensus reached jointly by the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM) and the Spanish Society of Pathology (SEAP).

  14. Outcome Criteria for Discharging the Patient With a New Ostomy From Home Health Care: A WOCN Society Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Janice C; Kupsick, Phyllis T; McNichol, Laurie L

    2016-01-01

    The Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society hosted a consensus panel of expert ostomy clinicians who were tasked with identifying minimal discharge criteria for home care patients with a new fecal or urinary diversion. Shortened hospital inpatient stays, higher patient acuity, and limited access to ostomy specialists send patients with new ostomies home with multiple educational and adjustment needs related to a new stoma. The Society recognized the lack of evidence-based ostomy practice and supported the work of the panel to develop statements that defined elements of the care plan for the patient or caregiver in home care who is adapting to living with a stoma. Eighteen statements were developed that provide minimum discharge criteria for the patient with a new ostomy in the home care setting. Support based upon current evidence as well as expert opinion with implementation strategies are offered for each statement.

  15. Outcome Criteria for Discharging the Patient With a New Ostomy From Home Health Care: A WOCN Society Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Janice C; Kupsick, Phyllis T; McNichol, Laurie L

    2016-01-01

    The Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society hosted a consensus panel of expert ostomy clinicians who were tasked with identifying minimal discharge criteria for home care patients with a new fecal or urinary diversion. Shortened hospital inpatient stays, higher patient acuity, and limited access to ostomy specialists send patients with new ostomies home with multiple educational and adjustment needs related to a new stoma. The Society recognized the lack of evidence-based ostomy practice and supported the work of the panel to develop statements that defined elements of the care plan for the patient or caregiver in home care who is adapting to living with a stoma. Eighteen statements were developed that provide minimum discharge criteria for the patient with a new ostomy in the home care setting. Support based upon current evidence as well as expert opinion with implementation strategies are offered for each statement. PMID:27163682

  16. Pharmacological management of chronic neuropathic pain: Revised consensus statement from the Canadian Pain Society

    OpenAIRE

    Moulin, DE; Boulanger, A; AJ Clark; Clarke, H.; Dao, T; GA Finley; Furlan, A.; Gilron, I; Gordon, A.; PK Morley-Forster; BJ Sessle; Squire, P; Stinson, J; Taenzer, P.; Velly, A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuropathic pain (NeP), redefined as pain caused by a lesion or a disease of the somatosensory system, is a disabling condition that affects approximately two million Canadians. OBJECTIVE: To review the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews related to the pharmacological management of NeP to develop a revised evidence-based consensus statement on its management. METHODS: RCTs, systematic reviews and existing guidelines on the pharmacological management of NeP ...

  17. Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgeons/Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery Joint Position Statement on Open and Endovascular Surgery for Thoracic Aortic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appoo, Jehangir J; Bozinovski, John; Chu, Michael W A; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Forbes, Thomas L; Moon, Michael; Ouzounian, Maral; Peterson, Mark D; Tittley, Jacques; Boodhwani, Munir

    2016-06-01

    In 2014, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) published a position statement on the management of thoracic aortic disease addressing size thresholds for surgery, imaging modalities, medical therapy, and genetics. It did not address issues related to surgical intervention. This joint Position Statement on behalf of the CCS, Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgeons, and the Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery provides recommendations about thoracic aortic disease interventions, including: aortic valve repair, perfusion strategies for arch repair, extended arch hybrid reconstruction for acute type A dissection, endovascular management of arch and descending aortic aneurysms, and type B dissection. The position statement is constructed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology, and has been approved by the primary panel, an international secondary panel, and the CCS Guidelines Committee. Advent of endovascular technology has improved aortic surgery safety and extended the indications of minimally invasive thoracic aortic surgery. The combination of safer open surgery with endovascular treatment has improved patient outcomes in this rapidly evolving subspecialty field of cardiovascular surgery.

  18. 2010 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Society of Echocardiography Guidelines for Training and Maintenance of Competency in Adult Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwash, Ian G; Basmadjian, Arsene; Bewick, David; Choy, Jonathan B; Cujec, Bibiana; Jassal, Davinder S; MacKenzie, Scott; Nair, Parvathy; Rudski, Lawrence G; Yu, Eric; Tam, James W

    2011-01-01

    Guidelines for the provision of echocardiography in Canada were jointly developed and published by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and the Canadian Society of Echocardiography in 2005. Since their publication, recognition of the importance of echocardiography to patient care has increased, along with the use of focused, point-of-care echocardiography by physicians of diverse clinical backgrounds and variable training. New guidelines for physician training and maintenance of competence in adult echocardiography were required to ensure that physicians providing either focused, point-of-care echocardiography or comprehensive echocardiography are appropriately trained and proficient in their use of echocardiography. In addition, revision of the guidelines was required to address technological advances and the desire to standardize echocardiography training across the country to facilitate the national recognition of a physician's expertise in echocardiography. This paper summarizes the new Guidelines for Physician Training and Maintenance of Competency in Adult Echocardiography, which are considerably more comprehensive than earlier guidelines and address many important issues not previously covered. These guidelines provide a blueprint for physician training despite different clinical backgrounds and help standardize physician training and training programs across the country. Adherence to the guidelines will ensure that physicians providing echocardiography have acquired sufficient expertise required for their specific practice. The document will also provide a framework for other national societies to standardize their training programs in echocardiography and will provide a benchmark by which competency in adult echocardiography may be measured.

  19. Statin-associated muscle symptoms: impact on statin therapy-European Atherosclerosis Society Consensus Panel Statement on Assessment, Aetiology and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroes, Erik S; Thompson, Paul D; Corsini, Alberto; Vladutiu, Georgirene D; Raal, Frederick J; Ray, Kausik K; Roden, Michael; Stein, Evan; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bruckert, Eric; De Backer, Guy; Krauss, Ronald M; Laufs, Ulrich; Santos, Raul D; Hegele, Robert A; Hovingh, G Kees; Leiter, Lawrence A; Mach, Francois; März, Winfried; Newman, Connie B; Wiklund, Olov; Jacobson, Terry A; Catapano, Alberico L; Chapman, M John; Ginsberg, Henry N

    2015-05-01

    Statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS) are one of the principal reasons for statin non-adherence and/or discontinuation, contributing to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. This European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) Consensus Panel overviews current understanding of the pathophysiology of statin-associated myopathy, and provides guidance for diagnosis and management of SAMS. Statin-associated myopathy, with significant elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK), is a rare but serious side effect of statins, affecting 1 per 1000 to 1 per 10 000 people on standard statin doses. Statin-associated muscle symptoms cover a broader range of clinical presentations, usually with normal or minimally elevated CK levels, with a prevalence of 7-29% in registries and observational studies. Preclinical studies show that statins decrease mitochondrial function, attenuate energy production, and alter muscle protein degradation, thereby providing a potential link between statins and muscle symptoms; controlled mechanistic and genetic studies in humans are necessary to further understanding. The Panel proposes to identify SAMS by symptoms typical of statin myalgia (i.e. muscle pain or aching) and their temporal association with discontinuation and response to repetitive statin re-challenge. In people with SAMS, the Panel recommends the use of a maximally tolerated statin dose combined with non-statin lipid-lowering therapies to attain recommended low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets. The Panel recommends a structured work-up to identify individuals with clinically relevant SAMS generally to at least three different statins, so that they can be offered therapeutic regimens to satisfactorily address their cardiovascular risk. Further research into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms may offer future therapeutic potential.

  20. The impact of the 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus guidelines on Gleason grading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper D; Thomsen, Frederik B; Nerstrøm, Camilla;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) 2005 revision of the Gleason grading system has influenced the risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP), as the new guideline implies that some prostate cancers previously graded...

  1. Training Guidelines for Endovascular Ischemic Stroke Intervention: An International multi-society consensus document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    ContributorsAmerican Academy of Neurological Surgeons/ Congress of Neurological Surgeons (AANS/CNS): S.D. Lavine, K Cockroft, B Hoh, N Bambakidis, AA Khalessi, H Woo, H Riina. A. SiddiquiAmerican Society of Neuroradiology (ASNR): J. A. HirschAsian Australasian Federation of Interventional and Therapeutic Neuroradiology (AAFITN): W. ChongAustralian and New Zealand Society of Neuroradiology - Conjoint Committee for Recognition of Training in Interventional Neuroradiology (CCINR) representing the RANZCR (ANZSNR), ANZAN and NSA: H. Rice, J Wenderoth, P Mitchell, A Coulthard, TJ Signh, C Phatorous, M KhangureCanadian Interventional Neuro Group (CING): P. Klurfan, K. Terbrugge, D Iancu, T. GunnarssonEuropean Society of Neuroradiology (ESNR); O. Jansen, M. MutoEuropean Society of Minimally Invasive Neurologic Therapy (ESMINT): I. Szikora L. Pierot P. Brouwer J. Gralla, S. Renowden, T. Andersson, J. Fiehler, F. Turjman, P. White, AC Januel, L Spelle, Z Kulcsar, R Chapot, L Spelle, A Biondi, S Dima, C Taschner, M Szajner, A KrajinaJapanese Society for Neuroendovascular therapy (JSNET): N.Sakai, Y. Matsumaru, S. YoshimuraSociedad Ibero Latino Americana de Neuroradiologica (SILAN): O.Diaz, P.LylykSociety of NeuroInterventional Surgery (SNIS): M.V. Jayaraman, A. Patsalides, C. D. Gandhi, S.K.Lee, T. Abruzzo, B. Albani, S. A. Ansari, A.S. Arthur, B.W. Baxter, K.R.Bulsara, M. Chen, J.E.Delgado-Almandoz, J.F.Fraser, D.V. Heck, S.W. Hetts, M.S.Hussain, R.P. Klucznik, T.M. Leslie-Mawzi, W.J.Mack, R.A.McTaggart, P.M.Meyers, J. Mocco, C.J.Prestigiacomo, G.L.Pride, P.A.Rasmussen, R.M.Starke, P.J.Sunenshine, R.W.Tarr, D.F.FreiSociety of Vascular and Interventional Neurology (SVIN): M.Ribo, R.G.Nogeuira, O.O. Zaidat, T. Jovin, I. Linfante, D. Yavagal, D. Liebeskind, R. NovakovicWorld Federation of Interventional and Therapeutic Neuroradiology (WFITN): S. Pongpech, G Rodesch, M Soderman, K ter Brugge, A. Taylor, T Krings, D Orbach, A. Biondi, L Picard, D C Suh, M. Tanaka, HQ Zhang. PMID

  2. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance activity in the United Kingdom: a survey on behalf of the british society of cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dargie Henry J

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The indications, complexity and capabilities of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR have rapidly expanded. Whether actual service provision and training have developed in parallel is unknown. Methods We undertook a systematic telephone and postal survey of all public hospitals on behalf of the British Society of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance to identify all CMR providers within the United Kingdom. Results Of the 60 CMR centres identified, 88% responded to a detailed questionnaire. Services are led by cardiologists and radiologists in equal proportion, though the majority of current trainees are cardiologists. The mean number of CMR scans performed annually per centre increased by 44% over two years. This trend was consistent across centres of different scanning volumes. The commonest indication for CMR was assessment of heart failure and cardiomyopathy (39%, followed by coronary artery disease and congenital heart disease. There was striking geographical variation in CMR availability, numbers of scans performed, and distribution of trainees. Centres without on site scanning capability refer very few patients for CMR. Just over half of centres had a formal training programme, and few performed regular audit. Conclusion The number of CMR scans performed in the UK has increased dramatically in just two years. Trainees are mainly located in large volume centres and enrolled in cardiology as opposed to radiology training programmes.

  3. Ultrasonography diagnosis and imaging-based management of thyroid nodules: Revised Korean society of thyroid radiology consensus statement and recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jung Hee [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Jung Hwan [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-06-15

    The rate of detection of thyroid nodules and carcinomas has increased with the widespread use of ultrasonography (US), which is the mainstay for the detection and risk stratification of thyroid nodules as well as for providing guidance for their biopsy and nonsurgical treatment. The Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology (KSThR) published their first recommendations for the US-based diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules in 2011. These recommendations have been used as the standard guidelines for the past several years in Korea. Lately, the application of US has been further emphasized for the personalized management of patients with thyroid nodules. The Task Force on Thyroid Nodules of the KSThR has revised the recommendations for the ultrasound diagnosis and imaging-based management of thyroid nodules. The review and recommendations in this report have been based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature and the consensus of experts.

  4. Consensus of the Brazilian Society of Infectious Diseases and Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology on the management and treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érico Arruda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma is a multifocal vascular lesion of low-grade potential that is most often present in mucocutaneous sites and usually also affects lymph nodes and visceral organs. The condition may manifest through purplish lesions, flat or raised with an irregular shape, gastrointestinal bleeding due to lesions located in the digestive system, and dyspnea and hemoptysis associated with pulmonary lesions. In the early 1980s, the appearance of several cases of Kaposi's sarcoma in homosexual men was the first alarm about a newly identified epidemic, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In 1994, it was finally demonstrated that the presence of a herpes virus associated with Kaposi's sarcoma called HHV-8 or Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus and its genetic sequence was rapidly deciphered. The prevalence of this virus is very high (about 50% in some African populations, but stands between 2% and 8% for the entire world population. Kaposi's sarcoma only develops when the immune system is depressed, as in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, which appears to be associated with a specific variant of the Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus. There are no treatment guidelines for Kaposi's sarcoma established in Brazil, and thus the Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology and the Brazilian Society of Infectious Diseases developed the treatment consensus presented here.

  5. European Society of Coloproctology consensus on the surgical management of intestinal failure in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaizey, C J; Maeda, Y; Barbosa, E; Bozzetti, F; Calvo, J; Irtun, Ø; Jeppesen, P B; Klek, S; Panisic-Sekeljic, M; Papaconstantinou, I; Pascher, A; Panis, Y; Wallace, W D; Carlson, G; Boermeester, M

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal failure (IF) is a debilitating condition of inadequate nutrition due to an anatomical and/or physiological deficit of the intestine. Surgical management of patients with acute and chronic IF requires expertise to deal with technical challenges and make correct decisions. Dedicated IF units have expertise in patient selection, operative risk assessment and multidisciplinary support such as nutritional input and interventional radiology, which dramatically improve the morbidity and mortality of this complex condition and can beneficially affect the continuing dependence on parenteral nutritional support. Currently there is little guidance to bridge the gap between general surgeons and specialist IF surgeons. Fifteen European experts took part in a consensus process to develop guidance to support surgeons in the management of patients with IF. Based on a systematic literature review, statements were prepared for a modified Delphi process. The evidence for each statement was graded using Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence. The current paper contains the statements reflecting the position and practice of leading European experts in IF encompassing the general definition of IF surgery and organization of an IF unit, strategies to prevent IF, management of acute IF, management of wound, fistula and stoma, rehabilitation, intestinal and abdominal reconstruction, criteria for referral to a specialist unit and intestinal transplantation. PMID:26946219

  6. Consensus summary statement of the International Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference on Multimodality Monitoring in Neurocritical Care: a statement for healthcare professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Peter; Menon, David K; Citerio, Giuseppe; Vespa, Paul; Bader, Mary Kay; Brophy, Gretchen M; Diringer, Michael N; Stocchetti, Nino; Videtta, Walter; Armonda, Rocco; Badjatia, Neeraj; Böesel, Julian; Chesnut, Randall; Chou, Sherry; Claassen, Jan; Czosnyka, Marek; De Georgia, Michael; Figaji, Anthony; Fugate, Jennifer; Helbok, Raimund; Horowitz, David; Hutchinson, Peter; Kumar, Monisha; McNett, Molly; Miller, Chad; Naidech, Andrew; Oddo, Mauro; Olson, DaiWai; O'Phelan, Kristine; Provencio, J Javier; Puppo, Corinna; Riker, Richard; Robertson, Claudia; Schmidt, Michael; Taccone, Fabio

    2014-12-01

    Neurocritical care depends, in part, on careful patient monitoring but as yet there are little data on what processes are the most important to monitor, how these should be monitored, and whether monitoring these processes is cost-effective and impacts outcome. At the same time, bioinformatics is a rapidly emerging field in critical care but as yet there is little agreement or standardization on what information is important and how it should be displayed and analyzed. The Neurocritical Care Society in collaboration with the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, the Society for Critical Care Medicine, and the Latin America Brain Injury Consortium organized an international, multidisciplinary consensus conference to begin to address these needs. International experts from neurosurgery, neurocritical care, neurology, critical care, neuroanesthesiology, nursing, pharmacy, and informatics were recruited on the basis of their research, publication record, and expertise. They undertook a systematic literature review to develop recommendations about specific topics on physiologic processes important to the care of patients with disorders that require neurocritical care. This review does not make recommendations about treatment, imaging, and intraoperative monitoring. A multidisciplinary jury, selected for their expertise in clinical investigation and development of practice guidelines, guided this process. The GRADE system was used to develop recommendations based on literature review, discussion, integrating the literature with the participants' collective experience, and critical review by an impartial jury. Emphasis was placed on the principle that recommendations should be based on both data quality and on trade-offs and translation into clinical practice. Strong consideration was given to providing pragmatic guidance and recommendations for bedside neuromonitoring, even in the absence of high quality data. PMID:25208678

  7. Anomie and Isolation: The Wind-up Bird Chronicle, Ghost in the Shell, Serial Experiments Lain, and Japanese Consensus Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmo Gonzaga

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The essay explores how the societal effects of Japan’s economic recession during the 1990s are reflected in several cultural texts from that period: Haruki Murakami’s novel The Wind-up Bird Chronicle, the animé film Ghost in the Shell and the animé series Serial Experiments Lain.Faced with sudden job uncertainty due to the recession, Japanese individuals accustomed to the ideology of progress of a society that values uniformity and conformity have fallen into listlessness and withdrawal. Accordingly, the protagonists of these texts all experience a crisis of embodied subjectivity, or shutaisei that is tied to a loss of community and history.They work to reconstitute their shutaisei by first uncovering their personal and collective history in the form of a coherent awareness of their past. Transcending their isolation, they likewise strive to develop bonds with others through reciprocal communication.Particularly because these texts are characterized by elements of the fantastic and narratives of metamorphosis, they can also be seen as allegories of subversion against Japanese consensus society and its ideology of progress.

  8. 2013 Up-date of the consensus statement of the Spanish Menopause Society on postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Nicolás; Sánchez-Borrego, Rafael; Villero, José; Baró, Francesc; Calaf, Joaquim; Cancelo, Ma Jesús; Coronado, Pluvio; Estévez, Antonio; Fernández-Moya, Jose M; González, Silvia; Llaneza, Plácido; Neyro, Jose Luis; del Pino, Javier; Rodríguez, Esteban; Ruiz, Elena; Cano, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a major female health problem that increases morbidity, mortality and healthcare system costs. Considering that gynecologists are the primary health practitioners involved in the treatment of women with osteoporosis in our country, a panel of experts from the Spanish Menopause Society met to establish a set of criteria and procedures for the diagnosis and treatment of this disease based on the best available evidence and according to the model proposed by the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system to elaborate clinical practice guidelines and to classify the quality of the evidence and the strength of the recommendations. These recommendations should be a reference to gynecologist and other health professionals involved in the treatment of postmenopausal women.

  9. Obesity-related hypertension: pathogenesis, cardiovascular risk, and treatment: a position paper of The Obesity Society and the American Society of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsberg, Lewis; Aronne, Louis J; Beilin, Lawrence J; Burke, Valerie; Igel, Leon I; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Sowers, James

    2013-01-01

    In light of the worldwide epidemic of obesity, and in recognition of hypertension as a major factor in the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with obesity, The Obesity Society and the American Society of Hypertension agreed to jointly sponsor a position paper on obesity-related hypertension to be published jointly in the journals of each society. The purpose is to inform the members of both societies, as well as practicing clinicians, with a timely review of the association between obesity and high blood pressure, the risk that this association entails, and the options for rational, evidenced-based treatment. The position paper is divided into six sections plus a summary as follows: pathophysiology, epidemiology and cardiovascular risk, the metabolic syndrome, lifestyle management in prevention and treatment, pharmacologic treatment of hypertension in the obese, and the medical and surgical treatment of obesity in obese hypertensive patients.

  10. Obesity-related hypertension: pathogenesis, cardiovascular risk, and treatment--a position paper of the The Obesity Society and The American Society of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsberg, Lewis; Aronne, Louis J; Beilin, Lawrence J; Burke, Valerie; Igel, Leon I; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Sowers, James

    2013-01-01

    In light of the worldwide epidemic of obesity, and in recognition of hypertension as a major factor in the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with obesity, The Obesity Society and The American Society of Hypertension agreed to jointly sponsor a position paper on obesity-related hypertension to be published jointly in the journals of each society. The purpose is to inform the members of both societies, as well as practicing clinicians, with a timely review of the association between obesity and high blood pressure, the risk that this association entails, and the options for rational, evidenced-based treatment. The position paper is divided into six sections plus a summary as follows: pathophysiology, epidemiology and cardiovascular risk, the metabolic syndrome, lifestyle management in prevention and treatment, pharmacologic treatment of hypertension in the obese, and the medical and surgical treatment of obesity in obese hypertensive patients.

  11. European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases consensus recommendations for rotavirus vaccination in Europe: update 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesikari, Timo; Van Damme, Pierre; Giaquinto, Carlo; Dagan, Ron; Guarino, Alfredo; Szajewska, Hania; Usonis, Vytautas

    2015-06-01

    The first evidence-based recommendations for rotavirus (RV) vaccination in Europe were prepared at the time of licensure of 2 live oral RV vaccines (Rotarix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, and RotaTeq, Sanofi Pasteur MSD) in 2006 and published in 2008. Since then several countries in Europe and more globally have adopted universal RV vaccination of all healthy infants as part of their national immunization programs (NIPs). The experience from these NIPs has produced a wealth of post-introduction effectiveness data that, together with the evidence from prelicensure efficacy trials presented in the 2008 Recommendations, support the case of RV vaccination in Europe. The prelicensure safety trials of Rotarix and RotaTeq, each in populations of more than 60,000 infants, did not reveal risk of intussusception (IS), but postvaccination surveillance in several countries, particularly Australia and Mexico, has established that the risk of IS for both vaccines after the first dose might be between 1:50,000 and 1:80,000. Although it may be argued that the risk is acceptable vis-à-vis the great benefits of RV vaccination, this argument alone may not suffice, and every effort should be made to reduce the risk of IS. Considerable evidence, including postvaccination surveillance data from Germany, suggests that the risk of IS can be reduced by early administration of the first dose of oral RV vaccine. The previous European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases/European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition recommendations held that the first dose of oral RV vaccine should be given between 6 and 12 weeks of age; this recommendation is sustained but with an emphasis toward the lower range of the recommended age, that is, preferably between 6 and 8 weeks of age. At the time of the earlier recommendations, experience of RV vaccination in premature infants and other special target groups was limited. It is now recommended with greater confidence than

  12. Trends in qualifying biomarkers in drug safety. Consensus of the 2011 meeting of the Spanish Society of Clinical Pharmacology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A.G. eAgúndez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the consensus view on the use of qualifying biomarkers in drug safety, raised within the frame of the XXIV meeting of the Spanish Society of Clinical Pharmacology held in Málaga (Spain in October, 2011.The widespread use of biomarkers as surrogate endpoints is a goal that scientists have long been pursuing. Thirty years ago, when molecular pharmacogenomics evolved, we anticipated that these genetic biomarkers would soon obviate the routine use of drug therapies in a way that patients should adapt to the therapy rather than the opposite. This expected revolution in routine clinical practice never took place as quickly nor with the intensity as initially expected.The concerted action of operating multicenter networks holds great promise for future studies to identify biomarkers related to drug toxicity and to provide better insight into the underlying pathogenesis. Today some pharmacogenomic advances are already widely accepted, but pharmacogenomics still needs further development to elaborate more precise algorithms and many barriers to implementing individualized medicine exist. We briefly discuss our view about these barriers and we provide suggestions and areas of focus to advance in the field.

  13. SCAI expert consensus statement: Evaluation, management, and special considerations of cardio-oncology patients in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (Endorsed by the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologıa Intervencionista).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliescu, Cezar; Grines, Cindy L; Herrmann, Joerg; Yang, Eric H; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet; Charitakis, Konstantinos; Hakeem, Abdul; Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Leesar, Massoud A; Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    In the United States alone, there are currently approximately 14.5 million cancer survivors, and this number is expected to increase to 20 million by 2020. Cancer therapies can cause significant injury to the vasculature, resulting in angina, acute coronary syndromes (ACS), stroke, critical limb ischemia, arrhythmias, and heart failure, independently from the direct myocardial or pericardial damage from the malignancy itself. Consequently, the need for invasive evaluation and management in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (CCL) for such patients has been increasing. In recognition of the need for a document on special considerations for cancer patients in the CCL, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) commissioned a consensus group to provide recommendations based on the published medical literature and on the expertise of operators with accumulated experience in the cardiac catheterization of cancer patients.

  14. Consensus recommendations from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on the management of rosacea, part 5: a guide on the management of rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, James Q; Thiboutot, Diane; Gallo, Richard; Webster, Guy; Tanghetti, Emil; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Stein-Gold, Linda; Berson, Diane; Zaenglein, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    The last article in this 5-part series provides a final overview of consensus recommendations from the American Acne & Rosacea Society (AARS) on the management of the common presentations of cutaneous rosacea. Optimal management of rosacea requires careful assessment of the patient's clinical features with integration of therapies that adequately treat the presenting signs and symptoms. The treatment consensus recommendations from the AARS are based on 2 major common clinical presentations of rosacea: (1) centrofacial erythema with papulopustular lesions, and (2) centrofacial erythema without papulopustular lesions. The recommendations provided here serve to guide clinicians in their clinical practice.

  15. [Nutritional status assessment in Geriatrics: Consensus declaration by the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology NutritionWork Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camina-Martín, María Alicia; de Mateo-Silleras, Beatriz; Malafarina, Vincenzo; Lopez-Mongil, Rosa; Niño-Martín, Virtudes; López-Trigo, José Antonio; Redondo-Del-Río, María Paz

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing population ageing is one of the factors influencing the increase in the prevalence of undernutrition, as elderly people are a vulnerable group due to their biological, psychological and social characteristics. Despite its high prevalence, undernutrition is underdiagnosed in the geriatric sphere. For this reason, the aim of this consensus document is to devise a protocol for geriatric nutritional assessment. A multidisciplinary team has been set up within the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology (in Spanish Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología [SEGG]) in order to address undernutrition and risk of undernutrition so that they can be diagnosed and treated in an effective manner. The MNA-SF is a practical tool amongst the many validated methods for nutritional screening. Following suspicion of undernutrition, or after establishing the presence of undernutrition, a full assessment will include a detailed nutritional history of the patient. The compilation of clinical-nutritional and dietetic histories is intended to help in identifying the possible risk factors at the root of a patient's undernutrition. Following this, an anthropometric assessment, combined with laboratory data, will describe the patient's physical and metabolic changes associated to undernutrition. Currently, the tendency is for further nutritional assessment through the use of non-invasive techniques to study body composition in association with functional status. The latter is an indirect index for nutritional status, which is very interesting from a geriatrician's point of view. To conclude, correct nutritional screening is the fundamental basis for an early undernutrition diagnosis and to assess the need for nutritional treatment. In order to achieve this, it is fundamental to foster research in the field of nutritional geriatrics, in order to expand our knowledge base and to increasingly practice evidence-based geriatrics. PMID:26388249

  16. Nutritional status assessment in geriatrics: Consensus declaration by the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology Nutrition Work Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camina-Martín, M Alicia; de Mateo-Silleras, Beatriz; Malafarina, Vincenzo; Lopez-Mongil, Rosa; Niño-Martín, Virtudes; López-Trigo, J Antonio; Redondo-del-Río, M Paz

    2015-07-01

    Ongoing population ageing is one of the factors influencing the increase in the prevalence of undernutrition, because elderly people are a vulnerable group due to their biological, psychological and social characteristics. Despite its high prevalence, undernutrition is underdiagnosed in the geriatric sphere. For this reason, the aim of this consensus document is to devise a protocol for geriatric nutritional assessment. A multidisciplinary team has been set up within the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology (in Spanish Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología, SEGG) in order to address undernutrition and risk of undernutrition so that they can be diagnosed and treated in an effective manner. The MNA-SF is a practical tool amongst the many validated methods for nutritional screening. Following suspicion of undernutrition or after establishing the presence of undernutrition, a full assessment will include a detailed nutritional history of the patient. The compilation of clinical-nutritional and dietetic histories seeks to aid in identifying the possible risk factors at the root of a patient's undernutrition. Following this, an anthropometric assessment associated to laboratory data, will describe the patient's physical and metabolic changes associated to undernutrition. Currently, the tendency is to further nutritional assessment through the use of non-invasive techniques to study body composition in association with functional status. The latter is an indirect index for nutritional status which is very interesting from a geriatrician's point of view. To conclude, correct nutritional screening is the fundamental basis for an early undernutrition diagnosis and to assess the need for nutritional treatment. In order to achieve this, it is fundamental to foster research in the field of nutritional geriatrics, in order to expand our knowledge base and to increasingly practice evidence-based geriatrics. PMID:26025067

  17. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of metastatic colorectal cancer: a consensus statement of the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncologists (HeSMO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervenis, Christos; Xynos, Evaghelos; Sotiropoulos, George; Gouvas, Nikolaos; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Agalianos, Christos; Androulakis, Nikolaos; Athanasiadis, Athanasios; Christodoulou, Christos; Chrysou, Evangelia; Emmanouilidis, Christos; Georgiou, Panagiotis; Karachaliou, Niki; Katopodi, Ourania; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Kyriazanos, Ioannis; Makatsoris, Thomas; Papakostas, Pavlos; Papamichael, Demetris; Pechlivanides, George; Pentheroudakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Sgouros, Joseph; Tekkis, Paris; Triantopoulou, Charina; Tzardi, Maria; Vassiliou, Vassilis; Vini, Louiza; Xynogalos, Spyridon; Ziras, Nikolaos; Souglakos, John

    2016-01-01

    There is discrepancy and failure to adhere to current international guidelines for the management of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) in hospitals in Greece and Cyprus. The aim of the present document is to provide a consensus on the multidisciplinary management of metastastic CRC, considering both special characteristics of our Healthcare System and international guidelines. Following discussion and online communication among the members of an executive team chosen by the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncology (HeSMO), a consensus for metastastic CRC disease was developed. Statements were subjected to the Delphi methodology on two voting rounds by invited multidisciplinary international experts on CRC. Statements reaching level of agreement by ≥80% were considered as having achieved large consensus, whereas statements reaching 60-80% moderate consensus. One hundred and nine statements were developed. Ninety experts voted for those statements. The median rate of abstain per statement was 18.5% (range: 0-54%). In the end of the process, all statements achieved a large consensus. The importance of centralization, care by a multidisciplinary team, adherence to guidelines, and personalization is emphasized. R0 resection is the only intervention that may offer substantial improvement in the oncological outcomes.

  18. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, The Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and The American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology: Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Bypass—Temperature Management during Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Richard; Baker, Robert A.; Likosky, Donald S.; Grigore, Alina; Dickinson, Timothy A.; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Hammon, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: To improve our understanding of the evidence-based literature supporting temperature management during adult cardiopulmonary bypass, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiology and the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology tasked the authors to conduct a review of the peer-reviewed literature, including 1) optimal site for temperature monitoring, 2) avoidance of hyperthermia, 3) peak cooling temperature gradient and cooling rate, and 4) peak warming temperature gradient and rewarming rate. Authors adopted the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association method for development clinical practice guidelines, and arrived at the following recommendation. PMID:26543248

  19. Consensus recommendations from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on the management of rosacea, part 3: a status report on systemic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, James Q; Thiboutot, Diane; Gallo, Richard; Webster, Guy; Tanghetti, Emil; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Stein-Gold, Linda; Berson, Diane; Zaenglein, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The third article in this 5-part series reviews systemic therapies used to treat cutaneous rosacea based on consensus recommendations from the American Acne & Rosacea Society (AARS) on the management of the common presentations of cutaneous rosacea. The consensus recommendations are based on current understanding of research that describes pathophysiologic mechanisms that appear to be operative in rosacea, correlation of these underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms with specific clinical manifestations of rosacea, and outcomes from clinical trials that evaluate therapies for rosacea both as monotherapy and in combination with other agents. Systemic agents used for treatment of rosacea have been administered as oral formulations (ie, tablets, capsules). The only oral agent for rosacea approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is a modified-release doxycycline 40-mg capsule. Other non-FDA-approved oral agents also are discussed including other tetracyclines, macrolides, metronidazole, and isotretinoin.

  20. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis: executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease (PD) caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF, but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened a panel of 19 experts to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM-PD in individuals with CF. PICO (population, intervention, comparison, outcome) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations, which were then modified to achieve consensus and subsequently circulated for public consultation within the USA and European CF communities. We have thus generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition.

  1. Best practices recommendations in the application of immunohistochemistry in urologic pathology: report from the International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Mahul B; Epstein, Jonathan I; Ulbright, Thomas M; Humphrey, Peter A; Egevad, Lars; Montironi, Rodolfo; Grignon, David; Trpkov, Kiril; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Zhou, Ming; Argani, Pedram; Delahunt, Brett; Berney, Daniel M; Srigley, John R; Tickoo, Satish K; Reuter, Victor E

    2014-08-01

    Members of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) participated in a half-day consensus conference to discuss guidelines and recommendations regarding best practice approaches to use of immunohistochemistry (IHC) in differential diagnostic situations in urologic pathology, including bladder, prostate, testis and, kidney lesions. Four working groups, selected by the ISUP leadership, identified several high-interest topics based on common or relevant challenging diagnostic situations and proposed best practice recommendations, which were discussed by the membership. The overall summary of the discussions and the consensus opinion forms the basis of a series of articles, one for each organ site. This Special Article summarizes the overall recommendations made by the four working groups. It is anticipated that this ISUP effort will be valuable to the entire practicing community in the appropriate use of IHC in diagnostic urologic pathology.

  2. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy: the evidence. A consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society, endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review summarises the evidence for the role of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. It is the product of a consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society and is endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists. It was used to inform the UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence in their appraisal of MPS in patients with chest pain and myocardial infarction. MPS is a well-established, non-invasive imaging technique with a large body of evidence to support its effectiveness in the diagnosis and management of angina and myocardial infarction. It is more accurate than the exercise ECG in detecting myocardial ischaemia and it is the single most powerful technique for predicting future coronary events. The high diagnostic accuracy of MPS allows reliable risk stratification and guides the selection of patients for further interventions, such as revascularisation. This in turn allows more appropriate utilisation of resources, with the potential for both improved clinical outcomes and greater cost-effectiveness. Evidence from modelling and observational studies supports the enhanced cost-effectiveness associated with MPS use. In patients presenting with stable or acute chest pain, strategies of investigation involving MPS are more cost-effective than those not using the technique. MPS also has particular advantages over alternative techniques in the management of a number of patient subgroups, including women, the elderly and those with diabetes, and its use will have a favourable impact on cost-effectiveness in these groups. MPS is already an integral part of many clinical guidelines for the investigation and management of angina and myocardial infarction. However, the technique is underutilised in the UK, as judged by the inappropriately long waiting times and by

  3. 2014 Korean Guidelines for Appropriate Utilization of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Joint Report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yeonyee E. [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yoo Jin [Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung-Kwan [Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong A [Department of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang 411-706 (Korea, Republic of); Na, Jin Oh [Cardiovascular Center, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Dong Hyun [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Jin [Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eui-Young [Division of Cardiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 135-720 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is now widely used in several fields of cardiovascular disease assessment due to recent technical developments. CMR can give physicians information that cannot be found with other imaging modalities. However, there is no guideline which is suitable for Korean people for the use of CMR. Therefore, we have prepared a Korean guideline for the appropriate utilization of CMR to guide Korean physicians, imaging specialists, medical associates and patients to improve the overall medical system performances. By addressing CMR usage and creating these guidelines we hope to contribute towards the promotion of public health. This guideline is a joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology.

  4. 2014 Korean guidelines for appropriate utilization of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging: A joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yeon Yee E. [Dept. of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yoo Jin; Choi, Eui Young [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-04-15

    The use of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is increasing for the assessment of certain cardiovascular diseases, due to recent technical developments. CMR can give physicians information that cannot be found with other imaging modalities. However, there has been no guideline for the use of CMR in Korean people. Therefore, we have prepared a Korean guideline for the appropriate utilization of CMR to guide Korean physicians, imaging specialists, medical associates, and patients to improve the overall performances in medical system. By addressing CMR usage and creating these guidelines, we hope to contribute to the promotion of public health. This guideline is a joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology.

  5. 2014 Korean Guidelines for Appropriate Utilization of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Joint Report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is now widely used in several fields of cardiovascular disease assessment due to recent technical developments. CMR can give physicians information that cannot be found with other imaging modalities. However, there is no guideline which is suitable for Korean people for the use of CMR. Therefore, we have prepared a Korean guideline for the appropriate utilization of CMR to guide Korean physicians, imaging specialists, medical associates and patients to improve the overall medical system performances. By addressing CMR usage and creating these guidelines we hope to contribute towards the promotion of public health. This guideline is a joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology

  6. Consensus document regarding cardiovascular safety at sports arenas: position stand from the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation (EACPR), section of Sports Cardiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borjesson, M.; Serratosa, L.; Carre, F.; Corrado, D.; Drezner, J.; Dugmore, D.L.; Heidbuchel, H.H.; Mellwig, K.P.; Panhuyzen-Goedkoop, N.M.; Papadakis, M.; Rasmusen, H.; Sharma, S.; Solberg, E.E.; Buuren, F. van; Pelliccia, A.

    2011-01-01

    Mass gathering events in sports arenas create challenges regarding the cardiovascular safety of both athletes and spectators. A comprehensive medical action plan, to ensure properly applied cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and wide availability and use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs), is e

  7. Consensus Report of the XI Congress of the Spanish Society of Odontology for the Handicapped and Special Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Machuca Portillo, Guillermo; Cabrerizo Merino, María del Carmen; Cutando Soriano, Antonio; Giménez Prats, María José; Silvestre Donat, Francisco Javier; Tomás Carmona, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes the findings of consensus of the XI congress of the SEOEME. All of these conclusions are referring to the review articles responsible to the general rapporteurs in order to bringing up to date knowledge with regard to the use of implants in patients medically compromised and with special needs and, in the dental management of autism and cerebral palsy, in the dental treatment of patients with genetic and adquired haematological disorders, the dental implications of car...

  8. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened an expert panel of specialists to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM pulmonary disease in individuals with CF. Nineteen experts were invited to participate in the recommendation development process. Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome (PICO) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations. An anonymous voting process was used by the committee to reach consensus. All committee members were asked to rate each statement on a scale of: 0, completely disagree, to 9, completely agree; with 80% or more of scores between 7 and 9 being considered 'good' agreement. Additionally, the committee solicited feedback from the CF communities in the USA and Europe and considered the feedback in the development of the final recommendation statements. Three rounds of voting were conducted to achieve 80% consensus for each recommendation statement. Through this process, we have generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in individuals with CF as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition.

  9. Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe commentary on the treatment of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reekers, J A

    2011-02-01

    , who are directly approached by MS patients, contact the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) for advice. Worldwide, several centres are actively promoting and performing balloon dilatation, with or without stenting, for CCSVI. Thus far, no trial data are available, and there is currently no randomized controlled trial (RCT) in progress Therefore, the basis for this new treatment rests on anecdotal evidence and successful testimonies by patients on the Internet. CIRSE believes that this is not a sound basis on which to offer a new treatment, which could have possible procedure-related complications, to an often desperate patient population.

  10. Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe commentary on the treatment of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reekers, J A; Lee, M J; Belli, A M; Barkhof, F

    2011-02-01

    , who are directly approached by MS patients, contact the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) for advice. Worldwide, several centres are actively promoting and performing balloon dilatation, with or without stenting, for CCSVI. Thus far, no trial data are available, and there is currently no randomized controlled trial (RCT) in progress Therefore, the basis for this new treatment rests on anecdotal evidence and successful testimonies by patients on the Internet. CIRSE believes that this is not a sound basis on which to offer a new treatment, which could have possible procedure-related complications, to an often desperate patient population. PMID:21136256

  11. Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe Commentary on the Treatment of Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , who are directly approached by MS patients, contact the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) for advice. Worldwide, several centres are actively promoting and performing balloon dilatation, with or without stenting, for CCSVI. Thus far, no trial data are available, and there is currently no randomized controlled trial (RCT) in progress Therefore, the basis for this new treatment rests on anecdotal evidence and successful testimonies by patients on the Internet. CIRSE believes that this is not a sound basis on which to offer a new treatment, which could have possible procedure-related complications, to an often desperate patient population.

  12. Estimation of the Cardiovascular Risk Using World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) Risk Prediction Charts in a Rural Population of South India

    OpenAIRE

    Arun Gangadhar Ghorpade; Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava; Sitanshu Sekhar Kar; Sonali Sarkar; Sumanth Mallikarjuna Majgi; Gautam Roy

    2015-01-01

    Background World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) charts have been employed to predict the risk of cardiovascular outcome in heterogeneous settings. The aim of this research is to assess the prevalence of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) risk factors and to estimate the cardiovascular risk among adults aged >40 years, utilizing the risk charts alone, and by the addition of other parameters. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in two o...

  13. Obesity as a risk factor in cancer: A national consensus of the Spanish Society for the Study of Obesity and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goday, A; Barneto, I; García-Almeida, J M; Blasco, A; Lecube, A; Grávalos, C; Martínez de Icaya, P; de las Peñas, R; Monereo, S; Vázquez, L; Palacio, J E; Pérez-Segura, P

    2015-10-01

    In the last few years, many prospective studies have demonstrated a clear association between obesity and cancers of the colon and rectum, breast in post-menopausal women, endometrium, kidney, oesophagus and pancreas. Obesity is also associated with a high risk of recurrence and cancer-related death. The pathophysiology of obesity involves various changes that may be implicated in the relationship between obesity and cancer, such as excess inflammatory cytokines and chronic inflammation, hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance, and raised leptin and oestrogens. The Spanish Society for the Study of Obesity and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology have signed a cooperation agreement to work together towards reducing the impact of obesity in cancer. Preventing obesity prevents cancer.

  14. Obesity as a risk factor in cancer: A national consensus of the Spanish Society for the Study of Obesity and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goday, A; Barneto, I; García-Almeida, J M; Blasco, A; Lecube, A; Grávalos, C; Martínez de Icaya, P; de las Peñas, R; Monereo, S; Vázquez, L; Palacio, J E; Pérez-Segura, P

    2015-10-01

    In the last few years, many prospective studies have demonstrated a clear association between obesity and cancers of the colon and rectum, breast in post-menopausal women, endometrium, kidney, oesophagus and pancreas. Obesity is also associated with a high risk of recurrence and cancer-related death. The pathophysiology of obesity involves various changes that may be implicated in the relationship between obesity and cancer, such as excess inflammatory cytokines and chronic inflammation, hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance, and raised leptin and oestrogens. The Spanish Society for the Study of Obesity and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology have signed a cooperation agreement to work together towards reducing the impact of obesity in cancer. Preventing obesity prevents cancer. PMID:26036853

  15. Consensus recommendations from the American acne & rosacea society on the management of rosacea, part 4: a status report on physical modalities and devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanghetti, Emil; Del Rosso, James Q; Thiboutot, Diane; Gallo, Richard; Webster, Guy; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Stein-Gold, Linda; Berson, Diane; Zaenglein, Andrea

    2014-02-01

    The fourth article in this 5-part series reviews physical modalities and devices used to treat cutaneous rosacea based on consensus recommendations from the American Acne & Rosacea Society (AARS) on the management of the common presentations of cutaneous rosacea. The major therapeutic uses of physical modalities and devices, especially laser and light-based systems, are for treatment of telangiectases and persistent facial erythema (background erythema). Phymas, especially rhinophyma, also are treated with physical modalities such as ablative lasers or surgical devices (eg, electrosurgical loop). Appropriately selected and properly used lasers and intense pulsed light (IPL) devices can successfully address specific clinical manifestations of rosacea that exhibit limited or no response to available medical therapies, such as telangiectases and background centrofacial erythema. Rosacea-associated symptoms also may improve. In most cases, treatment will need to be repeated intermittently to sustain improvement.

  16. International Committee on Mental Health in Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus statements for screening and treating depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quittner, Alexandra L; Abbott, Janice; Georgiopoulos, Anna M; Goldbeck, Lutz; Smith, Beth; Hempstead, Sarah E; Marshall, Bruce; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Elborn, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Studies measuring psychological distress in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have found high rates of both depression and anxiety. Psychological symptoms in both individuals with CF and parent caregivers have been associated with decreased lung function, lower body mass index, worse adherence, worse health-related quality of life, more frequent hospitalisations and increased healthcare costs. To identify and treat depression and anxiety in CF, the CF Foundation and the European CF Society invited a panel of experts, including physicians, psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses, social workers, a pharmacist, parents and an individual with CF, to develop consensus recommendations for clinical care. Over 18 months, this 22-member committee was divided into four workgroups: Screening; Psychological Interventions; Pharmacological Treatments and Implementation and Future Research, and used the Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome methodology to develop questions for literature search and review. Searches were conducted in PubMed, PsychINFO, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, Psychiatry online and ABDATA by a methodologist at Dartmouth. The committee reviewed 344 articles, drafted statements and set an 80% acceptance for each recommendation statement as a consensus threshold prior to an anonymous voting process. Fifteen guideline recommendation statements for screening and treatment of depression and anxiety in individuals with CF and parent caregivers were finalised by vote. As these recommendations are implemented in CF centres internationally, the process of dissemination, implementation and resource provision should be closely monitored to assess barriers and concerns, validity and use.

  17. Why Consensus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Polletta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Activists have long justified their egalitarian organizational forms in prefigurative terms. Making decisions by consensus, decentralizing organization, and rotating leadership serves to model the radically democratic society that activists hope to bring into being. Our comparison of consensus-based decision-making in three historical periods, however, shows that activists have understood the purposes of prefiguration in very different ways. Whereas radical pacifists in the 1940s saw their cooperative organizations as sustaining movement stalwarts in a period of political repression, new left activists in the 1960s imagined that their radically democratic practices would be adopted by ever-widening circles. Along with the political conditions in which they have operated, activists’ distinctive understandings of equality have also shaped the way they have made decisions. Our interviews with 30 leftist activists today reveal a view of decision-making as a place to work through inequalities that are informal, unacknowledged, and pervasive.

  18. [Consensus for antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Enterobacteriaceae. Subcommittee on Antimicrobials, SADEBAC (Argentinian Society of Clinical Bacteriology), Argentinian Association of Microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famiglietti, A; Quinteros, M; Vázquez, M; Marín, M; Nicola, F; Radice, M; Galas, M; Pasterán, F; Bantar, C; Casellas, J M; Kovensky Pupko, J; Couto, E; Goldberg, M; Lopardo, H; Gutkind, G; Soloaga, R

    2005-01-01

    Taking into account previous recommendations from the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS), the Antimicrobial Committee, Sociedad Argentina de Bacteriología Clínica (SADEBAC), Asociación Argentina de Microbiología (AAM), and the experience from its members and some invited microbiologists, a consensus was obtained for antimicrobial susceptibility testing and interpretation in most frequent enterobacterial species isolated from clinical samples in our region. This document describes the natural antimicrobial resistance of some Enterobacteriaceae family members, including the resistance profiles due to their own chromosomal encoded beta-lactamases. A list of the antimicrobial agents that should be tested, their position on the agar plates, in order to detect the most frequent antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, and considerations on which antimicrobial agents should be reported regarding to the infection site and patient characteristics are included. Also, a description on appropriate phenotypic screening and confirmatory test for detection of prevalent extended spectrum beta-lactamases in our region are presented. Finally, a summary on frequent antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and their probably associated resistance mechanisms, and some infrequent antimicrobial resistance profiles that deserve confirmation are outlined.

