WorldWideScience

Sample records for cardiovascular magnetic resonance

  1. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  2. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines for reporting cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations

    OpenAIRE

    van Rossum Albert C; Raman Subha V; McConnell Michael V; Lawson Mark A; Higgins Charles B; Friedrich Matthias G; Bogaert Jan G; Bluemke David; Hundley W Gregory; Flamm Scott; Kramer Christopher M; Nagel Eike; Neubauer Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract These reporting guidelines are recommended by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) to provide a framework for healthcare delivery systems to disseminate cardiac and vascular imaging findings related to the performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) examinations.

  3. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Maceira Alicia M; Mohiaddin Raad H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue char...

  4. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines for reporting cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rossum Albert C

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract These reporting guidelines are recommended by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR to provide a framework for healthcare delivery systems to disseminate cardiac and vascular imaging findings related to the performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR examinations.

  5. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in carotid atherosclerotic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Huijun; Wang Jinnan; Li Rui; Ferguson Marina S; Kerwin William S; Dong Li; Canton Gador; Hatsukami Thomas S; Yuan Chun

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease affecting many vascular beds. Disease progression leads to acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke and death. The diseased carotid alone is responsible for one third of the 700,000 new or recurrent strokes occurring yearly in the United States. Imaging plays an important role in the management of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) of the carotid vessel wall is one promi...

  6. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maceira Alicia M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue characterization of diffuse and focal fibrosis. In addition, CMR is well suited for exclusion of common secondary causes for hypertension. We review the current and emerging clinical and research applications of CMR in hypertension.

  7. Myocardial tissue tagging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Bluemke David A; Osman Nael F; Cheng Susan; Shehata Monda L; Lima João AC

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is currently the gold standard for assessing both global and regional myocardial function. New tools for quantifying regional function have been recently developed to characterize early myocardial dysfunction in order to improve the identification and management of individuals at risk for heart failure. Of particular interest is CMR myocardial tagging, a non-invasive technique for assessing regional function that provides a detailed and compreh...

  8. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in pulmonary hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Bradlow William M; R Gibbs J Simon; Mohiaddin Raad H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension represents a group of conditions characterized by higher than normal pulmonary artery pressures. Despite improved treatments, outcomes in many instances remain poor. In recent years, there has been growing interest in the use of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) in patients with pulmonary hypertension. This technique offers certain advantages over other imaging modalities since it is well suited to the assessment of the right ventricle and the proximal pu...

  9. Quantitative cardiovascular magnetic resonance for molecular imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lanza Gregory M; Caruthers Shelton D; Winter Patrick M; Wickline Samuel A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) molecular imaging aims to identify and map the expression of important biomarkers on a cellular scale utilizing contrast agents that are specifically targeted to the biochemical signatures of disease and are capable of generating sufficient image contrast. In some cases, the contrast agents may be designed to carry a drug payload or to be sensitive to important physiological factors, such as pH, temperature or oxygenation. In this review, examp...

  10. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging - a pictorial review

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Dahya; Spottiswoode, Bruce S.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is a powerful problem-solving tool and arguably offers the most comprehensive assessment of cardiac morphology and function, as well as the opportunity of rebuilding the bridge between cardiologists and radiologists. The role of CMR-trained imaging physicists is also valuable, and many CMR centres harmoniously incorporate these three sub-specialty fields. This paper comprises an overview of several CMR techniques, outlining both the strengths...

  11. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging - a pictorial review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Dahya

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR is a powerful problem-solving tool and arguably offers the most comprehensive assessment of cardiac morphology and function, as well as the opportunity of rebuilding the bridge between cardiologists and radiologists. The role of CMR-trained imaging physicists is also valuable, and many CMR centres harmoniously incorporate these three sub-specialty fields. This paper comprises an overview of several CMR techniques, outlining both the strengths and limitations of the modality.

  12. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in carotid atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Huijun

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease affecting many vascular beds. Disease progression leads to acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke and death. The diseased carotid alone is responsible for one third of the 700,000 new or recurrent strokes occurring yearly in the United States. Imaging plays an important role in the management of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR of the carotid vessel wall is one promising modality in the evaluation of patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. Advances in carotid vessel wall CMR allow comprehensive assessment of morphology inside the wall, contributing substantial disease-specific information beyond luminal stenosis. Although carotid vessel wall CMR has not been widely used to screen for carotid atherosclerotic disease, many trials support its potential for this indication. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding carotid vessel wall CMR and its potential clinical application for management of carotid atherosclerotic disease.

  13. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiozaki, Afonso Akio; Parga, Jose Rodrigues; Arteaga, Edmundo; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo [Sao Paulo Univ. (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto do Coracao. Setor de Tomografia Computarizada e Ressonancia Magnetica Cardiovascular]. E-mail: rochitte@incor.usp.br; Kim, Raymond J. [Duke Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Center, Durham, NC (United States); Tassi, Eduardo Marinho [Diagnosticos da America S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Sector of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography

    2007-03-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most frequent genetic cardiac disease that causes sudden death in young people, with an incidence of 1:500 adults. The routinely used criteria for worst prognosis have limited sensitivity and specificity. Thus, the estimated risk of evolving to dilated cardiomyopathy or sudden death is somewhat inaccurate, leading to management uncertainty of HCM patients. Therefore, an accurate noninvasive method for the diagnosis of HCM with prognostic value is of great importance. In the last years, Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) emerged not only as a diagnostic tool, but also as a study with prognostic values, by characterizing myocardial fibrosis with great accuracy in HCM patients. Additionally, CMR identifies the types of hypertrophy, analyses the ventricular function, estimates the intraventricular gradient and allows the determination of differential diagnosis. Moreover, CMR can uniquely access myocardial fibrosis in HCM. (author)

  14. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in pericardial diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francone Marco

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The pericardium and pericardial diseases in particular have received, in contrast to other topics in the field of cardiology, relatively limited interest. Today, despite improved knowledge of pathophysiology of pericardial diseases and the availability of a wide spectrum of diagnostic tools, the diagnostic challenge remains. Not only the clinical presentation may be atypical, mimicking other cardiac, pulmonary or pleural diseases; in developed countries a shift for instance in the epidemiology of constrictive pericarditis has been noted. Accurate decision making is crucial taking into account the significant morbidity and mortality caused by complicated pericardial diseases, and the potential benefit of therapeutic interventions. Imaging herein has an important role, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is definitely one of the most versatile modalities to study the pericardium. It fuses excellent anatomic detail and tissue characterization with accurate evaluation of cardiac function and assessment of the haemodynamic consequences of pericardial constraint on cardiac filling. This review focuses on the current state of knowledge how CMR can be used to study the most common pericardial diseases.

  15. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance with an MR compatible pacemaker

    OpenAIRE

    Bhandiwad Anita R; Cummings Kristopher W; Crowley Michael; Woodard Pamela K

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within FDA guidelines for the MRI-conditional pacemaker precludes placing the heart at the center of the magnet’s bore. This in effect appears to preclude cardiovascular MR. In this manuscript, we describe a protocol for cardiovascular MR of patients with a Revo pacemaker system while operating within FDA guidelines, and the first US case of cardiovascular MR in a patient with a Revo MRI-conditional pacing system despite position constraints.

  16. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance physics for clinicians: part I

    OpenAIRE

    Ridgway John P

    2010-01-01

    Abstract There are many excellent specialised texts and articles that describe the physical principles of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques. There are also many texts written with the clinician in mind that provide an understandable, more general introduction to the basic physical principles of magnetic resonance (MR) techniques and applications. There are however very few texts or articles that attempt to provide a basic MR physics introduction that is tailored for clinician...

  17. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Marfan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Dormand, Helen; Mohiaddin, Raad H

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an overview of Marfan syndrome with an emphasis on cardiovascular complications and cardiovascular imaging. Both pre- and post-operative imaging is addressed with an explanation of surgical management. All relevant imaging modalities are discussed with a particular focus on cardiovascular MR.

  18. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance findings in a case of Danon disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kosieradzka Agnieszka; Walczak Ewa; Kuch Marek; Kownacki Lukasz; Piotrowska-Kownacka Dorota; Fidzianska Anna; Krolicki Leszek

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Danon disease is a rare X-linked dominant lysosomal glycogen storage disease that can lead to severe ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure. We report a case of Danon disease with cardiac involvement evaluated with cardiovascular magnetic resonance, including late gadolinium enhancement and perfusion studies.

  19. Interventional cardiovascular magnetic resonance: still tantalizing

    OpenAIRE

    Saikus Christina E; Kocaturk Ozgur; Guttman Michael A; Faranesh Anthony Z; Ratnayaka Kanishka; Lederman Robert J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The often touted advantages of MR guidance remain largely unrealized for cardiovascular interventional procedures in patients. Many procedures have been simulated in animal models. We argue these opportunities for clinical interventional MR will be met in the near future. This paper reviews technical and clinical considerations and offers advice on how to implement a clinical-grade interventional cardiovascular MR (iCMR) laboratory. We caution that this reflects our personal view of ...

  20. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in wet beriberi

    OpenAIRE

    Giri Shivraman; Smith Sakima; Velez Michael R; Essa Essa; Raman Subha V; Gumina Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The clinical presentation of beriberi can be quite varied. In the extreme form, profound cardiovascular involvement leads to circulatory collapse and death. This case report is of a 72 year-old male who was admitted to the Neurology inpatient ward with progressive bilateral lower extremity weakness and parasthesia. He subsequently developed pulmonary edema and high output cardiac failure requiring intubation and blood pressure support. With the constellation of peripheral neuropathy,...

  1. Technical competence in cardiovascular magnetic resonance and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance and computed tomography have evolved as very practical and useful techniques applied in clinical cardiology. Due to their rapid acceptance in the cardiology community and widespread use, training of both cardiologists and radiologists on this subspecialty has not been homogeneous so far. This in part explains significant differences observed in the diverse background found in today’s practicing physicians who execute these exams. In order to guide training facilities as well as both payers, contractors and general cardiologists ordering the exam, this document provides a minimum standard that should be accomplished by all physicians who pursue education in the field and for those who already practice in it. The clinical competences listed in this statement are by no means thorough but should be required by all those involved in cardiovascular magnetic resonance and computed tomography as the customary requirements for current and future practitioners. (author)

  2. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance physics for clinicians: part II

    OpenAIRE

    Biglands John D; Radjenovic Aleksandra; Ridgway John P

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This is the second of two reviews that is intended to cover the essential aspects of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) physics in a way that is understandable and relevant to clinicians using CMR in their daily practice. Starting with the basic pulse sequences and contrast mechanisms described in part I, it briefly discusses further approaches to accelerate image acquisition. It then continues by showing in detail how the contrast behaviour of black blood fast spin echo and bri...

  3. The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Noureldin Radwa A; Liu Songtao; Nacif Marcelo S; Judge Daniel P; Halushka Marc K; Abraham Theodore P; Ho Carolyn; Bluemke David A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic disease of the heart. HCM is characterized by a wide range of clinical expression, ranging from asymptomatic mutation carriers to sudden cardiac death as the first manifestation of the disease. Over 1000 mutations have been identified, classically in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins. Noninvasive imaging is central to the diagnosis of HCM and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is increasingly used to characterize morp...