  19. Recommendations abstracted from the American Geriatrics Society Consensus Statement on vitamin D for Prevention of Falls and Their Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this Consensus Statement is to help primary care practitioners achieve adequate vitamin D intake from all sources in their older patients, with the goal of reducing falls and fall-related injuries. The workgroup graded the quality of evidence and assigned an evidence level using established criteria. Based on the evidence for fall and fracture reduction in the clinical trials of older community-dwelling and institutionalized persons and metaanalyses, the workgroup concluded that a serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration of 30 ng/mL (75 nmol/L) should be a minimum goal to achieve in older adults, particularly in frail adults, who are at higher risk of falls, injuries, and fractures. The workgroup concluded that the goal--to reduce fall injuries related to low vitamin D status--could be achieved safely and would not require practitioners to measure serum 25(OH)D concentrations in older adults in the absence of underlying conditions that increase the risk of hypercalcemia (e.g., advanced renal disease, certain malignancies, sarcoidosis). PMID:24350602

  20. Methodological background and strategy for the 2012-2013 updated consensus definitions and clinical practice guidelines from the abdominal compartment society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Roberts, Derek J; Jaeschke, Roman; De Waele, Jan J; De Keulenaer, Bart L; Duchesne, Juan; Bjorck, Martin; Leppäniemi, Ari; Ejike, Janeth C; Sugrue, Michael; Cheatham, Michael L; Ivatury, Rao; Ball, Chad G; Reintam Blaser, Annika; Regli, Adrian; Balogh, Zsolt; D'Amours, Scott; De Laet, Inneke; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2015-01-01

    The Abdominal Compartment Society (www.wsacs.org) previously created highly cited Consensus Definitions/Management Guidelines related to intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Implicit in this previous work, was a commitment to regularly reassess and update in relation to evolving research. Two years preceding the Fifth World Congress on Abdominal Compartment Syndrome, an International Guidelines committee began preparation. An oversight/steering committee formulated key clinical questions regarding IAH/ /ACS based on polling of the Executive to redundancy, structured according to the Patient, Intervention, Comparator, and Outcome (PICO) format. Scientific consultations were obtained from Methodological GRADE experts and a series of educational teleconferences were conducted to educate scientific review teams from among the wscacs. org membership. Each team conducted systematic or structured reviews to identify relevant studies and prepared evidence summaries and draft Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) recommendations. The evidence and draft recommendations were presented and debated in person over four days. Updated consensus definitions and management statements were derived using a modified Delphi method. A writingcommittee subsequently compiled the results utilizing frequent Internet discussion and Delphi voting methods to compile a robust online Master Report and a concise peer-reviewed summarizing publication. A dedicated Paediatric Guidelines Subcommittee reviewed all recommendations and either accepted or revised them for appropriateness in children. Of the original 12 IAH/ACS definitions proposed in 2006, three (25%) were accepted unanimously, with four (33%) accepted by > 80%, and four (33%) accepted by > 50%, but required discussion to produce revised definitions. One (8%) was rejected by > 50%. In addition to previous 2006 definitions, the panel also defined the open abdomen

  1. Recommendations on pre-hospital & early hospital management of acute heart failure: a consensus paper from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology, the European Society of Emergency Medicine and the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebazaa, Alexandre; Yilmaz, M Birhan; Levy, Phillip; Ponikowski, Piotr; Peacock, W Frank; Laribi, Said; Ristic, Arsen D; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Masip, Josep; Riley, Jillian P; McDonagh, Theresa; Mueller, Christian; deFilippi, Christopher; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Thiele, Holger; Piepoli, Massimo F; Metra, Marco; Maggioni, Aldo; McMurray, John; Dickstein, Kenneth; Damman, Kevin; Seferovic, Petar M; Ruschitzka, Frank; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Bellou, Abdelouahab; Anker, Stefan D; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-06-01

    Acute heart failure is a fatal syndrome. Emergency physicians, cardiologists, intensivists, nurses and other health care providers have to cooperate to provide optimal benefit. However, many treatment decisions are opinion-based and few are evidenced-based. This consensus paper provides guidance to practicing physicians and nurses to manage acute heart failure in the pre-hospital and hospital setting. Criteria of hospitalization and of discharge are described. Gaps in knowledge and perspectives in the management of acute heart failure are also detailed. This consensus paper on acute heart failure might help enable contiguous practice.

  2. The Limits of Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poster, John B.

    Dynamics in the education policy arena suggest that, despite two generations of researchers extolling democratic leadership styles and consensus building over autocratic techniques, wide participation in policymaking and the broadest possible consensus are not always productive: American society has not yet agreed on what schools should…

  3. Recommendations on pre-hospital & early hospital management of acute heart failure : a consensus paper from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology, the European Society of Emergency Medicine and the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mebazaa, Alexandre; Yilmaz, M. Birhan; Levy, Phillip; Ponikowski, Piotr; Peacock, W. Frank; Laribi, Said; Ristic, Arsen D.; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Masip, Josep; Riley, Jillian P.; McDonagh, Theresa; Mueller, Christian; deFilippi, Christopher; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Thiele, Holger; Piepoli, Massimo F.; Metra, Marco; Maggioni, Aldo; McMurray, John; Dickstein, Kenneth; Damman, Kevin; Seferovic, Petar M.; Ruschitzka, Frank; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F.; Bellou, Abdelouahab; Anker, Stefan D.; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-01-01

    Acute heart failure is a fatal syndrome. Emergency physicians, cardiologists, intensivists, nurses and other health care providers have to cooperate to provide optimal benefit. However, many treatment decisions are opinion-based and few are evidenced-based. This consensus paper provides guidance to

  4. Development of the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ) for migrants to Western societies: an international Delphi consensus process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Through the World Health Assembly Resolution, ‘Health of Migrants’, the international community has identified migrant health as a priority. Recommendations for general hospital care for international migrants in receiving-countries have been put forward by the Migrant Friendly Hospital Initiative; adaptations of these recommendations specific to maternity care have yet to be elucidated and validated. We aimed to develop a questionnaire measuring migrant-friendly maternity care (MFMC) which could be used in a range of maternity care settings and countries. Methods This study was conducted in four stages. First, questions related to migrant friendly maternity care were identified from existing questionnaires including the Migrant Friendliness Quality Questionnaire, developed in Europe to capture recommended general hospital care for migrants, and the Mothers In a New Country (MINC) Questionnaire, developed in Australia and revised for use in Canada to capture the maternity care experiences of migrant women, and combined to create an initial MFMC questionnaire. Second, a Delphi consensus process in three rounds with a panel of 89 experts in perinatal health and migration from 17 countries was undertaken to identify priority themes and questions as well as to clarify wording and format. Third, the draft questionnaire was translated from English to French and Spanish and back-translated and subsequently culturally validated (assessed for cultural appropriateness) by migrant women. Fourth, the questionnaire was piloted with migrant women who had recently given birth in Montreal, Canada. Results A 112-item questionnaire on maternity care from pregnancy, through labour and birth, to postpartum care, and including items on maternal socio-demographic, migration and obstetrical characteristics, and perceptions of care, has been created - the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ) – in three languages (English, French and Spanish). It is

  5. The 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure Management Guidelines Update: focus on rehabilitation and exercise and surgical coronary revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Gordon W; Ezekowitz, Justin A; O'Meara, Eileen; Howlett, Jonathan G; Fremes, Steve E; Al-Hesayen, Abdul; Heckman, George A; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Grzeslo, Adam; Harkness, Karen; Lepage, Serge; McDonald, Michael; McKelvie, Robert S; Nigam, Anil; Rajda, Miroslaw; Rao, Vivek; Swiggum, Elizabeth; Virani, Sean; Van Le, Vy; Zieroth, Shelley; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Ashton, Tom; D'Astous, Michel; Dorian, Paul; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Isaac, Debra L; Kouz, Simon; Leblanc, Marie-Hélène; Liu, Peter; Ross, Heather J; Sussex, Bruce; White, Michel

    2014-03-01

    The 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure Management Guidelines Update provides focused discussions on the management recommendations on 2 topics: (1) exercise and rehabilitation; and (2) surgical coronary revascularization in patients with heart failure. First, all patients with stable New York Heart Association class I-III symptoms should be considered for enrollment in a tailored exercise training program, to improve exercise tolerance and quality of life. Second, selected patients with suitable coronary anatomy should be considered for bypass graft surgery. As in previous updates, the topics were chosen in response to stakeholder feedback. The 2013 Update also includes recommendations, values and preferences, and practical tips to assist the clinicians and health care workers manage their patients with heart failure.

  6. Ten-year technical and clinical outcomes in TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus II infrainguinal C/D lesions using duplex ultrasound arterial mapping as the sole imaging modality for critical lower limb ischemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, Sherif

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate duplex ultrasound arterial mapping (DUAM) as the sole imaging modality when planning for bypass surgery (BS) and endovascular revascularization (EvR) in patients with critical limb ischemia for TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) II C\\/D infrainguinal lesions.

  7. Lifestyle Modifications Versus Antihypertensive Medications in Reducing Cardiovascular Events in an Aging Society: A Success Rate-oriented Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoichi; Shibazaki, Satomi; Araki, Ryuichiro; Miyazaki, Takashi; Sato, Makiko; Takahashi, Sachiko; Suwa, Emi; Takenaka, Tsuneo; Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Objective It is difficult to compare directly the practical effects of lifestyle modifications and antihypertensive medications on reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD). The purpose of this study was to compare the hypothetical potential of lifestyle modifications with that of antihypertensive medications in reducing CVD in an aging society using a success rate-oriented simulation. Methods We constructed a simulation model for virtual Japanese subpopulations according to sex and age at 10-year intervals from 40 years of age as an example of an aging society. The fractional incidence rate of CVD was calculated as the product of the incidence rate at each systolic blood pressure (SBP) level and the proportion of the SBP frequency distribution in the fractional subpopulations of each SBP. The total incidence rate was calculated by the definite integral of the fractional incidence rate at each SBP level in the sex- and age-specific subpopulations. Results If we consider the effects of lifestyle modifications on metabolic factors and transfer them onto SBP, the reductions in the total incidence rate of CVD were competitive between lifestyle modifications and antihypertensive medications in realistic scenarios. In middle-aged women, the preventive effects of both approaches were limited due to a low incidence rate. In middle-aged men and extremely elderly subjects whose adherence to antihypertensive medications is predicted to be low, lifestyle modifications could be an alternative choice. Conclusion The success rate-oriented simulation suggests that the effectiveness of lifestyle modifications or antihypertensive medications in preventing cardiovascular events largely depends on the baseline incidence rate and sex- and age-specific behavioral factors. PMID:27522993

  8. Guideline for wireless capsule endoscopy in children and adolescents: a consensus document by the SEGHNP (Spanish Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition and the SEPD (Spanish Society for Digestive Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Argüelles-Arias

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Capsule endoscopy (CE in children has limitations based mainly on age. The objective of this consensus was reviewing the scientific evidence. Material and methods: Some experts from the Spanish Society of Gastroenterology (SEPD and Spanish Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (SEGHNP were invited to answer different issues about CE in children. These sections were: a Indications, contraindications and limitations; b efficacy of CE in different clinical scenarios; c CE performance; d CE-related complications; e Patency capsule; and f colon capsule endoscopy. They reviewed relevant questions on each topic. Results: The main indication is Crohn's disease (CD. There is no contraindication for the age and in the event that the patient not to swallow it, it should be administered under deep sedation with endoscopy and specific device. The CE is useful in CD, for the management of OGIB in children and in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (in this indication has the most effectiveness. The main complication is retention, which should be specially taken into account in cases of CD already diagnosed with malnutrition. A preparation regimen based on a low volume of polyethylene glycol (PEG the day before plus simethicone on the same day is the best one in terms of cleanliness although does not improve the results of the CE procedure. Conclusions: CE is safe and useful in children. Indications are similar to those of adults, the main one is CD to establish both a diagnosis and disease extension. Moreover, only few limitations are detected in children.

  9. A consensus on the diagnosis and treatment of acromegaly complications

    OpenAIRE

    Melmed, S; Casanueva, F.F.; Klibanski, A; Bronstein, M. D.; Chanson, P.; Lamberts, S. W.; Strasburger, C. J.; Wass, J. A. H.; Giustina, A

    2012-01-01

    In March 2011, the Acromegaly Consensus Group met to revise and update the guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of acromegaly complications. The meeting was sponsored by the Pituitary Society and the European Neuroendocrinology Association and included experts skilled in the management of acromegaly. Complications considered included cardiovascular, endocrine and metabolic, sleep apnea, bone diseases, and mortality. Outcomes in selected, related clinical conditions were also considered, ...

  10. Age relations of cardiovascular risk factors in a traditional Melanesian society: the Kitava Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeberg, S; Berntorp, E; Nilsson-Ehle, P; Terént, A; Vessby, B

    1997-10-01

    This study examined cross-sectional age relations of blood pressure, anthropometric indexes, serum lipids, and hemostatic variables in 203 subsistence horticulturists aged 20-86 y in Kitava, Trobriand Islands, Papua New Guinea. The population is characterized by extreme leanness (despite food abundance), low blood pressure, low plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 activity, and rarity of cardiovascular disease. Tubers, fruit, fish, and coconut are dietary staples whereas dairy products, refined fat and sugar, cereals, and alcohol are absent and salt intake is low. Although diastolic blood pressure was not associated with age in Kitavans, systolic blood pressure increased linearly after 50 y of age in both sexes. Body mass index decreased with age in both sexes. Serum total cholesterol, triacylglycerol, low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B increased in males between 20 and 50 y of age, whereas high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I decreased. There were no significant differences in these indexes with age in the few females studied. A slight linear age-related increase of lipoprotein(a) was present in males. Plasma fibrinogen, factor VII clotting activity, factor VIII clotting activity, and von Willebrand factor antigen increased with age in both sexes but plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 activity did not. The modest or absent relations between the indexes measured and age are apparently important explanations of the virtual nonexistence of stroke and ischemic heart disease in Kitava.

  11. Consensus statement of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition: indicators recommended for the identification and documentation of pediatric malnutrition (undernutrition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Patricia; Carney, Liesje Nieman; Corkins, Mark R; Monczka, Jessica; Smith, Elizabeth; Smith, Susan E; Spear, Bonnie A; White, Jane V

    2015-02-01

    The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (the Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.), utilizing an evidence-informed, consensus-derived process, recommend that a standardized set of diagnostic indicators be used to identify and document pediatric malnutrition (undernutrition) in routine clinical practice. The recommended indicators include z scores for weight-for-height/length, body mass index-for-age, or length/height-for-age or mid-upper arm circumference when a single data point is available. When 2 or more data points are available, indicators may also include weight gain velocity (nutritional risk is not the purpose of this paper. Clinicians should use as many data points as available to identify and document the presence of malnutrition. The universal use of a single set of diagnostic parameters will expedite the recognition of pediatric undernutrition, lead to the development of more accurate estimates of its prevalence and incidence, direct interventions, and promote improved outcomes. A standardized diagnostic approach will also inform the prediction of the human and financial responsibilities and costs associated with the prevention and treatment of undernutrition in this vulnerable population and help to further ensure the provision of high-quality, cost-effective nutritional care.

  12. EUROPEAN NATIONAL SOCIETY CARDIOVASCULAR JOURNALS. BACKGROUND, RATIONALE AND MISSION STATEMENT OF THE “EDITORS´ CLUB”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology.Djamaleddine Nibouche MD, Karlen Adamyan MD, Kurt Huber MD, Hugo Ector MD, Izet Masic MD, Rumiana Tarnovska MD, Mario Ivanusa MD, Vladimír Staněk MD, Jørgen Videbæk MD, Mohamed Hamed MD, Alexandras Laucevicius MD, Pirjo Mustonen MD, Jean-Yves Artigou MD, Mamanti Rogava MD, Michael Böhm MD, Eckart Fleck MD, Gerd Heusch MD, Rainer Klawki MD, Panos Vardas MD, Christodoulos Stefanadis MD, József Tenczer MD, Gianluigi Nicolosi MD, Aleksandras Laucevicius MD, Joseph Elias MD, Aleksandras Laucevicius MD, Abdelhamid Moustaghfir MD, Olaf Rødevand MD, Piotr Kułakowski MD, Victor A. Lusov MD, Rafael G. Oganov MD, Arsen Ristic MD, Gabriel Kamensky MD, Miran F. Kenda MD, Christer Höglund MD, Thomas F. Lüscher MD, René Lerch MD, Sami Kabbani MD, Habib Haouala MD, Vedat Sansoy MD, Alexandr Shumakov MD, Adam Timmis MD.(Редакторы кардиологических журналов Европейских национальных обществ кардиологов; подробные данные см. в Приложении.

  13. ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan, Grace; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M; Brindis, Ralph G; Kramer, Christopher M; Shaw, Leslee J; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Chen, Jersey; Dean, Larry S; Fazel, Reza; Hundley, W Gregory; Itchhaporia, Dipti; Kligfield, Paul; Lockwood, Richard; Marine, Joseph Edward; McCully, Robert Benjamin; Messer, Joseph V; O'Gara, Patrick T; Shemin, Richard J; Wann, L Samuel; Wong, John B; Patel, Manesh R; Kramer, Christopher M; Bailey, Steven R; Brown, Alan S; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Lindsay, Bruce D; Min, James K; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Wann, L Samuel; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2014-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) to consider use of stress testing and anatomic diagnostic procedures. This document reflects an updating of the prior Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) published for radionuclide imaging (RNI), stress echocardiography (Echo), calcium scoring, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and invasive coronary angiography for SIHD. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine the AUC on a frequent basis. A major innovation in this document is the rating of tests side by side for the same indication. The side-by-side rating removes any concerns about differences in indication or interpretation stemming from prior use of separate documents for each test. However, the ratings were explicitly not competitive rankings due to the limited availability of comparative evidence, patient variability, and range of capabilities available in any given local setting. The indications for this review are limited to the detection and risk assessment of SIHD and were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Eighty clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate rating panel on a scale of 1-9, to designate Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate use following a modified Delphi process following the recently updated AUC development methodology. The use of some modalities of testing in the initial evaluation of patients with symptoms representing ischemic equivalents, newly diagnosed heart failure, arrhythmias, and syncope was generally found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate, except in cases where low pre-test probability or low risk limited the benefit of most testing except exercise electrocardiogram (ECG

  14. Open and Endovascular Treatment of Trans-Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus Ⅱ D Aortoiliac Occlusive Lesions: What Determines the Rate of Restenosis?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen-Yang Shen; Yun-Feng Liu; Qing-Le Li; Yong-Bao Zhang; Yang Jiao; Miltiadis E Krokidis; Xiao-Ming Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Open surgery is the preferred approach for the treatment of type D lesions according to the Trans-Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) Ⅱ guideline, but endovascular solutions also appear to be a valid option in selected patients.The study aimed to identify the risk factors of restenosis after open and endovascular reconstruction of symptomatic TASC Ⅱ D aortoiliac occlusive lesions (AIOLs).Methods: Fifty-six patients (82 limbs) who underwent open repair and endovascular treatment (ET) for symptomatic TASC ⅡD AIOLs between March 2005 and December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed.Baseline characteristics, preoperative and postoperative imaging,and operation procedure reports were reviewed and analyzed.Restenosis after revascularization was assessed by duplex ultrasound or computed tomography angiogram.Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, Log-rank test, and multivariate Cox regression were used to evaluate the relevance between risk factors and patency.Results: The mean duration of follow-up was 42.8 ± 23.5 months (ranging from 3 to 90 months).Primary patency rates at 1-, 3-, 5-,and 7-year were 93.6%, 89.3%, 87.0%, and 70.3%, respectively.Restenosis after revascularization occurred in 11 limbs.Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and the Log-rank test revealed that diabetes, Rutherford classification ≥5th and concurrent femoropopliteal TASC Ⅱ type C/D lesions were significantly related to the duration of primary patency.According to the result of Cox regression, diabetes and femoropopliteal TASC Ⅱ type C/D lesions were identified as the risk factors for restenosis after revascularization.Conclusion: This study demonstrated that diabetes and femoropopliteal TASC Ⅱ type C/D lesions are risk factors associated with restenosis after open and ET of TASC Ⅱ D AIOLs.

  15. German Heart Surgery Report 2015: The Annual Updated Registry of the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Andreas; Funkat, Anne-Katrin; Lewandowski, Jana; Frie, Michael; Ernst, Markus; Hekmat, Khosro; Schiller, Wolfgang; Gummert, Jan F; Welz, Armin

    2016-09-01

    On the basis of a long-standing voluntary registry, which was founded by the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (GSTCVS), well-defined data of all heart, thoracic, and vascular surgery procedures performed in 78 German heart surgery departments during 2015 are analyzed. In 2015, a total of 103,967 heart surgery procedures (implantable cardioverter defibrillator, pacemaker, and extracardiac procedures without ECC excluded) were submitted to the database. Approximately 14.8% of the patients were at least 80 years old, resulting in an increase of 0.6% compared with the data of 2014. For 38,601 isolated coronary artery bypass grafting procedures (relationship on-/off-pump: 5:1), the unadjusted inhospital mortality was 2.7%. Concerning the 32,346 isolated heart valve procedures (including 10,606 catheter-based implantations) an unadjusted inhospital mortality of 4.4% was observed.This annual updated registry of the GSTCVS represents voluntary public reporting by accumulating actual information for nearly all heart surgical procedures in Germany, demonstrates advancements in heart medicine, and enables internal/external quality assurance for all participants. In addition, the registry demonstrates that the provision of heart surgery in Germany is appropriate and patients are treated nationwide in a round-the-clock service.

  16. Guidelenines in the management of obstructing cancer of the left colon: consensus conference of the world society of emergency surgery (WSES and peritoneum and surgery (PnS society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinna Antonio D

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obstructive left colon carcinoma (OLCC is a challenging matter in terms of obstruction release as well of oncological issues. Several options are available and no guidelines are established. The paper aims to generate evidenced based recommendations on management of OLCC. Methods The PubMed and Cochrane Library databases were queried for publications focusing on OLCC published prior to April 2010. A extensive retrieval, analyses, and grading of the literature was undertaken. The findings of the research were presented and largely discussed among panellist and audience at the Consensus Conference of the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES and Peritoneum and Surgery (PnS Society held in Bologna July 2010. Comparisons of techniques are presented and final committee recommendation are enounced. Results Hartmann's procedure should be preferred to loop colostomy (Grade 2B. Hartmann's procedure offers no survival benefit compared to segmental colonic resection with primary anastomosis (Grade 2C+; Hartmann's procedure should be considered in patients with high surgical risk (Grade 2C. Total colectomy and segmental colectomy with intraoperative colonic irrigation are associated with same mortality/morbidity, however total colectomy is associated with higher rates impaired bowel function (Grade 1A. Segmental resection and primary anastomosis either with manual decompression or intraoperative colonic irrigation are associated with same mortality/morbidity rate (Grade 1A. In palliation stent placement is associated with similar mortality/morbidity rates and shorter hospital stay (Grade 2B. Stents as a bridge to surgery seems associated with lower mortality rate, shorter hospital stay, and a lower colostomy formation rate (Grade 1B. Conclusions Loop colostomy and staged procedure should be adopted in case of dramatic scenario, when neoadjuvant therapy could be expected. Hartmann's procedure should be performed in case of high risk of

  17. Selected Abstracts presented at the 18th International Congress of the International Society of Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy (ISCP), Rome, Italy, 28--30 June 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, CL; Lam, KSL.; Cheung, BMY; Ivan, V.; Turcan, M.; Tudoran, M.; Apostol, A.; Komiyama, M.K.; Wada, H.W.; Asahara, N.A.; Koyama, H.K.; Kono, K.K.; Takahashi, Y.T.; Shimada, SS.; Nagaoka, NN.

    2013-01-01

    ANNUAL SCIENTIFIC MEETING OF THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY OF CARDIOVASCULAR PHARMACOTHERAPY (ISCP) ROME, 28–30 JUNE 2013 The following scientific abstracts were presented at the latest Annual Scientific Meeting of ISCP this year in Rome. They summarise the work of young investigators from different geographical regions worldwide. ISCP supports the scientific work of researchers round the Globe and offers a forum where the results of their investigations can be presented and discussed in the cont...

  18. [Differences between the 2013 and 2014 hypertension guidelines.: Position of the Central American and Caribbean Society for Hypertension and Cardiovascular Prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Salinas, Alberto; Wyss, Fernando; Coca, Antonio; Ramírez, Agustín J; Valdez, Osiris; Valerio, Luis F

    2015-03-01

    Between the end of 2013 and the beginning of 2014 the most internationally influential hypertension guidelines were published. Although there are no major differences between them, there are discrepancies that can have an impact on treatment and prognosis for individuals with hypertension. This article analyzes the main controversial elements in the guides and presents the recommendations of the Sociedad Centroamericana y del Caribe de Hipertensión y Prevención Cardiovascular (Caribbean Society for Hypertension and Cardiovascular Prevention). The main differences are found a) in the categorization of prehypertension, b) in the use of global cardiovascular risk in the decision to begin antihypertensive treatment, c) in the validity of beta-blockers as first-line drugs in treating uncomplicated hypertension, and d) the increase in the therapeutic goal of maintaining values between drugs in uncomplicated hypertension, and not delaying the start of drug treatment for hypertension stage I with low global cardiovascular risk. Finally, seven recommendations by the Society based on the analysis are included.

  19. Estimation of the Cardiovascular Risk Using World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH Risk Prediction Charts in a Rural Population of South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Gangadhar Ghorpade

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH charts have been employed to predict the risk of cardiovascular outcome in heterogeneous settings. The aim of this research is to assess the prevalence of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD risk factors and to estimate the cardiovascular risk among adults aged >40 years, utilizing the risk charts alone, and by the addition of other parameters. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in two of the villages availing health services of a medical college. Overall 570 subjects completed the assessment. The desired information was obtained using a pretested questionnaire and participants were also subjected to anthropometric measurements and laboratory investigations. The WHO/ISH risk prediction charts for the South-East Asian region was used to assess the cardiovascular risk among the study participants. Results The study covered 570 adults aged above 40 years. The mean age of the subjects was 54.2 (±11.1 years and 53.3% subjects were women. Seventeen percent of the participants had moderate to high risk for the occurrence of cardiovascular events by using WHO/ISH risk prediction charts. In addition, CVD risk factors like smoking, alcohol, low High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol were found in 32%, 53%, 56.3%, and 61.5% study participants, respectively. Conclusion Categorizing people as low (20% risk is one of the crucial steps to mitigate the magnitude of cardiovascular fatal/non-fatal outcome. This cross-sectional study indicates that there is a high burden of CVD risk in the rural Pondicherry as assessed by WHO/ISH risk prediction charts. Use of WHO/ISH charts is easy and inexpensive screening tool in predicting the cardiovascular event.

  20. Estimation of the cardiovascular risk using World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) risk prediction charts in a rural population of South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorpade, Arun Gangadhar; Shrivastava, Saurabh RamBihariLal; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar; Sarkar, Sonali; Majgi, Sumanth Mallikarjuna; Roy, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Background: World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) charts have been employed to predict the risk of cardiovascular outcome in heterogeneous settings. The aim of this research is to assess the prevalence of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) risk factors and to estimate the cardiovascular risk among adults aged >40 years, utilizing the risk charts alone, and by the addition of other parameters. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed in two of the villages availing health services of a medical college. Overall 570 subjects completed the assessment. The desired information was obtained using a pre-tested questionnaire and participants were also subjected to anthropometric measurements and laboratory investigations. The WHO/ISH risk prediction charts for the South-East Asian region was used to assess the cardiovascular risk among the study participants. Results: The study covered 570 adults aged above 40 years. The mean age of the subjects was 54.2 (±11.1) years and 53.3% subjects were women. Seventeen percent of the participants had moderate to high risk for the occurrence of cardiovascular events by using WHO/ISH risk prediction charts. In addition, CVD risk factors like smoking, alcohol, low High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were found in 32%, 53%, 56.3%, and 61.5% study participants, respectively. Conclusion: Categorizing people as low (20%) risk is one of the crucial steps to mitigate the magnitude of cardiovascular fatal/non-fatal outcome. This cross-sectional study indicates that there is a high burden of CVD risk in the rural Pondicherry as assessed by WHO/ISH risk prediction charts. Use of WHO/ISH charts is easy and inexpensive screening tool in predicting the cardiovascular event PMID:26340393

  1. Achieving quality in cardiovascular imaging: proceedings from the American College of Cardiology-Duke University Medical Center Think Tank on Quality in Cardiovascular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pamela; Iskandrian, Ami E; Krumholz, Harlan M; Gillam, Linda; Hendel, Robert; Jollis, James; Peterson, Eric; Chen, Jersey; Masoudi, Frederick; Mohler, Emile; McNamara, Robert L; Patel, Manesh R; Spertus, John

    2006-11-21

    Cardiovascular imaging has enjoyed both rapid technological advances and sustained growth, yet less attention has been focused on quality than in other areas of cardiovascular medicine. To address this deficit, representatives from cardiovascular imaging societies, private payers, government agencies, the medical imaging industry, and experts in quality measurement met, and this report provides an overview of the discussions. A consensus definition of quality in imaging and a convergence of opinion on quality measures across imaging modalities was achieved and are intended to be the start of a process culminating in the development, dissemination, and adoption of quality measures for all cardiovascular imaging modalities.

  2. Cardiovascular implanted electronic devices in people towards the end of life, during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and after death: guidance from the Resuscitation Council (UK), British Cardiovascular Society and National Council for Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, David; Soar, Jasmeet; Hogg, Karen; Linker, Nicholas; Chapman, Simon; Beattie, James M; Jones, Sue; George, Robert; McComb, Janet; Glancy, James; Patterson, Gordon; Turner, Sheila; Hampshire, Susan; Lockey, Andrew; Baker, Tracey; Mitchell, Sarah

    2016-06-01

    The Resuscitation Council (UK), the British Cardiovascular Society (including the British Heart Rhythm Society and the British Society for Heart Failure) and the National Council for Palliative Care recognise the importance of providing clear and consistent guidance on management of cardiovascular implanted electronic devices (CIEDs) towards the end of life, during cardiorespiratory arrest and after death. This document has been developed to provide guidance for the full range of healthcare professionals who may encounter people with CIEDs in the situations described and for healthcare managers and commissioners. The authors recognise that some patients and people close to patients may also wish to refer to this document. It is intended as an initial step to help to ensure that people who have CIEDs, or are considering implantation of one, receive explanation of and understand the practical implications and decisions that this entails; to promote a good standard of care and service provision for people in the UK with CIEDs in the circumstances described; to offer relevant ethical and legal guidance on this topic; to offer guidance on the delivery of services in relation to deactivation of CIEDs where appropriate; to offer guidance on whether any special measures are needed when a person with a CIED receives cardiopulmonary resuscitation; and to offer guidance on the actions needed when a person with a CIED dies. PMID:27277710

  3. Expert consensus (SBC/SBHCI) on the use of drug-eluting stents: recommendations of the Brazilian society of interventional cardiology/ Brazilian society of cardiology for the Brazilian public single healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Valter C; Mattos, Luiz Alberto P; Caramori, Paulo R A; Perin, Marco A; Mangione, José A; Machado, Bruno M; Coelho, Wilson M C; Bueno, Ronaldo R L

    2006-10-01

    The authors review percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) evolution and its growing application in myocardial revascularization for patients with coronary heart disease in Brazil and worldwide. PCI was introduced in 1977 using only the catheter balloon. Limitations of this method (acute occlusion and coronary restenosis) led to the adoption of coronary stents and more recently the advent of drug-eluting stents2, which were developed to drastically reduce restenosis rates. These developments allowed the exponential growth of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures in Brazil which have replaced many bypass surgery procedures and have become the gold standard for the majority of symptomatic patients suffering from coronary artery disease. The preference for this procedure gained new dimensions in 2000 when the Brazilian Public Healthcare System (SUS) began reimbursing for stent procedures. This measure exemplified the importance of the Public Healthcare System's participation in incorporating medical advances and offering a high standard of cardiovascular treatment to a large portion of the Brazilian population. It is emphasized that prevention of in-stent restenosis is complex due to its unpredictable and ubiquitous occurrence. Control of this condition improves quality of life and reduces the recurrence of angina pectoris, the need to perform new revascularization procedures and hospital readmissions. The overall success of the drug-eluting stents has proven to be reliable and consistent in overcoming restenosis and has some beneficial impact for all clinical and angiographic conditions. This paper discusses the adoption and criteria for the use of drug-eluting stents in other countries as well as the recommendations established by the Brazilian Society of Interventional Cardiology for their reimbursement by SUS. The incorporation of new healthcare technology involves two distinct stages. During the first stage, the product is registered with the

  4. Evaluation and management of perianal abscess and anal fistula: a consensus statement developed by the Italian Society of Colorectal Surgery (SICCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, A; Bottini, C; De Nardi, P; Giamundo, P; Lauretta, A; Realis Luc, A; Tegon, G; Nicholls, R J

    2015-10-01

    Perianal sepsis is a common condition ranging from acute abscess to chronic fistula formation. In most cases, the source is considered to be a non-specific cryptoglandular infection starting from the intersphincteric space. The key to successful treatment is the eradication of the primary track. As surgery may lead to a disturbance of continence, several sphincter-preserving techniques have been developed. This consensus statement examines the pertinent literature and provides evidence-based recommendations to improve individualized management of patients.

  5. Hereditary angioedema: beyond international consensus - circa December 2010 - The Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Dr. David McCourtie Lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema was published earlier this year in this Journal (Bowen et al. Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology 2010, 6:24 - http://www.aacijournal.com/content/6/1/24. Since that publication, there have been multiple phase III clinical trials published on either prophylaxis or therapy of hereditary angioedema and some of these products have changed approval status in various countries. This manuscript was prepared to review and update the management of hereditary angioedema. Objective To review approaches for the diagnosis and management of hereditary angioedema (HAE circa December 2010 and present thoughts on moving from HAE management from international evidence-based consensus to facilitate more local health unit considerations balancing costs, efficacies of treatments, and risk benefits. Thoughts will reflect Canadian and international experiences. Methods PubMed searches including hereditary angioedema and diagnosis, therapy, management and consensus were reviewed as well as press releases from various pharmaceutical companies to early December 2010. Results The 2010 International Consensus Algorithms for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema is reviewed in light of the newly published phase III Clinical trials for prevention and therapy of HAE. Management approaches and models are discussed. Conclusions Consensus approach and double-blind placebo controlled trials are only interim guides to a complex disorder such as HAE and should be replaced as soon as possible with large phase IV clinical trials, meta analyses, data base registry validation of approaches including quality of life and cost benefit analyses, safety, and head-to-head clinical trials investigating superiority or non-inferiority comparisons of available approaches. Since not all therapeutic products are available in all jurisdictions

  6. [Non-invasive and invasive out of hospital ventilation in chronic respiratory failure : Consensus report of the working group on ventilation and intensive care medicine of the Austrian Society of Pneumology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Peter; Eber, Ernst; Funk, Georg-Christian; Fritz, Wilfried; Hartl, Sylvia; Heininger, Peter; Kink, Eveline; Kühteubl, Gernot; Oberwaldner, Beatrice; Pachernigg, Ulrike; Pfleger, Andreas; Schandl, Petra; Schmidt, Ingrid; Stein, Markus

    2016-02-01

    The current consensus report was compiled under the patronage of the Austrian Society of Pneumology (Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Pneumologie, ÖGP) with the intention of providing practical guidelines for out-of-hospital ventilation that are in accordance with specific Austrian framework parameters and legal foundations. The guidelines are oriented toward a 2004 consensus ÖGP recommendation concerning the setup of long-term ventilated patients and the 2010 German Respiratory Society S2 guidelines on noninvasive and invasive ventilation of chronic respiratory insufficiency, adapted to national experiences and updated according to recent literature. In 11 chapters, the initiation, adjustment, and monitoring of out-of-hospital ventilation is described, as is the technical equipment and airway access. Additionally, the different indications-such as chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, thoracic restrictive and neuromuscular diseases, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, and pediatric diseases-are discussed. Furthermore, the respiratory physiotherapy of adults and children on invasive and noninvasive long-term ventilation is addressed in detail. PMID:26837865

  7. 2014 ESC/ESA Guidelines on non-cardiac surgery: cardiovascular assessment and management: The Joint Task Force on non-cardiac surgery: cardiovascular assessment and management of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA).

    OpenAIRE

    Kristensen, Steen Dalby; Knuuti, Juhani; Saraste, Antti; Anker, Stefan; Botker, Hans Erik; Hert, Stefan De; Ford, Ian; Juanatey, Jose Ramon Gonzalez; Gorenek, Bulent; Heyndrickx, Guy Robert; Hoeft, Andreas; Huber, Kurt; Iung, Bernard; Kjeldsen, Keld Per; Longrois, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Heart Association (AHA), and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) are pleased to announce the publication of two new versions of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) on Perioperative Cardiovascular Evaluation from our respective organizations.1–3 These revisions were begun independently, dictated both by emerging, new information regarding the topic and the controversy regarding the legitimacy of data from previously published pivo...

  8. American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, and International Myeloma Working Group Consensus Conference on Salvage Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Relapsed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giralt, Sergio; Garderet, Laurent; Durie, Brian;

    2015-01-01

    not been extensively studied in MM patients relapsing after primary therapy. The International Myeloma Working Group together with the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation...

  9. Heart failure as an endpoint in heart failure and non-heart failure cardiovascular clinical trials: the need for a consensus definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zannad, F.; Stough, W.G.; Pitt, B.;

    2008-01-01

    Specific criteria have been established to define the occurrence of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke in cardiovascular clinical trials, but there is not a consistent definition for heart failure. Heart failure events appear to occur at a rate that is similar to stroke and MI in trials...... of hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, and coronary heart disease, yet a consistent approach to defining heart failure events has not yet been realized. The wide range of definitions used in clinical trials makes it difficult to interpret new data in the context of existing literature. This inconsistency has...... led to challenges in determining the incidence of heart failure in cardiovascular studies and the effects of interventions on these endpoints. This paper examines issues related to defining heart failure events in cardiovascular clinical trials and presents a definition to formally address this issue...

  10. Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology position statement on dyslipidemia management. Differences between the European and American guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2014-11-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention.

  11. [Spanish interdisciplinary committee for cardiovascular disease prevention and the spanish society of cardiology position statement on dyslipidemia management. Differences between the European and american guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-04-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention.

  12. Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology Position Statement on Dyslipidemia Management: differences between the European and American Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention.

  13. [Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology position statement on dyslipidemia management. Differences between the European and American guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos Bejarano, José María; Galve, Enrique; Royo-Bordonada, Miguel Ángel; Alegría Ezquerra, Eduardo; Armario, Pedro; Brotons Cuixart, Carlos; Camafort Babkowski, Miguel; Cordero Fort, Alberto; Maiques Galán, Antonio; Mantilla Morató, Teresa; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Villar Álvarez, Fernando; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The publication of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the treatment of high blood cholesterol has had a strong impact due to the paradigm shift in its recommendations. The Spanish Interdisciplinary Committee for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and the Spanish Society of Cardiology reviewed this guideline and compared it with current European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention and dyslipidemia management. The most striking aspect of the American guideline is the elimination of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treat-to-target strategy and the adoption of a risk reduction strategy in 4 major statin benefit groups. In patients with established cardiovascular disease, both guidelines recommend a similar therapeutic strategy (high-dose potent statins). However, in primary prevention, the application of the American guidelines would substantially increase the number of persons, particularly older people, receiving statin therapy. The elimination of the cholesterol treat-to-target strategy, so strongly rooted in the scientific community, could have a negative impact on clinical practice, create a certain amount of confusion and uncertainty among professionals, and decrease follow-up and patient adherence. Thus, this article reaffirms the recommendations of the European guidelines. Although both guidelines have positive aspects, doubt remains regarding the concerns outlined above. In addition to using risk charts based on the native population, the messages of the European guideline are more appropriate to the Spanish setting and avoid the possible risk of overtreatment with statins in primary prevention. Full English text available from:www.revespcardiol.org/en.

  14. Overlapping Consensus in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Monsen, Mats

    2007-01-01

    An empirical study of how Malaysian pluralism is understood through Islam Hadhari, Article 11 and the Inter-faith Commission against the backdrop of current Malaysian political and social history, coupled with a theoretical analysis through John Rawls' Political Liberalism, with particular emphasis on the idea of Overlapping Consensus. The thesis is an attempt at applying Rawls' theory on the practical case of Malaysia, as a plural society, while at the same time using the practical case of M...

  15. Consensus statement of the academy of nutrition and dietetics/american society for parenteral and enteral nutrition: Characteristics recommended for the identification and documentation of adult malnutrition (undernutrition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy) and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) recommend that a standardized set of diagnostic characteristics be used to identify and document adult malnutrition in routine clinical practice. An etiologically based diagno...

  16. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis: executive summary

    OpenAIRE

    Floto, R. Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L.; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A.; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L.; Hempstead, Sarah E.; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease (PD) caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF, but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society...

  17. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Floto, R. Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L.; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A.; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L.; Hempstead, Sarah E.; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R

    2015-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS)...

  18. Society of Surgical Oncology–American Society for Radiation Oncology Consensus Guideline on Margins for Breast-Conserving Surgery With Whole-Breast Irradiation in Stages I and II Invasive Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To convene a multidisciplinary panel of breast experts to examine the relationship between margin width and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and develop a guideline for defining adequate margins in the setting of breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A multidisciplinary consensus panel used a meta-analysis of margin width and IBTR from a systematic review of 33 studies including 28,162 patients as the primary evidence base for consensus. Results: Positive margins (ink on invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ) are associated with a 2-fold increase in the risk of IBTR compared with negative margins. This increased risk is not mitigated by favorable biology, endocrine therapy, or a radiation boost. More widely clear margins than no ink on tumor do not significantly decrease the rate of IBTR compared with no ink on tumor. There is no evidence that more widely clear margins reduce IBTR for young patients or for those with unfavorable biology, lobular cancers, or cancers with an extensive intraductal component. Conclusions: The use of no ink on tumor as the standard for an adequate margin in invasive cancer in the era of multidisciplinary therapy is associated with low rates of IBTR and has the potential to decrease re-excision rates, improve cosmetic outcomes, and decrease health care costs

  19. Society of Surgical Oncology–American Society for Radiation Oncology Consensus Guideline on Margins for Breast-Conserving Surgery With Whole-Breast Irradiation in Stages I and II Invasive Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Meena S. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Schnitt, Stuart J. [Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Giuliano, Armando E. [Department of Surgery, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Harris, Jay R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Khan, Seema A. [Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Horton, Janet [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Klimberg, Suzanne [Department of Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Fayetteville, Arkansas (United States); Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Freedman, Gary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Houssami, Nehmat [School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Johnson, Peggy L. [Advocate in Science, Susan G. Komen, Wichita, Kansas (United States); Morrow, Monica, E-mail: morrowm@mskcc.org [Breast Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To convene a multidisciplinary panel of breast experts to examine the relationship between margin width and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and develop a guideline for defining adequate margins in the setting of breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A multidisciplinary consensus panel used a meta-analysis of margin width and IBTR from a systematic review of 33 studies including 28,162 patients as the primary evidence base for consensus. Results: Positive margins (ink on invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ) are associated with a 2-fold increase in the risk of IBTR compared with negative margins. This increased risk is not mitigated by favorable biology, endocrine therapy, or a radiation boost. More widely clear margins than no ink on tumor do not significantly decrease the rate of IBTR compared with no ink on tumor. There is no evidence that more widely clear margins reduce IBTR for young patients or for those with unfavorable biology, lobular cancers, or cancers with an extensive intraductal component. Conclusions: The use of no ink on tumor as the standard for an adequate margin in invasive cancer in the era of multidisciplinary therapy is associated with low rates of IBTR and has the potential to decrease re-excision rates, improve cosmetic outcomes, and decrease health care costs.

  20. The minutes of Beijing-Tianjin seminar of Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology experts'-consensus on the diagnosis and treatment of osteosarcoma%CSCO骨肉瘤诊治专家共识北京-天津研讨会会议纪要

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙扬; 金韬; 张清

    2012-01-01

    In order to reach a consensus on the standardized clinical diagnosis and treatment of osteosarcoma and lay the foundation for the future Chinese version of "Experts' Consensus of the Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment of Osteosarcoma", the Beijing-Tianjin seminar of Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) experts' consensus on the diagnosis and treatment of osteosarcoma was held at the China National Convention Centre on April 20, 2012. More than 40 representatives from over 20 hospitals nationwide attended the conference. Insisting on the aim of multidisciplinary mutual learning, communication and enhancement, in the conference there was a heated exchange and discussion in the area of the standardized clinical diagnosis and treatment of osteosarcoma.

  1. Consensus conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annika Porsborg; Lassen, Jesper

    Our results point to significant national variation both in terms of the perceived aim of consensus conferences, expectations to conference outcomes, conceptions of the roles of lay people and experts, and in terms of the way in which the role of public deliberation is interpreted. Interestingly......, the differing perceptions are each in their own way rooted in an argument for democratic legitimacy. We therefore argue that national interpretations of consensus conferences, and of their ability to functions as a tool for public participation, depend to a great extent on the dominant ideals of democratic...

  2. The Insertion and Management of External Ventricular Drains: An Evidence-Based Consensus Statement : A Statement for Healthcare Professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Herbert I; Nathan, Barnett R; Rowe, A Shaun; Zabramski, Joseph M; Andaluz, Norberto; Bhimraj, Adarsh; Guanci, Mary McKenna; Seder, David B; Singh, Jeffrey M

    2016-02-01

    External ventricular drains (EVDs) are commonly placed to monitor intracranial pressure and manage acute hydrocephalus in patients with a variety of intracranial pathologies. The indications for EVD insertion and their efficacy in the management of these various conditions have been previously addressed in guidelines published by the Brain Trauma Foundation, American Heart Association and combined committees of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. While it is well recognized that placement of an EVD may be a lifesaving intervention, the benefits can be offset by procedural and catheter-related complications, such as hemorrhage along the catheter tract, catheter malposition, and CSF infection. Despite their widespread use, there are a lack of high-quality data regarding the best methods for placement and management of EVDs to minimize these risks. Existing recommendations are frequently based on observational data from a single center and may be biased to the authors' view. To address the need for a comprehensive set of evidence-based guidelines for EVD management, the Neurocritical Care Society organized a committee of experts in the fields of neurosurgery, neurology, neuroinfectious disease, critical care, pharmacotherapy, and nursing. The Committee generated clinical questions relevant to EVD placement and management. They developed recommendations based on a thorough literature review using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system, with emphasis placed not only on the quality of the evidence, but also on the balance of benefits versus risks, patient values and preferences, and resource considerations. PMID:26738503

  3. Early management of patients with acute heart failure: state of the art and future directions. A consensus document from the society for academic emergency medicine/heart failure society of America acute heart failure working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sean; Storrow, Alan B; Albert, Nancy M; Butler, Javed; Ezekowitz, Justin; Felker, G Michael; Fermann, Gregory J; Fonarow, Gregg C; Givertz, Michael M; Hiestand, Brian; Hollander, Judd E; Lanfear, David E; Levy, Phillip D; Pang, Peter S; Peacock, W Frank; Sawyer, Douglas B; Teerlink, John R; Lenihan, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) afflicts nearly 6 million Americans, resulting in one million emergency department (ED) visits and over one million annual hospital discharges. An aging population and improved survival from cardiovascular diseases is expected to further increase HF prevalence. Emergency providers play a significant role in the management of patients with acute heart failure (AHF). It is crucial that emergency physicians and other providers involved in early management understand the latest developments in diagnostic testing, therapeutics and alternatives to hospitalization. Further, clinical trials must be conducted in the ED in order to improve the evidence base and drive optimal initial therapy for AHF. Should ongoing and future studies suggest early phenotype-driven therapy improves in-hospital and post-discharge outcomes, ED treatment decisions will need to evolve accordingly. The potential impact of future studies which incorporate risk-stratification into ED disposition decisions cannot be underestimated. Predictive instruments that identify a cohort of patients safe for ED discharge, while simultaneously addressing barriers to successful outpatient management, have the potential to significantly impact quality of life and resource expenditures.

  4. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): cardiac patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Jiménez, F J; Cervera Montes, M; Blesa Malpica, A L

    2011-11-01

    Patients with cardiac disease can develop two types of malnutrition: cardiac cachexia, which appears in chronic congestive heart failure, and malnutrition due to the complications of cardiac surgery or any other type of surgery in patients with heart disease. Early enteral nutrition should be attempted if the oral route cannot be used. When cardiac function is severely compromised, enteral nutrition is feasible, but supplementation with parenteral nutrition is sometimes required. Sustained hyperglycemia in the first 24 hours in patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome, whether diabetic or not, is a poor prognostic factor for 30-day mortality. In critically-ill cardiac patients with stable hemodynamic failure, nutritional support of 20-25 kcal/kg/day is effective in maintaining adequate nutritional status. Protein intake should be 1.2*-1.5 g/kg/day. Routine polymeric or high protein formulae should be used, according to the patient's prior nutritional status, with sodium and volume restriction according to the patient's clinical situation. The major energy source for myocytes is glutamine, through conversion to glutamate, which also protects the myocardial cell from ischemia in critical situations. Administration of 1 g/ day of omega-3 (EPA+DHA) in the form of fish oil can prevent sudden death in the treatment of acute coronary syndrome and can also help to reduce hospital admission for cardiovascular events in patients with chronic heart failure.

  5. Sexual counselling for individuals with cardiovascular disease and their partners: a consensus document from the American Heart Association and the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Elaine E; Jaarsma, Tiny; Barnason, Susan A; Byrne, Molly; Doherty, Sally; Dougherty, Cynthia M; Fridlund, Bengt; Kautz, Donald D; Mårtensson, Jan; Mosack, Victoria; Moser, Debra K

    2013-11-01

    After a cardiovascular event, patients and their families often cope with numerous changes in their lives, including dealing with consequences of the disease or its treatment on their daily lives and functioning. Coping poorly with both physical and psychological challenges may lead to impaired quality of life. Sexuality is one aspect of quality of life that is important for many patients and partners that may be adversely affected by a cardiac event. The World Health Organization defines sexual health as '… a state of physical, emotional, mental and social well-being in relation to sexuality; it is not merely the absence of disease, dysfunction or infirmity. Sexual health requires a positive and respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships, as well as the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences ….'(1(p4)) The safety and timing of return to sexual activity after a cardiac event have been well addressed in an American Heart Association scientific statement, and decreased sexual activity among cardiac patients is frequently reported.(2) Rates of erectile dysfunction (ED) among men with cardiovascular disease (CVD) are twice as high as those in the general population, with similar rates of sexual dysfunction in females with CVD.(3) ED and vaginal dryness may also be presenting signs of heart disease and may appear 1-3 years before the onset of angina pectoris. Estimates reflect that only a small percentage of those with sexual dysfunction seek medical care;(4) therefore, routine assessment of sexual problems and sexual counselling may be of benefit as part of effective management by physicians, nurses, and other healthcare providers. PMID:23900695

  6. Consenso 2012 da Sociedade Brasileira de Reumatologia para o tratamento da artrite reumatoide 2012 Brazilian Society of Rheumatology Consensus for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licia Maria Henrique da Mota

    2012-04-01

    Brazil. METHOD: Literature review with articles' selection based on evidence and the expert opinion of the Rheumatoid Arthritis Committee of the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: 1 The therapeutic decision should be shared with the patient; 2 immediately after the diagnosis, a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD should be prescribed, and the treatment adjusted to achieve remission; 3 treatment should be conducted by a rheumatologist; 4 the initial treatment includes synthetic DMARDs; 5 methotrexate is the drug of choice; 6 patients who fail to respond after two schedules of synthetic DMARDs should be assessed for the use of biologic DMARDs; 7 exceptionally, biologic DMARDs can be considered earlier; 8 anti-TNF agents are preferentially recommended as the initial biologic therapy; 9 after therapeutic failure of a first biologic DMARD, other biologics can be used; 10 cyclophosphamide and azathioprine can be used in severe extra-articular manifestations; 11 oral corticoid is recommended at low doses and for short periods of time; 12 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should always be prescribed in association with a DMARD; 13 clinical assessments should be performed on a monthly basis at the beginning of treatment; 14 physical therapy, rehabilitation, and occupational therapy are indicated; 15 surgical treatment is recommended to correct sequelae; 16 alternative therapy does not replace traditional therapy; 17 family planning is recommended; 18 the active search and management of comorbidities are recommended; 19 the patient's vaccination status should be recorded and updated; 20 endemic-epidemic transmissible diseases should be investigated and treated

  7. Spanish Consensus Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Guillermo Álvarez; Cuesta, Jordi Ardevol; Loureda, Rafael Arriaza; España, Fernando Ávila; Matas, Ramón Balius; Pazos, Fernando Baró; de Dios Beas Jiménez, Juan; Rosell, Jorge Candel; Fernandez, César Cobián; Ros, Francisco Esparza; Colmenero, Josefina Espejo; de Prado, Jorge Fernández; Cota, Juan José García; González, Jose Ignacio Garrido; Santander, Manuela González; Munilla, Miguel Ángel Herrador; Ruiz, Francisco Ivorra; Díaz, Fernando Jiménez; Marqueta, Pedro Manonelles; Fernandez, Antonio Maestro; Benito, Juan José Muñoz; Vilás, Ramón Olivé; Teres, Xavier Peirau; Amaro, José Peña; Roque, Juan Pérez San; Parenteu, Christophe Ramírez; Serna, Juan Ribas; Álvarez, Mikel Sánchez; Marchori, Carlos Sanchez; Soto, Miguel del Valle; Alonso, José María Villalón; García, Pedro Guillen; de la Iglesia, Nicolas Hugo; Alcorocho, Juan Manuel Lopez

    2016-01-01

    On the 21st of March, 2015, experts met at Clínica CEMTRO in Madrid, Spain, under the patronage of The Spanish Society for Sports Traumatology (SETRADE), The Spanish Federation of Sports Medicine (FEMEDE), The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Football Clubs (AEMEF), and The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Basketball Clubs (AEMB) with the aim of establishing a round table that would allow specialists to consider the most appropriate current general actions to be taken when treating muscle tears in sport, based on proven scientific data described in the medical literature. Each expert received a questionnaire prior to the aforementioned meeting comprising a set of questions concerning therapeutic indications generally applied in the different stages present during muscle repair. The present Consensus Document is the result of the answers to the questionnaire and resulting discussion and consensus over which are the best current indications in the treatment of muscle tears in sport. Avoiding immobilization, not taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) randomly, fostering early mobilization, increasing vascularization of injured, site and regulating inflammatory mechanisms—without inhibiting these from the early stages of the recovery period—all stood out as main points of the Consensus Document. Additionally, there is controversy concerning cell stimulation techniques and the use of growth factors or cell inhibitors. The decision concerning discharge was unanimous, as was the criteria considered when it came to performing sport techniques without pain. PMID:27213161

  8. Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology (SVIN) Stroke Interventional Laboratory Consensus (SILC) Criteria: A 7M Management Approach to Developing a Stroke Interventional Laboratory in the Era of Stroke Thrombectomy for Large Vessel Occlusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Tanzila; Zaidat, Osama; Yavagal, Dileep; Xavier, Andrew; Jovin, Tudor; Janardhan, Vallabh

    2016-06-01

    Brain attack care is rapidly evolving with cutting-edge stroke interventions similar to the growth of heart attack care with cardiac interventions in the last two decades. As the field of stroke intervention is growing exponentially globally, there is clearly an unmet need to standardize stroke interventional laboratories for safe, effective, and timely stroke care. Towards this goal, the Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology (SVIN) Writing Committee has developed the Stroke Interventional Laboratory Consensus (SILC) criteria using a 7M management approach for the development and standardization of each stroke interventional laboratory within stroke centers. The SILC criteria include: (1) manpower: personnel including roles of medical and administrative directors, attending physicians, fellows, physician extenders, and all the key stakeholders in the stroke chain of survival; (2) machines: resources needed in terms of physical facilities, and angiography equipment; (3) materials: medical device inventory, medications, and angiography supplies; (4) methods: standardized protocols for stroke workflow optimization; (5) metrics (volume): existing credentialing criteria for facilities and stroke interventionalists; (6) metrics (quality): benchmarks for quality assurance; (7) metrics (safety): radiation and procedural safety practices. PMID:27610118

  9. 2016 Expert consensus document on prevention, diagnosis and treatment of short-term peripheral venous catheter-related infections in adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdevila, J A; Guembe, M; Barberán, J; de Alarcón, A; Bouza, E; Fariñas, M C; Gálvez, J; Goenaga, M A; Gutiérrez, F; Kestler, M; Llinares, P; Miró, J M; Montejo, M; Muñoz, P; Rodríguez-Creixems, M; Sousa, D; Cuenca, J; Mestres, C A

    2016-08-01

    The use of endovascular catheters is a routine practice in secondary and tertiary care level hospitals. Short peripheral catheters have been found to be associated with the risk of nosocomial bacteremia resulting in morbidity and mortality. Staphyloccus aureus is mostly associated with peripheral catheter insertion. This Consensus Document has been elaborated by a panel of experts of the Spanish Society of Cardiovascular Infections in cooperation with experts from the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, Spanish Society of Chemotherapy and Spanish Society of Thoracic-Cardiovascular Surgery and aims at define and establish the norm for management of short duration peripheral vascular catheters. The document addresses the indications for insertion, catheter maintenance and registry, diagnosis and treatment of infection, indications for removal and stresses on continuous education as a driver for quality. Implementation of this norm will allow uniformity in usage thus minimizing the risk of infection and its complications. PMID:27580009

  10. Cardiovascular risk assessment in type 2 diabetes mellitus: comparison of the World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension risk prediction charts versus UK Prospective Diabetes Study risk engine

    OpenAIRE

    Herath HMM; Weerarathna TP; Umesha D

    2015-01-01

    Herath M Meththananda Herath, Thilak Priyantha Weerarathna, Dilini Umesha Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ruhuna, Galle, Sri Lanka Introduction: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, and assessment of their cardiac risk is important for preventive strategies. Purpose: The Ministry of Health of Sri Lanka has recommended World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) charts f...

  11. [Present Execution of and Problems with Clinical Lipid Examination and Application of "the Japan Atherosclerotic Society (JAS) Guidelines for Prevention of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases 2012"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Masahiko; Tanji, Yasuhiro; Nomura, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    It is well known that dyslipidemia is one of the most crucial risk factors for atherosclerosis, including cardiovascular diseases (ASCVD). In order to prevent the onset of ASCVD, the Japan Atherosclerotic Society (JAS) published the JAS Guidelines in 2012 for appropriate lipid examination and treatment. However, it is unknown how the guidelines are practically used by Japanese clinicians. Therefore, we conducted a questionnaire survey to assess the present execution of and problems with clinical lipid examination and the application of the JAS Guidelines by doctors working in hospitals and clinics of Yamagata district in Japan. We found that 16% of doctors carried out clinical lipid examination every time, but some did not examine lipids at all. Fasting blood sampling for lipid examination was performed by 44% of doctors, and the items of triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) were measured by more than 95%. Regarding problems with clinical lipid examination, more than 40% of doctors requested the early achievement of the standardization of LDL-C. The JAS Guidelines in 2012 were unfortunately recognized by only 55% of doctors. In addition, the rate of the clinical application of the guidelines, including the absolute risk, the flowchart of LDL-C, and non-HDL-C, was less than 30%, and more than half of the doctors measured LDL-C with the direct method, but did not use the "recommended" Friedewald method. In contrast, the cardiologists and endocrinologists generally accepted the guidelines, and their clinical application rate was higher than in other doctors. Through the questionnaire survey, it was revealed that doctors in various fields have not properly accepted the use and significance of lipid examination and the JAS Guidelines, and so further educational activities are necessary. PMID:27526534

  12. Evaluation of Current Consensus Statement Recommendations for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Pooled Analysis of William Beaumont Hospital and American Society of Breast Surgeon MammoSite Registry Trial Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus Statement (CS) recommendations for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) are associated with significantly different outcomes in a pooled analysis from William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) and the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) MammoSite® Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: APBI was used to treat 2127 cases of early-stage breast cancer (WBH, n=678; ASBrS, n=1449). Three forms of APBI were used at WBH (interstitial, n=221; balloon-based, n=255; or 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, n=206), whereas all Registry Trial patients received balloon-based brachytherapy. Patients were divided according to the ASTRO CS into suitable (n=661, 36.5%), cautionary (n=850, 46.9%), and unsuitable (n=302, 16.7%) categories. Tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes were analyzed according to CS group. Results: The median age was 65 years (range, 32-94 years), and the median tumor size was 10.0 mm (range, 0-45 mm). The median follow-up time was 60.6 months. The WBH cohort had more node-positive disease (6.9% vs 2.6%, P<.01) and cautionary patients (49.5% vs 41.8%, P=.06). The 5-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure (RNF), and distant metastasis (DM) for the whole cohort were 2.8%, 0.6%, 1.6%. The rate of IBTR was not statistically higher between suitable (2.5%), cautionary (3.3%), or unsuitable (4.6%) patients (P=.20). The nonsignificant increase in IBTR for the cautionary and unsuitable categories was due to increased elsewhere failures and new primaries (P=.04), not tumor bed recurrence (P=.93). Conclusions: Excellent outcomes after breast-conserving surgery and APBI were seen in our pooled analysis. The current ASTRO CS guidelines did not adequately differentiate patients at an increased risk of IBTR or tumor bed failure in this large patient cohort

  13. Efficacy of Enhanced External Counterpulsation in Patients With Chronic Refractory Angina on Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Angina Class: An Updated Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunmei; Liu, Xiangjuan; Wang, Xiaomeng; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Yun; Ge, Zhiming

    2015-11-01

    A growing number of patients with chronic artery disease suffer from angina, despite the optimal medical management (ie, β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and long-acting nitrates) and revascularization. Currently, enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP) therapy has been verified as a noninvasive, safe therapy for refractory angina. The study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of EECP in patients with chronic refractory angina according to Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) angina class.We identified systematic literature through MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Clinical Trials Register Database, and the ClinicalTrials. gov Website from 1990 to 2015. Studies were considered eligible if they were prospective and reported data on CCS class before and after EECP treatment. Meta-analysis was performed to assess the efficacy of EECP therapy by at least 1 CCS angina class improvement, and proportion along with the 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated. Statistical heterogeneity was calculated by I statistic and the Q statistic. Sensitivity analysis was addressed to test the influence of trials on the overall pooled results. Subgroup analysis was applied to explore potential reasons for heterogeneity.Eighteen studies were enrolled in our meta-analysis. Pooled analysis showed 85% of patients underwent EECP had a reduction by at least one CCS class (95%CI 0.81-0.88, I = 58.5%, P < 0.001). The proportion of patients enrolled at primarily different studies with chronic heart failure (CHF) improved by at least 1 CCS class was about 84% after EECP (95%CI 0.81-0.88, I = 32.7%, P = 0.1668). After 3 large studies were excluded, the pooled proportion was 82% (95%CI 0.79-0.86, I = 18%, P = 0.2528). Funnel plot indicated that some asymmetry while the Begg and Egger bias statistic showed no publication bias (P = 0.1495 and 0.2859, respectively).Our study confirmed that EECP provided an effective treatment for patients who were unresponsive to medical management and

  14. Cardiovascular disease and diabetes in people with severe mental illness position statement from the European Psychiatric Association (EPA), supported by the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Hert, M; Dekker, J M; Wood, D; Kahl, K G; Holt, R I G; Möller, H-J

    2009-09-01

    People with severe mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia, depression or bipolar disorder, have worse physical health and reduced life expectancy compared to the general population. The excess cardiovascular mortality associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is attributed in part to an increased risk of the modifiable coronary heart disease risk factors; obesity, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Antipsychotic medication and possibly other psychotropic medication like antidepressants can induce weight gain or worsen other metabolic cardiovascular risk factors. Patients may have limited access to general healthcare with less opportunity for cardiovascular risk screening and prevention than would be expected in a non-psychiatric population. The European Psychiatric Association (EPA), supported by the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) published this statement with the aim of improving the care of patients suffering from severe mental illness. The intention is to initiate cooperation and shared care between the different healthcare professionals and to increase the awareness of psychiatrists and primary care physicians caring for patients with severe mental illness to screen and treat cardiovascular risk factors and diabetes. PMID:19682863

  15. Guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention and management of implantable cardiac electronic device infection. Report of a joint Working Party project on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (BSAC, host organization), British Heart Rhythm Society (BHRS), British Cardiovascular Society (BCS), British Heart Valve Society (BHVS) and British Society for Echocardiography (BSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoe, Jonathan A T; Barlow, Gavin; Chambers, John B; Gammage, Michael; Guleri, Achyut; Howard, Philip; Olson, Ewan; Perry, John D; Prendergast, Bernard D; Spry, Michael J; Steeds, Richard P; Tayebjee, Muzahir H; Watkin, Richard

    2015-02-01

    Infections related to implantable cardiac electronic devices (ICEDs), including pacemakers, implantable cardiac defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices, are increasing in incidence in the USA and are likely to increase in the UK, because more devices are being implanted. These devices have both intravascular and extravascular components and infection can involve the generator, device leads and native cardiac structures or various combinations. ICED infections can be life-threatening, particularly when associated with endocardial infection, and all-cause mortality of up to 35% has been reported. Like infective endocarditis, ICED infections can be difficult to diagnose and manage. This guideline aims to (i) improve the quality of care provided to patients with ICEDs, (ii) provide an educational resource for all relevant healthcare professionals, (iii) encourage a multidisciplinary approach to ICED infection management, (iv) promote a standardized approach to the diagnosis, management, surveillance and prevention of ICED infection through pragmatic evidence-rated recommendations, and (v) advise on future research projects/audit. The guideline is intended to assist in the clinical care of patients with suspected or confirmed ICED infection in the UK, to inform local infection prevention and treatment policies and guidelines and to be used in the development of educational and training material by the relevant professional societies. The questions covered by the guideline are presented at the beginning of each section.

  16. Recent consensus statements in pediatric endocrinology: a selective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michelle; Sathasivam, Anpalakan; Novoa, Yeray; Rapaport, Robert

    2011-10-01

    Clinical guidelines and consensus statements serve to summarize and organize current knowledge on diverse subjects and provide practical guidelines for proper clinical management. Recommendations should be based on research and evidence derived from appropriate sources. In 2008, more than 20 consensus statements were published in the pediatric literature alone. This article summarizes the salient points of the latest consensus statements jointly developed by multiple endocrine societies including the Lawson Wilkins Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and the European Society for Pediatric Endocrinology. As much as possible, the original intent and language of the statements was respected and paraphrased.

  17. Expert consensus and recommendations on safety criteria for active mobilization of mechanically ventilated critically ill adults

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgson, Carol L; Stiller, Kathy; Needham, Dale M.; Tipping, Claire J; Harrold, Megan; Baldwin, Claire E; Bradley, Scott; Berney, Sue; Caruana, Lawrence R; Elliott, Doug; Green, Margot; Haines, Kimberley; Higgins, Alisa M; Kaukonen, Kirsi-Maija; Leditschke, Isabel Anne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to develop consensus recommendations on safety parameters for mobilizing adult, mechanically ventilated, intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Methods A systematic literature review was followed by a meeting of 23 multidisciplinary ICU experts to seek consensus regarding the safe mobilization of mechanically ventilated patients. Results Safety considerations were summarized in four categories: respiratory, cardiovascular, neurological and other. Consensus ...

  18. An update on methods for revascularization and expansion of the TASC lesion classification to include below-the-knee arteries: A supplement to the inter-society consensus for the management of peripheral arterial disease (TASC II): The TASC steering committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaff, Michael R; White, Christopher J; Hiatt, William R; Fowkes, Gerry R; Dormandy, John; Razavi, Mahmood; Reekers, Jim; Norgren, Lars

    2015-10-01

    The Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC) guidelines were last updated in 2007 (TASC II) and represented the collaboration of international vascular specialties involved in the management of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Since the publication of TASC II, there have been innovations in endovascular revascularization strategies for patients with PAD. The intent of this publication is to provide a complete anatomic lower limb TASC lesion classification, including the infrapopliteal segment, and an updated literature review of new endovascular techniques and practice patterns employed by vascular specialists today.

  19. Sarcopenia: European consensus on definition and diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J; Baeyens, Jean Pierre; Bauer, Jürgen M.; Boirie, Yves,; Cederholm, Tommy; Landi, Francesco; Martin, Finbarr C.; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Rolland, Yves; Schneider, Stéphane M.; Topinková, Eva; Vandewoude, Maurits; Zamboni, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    The European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) developed a practical clinical definition and consensus diagnostic criteria for age-related sarcopenia. EWGSOP included representatives from four participant organisations, i.e. the European Geriatric Medicine Society, the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics—European Region and the International Association of Nutrition and Aging. These organisation...

  20. Knowledge Gaps in Cardiovascular Care of the Older Adult Population: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Geriatrics Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Michael W; Chyun, Deborah A; Skolnick, Adam H; Alexander, Karen P; Forman, Daniel E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Maurer, Mathew S; McClurken, James B; Resnick, Barbara M; Shen, Win K; Tirschwell, David L

    2016-05-24

    The incidence and prevalence of most cardiovascular disorders increase with age, and cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and major disability in adults ≥75 years of age; however, despite the large impact of cardiovascular disease on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in older adults, patients aged ≥75 years have been markedly underrepresented in most major cardiovascular trials, and virtually all trials have excluded older patients with complex comorbidities, significant physical or cognitive disabilities, frailty, or residence in a nursing home or assisted living facility. As a result, current guidelines are unable to provide evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of older patients typical of those encountered in routine clinical practice. The objectives of this scientific statement are to summarize current guideline recommendations as they apply to older adults, identify critical gaps in knowledge that preclude informed evidence-based decision making, and recommend future research to close existing knowledge gaps. To achieve these objectives, we conducted a detailed review of current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and American Stroke Association guidelines to identify content and recommendations that explicitly targeted older patients. We found that there is a pervasive lack of evidence to guide clinical decision making in older patients with cardiovascular disease, as well as a paucity of data on the impact of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on key outcomes that are particularly important to older patients, such as quality of life, physical function, and maintenance of independence. Accordingly, there is a critical need for a multitude of large population-based studies and clinical trials that include a broad spectrum of older patients representative of those seen in clinical practice and that incorporate relevant outcomes important to older patients in the study design. The

  1. [ANMCO/ISS/AMD/ANCE/ARCA/FADOI/ GICR-IACPR/SICI-GISE/SIBioC/SIC/SICOA/ SID/SIF/SIMEU/SIMG/SIMI/SISA Consensus document. Hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular risk: diagnostic and therapeutic pathways in Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Colivicchi, Furio; Ricciardi, Gualtiero; Giampaoli, Simona; Maggioni, Aldo Pietro; Averna, Maurizio; Graziani, Maria Stella; Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Mugelli, Alessandro; Rossi, Francesco; Medea, Gerardo; Parretti, Damiano; Abrignani, Maurizio Giuseppe; Arca, Marcello; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone; Perticone, Francesco; Catapano, Alberico; Griffo, Raffaele; Nardi, Federico; Riccio, Carmine; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Scherillo, Marino; Musacchio, Nicoletta; Panno, Antonio Vittorio; Zito, Giovanni Battista; Campanini, Mauro; Bolognese, Leonardo; Faggiano, Pompilio Massimo; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Pusineri, Enrico; Ciaccio, Marcello; Bonora, Enzo; Cantelli Forti, Giorgio; Ruggieri, Maria Pia; Cricelli, Claudio; Romeo, Francesco; Ferrari, Roberto; Maseri, Attilio

    2016-06-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease still represents the leading cause of death in western countries. A wealth of scientific evidence demonstrates that increased blood cholesterol levels have a major impact on the outbreak and progression of atherosclerotic plaques. Moreover, several cholesterol-lowering pharmacological agents, including statins and ezetimibe, have proven effective in improving clinical outcomes. This document is focused on the clinical management of hypercholesterolemia and has been conceived by 16 Italian medical associations with the support of the Italian National Institute of Health. The authors have considered with particular attention the role of hypercholesterolemia in the genesis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Besides, the implications of high cholesterol levels in the definition of the individual cardiovascular risk profile have been carefully analyzed, while all available therapeutic options for blood cholesterol reduction and cardiovascular risk mitigation have been considered. Finally, this document outlines the diagnostic and therapeutic pathways for the clinical management of patients with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:27312138

  2. Consensus Sequence Zen

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Thomas D.

    2002-01-01

    Consensus sequences are widely used in molecular biology but they have many flaws. As a result, binding sites of proteins and other molecules are missed during studies of genetic sequences and important biological effects cannot be seen. Information theory provides a mathematically robust way to avoid consensus sequences. Instead of using consensus sequences, sequence conservation can be quantitatively presented in bits of information by using sequence logo graphics to repre...

  3. Clinical evaluation of cardiovascular devices: principles, problems, and proposals for European regulatory reform. Report of a policy conference of the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Alan G; Daubert, Jean-Claude; Van de Werf, Frans; Estes, N A Mark; Smith, Sidney C; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Vardas, Panos E; Komajda, Michel

    2011-07-01

    The European Commission announced in 2008 that a fundamental revision of the medical device directives is being considered in order to clarify and strengthen the current legal framework. The system for testing and approving devices in Europe was established >20 years ago as a 'New Approach' to a previously little-regulated industry. It is recognized by many that the regulatory system has not kept pace with technological advances and changing patterns of medical practice. New legislation will be drafted during 2011, but medical experts have been little involved in this important process. This context makes it an opportune time for a professional association to advise from both clinical and academic perspectives about changes which should be made to improve the safety and efficacy of devices used in clinical practice and to develop more appropriate systems for their clinical evaluation and post-marketing surveillance. This report summarizes how medical devices are regulated and it reviews some serious clinical problems that have occurred with cardiovascular devices. Finally, it presents the main recommendations from a Policy Conference on the Clinical Evaluation of Cardiovascular Devices that was held at the European Heart House in January 2011.

  4. I diretriz de ressuscitação cardiopulmonar e cuidados cardiovasculares de emergência da Sociedade Brasileira de Cardiologia: resumo executivo I guideline for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiovascular care - Brazilian Society of Cardiology: executive summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Margarita Gonzalez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Apesar de avanços nos últimos anos relacionados à prevenção e a tratamento, muitas são as vidas perdidas anualmente no Brasil relacionado à parada cardíaca e a eventos cardiovasculares em geral. O Suporte Básico de Vida envolve o atendimento às emergências cardiovasculares principalmente em ambiente pré-hospitalar, enfatizando reconhecimento e realização precoces das manobras de ressuscitação cardiopulmonar com foco na realização de compressões torácicas de boa qualidade, assim como na rápida desfibrilação, por meio da implementação dos programas de acesso público à desfibrilação. Esses aspectos são de fundamental importância e podem fazer diferença no desfecho dos casos como sobrevida hospitalar sem sequelas neurológicas. O início precoce do Suporte Avançado de Vida em Cardiologia também possui papel essencial, mantendo, durante todo o atendimento, a qualidade das compressões torácicas, adequado manejo da via aérea, tratamento específico dos diferentes ritmos de parada, desfibrilação, avaliação e tratamento das possíveis causas. Mais recentemente dá-se ênfase a cuidados pós-ressuscitação, visando reduzir a mortalidade por meio do reconhecimento precoce e tratamento da síndrome pós-parada cardíaca. A hipotermia terapêutica tem demonstrado melhora significativa da lesão neurológica e deve ser realizada em indivíduos comatosos pós-parada cardíaca. Para os médicos que trabalham na emergência ou unidade de terapia intensiva é de grande importância o aperfeiçoamento no tratamento desses pacientes por meio de treinamentos específicos, possibilitando maiores chances de sucesso e maior sobrevida.Despite advances related to the prevention and treatment in the past few years, many lives are lost to cardiac arrest and cardiovascular events in general in Brazil every year. Basic Life Support involves cardiovascular emergency treatment mainly in the pre-hospital environment, with emphasis on

  5. Model-based consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Boumans

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the rational-consensus method is to produce "rational consensus", that is, "mathematical aggregation", by weighing the performance of each expert on the basis of his or her knowledge and ability to judge relevant uncertainties. The measurement of the performance of the experts is based on

  6. [Recommendations of the Spanish Paediatric Endocrinology Society Working Group on Obesity on eating habits for the prevention of obesity and cardiovascular risk factors in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo Atance, E; Bahíllo Curieses, P; Bueno Lozano, G; Feliu Rovira, A; Gil-Campos, M; Lechuga-Sancho, A M; Ruiz Cano, R; Vela Desojo, A

    2016-03-01

    Childhood obesity is associated with a high risk of cardiovascular disease and early mortality. This paper summarises the currently available evidence on the implications of dietary factors on the development and prevention of obesity in paediatric patients. Evidence-based recommendations are: promote the consumption of slowly absorbed carbohydrates and reduce those with a high-glycaemic-index, avoid intake of sugar-sweetened beverages. Fat may provide up to 30-35% of the daily energy intake and saturated fat should provide no more than 10% of daily energy intake; reduce cholesterol intake, avoid formula milk with a high protein content during the first year; promote higher fibre content in the diet, reduce sodium intake, and have at least four meals a day, avoiding regular consumption of fast food and snacks. PMID:26212421

  7. [Recommendations of the Spanish Paediatric Endocrinology Society Working Group on Obesity on eating habits for the prevention of obesity and cardiovascular risk factors in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo Atance, E; Bahíllo Curieses, P; Bueno Lozano, G; Feliu Rovira, A; Gil-Campos, M; Lechuga-Sancho, A M; Ruiz Cano, R; Vela Desojo, A

    2016-03-01

    Childhood obesity is associated with a high risk of cardiovascular disease and early mortality. This paper summarises the currently available evidence on the implications of dietary factors on the development and prevention of obesity in paediatric patients. Evidence-based recommendations are: promote the consumption of slowly absorbed carbohydrates and reduce those with a high-glycaemic-index, avoid intake of sugar-sweetened beverages. Fat may provide up to 30-35% of the daily energy intake and saturated fat should provide no more than 10% of daily energy intake; reduce cholesterol intake, avoid formula milk with a high protein content during the first year; promote higher fibre content in the diet, reduce sodium intake, and have at least four meals a day, avoiding regular consumption of fast food and snacks.

  8. Acquisition and analysis of cardiovascular signals on smartphones: potential, pitfalls and perspectives: by the Task Force of the e-Cardiology Working Group of European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruining, Nico; Caiani, Enrico; Chronaki, Catherine; Guzik, Przemyslaw; van der Velde, Enno

    2014-11-01

    Smartphones, mobile applications ('apps'), social media, analytics, and the cloud are profoundly changing the practice of medicine and the way health decisions are made. With the constant progress of technology, the measurement of vital signals becomes easier, cheaper, and practically a standard approach in clinical practice. The interest in measuring vital signals goes beyond medical professionals to the general public, patients, informal caregivers, and healthy individuals, who frequently lack any formal medical training. On smartphone platforms such as iOS and Android, a proliferation of health or medical 'apps' acquire and analyse a variety of vital signs through embedded sensors, interconnected devices or peripherals utilising on occasion analytics and social media. Smartphone vendors compete with traditional medical device manufacturers in the grey area between health care, wellness, and fitness, as US and EU regulatory bodies are setting and revising rules for these new technologies. On the other hand, in the absence of robust validation results, clinicians are hesitant to trust measurements by apps or recommend specific apps to their patients, partly also due to lack of a cost reimbursement policy. This review focuses on the acquisition and analysis on smartphones of three important vital signs in the cardiovascular and respiratory field as well as in rehabilitation i.e. heart or pulse rate, blood pressure, and blood oxygenation. The potential, pitfalls, and perspectives on mobile devices and smartphone apps for health management by patients and healthy individuals are discussed. PMID:25354948

  9. Implants and/or teeth: consensus statements and recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Carlsson, G E; Jokstad, A;

    2008-01-01

    In August 23-25, 2007, the Scandinavian Society for Prosthetic Dentistry in collaboration with the Danish Society of Oral Implantology arranged a consensus conference on the topic 'Implants and/or teeth'. It was preceded by a workshop in which eight focused questions were raised and answered...

  10. European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Cardiovascular Imaging Department of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology recommendations for the use of cardiac imaging to assess and follow patients after heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badano, Luigi P; Miglioranza, Marcelo H; Edvardsen, Thor; Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano; Muraru, Denisa; Bacal, Fernando; Nieman, Koen; Zoppellaro, Giacomo; Marcondes Braga, Fabiana G; Binder, Thomas; Habib, Gilbert; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2015-09-01

    The cohort of long-term survivors of heart transplant is expanding, and the assessment of these patients requires specific knowledge of the surgical techniques employed to implant the donor heart, the physiology of the transplanted heart, complications of invasive tests routinely performed to detect graft rejection (GR), and the specific pathologies that may affect the transplanted heart. A joint EACVI/Brazilian cardiovascular imaging writing group committee has prepared these recommendations to provide a practical guide to echocardiographers involved in the follow-up of heart transplant patients and a framework for standardized and efficient use of cardiovascular imaging after heart transplant. Since the transplanted heart is smaller than the recipient's dilated heart, the former is usually located more medially in the mediastinum and tends to be rotated clockwise. Therefore, standard views with conventional two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography are often difficult to obtain generating a large variability from patient to patient. Therefore, in echocardiography laboratories equipped with three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) scanners and specific expertise with the technique, 3DE may be a suitable alternative to conventional 2D echocardiography to assess the size and the function of cardiac chambers. 3DE measurement of left (LV) and right ventricular (RV) size and function are more accurate and reproducible than conventional 2D calculations. However, clinicians should be aware that cardiac chamber volumes obtained with 3DE cannot be compared with those obtained with 2D echocardiography. To assess cardiac chamber morphology and function during follow-up studies, it is recommended to obtain a comprehensive echocardiographic study at 6 months from the cardiac transplantation as a baseline and make a careful quantitation of cardiac chamber size, RV systolic function, both systolic and diastolic parameters of LV function, and pulmonary artery pressure. Subsequent

  11. Practical Techniques for Achieving Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, John A.

    Consensus is important in the making of a policy decision. If a decision is reached without consensus, morale and unit satisfaction may both suffer. With genuine consensus, a unit tends to willingly support and implement the new policy. After analyzing how observed small groups had actually reached consensus, the following ten techniques were…

  12. [Structure of pain management facilities in Germany : Classification of medical and psychological pain treatment services-Consensus of the Joint Commission of the Professional Societies and Organizations for Quality in Pain Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Schwefe, G H H; Nadstawek, J; Tölle, T; Nilges, P; Überall, M A; Laubenthal, H J; Bock, F; Arnold, B; Casser, H R; Cegla, T H; Emrich, O M D; Graf-Baumann, T; Henning, J; Horlemann, J; Kayser, H; Kletzko, H; Koppert, W; Längler, K H; Locher, H; Ludwig, J; Maurer, S; Pfingsten, M; Schäfer, M; Schenk, M; Willweber-Strumpf, A

    2016-06-01

    On behalf of the Medical/Psychological Pain Associations, Pain Patients Alliance and the Professional Association of Pain Physicians and Psychologists, the Joint Commission of Professional Societies and Organizations for Quality in Pain Medicine, working in close collaboration with the respective presidents, has developed verifiable structural and process-related criteria for the classification of medical and psychological pain treatment facilities in Germany. Based on the established system of graded care in Germany and on existing qualifications, these criteria also argue for the introduction of a basic qualification in pain medicine. In addition to the first-ever comprehensive description of psychological pain facilities, the criteria presented can be used to classify five different levels of pain facilities, from basic pain management facilities, to specialized institutions, to the Centre for Interdisciplinary Pain Medicine. The recommendations offer binding and verifiable criteria for quality assurance in pain medicine and improved pain treatment.

  13. Continuity and consensus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    maternal leave. These changes can be explained as adjustments to post-industrial conditions within a political culture relying on class compromises and a broad consensus informed by expert advice coming from civil servants and ad hoc policy commissions. The paper concludes that changes in Danish family...... policy reflect changing conditions for employment and the minding of children and that there has been a high degree of continuity and consensus about the change, as indicated by the strong increase in female labour market involvement....

  14. The role of dietary protein and vitamin D in maintaining musculoskeletal health in postmenopausal women: a consensus statement from the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoli, René; Stevenson, John C; Bauer, Jürgen M; van Loon, Luc J C; Walrand, Stéphane; Kanis, John A; Cooper, Cyrus; Brandi, Maria-Luisa; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2014-09-01

    From 50 years of age, postmenopausal women are at an increased risk of developing sarcopenia and osteoporosis as a result of deterioration of musculoskeletal health. Both disorders increase the risk of falls and fractures. The risk of developing sarcopenia and osteoporosis may be attenuated through healthy lifestyle changes, which include adequate dietary protein, calcium and vitamin D intakes, and regular physical activity/exercise, besides hormone replacement therapy when appropriate. Protein intake and physical activity are the main anabolic stimuli for muscle protein synthesis. Exercise training leads to increased muscle mass and strength, and the combination of optimal protein intake and exercise produces a greater degree of muscle protein accretion than either intervention alone. Similarly, adequate dietary protein intake and resistance exercise are important contributors to the maintenance of bone strength. Vitamin D helps to maintain muscle mass and strength as well as bone health. These findings suggest that healthy lifestyle measures in women aged >50 years are essential to allow healthy ageing. The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) recommends optimal dietary protein intake of 1.0-1.2g/kgbodyweight/d with at least 20-25g of high-quality protein at each main meal, with adequate vitamin D intake at 800IU/d to maintain serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels >50nmol/L as well as calcium intake of 1000mg/d, alongside regular physical activity/exercise 3-5 times/week combined with protein intake in close proximity to exercise, in postmenopausal women for prevention of age-related deterioration of musculoskeletal health.

  15. Model-based consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the rational-consensus method is to produce “rational consensus”, that is, “mathematical aggregation”, by weighing the performance of each expert on the basis of his or her knowledge and ability to judge relevant uncertainties. The measurement of the performance of the experts is based on

  16. Critique, Contextualism and Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jane

    2004-01-01

    In an epistemology of contextualism, how robust does consensus need to be for critique to be practically effective? In 'Relativism and the Critical Potential of Philosophy of Education,' Frieda Heyting proposes a form of contextualism, but her argument raises a number of problems. The kinds of criteria that her version of contextualism will…

  17. Making Consensus Tractable

    CERN Document Server

    Mossel, Elchanan

    2010-01-01

    The process of consensus voting has many distinct advantages: it fosters discussion and participation, empowers minorities and independent thinkers, and is more likely, after a decision has been made, to secure the participants' support for the chosen course of action. The disadvantage of consensus decision making is, of course, the difficulty of reaching consensus. While this challenge is largely overcome in many theoretical settings such as Aumann's ``agree to disagree'' result, a hitherto unsolved difficulty is the lack of a framework offering rational (i.e., Bayesian) consensus decision making that can be performed using simple and efficient calculations. We propose a model featuring two possible states of the world and a finite number of individuals. The group has to come to a binary decision, where the merit of each of the two possible courses of action depends on the state of the world. Each member of the group has a private and independent signal at his or her disposal, giving some indication as to wh...

  18. Cardiovascular risk assessment in type 2 diabetes mellitus: comparison of the World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension risk prediction charts versus UK Prospective Diabetes Study risk engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herath HMM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Herath M Meththananda Herath, Thilak Priyantha Weerarathna, Dilini Umesha Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ruhuna, Galle, Sri Lanka Introduction: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, and assessment of their cardiac risk is important for preventive strategies. Purpose: The Ministry of Health of Sri Lanka has recommended World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH charts for cardiac risk assessment in individuals with T2DM. However, the most suitable cardiac risk assessment tool for Sri Lankans with T2DM has not been studied. This study was designed to evaluate the performance of two cardiac risk assessments tools; WHO/ISH charts and UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS risk engine. Methods: Cardiac risk assessments were done in 2,432 patients with T2DM attending a diabetes clinic in Southern Sri Lanka using the two risk assessment tools. Validity of two assessment tools was further assessed by their ability to recognize individuals with raised low-density lipoprotein (LDL and raised diastolic blood pressure in a cohort of newly diagnosed T2DM patients (n=332. Results: WHO/ISH charts identified 78.4% of subjects as low cardiac risk whereas the UKPDS risk engine categorized 52.3% as low cardiac risk (P<0.001. In the risk categories of 10%–<20%, the UKPDS risk engine identified higher proportions of patients (28% compared to WHO/ISH charts (7%. Approximately 6% of subjects were classified as low cardiac risk (<10% by WHO/ISH when UKPDS recognized them as cardiac risk of >20%. Agreement between the two tools was poor (κ value =0.144, P<0.01. Approximately 82% of individuals categorized as low cardiac risk by WHO/ISH had higher LDL cholesterol than the therapeutic target of 100 mg/dL. Conclusion: There is a significant discrepancy between the two assessment tools with WHO/ISH risk chart recognizing higher proportions of patients

  19. Consensus Conference on North American Training in Hepatopancreaticobiliary Surgery: A Review of the Conference and Presentation of Consensus Statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyarajah, D Rohan; Berman, Russell S; Doyle, Majella; Geevarghese, Sunil K; Posner, Mitchell C; Farmer, Douglas; Minter, Rebecca M

    2016-07-01

    The findings and recommendations of the North American Consensus Conference on Training in HPB Surgery held October 2014 are presented. The conference was hosted by the Society for Surgical Oncology (SSO), Americas Hepatopancreaticobiliary Association (AHPBA), and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons (ASTS). The current state of training in HPB surgery in North America was defined through three pathways-HPB, Surgical Oncology, and Solid Organ Transplant fellowships. Consensus regarding programmatic requirements included establishment of minimum case volumes and inclusion of quality metrics. Formative assessment, using milestones as a framework and inclusive of both operative and non-operative skills, must be present. Specific core HPB cases should be defined and used for evaluation of operative skills. The conference concluded with a focus on the optimal means to perform summative assessment to evaluate the individual fellow completing a fellowship in HPB surgery. Presentations from the hospital perspective and the American Board of Surgery led to consensus that summative assessment was desired by the public and the hospital systems, and should occur in a uniform but possibly modular manner for all HPB fellowship pathways. A task force comprised of representatives of the SSO, AHPBA, and ASTS are charged with implementation of the consensus statements emanating from this consensus conference.Copyright © 2016 The American Society of Transplantation, the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, and the Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission by The American Society of Transplantation, the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, or the Society of Surgical Oncology. PMID:26932708

  20. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) Task Force Report on Antidepressant Use in Bipolar Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacchiarotti, Isabella; Bond, David J.; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Nolen, Willem A.; Grunze, Heinz; Licht, Rasmus W.; Post, Robert M.; Berk, Michael; Goodwin, Guy M.; Sachs, Gary S.; Tondo, Leonardo; Findling, Robert L.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Tohen, Mauricio; Undurraga, Juan; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Goldberg, Joseph F.; Yildiz, Aysegul; Altshuler, Lori L.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Thase, Michael E.; Koukopoulos, Athanasios; Colom, Francesc; Frye, Mark A.; Malhi, Gin S.; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.; Vazquez, Gustavo; Perlis, Roy H.; Ketter, Terence A.; Cassidy, Frederick; Akiskal, Hagop; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Valenti, Marc; Mazzei, Diego Hidalgo; Lafer, Beny; Kato, Tadafumi; Mazzarini, Lorenzo; Martinez-Aran, Anabel; Parker, Gordon; Souery, Daniel; Ozerdem, Aysegul; McElroy, Susan L.; Girardi, Paolo; Bauer, Michael; Yatham, Lakshmi N.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Birmaher, Boris; Kanba, Shigenobu; El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Serretti, Alessandro; Rihmer, Zoltan; Young, Allan H.; Kotzalidis, Georgios D.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Bowden, Charles L.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Rybakowski, Janusz; Ha, Kyooseob; Perugi, Giulio; Kasper, Siegfried; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Hirschfeld, Robert M.; Kapczinski, Flavio; Vieta, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The risk-benefit profile of antidepressant medications in bipolar disorder is controversial. When conclusive evidence is lacking, expert consensus can guide treatment decisions. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to seek consensus recommendations

  1. Consenso 2012 da Sociedade Brasileira de Reumatologia sobre vacinação em pacientes com artrite reumatoide 2012 Brazilian Society of Rheumatology Consensus on vaccination of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claiton Viegas Brenol

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Elaborar recomendações para a vacinação em pacientes com artrite reumatoide (AR no Brasil. MÉTODO: Revisão da literatura e opinião de especialistas membros da Comissão de AR da Sociedade Brasileira de Reumatologia e um pediatra reumatologista. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÕES: Foram estabelecidas 12 recomendações: 1 Antes de iniciar drogas modificadoras do curso de doença, deve-se revisar e atualizar o cartão vacinal; 2 As vacinas contra influenza sazonal e contra H1N1 estão indicadas anualmente para pacientes portadores de AR; 3 A vacina antipneumocócica deve ser indicada para todos os pacientes; 4 A vacina contra varicela deve ser indicada para pacientes com história negativa ou duvidosa de infecção prévia por varicela; 5 A vacina contra HPV deve ser considerada em adolescentes e mulheres jovens; 6 A vacina antimeningocócica é indicada para pacientes portadores de AR apenas em casos de asplenia ou deficiência de complemento; 7 Existe orientação de imunização contra o Haemophilus influenzae tipo B de pacientes adultos asplênicos; 8 Não há indicação de uma vacina adicional contra BCG em pacientes com AR; 9 A vacina contra hepatite B é indicada para pacientes com anticorpos contra HBsAg negativos; considerar a vacina contra hepatite A em combinação com a hepatite B; 10 Pacientes com grande risco de contrair tétano que receberam rituximabe nas últimas 24 semanas devem utilizar imunização passiva com imunoglobulina antitetânica; 11 A vacina contra febre amarela é contraindicada nos pacientes com AR em uso de imunossupressores; 12 As recomendações acima descritas devem ser revisadas ao longo da evolução da AR.OBJECTIVE: To elaborate recommendations to the vaccination of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA in Brazil. METHOD: Literature review and opinion of expert members of the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology Committee of Rheumatoid Arthritis and of an invited pediatric rheumatologist. RESULTS AND

  2. Cardiovascular risk assessment in type 2 diabetes mellitus: comparison of the World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension risk prediction charts versus UK Prospective Diabetes Study risk engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Herath M Meththananda; Weerarathna, Thilak Priyantha; Umesha, Dilini

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, and assessment of their cardiac risk is important for preventive strategies. Purpose The Ministry of Health of Sri Lanka has recommended World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) charts for cardiac risk assessment in individuals with T2DM. However, the most suitable cardiac risk assessment tool for Sri Lankans with T2DM has not been studied. This study was designed to evaluate the performance of two cardiac risk assessments tools; WHO/ISH charts and UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) risk engine. Methods Cardiac risk assessments were done in 2,432 patients with T2DM attending a diabetes clinic in Southern Sri Lanka using the two risk assessment tools. Validity of two assessment tools was further assessed by their ability to recognize individuals with raised low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and raised diastolic blood pressure in a cohort of newly diagnosed T2DM patients (n=332). Results WHO/ISH charts identified 78.4% of subjects as low cardiac risk whereas the UKPDS risk engine categorized 52.3% as low cardiac risk (P20%. Agreement between the two tools was poor (κ value =0.144, P<0.01). Approximately 82% of individuals categorized as low cardiac risk by WHO/ISH had higher LDL cholesterol than the therapeutic target of 100 mg/dL. Conclusion There is a significant discrepancy between the two assessment tools with WHO/ISH risk chart recognizing higher proportions of patients having low cardiac risk than the UKPDS risk engine. Risk assessment by both assessment tools demonstrated poor sensitivity in identifying those with treatable levels of LDL cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure. PMID:26622181

  3. Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Programs Press & News Press Releases About SCAI CCI Journal SCAI Newsletter SCAI This Week ... November 19 - 20, 2016 SCAI / EDUCARE Master the Complex Course Dubai, United Arab Emirates December 10 - 14, 2016 SCAI ...

  4. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance President's page

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer Christopher M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The year 2009 has been a busy one for the SCMR. With health care reform in the headlines, SCMR is committed to expanding the use of CMR in clinical practice and research. Progress is being made quickly as the U.S. moves towards approval of payment for flow and in Europe, publication of the CMR registry is nigh. The impact factor of JCMR jumped up and the program for the 2010 meeting in Phoenix looks outstanding. All in all, SCMR is making advancements in many fronts.

  5. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance President's page

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    The year 2009 has been a busy one for the SCMR. With health care reform in the headlines, SCMR is committed to expanding the use of CMR in clinical practice and research. Progress is being made quickly as the U.S. moves towards approval of payment for flow and in Europe, publication of the CMR registry is nigh. The impact factor of JCMR jumped up and the program for the 2010 meeting in Phoenix looks outstanding. All in all, SCMR is making advancements in many fronts.

  6. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance President's page

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The year 2009 has been a busy one for the SCMR. With health care reform in the headlines, SCMR is committed to expanding the use of CMR in clinical practice and research. Progress is being made quickly as the U.S. moves towards approval of payment for flow and in Europe, publication of the CMR registry is nigh. The impact factor of JCMR jumped up and the program for the 2010 meeting in Phoenix looks outstanding. All in all, SCMR is making advancements in many fronts.

  7. Achieving diagnosis by consensus

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kane, Bridget

    2009-08-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the collaborative work conducted at a multidisciplinary medical team meeting, where a patient’s definitive diagnosis is agreed, by consensus. The features that distinguish this process of diagnostic work by consensus are examined in depth. The current use of technology to support this collaborative activity is described, and experienced deficiencies are identified. Emphasis is placed on the visual and perceptual difficulty for individual specialities in making interpretations, and on how, through collaboration in discussion, definitive diagnosis is actually achieved. The challenge for providing adequate support for the multidisciplinary team at their meeting is outlined, given the multifaceted nature of the setting, i.e. patient management, educational, organizational and social functions, that need to be satisfied.

  8. Consenso da Sociedade Brasileira de Reumatologia 2011 para o diagnóstico e avaliação inicial da artrite reumatoide 2011 Consensus of the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology for diagnosis and early assessment of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licia Maria Henrique da Mota

    2011-06-01

    of RA Committee members of the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The following ten reccommendations were established: 1 RA diagnosis should be established considering clinical findings and complementary test results; 2 Special attention should be given to the differential diagnosis of arthritis; 3 Rheumatoid factor (RF is an important diagnostic test, but has limited sensitivity and specificity, mainly in early RA; 4 Anti-CCP (anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody is a marker with sensitivity similar to that of the RF, but with higher specificity, mainly in the initial phase of disease; 5 Although unspecific, acute-phase reactants should be measured in patients with clinical suspicion of RA; 6 Conventional radiography should be performed for diagnostic and prognostic assessment of the disease. When necessary and available, ultrasound and magnetic resonance may be used; 7 Rheumatoid arthritis classification criteria (ACR/EULAR 2010, although not yet validated, may be used as a guide to aid in diagnosing patients with early RA; 8 One of the combined disease activity indices should be used to assess disease activity; 9 At least one of the functional capacity assessment instruments, such as mHAQ or HAQ-DI, should be regularly used; 10 At the early assessment of the disease, the presence of worse prognostic factors, such as polyarticular involvement, high titers of RF and/or anti-CCP, and early joint erosion, should be investigated.

  9. Consenso 2012 da Sociedade Brasileira de Reumatologia sobre o manejo de comorbidades em pacientes com artrite reumatoide 2012 Brazilian Society of Rheumatology Consensus on the management of comorbidities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivânio Alves Pereira

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Elaborar recomendações da Comissão de Artrite Reumatoide da Sociedade Brasileira de Reumatologia (SBR para o manuseio das comorbidades em artrite reumatoide (AR. MÉTODOS: Revisão da literatura e opinião de especialistas da Comissão de AR da SBR. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÕES: Recomendações: 1 Diagnosticar e tratar precoce e adequadamente as comorbidades; 2 O tratamento específico da AR deve ser adaptado às comorbidades; 3 Inibidores da enzima conversora da angiotensina (IECA ou bloqueadores dos receptores de angiotensina II (BRA são preferidos no tratamento da hipertensão arterial sistêmica; 4 Em pacientes com AR e diabetes mellitus, deve-se evitar o uso contínuo de dose cumulativa alta de corticoides; 5 Sugere-se o uso de estatinas para manter níveis de LDL menor que 100 mg/dL e índice aterosclerótico menor que 3,5 em pacientes com AR e comorbidades; 6 A síndrome metabólica deve ser tratada; 7 Recomenda-se a realização de exames para a investigação de aterosclerose subclínica; 8 Maior vigilância para um diagnóstico precoce de neoplasia oculta; 9 Medidas de prevenção para trombose venosa são sugeridas; 10 Recomenda-se a realização de densitometria óssea em pacientes com AR acima de 50 anos, e naqueles com idade menor com corticoide maior que 7,5 mg por mais de três meses; 11 Pacientes com AR e osteoporose devem evitar quedas, e devem ser aconselhados a aumentarem a ingestão de cálcio, aumentarem a exposição solar e fazerem atividade física; 12 Suplementação de cálcio e vitamina D é sugerida.Autilização de bisfosfonatos é sugerida para pacientes com escore T menor que -2,5 na densidade mineral óssea; 13 Recomenda-se equipe multidisciplinar, com participação ativa do médico reumatologista no tratamento das comorbidades.OBJECTIVE: To elaborate recommendations of the Rheumatoid Arthritis Committee of the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology (SBR to manage comorbidities in rheumatoid arthritis (RA

  10. Note on level r consensus

    OpenAIRE

    Poliakov, Nikolay L.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the hierarchy of level $r$ consensus partially collapses. In particular, any profile $\\pi\\in \\mathcal{P}$ that exhibits consensus of level $(K-1)!$ around $\\succ_0$ in fact exhibits consensus of level $1$ around $\\succ_0$.