  4. Dressler's syndrome demonstrated by late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Kovac Jan; Khoo Jeffrey; Steadman Christopher D; McCann Gerry P

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A 49-year old patient presented late with an anterolateral ST-elevation myocardial infarction and was treated with rescue angioplasty to an occluded left anterior descending artery. Her recovery was complicated by low-grade pyrexia and raised inflammatory markers. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance 5 weeks after the acute presentation showed transmural infarction and global late gadolinium enhancement of the pericardium in keeping with Dressler's syndrome.

  5. Feasibility of perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance in paediatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kellenberger Christian; Schwitter Juerg; Buechel Emanuela; Balmer Christian; Bauersfeld Urs

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Aims As coronary artery disease may also occur during childhood in some specific conditions, we sought to assess the feasibility and accuracy of perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in paediatric patients. Methods and results First-pass perfusion CMR studies were performed under pharmacological stress with adenosine and by using a hybrid echo-planar pulse sequence with slice-selective saturation recovery preparation. Fifty-six perfusion CMR examinations were performed in...

  6. T2-weighted cardiovascular magnetic resonance in acute cardiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Eitel Ingo; Friedrich Matthias G

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) using T2-weighted sequences can visualize myocardial edema. When compared to previous protocols, newer pulse sequences with substantially improved image quality have increased its clinical utility. The assessment of myocardial edema provides useful incremental diagnostic and prognostic information in a variety of clinical settings associated with acute myocardial injury. In patients with acute chest pain, T2-weighted CMR is able to identify acu...

  7. Iatrogenic intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia diagnosed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Entrikin Daniel W; Chughtai Haroon L; Drafts Brandon C

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernias are very uncommon and are most typically caused by high-force blunt trauma. Other iatrogenic causes such as prior surgical formation of a pericardial window have been described, but are exceedingly rare. We present a case of an intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia in a patient with a prior pericardial window in which the diagnosis was unclear using conventional imaging modalities, but was established using cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

  8. Value of black blood T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter John Paul; Smith Gillian C; He Taigang; Alam Mohammed H; Firmin David N; Pennell Dudley J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To assess whether black blood T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance is superior to conventional white blood imaging of cardiac iron in patients with thalassaemia major (TM). Materials and methods We performed both conventional white blood and black blood T2* CMR sequences in 100 TM patients to determine intra and inter-observer variability and presence of artefacts. In 23 patients, 2 separate studies of both techniques were performed to assess interstudy reproducibility. Resu...

  9. Quantification of myocardial perfusion by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Jerosch-Herold Michael

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The potential of contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) for a quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion has been explored for more than a decade now, with encouraging results from comparisons with accepted "gold standards", such as microspheres used in the physiology laboratory. This has generated an increasing interest in the requirements and methodological approaches for the non-invasive quantification of myocardial blood flow by CMR. This review provides a...

  10. Heart valve disease: investigation by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Myerson Saul G

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has become a valuable investigative tool in many areas of cardiac medicine. Its value in heart valve disease is less well appreciated however, particularly as echocardiography is a powerful and widely available technique in valve disease. This review highlights the added value that CMR can bring in valve disease, complementing echocardiography in many areas, but it has also become the first-line investigation in some, such as pulmonary valve di...

  11. Visualization of coronary venous anatomy by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Crean Andrew; Plein Sven; Younger John F; Ball Stephen G; Greenwood John P

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Coronary venous imaging with whole-heart cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) angiography has recently been described using developmental pulse sequences and intravascular contrast agents. However, the practical utility of coronary venous imaging will be for patients with heart failure in whom cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) is being considered. As such complementary information on ventricular function and myocardial viability will be required. The aim of this s...

  12. Review of Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Neubauer S; Mohiaddin RH; Manning WJ; Kilner PJ; Firmin DN; Pennell DJ; Prasad SK

    2010-01-01

    Abstract There were 56 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in 2009. The editors were impressed with the high quality of the submissions, of which our acceptance rate was about 40%. In accordance with open-access publishing, the articles go on-line as they are accepted with no collating of the articles into sections or special thematic issues. We have therefore chosen to briefly summarise the papers in this article for quick reference for our readers in broad...

  13. Review of Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Pennell Dudley J; Carpenter John; Firmin David N; Kilner Philip J; Mohiaddin Raad H; Prasad Sanjay K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract There were 83 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (JCMR) in 2011, which is an 11% increase in the number of articles since 2010. The quality of the submissions continues to increase. The editors had been delighted with the 2010 JCMR Impact Factor of 4.33, although this fell modestly to 3.72 for 2011. The impact factor undergoes natural variation according to citation rates of papers in the 2 years following publication, and is significantly influenc...

  14. Review of Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Pennell, Dudley J; Baksi, A. John; Carpenter, John Paul; Firmin, David N; Kilner, Philip J; Mohiaddin, Raad H; Prasad, Sanjay K.

    2013-01-01

    There were 90 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (JCMR) in 2012, which is an 8% increase in the number of articles since 2011. The quality of the submissions continues to increase. The editors are delighted to report that the 2011 JCMR Impact Factor (which is published in June 2012) has risen to 4.44, up from 3.72 for 2010 (as published in June 2011), a 20% increase. The 2011 impact factor means that the JCMR papers that were published in 2009 and 2010 were...

  15. Review of Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 2009.

    OpenAIRE

    Pennell, DJ; Firmin, DN; Kilner, PJ; Manning, WJ; Mohiaddin, RH; Neubauer, S.; Prasad, SK

    2010-01-01

    There were 56 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in 2009. The editors were impressed with the high quality of the submissions, of which our acceptance rate was about 40%. In accordance with open-access publishing, the articles go on-line as they are accepted with no collating of the articles into sections or special thematic issues. We have therefore chosen to briefly summarise the papers in this article for quick reference for our readers in broad areas of...

  16. Review of Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Pennell, D J; Baksi, A. J.; Prasad, S. K.; Raphael, C. E.; Kilner, P. J.; Mohiaddin, R. H.; Alpendurada, F.; Babu-Narayan, S V; Schneider, J.; Firmin, D. N.

    2015-01-01

    There were 102 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (JCMR) in 2014, which is a 6 % decrease on the 109 articles published in 2013. The quality of the submissions continues to increase. The 2013 JCMR Impact Factor (which is published in June 2014) fell to 4.72 from 5.11 for 2012 (as published in June 2013). The 2013 impact factor means that the JCMR papers that were published in 2011 and 2012 were cited on average 4.72 times in 2013. The impact factor undergoe...

  17. Review of journal of cardiovascular magnetic resonance 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Pennell, Dudley J; Firmin, David N; Kilner, Philip J; Manning, Warren J; Mohiaddin, Raad H; Prasad, Sanjay K.

    2011-01-01

    There were 75 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (JCMR) in 2010, which is a 34% increase in the number of articles since 2009. The quality of the submissions continues to increase, and the editors were delighted with the recent announcement of the JCMR Impact Factor of 4.33 which showed a 90% increase since last year. Our acceptance rate is approximately 30%, but has been falling as the number of articles being submitted has been increasing. In accordance w...

  18. Review of Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Pennell, Dudley J; Carpenter, John Paul; Firmin, David N; Kilner, Philip J; Mohiaddin, Raad H; Prasad, Sanjay K.

    2012-01-01

    There were 83 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (JCMR) in 2011, which is an 11% increase in the number of articles since 2010. The quality of the submissions continues to increase. The editors had been delighted with the 2010 JCMR Impact Factor of 4.33, although this fell modestly to 3.72 for 2011. The impact factor undergoes natural variation according to citation rates of papers in the 2 years following publication, and is significantly influenced by hig...

  19. Review of Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Pennell, Dudley John; Baksi, Arun John; Kilner, Philip John; Mohiaddin, Raad Hashem; Prasad, Sanjay Kumar; Alpendurada, Francisco; Babu-Narayan, Sonya Vidya; Neubauer, Stefan; Firmin, David Nigel

    2014-01-01

    There were 109 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (JCMR) in 2013, which is a 21% increase on the 90 articles published in 2012. The quality of the submissions continues to increase. The editors are delighted to report that the 2012 JCMR Impact Factor (which is published in June 2013) has risen to 5.11, up from 4.44 for 2011 (as published in June 2012), a 15% increase and taking us through the 5 threshold for the first time. The 2012 impact factor means that...

  20. Review of Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Pennell, DJ; Firmin, DN; Kilner, PJ; Mohiaddin, RH; Neubauer, S.; Prasad, SK; Manning, Warren J

    2010-01-01

    There were 56 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in 2009. The editors were impressed with the high quality of the submissions, of which our acceptance rate was about 40%. In accordance with open-access publishing, the articles go on-line as they are accepted with no collating of the articles into sections or special thematic issues. We have therefore chosen to briefly summarise the papers in this article for quick reference for our readers in broad areas of...

  1. Review of journal of cardiovascular magnetic resonance 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Kilner Philip J; Firmin David N; Pennell Dudley J; Manning Warren J; Mohiaddin Raad H; Prasad Sanjay K

    2011-01-01

    Abstract There were 75 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (JCMR) in 2010, which is a 34% increase in the number of articles since 2009. The quality of the submissions continues to increase, and the editors were delighted with the recent announcement of the JCMR Impact Factor of 4.33 which showed a 90% increase since last year. Our acceptance rate is approximately 30%, but has been falling as the number of articles being submitted has been increasing. In acc...

  2. Review of journal of cardiovascular magnetic resonance 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Dudley J; Firmin, David N; Kilner, Philip J; Manning, Warren J; Mohiaddin, Raad H; Prasad, Sanjay K

    2011-01-01

    There were 75 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (JCMR) in 2010, which is a 34% increase in the number of articles since 2009. The quality of the submissions continues to increase, and the editors were delighted with the recent announcement of the JCMR Impact Factor of 4.33 which showed a 90% increase since last year. Our acceptance rate is approximately 30%, but has been falling as the number of articles being submitted has been increasing. In accordance with Open-Access publishing, the JCMR articles go on-line as they are accepted with no collating of the articles into sections or special thematic issues. Last year for the first time, the Editors summarized the papers for the readership into broad areas of interest or theme, which we felt would be useful to practitioners of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) so that you could review areas of interest from the previous year in a single article in relation to each other and other recent JCMR articles 1. This experiment proved very popular with a very high rate of downloading, and therefore we intend to continue this review annually. The papers are presented in themes and comparison is drawn with previously published JCMR papers to identify the continuity of thought and publication in the journal. We hope that you find the open-access system increases wider reading and citation of your papers, and that you will continue to send your quality manuscripts to JCMR for publication. PMID:21914185

  3. Review of journal of cardiovascular magnetic resonance 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilner Philip J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There were 75 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (JCMR in 2010, which is a 34% increase in the number of articles since 2009. The quality of the submissions continues to increase, and the editors were delighted with the recent announcement of the JCMR Impact Factor of 4.33 which showed a 90% increase since last year. Our acceptance rate is approximately 30%, but has been falling as the number of articles being submitted has been increasing. In accordance with Open-Access publishing, the JCMR articles go on-line as they are accepted with no collating of the articles into sections or special thematic issues. Last year for the first time, the Editors summarized the papers for the readership into broad areas of interest or theme, which we felt would be useful to practitioners of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR so that you could review areas of interest from the previous year in a single article in relation to each other and other recent JCMR articles 1. This experiment proved very popular with a very high rate of downloading, and therefore we intend to continue this review annually. The papers are presented in themes and comparison is drawn with previously published JCMR papers to identify the continuity of thought and publication in the journal. We hope that you find the open-access system increases wider reading and citation of your papers, and that you will continue to send your quality manuscripts to JCMR for publication.