  11. Achieving consensus in environmental programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the authors describe a research effort on consensus tied to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) within the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management (DWTM). They define consensus and explain why consensus decisions are not merely desirable but necessary in furthering ERP activities. As examples of their planned applied research, the authors first discuss nominal group technique as a representative consensus-generating tool, and conclude by describing the consensus-related mission of the Waste Management Review Group, established to conduct independent, third-party review of DWTM/ERP plans and activities

  12. Achieving consensus in environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurstedt, Jr., H. A.; Jones, R. M.; Walker, J. A.; Middleman, L. I.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new research effort on consensus tied to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) within the US Department of Energy's Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management (DWTM). We define consensus and explain why consensus decisions are not merely desirable but necessary in furthering ERP activities. As examples of our planned applied research, we first discuss Nominal Group Technique as a representative consensus-generating tool, and we conclude by describing the consensus-related mission of the Waste Management Review Group, established at Virginia Tech to conduct independent, third-party review of DWTM/ERP plans and activities. 10 refs.

  13. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5(th) International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy.

  14. Consensus Conference on Clinical Management of pediatric Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Elena; Neri, Iria; Ricci, Giampaolo; Baldo, Ermanno; Barone, Maurizio; Belloni Fortina, Anna; Bernardini, Roberto; Berti, Irene; Caffarelli, Carlo; Calamelli, Elisabetta; Capra, Lucetta; Carello, Rossella; Cipriani, Francesca; Comberiati, Pasquale; Diociaiuti, Andrea; El Hachem, Maya; Fontana, Elena; Gruber, Michaela; Haddock, Ellen; Maiello, Nunzia; Meglio, Paolo; Patrizi, Annalisa; Peroni, Diego; Scarponi, Dorella; Wielander, Ingrid; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2016-01-01

    The Italian Consensus Conference on clinical management of atopic dermatitis in children reflects the best and most recent scientific evidence, with the aim to provide specialists with a useful tool for managing this common, but complex clinical condition. Thanks to the contribution of experts in the field and members of the Italian Society of Pediatric Allergology and Immunology (SIAIP) and the Italian Society of Pediatric Dermatology (SIDerP), this Consensus statement integrates the basic principles of the most recent guidelines for the management of atopic dermatitis to facilitate a practical approach to the disease. The therapeutical approach should be adapted to the clinical severity and requires a tailored strategy to ensure good compliance by children and their parents. In this Consensus, levels and models of intervention are also enriched by the Italian experience to facilitate a practical approach to the disease.

  15. Planetary Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded the non-profit Planetary Society in 1979 to advance the exploration of the solar system and to continue the search for extraterrestrial life. The Society has its headquarters in Pasadena, California, but is international in scope, with 100 000 members worldwide, making it the largest space interest group in the world. The Society funds a var...

  16. BRAINSTORMING: Consensus Learning in Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2009-01-01

    We present here an introduction to Brainstorming approach, that was recently proposed as a consensus meta-learning technique, and used in several practical applications in bioinformatics and chemoinformatics. The consensus learning denotes heterogeneous theoretical classification method, where one trains an ensemble of machine learning algorithms using different types of input training data representations. In the second step all solutions are gathered and the consensus is build between them....

  17. Political Consensus and Fiscal Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg, Kurt; Holm Pedersen, Lene

    2015-01-01

    to analyse the association between political consensus and public expenditure growth. The results show that political consensus is positively associated with both budgeted and actual expenditure growth, but also negatively associated with budget overruns. This indicates that political consensus comes...... at a cost, while at the same time politicians may be better at sticking to budgets if political consensus exists. The analysis is based on a pooled regression analysis of the local governments in Denmark in the years 2008 and 2009 using a data set combining survey data with administrative data on the local...

  18. ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO consensus conference on endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Nicoletta; Creutzberg, Carien; Amant, Frederic;

    2015-01-01

    panel of 40 leading experts in the management of endometrial cancer. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared three clinically-relevant questions about endometrial cancer relating to the following four areas: Prevention and screening, surgery, adjuvant treatment and advanced and recurrent......The first joint European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European SocieTy for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO) and European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) consensus conference on endometrial cancer was held on 11-13 December 2014 in Milan, Italy, and comprised a multidisciplinary...

  19. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spallone, Vincenza; Ziegler, Dan; Freeman, Roy;

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy (CAN) Subcommittee of Toronto Consensus Panel on Diabetic Neuropathy worked to update CAN guidelines, with regard to epidemiology, clinical impact, diagnosis, usefulness of CAN testing, and management. CAN is the impairment of cardiovascular autonomic control...... in the setting of diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The prevalence of confirmed CAN is around 20%, and increases up to 65% with age and diabetes duration. Established risk factors for CAN are glycaemic control in type 1 and a combination of hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and glycaemic control...... in type 2 diabetes. CAN is a risk marker of mortality and cardiovascular morbidity, and possibly a progression promoter of diabetic nephropathy. Criteria for CAN diagnosis and staging are: 1. one abnormal cardio-vagal test identifies possible or early CAN; 2. at least two abnormal cardio-vagal tests...

  20. Surface Hopping by Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Craig C

    2016-07-01

    We present a new stochastic surface hopping method for modeling molecular dynamics with electronic transitions. The approach, consensus surface hopping (CSH), is a numerical framework for solving the semiclassical limit Liouville equation describing nuclear dynamics on coupled electronic surfaces using ensembles of trajectories. In contrast to existing techniques based on propagating independent classical trajectories that undergo stochastic hops between the electronic states, the present method determines the probabilities of transition of each trajectory collectively with input from the entire ensemble. The full coherent dynamics of the coupled system arise naturally at the ensemble level and ad hoc corrections, such as momentum rescaling to impose strict trajectory energy conservation and artificial decoherence to avoid the overcoherence of the quantum states associated with independent trajectories, are avoided. PMID:27345103

  1. Antinflammatory therapy and cardiovascular risk: a consensus view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Patrignani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fin dalla loro scoperta, circa 40 anni fa, i farmaci antinfiammatori non steroidei (FANS hanno rappresentato una delle classi di farmaci più utilizzate. Grazie a loro è radicalmente migliorata la capacità di controllare flogosi e dolore sia acuti che cronici. L’efficacia di questi farmaci, specialmente quando assunti cronicamente, si è sempre scontrata con un basso profilo di sicurezza specie a carico dell’apparato gastrointestinale superiore. Si stima che circa l’1% degli utilizzatori di FANS sviluppino lesioni gastro-duodenali importanti (sanguinamento e perforazione per le quali si deve ricorrere a cure ospedaliere. Malgrado la bassa percentuale di rischio, la vasta diffusione d’uso degli antinfiammatori rende la gastropatia da FANS una causa molto frequente di ospedalizzazione e morte negli USA (1. Allo

  2. Main: ANAERO5CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO5CONSENSUS S000481 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs found in silico...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO5CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000478, S00047...); Hordeum vulgare (barley); Oryza sativa (rice); Petunia hybrida (petunia); Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato); TTCCCTGTT ...

  3. Main: ANAERO2CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO2CONSENSUS S000478 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs found in silico...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO2CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000479, S00048...); Hordeum vulgare (barley); Oryza sativa (rice); Petunia hybrida (petunia); Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato); AGCAGC ...

  4. Main: ANAERO1CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO1CONSENSUS S000477 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs found in silico...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO1CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000478, S000479, S00048...); Hordeum vulgare (barley); Oryza sativa (rice); Petunia hybrida (petunia); Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato); AAACAAA ...

  5. Main: ANAERO3CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO3CONSENSUS S000479 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs found in silico...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO3CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000478, S00048...); Hordeum vulgare (barley); Oryza sativa (rice); Petunia hybrida (petunia); Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato); TCATCAC ...

  6. Between consensus and contestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weale, Albert

    2016-08-15

    Purpose - Noting that discussions of public participation and priority setting typically presuppose certain political theories of democracy, the purpose of this paper is to discuss two theories: the consensual and the agonistic. The distinction is illuminating when considering the difference between institutionalized public participation and contestatory participation. Design/methodology/approach - The approach is a theoretical reconstruction of two ways of thinking about public participation in relation to priority setting in health care, drawing on the work of Habermas, a deliberative theorist, and Mouffe, a theorist of agonism. Findings - The different theoretical approaches can be associated with different ways of understanding priority setting. In particular, agonistic democratic theory would understand priority setting as system of inclusions and exclusions rather than the determination of a consensus of social values, which is the typical deliberative way of thinking about the issues. Originality/value - The paper shows the value of drawing out explicitly the tacit assumptions of practices of political participation in order to reveal their scope and limitations. It suggests that making such theoretical presuppositions explicit has value for health services management in recognizing these implicit choices. PMID:27468774

  7. Consensus on consensus: a synthesis of consensus estimates on human-caused global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, John; Oreskes, Naomi; Doran, Peter T.; Anderegg, William R. L.; Verheggen, Bart; Maibach, Ed W.; Carlton, J. Stuart; Lewandowsky, Stephan; Skuce, Andrew G.; Green, Sarah A.; Nuccitelli, Dana; Jacobs, Peter; Richardson, Mark; Winkler, Bärbel; Painting, Rob; Rice, Ken

    2016-04-01

    The consensus that humans are causing recent global warming is shared by 90%-100% of publishing climate scientists according to six independent studies by co-authors of this paper. Those results are consistent with the 97% consensus reported by Cook et al (Environ. Res. Lett. 8 024024) based on 11 944 abstracts of research papers, of which 4014 took a position on the cause of recent global warming. A survey of authors of those papers (N = 2412 papers) also supported a 97% consensus. Tol (2016 Environ. Res. Lett. 11 048001) comes to a different conclusion using results from surveys of non-experts such as economic geologists and a self-selected group of those who reject the consensus. We demonstrate that this outcome is not unexpected because the level of consensus correlates with expertise in climate science. At one point, Tol also reduces the apparent consensus by assuming that abstracts that do not explicitly state the cause of global warming (‘no position’) represent non-endorsement, an approach that if applied elsewhere would reject consensus on well-established theories such as plate tectonics. We examine the available studies and conclude that the finding of 97% consensus in published climate research is robust and consistent with other surveys of climate scientists and peer-reviewed studies.

  8. ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO consensus conference on endometrial cancer: Diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Nicoletta; Creutzberg, Carien; Amant, Frederic; Bosse, Tjalling; González-Martín, Antonio; Ledermann, Jonathan; Marth, Christian; Nout, Remi; Querleu, Denis; Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Sessa, Cristiana

    2015-12-01

    The first joint European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European SocieTy for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO) and European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) consensus conference on endometrial cancer was held on 11-13 December 2014 in Milan, Italy, and comprised a multidisciplinary panel of 40 leading experts in the management of endometrial cancer. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared three clinically-relevant questions about endometrial cancer relating to the following four areas: Prevention and screening, surgery, adjuvant treatment and advanced and recurrent disease. All relevant scientific literature, as identified by the experts, was reviewed in advance. During the consensus conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question and a consensus was reached. Results of this consensus conference, together with a summary of evidence supporting each recommendation, are detailed in this article. All participants have approved this final article.

  9. The importance of assessing and communicating scientific consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maibach, Edward W.; van der Linden, Sander L.

    2016-09-01

    The spread of influential misinformation, such as conspiracy theories about the existence of a secret, large-scale atmospheric spraying program (SLAP), is contributing to the politicization of science. In an important recent study, Shearer et al (2016 Environ. Res. Lett. 11 084011) employ a novel methodology to quantify the expert consensus of popular SLAP assertions. The authors find that 99% (76/77) of surveyed experts have not encountered any evidence that would support the existence of such a program. Here we argue that this finding is important because a growing body of research has shown that the public’s perception of expert consensus on key societal issues acts an important ‘gateway’ to science acceptance. Furthermore, communicating normative agreement among experts, such as the strong scientific consensus against the existence of a SLAP, can help limit the spread of misinformation and promote more effective public decision-making about science and society.

  10. Is There a Consensus on Consensus Methodology? Descriptions and Recommendations for Future Consensus Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Jane; Carline, Jan D; Durning, Steven J

    2016-05-01

    The authors of this article reviewed the methodology of three common consensus methods: nominal group process, consensus development panels, and the Delphi technique. The authors set out to determine how a majority of researchers are conducting these studies, how they are analyzing results, and subsequently the manner in which they are reporting their findings. The authors conclude with a set of guidelines and suggestions designed to aid researchers who choose to use the consensus methodology in their work.Overall, researchers need to describe their inclusion criteria. In addition to this, on the basis of the current literature the authors found that a panel size of 5 to 11 members was most beneficial across all consensus methods described. Lastly, the authors agreed that the statistical analyses done in consensus method studies should be as rigorous as possible and that the predetermined definition of consensus must be included in the ultimate manuscript. More specific recommendations are given for each of the three consensus methods described in the article.

  11. Latin American consensus on guidelines for chronic migraine treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Rodrigo Espinoza Giacomozzi; Alexander Parajeles Vindas; Ariovaldo Alberto da Silva Junior; Carlos Alberto Bordini; Carlos Federico Buonanotte; Celia Aparecida de Paula Roesler; Claudio Manoel Brito; Cristina Perez; Deusvenir de Souza Carvalho; Djacir Dantas Pereira de Macedo; Elcio Juliato Piovesan; Elder Machado Sarmento; Eliana Meire Melhado; Fabiola Dach Eckeli; Fernando Kowacs

    2013-01-01

    Chronic migraine is a condition with significant prevalence all around the world and high socioeconomic impact, and its handling has been challenging neurologists. Developments for understanding its mechanisms and associated conditions, as well as that of new therapies, have been quick and important, a fact which has motivated the Latin American and Brazilian Headache Societies to prepare the present consensus. The treatment of chronic migraine should always be preceded by a careful diagnosis...

  12. What does the Development of the European Core Curriculum for Cardiovascular Nurses Mean for Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubeck, Lis; Lin, Stella Hsi-Man; Ferry, Cate; Gallagher, Robyn

    2016-04-01

    A core curriculum for the continuing professional development of nurses has recently been published by the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions of the European Society of Cardiology. This core curriculum was envisaged to bridge the educational gap between qualification as a nurse and an advance practice role. In addition, the shared elements and international consensus on core themes creates a strong pathway for nursing career development that is directly relevant to Australia. Education programs for nurses in Australia must meet the mandatory standards of the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Accreditation Council (ANMAC), but without a national core curriculum, there can be considerable variation in the content of such courses. The core curriculum is developed to be adapted locally, allowing the addition of nationally relevant competencies, for example, culturally appropriate care of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals. Two existing specialist resources could be utilised to deliver a tailored cardiovascular core curriculum; the Heart Education Assessment and Rehabilitation Toolkit (HEART) online (www.heartonline.org.au) and HeartOne (www.heartone.com.au). Both resources could be further enhanced by incorporating the core curriculum. The release of the European core curriculum should be viewed as a call to action for Australia to develop a core curriculum for cardiovascular nurses.

  13. What does the Development of the European Core Curriculum for Cardiovascular Nurses Mean for Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubeck, Lis; Lin, Stella Hsi-Man; Ferry, Cate; Gallagher, Robyn

    2016-04-01

    A core curriculum for the continuing professional development of nurses has recently been published by the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions of the European Society of Cardiology. This core curriculum was envisaged to bridge the educational gap between qualification as a nurse and an advance practice role. In addition, the shared elements and international consensus on core themes creates a strong pathway for nursing career development that is directly relevant to Australia. Education programs for nurses in Australia must meet the mandatory standards of the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Accreditation Council (ANMAC), but without a national core curriculum, there can be considerable variation in the content of such courses. The core curriculum is developed to be adapted locally, allowing the addition of nationally relevant competencies, for example, culturally appropriate care of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals. Two existing specialist resources could be utilised to deliver a tailored cardiovascular core curriculum; the Heart Education Assessment and Rehabilitation Toolkit (HEART) online (www.heartonline.org.au) and HeartOne (www.heartone.com.au). Both resources could be further enhanced by incorporating the core curriculum. The release of the European core curriculum should be viewed as a call to action for Australia to develop a core curriculum for cardiovascular nurses. PMID:26645795

  14. Ocular allergy latin american consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna Serapião dos Santos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To establish current definition, classification and staging, and to develop diagnosis and treatment recommendations for ocular allergy, by using Delphi approach. METHODS: Ten Latin American experts on ocular allergy participated in a 4-round Delphi panel approach. Four surveys were constructed and answered by panelists. A two-thirds majority was defined as consensus. Definition, classification, staging and diagnosis and treatment recommendations were the main outcomes. RESULTS: "Ocular allergy" was proposed as the general term to describe ocular allergic diseases. Consensus regarding classification was not reached. Signs and symptoms were considered extremely important for the diagnosis. It was consensus that a staging system should be proposed based on the disease severity. Environmental control, avoidance of allergens and the use of artificial tears were recommended as first line treatment. The secondary treatment should include topical anti-histamines, mast cell stabilizers and multi actions drugs. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and vasoconstrictors were not recommended. Topical corticosteroids were recommended as third line of treatment for the most severe keratoconjunctivitis. Consensus was not reached regarding the use of systemic corticosteroids or immunosuppressant. Surgical approach and unconventional treatments were not recommended as routine. CONCLUSION: The task of creating guidelines for ocular allergies showed to be very complex. Many controversial topics remain unsolved. A larger consensus including experts from different groups around the world may be needed to further improve the current recommendations for several aspects of ocular allergy.

  15. ERS/ELS/ACCP 2013 international consensus conference nomenclature on inducible laryngeal obstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernille M. Christensen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals reporting episodes of breathing problems caused by re-occurring variable airflow obstructions in the larynx have been described in an increasing number of publications, with more than 40 different terms being used without consensus on definitions. This lack of an international consensus on nomenclature is a serious obstacle for the development of the area, as knowledge from different centres cannot be matched, pooled or readily utilised by others. Thus, an international Task Force has been created, led by the European Respiratory Society/European Laryngological Society/American College of Chest Physicians. This review describes the methods used to reach an international consensus on the subject and the resulting nomenclature, the 2013 international consensus conference nomenclature.

  16. Consensus clustering in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lancichinetti, Andrea; 10.1038/srep00336

    2012-01-01

    The community structure of complex networks reveals both their organization and hidden relationships among their constituents. Most community detection methods currently available are not deterministic, and their results typically depend on the specific random seeds, initial conditions and tie-break rules adopted for their execution. Consensus clustering is used in data analysis to generate stable results out of a set of partitions delivered by stochastic methods. Here we show that consensus clustering can be combined with any existing method in a self-consistent way, enhancing considerably both the stability and the accuracy of the resulting partitions. This framework is also particularly suitable to monitor the evolution of community structure in temporal networks. An application of consensus clustering to a large citation network of physics papers demonstrates its capability to keep track of the birth, death and diversification of topics.

  17. Cryptozoology Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Reports of Loch Ness monsters, Bigfoot, and the Yeti spring u p from time to time, sparking scientific controversy about the veracity of these observations. Now an organization has been established to help cull, analyze, and disseminate information on the alleged creatures. The International Society of Cryptozoology, formed at a January meeting at the U.S. National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution, will serve as the focal point for the investigation, analysis, publication, and discussion of animals of unexpected form or size or of unexpected occurrences in time or space.

  18. C3 glomerulopathy: consensus report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Matthew C; D'Agati, Vivette D; Nester, Carla M; Smith, Richard J; Haas, Mark; Appel, Gerald B; Alpers, Charles E; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Bedrosian, Camille; Braun, Michael; Doyle, Mittie; Fakhouri, Fadi; Fervenza, Fernando C; Fogo, Agnes B; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Gale, Daniel P; Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Griffin, Gene; Harris, Claire L; Holers, V Michael; Johnson, Sally; Lavin, Peter J; Medjeral-Thomas, Nicholas; Paul Morgan, B; Nast, Cynthia C; Noel, Laure-Hélène; Peters, D Keith; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Servais, Aude; Sethi, Sanjeev; Song, Wen-Chao; Tamburini, Paul; Thurman, Joshua M; Zavros, Michael; Cook, H Terence

    2013-01-01

    C3 glomerulopathy is a recently introduced pathological entity whose original definition was glomerular pathology characterized by C3 accumulation with absent or scanty immunoglobulin deposition. In August 2012, an invited group of experts (comprising the authors of this document) in renal pathology, nephrology, complement biology, and complement therapeutics met to discuss C3 glomerulopathy in the first C3 Glomerulopathy Meeting. The objectives were to reach a consensus on: the definition of C3 glomerulopathy, appropriate complement investigations that should be performed in these patients, and how complement therapeutics should be explored in the condition. This meeting report represents the current consensus view of the group. PMID:24172683

  19. Functional Foods as Modifiers of Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Carol

    2009-01-01

    There is growing consensus that systemic inflammation is at the heart of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Inflammation is a key feature of the immune system, functioning to defend tissue integrity and function. However, chronic stimulation of inflammatory mediators leads to lasting vascular reactivity, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, and, subsequently, chronic disease. Dietary practices to minimize inflammatory stimuli and CVD risk include regular intakes of fatty fish rich in the eicosapent...

  20. The Copenhagen Consensus Conference 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Krustrup, Peter; Duda, Joan;

    2016-01-01

    From 4 to 7 April 2016, 24 researchers from 8 countries and from a variety of academic disciplines gathered in Snekkersten, Denmark, to reach evidence-based consensus about physical activity in children and youth, that is, individuals between 6 and 18 years. Physical activity is an overarching term...

  1. Reference: ANAERO2CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO2CONSENSUS Mohanty B, Krishnan SP, Swarup S, Bajic VB. Detection and prelimin...ary analysis of motifs in promoters of anaerobically induced genes of different plant species. Ann Bot (Lond).96: 669-681 (2005) in silico PubMed: 16027132 ...

  2. Reference: ANAERO3CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO3CONSENSUS Mohanty B, Krishnan SP, Swarup S, Bajic VB. Detection and prelimin...ary analysis of motifs in promoters of anaerobically induced genes of different plant species. Ann Bot (Lond).96: 669-681 (2005) in silico PubMed: 16027132 ...

  3. Reference: ANAERO4CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO4CONSENSUS Mohanty B, Krishnan SP, Swarup S, Bajic VB. Detection and prelimin...ary analysis of motifs in promoters of anaerobically induced genes of different plant species. Ann Bot (Lond).96: 669-681 (2005) in silico PubMed: 16027132 ...

  4. Reference: ANAERO5CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO5CONSENSUS Mohanty B, Krishnan SP, Swarup S, Bajic VB. Detection and prelimin...ary analysis of motifs in promoters of anaerobically induced genes of different plant species. Ann Bot (Lond).96: 669-681 (2005) in silico PubMed: 16027132 ...

  5. Reference: ANAERO1CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO1CONSENSUS Mohanty B, Krishnan SP, Swarup S, Bajic VB. Detection and prelimin...ary analysis of motifs in promoters of anaerobically induced genes of different plant species. Ann Bot (Lond).96: 669-681 (2005) in silico PubMed: 16027132 ...

  6. Reference: GT1CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GT1CONSENSUS Le Gourrierec J, Li YF, Zhou DX Transcriptional activation by Arabidop...sis GT-1 may be through interaction with TFIIA-TBP-TATA complex Plant J 18:663-668 (1999) PubMed: 10417717 ...

  7. Quantized average consensus with delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jafarian, Matin; De Persis, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Average consensus problem is a special case of cooperative control in which the agents of the network asymptotically converge to the average state (i.e., position) of the network by transferring information via a communication topology. One of the issues of the large scale networks is the cost of co

  8. [Essence of the Japan Atherosclerosis Society (JAS) Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Prevention of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases in Japan-2012 Version and Treatment Guide for Dyslipidemia 2013--Current Strategy for the Lipid Assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Hidenori

    2014-09-01

    Dyslipidemia is one of the most important risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (ASCVD), and its management is very important for the prevention of ASCVD. In addition, the management of other major risk factors, such as cigarette smoking, hypertension, and diabetes, is also important. Therefore, the comprehensive management of these major risk factors is key to prevent ASCVD. Among several types of primary dyslipidemia, familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a very high-risk genetic disorder which causes premature coronary artery disease (CAD). Therefore, the early diagnosis of and treatment for FH are crucial. For the treatment of dyslipidemia, lifestyle modifications are the bases of ASCVD prevention. However, when lipid management goals are not achieved with lifestyle modification, we should consider pharmacological treatments, and statins are the drugs with the most abundant evidence to support LDL-C-lowering and ASCVD prevention.

  9. Energy strategy: Roadmap to consensus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    The United States lacks a comprehensive approach to policy-making in the energy realm. Today, as in the past, individual constituency groups tend to focus on their particular aspect of the energy challenge. Many employ a decide-announce-defend'' approach to policy-making, setting out to secure a unilateral advantage for themselves. By so doing, they inevitably pit interest against interest. The result is a polarization of constituencies, and shortsighted policies designed to address the issue of the moment. The American Energy Assurance Council (AEAC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1987 for the sole purpose of facilitating progress toward a fair efficient wise, stable, and consensus-based national energy strategy. AEAC does not have a substantive policy agencies. Rather, we are committed to supporting a process whereby the many stakeholders and policy makers concerned with energy-related issues can come together in productive discourse, thereby overcoming ignorance of each other's positions. The Council seeks to act as a facilitative body, providing a safe'' context for inventive and creative thinking. We attempt to build a store of common knowledge, and to build on that store according to mutually agreed-upon groundrules, and employing sophisticated approaches to facilitation and mediation. This report, the National Energy Consensus Experiment (NECE), was an ambitious experiment in consensus-building. We learned a great deal from it, both in terms of substance and process, and we are convinced that it holds important lessons for others who may seek to build consensus in the public policy realm.

  10. Energy strategy: Roadmap to consensus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    The United States lacks a comprehensive approach to policy-making in the energy realm. Today, as in the past, individual constituency groups tend to focus on their particular aspect of the energy challenge. Many employ a ``decide-announce-defend`` approach to policy-making, setting out to secure a unilateral advantage for themselves. By so doing, they inevitably pit interest against interest. The result is a polarization of constituencies, and shortsighted policies designed to address the issue of the moment. The American Energy Assurance Council (AEAC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1987 for the sole purpose of facilitating progress toward a fair efficient wise, stable, and consensus-based national energy strategy. AEAC does not have a substantive policy agencies. Rather, we are committed to supporting a process whereby the many stakeholders and policy makers concerned with energy-related issues can come together in productive discourse, thereby overcoming ignorance of each other`s positions. The Council seeks to act as a facilitative body, providing a ``safe`` context for inventive and creative thinking. We attempt to build a store of common knowledge, and to build on that store according to mutually agreed-upon groundrules, and employing sophisticated approaches to facilitation and mediation. This report, the National Energy Consensus Experiment (NECE), was an ambitious experiment in consensus-building. We learned a great deal from it, both in terms of substance and process, and we are convinced that it holds important lessons for others who may seek to build consensus in the public policy realm.

  11. Canadian asthma consensus report, 1999

    OpenAIRE

    Boulet, L. P.; A. Becker; Bérubé, D; Beveridge, R.; Ernst, P

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To provide physicians with current guidelines for the diagnosis and optimal management of asthma in children and adults, including pregnant women and the elderly, in office, emergency department, hospital and clinic settings. OPTIONS: The consensus group considered the roles of education, avoidance of provocative environmental and other factors, diverse pharmacotherapies, delivery devices and emergency and in-hospital management of asthma. OUTCOMES: Provision of the best control o...

  12. C3 glomerulopathy: consensus report.

    OpenAIRE

    Lavin, Peter

    2013-01-01

    PUBLISHED C3 glomerulopathy is a recently introduced pathological entity whose original definition was glomerular pathology characterized by C3 accumulation with absent or scanty immunoglobulin deposition. In August 2012, an invited group of experts (comprising the authors of this document) in renal pathology, nephrology, complement biology, and complement therapeutics met to discuss C3 glomerulopathy in the first C3 Glomerulopathy Meeting. The objectives were to reach a consensus on: the ...

  13. Bias, Belief and Consensus: Collective opinion formation on fluctuating networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ngampruetikorn, V

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of online networks, societies are substantially more connected with individual members able to easily modify and maintain their own social links. Here, we show that active network maintenance exposes agents to confirmation bias, the tendency to confirm one's beliefs, and we explore how this affects collective opinion formation. We introduce a model of binary opinion dynamics on a complex network with fast, stochastic rewiring and show that confirmation bias induces a segregation of individuals with different opinions. We use the dynamics of global opinion to generally categorize opinion update rules and find that confirmation bias always stabilizes the consensus state. Finally, we show that the time to reach consensus has a non-monotonic dependence on the magnitude of the bias, suggesting a novel avenue for large-scale opinion engineering.

  14. Latin American consensus on guidelines for chronic migraine treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Rodrigo Espinoza Giacomozzi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic migraine is a condition with significant prevalence all around the world and high socioeconomic impact, and its handling has been challenging neurologists. Developments for understanding its mechanisms and associated conditions, as well as that of new therapies, have been quick and important, a fact which has motivated the Latin American and Brazilian Headache Societies to prepare the present consensus. The treatment of chronic migraine should always be preceded by a careful diagnosis review; the detection of possible worsening factors and associated conditions; the stratification of seriousness/impossibility to treat; and monitoring establishment, with a pain diary. The present consensus deals with pharmacological and nonpharmacological forms of treatment to be used in chronic migraine.

  15. International consensus on safety principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been regularly requested by its Member States to provide evidence that radioactive waste can be managed safely and to help demonstrate a harmonization of approach at the international level by providing safety documents. In response, IAEA established a special series of safety documents devoted to radioactive waste management. These documents will be elaborated within the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme [1,2] which covers all aspects of radioactive waste management. The RADWASS programme develops a series of international consensus documents on all parts of the safe management of radioactive waste, including disposal. The purpose of the RADWASS programme is to (i) document existing international consensus in the approaches and methodologies for safe radioactive waste management, (ii) create a mechanism to establish consensus where it does not exist and (iii) provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed upon documents to complement national standards and criteria. This paper describes the RADWASS programme, and covers the structure, implementation plans and status of documents under preparation

  16. Cardiovascular group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  17. Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung Angela

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Health Issue Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of death in Canadian women and men. In general, women present with a wider range of symptoms, are more likely to delay seeking medial care and are less likely to be investigated and treated with evidence-based medications, angioplasty or coronary artery bypass graft than men. Key Findings In 1998, 78,964 Canadians died from CVD, almost half (39,197 were women. Acute myocardial infarction, which increases significantly after menopause, was the leading cause of death among women. Cardiovascular disease accounted for 21% of all hospital admissions for Canadian women over age 50 in 1999. Admissions to hospital for ischemic heart disease were more frequent for men, but the mean length of hospital stay was longer for women. Mean blood pressure increases with age in both men and women. After age 65, however, high blood pressure is more common among Canadian women. More than one-third of postmenopausal Canadian women have hypertension. Diabetes increases the mortality and morbidity associated with CVD in women more than it does in men. Depression also contributes to the incidence and recovery from CVD, particularly for women who experience twice the rate of depression as men. Data Gaps and Recommendations CVD needs to be recognized as a woman's health issue given Canadian mortality projections (particularly heart failure. Health professionals should be trained to screen, track, and address CVD risk factors among women, including hypertension, elevated lipid levels, smoking, physical inactivity, depression, diabetes and low socio-economic status.

  18. Update of the International Consensus on Palliative Radiotherapy Endpoints for Future Clinical Trials in Bone Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To update the international consensus on palliative radiotherapy endpoints for future clinical trials in bone metastases by surveying international experts regarding previous uncertainties within the 2002 consensus, changes that may be necessary based on practice pattern changes and research findings since that time. Methods and Materials: A two-phase survey was used to determine revisions and new additions to the 2002 consensus. A total of 49 experts from the American Society for Radiation Oncology, the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, the Faculty of Radiation Oncology of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists, and the Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology who are directly involved in the care of patients with bone metastases participated in this survey. Results: Consensus was established in areas involving response definitions, eligibility criteria for future trials, reirradiation, changes in systemic therapy, radiation techniques, parameters at follow-up, and timing of assessments. Conclusion: An outline for trials in bone metastases was updated based on survey and consensus. Investigators leading trials in bone metastases are encouraged to adopt the revised guideline to promote consistent reporting. Areas for future research were identified. It is intended for the consensus to be re-examined in the future on a regular basis.

  19. Update of the International Consensus on Palliative Radiotherapy Endpoints for Future Clinical Trials in Bone Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Edward, E-mail: Edward.Chow@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Hoskin, Peter [Mount Vernon Centre for Cancer Treatment, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Mitera, Gunita; Zeng Liang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Lutz, Stephen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Blanchard Valley Regional Cancer Center, Findlay, OH (United States); Roos, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Hahn, Carol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Linden, Yvette van der [Radiotherapeutic Institute Friesland, Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Hartsell, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advocate Good Samaritan Cancer Center, Downers Grove, IL (United States); Kumar, Eshwar [Department of Oncology, Atlantic Health Sciences Cancer Centre, Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John, NB (Canada)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To update the international consensus on palliative radiotherapy endpoints for future clinical trials in bone metastases by surveying international experts regarding previous uncertainties within the 2002 consensus, changes that may be necessary based on practice pattern changes and research findings since that time. Methods and Materials: A two-phase survey was used to determine revisions and new additions to the 2002 consensus. A total of 49 experts from the American Society for Radiation Oncology, the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, the Faculty of Radiation Oncology of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists, and the Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology who are directly involved in the care of patients with bone metastases participated in this survey. Results: Consensus was established in areas involving response definitions, eligibility criteria for future trials, reirradiation, changes in systemic therapy, radiation techniques, parameters at follow-up, and timing of assessments. Conclusion: An outline for trials in bone metastases was updated based on survey and consensus. Investigators leading trials in bone metastases are encouraged to adopt the revised guideline to promote consistent reporting. Areas for future research were identified. It is intended for the consensus to be re-examined in the future on a regular basis.

  20. Greatly improving consensus performance via predictive mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hai-Tao; Chen, Michael ZhiQiang; Zhou, Tao

    2007-01-01

    An important natural phenomenon surfaces that ultrafast consensus can be achieved by introducing the predictive mechanism. By predicting the dynamics of the network several steps ahead and using this information in the design of the consensus protocol of each agent, it is shown that drastic improvement can be achieved in terms of the speed of convergence towards consensus without changing the topology of the network. Moreover, with the predictive mechanism, the range of sampling rates leading to consensus convergence is broadly expanded compared to the routine consensus protocol. In natural science, this study provides support for the idea that some predictive mechanisms exist in widely-spread biological swarms, flocks, and schools. From the industrial engineering point of view, inclusion of an efficient predictive mechanism allows for not only a significant increase in the speed of convergence toward consensus but also a reduction of the communication energy required to achieve a predefined consensus perform...

  1. Consensus statement of the ESICM task force on colloid volume therapy in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhart, Konrad; Perner, Anders; Sprung, Charles L;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Colloids are administered to more patients than crystalloids, although recent evidence suggests that colloids may possibly be harmful in some patients. The European Society of Intensive Care Medicine therefore assembled a task force to compile consensus recommendations based on the current...

  2. 2010 International consensus algorithm for the diagnosis, therapy and management of hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowen, Tom; Cicardi, Marco; Farkas, Henriette;

    2010-01-01

    )/Reseau Canadien d'angioedeme hereditaire (RCAH) (www.haecanada.com) and cosponsors University of Calgary and the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (with an unrestricted educational grant from CSL Behring) held our third Conference May 15th to 16th, 2010 in Toronto Canada to update our consensus...

  3. 2010 International consensus algorithm for the diagnosis, therapy and management of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We published the Canadian 2003 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (HAE; C1 inhibitor [C1-INH] deficiency and updated this as Hereditary angioedema: a current state-of-the-art review: Canadian Hungarian 2007 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema. Objective To update the International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (circa 2010. Methods The Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN/Réseau Canadien d'angioédème héréditaire (RCAH http://www.haecanada.com and cosponsors University of Calgary and the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (with an unrestricted educational grant from CSL Behring held our third Conference May 15th to 16th, 2010 in Toronto Canada to update our consensus approach. The Consensus document was reviewed at the meeting and then circulated for review. Results This manuscript is the 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema that resulted from that conference. Conclusions Consensus approach is only an interim guide to a complex disorder such as HAE and should be replaced as soon as possible with large phase III and IV clinical trials, meta analyses, and using data base registry validation of approaches including quality of life and cost benefit analyses, followed by large head-to-head clinical trials and then evidence-based guidelines and standards for HAE disease management.

  4. The Appropriate Use of Neurostimulation of the Spinal Cord and Peripheral Nervous System for the Treatment of Chronic Pain and Ischemic Diseases : The Neuromodulation Appropriateness Consensus Committee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deer, Timothy R.; Mekhail, Nagy; Provenzano, David; Pope, Jason; Krames, Elliot; Leong, Michael; Levy, Robert M.; Abejon, David; Buchser, Eric; Burton, Allen; Buvanendran, Asokumar; Candido, Kenneth; Caraway, David; Cousins, Michael; de Jongste, Micheal; Diwan, Sudhir; Eldabe, Sam; Gatzinsky, Kliment; Foreman, Robert D.; Hayek, Salim; Kim, Philip; Kinfe, Thomas; Kloth, David; Kumar, Krishna; Rizvi, Syed; Lad, Shivanand P.; Liem, Liong; Linderoth, Bengt; Mackey, Sean; McDowell, Gladstone; McRoberts, Porter; Poree, Lawrence; Prager, Joshua; Raso, Lou; Rauck, Richard; Russo, Marc; Simpson, Brian; Slavin, Konstantin; Staats, Peter; Stanton-Hicks, Michael; Verrills, Paul; Wellington, Joshua; Williams, Kayode; North, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Neuromodulation Appropriateness Consensus Committee (NACC) of the International Neuromodulation Society (INS) evaluated evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of neurostimulation to treat chronic pain, chronic critical limb ischemia, and refractory angina and recommended approp

  5. Potassium in hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Hector; Raij, Leopoldo

    2013-05-01

    The increased prevalence of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in industrialized societies undoubtedly is associated with the modern high-sodium/low-potassium diet. Extensive experimental and clinical data strongly link potassium intake to cardiovascular outcome. Most studies suggest that the sodium-to-potassium intake ratio is a better predictor of cardiovascular outcome than either nutrient individually. A high-sodium/low-potassium environment results in significant abnormalities in central hemodynamics, leading to potential target organ damage. Altered renal sodium handling, impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, and increased oxidative stress are important mediators of this effect. It remains of paramount importance to reinforce consumption of a low-sodium/high-potassium diet as a critical strategy for prevention and treatment of hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

  6. [Kawasaki disease: interdisciplinary and intersocieties consensus (clinical guidelines). Brief version].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute self-limiting systemic vasculitis. It is the most common cause of acquired heart disease, with the risk of developing coronary artery aneurysms, myocardial infarction and sudden death. Diagnosis is based on the presence of fever in addition to other clinical criteria. The quarter of the Kawasaki disease patients have "incomplete" presentation. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin within ten days of fever onset improves clinical outcomes and reduces the incidence of coronary artery dilation to less than 5%. Non-responders to standard therapy have shown a successful response with the use of corticosteroids and/or biological agents. The long-term management must be delineated according to the degree of coronary involvement in a multidisciplinary manner. To facilitate the pediatrician's diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of Kawasaki disease, a group of experts from the Argentine Society of Pediatrics and the Argentine Society of Cardiology carried out a consensus to develop practical clinical guidelines.

  7. [Kawasaki disease: interdisciplinary and intersocieties consensus (clinical guidelines). Brief version].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute self-limiting systemic vasculitis. It is the most common cause of acquired heart disease, with the risk of developing coronary artery aneurysms, myocardial infarction and sudden death. Diagnosis is based on the presence of fever in addition to other clinical criteria. The quarter of the Kawasaki disease patients have "incomplete" presentation. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin within ten days of fever onset improves clinical outcomes and reduces the incidence of coronary artery dilation to less than 5%. Non-responders to standard therapy have shown a successful response with the use of corticosteroids and/or biological agents. The long-term management must be delineated according to the degree of coronary involvement in a multidisciplinary manner. To facilitate the pediatrician's diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of Kawasaki disease, a group of experts from the Argentine Society of Pediatrics and the Argentine Society of Cardiology carried out a consensus to develop practical clinical guidelines. PMID:27399018

  8. Spreading the message. Building a general consensus on the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, A

    1991-01-01

    In communicating an environmental message to society at large, it is useful to distinguish between decision-makers and the general public. The influence of decision-makers on public debates is as significant as their ability to implement decisions; in democratic societies, the two functions are inseparable. Proceeding from an environmental consensus, physicians can provide a source of impartial medical/ecological wisdom, and serve as mediators of public debates. For those purposes, a network of physicians and/or scientists can be useful; three examples are provided. Communicating to the general public can only be achieved economically through the mass news media, which operate under conditions very different from those of physicians and scientists. There is considerable room for improvement in environmental journalism, and physicians can make a useful contribution to any such process. It is an important issue, since the mass media constitute the 'ecology textbook' of the general public. PMID:1910871

  9. Society of Reproductive Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Society of Reproductive Surgeons Home About Us About SRS Mission Statement Officers The Role of Reproductive Surgeons For ... Fact Sheets and Booklets SRS is an affiliated society to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine . Below ...

  10. Spanish Consensus Statement: The Treatment of Muscle Tears in Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Jaén, Tomas F; Rey, Guillermo Álvarez; Cuesta, Jordi Ardevol; Loureda, Rafael Arriaza; España, Fernando Ávila; Matas, Ramón Balius; Pazos, Fernando Baró; de Dios Beas Jiménez, Juan; Rosell, Jorge Candel; Fernandez, César Cobián; Ros, Francisco Esparza; Colmenero, Josefina Espejo; de Prado, Jorge Fernández; Cota, Juan José García; González, Jose Ignacio Garrido; Santander, Manuela González; Munilla, Miguel Ángel Herrador; Ruiz, Francisco Ivorra; Díaz, Fernando Jiménez; Marqueta, Pedro Manonelles; Fernandez, Antonio Maestro; Benito, Juan José Muñoz; Vilás, Ramón Olivé; Teres, Xavier Peirau; Amaro, José Peña; Roque, Juan Pérez San; Parenteu, Christophe Ramírez; Serna, Juan Ribas; Álvarez, Mikel Sánchez; Marchori, Carlos Sanchez; Soto, Miguel Del Valle; Alonso, José María Villalón; García, Pedro Guillen; de la Iglesia, Nicolas Hugo; Alcorocho, Juan Manuel Lopez

    2015-12-01

    On the 21st of March, 2015, experts met at Clínica CEMTRO in Madrid, Spain, under the patronage of The Spanish Society for Sports Traumatology (SETRADE), The Spanish Federation of Sports Medicine (FEMEDE), The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Football Clubs (AEMEF), and The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Basketball Clubs (AEMB) with the aim of establishing a round table that would allow specialists to consider the most appropriate current general actions to be taken when treating muscle tears in sport, based on proven scientific data described in the medical literature. Each expert received a questionnaire prior to the aforementioned meeting comprising a set of questions concerning therapeutic indications generally applied in the different stages present during muscle repair. The present Consensus Document is the result of the answers to the questionnaire and resulting discussion and consensus over which are the best current indications in the treatment of muscle tears in sport. Avoiding immobilization, not taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) randomly, fostering early mobilization, increasing vascularization of injured, site and regulating inflammatory mechanisms-without inhibiting these from the early stages of the recovery period-all stood out as main points of the Consensus Document. Additionally, there is controversy concerning cell stimulation techniques and the use of growth factors or cell inhibitors. The decision concerning discharge was unanimous, as was the criteria considered when it came to performing sport techniques without pain.

  11. Spanish Consensus Statement: The Treatment of Muscle Tears in Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Jaén, Tomas F; Rey, Guillermo Álvarez; Cuesta, Jordi Ardevol; Loureda, Rafael Arriaza; España, Fernando Ávila; Matas, Ramón Balius; Pazos, Fernando Baró; de Dios Beas Jiménez, Juan; Rosell, Jorge Candel; Fernandez, César Cobián; Ros, Francisco Esparza; Colmenero, Josefina Espejo; de Prado, Jorge Fernández; Cota, Juan José García; González, Jose Ignacio Garrido; Santander, Manuela González; Munilla, Miguel Ángel Herrador; Ruiz, Francisco Ivorra; Díaz, Fernando Jiménez; Marqueta, Pedro Manonelles; Fernandez, Antonio Maestro; Benito, Juan José Muñoz; Vilás, Ramón Olivé; Teres, Xavier Peirau; Amaro, José Peña; Roque, Juan Pérez San; Parenteu, Christophe Ramírez; Serna, Juan Ribas; Álvarez, Mikel Sánchez; Marchori, Carlos Sanchez; Soto, Miguel Del Valle; Alonso, José María Villalón; García, Pedro Guillen; de la Iglesia, Nicolas Hugo; Alcorocho, Juan Manuel Lopez

    2015-12-01

    On the 21st of March, 2015, experts met at Clínica CEMTRO in Madrid, Spain, under the patronage of The Spanish Society for Sports Traumatology (SETRADE), The Spanish Federation of Sports Medicine (FEMEDE), The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Football Clubs (AEMEF), and The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Basketball Clubs (AEMB) with the aim of establishing a round table that would allow specialists to consider the most appropriate current general actions to be taken when treating muscle tears in sport, based on proven scientific data described in the medical literature. Each expert received a questionnaire prior to the aforementioned meeting comprising a set of questions concerning therapeutic indications generally applied in the different stages present during muscle repair. The present Consensus Document is the result of the answers to the questionnaire and resulting discussion and consensus over which are the best current indications in the treatment of muscle tears in sport. Avoiding immobilization, not taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) randomly, fostering early mobilization, increasing vascularization of injured, site and regulating inflammatory mechanisms-without inhibiting these from the early stages of the recovery period-all stood out as main points of the Consensus Document. Additionally, there is controversy concerning cell stimulation techniques and the use of growth factors or cell inhibitors. The decision concerning discharge was unanimous, as was the criteria considered when it came to performing sport techniques without pain. PMID:27213161

  12. Theories about consensus-based conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, William D

    2006-04-01

    "Conservation and the Myth of Consensus" (Peterson et al. 2005) levels several serious indictments against consensus-based approaches to environmental decision making. Namely, the authors argue that consensus processes (1) reinforce apathy and ignorance of conservation issues; (2) legitimize damage to the environment; (3) quash public debate about conservation; (4) solidify the existing balance of power in favor of prodevelopment forces; and (5) block progress toward an ecologically sustainable future. Careful scrutiny of consensus-based approaches is important, especially considering their surging use in conservation policy. In the spirit of advancing the debate further, I review some of the limitations of the essay and its modes of inquiry.

  13. Learning consensus in adversarial environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamvoudakis, Kyriakos G.; García Carrillo, Luis R.; Hespanha, João. P.

    2013-05-01

    This work presents a game theory-based consensus problem for leaderless multi-agent systems in the presence of adversarial inputs that are introducing disturbance to the dynamics. Given the presence of enemy components and the possibility of malicious cyber attacks compromising the security of networked teams, a position agreement must be reached by the networked mobile team based on environmental changes. The problem is addressed under a distributed decision making framework that is robust to possible cyber attacks, which has an advantage over centralized decision making in the sense that a decision maker is not required to access information from all the other decision makers. The proposed framework derives three tuning laws for every agent; one associated with the cost, one associated with the controller, and one with the adversarial input.

  14. Consensus statement on diabetes in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K M Prasanna Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While T1DM has been traditionally seen as a minor concern in the larger picture of pediatric ailments, new data reveals that the incidence of T1DM has assumed alarming proportions. It has long been clear that while the disease may be diagnosed at an early age, its impact is not isolated to afflicted children. The direct impact of the disease on the patient is debilitating due to the nature of the disease and lack of proper access to treatment in India. But this impact is further compounded by the utter apathy and often times antipathy, which patients withT1DM have to face. Lack of awareness of the issue in all stakeholders, low access to quality healthcare, patient, physician, and system level barriers to the delivery of optimal diabetes care are some of the factors which hinder successful management of T1DM. The first international consensus meet on diabetes in children was convened with the aim of providing a common platform to all the stakeholders in the management of T1DM, to discuss the academic, administrative and healthcare system related issues. The ultimate aim was to articulate the problems faced by children with diabetes in a way that centralized their position and focused on creating modalities of management sensitive to their needs and aspirations. It was conceptualized to raise a strong voice of advocacy for improving the management of T1DM and ensuring that "No child should die of diabetes". The unique clinical presentations of T1DM coupled with ignorance on the part of the medical community and society in general results in outcomes that are far worse than that seen with T2DM. So there is a need to substantially improve training of HCPs at all levels on this neglected aspect of healthcare.

  15. Consensus statement on diabetes in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna Kumar, K M; Dev, N Prabhu; Raman, K V; Desai, Rajnanda; Prasadini, T Geetha; Das, A K; Ramoul, Soraya

    2014-05-01

    While T1DM has been traditionally seen as a minor concern in the larger picture of pediatric ailments, new data reveals that the incidence of T1DM has assumed alarming proportions. It has long been clear that while the disease may be diagnosed at an early age, its impact is not isolated to afflicted children. The direct impact of the disease on the patient is debilitating due to the nature of the disease and lack of proper access to treatment in India. But this impact is further compounded by the utter apathy and often times antipathy, which patients withT1DM have to face. Lack of awareness of the issue in all stakeholders, low access to quality healthcare, patient, physician, and system level barriers to the delivery of optimal diabetes care are some of the factors which hinder successful management of T1DM. The first international consensus meet on diabetes in children was convened with the aim of providing a common platform to all the stakeholders in the management of T1DM, to discuss the academic, administrative and healthcare system related issues. The ultimate aim was to articulate the problems faced by children with diabetes in a way that centralized their position and focused on creating modalities of management sensitive to their needs and aspirations. It was conceptualized to raise a strong voice of advocacy for improving the management of T1DM and ensuring that "No child should die of diabetes". The unique clinical presentations of T1DM coupled with ignorance on the part of the medical community and society in general results in outcomes that are far worse than that seen with T2DM. So there is a need to substantially improve training of HCPs at all levels on this neglected aspect of healthcare.

  16. Latin American Consensus on Retinal Vein Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of anti-VEGF agents has allowed unprecedented progress in the management and treatment of ophthalmologic conditions characterized by an increased vascular permeability and intraocular neovascularization. One of these conditions is retinal vein occlusion (RVO.  RVO is one of the most common causes of reduced vision due to retinal vascular disease. Without timely treatment, macular edema, macular ischemia, neovascularization and other potential sequelae of RVO can lead to photoreceptor cell death and consequently to irreversible vision loss.   Treatments for this indication that have been recently approved by several regulatory agencies throughout the world include: the VEGF inhibitor ranibizumab (Lucentis, Genentech, the VEGF and placental growth factor inhibitor aflibercept (Eylea, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Bayer HealthCare, and a slow release intravitreal implant of dexamethasone (Ozurdex, Allergan. In addition bevacizumab (Avastin, Genentech has been used extensively in an off-label manner.   These new treatments allow us to preserve vision for many RVO patients who could not have expected such favorable results just 5 or 6 years ago. However, not every treatment is effective for every patient, and whether one option is superior to another or a combination of options is superior to monotherapy, have yet to be definitively determined.   A growing body of literature with strong evidence supports the use of these new treatments. However, in several instances the literature is not conclusive to support unified management of RVO. This document is a summary analysis on RVO assembled by a group of specialists summoned by the Pan-American Vitreo-Retinal Society (SPRV to participate in this Latin American consensus.

  17. Delay-Induced Consensus and Quasi-Consensus in Multi-Agent Dynamical Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Wenwu; Chen, Guanrong; Cao, Ming; Ren, Wei

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies consensus and quasi-consensus in multi-agent dynamical systems. A linear consensus protocol in the second-order dynamics is designed where both the current and delayed position information is utilized. Time delay, in a common perspective, can induce periodic oscillations or even c

  18. Strategic consensus mapping : A new method for testing and visualizing strategic consensus within and between teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarakci, M.; Ates, N.Y.; Porck, J.P.; van Knippenberg, D.; Groenen, P.J.F.; de Haas, M.

    2014-01-01

    Research on strategic consensus focuses primarily on the extent of agreement among team members regarding organizational strategy. It does not include elements such as the content of the agreement, between-group consensus, or the significance of differences in consensus (e.g., for evaluating the eff

  19. Review of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Practice guidelines for management of heart failure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colan, Steven D

    2015-08-01

    In 2004, practice guidelines for the management of heart failure in children by Rosenthal and colleagues were published in conjunction with the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. These guidelines have not been updated or reviewed since that time. In general, there has been considerable controversy as to the utility and purpose of clinical practice guidelines, but there is general recognition that the relentless progress of medicine leads to the progressive irrelevance of clinical practice guidelines that do not undergo periodic review and updating. Paediatrics and paediatric cardiology, in particular, have had comparatively minimal participation in the clinical practice guidelines realm. As a result, most clinical practice guidelines either specifically exclude paediatrics from consideration, as has been the case for the guidelines related to cardiac failure in adults, or else involve clinical practice guidelines committees that include one or two paediatric cardiologists and produce guidelines that cannot reasonably be considered a consensus paediatric opinion. These circumstances raise a legitimate question as to whether the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation paediatric heart failure guidelines should be re-reviewed. The time, effort, and expense involved in producing clinical practice guidelines should be considered before recommending an update to the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Paediatric Heart Failure guidelines. There are specific areas of rapid change in the evaluation and management of heart failure in children that are undoubtedly worthy of updating. These domains include areas such as use of serum and imaging biomarkers, wearable and implantable monitoring devices, and acute heart failure management and mechanical circulatory support. At the time the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation guidelines were published, echocardiographic tissue Doppler, 3 dimensional

  20. Plant sterols in food: No consensus in guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Plant sterols are used as food supplement to reduce serum cholesterol levels. • Reductions in serum cholesterol levels are achieved at the expense of increased plant sterol levels. • The potential atherogenicity of increased serum plant sterol levels is controversially debated. • This dispute is reflected by different guideline recommendations in regard to plant sterols. - Abstract: Plant sterols are supplemented in foods to reduce cardiovascular risk. Randomized controlled trials show 2 g of plant sterols a day reduce serum cholesterol by about 10%. This reduction in serum cholesterol levels is achieved at the expense of increased serum plant sterol levels. Findings in patients with phytosterolemia, in experimental studies and in clinical trials have lead to speculations that plant sterols might be atherogenic. In view of emerging safety issues the role of plant sterols in cardiovascular prevention has become controversial. This review reflects the ongoing controversial scientific debate and points out recent developments in guidelines of national and international societies

  1. Plant sterols in food: No consensus in guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weingärtner, Oliver, E-mail: oweingartner@aol.com [Abteilung für Kardiologie, Klinikum Oldenburg, European Medical School Oldenburg-Groningen, Carl von Ossietzky Universität, Oldenburg (Germany); Baber, Ronny [Institut für Laboratoriumsmedizin, Klinische Chemie und Molekulare Diagnostik, Universität Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); LIFE – Leipziger Forschungszentrum für Zivilisationserkrankungen, Universität Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Teupser, Daniel [Institut für Laboratoriumsmedizin, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München (Germany)

    2014-04-11

    Highlights: • Plant sterols are used as food supplement to reduce serum cholesterol levels. • Reductions in serum cholesterol levels are achieved at the expense of increased plant sterol levels. • The potential atherogenicity of increased serum plant sterol levels is controversially debated. • This dispute is reflected by different guideline recommendations in regard to plant sterols. - Abstract: Plant sterols are supplemented in foods to reduce cardiovascular risk. Randomized controlled trials show 2 g of plant sterols a day reduce serum cholesterol by about 10%. This reduction in serum cholesterol levels is achieved at the expense of increased serum plant sterol levels. Findings in patients with phytosterolemia, in experimental studies and in clinical trials have lead to speculations that plant sterols might be atherogenic. In view of emerging safety issues the role of plant sterols in cardiovascular prevention has become controversial. This review reflects the ongoing controversial scientific debate and points out recent developments in guidelines of national and international societies.

  2. Clinical end points and response criteria in mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: a consensus statement of the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas, the United States Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium, and the Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Elise A; Whittaker, Sean; Kim, Youn H; Duvic, Madeleine; Prince, H Miles; Lessin, Stuart R; Wood, Gary S; Willemze, Rein; Demierre, Marie-France; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Bernengo, Maria Grazia; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L; Bagot, Martine; Estrach, Teresa; Guitart, Joan; Knobler, Robert; Sanches, José Antonio; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Sugaya, Makoto; Dummer, Reinhard; Pittelkow, Mark; Hoppe, Richard; Parker, Sareeta; Geskin, Larisa; Pinter-Brown, Lauren; Girardi, Michael; Burg, Günter; Ranki, Annamari; Vermeer, Maartan; Horwitz, Steven; Heald, Peter; Rosen, Steve; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Dreno, Brigette; Vonderheid, Eric C

    2011-06-20

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), the major forms of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, have unique characteristics that distinguish them from other types of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Clinical trials in MF/SS have suffered from a lack of standardization in evaluation, staging, assessment, end points, and response criteria. Recently defined criteria for the diagnosis of early MF, guidelines for initial evaluation, and revised staging and classification criteria for MF and SS now offer the potential for uniform staging of patients enrolled in clinical trials for MF/SS. This article presents consensus recommendations for the general conduct of clinical trials of patients with MF/SS as well as methods for standardized assessment of potential disease manifestations in skin, lymph nodes, blood, and visceral organs, and definition of end points and response criteria. These guidelines should facilitate collaboration among investigators and collation of data from sponsor-generated or investigator-initiated clinical trials involving patients with MF or SS.

  3. Developing an action plan for patient radiation safety in adult cardiovascular medicine: proceedings from the Duke University Clinical Research Institute/American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Think Tank held on February 28, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pamela S; Carr, J Jeffrey; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Cummings, Jennifer E; Gerber, Thomas C; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Taylor, Allen J

    2012-05-15

    Technological advances and increased utilization of medical testing and procedures have prompted greater attention to ensuring the patient safety of radiation use in the practice of adult cardiovascular medicine. In response, representatives from cardiovascular imaging societies, private payers, government and nongovernmental agencies, industry, medical physicists, and patient representatives met to develop goals and strategies toward this end; this report provides an overview of the discussions. This expert “think tank” reached consensus on several broad directions including: the need for broad collaboration across a large number of diverse stakeholders; clarification of the relationship between medical radiation and stochastic events; required education of ordering and providing physicians, and creation of a culture of safety; development of infrastructure to support robust dose assessment and longitudinal tracking; continued close attention to patient selection by balancing the benefit of cardiovascular testing and procedures against carefully minimized radiation exposures; collation, dissemination, and implementation of best practices; and robust education, not only across the healthcare community, but also to patients, the public, and media. Finally, because patient radiation safety in cardiovascular imaging is complex, any proposed actions need to be carefully vetted (and monitored) for possible unintended consequences.

  4. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Muñana, Karen;

    2015-01-01

    with the initial drug is unsatisfactory, and 4) when treatment changes should be considered. In this consensus proposal, an overview is given on the aim of AED treatment, when to start long-term treatment in canine epilepsy and which veterinary AEDs are currently in use for dogs. The consensus proposal for drug...

  5. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen;

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient...

  6. Nordic consensus on treatment of undescended testes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritzén, E Martin; Bergh, A; Bjerknes, R;

    2007-01-01

    To reach consensus among specialists from the Nordic countries on the present state-of-the-art in treatment of undescended testicles.......To reach consensus among specialists from the Nordic countries on the present state-of-the-art in treatment of undescended testicles....

  7. Bruxism defined and graded: an international consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Lobbezoo; J. Ahlberg; A.G. Glaros; T. Kato; K. Koyano; G.J. Lavigne; R. de Leeuw; D. Manfredini; P. Svensson; E. Winocur

    2013-01-01

    To date, there is no consensus about the definition and diagnostic grading of bruxism. A written consensus discussion was held among an international group of bruxism experts as to formulate a definition of bruxism and to suggest a grading system for its operationalisation. The expert group defined

  8. Veto-Consensus Multiple Kernel Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Zhou; N. Hu; C.J. Spanos

    2016-01-01

    We propose Veto-Consensus Multiple Kernel Learning (VCMKL), a novel way of combining multiple kernels such that one class of samples is described by the logical intersection (consensus) of base kernelized decision rules, whereas the other classes by the union (veto) of their complements. The propose

  9. Consensus statement on genetic research in dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikkert, M.G. Olde; der, V van; Burns, A.;

    2008-01-01

    procedure fuelled the development of the consensus statement, which is presented in this paper. The consensus statement aims to stimulate ethically acceptable research in the field of dementia and the protection of vulnerable elderly patients with dementia from application of inadequate research methods...

  10. [Management strategies and choice of antithrombotic treatment in patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome--executive summary for clinical practice. Consensus Document of the Regional Chapters of the Italian National Association of Hospital Cardiologists (ANMCO) and of the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine (SIMEU)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uguccioni, Massimo; Pugliese, Francesco; De Luca, Leonardo; Tubaro, Marco; Ruggieri, Maria Pia; Colivicchi, Furio; Ammirati, Fabrizio; Ansalone, Gerardo; Avella, Andrea; Azzolini, Paolo; Bertazzoni, Giuliano; Brama, Paolo; Cacciatore, Giuseppe; De Luca, Massimo; De Simone, Massimo; Di Fusco, Stefania Angela; Ferraiuolo, Giuseppe; Ferranti, Fabio; Granatelli, Antonino; Loschiavo, Paolo; Mezzanotte, Roberto; Mirante, Enrico; Monti, Francesco; Pajes, Giuseppe; Pandolfo, Luciano; Proiettil, Fabrizio; Revello, Alessandra; Rigattieri, Stefano; Sabetta, Francesco; Sciahbasi, Alessandro; Scioli, Roberto; Serdoz, Roberto; Susi, Beniamino; Vincentelli, Giovanni Maria; Zuccalà, Giuseppe; Zulli, Luigi

    2013-03-01

    This document has been developed by the Lazio regional chapters of two scientific associations, the Italian National Association of Hospital Cardiologists (ANMCO) and the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine (SIMEU), whose members are actively involved in the everyday management of Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS). The document is aimed at providing a specific, practical, evidence-based guideline for the effective management of antithrombotic treatment (antiplatelet and anticoagulant) in the complex and ever changing scenario of ACS. The document employs a synthetic approach which considers two main issues: the actual operative context of treatment delivery and the general management strategy.

  11. EXERCÍCIO FÍSICO COMO TRATAMENTO NÃO FARMACOLÓGICO DAS DOENÇAS CARDIOVASCULARES: QUAL A INTENSIDADE IDEAL?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Antônio Bertasso de Araújo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There is an agreement that exercise has beneficial effects in patients with cardiovascular diseases. However, controversy exists about the intensity of exercise which produces maximum adjustments. The objective was to examine the best intensity for physical exercise in patients with cardiovascular diseases. The literature review was conducted in all the guidelines and consensus of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology from 1994-2010, related to cardiac rehabilitation and disease: Hypertension, Dyslipidemia and Atherosclerosis, Myocardial Infarction, Chronic Heart Failure. Review was made of articles related to the intensity of exercise for patients with cardiovascular diseases. The results showed that aerobic exercise is highly recommended. The prescribed duration varies from 30-60 minutes. The frequency of 3-5 times/week. The guidelines propose intensities 60-80% of maximum oxygen consumption. Moreover, many studies have shown better results in vascular, cardiac and metabolic with the training of high intensity compared to moderate and low intensity. We conclude that the Brazilian guidelines are conservative and the intensity of exercise. We suggest using moderate and high intensity in rehabilitation programs.

  12. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Mar 23,2016 The following statistics speak ... disease. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  13. Cardiovascular manifestations of phaeochromocytoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prejbisz, A.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Eisenhofer, G.; Januszewicz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical expression of phaeochromocytoma may involve numerous cardiovascular manifestations, but usually presents as sustained or paroxysmal hypertension associated with other signs and symptoms of catecholamine excess. Most of the life-threatening cardiovascular manifestations of phaeochromocytoma,

  14. Technological competencies in cardiovascular nursing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika Miyahara Kobayashi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify the perception of the coordinators of the Specialization Courses in Cardiovascular Nursing about inserting content from Information and Communication Technology (ICT and analyze them in relation to the technological competencies and regarding its applicability, relevance and importance in assisting, teaching and management. METHOD Descriptive study with 10 coordinators of the Specialization course in Cardiologic Nursing, who replied to the questionnaire for the development of technological competency adapted from the Technology Initiative Guidelines Education Reforms (TIGER, and analyzed using the Delphi technique for obtaining consensus and scored according to the relevance, pertinence and applicability using Likert scale according to degree of agreement. RESULTS Six courses developed ICT content. The contents of the TIGER were considered relevant, pertinent and applicable. CONCLUSION The coordinators recognize the need for technological competencies of the Cardiovascular Nurse for healthcare applicability.

  15. Sampled-Data Consensus Over Random Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junfeng; Meng, Ziyang; Yang, Tao; Shi, Guodong; Johansson, Karl Henrik

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the consensus problem for a network of nodes with random interactions and sampled-data control actions. We first show that consensus in expectation, in mean square, and almost surely are equivalent for a general random network model when the inter-sampling interval and network size satisfy a simple relation. The three types of consensus are shown to be simultaneously achieved over an independent or a Markovian random network defined on an underlying graph with a directed spanning tree. For both independent and Markovian random network models, necessary and sufficient conditions for mean-square consensus are derived in terms of the spectral radius of the corresponding state transition matrix. These conditions are then interpreted as the existence of critical value on the inter-sampling interval, below which global mean-square consensus is achieved and above which the system diverges in mean-square sense for some initial states. Finally, we establish an upper bound on the inter-sampling interval below which almost sure consensus is reached, and a lower bound on the inter-sampling interval above which almost sure divergence is reached. Some numerical simulations are given to validate the theoretical results and some discussions on the critical value of the inter-sampling intervals for the mean-square consensus are provided.

  16. [Cardiovascular safety of antidiabetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aline Roth, Pressl-Wenger; Jornayvaz, François R

    2016-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by a high risk of micro- and macro-vascular complications. Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death of diabetic patients. In this context, the search for molecules decreasing cardiovascular mortality makes sense. Until the EMPA-REG OUTCOME study published late 2015, showing a reduction of cardiovascular mortality of patients treated with empagliflozin, an SGLT2 inhibitor, there was no molecule known to decrease cardiovascular mortality. The purpose of this article is to review the various existing antidiabetic molecules and their impact (positive/neutral/negative) on cardiovascular mortality. PMID:27487675

  17. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care: Endorsed by the American Heart Assocation, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia Intervencion; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-05-19

    Although historically the intra-aortic balloon pump has been the only mechanical circulatory support device available to clinicians, a number of new devices have become commercially available and have entered clinical practice. These include axial flow pumps, such as Impella(®); left atrial to femoral artery bypass pumps, specifically the TandemHeart; and new devices for institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These devices differ significantly in their hemodynamic effects, insertion, monitoring, and clinical applicability. This document reviews the physiologic impact on the circulation of these devices and their use in specific clinical situations. These situations include patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. Specialized uses for right-sided support and in pediatric populations are discussed and the clinical utility of mechanical circulatory support devices is reviewed, as are the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines.

  18. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care (Endorsed by the American Heart Association, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia Intervencion; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Although historically the intra-aortic balloon pump has been the only mechanical circulatory support device available to clinicians, a number of new devices have become commercially available and have entered clinical practice. These include axial flow pumps, such as Impella(®); left atrial to femoral artery bypass pumps, specifically the TandemHeart; and new devices for institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These devices differ significantly in their hemodynamic effects, insertion, monitoring, and clinical applicability. This document reviews the physiologic impact on the circulation of these devices and their use in specific clinical situations. These situations include patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. Specialized uses for right-sided support and in pediatric populations are discussed and the clinical utility of mechanical circulatory support devices is reviewed, as are the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines.

  19. A Historical Reconsideration of the Work of the National Society for the Study of Education's Committee on Curriculum-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wraga, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Historical representations of the National Society for the Study of Education's Committee on Curriculum-Making typically recount that the purpose of the committee was to assemble representatives from competing curriculum camps to achieve consensus on curriculum principles, depict the committee's work as important, cast doubt on the consensus the…

  20. Randomized Binary Consensus with Faulty Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Gogolev

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates self-organizing binary majority consensus disturbed by faulty nodes with random and persistent failure. We study consensus in ordered and random networks with noise, message loss and delays. Using computer simulations, we show that: (1 explicit randomization by noise, message loss and topology can increase robustness towards faulty nodes; (2 commonly-used faulty nodes with random failure inhibit consensus less than faulty nodes with persistent failure; and (3 in some cases, such randomly failing faulty nodes can even promote agreement.

  1. Fasting is not routinely required for determination of a lipid profile: clinical and laboratory implications including flagging at desirable concentration cut-points—a joint consensus statement from the European Atherosclerosis Society and European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Langsted, Anne; Mora, Samia; Kolovou, Genovefa; Baum, Hannsjörg; Bruckert, Eric; Watts, Gerald F.; Sypniewska, Grazyna; Wiklund, Olov; Borén, Jan; Chapman, M. John; Cobbaert, Christa; Descamps, Olivier S.; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Kamstrup, Pia R.; Pulkki, Kari; Kronenberg, Florian; Remaley, Alan T.; Rifai, Nader; Ros, Emilio; Langlois, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Aims To critically evaluate the clinical implications of the use of non-fasting rather than fasting lipid profiles and to provide guidance for the laboratory reporting of abnormal non-fasting or fasting lipid profiles. Methods and results Extensive observational data, in which random non-fasting lipid profiles have been compared with those determined under fasting conditions, indicate that the maximal mean changes at 1–6 h after habitual meals are not clinically significant [+0.3 mmol/L (26 mg/dL) for triglycerides; −0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for total cholesterol; −0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for LDL cholesterol; +0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for calculated remnant cholesterol; −0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for calculated non-HDL cholesterol]; concentrations of HDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein B, and lipoprotein(a) are not affected by fasting/non-fasting status. In addition, non-fasting and fasting concentrations vary similarly over time and are comparable in the prediction of cardiovascular disease. To improve patient compliance with lipid testing, we therefore recommend the routine use of non-fasting lipid profiles, while fasting sampling may be considered when non-fasting triglycerides >5 mmol/L (440 mg/dL). For non-fasting samples, laboratory reports should flag abnormal concentrations as triglycerides ≥2 mmol/L (175 mg/dL), total cholesterol ≥5 mmol/L (190 mg/dL), LDL cholesterol ≥3 mmol/L (115 mg/dL), calculated remnant cholesterol ≥0.9 mmol/L (35 mg/dL), calculated non-HDL cholesterol ≥3.9 mmol/L (150 mg/dL), HDL cholesterol ≤1 mmol/L (40 mg/dL), apolipoprotein A1 ≤1.25 g/L (125 mg/dL), apolipoprotein B ≥1.0 g/L (100 mg/dL), and lipoprotein(a) ≥50 mg/dL (80th percentile); for fasting samples, abnormal concentrations correspond to triglycerides ≥1.7 mmol/L (150 mg/dL). Life-threatening concentrations require separate referral when triglycerides >10 mmol/L (880 mg/dL) for the risk of pancreatitis, LDL cholesterol >13 mmol/L (500 mg/dL) for

  2. American Society of Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Society of Echocardiography Join Ase Member Portal Log In Membership Member Portal Log In Join ASE Renew Benefits Rates FASE – Fellow of the American Society of Echocardiography Member Referral Program FAQs Initiatives Advocacy ...

  3. Society of Interventional Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... how interventional radiology research improves patients’ lives at Society of Interventional Radiology’s 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting; read ... comments to CMS on two MACRA coding issues; society is engaged with CMS as they develop codes ...

  4. International Transplant Nurses Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 25th Annual ITNS Symposium The International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS) cordially invites transplant nurses and other transplant ... pocket guide, developed by the International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS), provides an overview of the interventions used ...

  5. Ehlers-Danlos Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Scientific Board Staff Volunteer Leaders The Ehlers-Danlos Society Center for EDS Research & Clinical Care Our History ... Message Boards Patient Resource Library The Ehlers-Danlos Society Center for EDS Research & Clinical Care Loose Connections ...

  6. Scoliosis Research Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back To Top Scoliosis Research Society Close Menu Member Login Become a Member Home Find a Specialist | Calendar Contact | Donate Patients and Families ... a Member Find a Specialist Calendar Contact Donate Scoliosis Research Society Dedicated to the optimal care of ...

  7. Mutual Organizations, Mutual Societies

    OpenAIRE

    Archambault, Edith

    2009-01-01

    This article is an entry to be published in an International Encyclopedia of Civil Society in 2009. Mutual organizations exist everywhere in developed and developing countreies as well. After a definition founded on social economy principles, the paper gives the historical background of mutual insurance companies, mutual benefit societies and building societies. Then we draw a panorama of the European mutual societies with international perspectives on the USA and some developing countries. S...

  8. Reclaiming Society Publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip E. Steinberg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Learned societies have become aligned with commercial publishers, who have increasingly taken over the latter’s function as independent providers of scholarly information. Using the example of geographical societies, the advantages and disadvantages of this trend are examined. It is argued that in an era of digital publication, learned societies can offer leadership with a new model of open access that can guarantee high quality scholarly material whose publication costs are supported by society membership dues.

  9. The Warwick Agreement on femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAI syndrome): an international consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, D R; Dickenson, E J; O'Donnell, J; Agricola, R; Awan, T; Beck, M; Clohisy, J C; Dijkstra, H P; Falvey, E; Gimpel, M; Hinman, R S; Hölmich, P; Kassarjian, A; Martin, H D; Martin, R; Mather, R C; Philippon, M J; Reiman, M P; Takla, A; Thorborg, K; Walker, S; Weir, A; Bennell, K L

    2016-10-01

    The 2016 Warwick Agreement on femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome was convened to build an international, multidisciplinary consensus on the diagnosis and management of patients with FAI syndrome. 22 panel members and 1 patient from 9 countries and 5 different specialties participated in a 1-day consensus meeting on 29 June 2016. Prior to the meeting, 6 questions were agreed on, and recent relevant systematic reviews and seminal literature were circulated. Panel members gave presentations on the topics of the agreed questions at Sports Hip 2016, an open meeting held in the UK on 27-29 June. Presentations were followed by open discussion. At the 1-day consensus meeting, panel members developed statements in response to each question through open discussion; members then scored their level of agreement with each response on a scale of 0-10. Substantial agreement (range 9.5-10) was reached for each of the 6 consensus questions, and the associated terminology was agreed on. The term 'femoroacetabular impingement syndrome' was introduced to reflect the central role of patients' symptoms in the disorder. To reach a diagnosis, patients should have appropriate symptoms, positive clinical signs and imaging findings. Suitable treatments are conservative care, rehabilitation, and arthroscopic or open surgery. Current understanding of prognosis and topics for future research were discussed. The 2016 Warwick Agreement on FAI syndrome is an international multidisciplinary agreement on the diagnosis, treatment principles and key terminology relating to FAI syndrome.Author note The Warwick Agreement on femoroacetabular impingement syndrome has been endorsed by the following 25 clinical societies: American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM), Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Sports and Exercise Medicine (ACPSEM), Australasian College of Sports and Exercise Physicians (ACSEP), Austian Sports Physiotherapists, British Association of Sports and Exercise

  10. OGC Consensus: How Successful Standards Are Made

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Reed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the history, background, and current status of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC standards development consensus process. The roots of the formation of the OGC lie in the early 1990s when a very strong market requirement for exchanging GIS data content was clearly stated. At that time, each GIS vendor had their own formats for publishing and/or exchanging their GIS data. There was no mechanism or organization that provided a forum for the GIS vendors and GIS data users to collaborate and agree on how to share GIS data. That requirement, along with the vision of a few individuals, led to the formation of the OGC. This paper describes the early development of the consensus process in the OGC, how this process has evolved over time, why consensus is so important for defining open standards that are implemented in the marketplace, and the future of the OGC consensus process.

  11. Improve consensus via decentralized predictive mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.-T.; Chen, M. Z. Q.; Zhou, T.

    2009-05-01

    For biogroups and groups of self-driven agents, making decisions often depends on interactions among group members. In this paper, we seek to understand the fundamental predictive mechanisms used by group members in order to perform such coordinated behaviors. In particular, we show that the future dynamics of each node in the network can be predicted solely using local information provided by its neighbors. Using this predicted future dynamics information, we propose a decentralized predictive consensus protocol, which yields drastic improvements in terms of both consensus speed and internal communication cost. In natural science, this study provides an evidence for the idea that some decentralized predictive mechanisms may exist in widely-spread biological swarms/flocks. From the industrial point of view, incorporation of a decentralized predictive mechanism allows for not only a significant increase in the speed of convergence towards consensus but also a reduction in the communication energy required to achieve a predefined consensus performance.

  12. Distributed Detection via Bayesian Updates and Consensus

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Qipeng; Wang, Xiaofan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a class of distributed detection algorithms which can be viewed as implementations of Bayes' law in distributed settings. Some of the algorithms are proposed in the literature most recently, and others are first developed in this paper. The common feature of these algorithms is that they all combine (i) certain kinds of consensus protocols with (ii) Bayesian updates. They are different mainly in the aspect of the type of consensus protocol and the order of the two operations. After discussing their similarities and differences, we compare these distributed algorithms by numerical examples. We focus on the rate at which these algorithms detect the underlying true state of an object. We find that (a) The algorithms with consensus via geometric average is more efficient than that via arithmetic average; (b) The order of consensus aggregation and Bayesian update does not apparently influence the performance of the algorithms; (c) The existence of communication delay dramatically slows do...

  13. Population conference: consensus and conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, P D

    1984-01-01

    The United Nations-sponsored International Conference on Population held in Mexico City was both a rejection and an affirmation of a new policy of the Reagan administration. The policy denies international family planning funds to nongovernmental organizations that perform or actively promote abortion as a family planning method in other nations. A compromise statement was accepted urging governments to take appropriate measures to discourage abortion as a family planning method and when possible to provide for the humane treatment and counseling of women ho resorted to abortion. The statement on abortion was 1 of 88 reccomendations approved by the conference. The commitment expressed in the 10-year-old World Population Plan of Action to the rights and responsiblity to all people as reaffirmed. The conference also endorsed family life education and sex education as well as suitable family planning, information and services for adolescents, with due consideration given to the role, rights and obligations of parents. Increased support for international population and family planning programs was urged and World Bank President, Clausen, urged a 4-fold increase in international funding by the year 2000. Most of the conference's recommendations re devoted to the broad range of population policy issues, including morbidity and mortality, international and internal migration, the relationship between population and economic development and the status of women. The purpose of the recommendations is to increase the momentum of international support. The Mexico City conference was characterized by a remarkable degree of consensus about population policies with respect to integration with economic development, the need to respect individual rights and the recognition that all nations have sovereign rights to develop and implement their own population policies. Conflict and controversy arose in the areas of the arms race and the Middle East. The US position on abortion funding

  14. Standard operating procedures for ESPEN guidelines and consensus papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Stephan C; Singer, Pierre; Koller, Michael; Barazzoni, Rocco; Cederholm, Tommy; van Gossum, André

    2015-12-01

    The ESPEN Guideline standard operating procedures (SOP) is based on the methodology provided by the Association of Scientific Medical Societies of Germany (AWMF), the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN), and the Centre for Evidence-based Medicine at the University of Oxford. The SOP is valid and obligatory for all future ESPEN-sponsored guideline projects aiming to generate high-quality guidelines on a regular basis. The SOP aims to facilitate the preparation of guideline projects, to streamline the consensus process, to ensure quality and transparency, and to facilitate the dissemination and publication of ESPEN guidelines. To achieve this goal, the ESPEN Guidelines Editorial board (GEB) has been established headed by two chairmen. The GEB will support and supervise the guideline processes and is responsible for the strategic planning of ESPEN guideline activities. Key elements of the SOP are the generation of well-built clinical questions according to the PICO system, a systemic literature search, a classification of the selected literature according to the SIGN evidence levels providing an evidence table, and a clear and straight-forward consensus procedure consisting of online voting's and a consensus conference. Only experts who meet the obligation to disclosure any potential conflict of interests and who are not employed by the Industry can participate in the guideline process. All recommendations will be graded according to the SIGN grading and novel outcome models besides biomedical endpoints. This approach will further extent the leadership of ESPEN in creating up-to-date and suitable for implementation guidelines and in sharing knowledge on malnutrition and clinical nutrition. PMID:26254807

  15. The Role of Technology and Innovation in the Framework of the Information Society

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Sasvari

    2012-01-01

    The literature on the information society indicates that it is a still-developing field of research. It can be explained by the lack of consensus on basic definitions and research methods. There are also different judgments on the importance and the significance of the information society. Some social scientists write about a change of era, others emphasize parallelism with the past. There are some authors who expect that the information society will solve the problems of social inequalities,...

  16. Pragmatism and Political Pluralism - Consensus and Pluralism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Marsonet

    2015-07-01

    In our day the German philosopher Jürgen Habermas has in a way revived these Peircean insights, putting forward an influential theory to the effect that consensus indeed plays a key role in human praxis, so that the primary task of philosophy is to foster it by eliminating the disagreement which we constantly have to face in the course of our daily life. In his “communicative theory of consensus,” furthermore, he claims that human communication rests on an implicit commitment to a sort of “ideal speech situation” which is the normative foundation of agreement in linguistic matters. Consequently, the quest for consensus is a constitutive feature of our nature of (rational human beings: rationality and consensus are tied together. A very strong consequence derives from Habermas’ premises: were we to abandon the search for consensus we would lose rationality, too, and this makes us understand that he views the pursuit of consensus as a regulative principle (rather than as a merely practical objective. Rescher opposes both Peirce’s eschatological view and Habermas’ regulative and idealized one.

  17. Cardiovascular pre-participation screening of young competitive athletes for prevention of sudden death: proposal for a common European protocol.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corrado, D.; Pellicia, A.; Bjørnstad, H.; Vanhees, L.E.M.J.; Biffi, A.

    2005-01-01

    Consensus Statement of the Study Group of Sport Cardiology of the Working Group of Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology and the Working Group of Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases of the European Society of Cardiology.

  18. [Intra-dialysis parenteral nutrition in chronic renal patients: consensus SEN-SENPE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de Lorenzo, A; Arrieta, J; Ayúcar, A; Barril, G; Huarte, E

    2010-01-01

    Given the high prevalence of the hyponutrition state among haemodialysis patients and knowing that this implies an increase in the rates of infection, hospitalisation and hospital stay, which translates into an increase in global morbid-mortality, the Spanish Society of Nephrology (SEN) and the Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SENPE) have reached a consensus on the indications, contraindications, and limitations of Intra-Dialysis Parenteral Nutrition (IDPN.) This consensus considers IDPN as a valid alternative to other types of nutritional support when these show their lack of efficacy. The bases are set regarding the timing of nutritional intervention with IDPN, its ideal composition, the time of administration, its controls, follow-up schedules, and the time at which the nutritional support has to be discontinued.

  19. Consensus statement on the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carel, Jean-Claude; Eugster, Erica A; Rogol, Alan;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs revolutionized the treatment of central precocious puberty. However, questions remain regarding their optimal use in central precocious puberty and other conditions. The Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society and the European Society...... for Pediatric Endocrinology convened a consensus conference to review the clinical use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs in children and adolescents. PARTICIPANTS: When selecting the 30 participants, consideration was given to equal representation from North America (United States and Canada) and Europe...... was insufficient, conclusions were based on expert opinion. CONSENSUS PROCESS: Participants were put into working groups with assigned topics and specific questions. Written materials were prepared and distributed before the conference, revised on the basis of input during the meeting, and presented to the full...

  20. From social network (centralized vs. decentralized) to collective decision-making (unshared vs. shared consensus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Cédric; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Petit, Odile

    2012-01-01

    Relationships we have with our friends, family, or colleagues influence our personal decisions, as well as decisions we make together with others. As in human beings, despotism and egalitarian societies seem to also exist in animals. While studies have shown that social networks constrain many phenomena from amoebae to primates, we still do not know how consensus emerges from the properties of social networks in many biological systems. We created artificial social networks that represent the continuum from centralized to decentralized organization and used an agent-based model to make predictions about the patterns of consensus and collective movements we observed according to the social network. These theoretical results showed that different social networks and especially contrasted ones--star network vs. equal network--led to totally different patterns. Our model showed that, by moving from a centralized network to a decentralized one, the central individual seemed to lose its leadership in the collective movement's decisions. We, therefore, showed a link between the type of social network and the resulting consensus. By comparing our theoretical data with data on five groups of primates, we confirmed that this relationship between social network and consensus also appears to exist in animal societies.

  1. [Consensus statement for accreditation of multidisciplinary thyroid cancer units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Juan José; Galofré, Juan Carlos; Oleaga, Amelia; Grande, Enrique; Mitjavila, Mercedes; Moreno, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is the leading endocrine system tumor. Great advances have recently been made in understanding of the origin of these tumors and the molecular biology that makes them grow and proliferate, which have been associated to improvements in diagnostic procedures and increased availability of effective local and systemic treatments. All of the above makes thyroid cancer a paradigm of how different specialties should work together to achieve the greatest benefit for the patients. Coordination of all the procedures and patient flows should continue throughout diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up, and is essential for further optimization of resources and time. This manuscript was prepared at the request of the Working Group on Thyroid Cancer of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition, and is aimed to provide a consensus document on the definition, composition, requirements, structure, and operation of a multidisciplinary team for the comprehensive care of patients with thyroid cancer. For this purpose, we have included contributions by several professionals from different specialties with experience in thyroid cancer treatment at centers where multidisciplinary teams have been working for years, with the aim of developing a practical consensus applicable in clinical practice.

  2. Assessment of the cortisol awakening response: Expert consensus guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, Tobias; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Kudielka, Brigitte M; Adam, Emma K; Pruessner, Jens C; Wüst, Stefan; Dockray, Samantha; Smyth, Nina; Evans, Phil; Hellhammer, Dirk H; Miller, Robert; Wetherell, Mark A; Lupien, Sonia J; Clow, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The cortisol awakening response (CAR), the marked increase in cortisol secretion over the first 30-45 min after morning awakening, has been related to a wide range of psychosocial, physical and mental health parameters, making it a key variable for psychoneuroendocrinological research. The CAR is typically assessed from self-collection of saliva samples within the domestic setting. While this confers ecological validity, it lacks direct researcher oversight which can be problematic as the validity of CAR measurement critically relies on participants closely following a timed sampling schedule, beginning with the moment of awakening. Researchers assessing the CAR thus need to take important steps to maximize and monitor saliva sampling accuracy as well as consider a range of other relevant methodological factors. To promote best practice of future research in this field, the International Society of Psychoneuroendocrinology initiated an expert panel charged with (i) summarizing relevant evidence and collective experience on methodological factors affecting CAR assessment and (ii) formulating clear consensus guidelines for future research. The present report summarizes the results of this undertaking. Consensus guidelines are presented on central aspects of CAR assessment, including objective control of sampling accuracy/adherence, participant instructions, covariate accounting, sampling protocols, quantification strategies as well as reporting and interpreting of CAR data. Meeting these methodological standards in future research will create more powerful research designs, thus yielding more reliable and reproducible results and helping to further advance understanding in this evolving field of research. PMID:26563991

  3. [Consensus statement for accreditation of multidisciplinary thyroid cancer units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Juan José; Galofré, Juan Carlos; Oleaga, Amelia; Grande, Enrique; Mitjavila, Mercedes; Moreno, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is the leading endocrine system tumor. Great advances have recently been made in understanding of the origin of these tumors and the molecular biology that makes them grow and proliferate, which have been associated to improvements in diagnostic procedures and increased availability of effective local and systemic treatments. All of the above makes thyroid cancer a paradigm of how different specialties should work together to achieve the greatest benefit for the patients. Coordination of all the procedures and patient flows should continue throughout diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up, and is essential for further optimization of resources and time. This manuscript was prepared at the request of the Working Group on Thyroid Cancer of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition, and is aimed to provide a consensus document on the definition, composition, requirements, structure, and operation of a multidisciplinary team for the comprehensive care of patients with thyroid cancer. For this purpose, we have included contributions by several professionals from different specialties with experience in thyroid cancer treatment at centers where multidisciplinary teams have been working for years, with the aim of developing a practical consensus applicable in clinical practice. PMID:26456892

  4. 多囊卵巢综合征妇女的心血管风险评估和心血管疾病预防:雄激素过多和多囊卵巢综合征(AE-PCOS)学会的共识声明%Assessment of cardiovascular risk and prevention of cardiovascular disease in women with the polycystic ovary syndrome: A consensus statement by the Androgen Excess and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome( AE-PCOS ) Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李江源

    2010-01-01

    @@ 多囊卵巢综合征(PCOS)是一种常见的内分泌疾病,累及6%~10%的育龄妇女,临床表现包括高雄激素血症、排卵障碍和多囊卵巢.虽然PCOS妇女在育龄期发生心血管事件的证据不多,但现有资料表明,典型PCOS妇女中心血管疾病(CVD)发生率增高.

  5. Autophagy in cardiovascular biology

    OpenAIRE

    Lavandero, Sergio; Chiong, Mario; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. As such, there is great interest in identifying novel mechanisms that govern the cardiovascular response to disease-related stress. First described in failing hearts, autophagy within the cardiovascular system has been widely characterized in cardiomyocytes, cardiac fibroblasts, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and macrophages. In all cases, a window of optimal autophagic activity appears to be critical to the mai...

  6. Cardiovascular molecular MR imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, H J; van der Meer, R. W.; Roos, A. (Anna); Bax, J J

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular molecular imaging is a rapidly evolving field of research, aiming to image and quantify molecular and cellular targets in vivo. MR imaging has some inherent properties that make it very suitable for cardiovascular molecular imaging. Until now, only a limited number of studies have been published on cardiovascular molecular imaging using MR imaging. Review In the current review, MR techniques that have already shown potential are discussed. Metabolic MR imaging can ...

  7. From Social Network (Centralized vs. Decentralized) to Collective Decision-Making (Unshared vs. Shared Consensus)

    OpenAIRE

    Cédric Sueur; Jean-Louis Deneubourg; Odile Petit

    2012-01-01

    Relationships we have with our friends, family, or colleagues influence our personal decisions, as well as decisions we make together with others. As in human beings, despotism and egalitarian societies seem to also exist in animals. While studies have shown that social networks constrain many phenomena from amoebae to primates, we still do not know how consensus emerges from the properties of social networks in many biological systems. We created artificial social networks that represent the...

  8. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  9. ESGAR consensus statement on liver MR imaging and clinical use of liver-specific contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop a consensus and provide updated recommendations on liver MR imaging and the clinical use of liver-specific contrast agents. The European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) formed a multinational European panel of experts, selected on the basis of a literature review and their leadership in the field of liver MR imaging. A modified Delphi process was adopted to draft a list of statements. Descriptive and Cronbach's statistics were used to rate levels of agreement and internal reliability of the consensus. Three Delphi rounds were conducted and 76 statements composed on MR technique (n = 17), clinical application of liver-specific contrast agents in benign, focal liver lesions (n = 7), malignant liver lesions in non-cirrhotic (n = 9) and in cirrhotic patients (n = 18), diffuse and vascular liver diseases (n = 12), and bile ducts (n = 13). The overall mean score of agreement was 4.84 (SD ±0.17). Full consensus was reached in 22 % of all statements in all working groups, with no full consensus reached on diffuse and vascular diseases. The consensus provided updated recommendations on the methodology, and clinical indications, of MRI with liver specific contrast agents in the study of liver diseases. (orig.)

  10. ESGAR consensus statement on liver MR imaging and clinical use of liver-specific contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, E.; Boraschi, P.; Bartolozzi, C. [University of Pisa, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Bali, M.A.; Matos, C. [Hopital Erasme, MRI Clinics, Department of Radiology, Bruxelles (Belgium); Ba-Ssalamah, A. [The General Hospital of the Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Brancatelli, G. [University of Palermo, Department of Radiology, Palermo (Italy); Alves, F.C. [University Hospital of Coimbra, Medical Imaging Department and Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); Grazioli, L. [Spedali Civili di Brescia, Department of Radiology, Brescia (Italy); Helmberger, T. [Academic Teaching Hospital of the Technical University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany); Lee, J.M. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Division of Abdominal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Manfredi, R. [University of Verona, Department of Radiology, Verona (Italy); Marti-Bonmati, L. [Hospital Universitario y Politecnico La Fe, Area Clinica de Imagen Medica, Valencia (Spain); Merkle, E.M. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland); Op De Beeck, B. [Antwerp University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Schima, W. [KH Goettlicher Heiland, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern and Sankt Josef-Krankenhaus, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Skehan, S. [St Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Vilgrain, V. [Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, APHP, Hopital Beaujon, Radiology Department, Clichy, Paris (France); Zech, C. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Abteilungsleiter Interventionelle Radiologie, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    To develop a consensus and provide updated recommendations on liver MR imaging and the clinical use of liver-specific contrast agents. The European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) formed a multinational European panel of experts, selected on the basis of a literature review and their leadership in the field of liver MR imaging. A modified Delphi process was adopted to draft a list of statements. Descriptive and Cronbach's statistics were used to rate levels of agreement and internal reliability of the consensus. Three Delphi rounds were conducted and 76 statements composed on MR technique (n = 17), clinical application of liver-specific contrast agents in benign, focal liver lesions (n = 7), malignant liver lesions in non-cirrhotic (n = 9) and in cirrhotic patients (n = 18), diffuse and vascular liver diseases (n = 12), and bile ducts (n = 13). The overall mean score of agreement was 4.84 (SD ±0.17). Full consensus was reached in 22 % of all statements in all working groups, with no full consensus reached on diffuse and vascular diseases. The consensus provided updated recommendations on the methodology, and clinical indications, of MRI with liver specific contrast agents in the study of liver diseases. (orig.)

  11. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates, and the European Society of Anaesthesiology Guideline: Non-anesthesiologist administration of propofol for GI endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumonceau, J.M.; Riphaus, A.; Aparicio, J.R.;

    2010-01-01

    Propofol sedation by non-anesthesiologists is an upcoming sedation regimen in several countries throughout Europe. Numerous studies have shown the efficacy and safety of this sedation regimen in gastrointestinal endoscopy. Nevertheless, this issue remains highly controversial. The aim of this...... evidence- and consensus-based set of guideline is to provide non-anesthesiologists with a comprehensive framework for propofol sedation during digestive endoscopy. This guideline results from a collaborative effort from representatives of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), the...... European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates (ESGENA) and the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA). These three societies have endorsed the present guideline....

  12. Expert consensus of clinical application of the bone metabolic and biochemical markers, by Osteoporosis Committee of Chinese Gerontological Society%中国老年学学会骨质疏松委员会骨代谢生化指标临床应用专家共识

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张萌萌

    2014-01-01

    , with high sensitivity and specificity.They have been used in osteoporosis diagnosis, prediction of fracture risk, curative effect observation of drug treatment, and the differential diagnosis of metabolic bone disease.They have important application value in the research of the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, drugs for treatment of osteoporosis, and the epidemiological study.The clinical use of the bone metabolic and biochemical markers is getting popular due to the mature of the detection technology.However, the test results vary because of different source of the specimen, different methods, different equipment, different reagents, different ages, different races, and different gender.So far, there is no unified detection standard of bone metabolic and biochemical markers in the world.Therefore, we collect and summarize the biological role and clinical significance of bone metabolic and biochemical markers, application technology, and quality control in this paper, in order to provide a readable, applicable, and well referred material to colleagues.We look forward to promoting the detection technology for bone metabolic and biochemical markers in clinic, standardizing detection process, and establishing scientific reference range through the consensus, so that the bone metabolic and biochemical markers can play an important role in the standardization of osteoporosis diagnosis and treatment, anti-osteoporosis drug efficacy evaluation, and scientific research.

  13. April 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The April 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 4/23/2014 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 15 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. It was announced that there will be a wine tasting with the California, New Mexico and Colorado Thoracic Societies at the American Thoracic Society International Meeting. The tasting will be led by Peter Wagner and is scheduled for the Cobalt Room in the Hilton San Diego Bayfront on Tuesday, May 20, from 4-8 PM. Guideline development was again discussed. The consensus was to await publication of the IDSA Cocci Guidelines and respond appropriately. George Parides, Arizona Chapter Representative, gave a presentation on Hill Day. Representatives of the Arizona, New Mexico and Washington Thoracic Societies met with their Congressional delegations, including Rep. David Schweikert, to discuss the Cigar Bill, NIH funding, and the Medicare Sustainable Growth ...

  14. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Webinars Publications & Resources Clinical Practice Guidelines SAMBA Link Digital ... We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, encourages research ...

  15. Dynamic Average Consensus and Consensusability of General Linear Multiagent Systems with Random Packet Dropout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Min Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the consensus problem of general linear discrete-time multiagent systems (MASs with random packet dropout that happens during information exchange between agents. The packet dropout phenomenon is characterized as being a Bernoulli random process. A distributed consensus protocol with weighted graph is proposed to address the packet dropout phenomenon. Through introducing a new disagreement vector, a new framework is established to solve the consensus problem. Based on the control theory, the perturbation argument, and the matrix theory, the necessary and sufficient condition for MASs to reach mean-square consensus is derived in terms of stability of an array of low-dimensional matrices. Moreover, mean-square consensusable conditions with regard to network topology and agent dynamic structure are also provided. Finally, the effectiveness of the theoretical results is demonstrated through an illustrative example.

  16. Arsenic and cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianchi F.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of epidemiologic, experimental and clinical evidence shows that arsenic may exert relevant cardiovascular effects with early damage such as endothelial dysfunction. Early biomarkers of cardiovascular damage together with markers of exposure, genetic and epigenetic effects, DNA damage, apoptosis, oxidative stress remain unexplored and a study is ongoing in Italy.