  4. Review of Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, D J; Firmin, D N; Kilner, P J; Manning, W J; Mohiaddin, R H; Neubauer, S; Prasad, S K

    2010-01-01

    There were 56 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in 2009. The editors were impressed with the high quality of the submissions, of which our acceptance rate was about 40%. In accordance with open-access publishing, the articles go on-line as they are accepted with no collating of the articles into sections or special thematic issues. We have therefore chosen to briefly summarise the papers in this article for quick reference for our readers in broad areas of interest, which we feel will be useful to practitioners of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). In some cases where it is considered useful, the articles are also put into the wider context with a short narrative and recent CMR references. It has been a privilege to serve as the Editor of the JCMR this past year. I hope that you find the open-access system increases wider reading and citation of your papers, and that you will continue to send your quality manuscripts to JCMR for publication. PMID:20302618

  5. Review of Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There were 56 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in 2009. The editors were impressed with the high quality of the submissions, of which our acceptance rate was about 40%. In accordance with open-access publishing, the articles go on-line as they are accepted with no collating of the articles into sections or special thematic issues. We have therefore chosen to briefly summarise the papers in this article for quick reference for our readers in broad areas of interest, which we feel will be useful to practitioners of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. In some cases where it is considered useful, the articles are also put into the wider context with a short narrative and recent CMR references. It has been a privilege to serve as the Editor of the JCMR this past year. I hope that you find the open-access system increases wider reading and citation of your papers, and that you will continue to send your quality manuscripts to JCMR for publication.

  6. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance activity in the United Kingdom: a survey on behalf of the british society of cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dargie Henry J

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The indications, complexity and capabilities of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR have rapidly expanded. Whether actual service provision and training have developed in parallel is unknown. Methods We undertook a systematic telephone and postal survey of all public hospitals on behalf of the British Society of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance to identify all CMR providers within the United Kingdom. Results Of the 60 CMR centres identified, 88% responded to a detailed questionnaire. Services are led by cardiologists and radiologists in equal proportion, though the majority of current trainees are cardiologists. The mean number of CMR scans performed annually per centre increased by 44% over two years. This trend was consistent across centres of different scanning volumes. The commonest indication for CMR was assessment of heart failure and cardiomyopathy (39%, followed by coronary artery disease and congenital heart disease. There was striking geographical variation in CMR availability, numbers of scans performed, and distribution of trainees. Centres without on site scanning capability refer very few patients for CMR. Just over half of centres had a formal training programme, and few performed regular audit. Conclusion The number of CMR scans performed in the UK has increased dramatically in just two years. Trainees are mainly located in large volume centres and enrolled in cardiology as opposed to radiology training programmes.

  7. Technical competence in cardiovascular magnetic resonance and computed tomography; Competencia tecnica em ressonancia e tomografia cardiovascular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Juliano Lara; Shiozaki, Afonso Akio; Azevedo Filho, Clerio Francisco de; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo; Pinto, Ibraim Marciarelli Francisco; Lopes, Marly Maria Uellendahl; Schvartzman, Paulo Roberto, E-mail: jlaraf@fcm.unicamp.br [Universidade de Campinas (UNICAMP/GERT) SP (Brazil). Grupo de Estudo em Ressonancia e Tomografia Cardiovascular

    2009-10-15

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance and computed tomography have evolved as very practical and useful techniques applied in clinical cardiology. Due to their rapid acceptance in the cardiology community and widespread use, training of both cardiologists and radiologists on this subspecialty has not been homogeneous so far. This in part explains significant differences observed in the diverse background found in today’s practicing physicians who execute these exams. In order to guide training facilities as well as both payers, contractors and general cardiologists ordering the exam, this document provides a minimum standard that should be accomplished by all physicians who pursue education in the field and for those who already practice in it. The clinical competences listed in this statement are by no means thorough but should be required by all those involved in cardiovascular magnetic resonance and computed tomography as the customary requirements for current and future practitioners. (author)

  8. Magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRA; Angiography - magnetic resonance ... Kwong RY. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . ...

  9. Fractal frontiers in cardiovascular magnetic resonance: towards clinical implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Captur, Gabriella; Karperien, Audrey L; Li, Chunming; Zemrak, Filip; Tobon-Gomez, Catalina; Gao, Xuexin; Bluemke, David A; Elliott, Perry M; Petersen, Steffen E; Moon, James C

    2015-01-01

    Many of the structures and parameters that are detected, measured and reported in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) have at least some properties that are fractal, meaning complex and self-similar at different scales. To date however, there has been little use of fractal geometry in CMR; by comparison, many more applications of fractal analysis have been published in MR imaging of the brain.This review explains the fundamental principles of fractal geometry, places the fractal dimension into a meaningful context within the realms of Euclidean and topological space, and defines its role in digital image processing. It summarises the basic mathematics, highlights strengths and potential limitations of its application to biomedical imaging, shows key current examples and suggests a simple route for its successful clinical implementation by the CMR community.By simplifying some of the more abstract concepts of deterministic fractals, this review invites CMR scientists (clinicians, technologists, physicists) to experiment with fractal analysis as a means of developing the next generation of intelligent quantitative cardiac imaging tools.

  10. Feasibility of perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance in paediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellenberger Christian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims As coronary artery disease may also occur during childhood in some specific conditions, we sought to assess the feasibility and accuracy of perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR in paediatric patients. Methods and results First-pass perfusion CMR studies were performed under pharmacological stress with adenosine and by using a hybrid echo-planar pulse sequence with slice-selective saturation recovery preparation. Fifty-six perfusion CMR examinations were performed in 47 patients. The median age was 12 years (1 month-18 years, and weight 42.8 kg (2.6-82 kg. General anaesthesia was required in 18 patients. Mean examination time was 67 ± 19 min. Diagnostic image quality was obtained in 54/56 examinations. In 23 cases the acquisition parameters were adapted to patient's size. Perfusion CMR was abnormal in 16 examinations. The perfusion defects affected the territory of the left anterior descending coronary artery in 11, of the right coronary artery in 3, and of the circumflex coronary artery in 2 cases. Compared to coronary angiography, perfusion CMR showed a sensitivity of 87% (CI 52-97% and a specificity of 95% (CI 79-99%. Conclusion In children, perfusion CMR is feasible and accurate. In very young children (less than 1 year old, diagnostic image quality may be limited.

  11. Value of black blood T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carpenter John Paul

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To assess whether black blood T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance is superior to conventional white blood imaging of cardiac iron in patients with thalassaemia major (TM. Materials and methods We performed both conventional white blood and black blood T2* CMR sequences in 100 TM patients to determine intra and inter-observer variability and presence of artefacts. In 23 patients, 2 separate studies of both techniques were performed to assess interstudy reproducibility. Results Cardiac T2* values ranged from 4.5 to 43.8 ms. The mean T2* values were not different between black blood and white blood acquisitions (20.5 vs 21.6 ms, p = 0.26. Compared with the conventional white blood diastolic acquisition, the coefficient of variance of the black blood CMR technique was superior for intra-observer reproducibility (1.47% vs 4.23%, p Conclusions Black blood T2* CMR has superior reproducibility and reduced imaging artefacts for the assessment of cardiac iron, in comparison with the conventional white blood technique, which make it the preferred technique for clinical practice.

  12. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance physics for clinicians: part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridgway John P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are many excellent specialised texts and articles that describe the physical principles of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR techniques. There are also many texts written with the clinician in mind that provide an understandable, more general introduction to the basic physical principles of magnetic resonance (MR techniques and applications. There are however very few texts or articles that attempt to provide a basic MR physics introduction that is tailored for clinicians using CMR in their daily practice. This is the first of two reviews that are intended to cover the essential aspects of CMR physics in a way that is understandable and relevant to this group. It begins by explaining the basic physical principles of MR, including a description of the main components of an MR imaging system and the three types of magnetic field that they generate. The origin and method of production of the MR signal in biological systems are explained, focusing in particular on the two tissue magnetisation relaxation properties (T1 and T2 that give rise to signal differences from tissues, showing how they can be exploited to generate image contrast for tissue characterisation. The method most commonly used to localise and encode MR signal echoes to form a cross sectional image is described, introducing the concept of k-space and showing how the MR signal data stored within it relates to properties within the reconstructed image. Before describing the CMR acquisition methods in detail, the basic spin echo and gradient pulse sequences are introduced, identifying the key parameters that influence image contrast, including appearances in the presence of flowing blood, resolution and image acquisition time. The main derivatives of these two pulse sequences used for cardiac imaging are then described in more detail. Two of the key requirements for CMR are the need for data acquisition first to be to be synchronised with the subject's ECG and to be

  13. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance physics for clinicians: part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, John P

    2010-01-01

    There are many excellent specialised texts and articles that describe the physical principles of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques. There are also many texts written with the clinician in mind that provide an understandable, more general introduction to the basic physical principles of magnetic resonance (MR) techniques and applications. There are however very few texts or articles that attempt to provide a basic MR physics introduction that is tailored for clinicians using CMR in their daily practice. This is the first of two reviews that are intended to cover the essential aspects of CMR physics in a way that is understandable and relevant to this group. It begins by explaining the basic physical principles of MR, including a description of the main components of an MR imaging system and the three types of magnetic field that they generate. The origin and method of production of the MR signal in biological systems are explained, focusing in particular on the two tissue magnetisation relaxation properties (T1 and T2) that give rise to signal differences from tissues, showing how they can be exploited to generate image contrast for tissue characterisation. The method most commonly used to localise and encode MR signal echoes to form a cross sectional image is described, introducing the concept of k-space and showing how the MR signal data stored within it relates to properties within the reconstructed image. Before describing the CMR acquisition methods in detail, the basic spin echo and gradient pulse sequences are introduced, identifying the key parameters that influence image contrast, including appearances in the presence of flowing blood, resolution and image acquisition time. The main derivatives of these two pulse sequences used for cardiac imaging are then described in more detail. Two of the key requirements for CMR are the need for data acquisition first to be to be synchronised with the subject's ECG and to be fast enough for the subject

  14. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of quinticuspid aortic valve with aortic regurgitation and dilated ascending aorta

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Zhaoqi; Zhang Lijun; Meng Yanfeng; Wang Yongmei; Yang Xiaoming

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We report a rare case of a quinticuspid aortic valve associated with regurgitation and dilation of the ascending aorta, which was diagnosed and post-surgically followed up by cardiovascular magnetic resonance and dual source computed tomography.