  17. Cardiovascular manifestations in hyperthyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Vairamani Kandan; Sathyamurthy P; Rajkumar M; Lavanya Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is well known that thyroid hormone directly affects the heart and peripheral vascular system. In hyperthyroidism, cardiovascular manifestations are frequent findings. Atrial arrhythmias, limitations in exercise tolerance, and congestive heart failure were reported to occur more common in older patients as a result of hyperthyroidism. Cardiovascular signs of hyperthyroidism include tachycardia, widened pulse pressure, marked increase in cardiac output with impaired cardiovascula...

  18. Lifestyle in Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.O. Younge (John)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Globally, the burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is still increasing. However, in recent decades, better treatment modalities have led to less cardiovascular related deaths. After years of research, we now generally accept that lifestyle factors are the most importa

  19. Lack of consensus in social systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benczik, I. J.; Benczik, S. Z.; Schmittmann, B.; Zia, R. K. P.

    2008-05-01

    We propose an exactly solvable model for the dynamics of voters in a two-party system. The opinion formation process is modeled on a random network of agents. The dynamical nature of interpersonal relations is also reflected in the model, as the connections in the network evolve with the dynamics of the voters. In the infinite time limit, an exact solution predicts the emergence of consensus, for arbitrary initial conditions. However, before consensus is reached, two different metastable states can persist for exponentially long times. One state reflects a perfect balancing of opinions, the other reflects a completely static situation. An estimate of the associated lifetimes suggests that lack of consensus is typical for large systems.

  20. Consensus in personality judgments at zero acquaintance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, L; Kenny, D A; Malloy, T E

    1988-09-01

    This research focused on the target effect on a perceiver's judgments of personality when the perceiver and the target are unacquainted. The perceiver was given no opportunity to interact with the target, a condition we refer to as zero acquaintance. We reasoned that in order to make personality judgments, perceivers would use the information available to them (physical appearance). Consensus in personality judgments would result, then, from shared stereotypes about particular physical appearance characteristics. Results from three separate studies with 259 subjects supported this hypothesis. On two of the five dimensions (extraversion and conscientiousness) on which subjects rated each other, a significant proportion of variance was due to the stimulus target. Consensus on judgments of extraversion appears to have been largely mediated by judgments of physical attractiveness. Across the three studies there was also evidence that the consensus in judgments on these two dimensions had some validity, in that they correlated with self-judgments on those two dimensions. PMID:3171912

  1. Fastest Distributed Consensus on Petal Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Jafarizadeh, Saber

    2010-01-01

    Providing an analytical solution for the problem of finding Fastest Distributed Consensus (FDC) is one of the challenging problems in the field of sensor networks. Here in this work we present analytical solution for the problem of fastest distributed consensus averaging algorithm by means of stratification and semi-definite programming, for two particular types of Petal networks, namely symmetric and Complete Cored Symmetric (CCS) Petal networks. Our method in this paper is based on convexity of fastest distributed consensus averaging problem, and inductive comparing of the characteristic polynomials initiated by slackness conditions in order to find the optimal weights. Also certain types of leaves are introduced along with their optimal weights which are not achievable by the method used in this work if these leaves are considered individually.

  2. 'The ravages of permissiveness': sex education and the permissive society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampshire, James; Lewis, Jane

    2004-01-01

    In this article we explore how sex education in schools has become an adversarial political issue. Although sex education has never been a wholly uncontroversial subject, we show that for two decades after the Second World War there was a broad consensus among policy-makers that it offered a solution to public health and social problems, especially venereal disease. From the late 1960s, this consensus came under attack. As part of a wider effort to reverse the changes associated with the 'permissive' society and legislation of the late 1960s, moral traditionalists and pro-family campaigners sought to problematize sex education. They depicted it as morally corrupting and redefined it as a problem rather than a public health solution. Henceforth, the politics of sex education became increasingly polarized and adversarial. We conclude that the fractious debates about sex education in the 1980s and 1990s are a legacy of this reaction against the permissive society.

  3. Consensus dynamics on random rectangular graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Sheerin, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    A random rectangular graph (RRG) is a generalization of the random geometric graph (RGG) in which the nodes are embedded into a rectangle with side lengths a and b = 1 / a, instead of on a unit square [ 0 , 1 ] 2. Two nodes are then connected if and only if they are separated at a Euclidean distance smaller than or equal to a certain threshold radius r. When a = 1 the RRG is identical to the RGG. Here we apply the consensus dynamics model to the RRG. Our main result is a lower bound for the time of consensus, i.e., the time at which the network reaches a global consensus state. To prove this result we need first to find an upper bound for the algebraic connectivity of the RRG, i.e., the second smallest eigenvalue of the combinatorial Laplacian of the graph. This bound is based on a tight lower bound found for the graph diameter. Our results prove that as the rectangle in which the nodes are embedded becomes more elongated, the RRG becomes a 'large-world', i.e., the diameter grows to infinity, and a poorly-connected graph, i.e., the algebraic connectivity decays to zero. The main consequence of these findings is the proof that the time of consensus in RRGs grows to infinity as the rectangle becomes more elongated. In closing, consensus dynamics in RRGs strongly depend on the geometric characteristics of the embedding space, and reaching the consensus state becomes more difficult as the rectangle is more elongated.

  4. Overlapping community detection using weighted consensus clustering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LINTAO YANG; ZETAI YU; JING QIAN; SHOUYIN LIU

    2016-10-01

    Many overlapping community detection algorithms have been proposed. Most of them are unstable and behave non-deterministically. In this paper, we use weighted consensus clustering for combining multiple base covers obtained by classic non-deterministic algorithms to improve the quality of the results. We first evaluate a reliability measure for each community in all base covers and assign a proportional weight to each one. Then we redefine the consensus matrix that takes into account not only the common membership of nodes, but also the reliability of the communities. Experimental results on both artificial and real-world networks show that our algorithm can find overlapping communities accurately.

  5. Refractions of Civil Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuzmanovic, Daniella

    The thesis investigates various perceptions of civil society among civic activists in Turkey, and how these perceptions are produced and shaped. The thesis is an anthropological contribution to studies of civil society in general, as well as to studies on political culture in Turkey....

  6. Fieldwork in Transforming Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Ed; Michailova, Snejina

    The contributors to this text discuss the personal and professional challenges of conducting fieldwork in the difficult, sometimes threatening contexts of the transforming societies of post-socialist Europe and China.......The contributors to this text discuss the personal and professional challenges of conducting fieldwork in the difficult, sometimes threatening contexts of the transforming societies of post-socialist Europe and China....

  7. Civil Society and Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgård, Lars

    An illustration of how important the relationship is between civil society anbd governance. A short historic journey with four snapshots of times and situations that have provided interesting evidence about the connection between civil society and governance. My goal for the short historic journe...... is to make clear and hopefully even verify that providing knowledge about the impact of civil society and citizens’ participation on governance is one of the most urgent research tasks in the current period of time.......An illustration of how important the relationship is between civil society anbd governance. A short historic journey with four snapshots of times and situations that have provided interesting evidence about the connection between civil society and governance. My goal for the short historic journey...

  8. Cardiovascular comorbiditiy in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurcharan Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The chronic inflammatory nature of psoriasis is also thought to predispose patients to other diseases with an inflammatory component, the most notable being cardiovascular and metabolic (cardiometabolite disorders. This concept is supported by studies showing that psoriasis is associated with cardiovascular risk factors like diabetes, obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking and diseases including MI. Given the increased prevalence of cardiovascular co morbidities in patients, dermatologists treating psoriasis need to approach the disease as a potentially multisystem disorder and must alert these patients to the potentially negative effects of their disease.

  9. Teacher Effectiveness in Physical Education--Consensus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Judith

    2014-01-01

    This article synthesizes the series of manuscripts on teacher effectiveness in physical education recently published by the "Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport" and highlights both the consensus and points of disagreement. Although there is much agreement as to the mission to develop a physically active lifestyle, there is a great…

  10. Adaptive bipartite consensus on coopetition networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiangping; Zhu, Hong

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a bipartite consensus tracking problem is considered for a group of autonomous agents on a coopetition network, on which the agents interact cooperatively and competitively simultaneously. The coopetition network involves positive and negative edges and is conveniently modeled by a signed graph. Additionally, the dynamics of all the agents are subjected to unknown disturbances, which are represented by linearly parameterized models. An adaptive estimation scheme is designed for each agent by virtue of the relative position measurements and the relative velocity measurements from its neighbors. Then a consensus tracking law is proposed for a new distributed system, which uses the relative measurements as the new state variables. The convergence of the consensus tracking error and the parameter estimation are analyzed even when the coopetition network is time-varying and no more global information about the bounds of the unknown disturbances is available to all the agents. Finally, some simulation results are provided to demonstrate the formation of the bipartite consensus on the coopetition network.

  11. Consumer and professional standards: working towards consensus

    OpenAIRE

    C. Williamson

    2000-01-01

    Standards of treatment and care should be acceptable to healthcare consumers as well as to healthcare professionals. A simple categorisation of standards according to their acceptability to consumers is outlined. Professional/consumer groups which review and set standards are discussed, with emphasis on the principles of partnership. Working together towards consensus can be difficult but is now an important way forward.

  12. Introduction: experts and consensus in social science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Boumans; C. Martini

    2014-01-01

    The ideals of science as objectivity and consensus are - unsurprisingly - not so easy to attain in scientific practice. Science is ultimately a product of individual scientists with their own personal backgrounds and experiences, and there is no unique methodology to de-personalize and objectify kno

  13. Consensus among Economics Teachers from Transition Economies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leet, Don R.; Lang, Nancy A.

    2010-01-01

    The authors analyze the economic opinions of teachers and economists from the former Soviet Union who participated in economic education programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education under the auspices of the National Council on Economic Education from 1995-2001. They sought to determine the level of consensus on economic topics among the…

  14. 2016 updated MASCC/ESMO consensus recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roila, Fausto; Warr, David; Hesketh, Paul J;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: An update of the recommendations for the prophylaxis of acute and delayed emesis induced by moderately emetogenic chemotherapy published after the last MASCC/ESMO antiemetic consensus conference in 2009 has been carried out. METHODS: A systematic literature search using PubMed from Janua...

  15. Consensus over peri-implantaire infecties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Winkelhoff, A J

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, in a workshop of the European Federation on Periodontology, a consensus was reached concerning oral peri-implant infections on the basis of the state of the art in the relevant sciences. Important conclusions were that peri-implant mucositis occurs in 80% of subjects with oral implants, and

  16. Discontinuities and hysteresis in quantized average consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceragioli, Francesca; Persis, Claudio De; Frasca, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    We consider continuous-time average consensus dynamics in which the agents’ states are communicated through uniform quantizers. Solutions to the resulting system are defined in the Krasowskii sense and are proven to converge to conditions of ‘‘practical consensus’’. To cope with undesired chattering

  17. Health Promoting Schools: Consensus, Strategies, and Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnab, Andrew J.; Gagnon, Faith A.; Stewart, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to summarize a consensus statement generated on the current challenges, strategies, and potential of health promoting schools (HPS) at a 2011 colloquium at the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study where 40 people from five continents came together to share their global and regional experience surrounding…

  18. 3rd BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS ON Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  19. International Consensus for ultrasound lesions in gout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez, Marwin; Schmidt, Wolfgang A; Thiele, Ralf G;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To produce consensus-based definitions of the US elementary lesions in gout and to test their reliability in a web-based exercise. METHODS: The process consisted of two steps. In the first step a written Delphi questionnaire was developed from a systematic literature review and expert ...

  20. Blood pressure and control of cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith A Whitworth

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Judith A WhitworthJohn Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaAbstract: Two key early 20th century notions, the first the primacy of diastolic pressure in determining risk, and the second that hypertension is a discrete disorder, have proved to be incorrect. We now recognize the primacy of systolic pressure as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and that hypertension is an arbitrary definition. In the early 21st century, we are moving away from a dichotomous approach to risk classification, and away from notions of hypertension and normotension towards an appreciation that blood pressure-related risk is continuous. In parallel, there has been a paradigm shift from a single risk factor approach to comprehensive cardiovascular disease risk prevention. Accordingly, prevention of cardiovascular disease requires a focus on lowering of blood pressure and modification of associated risk factors rather than simply treatment of hypertension. This emphasis is reflected in the World Health Organization (WHO – International Society of Hypertension (ISH 2003 statement on management of hypertension.Keywords: blood pressure, hypertension, cardiovascular risk, treatment

  1. Climate and Ancient Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Climate, and human responses to it, have a strongly interconnected relationship. This when climate change occurs, the result of either natural or human causes, societies should react and adapt to these. But do they? If so, what is the nature of that change, and are the responses positive...... or negative for the long-term survival of social groups? In this volume, scholars from diverse disciplines including archaeology, geology and climate sciences explore scientific and material evidence for climate changes in the past, their causes, their effects on ancient societies and how those societies...

  2. Fairness in society

    CERN Document Server

    Flomenbom, Ophir

    2011-01-01

    Models that explain the economical and political realities of nowadays societies should help all the world's citizens. Yet, the last four years showed that the current models are missing. Here we develop a dynamical society-deciders model showing that the long lasting economical stress can be solved when increasing fairness in nations. fairness is computed for each nation using indicators from economy and politics. Rather than austerity versus spending, the dynamical model suggests that solving crises in western societies is possible with regulations that reduce the stability of the deciders, while shifting wealth in the direction of the people. This shall increase the dynamics among socio-economic classes, further increasing fairness.

  3. Information society studies

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, Alistair S

    2013-01-01

    We are often told that we are ""living in an information society"" or that we are ""information workers."" But what exactly do these claims mean, and how might they be verified? In this important methodological study, Alistair S. Duff cuts through the rhetoric to get to the bottom of the ""information society thesis."" Wide-ranging in coverage, this study will be of interest to scholars in information science, communication and media studies and social theory. It is a key text for the newly-unified specialism of information society studies, and an indispensable guide to the future of this disc

  4. [Cardiovascular prevention - 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vértes, András; Szabados, Eszter

    2016-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the main causes of premature death worldwide despite the fact that cardiovascular mortality decreased significantly in the last few decades in financially developed countries. This reduction is partly due to the modern medical and revascularisation treatments, and partly because of the effectiveness of prevention strategies such as lowering blood pressure and cholesterol level, as well as successful strategies against smoking. However, this positive trend is undermined by the striking growth in obesity and in type 2 diabetes mellitus, which could also be successfully controlled by lifestyle changes. This summary is based on an overview of the recent (2016) European Guideline for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases. Here the authors describe preventive strategies and goals to be achieved, the most important lifestyle suggestions, and the secondary prevention medical treatment for patients with already established cardiovascular disease. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(38), 1526-1531. PMID:27640620

  5. Depression and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Steven M; Rumsfeld, John S

    2015-10-01

    There is a wealth of evidence linking depression to increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and worse outcomes among patients with known CVD. In addition, there are safe and effective treatments for depression. Despite this, depression remains under-recognized and undertreated in patients at risk for or living with CVD. In this review, we first summarize the evidence linking depression to increased risk of CVD and worse patient outcomes. We then review the mechanisms by which depression may contribute to cardiovascular risk and poor cardiovascular outcomes. We then summarize prior studies of depression treatment on cardiovascular outcomes. Finally, we offer guidance in the identification and management of depression among CVD populations. Given that 1 in 4 CVD patients has concurrent depression, application of these best-practices will assist providers in achieving optimal outcomes for their CVD patients. PMID:25850976

  6. Testosterone and Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloner, Robert A; Carson, Culley; Dobs, Adrian; Kopecky, Stephen; Mohler, Emile R

    2016-02-01

    Testosterone (T) is the principal male sex hormone. As men age, T levels typically fall. Symptoms of low T include decreased libido, vasomotor instability, and decreased bone mineral density. Other symptoms may include depression, fatigue, erectile dysfunction, and reduced muscle strength/mass. Epidemiology studies show that low levels of T are associated with more atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular events. However, treating hypogonadism in the aging male has resulted in discrepant results in regard to its effect on cardiovascular events. Emerging studies suggest that T may have a future role in treating heart failure, angina, and myocardial ischemia. A large, prospective, long-term study of T replacement, with a primary endpoint of a composite of adverse cardiovascular events including myocardial infarction, stroke, and/or cardiovascular death, is needed. The Food and Drug Administration recently put additional restrictions on T replacement therapy labeling and called for additional studies to determine its cardiac safety. PMID:26846952

  7. Cardiovascular modeling and diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.; Hashem, S.; Kouzes, R.T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, a novel approach to modeling and diagnosing the cardiovascular system is introduced. A model exhibits a subset of the dynamics of the cardiovascular behavior of an individual by using a recurrent artificial neural network. Potentially, a model will be incorporated into a cardiovascular diagnostic system. This approach is unique in that each cardiovascular model is developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled variables and the variables of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis. This approach also exploits sensor fusion to optimize the utilization of biomedical sensors. The advantage of sensor fusion has been demonstrated in applications including control and diagnostics of mechanical and chemical processes.

  8. [Botulinum neurotoxin type A in neurogenic detrusor overactivity: consensus paper of the Working Group Neuro-Urology of the DMGP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böthig, R; Kaufmann, A; Bremer, J; Pannek, J; Domurath, B

    2014-04-01

    The use of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT-A) for suppression of neurogenic detrusor overactivity was first reported in 2000. Since that time, this method has gained widespread use. A number of recommendations and consensus statements have already been published. The current practice-oriented consensus paper takes into account recent developments and the over 10-year experience of most members of the Working Group Neuro-Urology of the German-speaking Medical Society for Paraplegia (DMGP) with a focus on the use of BoNT-A in paraplegic patients and in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:24604016

  9. [SEIP-SERPE-SEOP Consensus document on the treatment of uncomplicated acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra-Lozano, J; Calvo, C; Huguet Carol, R; Rodrigo, C; Núñez, E; Obando, I; Rojo, P; Merino, R; Pérez, C; Downey, F J; Colino, E; García, J J; Cilleruelo, M J; Torner, F; García, L

    2015-04-01

    This is a Consensus Document of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (Sociedad Española de Infectología Pediatrica), Spanish Society of Paediatric Rheumatology (Sociedad Española de Reumatología Pediátrica) and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Orthopaedics (Sociedad Española de Ortopedia Pediátrica), on the treatment of uncomplicated acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. A review is presented on the medical and surgical treatment of acute osteoarticular infection, defined as a process with less than 14 days of symptomatology, uncomplicated and community-acquired. The different possible options are evaluated based on the best available scientific knowledge, and a number of evidence-based recommendations for clinical practice are provided.

  10. North American Menopause Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advertisements NAMS in the News Press Room Assistance Society Overview Top 10 reasons why NAMS is your ... fully updated and referenced 5th edition of the Society’s leading professional resource, featuring the latest comprehensive clinical ...

  11. National Multiple Sclerosis Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Join the Community Stay Informed Corporate Support National Multiple Sclerosis Society Our Mission: People affected by MS can ... 10.5 Million in New Research to Stop Multiple Sclerosis, Restore Function and End MS Forever October 11, ...

  12. Valie EXPORT Society Rooseumis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2002-01-01

    Malmös Rooseumi Kaasaegse Kunsti Keskuses näitus "Baltic Babel". Projekt koosneb Läänemeremaade linnades tegutsevate innovatiivsete gruppide aktsioonidest. Kuraator Charles Esche. Esinejatest (Eestist Valie Export Society: Kadi Estland, Killu Sukmit)

  13. Changing anthropology, changing society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varughese, Heather

    2009-12-01

    Fifty years after the founding of the field of medical anthropology, the Society for Medical Anthropology of the American Anthropological Association held its first independent meeting on September 24-27, 2009, at Yale University.

  14. Valie EXPORT Society. Overlok

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2001-01-01

    Valie EXPORT Society asutasid 23. okt. 1999. a. Frankfurdis Kadi Estland, Killu Sukmit ja Mari Laanemets, kui olid külastanud austria naiskunstniku Valie Exporti näitust. Rühmituse aktsioonide kirjeldus

  15. Society of Gynecologic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... December 1 – 3, 2016. This year’s course includes didactic lectures by outstanding surgeons and educators who are ... held in high esteem by other medical societies. Education Evidence-Based Medicine article published in OBG Mangement ...

  16. Pediatric Endocrinology Nurses Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... International Welcome to PENS The Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society (PENS) is committed to the development and advancement of nurses in the art and science of pediatric endocrinology nursing. Learn More ...

  17. American Society of Nephrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... join the conversation today. Learn More The American Society of Nephrology (ASN) leads the fight against kidney diseases by educating health professionals, sharing new knowledge, advancing research, and advocating the highest quality care ...

  18. Information Practices in Contemporary Cosmopolitan Civil Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Olsson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available What is the nature of information?  What is its role in Contemporary Cosmopolitan Civil Society? What is the basis for the widespread current belief that we live in an ‘information society’? The present article will examine these questions through an examination of the historical origins of established ‘scientized’ views of information in the philosophy of the Enlightenment. It describes how postmodern and poststructuralist critique of such positivist approaches led to profound paradigmatic and methodological shifts in the social and information studies fields in recent decades. It consider how the emergence of social constructivist approaches to information research drawing on discourse analysis, practice theory and ethnographic theories and methodologies has led to a have led researchers to a radically different understanding of central concepts such as: the influence of emergent information and communication technologies on contemporary society; the relationship between knowledge and power, the nature of expertise and authoritative information; a re-thinking of community and consensus; a re-interpretation of notions of space and place in information dissemination, sharing and use and a reconsideration of the role of the researcher. The article illustrates this changing research landscape through reference to the work of scholars in the Cosmopolitan Civil Societies Research Centre at the University of Technology, Sydney, published in the Centre’s journal.

  19. Italian consensus on EULAR recommendations 2005 for the management of hip osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramonda

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The recommendations for the management of osteoarthritis (OA of the hip were proposed by EULAR in 2005. Among the most important objectives of the expert charged to provide these recommendations were their wide dissemination and implementation. Thus, the information generated can be used by each individual country to produce their own set of management guidelines and algorithms for treatment in primary care. According with that previously executed for the EULAR recommendation 2003 for the knee, the Italian Society of Rheumatology (SIR has organised a Consensus on the EULAR recommendations 2005 for the management of hip OA. To obtain an acceptability as large as possible, the group of experts was composed by many physicians interested in the management of hip OA, including Orthopaedics, Rheumatologists, Physiatrists, and General Practitioners. Main aim of the Consensus was to analyse the acceptability and applicability of the recommendations according to own experience and local situations in the Italy. The results of this Consensus have demonstrated that a large majority of the EULAR recommendations are endorsed by the Italian experts. Furthermore, the final document of the Italian Consensus clearly indicated the need that the specialists involved in the management of hip OA strongly encourage the dissemination of the EULAR 2005 recommendations also in Italy.

  20. The Tranquebarian Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niklas Thode

    2015-01-01

    of this development was the establishment of the Tranquebarian Society, the third learned society east of the Cape of Good Hope. The article examines the unique assemblage of scientific networks, people, instruments, institutions, and ideas of local and global origin that converged in Tranquebar, and it investigates...... the fusion of local problems and radical ideas of enlightenment, education, and improvement that united government, mission, and merchants in Tranquebar in the quest for ‘useful knowledge’....

  1. Consumption in the Information Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherebin, V. M.; Ermakova, N. A.; Makhrova, O. N.

    2010-01-01

    The current state of the economy in the developed countries make it possible to characterize them using concepts and terms such as the postindustrial society, the new economy, the service economy, the creative economy, the posteconomic society, the information society, the knowledge society, and the consumer society. Among these terms and…

  2. Nuclear technology and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This special issue of Journal of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan deals with the relation between nuclear technology and society, and is composed of four papers: (1) Nuclear energy and international politics - sociotechnics around plutonium utilization; (2) Risk recognition and benefit recognition of nuclear facilities and social acceptance; (3) Environmental risk management and radioactive waste problem; and, (4) Public administration around the relation between nuclear energy and society. (1) describes the historical development of nuclear energy since its birth, focusing on how the leading countries tried to control nuclear proliferation. Peaceful utilization of nuclear energy is closely connected with the Non-proliferation problem. (1) also discusses the relation of plutonium utilization of Japan with international society. (2) discusses how nuclear facilities can be accepted by society, analyzing the background of risk recognition, in particular, of psychological character of mass society. (3) introduces an new approach (risk-based or risk-informed regulation) of environmental risk management for radioactive waste disposal problem, focusing on HLW (high-level waste). (4) explains the approach from public administration to nuclear energy and general energy policy and introduces PPA (participatory policy analysis) as a means for policy making. (M.M.)

  3. Inter-society consensus document on treatment and prevention of bronchiolitis in newborns and infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraldi, Eugenio; Lanari, Marcello; Manzoni, Paolo; Rossi, Giovanni A; Vandini, Silvia; Rimini, Alessandro; Romagnoli, Costantino; Colonna, Pierluigi; Biondi, Andrea; Biban, Paolo; Chiamenti, Giampietro; Bernardini, Roberto; Picca, Marina; Cappa, Marco; Magazzù, Giuseppe; Catassi, Carlo; Urbino, Antonio Francesco; Memo, Luigi; Donzelli, Gianpaolo; Minetti, Carlo; Paravati, Francesco; Di Mauro, Giuseppe; Festini, Filippo; Esposito, Susanna; Corsello, Giovanni

    2014-10-24

    Acute bronchiolitis is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection and hospitalization in children less than 1 year of age worldwide. It is usually a mild disease, but some children may develop severe symptoms, requiring hospital admission and ventilatory support in the ICU. Infants with pre-existing risk factors (prematurity, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, congenital heart diseases and immunodeficiency) may be predisposed to a severe form of the disease. Clinical diagnosis of bronchiolitis is manly based on medical history and physical examination (rhinorrhea, cough, crackles, wheezing and signs of respiratory distress). Etiological diagnosis, with antigen or genome detection to identify viruses involved, may have a role in reducing hospital transmission of the infection. Criteria for hospitalization include low oxygen saturation (bronchiolitis, and the mainstay of therapy is supportive care. This consists of nasal suctioning and nebulized 3% hypertonic saline, assisted feeding and hydration, humidified O2 delivery. The possible role of any pharmacological approach is still debated, and till now there is no evidence to support the use of bronchodilators, corticosteroids, chest physiotherapy, antibiotics or antivirals. Nebulized adrenaline may be sometimes useful in the emergency room. Nebulized adrenaline can be useful in the hospital setting for treatment as needed. Lacking a specific etiological treatment, prophylaxis and prevention, especially in children at high risk of severe infection, have a fundamental role. Environmental preventive measures minimize viral transmission in hospital, in the outpatient setting and at home. Pharmacological prophylaxis with palivizumab for RSV bronchiolitis is indicated in specific categories of children at risk during the epidemic period. Viral bronchiolitis, especially in the case of severe form, may correlate with an increased incidence of recurrent wheezing in pre-schooled children and with asthma at school age.The aim of this document is to provide a multidisciplinary update on the current recommendations for the management and prevention of bronchiolitis, in order to share useful indications, identify gaps in knowledge and drive future research.

  4. International society of neuropathology-haarlem consensus guidelines for nervous system tumor classification and grading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louis, D.N.; Perry, A.; Burger, P.; Ellison, D.W.; Reifenberger, G.; Deimling, A. Von; Aldape, K.; Brat, D.; Collins, V.P.; Eberhart, C.; Figarella-Branger, D.; Fuller, G.N.; Giangaspero, F.; Giannini, C.; Hawkins, C.; Kleihues, P.; Korshunov, A.; Kros, J.M.; Lopes, M. Beatriz; Ng, H.K.; Ohgaki, H.; Paulus, W.; Pietsch, T.; Rosenblum, M.; Rushing, E.; Soylemezoglu, F.; Wiestler, O.; Wesseling, P.

    2014-01-01

    Major discoveries in the biology of nervous system tumors have raised the question of how non-histological data such as molecular information can be incorporated into the next World Health Organization (WHO) classification of central nervous system tumors. To address this question, a meeting of neur

  5. Consensus Through Conversation How to Achieve High-Commitment Decisions

    CERN Document Server

    Dressler, Larry

    2006-01-01

    Facilitation expert Larry Dressler's Consensus Through Conversation is a guide for the effective facilitation and practice of one of business's most popular - but most widely misunderstood - decision-making models: consensus.

  6. Building Consensus on Community Standards for Reproducible Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, K. A.; Nielsen, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    As geochemists, the traditional model by which standard methods for generating, presenting, and using data have been generated relied on input from the community, the results of seminal studies, a variety of authoritative bodies, and has required a great deal of time. The rate of technological and related policy change has accelerated to the point that this historical model does not satisfy the needs of the community, publishers, or funders. The development of a new mechanism for building consensus raises a number of questions: Which aspects of our data are the focus of reproducibility standards? Who sets the standards? How do we subdivide the development of the consensus? We propose an open, transparent, and inclusive approach to the development of data and reproducibility standards that is organized around specific sub-disciplines and driven by the community of practitioners in those sub-disciplines. It should involve editors, program managers, and representatives of domain data facilities as well as professional societies, but avoid any single group to be the final authority. A successful example of this model is the Editors Roundtable, a cross section of editors, funders, and data facility managers that discussed and agreed on leading practices for the reporting of geochemical data in publications, including accessibility and format of the data, data quality information, and metadata and identifiers for samples (Goldstein et al., 2014). We argue that development of data and reproducibility standards needs to heavily rely on representatives from the community of practitioners to set priorities and provide perspective. Groups of editors, practicing scientists, and other stakeholders would be assigned the task of reviewing existing practices and recommending changes as deemed necessary. They would weigh the costs and benefits of changing the standards for that community, propose appropriate tools to facilitate those changes, work through the professional societies

  7. South American Guidelines for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Herdy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this document, the Inter-American Committee of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, together with the South American Society of Cardiology, aimed to formulate strategies, measures, and actions for cardiovascular disease prevention and rehabilitation (CVDPR. In the context of the implementation of a regional and national health policy in Latin American countries, the goal is to promote cardiovascular health and thereby decrease morbidity and mortality. The study group on Cardiopulmonary and Metabolic Rehabilitation from the Department of Exercise, Ergometry, and Cardiovascular Rehabilitation of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology has created a committee of experts to review the Portuguese version of the guideline and adapt it to the national reality. The mission of this document is to help health professionals to adopt effective measures of CVDPR in the routine clinical practice. The publication of this document and its broad implementation will contribute to the goal of the World Health Organization (WHO, which is the reduction of worldwide cardiovascular mortality by 25% until 2025. The study group's priorities are the following: • Emphasize the important role of CVDPR as an instrument of secondary prevention with significant impact on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality; • Join efforts for the knowledge on CVDPR, its dissemination, and adoption in most cardiovascular centers and institutes in South America, prioritizing the adoption of cardiovascular prevention methods that are comprehensive, practical, simple and which have a good cost/benefit ratio; • Improve the education of health professionals and patients with education programs on the importance of CVDPR services, which are directly targeted at the health system, clinical staff, patients, and community leaders, with the aim of decreasing the barriers to CVDPR implementation.

  8. Androgen therapy and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    K-CY McGrath; LS McRobb; AK Heather

    2008-01-01

    K-CY McGrath1, LS McRobb1,2, AK Heather1,21Heart Research Institute, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 2Discipline of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death in Western society today. There is a striking gender difference in CVD with men predisposed to earlier onset and more severe disease. Following the recent reevaluation and ongoing debate regarding the estrogen protection hypothesis, and given that androgen ...

  9. Using consensus building to improve utility regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utility industry and its regulatory environment are at a crossroads. Utilities, intervenors and even public utility commissions are no longer able to initiate and sustain changes unilaterally. Traditional approaches to regulation are often contentious and costly, producing results that are not perceived as legitimate or practical. Consensus building and alternative dispute resolution have the potential to help utilities, intervenors and regulators resolve a host of regulatory issues. This book traces the decline of consensus in utility regulation and delineates current controversies. It presents the theory and practice of alternative dispute resolution in utility regulation and offers a framework for evaluating the successes and failures of attempts to employ these processes. Four regulatory cases are analyzed in detail: the Pilgrim nuclear power plant outage settlement, the use of DSM collaboratives, the New Jersey resource bidding policy and the formation of integrated resource management rules in Massachusetts

  10. Stochastic stability of continuous time consensus protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Medvedev, Georgi S.

    2010-01-01

    A unified approach to studying convergence and stochastic stability of continuous time consensus protocols (CPs) is presented in this work. Our method applies to networks with directed information flow; both cooperative and noncooperative interactions; networks under weak stochastic forcing; and those whose topology and strength of connections may vary in time. The graph theoretic interpretation of the analytical results is emphasized. We show how the spectral properties, such as algebraic co...

  11. On Conditions for Convergence to Consensus

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenz, Jan; Lorenz, Dirk A.

    2008-01-01

    A new theorem on conditions for convergence to consensus of a multiagent time-dependent time-discrete dynamical system is presented. The theorem is build up on the notion of averaging maps. We compare this theorem to results by Moreau (IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, vol. 50, no. 2, 2005) about set-valued Lyapunov theory and convergence under switching communication topologies. We give examples that point out differences of approaches including examples where Moreau's theorem is not a...

  12. Consensus Paper: Neuroimmune Mechanisms of Cerebellar Ataxias

    OpenAIRE

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Adhikari, Keya; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Chattopadhyay, Partha; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Hampe, Christiane S.; Honnorat, Jérôme; Joubert, Bastien; Kakei, Shinji; Lee, Jongho; Manto, Mario; Matsunaga, Akiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nanri, Kazunori; Shanmugarajah, Priya

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, a lot of publications suggested that disabling cerebellar ataxias may develop through immune-mediated mechanisms. In this consensus paper, we discuss the clinical features of the main described immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias and address their presumed pathogenesis. Immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias include cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies, the cerebellar type of Hashimoto’s encephalopathy, primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, gluten ataxia, Mi...

  13. A Self-Categorization Explanation for Opinion Consensus Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinguang; Reid, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    The public expression of opinions (and related communicative activities) hinges upon the perception of opinion consensus. Current explanations for opinion consensus perceptions typically focus on egocentric and other biases, rather than functional cognitions. Using self-categorization theory we showed that opinion consensus perceptions flow from…

  14. Time, science and consensus: the different times involving scientific research, political decision and public opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Aparecido de

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay analyses the asymmetrical relationship between the time of scientific research and the time of the different segments interested in their results, focusing mainly on necessity to establish technical consensus about the fields of science that require rigorous investigations and texts. In the last years, civil society sectors - mainly scientific journalism, legislative power, and public opinion - has shown growing interest in participating of the decision making process that regulates science routes. In this study, we analyzed the decision making process of the Biosafety Law, as it allows research with embryonic stem cells in Brazil. The results allow us to conclude that this asymmetrical relationship between the different times (of science, scientific disclosure, public opinion, and public power contribute to the maturing of the dialog on scientific policies, as well as to the establishment of a consensus concerning science routes, which aims at the democratization of scientific work.

  15. Committed activists and the reshaping of status-quo social consensus

    CERN Document Server

    Mistry, Dina; Perra, Nicola; Baronchelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The role of committed minorities in shaping public opinion has been recently addressed with the help of multi-agent models. However, previous studies focused on homogeneous populations where zealots stand out only for their stubbornness. Here, we consider the more general case in which individuals are characterized by different propensities to communicate. In particular, we correlate commitment with a higher tendency to push an opinion, acknowledging the fact that individuals with unwavering dedication to a cause are also more active in their attempts to promote their message. We show that these \\textit{activists} are not only more efficient in spreading their message but that their efforts require an order of magnitude fewer individuals than a randomly selected committed minority to bring the population over to a new consensus. Finally, we address the role of communities, showing that partisan divisions in the society can make it harder for committed individuals to flip the status-quo social consensus.

  16. Local communities obstruct global consensus: Naming game on multi-local-world networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lou, Yang; Fan, Zhengping; Xiang, Luna

    2016-01-01

    Community structure is essential for social communications, where individuals belonging to the same community are much more actively interacting and communicating with each other than those in different communities within the human society. Naming game, on the other hand, is a social communication model that simulates the process of learning a name of an object within a community of humans, where the individuals can reach global consensus on naming an object asymptotically through iterative pair-wise conversations. The underlying communication network indicates the relationships among the individuals. In this paper, three typical topologies of human communication networks, namely random-graph, small-world and scale-free networks, are employed, which are embedded with the multi-local-world community structure, to study the naming game. Simulations show that 1) when the intra-community connections increase while the inter-community connections remain to be unchanged, the convergence to global consensus is slow ...

  17. Modeling Consensus Semantics in Social Tagging Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Zhang; Yin Zhang; Ke-Ning Gao

    2011-01-01

    In social tagging systems,people can annotate arbitrary tags to online data to categorize and index them.However,the lack of the "a priori" set of words makes it difficult for people to reach consensus about the semantics of tags and how to categorize data.Ontologies based approaches can help reaching such consensus,but they are still facing problems such as inability of model ambiguous and new concepts properly.For tags that are used very few times,since they can only be used in very specific contexts,their semantics are very clear and detailed.Although people have no consensus on these tags,it is still possible to leverage these detailed semantics to model the other tags.In this paper we introduce a random walk and spreading activation like model to represent the semantics of tags using semantics of unpopular tags.By comparing the proposed model to the classic Latent Semantic Analysis approach in a concept clustering task,we show that the proposed model can properly capture the semantics of tags.

  18. Convergence Speed of Binary Interval Consensus

    CERN Document Server

    Draief, Moez

    2012-01-01

    We consider the convergence time for solving the binary consensus problem using the interval consensus algorithm proposed by B\\' en\\' ezit, Thiran and Vetterli (2009). In the binary consensus problem, each node initially holds one of two states and the goal for each node is to correctly decide which one of these two states was initially held by a majority of nodes. We derive an upper bound on the expected convergence time that holds for arbitrary connected graphs, which is based on the location of eigenvalues of some contact rate matrices. We instantiate our bound for particular networks of interest, including complete graphs, paths, cycles, star-shaped networks, and Erd\\" os-R\\' enyi random graphs; for these graphs, we compare our bound with alternative computations. We find that for all these examples our bound is tight, yielding the exact order with respect to the number of nodes. We pinpoint the fact that the expected convergence time critically depends on the voting margin defined as the difference betwe...

  19. Marathon run: cardiovascular adaptation and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predel, Hans-Georg

    2014-11-21

    The first marathon run as an athletic event took place in the context of the Olympic Games in 1896 in Athens, Greece. Today, participation in a 'marathon run' has become a global phenomenon attracting young professional athletes as well as millions of mainly middle-aged amateur athletes worldwide each year. One of the main motives for these amateur marathon runners is the expectation that endurance exercise (EE) delivers profound beneficial health effects. However, with respect to the cardiovascular system, a controversial debate has emerged whether the marathon run itself is healthy or potentially harmful to the cardiovascular system, especially in middle-aged non-elite male amateur runners. In this cohort, exercise-induced increases in cardiac biomarkers-troponin and brain natriuretic peptide-and acute functional cardiac alterations have been observed and interpreted as potential cardiac damage. Furthermore, in the cohort of 40- to 65-year-old males engaged in intensive EE, a significant risk for the development of atrial fibrillation has been identified. Fortunately, recent studies demonstrated a normalization of the cardiac biomarkers and the functional alterations within a short time frame. Therefore, these alterations may be perceived as physiological myocardial reactions to the strenuous exercise and the term 'cardiac fatigue' has been coined. This interpretation is supported by a recent analysis of 10.9 million marathon runners demonstrating that there was no significantly increased overall risk of cardiac arrest during long-distance running races. In conclusion, intensive and long-lasting EE, e.g. running a full-distance Marathon, results in high cardiovascular strain whose clinical relevance especially for middle-aged and older athletes is unclear and remains a matter of controversy. Furthermore, there is a need for evidence-based recommendations with respect to medical screening and training strategies especially in male amateur runners over the age of

  20. From invited to uninvited participation (and back?): rethinking civil society engagement in technology assessment and development

    OpenAIRE

    Wehling, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, citizens’ and civil society engagement with science and technology has become almost synonymous with participation in institutionally organized formats of participatory technology assessment (pTA) such as consensus conferences or stakeholder dialogues. Contrary to this view, it is argued in the article that beyond these standardized models of “invited” participation, there exist various forms of “uninvited” and independent civil society engagement, which frequently not only h...

  1. 结直肠肿瘤筛查和息肉切除术后结肠镜检查的新指南美国多学科结直肠癌协作团队2012年最新共识意见%Guidelines for colonoscopy surveillance after screening and polypectomy 2012 Consensus Update by the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董丽娟; 韩英

    2013-01-01

    美国多学科结直肠癌协作团队(US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer,MSTF)包括美国胃肠病协会(American College of Gastroenterology)、美国胃肠病学会(American Gastroenterological Association)和美国胃肠内镜学会( American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy),最近更新了2006年制定的关于结直肠息肉切除术后肠镜随访监控间隔时间的共识意见.

  2. Geoethics and the Role of Professional Geoscience Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, S. W.; Palka, J. M.; Geissman, J. W.; Mogk, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    Codes of Ethics (Conduct) for geoscientists are formulated primarily by professional societies and the codes must be viewed in the context of the Goals (Missions, Values) of the societies. Our survey of the codes of approximately twenty-five societies reveals that most codes enumerate principles centered on practical issues regarding professional conduct of individuals such as plagiarism, fabrication, and falsification, and the obligation of individuals to the profession and society at large. With the exception of statements regarding the ethics of peer review, there is relatively little regarding the ethical obligations of the societies themselves. In essence, the codes call for traditionally honorable behavior of individual members. It is striking, given that the geosciences are largely relevant to the future of Earth, most current codes of societies fail to address our immediate obligations to the environment and Earth itself. We challenge professional organizations to consider the ethical obligations to Earth in both their statements of goals and in their codes of ethics. Actions by societies could enhance the efforts of individual geoscientists to serve society, especially in matters related to hazards, resources and planetary stewardship. Actions we suggest to be considered include: (1) Issue timely position statements on topics in which there is expertise and consensus (some professional societies such as AGU, GSA, AAAS, and the AMS, do this regularly, yet others not at all.); (2) Build databases of case studies regarding geoethics that can be used in university classes; (3) Hold interdisciplinary panel discussions with ethicists, scientists, and policy makers at annual meetings; (4) Foster publication in society journals of contributions relating to ethical questions; and (5) Aggressively pursue the incorporation of geoethical issues in undergraduate and graduate curricula and in continuing professional development.

  3. Healthy Satiety Effects of Paleolithic diet on Satiety and Risk factors for Cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jönsson, Tommy

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) exhibits considerable variation across agrarian societies, whereas they are virtually absent in non-agrarian societies such as hunter-gatherer and horticultural societies. When looking for lifestyle factors which could promote CVD, it therefore seems logical to focus on the agrarian lifestyle and ways in which it departs from a non-agrarian lifestyle. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate the effect of a hunter-gatherer diet (also called Paleol...

  4. Civil society sphericules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    the organization strategizes about and seeks to articulate amongst Tanzanian youth. Situated in the ‘perverse confluence’ (Dagnino, 2011) between neoliberal and radical democratic agendas in the communicative practices of civil society-driven media platforms, Femina navigates between identities as an NGO, a social...... movement and a media initiative. In the context of the growing literature on social networking sites and their affordances, dynamics and structures, the case of Femina illustrates how a civil society sphericule emerges within the dynamic co-evolution of new and old media platforms. The study is furthermore...... an example of the difficult shift in civil society practice, from service provision to an agenda of public service monitoring, social accountability and community engagement....

  5. [Cardiovascular disease in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Bauersachs, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are among the most frequent complications in pregnancies. Among them preexisting heart diseases including congenital heart disease, genetic cardiomyopathies, myocardial infarction and chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathies display a special challenge for the mother and her physicians. Moreover, the incidence of cardiovascular disease induced by or associated with pregnancy, i.e. hypertensive disorders and peripartum cardiomyopathies, has increased over the past decades. In the present overview we explain why pregnancy is a stress model for the maternal heart and summarize the current knowledge on the influence of pregnancy on preexisting cardiomyopathies. We highlight recent advances in research with regard to hypertensive complications in pregnancy and peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). Moreover, we summarize etiologies, risk factors, pathomechanisms, diagnosis, treatment, management and prognosis. Finally, interdisciplinarity between different clinical fields and basic science is a key requirement to avoid longterm damage to the cardiovascular system induced by pregnancy associated impacts and with this improve women's health in general. PMID:26800071

  6. Triglycerides and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Varbo, Anette

    2014-01-01

    After the introduction of statins, clinical emphasis first focussed on LDL cholesterol-lowering, then on the potential for raising HDL cholesterol, with less focus on lowering triglycerides. However, the understanding from genetic studies and negative results from randomised trials that low HDL...... cholesterol might not cause cardiovascular disease as originally thought has now generated renewed interest in raised concentrations of triglycerides. This renewed interest has also been driven by epidemiological and genetic evidence supporting raised triglycerides, remnant cholesterol, or triglyceride......-rich lipoproteins as an additional cause of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Triglycerides can be measured in the non-fasting or fasting states, with concentrations of 2-10 mmol/L conferring increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and concentrations greater than 10 mmol/L conferring increased risk...

  7. Expert consensus for multi-modality imaging evaluation of cardiovascular complications of radiotherapy in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Nkomo, Vuyisile T; Badano, Luigi P;

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac toxicity is one of the most concerning side effects of anti-cancer therapy. The gain in life expectancy obtained with anti-cancer therapy can be compromised by increased morbidity and mortality associated with its cardiac complications. While radiosensitivity of the heart was initially re...

  8. Science and Society Colloquium

    CERN Multimedia

    Randi, J

    1991-01-01

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  9. Pharmacogenomics and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Roden, Dan M

    2013-01-01

    Variability in drug responsiveness is a sine qua non of modern therapeutics, and the contribution of genomic variation is increasingly recognized. Investigating the genomic basis for variable responses to cardiovascular therapies has been a model for pharmacogenomics in general and has established...... resulted in changes to the product labels but also have led to development of initial clinical guidelines that consider how to facilitate incorporating genetic information to the bedside. This review summarizes the state of knowledge in cardiovascular pharmacogenomics and considers how variants described...

  10. Clocks and cardiovascular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, Sarah C.; Haines, Philip; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks in central and peripheral tissues enable the temporal synchronization and organization of molecular and physiological processes of rhythmic animals, allowing optimum functioning of cells and organisms at the most appropriate time of day. Disruption of circadian rhythms, from external or internal forces, leads to widespread biological disruption and is postulated to underlie many human conditions, such as the incidence and timing of cardiovascular disease. Here, we describe in vivo and in vitro methodology relevant to studying the role of circadian rhythms in cardiovascular function and dysfunction PMID:25707279

  11. Cardiovascular complications of cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    2008-01-01

    and electrophysiological abnormalities, an entity that is different from alcoholic heart muscle disease. Being clinically latent, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy can be unmasked by physical or pharmacological strain. Consequently, caution should be exercised in the case of stressful procedures, such as large volume paracentesis......Cardiovascular complications of cirrhosis include cardiac dysfunction and abnormalities in the central, splanchnic and peripheral circulation, and haemodynamic changes caused by humoral and nervous dysregulation. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy implies systolic and diastolic dysfunction....... The clinical significance of cardiovascular complications and cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is an important topic for future research, and the initiation of new randomised studies of potential treatments for these complications is needed.  ...

  12. Cardiovascular complications of cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    2008-01-01

    and electrophysiological abnormalities, an entity that is different from alcoholic heart muscle disease. Being clinically latent, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy can be unmasked by physical or pharmacological strain. Consequently, caution should be exercised in the case of stressful procedures, such as large volume paracentesis......Cardiovascular complications of cirrhosis include cardiac dysfunction and abnormalities in the central, splanchnic and peripheral circulation, and haemodynamic changes caused by humoral and nervous dysregulation. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy implies systolic and diastolic dysfunction....... The clinical significance of cardiovascular complications and cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is an important topic for future research, and the initiation of new randomised studies of potential treatments for these complications is needed....

  13. Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truskey, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering offers the promise of biologically based repair of injured and damaged blood vessels, valves, and cardiac tissue. Major advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering over the past few years involve improved methods to promote the establishment and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), scaffolds from decellularized tissue that may produce more highly differentiated tissues and advance clinical translation, improved methods to promote vascularization, and novel in vitro microphysiological systems to model normal and diseased tissue function. iPSC technology holds great promise, but robust methods are needed to further promote differentiation. Differentiation can be further enhanced with chemical, electrical, or mechanical stimuli. PMID:27303643

  14. [Cardiovascular complications of diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Yoshihiko

    2015-12-01

    Several lines of epidemical evidence have shown that type 2 diabetes is the most important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). It has been shown that the risk of primary prevention of CVD in patients with diabetes is equal to that of the secondary prevention in general population. In this manuscript, recent reports on the cardiac tests to detect the cardiovascular lesions will be reviewed. The data suggest that MDCT is a promising test even in the patients with diabetes. Furthermore, recent evidence of the treatment of diabetes with insulin or the drugs available recently such as DPP-4 inhibitors and SGLT-2 inhibitors will be reviewed. PMID:26666152

  15. Research in cardiovascular care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Deaton, Christi; Fitzsimmons, Donna;

    2014-01-01

    To deliver optimal patient care, evidence-based care is advocated and research is needed to support health care staff of all disciplines in deciding which options to use in their daily practice. Due to the increasing complexity of cardiac care across the life span of patients combined...... of the body of knowledge that is needed to further improve cardiovascular care. In this paper, knowledge gaps in current research related to cardiovascular patient care are identified, upcoming challenges are explored and recommendations for future research are given....

  16. Recommendations for research studies on treatment of idiopathic scoliosis: Consensus 2014 between SOSORT and SRS non-operative management committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrini, Stefano; Hresko, Timothy M; O'Brien, Joseph P; Price, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    The two main societies clinically dealing with idiopathic scoliosis are the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS), founded in 1966, and the international Society on Scoliosis Orthopedic and Rehabilitation Treatment (SOSORT), started in 2004. Inside the SRS, the Non-Operative Management Committee (SRS-NOC) has the same clinical interest of SOSORT, that is the Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation (or Non-Operative, or conservative) Management of idiopathic scoliosis patients. The aim of this paper is to present the results of a Consensus among the best experts of non-operative treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis, as represented by SOSORT and SRS, on the recommendation for research studies on treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis. The goal of the consensus statement is to establish a framework for research with clearly delineated inclusion criteria, methodologies, and outcome measures so that future meta- analysis or comparative studies could occur. A Delphi method was used to generate a consensus to develop a set of recommendations for clinical studies on treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis. It included the development of a reference scheme, which was judged during two Delphi Rounds; after this first phase, it was decided to develop the recommendations and 4 other Delphi Rounds followed. The process finished with a Consensus Meeting, that was held during the SOSORT Meeting in Wiesbaden, 8-10 May 2014, moderated by the Presidents of SOSORT (JP O'Brien) and SRS (SD Glassman) and by the Chairs of the involved Committees (SOSORT Consensus Committee: S Negrini; SRS Non-Operative Committee: MT Hresko). The Boards of the SRS and SOSORT formally accepted the final recommendations. The 18 Recommendations focused: Research needs (3), Clinically significant outcomes (4), Radiographic outcomes (3), Other key outcomes (Quality of Life, adherence to treatment) (2), Standardization of methods of non-operative research (6). PMID:25780381

  17. Evidence and consensus based guideline for the management of delirium, analgesia, and sedation in intensive care medicine. Revision 2015 (DAS-Guideline 2015) – short version

    OpenAIRE

    DAS-Taskforce 2015; Baron, Ralf; Binder, Andreas; Biniek, Rolf; Braune, Stephan; Buerkle, Hartmut; Dall, Peter; Demirakca, Sueha; Eckardt, Rahel; Eggers, Verena; Eichler, Ingolf; Fietze, Ingo; Freys, Stephan; Fründ, Andreas; Garten, Lars

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, under the guidance of the DGAI (German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine) and DIVI (German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine), twelve German medical societies published the “Evidence- and Consensus-based Guidelines on the Management of Analgesia, Sedation and Delirium in Intensive Care”. Since then, several new studies and publications have considerably increased the body of evidence, including the new recommendations from th...

  18. Evidence and consensus based guideline for the management of delirium, analgesia, and sedation in intensive care medicine. Revision 2015 (DAS-Guideline 2015) - short version

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, R.; Binder, A.; Biniek, R; Braune, S; Buerkle, H; Dall, P.; Demirakca, S; Eckardt, R; Eggers, V; Eichler, I; Fietze, I.; Freys, S; Fründ, A; Garten, L; Gohrbandt, B

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, under the guidance of the DGAI (German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine) and DIVI (German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine), twelve German medical societies published the "Evidence- and Consensus-based Guidelines on the Management of Analgesia, Sedation and Delirium in Intensive Care". Since then, several new studies and publications have considerably increased the body of evidence, including the new recommendations from th...

  19. Chemotherapy drug shortages in pediatric oncology: a consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decamp, Matthew; Joffe, Steven; Fernandez, Conrad V; Faden, Ruth R; Unguru, Yoram

    2014-03-01

    Shortages of essential drugs, including critical chemotherapy drugs, have become commonplace. Drug shortages cost significant time and financial resources, lead to adverse patient outcomes, delay clinical trials, and pose significant ethical challenges. Pediatric oncology is particularly susceptible to drug shortages, presenting an opportunity to examine these ethical issues and provide recommendations for preventing and alleviating shortages. We convened the Working Group on Chemotherapy Drug Shortages in Pediatric Oncology (WG) and developed consensus on the core ethical values and practical actions necessary for a coordinated response to the problem of shortages by institutions, agencies, and other stakeholders. The interdisciplinary and multiinstitutional WG included practicing pediatric hematologist-oncologists, nurses, hospital pharmacists, bioethicists, experts in emergency management and public policy, legal scholars, patient/family advocates, and leaders of relevant professional societies and organizations. The WG endorsed 2 core ethical values: maximizing the potential benefits of effective drugs and ensuring equitable access. From these, we developed 6 recommendations: (1) supporting national polices to prevent shortages, (2) optimizing use of drug supplies, (3) giving equal priority to evidence-based uses of drugs whether they occur within or outside clinical trials, (4) developing an improved clearinghouse for sharing drug shortage information, (5) exploring the sharing of drug supplies among institutions, and (6) developing proactive stakeholder engagement strategies to facilitate prevention and management of shortages. Each recommendation includes an ethical rationale, action items, and barriers that must be overcome. Implemented together, they provide a blueprint for effective and ethical management of drug shortages in pediatric oncology and beyond.

  20. Nationalism and state control in Russia: A weakened social consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlène Laruelle

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nationalism in Russia is played out on several registers. It is the instrument by which the ruling elites succeed in effacing (at least superficially their internal divisions and unifying the political spectrum under their banner. It can also be likened to a new form of state-proposed social contract, an attempt to remobilise society to its advantage by drawing on those elements of its cultural reservoirs that form a consensus around the theme of patriotism. Lastly, for the tiny proportion of the population committed to radical right-wing parties, it makes it possible to mobilise against the “other” at a time when massive social discontent is being expressed in xenophobic terms. Nationalism is therefore akin to an amalgam that reveals the multiplicity of current social and cultural experiences in contemporary Russia. Through nationalism, those who have lost out as a result of the reforms formulate their critique of the present and their nostalgia for the past, whereas the elites and the middle classes that have gained from these changes express their satisfaction and belief that Russia will win the game of globalisation.

  1. International consensus on ANA patterns (ICAP): the bumpy road towards a consensus on reporting ANA results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damoiseaux, Jan; von Mühlen, Carlos A; Garcia-De La Torre, Ignacio; Carballo, Orlando Gabriel; de Melo Cruvinel, Wilson; Francescantonio, Paulo Luiz Carvalho; Fritzler, Marvin J; Herold, Manfred; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Satoh, Minoru; Andrade, Luis E C; Chan, Edward K L; Conrad, Karsten

    2016-12-01

    The International Consensus on ANA Patterns (ICAP) was initiated as a workshop aiming to thoroughly discuss and achieve consensus regarding the morphological patterns observed in the indirect immunofluorescence assay on HEp-2 cells. One of the topics discussed at the second ICAP workshop, and addressed in this paper, was the harmonization of reporting ANA test results. This discussion centered on the issue if cytoplasmic and mitotic patterns should be reported as positive or negative. This report outlines the issues that impact on two major different reporting methods. Although it was appreciated by all participants that cytoplasmic and mitotic patterns are clinically relevant, implications for existing diagnostic/classification criteria for ANA-associated diseases in particular hampered a final consensus on this topic. Evidently, a more concerted action of all relevant stakeholders is required. Future ICAP workshops may help to facilitate this action. PMID:26831867

  2. Science, technology and society

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, G

    2005-01-01

    We shall discuss some aspects of science and technology, their increasing role in the society, the fast advances in modern science, the apparent decrease of interest of the young generation in basic sciences, the importance of proper science popularization for better public education and awareness in scientific fields.

  3. Italian Society of Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The abstracts of most of the papers read at the 53 National Congress of the Italian Society of Physics are presented. The Congress developed in ten sessions: high energy and elementary particle physics, physics of nuclei, condensed matter, quantum electronics, cosmic physics, geophysics, general physics, electronics and applied physics, health physics and hystory of physics. An author index is also included

  4. MARX EMBRYOLOGY OF SOCIETY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOUTERS, A

    1993-01-01

    This article presents a new interpretation of Marx's dialectical method. Marx conceived dialectics as a method for constructing a model of society. The way this model is developed is analogous to the way organisms develop according to the German embryologist Karl Ernst von Baer, and, indeed, Marx's

  5. Connecting Science with Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    awareness of the important questions of our society reflected in scientific research and of the answers produced by these research activities. The CRIS2010 conference, entitled “Bringing Science to Society”, therefore seeks to highlight the role of Current Research Information Systems for communicating...

  6. Exploratory of society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederman, L.-E.; Conte, R.; Helbing, D.; Nowak, A.; Schweitzer, F.; Vespignani, A.

    2012-11-01

    A huge flow of quantitative social, demographic and behavioral data is becoming available that traces the activities and interactions of individuals, social patterns, transportation infrastructures and travel fluxes. This has caused, together with innovative computational techniques and methods for modeling social actions in hybrid (natural and artificial) societies, a qualitative change in the ways we model socio-technical systems. For the first time, society can be studied in a comprehensive fashion that addresses social and behavioral complexity. In other words we are in the position to envision the development of large data and computational cyber infrastructure defining an exploratory of society that provides quantitative anticipatory, explanatory and scenario analysis capabilities ranging from emerging infectious disease to conflict and crime surges. The goal of the exploratory of society is to provide the basic infrastructure embedding the framework of tools and knowledge needed for the design of forecast/anticipatory/crisis management approaches to socio technical systems, supporting future decision making procedures by accelerating the scientific cycle that goes from data generation to predictions.

  7. Multiethnic Societies and Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanfield, John H., II

    1996-01-01

    Maintains that sociology must reconceptualize the meaning of multiethnic societies and regions and also advance theories about how such social organizations came into being and transform themselves through conflicting and peaceful processes. Briefly reviews traditional approaches and outlines new areas of study. (MJP)

  8. Androgen therapy and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K-CY McGrath

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available K-CY McGrath1, LS McRobb1,2, AK Heather1,21Heart Research Institute, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 2Discipline of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD remains the leading cause of death in Western society today. There is a striking gender difference in CVD with men predisposed to earlier onset and more severe disease. Following the recent reevaluation and ongoing debate regarding the estrogen protection hypothesis, and given that androgen use and abuse is increasing in our society, the alternate view that androgens may promote CVD in men is assuming increasing importance. Whether androgens adversely affect CVD in either men or women remains a contentious issue within both the cardiovascular and endocrinological fraternities. This review draws from basic science, animal and clinical studies to outline our current understanding regarding androgen effects on atherosclerosis, the major CVD, and asks where future directions of atherosclerosis-related androgen research may lie.

  9. Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. Nijhuis (Rogier)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWhereas secondary prevention of cardiovascular events through risk factor modification in patients with known coronary and carotid artery disease is recognised as cost-effective, CVD prevention by drug therapy in asymptomatic individuals has shown only modest benefits and to be relativel

  10. Gender and Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Ruijter, Hester M.; Pasterkamp, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    More women than men die of cardiovascular disease (CVD) each year in every major developed country and most emerging economies. Nonetheless, CVD has often been considered as men’s disease due to the higher rates of coronary artery disease (CAD) of men at younger age. This has led to the underestimat

  11. Cardiovascular effects of gliptins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J

    2013-02-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (commonly referred to as gliptins) are a novel class of oral antihyperglycaemic agents with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Preclinical data and mechanistic studies have indicated a possible beneficial action on blood vessels and the heart, via both glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)-dependent and GLP-1-independent effects. DPP-4 inhibition increases the concentration of many peptides with potential vasoactive and cardioprotective effects. Clinically, DPP-4 inhibitors improve several risk factors in patients with T2DM. They improve blood glucose control (mainly by reducing postprandial glycaemia), are weight neutral (or even induce modest weight loss), lower blood pressure, improve postprandial lipaemia, reduce inflammatory markers, diminish oxidative stress, and improve endothelial function. Some positive effects on the heart have also been described in patients with ischaemic heart disease or congestive heart failure, although their clinical relevance requires further investigation. Post-hoc analyses of phase II-III, controlled trials suggest a possible cardioprotective effect with a trend for a lower incidence of major cardiovascular events with gliptins than with placebo or active agents. However, the actual relationship between DPP-4 inhibition and cardiovascular outcomes remains to be proven. Major prospective clinical trials with predefined cardiovascular outcomes and involving various DPP-4 inhibitors are now underway in patients with T2DM and a high-risk cardiovascular profile.

  12. Neuropeptides in cardiovascular control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W F

    1984-12-01

    Neuropeptides can affect cardiovascular function in various ways. They can serve as cotransmitters in the autonomic nervous system; for example, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is released with acetylcholine and neuropeptide Y with norepinephrine from postganglionic neurons. Substance P and, presumably, other peptides can can affect cardiovascular function when released near blood vessels by antidromically conducted impulses in branches of stimulated sensory neurons. In the central nervous system, many different neuropeptides appear to function as transmitters or contransmittes in the neural pathways that regulate the cardiovascular system. In addition neuropeptides such as vasopressin and angiotensin II also circulate as hormones that are involved in cardiovascular control. Large doses of exogenous vasopressin are required to increase blood pressure in normal animals because the increase in total peripheral resistance produced by the hormones is accompanied by a decrease in cardiac output. However, studies with synthetic peptides that selectively antagonize the vasopressor action of vasopressin indicate that circulating vasopressin is important in maintaining blood pressure when animals are hypovolemic due to dehydration, haemorrhage or adrenocortical insufficiency. VIP dilates blood vessels and stimulates renin secretion by a direct action on the juxtaglomerular cells. Renin secretion is stimulated when the concentration of VIP in plasma exceeds 75 pmol/litre, and higher values are seen in a number of conditions. Neostigmine, a drug which increases the secretion of endogenous VIP, also increases renin secretion, and this increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Thus, VIP may be a physiologically significant renin stimulating hormone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Epigenetics and cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite advances in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD), this group of multifactorial disorders remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide. CVD is associated with multiple genetic and modifiable risk factors; however, known environmental and genetic influences can only...

  14. Developing consensus criteria for sarcopenia: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Robert R; Kiel, Douglas P

    2015-04-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength, is a major cause of impaired physical function, which contributes to mobility disability, falls and hospitalizations in older adults. Lower muscle mass and strength are also associated with lower bone mineral density and greater risk for osteoporotic fractures. Thus, identification of sarcopenia could be important for fracture prevention as it may help improve fracture risk assessment, and muscle mass and strength can be improved with exercise, even among the frailest older adults. Unfortunately, there are no consensus diagnostic criteria for sarcopenia. Consequently there is no guidance to help clinicians identify older adults with clinically meaningful low muscle mass or weakness. Further, development of novel sarcopenia therapies is hindered not only due to the difficulty in identifying participants for clinical trials, and but also because there are no validated, clinically appropriate endpoints for assessment of treatment efficacy. There is currently a major push to establish a consensus definition of sarcopenia, and recent work holds promise that this goal may be within reach. This article discusses the evolution of the definition of sarcopenia, and focuses on the latest recommended diagnostic criteria proposed by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) Sarcopenia Project. While these empirically-based cut-points for clinically important low muscle mass and weakness are a significant step forward for the sarcopenia field, important questions remain to be answered before consensus diagnostic criteria can be definitively established. Ongoing work to refine sarcopenia criteria will further advance the field and bring this important contributor to falls, fractures and disability into the mainstream of clinical care and ultimately lead to better quality of life with aging.

  15. Wireless sensor networks distributed consensus estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Cailian; Guan, Xinping

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief evaluates the cooperative effort of sensor nodes to accomplish high-level tasks with sensing, data processing and communication. The metrics of network-wide convergence, unbiasedness, consistency and optimality are discussed through network topology, distributed estimation algorithms and consensus strategy. Systematic analysis reveals that proper deployment of sensor nodes and a small number of low-cost relays (without sensing function) can speed up the information fusion and thus improve the estimation capability of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). This brief also investiga

  16. Consensus Formation on Simplicial Complex of Opinions

    CERN Document Server

    Maletic, Slobodan

    2012-01-01

    Geometric realization of opinion is considered as a simplex and the opinion space of a group of individuals is a simplicial complex whose topological features are monitored in the process of opinion formation. The agents are physically located on the nodes of the scale-free network. Social interactions include all concepts of social dynamics present in the mainstream models augmented by four additional interaction mechanisms which depend on the local properties of opinions and their overlapping properties. The results pertaining to the formation of consensus are of particular interest. An analogy with quantum mechanical pure states is established through the application of the high dimensional combinatorial Laplacian.

  17. Consensus document on European brain research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Luca, Monica; Baker, Mary; Corradetti, Renato;

    2011-01-01

    the economic and social challenge posed by management of brain diseases in European countries. To setup a platform for discussion, EBC published in 2006 a Consensus Document on European Brain Research, describing needs and achievements of research in Europe and presenting proposals for future research...... programs. Since 2006, European research in neuroscience has advanced tremendously. The present document represents an update elaborated to reflect changes in research priorities and advances in brain research that have taken place since 2006. The same approach and format have been used here as in the...

  18. Energy consensus talks collapse over nuclear issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germany's energy consensus talks, ongoing since March 1993, were brought to unsuccessful end on October 26. Representatives from the Social Democratic Party (SDP), led by Lower Saxony's prime minister, Gerhard Schroeder, failed to get approval from party leaders on continued development of advanced reactors with enhanced safety - notably the Siemens/Framatome-designed 1500-MWe European pressurized water reactor (EPR) plan, for which the prospective schedule envisages a construction start in 1998. Nor would the SDP leadership accept the continued operation of existing nuclear plans to the end of their design life (some 20 to 25 years)

  19. Multiple chemical sensitivity: a 1999 consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Consensus criteria for the definition of multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) were first identified in a 1989 multidisciplinary survey of 89 clinicians and researchers with extensive experience in, but widely differing views of, MCS. A decade later, their top 5 consensus criteria (i.e., defining MCS as [1] a chronic condition [2] with symptoms that recur reproducibly [3] in response to low levels of exposure [4] to multiple unrelated chemicals and [5] improve or resolve when incitants are removed) are still unrefuted in published literature. Along with a 6th criterion that we now propose adding (i.e., requiring that symptoms occur in multiple organ systems), these criteria are all commonly encompassed by research definitions of MCS. Nonetheless, their standardized use in clinical settings is still lacking, long overdue, and greatly needed--especially in light of government studies in the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada that revealed 2-4 times as many cases of chemical sensitivity among Gulf War veterans than undeployed controls. In addition, state health department surveys of civilians in New Mexico and California showed that 2-6%, respectively, already had been diagnosed with MCS and that 16% of the civilians reported an "unusual sensitivity" to common everyday chemicals. Given this high prevalence, as well as the 1994 consensus of the American Lung Association, American Medical Association, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission that "complaints [of MCS] should not be dismissed as psychogenic, and a thorough workup is essential," we recommend that MCS be formally diagnosed--in addition to any other disorders that may be present--in all cases in which the 6 aforementioned consensus criteria are met and no single other organic disorder (e.g., mastocytosis) can account for all the signs and symptoms associated with chemical exposure. The millions of civilians and tens of thousands of Gulf War veterans who

  20. Cardiovascular prevention guidelines in daily practice: a comparison of EUROASPIRE I, II, and III surveys in eight European countries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kotseva, Kornelia

    2009-03-14

    The first and second EUROASPIRE surveys showed high rates of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease. The third EUROASPIRE survey was done in 2006-07 in 22 countries to see whether preventive cardiology had improved and if the Joint European Societies\\' recommendations on cardiovascular disease prevention are being followed in clinical practice.

  1. Hypertriglyceridemia and Cardiovascular Diseases: Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Seung Hwan; Stephen J Nicholls; Sakuma, Ichiro; Zhao, Dong; Koh, Kwang Kon

    2016-01-01

    Residual cardiovascular risk and failure of high density lipoprotein cholesterol raising treatment have refocused interest on targeting hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and remnant cholesterol have demonstrated to be important risk factors for cardiovascular disease; this has been demonstrated in experimental, genetic, and epidemiological studies. Fibrates can reduce cardiovascular event rates with or without statins. High dose omega-3 fatty acids co...

  2. Nonfasting hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, B G; Langsted, A; Freiberg, J J

    2009-01-01

    , total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 all associate with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. These new data open the possibility that nonfasting rather than fasting lipid profiles can be used for cardiovascular risk prediction. If implemented, this would...... of cardiovascular disease and early death....

  3. International Consensus On (ICON) Pediatric Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, N. G.; Arakawa, H.; Carlsen, K.-H.; Custovic, A.; Gern, J.; Lemanske, R.; Le Souef, P.; Makela, M.; Roberts, G.; Wong, G.; Zar, H.; Akdis, C. A.; Bacharier, L. B.; Baraldi, E.; van Bever, H. P.; de Blic, J.; Boner, A.; Burks, W.; Casale, T. B.; Castro-Rodriguez, J. A.; Chen, Y. Z.; El-Gamal, Y. M.; Everard, M. L.; Frischer, T.; Geller, M.; Gereda, J.; Goh, D. Y.; Guilbert, T. W.; Hedlin, G.; Heymann, P. W.; Hong, S. J.; Hossny, E. M.; Huang, J. L.; Jackson, D. J.; de Jongste, J. C.; Kalayci, O.; Khaled, N.; Kling, S.; Kuna, P.; Lau, S.; Ledford, D. K.; Lee, S. I.; Liu, A. H.; Lockey, R. F.; Lodrup-Carlsen, K.; Lotvall, J.; Morikawa, A.; Nieto, A.; Paramesh, H.; Pawankar, R.; Pohunek, P.; Pongracic, J.; Price, D.; Robertson, C.; Rosario, N.; Rossenwasser, L. J.; Sly, P. D.; Stein, R.; Stick, S.; Szefler, S.; Taussig, L. M.; Valovirta, E.; Vichyanond, P.; Wallace, D.; Weinberg, E.; Wennergren, G.; Wildhaber, J.; Zeiger, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic lower respiratory disease in childhood throughout the world. Several guidelines and/or consensus documents are available to support medical decisions on pediatric asthma. Although there is no doubt that the use of common systematic approaches for management can considerably improve outcomes, dissemination and implementation of these are still major challenges. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), recently formed by the EAACI, AAAAI, ACAAI and WAO, has decided to propose an International Consensus on (ICON) Pediatric Asthma. The purpose of this document is to highlight the key messages that are common to many of the existing guidelines, while critically reviewing and commenting on any differences, thus providing a concise reference. The principles of pediatric asthma management are generally accepted. Overall, the treatment goal is disease control. In order to achieve this, patients and their parents should be educated to optimally manage the disease, in collaboration with health care professionals. Identification and avoidance of triggers is also of significant importance. Assessment and monitoring should be performed regularly to re-evaluate and fine-tune treatment. Pharmacotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment. The optimal use of medication can, in most cases, help patients control symptoms and reduce the risk for future morbidity. The management of exacerbations is a major consideration, independent from chronic treatment. There is a trend towards considering phenotype specific treatment choices; however this goal has not yet been achieved. PMID:22702533

  4. Geological Society of Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JohnD.Bennett; NasserEnnih; S.FelixToteu

    2005-01-01

    History and objectives,The ambitious and forward-looking decision to establish a pan-African geological society was taken during the course of a conference on African geology held in Ibadan, Nigeria in 1970. A Steering Committee was convened at that meeting under the Chairmanship of Professor Russell Black of the Department of Geology, Haile Selassie University, Addis Ababa, and the provisional constitution drafted by his Committee was approved at a second conference on African geology in Addis Ababa in 1973. Thus was the Geological Society of Africa (GSA.t) born. Its first President was Professor M O Owawoye (Nigeria) and Dr S M E1 Rabba (Sudan) became its first Secretary General.

  5. Branding Cities, Changing Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    Societal changes are seldom discussed in the literature on city branding. The time element is important because it highlights the fluctuating reality of society. The city brand message freezes the place but in fact, the city branding exercise is a continuous process. Society emerges too. City...... brands are supposed to accentuate the uniqueness of the city, be built from the bottom-up and reflect the city's identity. This paper highlights three paradoxes, pointing out that city branding processes can also make cities more alike, bring about societal changes and forge new city identities. A city...... branding campaign does not just present the city, it may change the city. The relationships between the branding exercise and the city are intertwined in the evolution of the place....

  6. Argentine radiation protection society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Argentine Radiation Protection Society (SAR) is a non profit society, member of IRPA. It was originally launched in 1987 and a formal constitution was adopted in 1983. Presently, SAR has 220 active members, professionals and technicians dedicated to a variety of disciplines related to different radiation protection aspects: medicine, industry, research and teaching. The basic SAR objectives are: to promote research and knowledge exchange on radiation protection topics and related disciplines; to promote the comprehension of radiation protection criteria with regard to existence and handling of radioactive and fissile materials and any other radiation sources; to foster the conception of radiation protection as a professional discipline and to contribute to its permanent improvement; to promote the diffusion of the information related to all radiation protection and nuclear safety aspects, and radiation protection standards and recommendations, not only within the scientific, technical and academic areas, but also to general public

  7. Transnationalising Civil Society?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Bak

    The paper takes a transnational perspective on developing an analytical framework for understanding how transnationalism interacts with civil society and how immigrant organisations use transnational strategies to challenge the pre-given positions of immigrants within given integration- and citiz......The paper takes a transnational perspective on developing an analytical framework for understanding how transnationalism interacts with civil society and how immigrant organisations use transnational strategies to challenge the pre-given positions of immigrants within given integration...... degree, what kind of groups and which types of aims are pursued via these channels and this type of engagement. The paper ends with some preliminary empirical findings of transnational engagement and organisation among Alevis and (Turkish) Assyrians in Denmark, Sweden, and Germany....

  8. l'Internet Society

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN

    1997-01-01

    Conference of Vinton "Vint" Gray Cerf in the Intercontinental Hostel. Vinton Gray Cerf (born June 23, 1943) is an American computer scientist who is commonly referred to as one of the "founding fathers of the Internet" for his key technical and managerial role, together with Bob Kahn, in the creation of the Internet and the TCP/IP protocols which it uses. He was also a co-founder (in 1992) of the Internet Society (ISOC) which is intended to both promote the views of ordinary users of the Internet, and also serve as an umbrella body for the technical groups developing the Internet (such as the Internet Engineering Task Force). He served as the first president of the Internet Society from 1992-1995.

  9. Creativity In Conscience Society

    OpenAIRE

    Ion Gh. Rosca; Dumitru Todoroi

    2011-01-01

    Creativity is a result of brain activity which differentiates individuals and could ensure an important competitive advantage for persons, for companies, and for Society in general. Very innovative branches – like software industry, computer industry, car industry – consider creativity as the key of business success. Natural Intelligence Creativity can develop basic creative activities, but Artificial Intelligence Creativity, and, especially, Conscience Intelligence Creativity should be devel...

  10. Society and Social Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janani Harish

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Society is the source of immense power. Over the past few centuries humanity has record­ed phenomenal growth in its collective capacity for accomplishment, as reflected in the 12-fold growth in global per capita income since 1800. The remarkable achievements in living standards, longevity, science, technology, industry, education, democracy, human rights, peace and global governance are the result of the exponential development of the capacity of society to harness human energies and convert them into social power for productive purposes. Today, humanity possesses the power and capabilities needed to fully meet the multi-dimensional challenges confronting global society. The source of this energy is people. Human energy is transformed into social power by the increasing reach, frequency and complexity of human relationships. Society is a complex living network of organized relationships between people. Its power issues from channelizing our collective energies in productive ways by means of organizing principles such as coordination, systems, specialization of function, hierarchy of authority, and integration. This immense social power remains largely underutilized. Social science needs to evolve a comprehensive, trans-disciplinary understanding of the roots of social power and the process by which it is generated, distributed and applied. This knowledge is the essential foundation for formulating effective social policies capable of eradicating forever persistent poverty, unemployment and social inequality. This article is based on a series of lectures delivered by the author in the WAAS-WUC course on “Toward a Trans-disciplinary Science of Society” at Dubrovnik on September 1-3, 2014. It traces the development of social power in different fields to show that human and social capital are inexhaustible in potential. The more we harness them, the more they grow. Unleashing, directing, channeling and converting human potential into social

  11. Evolvement of Classification Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Hua

    2011-01-01

    As an independent industry, the emergence of the classification society was perhaps the demand of beneficial interests between shipowners, cargo owners and insurers at the earliest time. Today, as an indispensable link of the international maritime industry, class role has changed fundamentally. Start off from the demand of the insurersSeaborne trade, transport and insurance industries began to emerge successively in the 17th century. The massive risk and benefit brought by seaborne transport provided a difficult problem to insurers.

  12. Evolution, museums and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFadden, Bruce J

    2008-11-01

    Visitors to natural history museums have an incomplete understanding of evolution. Although they are relatively knowledgeable about fossils and geological time, they have a poor understanding of natural selection. Museums in the 21st century can effectively increase public understanding of evolution through interactive displays, novel content (e.g. genomics), engaging videos and cyberexhibits that communicate to a broad spectrum of society, both within the exhibit halls as well as outside the museum.

  13. Leadership in Small Societies

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Younger

    2010-01-01

    Multi-agent simulation was used to study several styles of leadership in small societies. Populations of 50 and100 agents inhabited a bounded landscape containing a fixed number of food sources. Agents moved about the landscape in search of food, mated, produced offspring, and died either of hunger or at a predetermined maximum age. Leadership models focused on the collection and redistribution of food. The simulations suggest that individual households were more effective at meeting their ne...

  14. The management of abdominal wall hernias – in search of consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Kamil; Śmietański, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic repair is becoming an increasingly popular alternative in the treatment of abdominal wall hernias. In spite of numerous studies evaluating this technique, indications for laparoscopic surgery have not been established. Similarly, implant selection and fixation techniques have not been unified and are the subject of scientific discussion. Aim To assess whether there is a consensus on the management of the most common ventral abdominal wall hernias among recognised experts. Material and methods Fourteen specialists representing the boards of European surgical societies were surveyed to determine their choice of surgical technique for nine typical primary ventral and incisional hernias. The access method, type of operation, mesh prosthesis and fixation method were evaluated. In addition to the laparoscopic procedures, the number of tackers and their arrangement were assessed. Results In none of the cases presented was a consensus of experts obtained. Laparoscopic and open techniques were used equally often. Especially in the group of large hernias, decisions on repair methods were characterised by high variability. The technique of laparoscopic mesh fixation was a subject of great variability in terms of both method selection and the numbers of tackers and sutures used. Conclusions Recognised experts have not reached a consensus on the management of abdominal wall hernias. Our survey results indicate the need for further research and the inclusion of large cohorts of patients in the dedicated registries to evaluate the results of different surgical methods, which would help in the development of treatment algorithms for surgical education in the future. PMID:25960793

  15. Slow breathing and cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Chaddha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women worldwide. Much emphasis has been placed on the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. While depression and anxiety increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease also increases the risk of developing anxiety and depression. Thus, promoting optimal mental health may be important for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Like lowering blood pressure, lipids, and body weight, lowering anger and hostility and improving depression and anxiety may also be an important intervention in preventive cardiology. As we strive to further improve cardiovascular outcomes, the next bridge to cross may be one of offering patients nonpharmacologic means for combating daily mental stress and promoting mental health, such as yoga and pranayama. Indeed, the best preventive cardiovascular medicine may be a blend of both Western and Eastern medicine.

  16. Slow breathing and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaddha, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women worldwide. Much emphasis has been placed on the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. While depression and anxiety increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease also increases the risk of developing anxiety and depression. Thus, promoting optimal mental health may be important for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Like lowering blood pressure, lipids, and body weight, lowering anger and hostility and improving depression and anxiety may also be an important intervention in preventive cardiology. As we strive to further improve cardiovascular outcomes, the next bridge to cross may be one of offering patients nonpharmacologic means for combating daily mental stress and promoting mental health, such as yoga and pranayama. Indeed, the best preventive cardiovascular medicine may be a blend of both Western and Eastern medicine. PMID:26170595

  17. Prodrugs in Cardiovascular Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Tabrizian

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Prodrugs are biologically inactive derivatives of an active drug intended to solve certain problems of the parent drug such as toxicity, instability, minimal solubility and non-targeting capabilities. The majority of drugs for cardiovascular diseases undergo firstpass metabolism, resulting in drug inactivation and generation of toxic metabolites, which makes them appealing targets for prodrug design. Since prodrugs undergo a chemical reaction to form the parent drug once inside the body, this makes them very effective in controlling the release of a variety of compounds to the targeted site. This review will provide the reader with an insight on the latest developments of prodrugs that are available for treating a variety of cardiovascular diseases. In addition, we will focus on several drug delivery methodologies that have merged with the prodrug approach to provide enhanced target specificity and controlled drug release with minimal side effects.

  18. Cardiovascular and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This year's cardiovascular section demonstrates a continued growth in the number of digests on cardivascular and general interventional topics and continued progress in MRI studies. The reader will also notice fewer digests on DSA and percutaneous stone removal compared with the 1985 and 1986 Year Books. While newer technology, such as extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, has significantly reduced the number of percutaneous procedures for renal calculi, other interventional procedures, such as those involving fibrinolysis, are increasing by leaps and bounds. A number of digests on benign and malignant bile duct strictures continue to shed light on the management of these difficult cases. While abscess drainage is growing and well accepted by most surgeons, articles on esophageal dilatations seem to be declining in the radiology literature, probably on the basis of fewer operations being performed by us and more being performed by endoscopists. Digests on MRI in the cardiovascular system continue to report excellent images of the aorta and of congenital heart disease

  19. Migraine and cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo E. Bigal

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Migraine, especially migraine with aura is an established risk factor for ischemic lesions of the brain. Recent evidence has also linked migraine with and without aura to a broader range of ischemic vascular disorders including angina, myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization, claudication and cardiovascular mortality. The topic is therefore of considerable interest. Accordingly, herein we review the association between migraine and cardiovascular disease. We start by briefly presenting diagnostic criteria for migraine and revising its pathophysiology. We follow by summarizing the evidence on the topic. We then briefly present the results of a recent meta-analysis. We close by highlighting results of a large epidemiological study conducted after the publication of the meta-analysis.

  20. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in rheumatology: Current status and recommendations for use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogeni, Sophie I; Kitas, George D; Dimitroulas, Theodoros; Sfikakis, Petros P; Seo, Philip; Gabriel, Sherine; Patel, Amit R; Gargani, Luna; Bombardieri, Stefano; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Lombardi, Massimo; Pepe, Alessia; Aletras, Anthony H; Kolovou, Genovefa; Miszalski, Tomasz; van Riel, Piet; Semb, AnneGrete; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel Angel; Dessein, Patrick; Karpouzas, George; Puntmann, Valentina; Nagel, Eike; Bratis, Konstantinos; Karabela, Georgia; Stavropoulos, Efthymios; Katsifis, Gikas; Koutsogeorgopoulou, Loukia; van Rossum, Albert; Rademakers, Frank; Pohost, Gerald; Lima, Joao A C

    2016-08-15

    Targeted therapies in connective tissue diseases (CTDs) have led to improvements of disease-associated outcomes, but life expectancy remains lower compared to general population due to emerging co-morbidities, particularly due to excess cardiovascular risk. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a noninvasive imaging technique which can provide detailed information about multiple cardiovascular pathologies without using ionizing radiation. CMR is considered the reference standard for quantitative evaluation of left and right ventricular volumes, mass and function, cardiac tissue characterization and assessment of thoracic vessels; it may also be used for the quantitative assessment of myocardial blood flow with high spatial resolution and for the evaluation of the proximal coronary arteries. These applications are of particular interest in CTDs, because of the potential of serious and variable involvement of the cardiovascular system during their course. The International Consensus Group on CMR in Rheumatology was formed in January 2012 aiming to achieve consensus among CMR and rheumatology experts in developing initial recommendations on the current state-of-the-art use of CMR in CTDs. The present report outlines the recommendations of the participating CMR and rheumatology experts with regards to: (a) indications for use of CMR in rheumatoid arthritis, the spondyloarthropathies, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis of small, medium and large vessels, myositis, sarcoidosis (SRC), and scleroderma (SSc); (b) CMR protocols, terminology for reporting CMR and diagnostic CMR criteria for assessment and quantification of cardiovascular involvement in CTDs; and (c) a research agenda for the further development of this evolving field. PMID:27179903

  1. A consensus on criteria for cure of acromegaly

    OpenAIRE

    Giustina, Andrea; Chanson, Philippe; Bronstein, M D; Klibanski, A.; Lamberts, Steven; Casanueva, F.F. (Felipe F.); TRAINER, P; Ghigo, Ezio; Ho, K. K. Y.; Melmed, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective: The Acromegaly Consensus Group met in April 2009 to revisit the guidelines on criteria for cure as defined in 2000. Participants: Participants included 74 neurosurgeons and endocrinologists with extensive experience of treating acromegaly. Evidence/Consensus Process: Relevant assays, biochemical measures, clinical outcomes, and definition of disease control were discussed, based on the available published evidence, and the strength of consensus statements was rated. Con...

  2. Average-Consensus Algorithms in a Deterministic Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Topley, Kevin; Krishnamurthy, Vikram

    2011-01-01

    We consider the average-consensus problem in a multi-node network of finite size. Communication between nodes is modeled by a sequence of directed signals with arbitrary communication delays. Four distributed algorithms that achieve average-consensus are proposed. Necessary and sufficient communication conditions are given for each algorithm to achieve average-consensus. Resource costs for each algorithm are derived based on the number of scalar values that are required for communication and ...

  3. Didactics and training in cardiovascular computed tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhojraj, Sanjay D; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2009-01-01

    As the role of cardiovascular computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is further expanded through research, the use of this technology will expand as a result of demand both from medical professionals and the public. To ensure a standardized quality of interpretation of these scans in the face of an increased demand for physicians qualified to interpret these studies, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, along with several other professional societies, has proposed a didactic curriculum for the study of CCTA. This review highlights the currently proposed didactic curriculum for the study of CCTA, examines current trends in training for both medical trainees and physicians in practice, and proposes future directions for the study of CCTA. PMID:19203747

  4. Didactics and training in cardiovascular computed tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhojraj, Sanjay D; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2009-01-01

    As the role of cardiovascular computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is further expanded through research, the use of this technology will expand as a result of demand both from medical professionals and the public. To ensure a standardized quality of interpretation of these scans in the face of an increased demand for physicians qualified to interpret these studies, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, along with several other professional societies, has proposed a didactic curriculum for the study of CCTA. This review highlights the currently proposed didactic curriculum for the study of CCTA, examines current trends in training for both medical trainees and physicians in practice, and proposes future directions for the study of CCTA.

  5. Cardiovascular Molecular Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Khanicheh, Elham

    2009-01-01

    Although there have been significant improvements in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases they still remain the main cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Currently available diagnostic approaches may not be adequate to detect pathologic changes during the early disease stages, which may be valuable for risk stratification and also to assess a response to a therapy. Therefore molecular imaging techniques such as Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEU) molecular imaging to noninvasively i...

  6. Cocoa and cardiovascular health

    OpenAIRE

    R. Corti; Flammer, A J; Hollenberg, N K; Lüscher, T F

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological data demonstrate that regular dietary intake of plant-derived foods and beverages reduces the risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. Among many ingredients, cocoa might be an important mediator. Indeed, recent research demonstrates a beneficial effect of cocoa on blood pressure, insulin resistance, and vascular and platelet function. Although still debated, a range of potential mechanisms through which cocoa might exert its benefits on cardiovascular health have been propo...

  7. Modelling cardiovascular disease prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Alimadad, Azadeh

    2012-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cardiovascular disease (CVD), which sits under the chronic disease umbrella, is the number one cause of death globally. Over time, we have witnessed different trends that have influenced the prevalence of CVD. One of the ways of decreasing CVD and its social costs and global fatalities is through influencing preventable CVD risk factors. Though many risk factors such as age and gender are not preventable, there are several effective behaviours...

  8. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan C. Vesa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents some general facts about omega-3 fatty acids and their role in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for the human body. Their beneficial effects in the prevention of cardiovascular disease have been known for decades. Since then, several epidemiological and interventional trials showed the value of omega-3 acids in the treatment of certain diseases. Most of them revealed the protective role of omega-3 fatty acids on heart and cardiac functions. However, some of these studies couldn?t demonstrate a positive association between fish oils and preventing cardiac events. The major cardiologic societies from European Union and United States of America recommend omega-3 fatty acids as supplements for primary and secondary prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Finite-time consensus of heterogeneous multi-agent systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Ya-Kun; Guan Xin-Ping; Luo Xiao-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the finite-time consensus problem for heterogeneous multi-agent systems composed of first-order and second-order agents.A novel continuous nonlinear distributed consensus protocol is constructed,and finite-time consensus criteria are obtained for the heterogeneous multi-agent systems.Compared with the existing results,the stationary and kinetic consensuses of the heterogeneous multi-agent systems can be achieved in a finite time respectively.Moreover,the leader can be a first-order or a second-order integrator agent.Finally,some simulation examples are employed to verify the efficiency of the theoretical results.

  10. Colon capsule endoscopy: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, C; Hassan, C; Galmiche, J P; Neuhaus, H; Dumonceau, J M; Adler, S; Epstein, O; Gay, G; Pennazio, M; Rex, D K; Benamouzig, R; de Franchis, R; Delvaux, M; Devière, J; Eliakim, R; Fraser, C; Hagenmuller, F; Herrerias, J M; Keuchel, M; Macrae, F; Munoz-Navas, M; Ponchon, T; Quintero, E; Riccioni, M E; Rondonotti, E; Marmo, R; Sung, J J; Tajiri, H; Toth, E; Triantafyllou, K; Van Gossum, A; Costamagna, G

    2012-05-01

    PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) is an innovative noninvasive, and painless ingestible capsule technique that allows exploration of the colon without the need for sedation and gas insufflation. Although it is already available in European and other countries, the clinical indications for CCE as well as the reporting and work-up of detected findings have not yet been standardized. The aim of this evidence-based and consensus-based guideline, commissioned by the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) is to furnish healthcare providers with a comprehensive framework for potential implementation of this technique in a clinical setting.

  11. Collective knowledge: using a consensus conference approach to develop recommendations for physical activity and nutrition programs for persons with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Tanya eBerry; Catherine eChan; Bell, Rhonda C.; Jessica eWalker

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this consensus conference was to have a lay panel of persons with type 2 diabetes (T2D) work in collaboration with an expert panel of diabetes professionals to develop strategies designed to improve dietary and physical activity adherence in persons with T2D. Lay panel participants were 15 people living with T2D. The seven experts had expertise in exercise management, cardiovascular risk factors, community-based lifestyle interventions, healthy weight strategies, the glycemic i...

  12. Using Network Dynamical Influence to Drive Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punzo, Giuliano; Young, George F.; MacDonald, Malcolm; Leonard, Naomi E.

    2016-05-01

    Consensus and decision-making are often analysed in the context of networks, with many studies focusing attention on ranking the nodes of a network depending on their relative importance to information routing. Dynamical influence ranks the nodes with respect to their ability to influence the evolution of the associated network dynamical system. In this study it is shown that dynamical influence not only ranks the nodes, but also provides a naturally optimised distribution of effort to steer a network from one state to another. An example is provided where the “steering” refers to the physical change in velocity of self-propelled agents interacting through a network. Distinct from other works on this subject, this study looks at directed and hence more general graphs. The findings are presented with a theoretical angle, without targeting particular applications or networked systems; however, the framework and results offer parallels with biological flocks and swarms and opportunities for design of technological networks.

  13. Consensus document on European brain research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Luca, Monica; Baker, Mary; Corradetti, Renato;

    2011-01-01

    the economic and social challenge posed by management of brain diseases in European countries. To setup a platform for discussion, EBC published in 2006 a Consensus Document on European Brain Research, describing needs and achievements of research in Europe and presenting proposals for future research...... programs. Since 2006, European research in neuroscience has advanced tremendously. The present document represents an update elaborated to reflect changes in research priorities and advances in brain research that have taken place since 2006. The same approach and format have been used here as in the......Psychiatric and neurological diseases combined represent a considerable social and economic burden in Europe. A recent study conducted by the European Brain Council (EBC) quantified the 'cost and burden' of major brain diseases in Europe, amounting to €386bn per year. Considering that these costs...

  14. Distributed Consensus with Finite Message Passing

    CERN Document Server

    Dash, Debashis

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by distributed resource allocation problems in dynamic topology networks, we initiate the study of distributed consensus with finite messaging passing. We first find a sufficient condition on the network graph for which no distributed protocol can guarantee a conflict-free allocation after $R$ rounds of message passing. Secondly we fully characterize the conflict minimizing zero-round protocol for path graphs, namely random allocation, which partitions the graph into small conflict groups. Thirdly, we enumerate all one-round protocols for path graphs and show that the best one further partitions each of the smaller groups. Finally, we show that the number of conflicts decrease to zero as the number of available resources increase.

  15. The consensus molecular subtypes of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinney, Justin; Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Wang, Xin; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Schlicker, Andreas; Soneson, Charlotte; Marisa, Laetitia; Roepman, Paul; Nyamundanda, Gift; Angelino, Paolo; Bot, Brian M; Morris, Jeffrey S; Simon, Iris M; Gerster, Sarah; Fessler, Evelyn; De Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Ramay, Hena; Barras, David; Homicsko, Krisztian; Maru, Dipen; Manyam, Ganiraju C; Broom, Bradley; Boige, Valerie; Perez-Villamil, Beatriz; Laderas, Ted; Salazar, Ramon; Gray, Joe W; Hanahan, Douglas; Tabernero, Josep; Bernards, Rene; Friend, Stephen H; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Medema, Jan Paul; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wessels, Lodewyk; Delorenzi, Mauro; Kopetz, Scott; Vermeulen, Louis; Tejpar, Sabine

    2015-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a frequently lethal disease with heterogeneous outcomes and drug responses. To resolve inconsistencies among the reported gene expression-based CRC classifications and facilitate clinical translation, we formed an international consortium dedicated to large-scale data sharing and analytics across expert groups. We show marked interconnectivity between six independent classification systems coalescing into four consensus molecular subtypes (CMSs) with distinguishing features: CMS1 (microsatellite instability immune, 14%), hypermutated, microsatellite unstable and strong immune activation; CMS2 (canonical, 37%), epithelial, marked WNT and MYC signaling activation; CMS3 (metabolic, 13%), epithelial and evident metabolic dysregulation; and CMS4 (mesenchymal, 23%), prominent transforming growth factor-β activation, stromal invasion and angiogenesis. Samples with mixed features (13%) possibly represent a transition phenotype or intratumoral heterogeneity. We consider the CMS groups the most robust classification system currently available for CRC-with clear biological interpretability-and the basis for future clinical stratification and subtype-based targeted interventions.

  16. Child abuser stereotypes: consensus among clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krowchuk, H V

    1989-02-01

    This article reports the results of an investigation of nurses' stereotypes of child abusers. Ninety-four registered nurses completed a questionnaire that measured subjects' knowledge of child abuse; professional contact with perpetrators and victims of abuse; knowledge of the causes of child abuse; and child abuser stereotypes. Results reveal a consensus among the subjects as to the stereotypes associated with child abusers. This study supports the notion that nurses stereotype individuals on the basis of demographic characteristics. This study also raises questions regarding the bias that may result from the use of child abuser stereotypes. Clinical decision-making processes could become compromised if biased judgements are used in planning nursing care for clients diagnosed as child abusers. PMID:2930179

  17. American Society of Human Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Awards August 9, 2016 Media Advisory: American Society of Human Genetics 2016 Annual Meeting July 26, ... McKusick Leadership Award June 30, 2016 The American Society of Human Genetics, Incorporated 9650 Rockville Pike • Bethesda, ...

  18. Heart Failure Society of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Site Terms and Conditions Copyright © 2016 Heart Failure Society of America. All Rights Reserved 2016 Board Review ... Membership Membership Information Membership in the Heart Failure Society is open to all health care professionals with ...

  19. Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn More For First Responders & Medical Professionals Phoenix Society is the leader in connecting the burn recovery ... It can be a... Continue Reading The Phoenix Society, Inc. 1835 RW Berends Dr. SW Grand Rapids, ...