  15. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance physics for clinicians: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biglands, John D; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Ridgway, John P

    2012-09-20

    This is the second of two reviews that is intended to cover the essential aspects of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) physics in a way that is understandable and relevant to clinicians using CMR in their daily practice. Starting with the basic pulse sequences and contrast mechanisms described in part I, it briefly discusses further approaches to accelerate image acquisition. It then continues by showing in detail how the contrast behaviour of black blood fast spin echo and bright blood cine gradient echo techniques can be modified by adding rf preparation pulses to derive a number of more specialised pulse sequences. The simplest examples described include T2-weighted oedema imaging, fat suppression and myocardial tagging cine pulse sequences. Two further important derivatives of the gradient echo pulse sequence, obtained by adding preparation pulses, are used in combination with the administration of a gadolinium-based contrast agent for myocardial perfusion imaging and the assessment of myocardial tissue viability using a late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) technique. These two imaging techniques are discussed in more detail, outlining the basic principles of each pulse sequence, the practical steps required to achieve the best results in a clinical setting and, in the case of perfusion, explaining some of the factors that influence current approaches to perfusion image analysis. The key principles of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) are also explained in detail, especially focusing on timing of the acquisition following contrast agent bolus administration, and current approaches to achieving time resolved MRA. Alternative MRA techniques that do not require the use of an endogenous contrast agent are summarised, and the specialised pulse sequence used to image the coronary arteries, using respiratory navigator gating, is described in detail. The article concludes by explaining the principle behind phase contrast imaging techniques

  16. Highlights of the 16th annual scientific sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, John-Paul; Patel, Amit R; Fernandes, Juliano Lara

    2013-07-19

    The 16th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) took place in San Francisco, USA at the end of January 2013. With a faculty of experts from across the world, this congress provided a wealth of insight into cutting-edge research and technological development. This review article intends to provide a highlight of what represented the most significant advances in the field of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) during this year's meeting.

  17. Heart valve disease: investigation by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myerson Saul G

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR has become a valuable investigative tool in many areas of cardiac medicine. Its value in heart valve disease is less well appreciated however, particularly as echocardiography is a powerful and widely available technique in valve disease. This review highlights the added value that CMR can bring in valve disease, complementing echocardiography in many areas, but it has also become the first-line investigation in some, such as pulmonary valve disease and assessing the right ventricle. CMR has many advantages, including the ability to image in any plane, which allows full visualisation of valves and their inflow/outflow tracts, direct measurement of valve area (particularly for stenotic valves, and characterisation of the associated great vessel anatomy (e.g. the aortic root and arch in aortic valve disease. A particular strength is the ability to quantify flow, which allows accurate measurement of regurgitation, cardiac shunt volumes/ratios and differential flow volumes (e.g. left and right pulmonary arteries. Quantification of ventricular volumes and mass is vital for determining the impact of valve disease on the heart, and CMR is the 'Gold standard' for this. Limitations of the technique include partial volume effects due to image slice thickness, and a low ability to identify small, highly mobile objects (such as vegetations due to the need to acquire images over several cardiac cycles. The review examines the advantages and disadvantages of each imaging aspect in detail, and considers how CMR can be used optimally for each valve lesion.

  18. Review of Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Dudley John; Baksi, Arun John; Kilner, Philip John; Mohiaddin, Raad Hashem; Prasad, Sanjay Kumar; Alpendurada, Francisco; Babu-Narayan, Sonya Vidya; Neubauer, Stefan; Firmin, David Nigel

    2014-01-01

    There were 109 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (JCMR) in 2013, which is a 21% increase on the 90 articles published in 2012. The quality of the submissions continues to increase. The editors are delighted to report that the 2012 JCMR Impact Factor (which is published in June 2013) has risen to 5.11, up from 4.44 for 2011 (as published in June 2012), a 15% increase and taking us through the 5 threshold for the first time. The 2012 impact factor means that the JCMR papers that were published in 2010 and 2011 were cited on average 5.11 times in 2012. The impact factor undergoes natural variation according to citation rates of papers in the 2 years following publication, and is significantly influenced by highly cited papers such as official reports. However, the progress of the journal's impact over the last 5 years has been impressive. Our acceptance rate is JCMR articles go on-line as they are accepted with no collating of the articles into sections or special thematic issues. For this reason, the Editors have felt that it is useful once per calendar year to summarize the papers for the readership into broad areas of interest or theme, so that areas of interest can be reviewed in a single article in relation to each other and other recent JCMR articles. The papers are presented in broad themes and set in context with related literature and previously published JCMR papers to guide continuity of thought in the journal. We hope that you find the open-access system increases wider reading and citation of your papers, and that you will continue to send your quality manuscripts to JCMR for publication. PMID:25475898

  19. Review of Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Dudley J; Carpenter, John Paul; Firmin, David N; Kilner, Philip J; Mohiaddin, Raad H; Prasad, Sanjay K

    2012-01-01

    There were 83 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (JCMR) in 2011, which is an 11% increase in the number of articles since 2010. The quality of the submissions continues to increase. The editors had been delighted with the 2010 JCMR Impact Factor of 4.33, although this fell modestly to 3.72 for 2011. The impact factor undergoes natural variation according to citation rates of papers in the 2 years following publication, and is significantly influenced by highly cited papers such as official reports. However, we remain very pleased with the progress of the journal's impact over the last 5 years. Our acceptance rate is approximately 25%, and has been falling as the number of articles being submitted has been increasing. In accordance with Open-Access publishing, the JCMR articles go on-line as they are accepted with no collating of the articles into sections or special thematic issues. For this reason, the Editors feel it is useful to summarize the papers for the readership into broad areas of interest or theme, which we feel would be useful, so that areas of interest from the previous year can be reviewed in a single article in relation to each other and other recent JCMR articles. The papers are presented in broad themes and set in context with related literature and previously published JCMR papers to guide continuity of thought in the journal. We hope that you find the open-access system increases wider reading and citation of your papers, and that you will continue to send your quality manuscripts to JCMR for publication. PMID:23158097

  20. Review of Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, D J; Baksi, A J; Prasad, S K; Raphael, C E; Kilner, P J; Mohiaddin, R H; Alpendurada, F; Babu-Narayan, S V; Schneider, J; Firmin, D N

    2015-01-01

    There were 102 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (JCMR) in 2014, which is a 6% decrease on the 109 articles published in 2013. The quality of the submissions continues to increase. The 2013 JCMR Impact Factor (which is published in June 2014) fell to 4.72 from 5.11 for 2012 (as published in June 2013). The 2013 impact factor means that the JCMR papers that were published in 2011 and 2012 were cited on average 4.72 times in 2013. The impact factor undergoes natural variation according to citation rates of papers in the 2 years following publication, and is significantly influenced by highly cited papers such as official reports. However, the progress of the journal's impact over the last 5 years has been impressive. Our acceptance rate is JCMR articles go on-line as they are accepted with no collating of the articles into sections or special thematic issues. For this reason, the Editors have felt that it is useful once per calendar year to summarize the papers for the readership into broad areas of interest or theme, so that areas of interest can be reviewed in a single article in relation to each other and other recent JCMR articles. The papers are presented in broad themes and set in context with related literature and previously published JCMR papers to guide continuity of thought in the journal. We hope that you find the open-access system increases wider reading and citation of your papers, and that you will continue to send your quality papers to JCMR for publication. PMID:26589839

  1. Review of Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Dudley J; Baksi, A John; Carpenter, John Paul; Firmin, David N; Kilner, Philip J; Mohiaddin, Raad H; Prasad, Sanjay K

    2013-01-01

    There were 90 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (JCMR) in 2012, which is an 8% increase in the number of articles since 2011. The quality of the submissions continues to increase. The editors are delighted to report that the 2011 JCMR Impact Factor (which is published in June 2012) has risen to 4.44, up from 3.72 for 2010 (as published in June 2011), a 20% increase. The 2011 impact factor means that the JCMR papers that were published in 2009 and 2010 were cited on average 4.44 times in 2011. The impact factor undergoes natural variation according to citation rates of papers in the 2 years following publication, and is significantly influenced by highly cited papers such as official reports. However, the progress of the journal's impact over the last 5 years has been impressive. Our acceptance rate is approximately 25%, and has been falling as the number of articles being submitted has been increasing. In accordance with Open-Access publishing, the JCMR articles go on-line as they are accepted with no collating of the articles into sections or special thematic issues. For this reason, the Editors have felt that it is useful once per calendar year to summarize the papers for the readership into broad areas of interest or theme, so that areas of interest can be reviewed in a single article in relation to each other and other recent JCMR articles. The papers are presented in broad themes and set in context with related literature and previously published JCMR papers to guide continuity of thought in the journal. We hope that you find the open-access system increases wider reading and citation of your papers, and that you will continue to send your quality manuscripts to JCMR for publication. PMID:24006874

  2. Review of Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pennell Dudley J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There were 83 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (JCMR in 2011, which is an 11% increase in the number of articles since 2010. The quality of the submissions continues to increase. The editors had been delighted with the 2010 JCMR Impact Factor of 4.33, although this fell modestly to 3.72 for 2011. The impact factor undergoes natural variation according to citation rates of papers in the 2 years following publication, and is significantly influenced by highly cited papers such as official reports. However, we remain very pleased with the progress of the journal's impact over the last 5 years. Our acceptance rate is approximately 25%, and has been falling as the number of articles being submitted has been increasing. In accordance with Open-Access publishing, the JCMR articles go on-line as they are accepted with no collating of the articles into sections or special thematic issues. For this reason, the Editors feel it is useful to summarize the papers for the readership into broad areas of interest or theme, which we feel would be useful, so that areas of interest from the previous year can be reviewed in a single article in relation to each other and other recent JCMR articles [1]. The papers are presented in broad themes and set in context with related literature and previously published JCMR papers to guide continuity of thought in the journal. We hope that you find the open-access system increases wider reading and citation of your papers, and that you will continue to send your quality manuscripts to JCMR for publication.

  3. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance and prognosis in cardiac amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roughton Michael

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac involvement is common in amyloidosis and associated with a variably adverse outcome. We have previously shown that cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR can assess deposition of amyloid protein in the myocardial interstitium. In this study we assessed the prognostic value of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE and gadolinium kinetics in cardiac amyloidosis in a prospective longitudinal study. Materials and methods The pre-defined study end point was all-cause mortality. We prospectively followed a cohort of 29 patients with proven cardiac amyloidosis. All patients underwent biopsy, 2D-echocardiography and Doppler studies, 123I-SAP scintigraphy, serum NT pro BNP assay, and CMR with a T1 mapping method and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE. Results Patients with were followed for a median of 623 days (IQ range 221, 1436, during which 17 (58% patients died. The presence of myocardial LGE by itself was not a significant predictor of mortality. However, death was predicted by gadolinium kinetics, with the 2 minute post-gadolinium intramyocardial T1 difference between subepicardium and subendocardium predicting mortality with 85% accuracy at a threshold value of 23 ms (the lower the difference the worse the prognosis. Intramyocardial T1 gradient was a better predictor of survival than FLC response to chemotherapy (Kaplan Meier analysis P = 0.049 or diastolic function (Kaplan-Meier analysis P = 0.205. Conclusion In cardiac amyloidosis, CMR provides unique information relating to risk of mortality based on gadolinium kinetics which reflects the severity of the cardiac amyloid burden.