  20. Robust point matching via vector field consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiayi Ma; Ji Zhao; Jinwen Tian; Yuille, Alan L; Zhuowen Tu

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we propose an efficient algorithm, called vector field consensus, for establishing robust point correspondences between two sets of points. Our algorithm starts by creating a set of putative correspondences which can contain a very large number of false correspondences, or outliers, in addition to a limited number of true correspondences (inliers). Next, we solve for correspondence by interpolating a vector field between the two point sets, which involves estimating a consensus of inlier points whose matching follows a nonparametric geometrical constraint. We formulate this a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation of a Bayesian model with hidden/latent variables indicating whether matches in the putative set are outliers or inliers. We impose nonparametric geometrical constraints on the correspondence, as a prior distribution, using Tikhonov regularizers in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. MAP estimation is performed by the EM algorithm which by also estimating the variance of the prior model (initialized to a large value) is able to obtain good estimates very quickly (e.g., avoiding many of the local minima inherent in this formulation). We illustrate this method on data sets in 2D and 3D and demonstrate that it is robust to a very large number of outliers (even up to 90%). We also show that in the special case where there is an underlying parametric geometrical model (e.g., the epipolar line constraint) that we obtain better results than standard alternatives like RANSAC if a large number of outliers are present. This suggests a two-stage strategy, where we use our nonparametric model to reduce the size of the putative set and then apply a parametric variant of our approach to estimate the geometric parameters. Our algorithm is computationally efficient and we provide code for others to use it. In addition, our approach is general and can be applied to other problems, such as learning with a badly corrupted training data set. PMID:24808341

  1. Risk and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book brings together the communications presented at the colloquium 'risk and society' held in Paris (France) on November 1998. During this colloquium, the various aspects of risk and of its management were discussed by medical specialists, historians, industrialists, engineers, philosophers, lawyers, politicians and administration representatives. The first theme concerns the controversies generated by the development of some activities (genetics, bio-technologies, nuclear and radiations use). The second theme concerns the management of risks and the way to conciliate the point of view of authorities and citizens (confidence of the public with respect to experts, scientists, industrialists, government and administrative representatives, role played by the media). The debates that took place during the colloquium have shown that the public opinion concerning the nuclear activities or the new technologies greatly depends on the ideological attitudes and on the public's likes and dislikes with respect to some categories of actors (distrust with respect to public decisions, fears with respect to changes and future, nostalgia of the past). The following aspects are reviewed: Notions of risk and hazard (risk and health, risk in today's society, medicine and society, the point of view of the industrialists and of the scientific and technical specialists); from the psychological aspects of the risk to its social aspects (survey of the risk assessment battlefield, social attenuation and amplification of risk, the feeling of risks in Europe, insecurity and delinquency, controversies around radioactivity and health); the negotiation and communication about risks (risk and public health, negotiation around risks, risks and information dissemination about the public debate, communication and crisis, evolution of risk communication, comparison between American and European approaches, the Seveso directive); the public debate and the evolution of risks management (the

  2. Cardiovascular disease and diabetes in people with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hert, Marc De; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Wood, David; Kahl, Kai G; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    Position statement from the European Psychiatric Association (EPA), supported by the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). People with severe mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia, depression or bipolar disorder, have worse physical health and reduced life expectancy compared to the general population. The excess cardiovascular mortality associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is attributed to an increased risk of the modifiable coronary heart disease risk factors, obesity, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidaemia. Antipsychotic medication and possibly other psychotropic medication like antidepressants can induce weight gain and further increase the risk of adverse metabolic effects which may result in further increased incidence of cardiovascular disease. Patients have limited access to general healthcare with less opportunity for cardiovascular risk screening and prevention than would be expected in a non-psychiatric population. The European Psychiatric Association (EPA), supported by the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) published this statement aiming to improve the care of patients suffering from severe mental illness. The intention is to initiate co-operation and shared care between the different health care professionals and to increase the awareness of psychiatrists caring for patients suffering from severe mental illness to screen and treat increased cardiovascular risk factors and diabetes. PMID:23034198

  3. Paradigm, science and society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.T. van der Merwe

    1975-03-01

    Full Text Available The subject of my contribution to the Taljaard Festschrift is focused on a cardinal aspect of the contemporary discussion in the area of theory of science, namely the relationship between science and society', and in this connection especially the role ascribed by certain scholars to paradigms in the practice of science. Because of its bridge function, the first task will be a global getting acquainted with some characteristic accents in contemporary theory of science. If this is successful, it can hopefully open up avenues for a view of the relationship of the remaining two components of the above mentioned subject.

  4. Advanced information society (9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Hiroki

    This article discusses the U.S. and European national strategies and policies for information society. Coping with the declining competitiveness in high-tech products and Japanese technological advantages both have been trying hard to strengthen technology base and to deregulate the telecommunications services markets. The U.S. approach in 1980's, unlike its liberalist principle, has been characterized by technological protectlonism and defense-oriented policies. European Communities' approach has been more comprehensive and systematic, investing heavily telecommunication infrastructure, deregulating domestic market, and promoting cooperation of member countries. However, both of these approaches have, so far, been unable to achieve a considerable success.

  5. Spookytechnology and Society

    CERN Document Server

    Tahan, Charles

    2007-01-01

    New technologies based on the exploitation of so-called "second order" quantum phenomena - such as quantum entanglement - deserve a public-friendly, rational, and sexy name. Spookytechnology is that unifying term. From historical and motivational perspectives, this name has greater value than the many variations of quantum this and quantum that presently used. As many already believe, the pursuit of spookytechnology has profound implications for the development of the physical and information sciences and ultimately for society at large. Spookytechnology will find its place in the increasingly dense line of major technological revolutions of our time: quantum, info, bio, nano, spooky.

  6. Symposia, congresses, societies, meetings

    OpenAIRE

    NN

    1985-01-01

    Please submit your announcement to this Bulletin as early as possible! Several were received too late for interested readers to make use of. After the event please send a summary of the doings and/or the Proceedings, if any. Systematics and Biogeography of the Austral Biota, Canberra, Australia, August 1990. The ninth meeting of the Willi Hennig Society will take place in Canberra, Australia, 24-27 August 1990. The invited and contributed papers will be a mix of theory, methodology, and pract...

  7. Indicators of Information Society Measurement :

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind Elwy

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The indicator of information society describe the infrastructure of information and communication technology ; as well as it’s use and it’s production in different estate of society. The importance economic and social of tic is crescent in modern society. and the presentation of tendency inform above the situation of information society . in this article we want to describe the indicator of tic in Algeria according to librarian’s vision in Mentouri university

  8. American Head and Neck Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Head & Neck Society Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education American Head & Neck Society | AHNS Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education About AHNS ... and Announcements Copyright ©2016 · American Head and Neck Society · Privacy and Return Policy Managed by BSC Management, ...

  9. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates, and the European Society of Anaesthesiology Guideline: Non-anaesthesiologist administration of propofol for GI endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumonceau, J.M.; Riphaus, A.; Aparicio, J.R.;

    2010-01-01

    Propofol sedation by non-anaesthesiologists is an upcoming sedation regimen in several countries throughout Europe. Numerous studies have shown the efficacy and safety of this sedation regimen in gastrointestinal endoscopy. Nevertheless, this issue remains highly controversial. The aim of this...... evidence- and consensus-based set of guideline is to provide non-anaesthesiologists with a comprehensive framework for propofol sedation during digestive endoscopy. This guideline results from a collaborative effort from representatives of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), the...... European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates (ESGENA) and the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA). These three societies have endorsed the present guideline.The guideline is published simultaneously in the Journals Endoscopy and European Journal of Anaesthesiology....

  10. Prevalence of Cardiovascular disease risk among Medical Students in South India

    OpenAIRE

    Biswajit Paul; Vidhyaa Nayaaki; Mousumi Sen; Rita Isaac

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are global epidemic and contribute to double burden in developing countries. Individual’s dietary habits and risk behavior influence the onset and progression of CVDs. Medical students are future role models of the society and their knowledge, habits and behavior can influence their practice in prevention of CVDs in general population. Aims & Objectives: To assess the prevalence of common cardiovascular risk factors among a sample of medical stud...

  11. Recommendations for the management of biofilm: a consensus document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, T; Wolcott, R D; Peghetti, A; Leaper, D; Cutting, K; Polignano, R; Rosa Rita, Z; Moscatelli, A; Greco, A; Romanelli, M; Pancani, S; Bellingeri, A; Ruggeri, V; Postacchini, L; Tedesco, S; Manfredi, L; Camerlingo, Maria; Rowan, S; Gabrielli, A; Pomponio, G

    2016-06-01

    The potential impact of biofilm on healing in acute and chronic wounds is one of the most controversial current issues in wound care. A significant amount of laboratory-based research has been carried out on this topic, however, in 2013 the European Wound Management Association (EWMA) pointed out the lack of guidance for managing biofilms in clinical practice and solicited the need for guidelines and further clinical research. In response to this challenge, the Italian Nursing Wound Healing Society (AISLeC) initiated a project which aimed to achieve consensus among a multidisciplinary and multiprofessional international panel of experts to identify what could be considered part of 'good clinical practice' with respect to the recognition and management of biofilms in acute and chronic wounds. The group followed a systematic approach, developed by the GRADE working group, to define relevant questions and clinical recommendations raised in clinical practice. An independent librarian retrieved and screened approximately 2000 pertinent published papers to produce tables of levels of evidence. After a smaller focus group had a multistep structured discussion, and a formal voting process had been completed, ten therapeutic interventions were identified as being strongly recommendable for clinical practice, while another four recommendations were graded as being 'weak'. The panel subsequently formulated a preliminary statement (although with a weak grade of agreement): 'provided that other causes that prevent optimal wound healing have been ruled out, chronic wounds are chronically infected'. All members of the panel agreed that there is a paucity of reliable, well-conducted clinical trials which have produced clear evidence related to the effects of biofilm presence. In the meantime it was agreed that expert-based guidelines were needed to be developed for the recognition and management of biofilms in wounds and for the best design of future clinical trials. This is a

  12. Recommendations for the management of biofilm: a consensus document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, T; Wolcott, R D; Peghetti, A; Leaper, D; Cutting, K; Polignano, R; Rosa Rita, Z; Moscatelli, A; Greco, A; Romanelli, M; Pancani, S; Bellingeri, A; Ruggeri, V; Postacchini, L; Tedesco, S; Manfredi, L; Camerlingo, Maria; Rowan, S; Gabrielli, A; Pomponio, G

    2016-06-01

    The potential impact of biofilm on healing in acute and chronic wounds is one of the most controversial current issues in wound care. A significant amount of laboratory-based research has been carried out on this topic, however, in 2013 the European Wound Management Association (EWMA) pointed out the lack of guidance for managing biofilms in clinical practice and solicited the need for guidelines and further clinical research. In response to this challenge, the Italian Nursing Wound Healing Society (AISLeC) initiated a project which aimed to achieve consensus among a multidisciplinary and multiprofessional international panel of experts to identify what could be considered part of 'good clinical practice' with respect to the recognition and management of biofilms in acute and chronic wounds. The group followed a systematic approach, developed by the GRADE working group, to define relevant questions and clinical recommendations raised in clinical practice. An independent librarian retrieved and screened approximately 2000 pertinent published papers to produce tables of levels of evidence. After a smaller focus group had a multistep structured discussion, and a formal voting process had been completed, ten therapeutic interventions were identified as being strongly recommendable for clinical practice, while another four recommendations were graded as being 'weak'. The panel subsequently formulated a preliminary statement (although with a weak grade of agreement): 'provided that other causes that prevent optimal wound healing have been ruled out, chronic wounds are chronically infected'. All members of the panel agreed that there is a paucity of reliable, well-conducted clinical trials which have produced clear evidence related to the effects of biofilm presence. In the meantime it was agreed that expert-based guidelines were needed to be developed for the recognition and management of biofilms in wounds and for the best design of future clinical trials. This is a

  13. API expert consensus document on management of ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    bypass surgery. Early reperfusion is key to management of patients presenting with STEMI. If facilities are available, primary percutaneous coronary intervention (angioplasty with stenting) is treatment of choice for patients with STEMI. In our country, thrombolysis still remains the most frequently utilized reperfusion therapy and all efforts should be devoted to provide this therapy at the earliest. All high risk patients with STEMI (including cardiogenic shock) are best treated in higher centres and these patients should be promptly transported to such centres. Early coronary angiography is recommended for majority of patients following thrombolysis for risk stratification and further treatment. In acute coronary syndromes there is drift towards early invasive treatment and this is reflected in marked increase in cardiac care (catheterization laboratories and cardiac surgery centers) facilities throughout India. All patients with CAD require life-long supervised treatment which includes medication, control of risk factors and lifestyle modification. Avoidance of smoking, heart healthy diet, proper exercise, ideal weight management are important for all the patients. Statins, ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers, antiplatelet agents have a great role to play in treatment and prevention and these drugs should be utilized under medical supervision. It is important that the medical profession play an important role in critically evaluating the use of diagnostic procedures and therapies as they are introduced and tested in the detection and management of cardiac disorders. The American College of Cardiology (ACC), American Heart Association (AHA), European Society of Cardiology (ESC), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) and several other societies engage in production of guidelines in the area of cardiovascular diseases from time to time. These guidelines attempt to define practices that meet the needs of most patients in most circumstances. The aim of

  14. Family in contemporary society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabije Murati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The family is part of social change and, as such changes and transform into steps with modern trends of society. Family function in a given society is structured according to the overall changes that occur in all areas of social life, not neglecting family life. The contemporary conditions impose requirements that must be met to move forward with the times that follow. In particular, should highlight the social changes that are related to the growth and advancement of the educational and professional standards, which will increase the overall impact on the family and its function. If you're looking for full responsibility of parents in the upbringing of children then it is necessary to see the conditions in which the family lives. For normal education and the rights of children with special meaning the number of members in the (quantity family. The tendency to a higher standard of economic life, a small number of children in the family and it is more than obvious that fewer family members or less have greater opportunity for parents to pay more attention to their children. One of the main roles of family, no matter where they are located in the city, village, developed or developing countries, by all means participate, intermediates and transfers the moral, social and other values in modern life.

  15. Mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke: Consensus statement by ESO-Karolinska Stroke Update 2014/2015, supported by ESO, ESMINT, ESNR and EAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, Nils; Moreira, Tiago; Michel, Patrik; Steiner, Thorsten; Jansen, Olav; Cognard, Christophe; Mattle, Heinrich P; van Zwam, Wim; Holmin, Staffan; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Petersson, Jesper; Caso, Valeria; Hacke, Werner; Mazighi, Mikael; Arnold, Marcel; Fischer, Urs; Szikora, Istvan; Pierot, Laurent; Fiehler, Jens; Gralla, Jan; Fazekas, Franz; Lees, Kennedy R

    2016-01-01

    The original version of this consensus statement on mechanical thrombectomy was approved at the European Stroke Organisation (ESO)-Karolinska Stroke Update conference in Stockholm, 16-18 November 2014. The statement has later, during 2015, been updated with new clinical trials data in accordance with a decision made at the conference. Revisions have been made at a face-to-face meeting during the ESO Winter School in Berne in February, through email exchanges and the final version has then been approved by each society. The recommendations are identical to the original version with evidence level upgraded by 20 February 2015 and confirmed by 15 May 2015. The purpose of the ESO-Karolinska Stroke Update meetings is to provide updates on recent stroke therapy research and to discuss how the results may be implemented into clinical routine. Selected topics are discussed at consensus sessions, for which a consensus statement is prepared and discussed by the participants at the meeting. The statements are advisory to the ESO guidelines committee. This consensus statement includes recommendations on mechanical thrombectomy after acute stroke. The statement is supported by ESO, European Society of Minimally Invasive Neurological Therapy (ESMINT), European Society of Neuroradiology (ESNR), and European Academy of Neurology (EAN).

  16. Cardiovascular physiology and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Narayana S; Svatikova, Anna; Somers, Virend K

    2003-05-01

    Sleep is a natural periodic suspension of consciousness during which processes of rest and restoration occur. The cognitive, reparative and regenerative accompaniments of sleep appear to be essential for maintenance of health and homeostasis. This brief overview will examine the cardiovascular responses to normal and disordered sleep, and their physiologic and pathologic implications. In the past, sleep was believed to be a passive state. The tableau of sleep as it unfolds is anything but a passive process. The brain's activity is as complex as wakefulness, never "resting" during sleep. Following the demise of the 'passive theory of sleep' (the reticular activating system is fatigued during the waking day and hence becomes inactive), there arose the 'active theory of sleep' (sleep is due to an active general inhibition of the brain) (1). Hess demonstrated the active nature of sleep in cats, inducing "physiological sleep" with electrical stimulation of the diencephalon (2). Classical experiments of transection of the cat brainstem (3) at midpontine level inhibited sleep completely, implying that centers below this level were involved in the induction of sleep (1, 4). For the first time, measurement of sleep depth without awakening the sleeper using the electroencephalogram (EEG) was demonstrated in animals by Caton and in humans, by Berger (1). This was soon followed by discovery of the rapid eye movement sleep periods (REM) by Aserinski and Kleitman (5), demonstration of periodical sleep cycles and their association with REM sleep (6, 7). Multiple studies and steady discoveries (4) made polysomnography, with its ability to perform simultaneous whole night recordings of EEG, electromyogram (EMG), and electrooculogram (EOC), a major diagnostic tool in study of sleep disorders. This facility has been of further critical importance in allowing evaluation of the interaction between sleep and changes in hemodynamics and autonomic cardiovascular control. Consequently the

  17. YOGA IMPROVES CARDIOVASCULAR PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod P. Kadu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Yoga in ancient technique practices by sage for a desirable and healthy life. Yogic exercise and Pranayam may modulate cardiovascular function. To assess the cardiovascular parameter in control and study group. We selected 90 healthy volunteers between age group 35 – 50 years and divided into two groups. i Study group – 45 ii Control group – 45. Control group was not doing any type of exercise or yoga during 1 yr of period whereas yoga group did yogic exercise for 1 yr under supervision of yoga expert. In both the group heart rate SBP and DBP evaluate at 0, 6 and 12 month period. In control group heart rate, SBP, and DBP showed no significant change at 0, 6, and 12 month reading, whereas study group (yoga 81.96±5.65 showed significant decreased heart rate From 81.96 ±5.65 to 75.60 ± 3.44 at 6 month and 73.75 ± 11.36 at 12 month (p<0.001 SBP decreased from 128 ± 7.66 to 120.97 ± 4.21 at 6 month and 120.48± 3.86 at 12 months (p<0.001. DBP showed significant decreased from 88.44 ± 5.25 to 80.53 ± 3.44 at 6 months and 80.53 ± 2.53 at 12months (p<0.001. Yogic exercise and Pranayam done regularly at long term improve cardiovascular efficiency.

  18. Breaking the biomass bottleneck of the fossil free society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik

    be converted to high-density fuels for mobility purposes, and it is a key source of carbon feedstock All in all, everything points to the fact, that biomass (and agricultural land) may be a severe bottleneck in the fossil free society and that excessive use can have severe consequences for the world’s forest...... resources, the food sector and the poorest part of the world population. We can, however, break this bottleneck. First of all, we must seek further energy savings. Secondly, we need to look for ways to de-carbonize society. There is a growing consensus among energy scientists and energy planners...... by hydrogenation and CCR, can approximately five-double our biomass potential for providing storable and high-density fuels and carbon feedstock compared to the presently applied technologies for converting biomass to fuels and feedstock. This can fully and effectively break the biomass bottleneck of the fossil...

  19. 77 FR 24251 - Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Aviation... availability of three new and three revised consensus standards relating to the provisions of the Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft rule issued July 16, 2004, and effective September 1, 2004....

  20. 78 FR 35085 - Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Aviation... availability of one new and seven revised consensus standards relating to the provisions of the Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft rule issued July 16, 2004, and effective September 1, 2004. ASTM...

  1. A consensus on criteria for cure of acromegaly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Giustina (Andrea); P. Chanson (Philippe); M.D. Bronstein; A. Klibanski; S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); F.F. Casanueva; P. Trainer; E. Ghigo (Ezio); K.K.Y. Ho; S. Melmed (Shlomo)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective: The Acromegaly Consensus Group met in April 2009 to revisit the guidelines on criteria for cure as defined in 2000. Participants: Participants included 74 neurosurgeons and endocrinologists with extensive experience of treating acromegaly. Evidence/Consensus Process: Relevant

  2. The Decrits Consensus Algorithm: Decentralized Agreement without Proof of Work

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Decrits is a cryptocurrency in development that makes use of a novel consensus algorithm that does not require proof-of-work. This paper describes how the Decrits Consensus Algorithm (DCA) is as trustless as a proof-of-work algorithm while offering superior transaction security at virtually no cost.

  3. Treatment of adrenocorticotropin-dependent cushing's syndrome: A consensus statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.M.K. Biller; A. Grossman (Ashley Barry); P.M. Stewart; S. Melmed (Shlomo); X. Bertagna; J. Bertherat (Jerome); M. Buchfelder; A. Colao (Annamaria); A.R. Hermus (Ad); L.J. Hofland (Leo); A. Klibanski; A. Lacroix; J.R. Lindsay; J. Newell-Price; L.K. Nieman; S. Petersenn; N. Sonino; G.K. Stalla (Günter); B. Swearingen; M.L. Vance; J.A.H. Wass (John); M. Boscaro

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Our objective was to evaluate the published literature and reach a consensus on the treatment of patients with ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome, because there is no recent consensus on the management of this rare disorder. Participants: Thirty-two leading endocrinologists, cl

  4. Treatment of adrenocorticotropin-dependent Cushing's syndrome: a consensus statement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossman, A.B.; Stewart, P.M.; Melmed, S.; Bertagna, X.; Bertherat, J.; Buchfelder, M.; Colao, A.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Hofland, L.J.; Klibanski, A.; Lacroix, A.; Lindsay, J.R.; Newell-Price, J.; Nieman, L.K.; Petersenn, S.; Sonino, N.; Stalla, G.K.; Swearingen, B.; Vance, M.L.; Wass, J.A.; Boscaro, M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to evaluate the published literature and reach a consensus on the treatment of patients with ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome, because there is no recent consensus on the management of this rare disorder. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-two leading endocrinologists, clinicians, an

  5. Consensus in Directed Networks of Agents With Nonlinear Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Wenwu; Chen, Guanrong; Cao, Ming; Qu, Z.

    2011-01-01

    This technical note studies the consensus problem for cooperative agents with nonlinear dynamics in a directed network. Both local and global consensus are defined and investigated. Techniques for studying the synchronization in such complex networks are exploited to establish various sufficient con

  6. Consensus Formation in Science Modeled by Aggregated Bibliographic Coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Jeppe; Frandsen, Tove Faber

    2012-01-01

    journal as their unit of analysis. To produce a more fine grained citation analysis one needs to study consensus formation on an even more detailed level – i.e. the scientific document or article. To do so, we have developed a new technique that measures consensus by aggregated bibliographic couplings...

  7. Consensus of Multiagent Systems with Sampled Information and Noisy Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Jun Tang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider consensus problems of first-order multiagent systems with sampled information and noisy measurements. A distributed stochastic approximation type algorithm is employed to attenuate the measurement noises. We provide conditions under which almost sure strong consensus is guaranteed for fixed and switching directed network topologies. Simulation results are provided to illustrate the theoretical results.

  8. The Consensus Definition Redefined from a Representational Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zand Scholten, Annemarie

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the author's critique to Paul E. Newton's article titled "Clarifying the consensus definition of validity." In his article, Newton not only clarifies but also redefines the consensus definition of validity. In this redefinition he omits the term "construct" and introduces the term "measurement." Both omission and introduction…

  9. Traffic noise and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Selander, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Traffic noise is an increasing problem in urban areas worldwide, but health effects in relation to traffic noise exposure are not well understood. Several studies show that noise may give rise to acute stress reactions, possibly leading to cardiovascular effects, but the evidence is limited on cardiovascular risks associated with traffic noise exposure. Cardiovascular effects have been indicated for other environmental stressors such as occupational noise exposure and job ...

  10. Fetal cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychik, J

    2004-01-01

    The cardiovascular system of the fetus is physiologically different than the adult, mature system. Unique characteristics of the myocardium and specific channels of blood flow differentitate the physiology of the fetus from the newborn. Conditions of increased preload and afterload in the fetus, such as sacrococcygeal teratoma and twin-twin transfusion syndrome, result in unique and complex pathophysiological states. Echocardiography has improved our understanding of human fetal cadiovasvular physiology in the normal and diseased states, and has expanded our capability to more effectively treat these disease processes.

  11. Cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, D P; Sanidas, E A; Viniou, N A; Gennimata, V; Chantziara, V; Barbetseas, I; Makris, T K

    2015-02-01

    Inevitably, a small proportion of patients with systematic hypertension will develop hypertensive crisis at some point. Hypertensive crises can be divided into hypertensive emergency or hypertensive urgency according to the presence or lack of acute target organ damage. In this review, we discuss cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies, including acute coronary syndrome, aortic dissection, congestive heart failure, and sympathomimetic hypertensive crises, including those caused by cocaine use. Each presents in a unique fashion, although some hypertensive emergency patients report nonspecific symptoms. Treatment includes several effective and rapid-acting medications to safely reduce the blood pressure, protect remaining end-organ function, relieve symptoms, minimize the risk of complications, and thereby improve patient outcomes.

  12. Periodontitis and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeftha, A; Holmes, H

    2013-03-01

    Periodontal medicine has been studied and reviewed extensively since its introduction to the dental fraternity. The association of periodontal disease with and its effects on the cardiovascular system are amongst the many topics explored. A summary of the research into these associations and the possible mechanisms of any relationship is presented. Although a link between these two chronic inflammatory diseases is evident, the very heterogeneity of the relevant studies has not provided evidence sufficient to support an actual causal relationship. More stringent epidemiologic and intervention studies are required. PMID:23951765

  13. CERN & Society launches donation portal

    CERN Multimedia

    Cian O'Luanaigh

    2014-01-01

    The CERN & Society programme brings together projects in the areas of education and outreach, innovation and knowledge exchange, and culture and arts, that spread the CERN spirit of scientific curiosity for the inspiration and benefit of society. Today, CERN & Society is launching its "giving" website – a portal to allow donors to contribute to various projects and forge new relationships with CERN.   "The CERN & Society initiative in its embryonic form began almost three years ago, with the feeling that the laboratory could play a bigger role for the benefit of society," says Matteo Castoldi, Head of the CERN Development Office, who, with his team, is seeking supporters and ambassadors for the CERN & Society initiative. "The concept is not completely new – in some sense it is embedded in CERN’s DNA, as the laboratory helps society by creating knowledge and new technologies – but we would like to d...

  14. Nanotechnology and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Past experience has shown that the successful introduction of a new technology requires careful attention to the interactions between the technology and society. These interactions are bi-directional: on the one hand, technology changes and challenges social patterns and, on the other hand, the governance structures and values of the society affect progress in developing the technology. Nanotechnology is likely to be particularly affected by these kinds of interactions because of its great promise and the unusually early public attention it has received. Moreover, it represents a new kind of experiment in packaging a rather wide range of fundamental research activities under a single 'mission-like' umbrella. Although this gives it more impetus as a field, it sets a higher bar for showing successful applications early on and because it links disparate fields, regulatory regimes reasonable for one kind of nanotechnology development may be inappropriately extended to others. There are a number of lessons to be gleaned from experience with the introduction of other technologies, which offer guidance with respect to what pitfalls to avoid and what issues to be sensitive to as we move forward with the development of nanotechnology applications. The problems encountered by nuclear power point out the dangers of over-promising and the role the need for the technology plays in ameliorating fears of risk. The public reaction to biomedical engineering and biotechnology highlights, in addition, the cultural factors that come into play when technologies raise questions about what is 'natural' and what is 'foreign' and what conceptions are involved in defining 'personhood'. In all cases, it has been clear that a main task for those introducing new technology is building public trust-in the safety of the technologies and the integrity of those introducing it. The advocates of nanotechnology have already shown that they are generally aware of the need to consider the public

  15. Communicating Science to Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Samuel; Muller, Jennifer; Leather, Kimberley; Morgan, William; O'Meara, Simon; Topping, David; Booth, Alastair; Llyod, Gary; Young, Dominique; Bannan, Thomas; Simpson, Emma; Percival, Carl; Allen, Grant; Clark, Elaine; Muller, Catherine; Graves, Rosemarie

    2014-05-01

    "Nothing in science has any value to society if it is not communicated." So goes the 1952 quote from Anne Roe, the noted twentieth century American psychologist and writer. She went on to say that "scientists are beginning to learn their social obligations", and now over 60 years later there is certainly evidence to support her assertions. As scientists, by communicating our research to the general public we not only better inform the tax payer where their money is being spent, but are also able to help put into context the topical environmental challenges and issues that society faces, as well as inspiring a whole new generation of future scientists. This process of communication is very much a two-way street; by presenting our work to people outside of our usual spheres of contemporaries, we expose ourselves to alternative thoughts and insights that can inspire us, as scientists, to take another look at our research from angles that we had never before considered. This work presents the results and experiences from a number of public engagement and outreach activities across the UK, in which geoscientists engaged and interacted with members of the general public. These include the design and implementation of Raspberry Pi based outreach activities for several hundred high school students; the process of running a successful podcast (http://thebarometer.podbean.com); hosting and participating in science events for thousands of members of the general public (e.g. http://www.manchestersciencefestival.com and http://sse.royalsociety.org/2013); and creating a citizen science activity that involved primary school children from across the UK. In communicating their research it is imperative that scientists interact with their audience in an effective and engaging manner, whether in an international conference, a classroom, or indeed down the pub. This work also presents a discussion of how these skills can be developed at an early stage in the careers of a research

  16. Randomized Consensus Processing over Random Graphs: Independence and Convergence

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Guodong

    2011-01-01

    Various consensus algorithms over random networks have been investigated in the literature. In this paper, we focus on the role that randomized individual decision-making plays to consensus seeking under stochastic communications. At each time step, each node will independently choose to follow the consensus algorithm, or to stick to current state by a simple Bernoulli trial with time-dependent success probabilities. This node decision strategy characterizes the random node-failures on a communication networks, or a biased opinion selection in the belief evolution over social networks. Connectivity-independent and arc-independent graphs are defined, respectively, to capture the fundamental nature of random network processes with regard to the convergence of the consensus algorithms. A series of sufficient and/or necessary conditions are given on the success probability sequence for the network to reach a global consensus with probability one under different stochastic connectivity assumptions, by which a comp...

  17. Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Csányi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the special issue “Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease” authors were invited to submit papers that investigate key questions in the field of cardiovascular free radical biology. The original research articles included in this issue provide important information regarding novel aspects of reactive oxygen species (ROS-mediated signaling, which have important implications in physiological and pathophysiological cardiovascular processes. The issue also included a number of review articles that highlight areas of intense research in the fields of free radical biology and cardiovascular medicine.

  18. Central neural control of the cardiovascular system: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dampney, Roger A L

    2016-09-01

    This brief review, which is based on a lecture presented at the American Physiological Society Teaching Refresher Course on the Brain and Systems Control as part of the Experimental Biology meeting in 2015, aims to summarize current concepts of the principal mechanisms in the brain that regulate the autonomic outflow to the cardiovascular system. Such cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms do not operate in isolation but are closely coordinated with respiratory and other regulatory mechanisms to maintain homeostasis. The brain regulates the cardiovascular system by two general means: 1) feedforward regulation, often referred to as "central command," and 2) feedback or reflex regulation. In most situations (e.g., during exercise, defensive behavior, sleep, etc.), both of these general mechanisms contribute to overall cardiovascular homeostasis. The review first describes the mechanisms and central circuitry subserving the baroreceptor, chemoreceptor, and other reflexes that work together to regulate an appropriate level of blood pressure and blood oxygenation and then considers the brain mechanisms that defend the body against more complex environmental challenges, using dehydration and cold and heat stress as examples. The last section of the review considers the central mechanisms regulating cardiovascular function associated with different behaviors, with a specific focus on defensive behavior and exercise. PMID:27445275

  19. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  20. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  1. Joining consensus of networked multi-agent systems with nonlinear couplings and weighting constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bohui; Wang, Jingcheng; Zhang, Langwen; Ge, Yang

    2016-04-01

    This paper studies the joining consensus of networked multi-agent systems subject to nonlinear couplings and weighted directed graphs via pinning control. A weighted-average consensus protocol is proposed to achieve the collective decision by interacting with the local information of some pinned agents. By proposing a novel joining consensus protocol, average consensus and general consensus strategies are joined to achieve an agreement for the weighting networked system. Furthermore, by calculating a proper consensus gain and using finite control Lyapunov controllers, an efficient joining consensus protocol is presented to improve the consensus speed. Sufficient conditions for achieving the consensuses asymptotically are proved. Finally, theoretical results are validated via simulations.

  2. Afghanistan, state and society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kværnø, Ole

    In June 2007, the RAND Corporation and the Royal Danish Defence College hosted a conference titled “Afghanistan: State and Society, Great Power Politics, and the Way Ahead”. The two-day event, held in Copenhagen, was attended by more than 100 politicians, scholars, academics, and representative...... of both governmental and nongovernmental institutions from more than 20 states. Its theme was to discuss the problems that Afghanistan faces in the wake of the U.S.-led attack on al Qaeda training camps and the Taliban government; examine the challenges confronting the NATO International Security...... Assistance Force as it coordinates nation-building activities in Afghanistan; and suggest ways to address these issues. This volume compiles 11 of the papers presented at the conference; themes include the importance of historical precedents, coordination among relevant parties, and the development of an all...

  3. Behaviorism and Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapfl, Jon E

    2016-05-01

    A probable list of causes for the limited acceptance of behaviorism in our society is identified. This is followed by a summary review of the proposed solutions identified in other papers in this special issue of The Behavior Analyst, most of which relate to either better marketing of either the behavior analytic process or the results achieved as a consequence. One paper proposes a more broad conception of behavior analysis. This paper endorses the solutions identified in previous papers and then goes on to propose an even more broad conception of behavior analysis and makes the point that behavior analysis is unlikely to flourish unless behavior analysts understand a good deal more about the cultural and other contextual features of the environments in which they work. PMID:27606191

  4. Popular Music and Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    Fifteen years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, popular music is thriving in the former Soviet territories and covers a broad variety of genres.  Among these are rock bands formed in the Soviet era, surviving legends of Soviet pop, and younger bands and performers of the 1990s and 2000s.......   Local and foreign musics blend as new impulses arrive from without and arise from within the region.  Thanks to the most recent wave of Russian emigrants, these popular musics have also spread to various localities around the world, as exemplified by the phenomenon of "Russendisko" in Berlin...... or the Russkii Rok-Klub v Amerike (Russian Rock Club of America).   This special edition of Popular Music and Society aims to present research on contemporary popular music (broadly defined) in the former Soviet republics and their diasporas.  A central issue will be how the musical landscape has changed since...

  5. Libraries in Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Michael; Skouvig, Laura

    brought about by the boom of the internet and the advent of the post-modern globalised knowledge-based and network-organised society. Finally, the paper outlines how theoretical and strategic library development can benefit from academic considerations on the dialectics between openness and restrictedness......The purpose of the paper is to investigate the phenomenon of openness in relation to library development. The term openness is presented and related to library development from historical and theoretical perspectives. The paper elaborates on the differences over time on to how openness has been...... understood in a library setting. Historically, openness in form of the open shelves played a crucial role in developing the modern public library. The paper examines this openness-centred library policy as adopted by Danish public libraries in the beginning of the 20th century by applying the theories...

  6. Management of hyperglycemia in geriatric patients with diabetes mellitus: South Asian consensus guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruah, Manash P; Kalra, Sanjay; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalkrishnan; Raza, Syed Abbas; Somasundaram, Noel; John, Mathew; Katulanda, Prasad; Shrestha, Dina; Bantwal, Ganpathy; Sahay, Rakesh; Latt, Tint Swe; Pathan, Faruque

    2011-04-01

    Asia is home to four of the world's five largest diabetic populations, two of them being South Asian nations, namely, India and Pakistan. This problem is compounded by a substantial rise in the elderly population in Asian countries. On the other hand, the heterogeneous health condition and multiple co-morbidities make the care of chronic disease in the elderly a challenging task. The aim of the South Asian Consensus Guidelines is to provide evidence-based recommendations to assist healthcare providers in the rational management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the elderly population. Current Guidelines used systematic reviews of available evidence to form its key recommendations. No evidence grading was done for the purpose of this manuscript. The clinical questions of the guidelines, the methodology of literature search, and medical writing strategy were finalized by consultations in person and through mail. The South Asian Consensus guideline emphasizes tailoring of glycemic goals for patients based on age, co-morbid conditions especially that of cardiovascular system, risk of hypoglycemia, and life expectancy. It also recommends cautious use of available pharmacotherapy in geriatric patients with diabetes. The primary principle of diabetes therapy should be to achieve euglycemia, without causing hypoglycemia. Appropriate use of modern insulins and oral drugs, including incretin mimetics will help physicians achieve this aim.

  7. Management of hyperglycemia in geriatric patients with diabetes mellitus: South Asian consensus guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manash P Baruah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Asia is home to four of the world′s five largest diabetic populations, two of them being South Asian nations, namely, India and Pakistan. This problem is compounded by a substantial rise in the elderly population in Asian countries. On the other hand, the heterogeneous health condition and multiple co-morbidities make the care of chronic disease in the elderly a challenging task. The aim of the South Asian Consensus Guidelines is to provide evidence-based recommendations to assist healthcare providers in the rational management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the elderly population. Current Guidelines used systematic reviews of available evidence to form its key recommendations. No evidence grading was done for the purpose of this manuscript. The clinical questions of the guidelines, the methodology of literature search, and medical writing strategy were finalized by consultations in person and through mail. The South Asian Consensus guideline emphasizes tailoring of glycemic goals for patients based on age, co-morbid conditions especially that of cardiovascular system, risk of hypoglycemia, and life expectancy. It also recommends cautious use of available pharmacotherapy in geriatric patients with diabetes. The primary principle of diabetes therapy should be to achieve euglycemia, without causing hypoglycemia. Appropriate use of modern insulins and oral drugs, including incretin mimetics will help physicians achieve this aim.

  8. Expectations from Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prof. A. Blowers observed that the social context within which radioactive waste management is considered has evolved over time. The early period where radioactive waste was a non-issue was succeeded by a period of intense conflict over solutions. The contemporary context is more consensual, in which solutions are sought that are both technically sound and socially acceptable. Among the major issues is that of inter-generational equity embraced in the question: how long can or should our responsibility to the future extend? He pointed out the differences in timescales. On the one hand, geo-scientific timescales are very long term, emphasizing the issue of how far into the future it is possible to make predictions about repository safety. By contrast, socio cultural timescales are much shorter, focusing on the foreseeable future of one or two generations and raising the issue of how far into the future we should be concerned. He listed. the primary expectations from society which are: safety and security to alleviate undue burdens to future generations and flexibility in order to enable the future generations to have a stake in decision making. The need to reconcile the two had led to a contemporary emphasis on phased geological disposal incorporating retrievability. However, the long timescales for implementation of disposal provided for sufficient flexibility without the need for retrievability. Future generations would inevitably have sold stake in decision making. Prof. A.. Blowers pointed out that society is also concerned with participation in decision making for implementation. The key elements for success are: openness and transparency, staged process, participation, partnership, benefits to enhance the well being of communities and a democratic framework for decision making, including the ratification of key decisions and the right for communities to withdraw from the process up to a predetermined point. This approach for decision making may also have

  9. Recommendations for switching antipsychotics. A position statement of the Spanish Society of Psychiatry and the Spanish Society of Biological Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Miquel; Vieta, Eduard; Saiz Ruiz, Jerónimo; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Alamo, Cecilio; Bobes, Julio

    2011-07-01

    Switching antipsychotics is common in the clinical practice setting and is associated with potential clinically relevant complications. An expert group selected by Spanish Society of Psychiatry and the Spanish Society of Biological Psychiatry has reviewed the evidence provided by randomized clinical trials and other relevant information to reach consensus recommendations for switching antipsychotics. In this article, we will review all the information that has led to those recommendations and which includes: indications and contraindications for switching antipsychotics, pharmacological issues, switching strategies, switching antipsychotics due to efficacy problems, switching antispychotics due to tolerability issues (including extrapyramidal symptoms and tardive dyskinesia, weight gain, metabolic disorders, hyperprolactinemia, sexual dysfunction, persistent sedation, and QT prolongation), switching antypsychotics due to lack of treatment compliance, and switching antipsychotics in patients with bipolar disorders.

  10. Optimization in Cardiovascular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Alison L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid mechanics plays a key role in the development, progression, and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Advances in imaging methods and patient-specific modeling now reveal increasingly detailed information about blood flow patterns in health and disease. Building on these tools, there is now an opportunity to couple blood flow simulation with optimization algorithms to improve the design of surgeries and devices, incorporating more information about the flow physics in the design process to augment current medical knowledge. In doing so, a major challenge is the need for efficient optimization tools that are appropriate for unsteady fluid mechanics problems, particularly for the optimization of complex patient-specific models in the presence of uncertainty. This article reviews the state of the art in optimization tools for virtual surgery, device design, and model parameter identification in cardiovascular flow and mechanobiology applications. In particular, it reviews trade-offs between traditional gradient-based methods and derivative-free approaches, as well as the need to incorporate uncertainties. Key future challenges are outlined, which extend to the incorporation of biological response and the customization of surgeries and devices for individual patients.

  11. Cardiovascular benefits of exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal SK

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Shashi K AgarwalMedical Director, Agarwal Health Center, NJ, USAAbstract: Regular physical activity during leisure time has been shown to be associated with better health outcomes. The American Heart Association, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Sports Medicine all recommend regular physical activity of moderate intensity for the prevention and complementary treatment of several diseases. The therapeutic role of exercise in maintaining good health and treating diseases is not new. The benefits of physical activity date back to Susruta, a 600 BC physician in India, who prescribed exercise to patients. Hippocrates (460–377 BC wrote “in order to remain healthy, the entire day should be devoted exclusively to ways and means of increasing one's strength and staying healthy, and the best way to do so is through physical exercise.” Plato (427–347 BC referred to medicine as a sister art to physical exercise while the noted ancient Greek physician Galen (129–217 AD penned several essays on aerobic fitness and strengthening muscles. This article briefly reviews the beneficial effects of physical activity on cardiovascular diseases.Keywords: exercise, cardiovascular disease, lifestyle changes, physical activity, good health

  12. Resveratrol and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Bonnefont-Rousselot

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs has stimulated research for substances that could improve cardiovascular health. Among them, resveratrol (RES, a polyphenolic compound notably present in grapes and red wine, has been involved in the “French paradox”. RES is known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and for its ability to upregulate endothelial NO synthase (eNOS. RES was able to scavenge •OH/O2•− and peroxyl radicals, which can limit the lipid peroxidation processes. Moreover, in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC under glucose-induced oxidative stress, RES restored the activity of dimethylargininedimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH, an enzyme that degrades an endogenous inhibitor of eNOS named asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA. Thus, RES could improve •NO availability and decrease the endothelial dysfunction observed in diabetes. Preclinical studies have made it possible to identify molecular targets (SIRT-1, AMPK, Nrf2, NFκB…; however, there are limited human clinical trials, and difficulties in the interpretation of results arise from the use of high-dose RES supplements in research studies, whereas low RES concentrations are present in red wine. The discussions on potential beneficial effects of RES in CVDs (atherosclerosis, hypertension, stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure should compare the results of preclinical studies with those of clinical trials.

  13. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: research questions in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolome R. Celli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality and resource use worldwide. The goal of this official American Thoracic Society (ATS/European Respiratory Society (ERS Research Statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment, and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarised, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment and management of COPD, as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS research statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centred outcomes.

  14. Consensus and Synchronization in Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Synchronization in complex networks is one of the most captivating cooperative phenomena in nature and has been shown to be of fundamental importance in such varied circumstances as the continued existence of species, the functioning of heart pacemaker cells, epileptic seizures, neuronal firing in the feline visual cortex and cognitive tasks in humans. E.g. coupled visual and acoustic interactions make fireflies flash, crickets chirp, and an audience clap in unison. On the other hand, in distributed systems and networks, it is often necessary for some or all of the nodes to calculate some function of certain parameters, e.g. sink nodes in sensor networks being tasked with calculating the average measurement value of all the sensors or multi-agent systems in which all agents are required to coordinate their speed and direction. When all nodes calculate the same function of the initial values in the system, they are said to reach consensus. Such concepts - sometimes also called state agreement, rendezvous, and ...

  15. Consensus maps of cloned plant cuticle genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eviatar; Nevo

    2010-01-01

    Plant cuticle,which covers the plant surface,consists of waxes and cutins,and is associated with plant drought,cold,and salt resistance.Hitherto,at least 47 genes participating in the formation of plant cuticle have been cloned from Arabidopsis thaliana,Oryza sativa,Zea mays,Ricinus communis,Brassica napus,and Medicago truncatula;and about 85% of them encode proteins sharing above 50% identities with their rice homologous sequences.These cloned cuticle genes were mapped in silico on different chromosomes of rice and Arabidopsis,respectively.The mapping results revealed that plant cuticle genes were not evenly distributed in both genomes.About 40% of the mapped cuticle genes were located on chromosome 1 in Arabidopsis,while 20% of the mapped cuticle genes were located on chromosome 2 but none on chromosome 12 in rice.Some cloned plant cuticle genes have several rice homologous sequences,which might be produced by chromosomal segment duplication.The consensus map of cloned plant cuticle genes will provide important clues for the selection of candidate genes in a positional cloning of an unknown cuticle gene in plants.

  16. O transplante de células-tronco hematopoéticas na leucemia linfoide crônica, uma proposta do I Encontro de Diretrizes do Transplante de Medula Óssea da Sociedade Brasileira de Transplante de Medula Óssea, Rio de Janeiro 2009 Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in chronic lymphoid leukemia: a proposal by the Brazilian Consensus on Bone Marrow Transplantation of the Brazilian Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation, Rio de Janeiro 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton A. Ruiz

    2010-05-01

    disease. Younger patients with high-risk criteria may benefit with a more aggressive treatment that includes hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Autologous transplantation, despite of the encouraging results with cases of molecular and/or cytogenetic remission and low mortality rates, does not present a plateau in survival curves and has a high relapse rate. Allogeneic transplantations using myeloablative regimens, have high toxicity and mortality rates, but also demonstrate the graft-versus-leukemia effect that increases the possibility of cure of these individuals. So the option of allogeneic transplants for patients with CLL is directed to conditioning using non-myeloablative regimens, which can also be applied to older patients or those with comorbidities, and maintain a potential graft-versus-leukemia effect. The identification of patients who may benefit from these procedures and the characterization of new prognostic markers remain the subjects of many clinical studies and were the objective of the group responsible for discussing guidelines for CLL of the consensus on HSCT SBTMO. Thus we believe that HSCT for CLL should follow the criteria of the EBMT. When a sibling donor is available the best option is allogeneic HSCT with a myeloablative regimen. The strategy of unrelated allogeneic or autologous HSCT must be considered as a second option when no donor is available, for special situations and clinical trials.

  17. Status of conversion of NE standards to national consensus standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One major goal of the Nuclear Standards Program is to convert existing NE standards into national consensus standards (where possible). This means that an NE standard in the same subject area using the national consensus process. This report is a summary of the activities that have evolved to effect conversion of NE standards to national consensus standards, and the status of current conversion activities. In some cases, all requirements in an NE standard will not be incorporated into the published national consensus standard because these requirements may be considered too restrictive or too specific for broader application by the nuclear industry. If these requirements are considered necessary for nuclear reactor program applications, the program standard will be revised and issued as a supplement to the national consensus standard. The supplemental program standard will contain only those necessary requirements not reflected by the national consensus standard. Therefore, while complete conversion of program standards may not always be realized, the standards policy has been fully supported in attempting to make maximum use of the national consensus standard. 1 tab

  18. Developing syndrome definitions based on consensus and current use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, John N; Baer, Atar; Buckeridge, David L; Cochrane, Dennis; Conway, Michael A; Elkin, Peter; Espino, Jeremy; Gunn, Julia E; Hales, Craig M; Hutwagner, Lori; Keller, Mikaela; Larson, Catherine; Noe, Rebecca; Okhmatovskaia, Anya; Olson, Karen; Paladini, Marc; Scholer, Matthew; Sniegoski, Carol; Thompson, David; Lober, Bill

    2010-01-01

    Objective Standardized surveillance syndromes do not exist but would facilitate sharing data among surveillance systems and comparing the accuracy of existing systems. The objective of this study was to create reference syndrome definitions from a consensus of investigators who currently have or are building syndromic surveillance systems. Design Clinical condition–syndrome pairs were catalogued for 10 surveillance systems across the United States and the representatives of these systems were brought together for a workshop to discuss consensus syndrome definitions. Results Consensus syndrome definitions were generated for the four syndromes monitored by the majority of the 10 participating surveillance systems: Respiratory, gastrointestinal, constitutional, and influenza-like illness (ILI). An important element in coming to consensus quickly was the development of a sensitive and specific definition for respiratory and gastrointestinal syndromes. After the workshop, the definitions were refined and supplemented with keywords and regular expressions, the keywords were mapped to standard vocabularies, and a web ontology language (OWL) ontology was created. Limitations The consensus definitions have not yet been validated through implementation. Conclusion The consensus definitions provide an explicit description of the current state-of-the-art syndromes used in automated surveillance, which can subsequently be systematically evaluated against real data to improve the definitions. The method for creating consensus definitions could be applied to other domains that have diverse existing definitions. PMID:20819870

  19. Spanish consensus on the physical health of patients with depressive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner, José; Saiz Ruiz, Jerónimo; Bobes, Julio; Zamorano, Enric; López, Francisco; Hernando, Teresa; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Álamo, Cecilio; Cervilla, Jorge A; Ibáñez Cuadrado, Ángela; Ibáñez Guerra, Elena; López, Silvia; Morán, Pedro; Palao, Diego J; Romacho, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Comorbidity between depression and physical illnesses is very common and has a significant impact on the health and management of the patient. With the support of the Sociedades Españolas de Psiquiatría y Psiquiatría Biológica, and Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN) a consensus was prepared on physical health in patients with depression and is summarized in the present work. The literature review highlighted the high frequency of cardiovascular and endocrine-metabolic disorders in patients with depression such as diabetes and obesity, thus making the primary and secondary prevention recommendations for patients with cardiovascular or metabolic risk applicable to patients with depression. Comorbidity between depression and chronic pain is also frequent, and requires an integrated therapeutic approach. The presence of physical illness in patients with depression may condition, but not preclude, the pharmacological treatment; drug selection should take into account potential side-effect and drug-drug interactions. On the other hand, psychotherapy may contribute to the patient's recovery. Overall, coordination between the primary care physician, the psychiatrist and other health professionals involved is essential for the management of patients with depression and concomitant physical illness.

  20. Evolving society and mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Dipesh Bhagabati; Anil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Numerous issues related to culture, occupation, gender, caste, and health, to name a few, have faced harshness of society from time immemorial. Reasons are debatable, ranging from somewhat understandable to completely unacceptable. There is no doubt that society is dynamic and it has changed its view on many of the issues with passing time. Mental health is one such issue which society has neglected for quite a long time. Even today, mental health and mentally ill people face stigma and discr...