  4. Alterations in vascular function in primary aldosteronism: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging study

    OpenAIRE

    Mark, P. B.; Boyle, S; Zimmerli, L U; McQuarrie, E.P.; Delles, C.; Freel, E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Excess aldosterone is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Aldosterone has a permissive effect on vascular fibrosis. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) allows study of vascular function by measuring aortic distensibility. We compared aortic distensibility in primary aldosteronism (PA), essential hypertension (EH) and normal controls and explored the relationship between aortic distensibility and pulse wave velocity (PWV). Methods: We studied PA (n=14)...

  5. The 20 year evolution of dobutamine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Hundley W; Charoenpanichkit Charaslak

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Over the past 20 years, investigators world-wide have developed and utilized dobutamine magnetic resonance stress testing procedures for the purpose of identifying ischemia, viability, and cardiac prognosis. This article traces these developments and reviews the data utilized to substantiate this relatively new noninvasive imaging procedure.

  6. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging findings in children with myocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Guiying; Yang Xi; Su Ying; Xu Jimin; Wen Zhaoying

    2014-01-01

    Background Myocarditis is a common,potentially life-threatening disease that presents a wide rang of symptoms in children,as an important underlying etiology of other myocardial diseases such as dilated and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.The incidence of nonfatal myocarditis is probably greater than that of the one actually diagnosed,which is the result of the challenges of establishing the diagnosis in standard clinical settings.Currently,no single clinical or imaging finding confirms the diagnosis of myocarditis with absolute certainty.Historically,clinical exam,electrocardiogram (ECG),serology and echocardiography had an unsatisfactory diagnostic accuracy in myocarditis.Endomyocardial biopsy remains as a widely accepted standard,but may not be suitable for every patient,especially for those with less severe disease.Our aim was to find the changes in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging of children with myocarditis diagnosed by clinical criteria.Methods We studied 25 children (18 male,7 female; aged from 5-17 years) with diagnosed myocarditis by clinical criteria.CMR included function analyses,T2-weighted imaging,T1-weighted imaging before and after i.v.gadolinium injection (early gadolinium enhancement (EGE) and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE)).Results The T2 ratio was elevated in 21 children (84%,11 in anterolateral (44%),5 in inferolateral (20%),and 5 in septum (20%)),EGE was present in 9 children (36%,3 in anterolateral (12%),4 in inferolateral (20%),and 2 in septum (8%)),and LGE was present in 5 children (20%,2 in anterolateral (8%),1 in inferolateral (4%),1 in septum (4%),and 1 in midwall of left ventricular (LV) wall).In 9 children (36%),two (or more) out of three sequences (T2,EGE,LGE) were abnormal.Conclusions The CMR findings in children with clinically diagnosed myocarditis vary within the groups,including regional or global myocardial signal increase in T2-weighted images,EGE and LGE in T1

  7. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 3.0T: Current state of the art

    OpenAIRE

    Gharib Ahmed M; Sharma Puneet; Delfino Jana G; Oshinski John N; Pettigrew Roderic I

    2010-01-01

    Abstract There are advantages to conducting cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) studies at a field strength of 3.0 Telsa, including the increase in bulk magnetization, the increase in frequency separation of off-resonance spins, and the increase in T1 of many tissues. However, there are significant challenges to routinely performing CMR at 3.0T, including the reduction in main magnetic field homogeneity, the increase in RF power deposition, and the increase in susceptibility-based artifac...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Wealth of Cardiovascular Information

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Sangeeta; Chryssos, Emanuel D.; Parker, Hugh

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is a relatively new noninvasive imaging modality that provides insight into multiple facets of the human myocardium not available by other imaging modalities. This one test allows for the assessment of ventricular and valvular function, ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies, congenital heart disease, and cardiac tumors. It has been coined by many as “one-stop shopping.” As with any imaging modality, it is important to understand not only the indications ...

  9. Dobutamine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 3 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein C

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The assessment of inducible wall motion abnormalities during high-dose dobutamine-stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (DCMR is well established for the identification of myocardial ischemia at 1.5 Tesla. Its feasibility at higher field strengths has not been reported. The present study was performed to prospectively determine the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of DCMR at 3 Tesla for depicting hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis (≥ 50% diameter stenosis in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease (CAD. Materials and methods Thirty consecutive patients (6 women (66 ± 9.3 years were scheduled for DCMR between January and May 2007 for detection of coronary artery disease. Patients were examined with a Philips Achieva 3 Tesla system (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands, using a spoiled gradient echo cine sequence. Technical parameters were: spatial resolution 2 × 2 × 8 mm3, 30 heart phases, spoiled gradient echo TR/TE: 4.5/2.6 msec, flip angle 15°. Images were acquired at rest and stress in accordance with a standardized high-dose dobutamine-atropine protocol during short breath-holds in three short and three long-axis views. Dobutamine was administered using a standard protocol (10 μg increments every 3 minutes up to 40 μg dobutamine/kg body weight/minute plus atropine if required to reach target heart rate. The study protocol included administration of 0.1 mmol/kg/body weight Gd-DTPA before the cine images at rest were acquired to improve the image quality. The examination was terminated if new or worsening wall-motion abnormalities or chest pain occurred or when > 85% of age-predicted maximum heart rate was reached. Myocardial ischemia was defined as new onset of wall-motion abnormality in at least one segment. In addition, late gadolinium enhancement (LGE was performed. Images were evaluated by two blinded readers. Diagnostic accuracy was determined with coronary

  10. Quantitative characterization of myocardial infarction by cardiovascular magnetic resonance predicts future cardiovascular events in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauly John M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR can provide quantitative data of the myocardial tissue utilizing high spatial and temporal resolution along with exquisite tissue contrast. Previous studies have correlated myocardial scar tissue with the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmia. This study was conducted to evaluate whether characterization of myocardial infarction by CMR can predict cardiovascular events in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM. Results We consecutively studied 86 patients with ICM (LVEF Conclusion Quantification of the scar volume and scar percentage by CMR is superior to LVEDV, LVESV, and LVEF in prognosticating the future likelihood of the development of cardiovascular events in patients with ICM.

  11. Cardiovascular imaging in the diagnosis and monitoring of cardiotoxicity: cardiovascular magnetic resonance and nuclear cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Alessia; Pizzino, Fausto; Gargiulo, Paola; Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale; Cadeddu, Christian; Mele, Donato; Monte, Ines; Novo, Giuseppina; Zito, Concetta; Di Bella, Gianluca

    2016-05-01

    Chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity (CTX) is a determining factor for the quality of life and mortality of patients administered potentially cardiotoxic drugs and in long-term cancer survivors. Therefore, prevention and early detection of CTX are highly desirable, as is the exploration of alternative therapeutic strategies and/or the proposal of potentially cardioprotective treatments. In recent years, cardiovascular imaging has acquired a pivotal role in this setting. Although echocardiography remains the diagnostic method most used to monitor cancer patients, the need for more reliable, reproducible and accurate detection of early chemotherapy-induced CTX has encouraged the introduction of second-line advanced imaging modalities, such as cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and nuclear techniques, into the clinical setting. This review of the Working Group on Drug Cardiotoxicity and Cardioprotection of the Italian Society of Cardiology aims to afford an overview of the most important findings from the literature about the role of CMR and nuclear techniques in the management of chemotherapy-treated patients, describe conventional and new parameters for detecting CTX from both diagnostic and prognostic perspectives and provide integrated insight into the role of CMR and nuclear techniques compared with other imaging tools and versus the positions of the most important international societies.

  12. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging of hypoplastic left heart syndrome in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) plays an important complementary role to echocardiography and conventional angiography in the evaluation of hypoplastic left heart syndrome. This imaging modality is particularly useful for assessing cardiovascular postsurgical changes, extracardiac vascular anatomy, ventricular and valvular function, and a variety of complications. The purpose of this article is to provide a contemporary review of the role of CMR in the management of untreated and surgically palliated hypoplastic left heart syndrome in children. (orig.)

  13. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial feature tracking detects quantitative wall motion during dobutamine stress.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuster, A.; Kutty, S.; Padiyath, A.; Parish, V.; Gribben, P.; Danford, D.A.; Makowski, M.R.; Bigalke, B.; Beerbaum, P.B.J.; Nagel, E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dobutamine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (DS-CMR) is an established tool to assess hibernating myocardium and ischemia. Analysis is typically based on visual assessment with considerable operator dependency. CMR myocardial feature tracking (CMR-FT) is a recently introduced tec

  14. Cardiovascular magnetics resonance diagnosis of cystic tumor of the atrioventricular node

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xuedong

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Late gadolinium enhanced (LGE cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR has proven to be the gold standard for viability assessment. LGE CMR is also useful for identifying the nature of cardiac masses or lesions. We report a case of a rare primary cystic tumor of the atrioventricular node, in which CMR proved to be valuable.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Cardiorhythmography as a Method of Study of Human's Cardiovascular System Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protasov, E. A.; Ryzhkova, A. V.

    In this article a highly sensitive method for graphic recording of cardiogram by detecting the signal of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of human finger has been developed and signals directly related to movement of blood ejected by the heart into the vessels have been studied. Changes in the behavior of signals depending on the condition of the cardiovascular system of person have been discovered.

  16. Truncus arteriosus with aortic arch interruption: cardiovascular magnetic resonance findings in the unrepaired adult

    OpenAIRE

    Cook Stephen C; Thavendiranathan Paaladinesh; Arruda Janine; Verhaert David; Raman Subha V

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Truncus arteriosus (TA) is a rare congenital condition defined as a single arterial vessel arising from the heart that gives origin to the systemic, pulmonary and coronary circulations. We discuss the unique case of a 28 year-old female patient with unrepaired TA and interruption of the aortic arch who underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR).

  17. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance and PET-CT of left atrial paraganglioma

    OpenAIRE

    Ruehm Stefan; Lai Chi; Tomasian Anderanik; Krishnam Mayil S

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac paragangliomas are among the rarest primary cardiac tumors. We present a case of left atrial paraganglioma in a patient who presented with symptoms and signs of catecholamine excess in which cardiovascular magnetic resonance in multiple orientations and PET-CT played an important role in the diagnosis and tissue characterization.

  18. Cardiovascular magnetics resonance diagnosis of cystic tumor of the atrioventricular node

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Xuedong; Starnes Vaughn; Tran Thao T; Getzen James; Ross Brian D

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has proven to be the gold standard for viability assessment. LGE CMR is also useful for identifying the nature of cardiac masses or lesions. We report a case of a rare primary cystic tumor of the atrioventricular node, in which CMR proved to be valuable.

  19. Late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance in genotyped hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with normal phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Jassal Davinder S; Soni Reeni; Ariyarajah Vignendra; Strijack Bradford; Greenberg Cheryl R; McGregor Robert; Morris Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Abstract A 35 year-old asymptomatic Caucasian female with a family history of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was referred for cardiologic evaluation. The electrocardiogram and transthoracic echocardiogram were normal. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) was performed for further assessment of myocardial function and presence of myocardial scar. CMR showed normal left ventricular systolic size, measurements and function. However, there was extensive, diffuse late gadolinium enhancement ...

  20. Automated image analysis techniques for cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, Robertus Jacobus van der

    2011-01-01

    The introductory chapter provides an overview of various aspects related to quantitative analysis of cardiovascular MR (CMR) imaging studies. Subsequently, the thesis describes several automated methods for quantitative assessment of left ventricular function from CMR imaging studies. Several novel

  1. Cardiovascular assessment of patients with Ullrich-Turner's Syndrome on Doppler echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro Ana Valéria Barros de

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the cardiovascular features of Ullrich-Turner's syndrome using echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging, and to correlate them with the phenotype and karyotype of the patients. The diagnostic concordance between the 2 methods was also assessed. METHODS: Fifteen patients with the syndrome were assessed by echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (cardiac chambers, valves, and aorta. Their ages ranged from 10 to 28 (mean of 16.7 years. The karyotype was analyzed in 11 or 25 metaphases of peripheral blood lymphocytes, or both. RESULTS: The most common phenotypic changes were short stature and spontaneous absence of puberal development (100%; 1 patient had a cardiac murmur. The karyotypes detected were as follows: 45,X (n=7, mosaics (n=5, and deletions (n=3. No echocardiographic changes were observed. In regard to magnetic resonance imaging, coarctation and dilation of the aorta were found in 1 patient, and isolated dilation of the aorta was found in 4 patients. CONCLUSION: The frequencies of coarctation and dilation of the aorta detected on magnetic resonance imaging were similar to those reported in the literature (5.5% to 20%, and 6.3% to 29%, respectively. This confirmed the adjuvant role of magnetic resonance imaging to Doppler echocardiography for diagnosing cardiovascular alterations in patients with Ullrich-Turner's syndrome.

  2. Determinants of left ventricular mass in obesity; a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Kieran

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is linked to increased left ventricular mass, an independent predictor of mortality. As a result of this, understanding the determinants of left ventricular mass in the setting of obesity has both therapeutic and prognostic implications. Using cardiovascular magnetic resonance our goal was to elucidate the main predictors of left ventricular mass in severely obese subjects free of additional cardiovascular risk factors. Methods 38 obese (BMI 37.8 ± 6.9 kg/m2 and 16 normal weight controls subjects, (BMI 21.7 ± 1.8 kg/m2, all without cardiovascular risk factors, underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess left ventricular mass, left ventricular volumes and visceral fat mass. Left ventricular mass was then compared to serum and anthropometric markers of obesity linked to left ventricular mass, i.e. height, age, blood pressure, total fat mass, visceral fat mass, lean mass, serum leptin and fasting insulin level. Results As expected, obesity was associated with significantly increased left ventricular mass (126 ± 27 vs 90 ± 20 g; p 2 = 0.77. Conclusion The left ventricular hypertrophic response to obesity in the absence of additional cardiovascular risk factors is mainly attributable to increases in lean body mass, LV stroke volume and visceral fat mass. In view of the well documented link between obesity, left ventricular hypertrophy and mortality, these findings have potentially important prognostic and therapeutic implications for primary and secondary prevention.

  3. Cystic adventitial disease of the popliteal artery: features on 3T cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelabert Hugh

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cystic adventitial disease (CAD of the popliteal artery is a rare vascular disease of unknown etiology in which a mucin-containing cyst develops in the adventitial layer of the artery. We report the case of a 26-year-old male with CAD of the right popliteal artery diagnosed non-invasively with 3 Tesla cardiovascular magnetic resonance and confirmed on post-operative histopathology.

  4. Accuracy of electrocardiographic criteria for atrial enlargement: validation with cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Manning Warren J; Agarwal Anupam; O'Halloran T David; Hauser Thomas H; Josephson Mark E; Tsao Connie W; Yeon Susan B

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Anatomic atrial enlargement is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. However, atrial enlargement may not correlate with clinical measures such as electrocardiographic (ECG) criteria. Past studies correlating ECG criteria with anatomic measures mainly used inferior M-mode or two-dimensional echocardiographic data. We sought to determine the accuracy of the ECG to predict anatomic atrial enlargement as determined by volumetric cardiovascular magnetic resonance...

  5. Assessment of pulmonary veins after atrio-pericardial anastomosis by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Greenway Steven C; Yoo Shi-Joon; Baliulis Giedrius; Caldarone Christopher; Coles John; Grosse-Wortmann Lars

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The atrio-pericardial anastomosis (APA) uses a pericardial pouch to create a large communication between the left atrium and the pulmonary venous contributaries in order to avoid direct suturing of the pulmonary veins during the repair of congenital cardiac malformations. Post-operative imaging is routinely performed by echocardiography but Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) offers excellent anatomical imaging and quantitative information about pulmonary blood flow. W...

  6. Cystic adventitial disease of the popliteal artery: features on 3T cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Gelabert Hugh; Finn J Paul; Lai Chi; Tomasian Anderanik; Krishnam Mayil S

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Cystic adventitial disease (CAD) of the popliteal artery is a rare vascular disease of unknown etiology in which a mucin-containing cyst develops in the adventitial layer of the artery. We report the case of a 26-year-old male with CAD of the right popliteal artery diagnosed non-invasively with 3 Tesla cardiovascular magnetic resonance and confirmed on post-operative histopathology.

  7. Myocardial first-pass perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance: history, theory, and current state of the art

    OpenAIRE

    Axel Leon; Ferreira Pedro; Epstein Frederick H; Nayak Krishna; Raman Subha V; Gerber Bernhard L; Kraitchman Dara L

    2008-01-01

    Abstract In less than two decades, first-pass perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has undergone a wide range of changes with the development and availability of improved hardware, software, and contrast agents, in concert with a better understanding of the mechanisms of contrast enhancement. The following review provides a perspective of the historical development of first-pass CMR, the developments in pulse sequence design and contrast agents, the relevant animal models used in...

  8. Recovery of methamphetamine associated cardiomyopathy predicted by late gadolinium enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Buonocore Michael; Caputo Gary; Yeo Khung; Lopez Javier E; Schaefer Saul

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Methamphetamine is known to cause a cardiomyopathy which may be reversible with appropriate medical therapy and cessation of use. Late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has been shown to identify fibrosis in ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. We present a case of severe methamphetamine-associated cardiomyopathy in which cardiac function recovered after 6 months. Evaluation by CMR using late gadolinium enhancement was notable for an absence of enh...

  9. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in cardiac sarcoidosis with MR conditional pacemaker in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Hausenloy Derek; Harkness Allan; Plant Gordon T; Holdright Diana R; Quarta Giovanni; Hyare Harpreet; Moon James C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular implantable electronic devices represent important limitations to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently, MRI-conditional dual chamber pacemakers and leads have become available. We describe a case of a patient with neuro-sarcoidosis presenting with diplopia and hydrocephalus requiring an MRI-conditional programmable ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, who developed complete heart block. In view of the ongoing need for neuro-imaging, MRI-conditional dual chamber pacemaker...

  10. Diagnostic and prognostic value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in non-ischaemic cardiomyopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Parsai Chirine; O’Hanlon Rory; Prasad Sanjay K; Mohiaddin Raad H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) is recognised as a valuable clinical tool which in a single scan setting can assess ventricular volumes and function, myocardial fibrosis, iron loading, flow quantification, tissue characterisation and myocardial perfusion imaging. The advent of CMR using extrinsic and intrinsic contrast-enhanced protocols for tissue characterisation have dramatically changed the non-invasive work-up of patients with suspected or known cardiomyopathy. Although ...

  11. The Role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor Andrew M; Hughes Marina L; Ntsinjana Hopewell N

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has expanded its role in the diagnosis and management of congenital heart disease (CHD) and acquired heart disease in pediatric patients. Ongoing technological advancements in both data acquisition and data presentation have enabled CMR to be integrated into clinical practice with increasing understanding of the advantages and limitations of the technique by pediatric cardiologists and congenital heart surgeons. Importantly, the combination of ...

  12. The effects of breath-holding on pulmonary regurgitation measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Babu-Narayan Sonya V; Johansson Bengt; Kilner Philip J

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Pulmonary regurgitation is a common and clinically important residual lesion after repair of tetralogy of Fallot. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) phase contrast velocity mapping is widely used for measurement of pulmonary regurgitant fraction. Breath-hold acquisitions, usually acquired during held expiration, are more convenient than the non-breath-hold approach, but we hypothesized that breath-holding might affect the amount of pulmonary regurgitation. Methods For...

  13. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 3.0T: Current state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gharib Ahmed M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are advantages to conducting cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR studies at a field strength of 3.0 Telsa, including the increase in bulk magnetization, the increase in frequency separation of off-resonance spins, and the increase in T1 of many tissues. However, there are significant challenges to routinely performing CMR at 3.0T, including the reduction in main magnetic field homogeneity, the increase in RF power deposition, and the increase in susceptibility-based artifacts. In this review, we outline the underlying physical effects that occur when imaging at higher fields, examine the practical results these effects have on the CMR applications, and examine methods used to compensate for these effects. Specifically, we will review cine imaging, MR coronary angiography, myocardial perfusion imaging, late gadolinium enhancement, and vascular wall imaging.

  14. Non-cardiovascular findings in clinical cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadimi Mahani, Maryam [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Morani, Ajaykumar C. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Lu, Jimmy C.; Dorfman, Adam L. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Fazeli Dehkordy, Soudabeh [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Providence Hospital and Medical Centers, Department of Graduate Medical Education, Southfield, MI (United States); Jeph, Sunil [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Geisinger Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Danville, PA (United States); Agarwal, Prachi P. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Division of Cardiothoracic Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-04-15

    With increasing use of pediatric cardiovascular MRI, it is important for all imagers to become familiar with the spectrum of non-cardiovascular imaging findings that can be encountered. This study aims to ascertain the prevalence and nature of these findings in pediatric cardiovascular MRIs performed at our institution. We retrospectively evaluated reports of all cardiovascular MRI studies performed at our institute from January 2008 to October 2012 in patients younger than18 years. Most studies (98%) were jointly interpreted by a pediatric cardiologist and a radiologist. We reviewed the electronic medical records of all cases with non-cardiovascular findings, defined as any imaging finding outside the cardiovascular system. Non-cardiovascular findings were classified into significant and non-significant, based on whether they were known at the time of imaging or they required additional workup or a change in management. In 849 consecutive studies (mean age 9.7 ± 6.3 years), 145 non-cardiovascular findings were found in 140 studies (16.5% of total studies). Overall, 51.0% (74/145) of non-cardiovascular findings were in the abdomen, 30.3% (44/145) were in the chest, and 18.6% (27/145) were in the spine. A total of 19 significant non-cardiovascular findings were observed in 19 studies in individual patients (2.2% of total studies, 47% male, mean age 5.9 ± 6.7 years). Significant non-cardiovascular findings included hepatic adenoma, arterially enhancing focal liver lesions, asplenia, solitary kidney, pelvicaliectasis, renal cystic diseases, gastric distention, adrenal hemorrhage, lung hypoplasia, air space disease, bronchial narrowing, pneumomediastinum and retained surgical sponge. Non-cardiovascular findings were seen in 16.5% of cardiovascular MRI studies in children, of which 2.2% were clinically significant findings. Prevalence and nature of these non-cardiovascular findings are different from those reported in adults. Attention to these findings is important

  15. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in rheumatology: Current status and recommendations for use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogeni, Sophie I; Kitas, George D; Dimitroulas, Theodoros; Sfikakis, Petros P; Seo, Philip; Gabriel, Sherine; Patel, Amit R; Gargani, Luna; Bombardieri, Stefano; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Lombardi, Massimo; Pepe, Alessia; Aletras, Anthony H; Kolovou, Genovefa; Miszalski, Tomasz; van Riel, Piet; Semb, AnneGrete; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel Angel; Dessein, Patrick; Karpouzas, George; Puntmann, Valentina; Nagel, Eike; Bratis, Konstantinos; Karabela, Georgia; Stavropoulos, Efthymios; Katsifis, Gikas; Koutsogeorgopoulou, Loukia; van Rossum, Albert; Rademakers, Frank; Pohost, Gerald; Lima, Joao A C

    2016-08-15

    Targeted therapies in connective tissue diseases (CTDs) have led to improvements of disease-associated outcomes, but life expectancy remains lower compared to general population due to emerging co-morbidities, particularly due to excess cardiovascular risk. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a noninvasive imaging technique which can provide detailed information about multiple cardiovascular pathologies without using ionizing radiation. CMR is considered the reference standard for quantitative evaluation of left and right ventricular volumes, mass and function, cardiac tissue characterization and assessment of thoracic vessels; it may also be used for the quantitative assessment of myocardial blood flow with high spatial resolution and for the evaluation of the proximal coronary arteries. These applications are of particular interest in CTDs, because of the potential of serious and variable involvement of the cardiovascular system during their course. The International Consensus Group on CMR in Rheumatology was formed in January 2012 aiming to achieve consensus among CMR and rheumatology experts in developing initial recommendations on the current state-of-the-art use of CMR in CTDs. The present report outlines the recommendations of the participating CMR and rheumatology experts with regards to: (a) indications for use of CMR in rheumatoid arthritis, the spondyloarthropathies, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis of small, medium and large vessels, myositis, sarcoidosis (SRC), and scleroderma (SSc); (b) CMR protocols, terminology for reporting CMR and diagnostic CMR criteria for assessment and quantification of cardiovascular involvement in CTDs; and (c) a research agenda for the further development of this evolving field. PMID:27179903

  16. Non Hodgkin lymphoma metastasis to the heart detected by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary and secondary heart tumors are relatively rare occurrences but usually imply significant treatment decisions. The differential diagnosis among these tumors and other masses can sometimes be difficult and require the use of different imaging modalities to establish a confident verdict. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance CMR imaging is a very useful tool in these cases by allowing for the application of different strategies to better delineate masses, heart structures and adjacent tissues. In this case description, we present a woman with shortness of breath and a paracardiac mass showing how CMR can be applied. (author)

  17. Isometric stress in cardiovascular magnetic resonance - a simple and easily replicable method of assessing cardiovascular differences not apparent at rest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, Kristian H.; Jones, Alexander; Steeden, Jennifer A.; Taylor, Andrew M.; Muthurangu, Vivek [UCL Centre for Cardiovascular MR, UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, Level 6 Old Nurses Home, Cardiorespiratory Unit, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    Isometric exercise may unmask cardiovascular disease not evident at rest, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is proven for comprehensive resting assessment. This study devised a simple isometric exercise CMR methodology and assessed the hemodynamic response evoked by isometric exercise. A biceps isometric exercise technique was devised for CMR, and 75 healthy volunteers were assessed at rest, after 3-minute biceps exercise, and 5-minute of recovery using: (1) blood pressure (BP) and (2) CMR measured aortic flow and left ventricular function. Total peripheral resistance (SVR) and arterial compliance (TAC), cardiac output (CO), left ventricular volumes and function (ejection fraction, stroke volume, power output), blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and rate pressure product were assessed at all time points. Image quality was preserved during stress. During exercise there were increases in CO (+14.9 %), HR (+17.0 %), SVR (+9.8 %), systolic BP (+22.4 %), diastolic BP (+25.4 %) and mean BP (+23.2 %). In addition, there were decreases in TAC (-22.0 %) and left ventricular ejection fraction (-6.3 %). Age and body mass index modified the evoked response, even when resting measures were similar. Isometric exercise technique evokes a significant cardiovascular response in CMR, unmasking physiological differences that are not apparent at rest. (orig.)

  18. Cardiac resynchronization therapy guided by late gadolinium-enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Russell EA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial scarring at the LV pacing site leads to incomplete resynchronization and a suboptimal symptomatic response to CRT. We sought to determine whether the use of late gadolinium cardiovascular magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR to guide left ventricular (LV lead deployment influences the long-term outcome of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT. Methods 559 patients with heart failure (age 70.4 ± 10.7 yrs [mean ± SD] due to ischemic or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy underwent CRT. Implantations were either guided (+CMR or not guided (-CMR by LGE-CMR prior to implantation. Fluoroscopy and LGE-CMR were used to localize the LV lead tip and and myocardial scarring retrospectively. Clinical events were assessed in three groups: +CMR and pacing scar (+CMR+S; CMR and not pacing scar (+CMR-S, and; LV pacing not guided by CMR (-CMR. Results Over a maximum follow-up of 9.1 yrs, +CMR+S had the highest risk of cardiovascular death (HR: 6.34, cardiovascular death or hospitalizations for heart failure (HR: 5.57 and death from any cause or hospitalizations for major adverse cardiovascular events (HR: 4.74 (all P Conclusions Compared with a conventional implantation approach, the use of LGE-CMR to guide LV lead deployment away from scarred myocardium results in a better clinical outcome after CRT. Pacing scarred myocardium was associated with the worst outcome, in terms of both pump failure and sudden cardiac death.

  19. Unmasking Silent Endothelial Activation in the Cardiovascular System Using Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belliere, Julie; Martinez de Lizarrondo, Sara; Choudhury, Robin P; Quenault, Aurélien; Le Béhot, Audrey; Delage, Christine; Chauveau, Dominique; Schanstra, Joost P; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Vivien, Denis; Gauberti, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial activation is a hallmark of cardiovascular diseases, acting either as a cause or a consequence of organ injury. To date, we lack suitable methods to measure endothelial activation in vivo. In the present study, we developed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method allowing non-invasive endothelial activation mapping in the vasculature of the main organs affected during cardiovascular diseases. In clinically relevant contexts in mice (including systemic inflammation, acute and chronic kidney diseases, diabetes mellitus and normal aging), we provided evidence that this method allows detecting endothelial activation before any clinical manifestation of organ failure in the brain, kidney and heart with an exceptional sensitivity. In particular, we demonstrated that diabetes mellitus induces chronic endothelial cells activation in the kidney and heart. Moreover, aged mice presented activated endothelial cells in the kidneys and the cerebrovasculature. Interestingly, depending on the underlying condition, the temporospatial patterns of endothelial activation in the vascular beds of the cardiovascular system were different. These results demonstrate the feasibility of detecting silent endothelial activation occurring in conditions associated with high cardiovascular risk using molecular MRI. PMID:26379785

  20. Vascular function assessed with cardiovascular magnetic resonance predicts survival in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steedman Tracey

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased arterial stiffness is associated with mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR permits assessment of the central arteries to measure aortic function. Methods We studied the relationship between central haemodynamics and outcome using CMR in 144 chronic kidney disease patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate Results Median follow up after the scan was 24 months. There were no significant differences in aortic distensibilty or aortic volumetric arterial strain between pre-dialysis and dialysis patients. Aortic distensibilty and volumetric arterial strain negatively correlated with age. Aortic distensibilty and volumetric arterial strain were lower in diabetics, patients with ischaemic heart disease and peripheral vascular disease. During follow up there were 20 deaths. Patients who died had lower aortic distensibilty than survivors. In a survival analysis, diabetes, systolic blood pressure and aortic distensibilty were independent predictors of mortality. There were 12 non-fatal cardiovascular events during follow up. Analysing the combined end point of death or a vascular event, diabetes, aortic distensibilty and volumetric arterial strain were predictors of events. Conclusion Deranged vascular function measured with CMR correlates with cardiovascular risk factors and predicts outcome. CMR measures of vascular function are potential targets for interventions to reduce cardiovascular risk.

  1. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Use of Delayed Contrast-Enhanced Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a severe and progressive disease. Its early diagnosis is the greatest clinical challenge. To evaluate the presence and extension of the delayed myocardial contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance, as well as to verify if the percentage of the myocardial fibrosis mass is a severity predictor. Cross-sectional study with 30 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension of groups I and IV, subjected to clinical, functional and hemodynamic evaluation, and to cardiac magnetic resonance. The mean age of patients was 52 years old, with female predominance (77%). Among the patients, 53% had right ventricular failure at diagnosis, and 90% were in functional class II/III. The mean of the 6-minute walk test was 395m. In hemodynamic study with right catheterism, the mean average pulmonary arterial pressure was 53.3mmHg, of the cardiac index of 2.1L/ min.m2, and median right atrial pressure was 13.5 mmHg. Delayed myocardial contrast enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance was found in 28 patients. The mean fibrosis mass was 9.9 g and the median percentage of fibrosis mass was 6.17%. The presence of functional class IV, right ventricular failure at diagnosis, 6-minute walk test < 300 meters and right atrial pressure ≥ 15 mmHg, with cardiac index < 2.0 L/ min.m2, there was a relevant association with the increased percentage of myocardial fibrosis. The percentage of the myocardial fibrosis mass indicates a non-invasive marker with promising perspectives in identifying patients with high risk factors for pulmonary hypertension

  2. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Use of Delayed Contrast-Enhanced Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessa, Luiz Gustavo Pignataro, E-mail: lgpignataro@ig.com.br; Junqueira, Flávia Pegado; Bandeira, Marcelo Luiz da Silva; Garcia, Marcelo Iorio; Xavier, Sérgio Salles; Lavall, Guilherme; Torres, Diego; Waetge, Daniel [Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho, Ilha do Fundão, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-10-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a severe and progressive disease. Its early diagnosis is the greatest clinical challenge. To evaluate the presence and extension of the delayed myocardial contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance, as well as to verify if the percentage of the myocardial fibrosis mass is a severity predictor. Cross-sectional study with 30 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension of groups I and IV, subjected to clinical, functional and hemodynamic evaluation, and to cardiac magnetic resonance. The mean age of patients was 52 years old, with female predominance (77%). Among the patients, 53% had right ventricular failure at diagnosis, and 90% were in functional class II/III. The mean of the 6-minute walk test was 395m. In hemodynamic study with right catheterism, the mean average pulmonary arterial pressure was 53.3mmHg, of the cardiac index of 2.1L/ min.m{sup 2}, and median right atrial pressure was 13.5 mmHg. Delayed myocardial contrast enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance was found in 28 patients. The mean fibrosis mass was 9.9 g and the median percentage of fibrosis mass was 6.17%. The presence of functional class IV, right ventricular failure at diagnosis, 6-minute walk test < 300 meters and right atrial pressure ≥ 15 mmHg, with cardiac index < 2.0 L/ min.m{sup 2}, there was a relevant association with the increased percentage of myocardial fibrosis. The percentage of the myocardial fibrosis mass indicates a non-invasive marker with promising perspectives in identifying patients with high risk factors for pulmonary hypertension.

  3. ECG-based gating in ultra high field cardiovascular magnetic resonance using an independent component analysis approach

    OpenAIRE

    Krug, Johannes W; Rose, Georg; Clifford, Gari D.; Oster, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Background In Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR), the synchronization of image acquisition with heart motion is performed in clinical practice by processing the electrocardiogram (ECG). The ECG-based synchronization is well established for MR scanners with magnetic fields up to 3 T. However, this technique is prone to errors in ultra high field environments, e.g. in 7 T MR scanners as used in research applications. The high magnetic fields cause severe magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects w...

  4. The Role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Andrew M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR has expanded its role in the diagnosis and management of congenital heart disease (CHD and acquired heart disease in pediatric patients. Ongoing technological advancements in both data acquisition and data presentation have enabled CMR to be integrated into clinical practice with increasing understanding of the advantages and limitations of the technique by pediatric cardiologists and congenital heart surgeons. Importantly, the combination of exquisite 3D anatomy with physiological data enables CMR to provide a unique perspective for the management of many patients with CHD. Imaging small children with CHD is challenging, and in this article we will review the technical adjustments, imaging protocols and application of CMR in the pediatric population.

  5. Myocardial first-pass perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance: history, theory, and current state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Leon

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In less than two decades, first-pass perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR has undergone a wide range of changes with the development and availability of improved hardware, software, and contrast agents, in concert with a better understanding of the mechanisms of contrast enhancement. The following review provides a perspective of the historical development of first-pass CMR, the developments in pulse sequence design and contrast agents, the relevant animal models used in early preclinical studies, the mechanism of artifacts, the differences between 1.5T and 3T scanning, and the relevant clinical applications and protocols. This comprehensive overview includes a summary of the past clinical performance of first-pass perfusion CMR and current clinical applications using state-of-the-art methodologies.

  6. Multidirectional flow analysis by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in aneurysm development following repair of aortic coarctation

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    Stalder Aurelien F

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aneurysm formation is a life-threatening complication after operative therapy in coarctation. The identification of patients at risk for the development of such secondary pathologies is of high interest and requires a detailed understanding of the link between vascular malformation and altered hemodynamics. The routine morphometric follow-up by magnetic resonance angiography is a well-established technique. However, the intrinsic sensitivity of magnetic resonance (MR towards motion offers the possibility to additionally investigate hemodynamic consequences of morphological changes of the aorta. We demonstrate two cases of aneurysm formation 13 and 35 years after coarctation surgery based on a Waldhausen repair with a subclavian patch and a Vosschulte repair with a Dacron patch, respectively. Comprehensive flow visualization by cardiovascular MR (CMR was performed using a flow-sensitive, 3-dimensional, and 3-directional time-resolved gradient echo sequence at 3T. Subsequent analysis included the calculation of a phase contrast MR angiography and color-coded streamline and particle trace 3D visualization. Additional quantitative evaluation provided regional physiological information on blood flow and derived vessel wall parameters such as wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index. The results highlight the individual 3D blood-flow patterns associated with the different vascular pathologies following repair of aortic coarctation. In addition to known factors predisposing for aneurysm formation after surgical repair of coarctation these findings indicate the importance of flow sensitive CMR to follow up hemodynamic changes with respect to the development of vascular disease.

  7. Alterations in vascular function in primary aldosteronism: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, P B; Boyle, S; Zimmerli, L U; McQuarrie, E P; Delles, C; Freel, E M

    2014-02-01

    Excess aldosterone is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Aldosterone has a permissive effect on vascular fibrosis. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) allows study of vascular function by measuring aortic distensibility. We compared aortic distensibility in primary aldosteronism (PA), essential hypertension (EH) and normal controls and explored the relationship between aortic distensibility and pulse wave velocity (PWV). We studied PA (n=14) and EH (n=33) subjects and age-matched healthy controls (n=17) with CMR, including measurement of aortic distensibility, and measured PWV using applanation tonometry. At recruitment, PA and EH patients had similar blood pressure and left ventricular mass. Subjects with PA had significantly lower aortic distensibility and higher PWV compared with EH and healthy controls. These changes were independent of other factors associated with reduced aortic distensibility, including ageing. There was a significant relationship between increasing aortic stiffness and age in keeping with physical and vascular ageing. As expected, aortic distensibility and PWV were closely correlated. These results demonstrate that PA patients display increased arterial stiffness compared with EH, independent of vascular ageing. The implication is that aldosterone invokes functional impairment of arterial function. The long-term implications of arterial stiffening in aldosterone excess require further study. PMID:23884211

  8. Structural and functional cardiac changes in myotonic dystrophy type 1: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

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    Hermans Mieke CE

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (MD1 is a neuromuscular disorder with potential involvement of the heart and increased risk of sudden death. Considering the importance of cardiomyopathy as a predictor of prognosis, we aimed to systematically evaluate and describe structural and functional cardiac alterations in patients with MD1. Methods Eighty MD1 patients underwent physical examination, electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Blood samples were taken for determination of NT-proBNP plasma levels and CTG repeat length. Results Functional and structural abnormalities were detected in 35 patients (44%. Left ventricular systolic dysfunction was found in 20 cases, left ventricular dilatation in 7 patients, and left ventricular hypertrophy in 6 patients. Myocardial fibrosis was seen in 10 patients (12.5%. In general, patients had low left ventricular mass indexes. Right ventricular involvement was uncommon and only seen together with left ventricular abnormalities. Functional or structural cardiac involvement was associated with age (p = 0.04, male gender (p Conclusions CMR can be useful to detect early structural and functional myocardial abnormalities in patients with MD1. Myocardial involvement is strongly associated with conduction abnormalities, but a normal ECG does not exclude myocardial alterations. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that MD1 patients have a complex cardiac phenotype, including both myocardial and conduction system alteration.

  9. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of primary tumors of the heart: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieno, David S; Saouaf, Rola; Thomson, Louise E J; Abidov, Aiden; Friedman, John D; Berman, Daniel S

    2006-01-01

    Overall, the prevalence of primary cardiac neoplasms is approximately 0.3% and these masses should be distinguished from the myriad of other primary and secondary processes that can occur in the heart. Tumors within, attached to, or near the heart can cause direct cardiac damage, can result in thrombus formation, can compromise blood flow and can embolize distally. Hence, proper diagnosis is clinically important. It has been suggested that cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is a useful tool for diagnosing and characterizing cardiac tumors. In this report, we present a case example of a patient with a large, mobile right atrial myxoma imaged by CMR with results of histopathologic analysis after excision. We also demonstrate the utilization of CMR for characterization of cardiac lesions, review the basic characteristics of primary cardiac neoplasms, provide an overview of published cases describing use of CMR, and give suggested guidelines for imaging of cardiac masses with emphasis on diagnosis of cardiac tumors. CMR is an important technique for diagnosing and characterizing cardiac tumors. PMID:17060107

  10. Assessment of Left Ventricular Structural Remodelling in Patients with Diabetic Cardiomyopathy by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaochun; Leng, Weiling

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is always accompanied with alteration of left ventricular structure and function. The aims of this study were to assess the structural remodelling in patients with DCM by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and correlation of structural remodelling with severity of DCM. Methods. Twenty-five patients (53.8 ± 8.8 years, 52.0% males) with DCM and thirty-one normal healthy controls (51.9 ± 13.6 years, 45.2% males) were scanned by CMR cine to assess function and structure of left ventricular. Length of diabetic history and results of cardiac echocardiography (E′, A′, and E′/A′) were also measured. Results. Compared with normal controls group, DCM group was associated with significantly increased ratio of left ventricular mass at end diastole to end-diastolic volume (MVR) (P 0.05). The ratio correlated with both length of diabetic history and echocardiographic Doppler tissue imaging E′ (all P < 0.05). Conclusions. CMR can be a powerful technique to assess LV remodelling, and MVR may be considered as an imaging marker to evaluate the severity of LV remodelling in patients with DCM.

  11. Late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance predicts clinical worsening in patients with pulmonary hypertension

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    Freed Benjamin H

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE occurs at the right ventricular (RV insertion point (RVIP in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH and has been shown to correlate with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR derived RV indices. However, the prognostic role of RVIP-LGE and other CMR-derived parameters of RV function are not well established. Our aim was to evaluate the predictive value of contrast-enhanced CMR in patients with PH. Methods RV size, ejection fraction (RVEF, and the presence of RVIP-LGE were determined in 58 patients with PH referred for CMR. All patients underwent right heart catheterization, exercise testing, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP evaluation; results of which were included in the final analysis if performed within 4 months of the CMR study. Patients were followed for the primary endpoint of time to clinical worsening (death, decompensated right ventricular heart failure, initiation of prostacyclin, or lung transplantation. Results Overall, 40/58 (69% of patients had RVIP-LGE. Patients with RVIP- LGE had larger right ventricular volume index, lower RVEF, and higher mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP, all p Conclusions The presence of RVIP-LGE in patients with PH is a marker for more advanced disease and poor prognosis. In addition, this study reveals for the first time that CMR-derived RVEF is an independent non-invasive imaging predictor of adverse outcomes in this patient population.

  12. Dilation of the ascending aorta in Turner syndrome - a prospective cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

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    Pedersen Erik M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The risk of aortic dissection is 100-fold increased in Turner syndrome (TS. Unfortunately, risk stratification is inadequate due to a lack of insight into the natural course of the syndrome-associated aortopathy. Therefore, this study aimed to prospectively assess aortic dimensions in TS. Methods Eighty adult TS patients were examined twice with a mean follow-up of 2.4 ± 0.4 years, and 67 healthy age and gender-matched controls were examined once. Aortic dimensions were measured at nine predefined positions using 3D, non-contrast and free-breathing cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Transthoracic echocardiography and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure were also performed. Results At baseline, aortic diameters (body surface area indexed were larger at all positions in TS. Aortic dilation was more prevalent at all positions excluding the distal transverse aortic arch. Aortic diameter increased in the aortic sinus, at the sinotubular junction and in the mid-ascending aorta with growth rates of 0.1 - 0.4 mm/year. Aortic diameters at all other positions were unchanged. The bicuspid aortic valve conferred higher aortic sinus growth rates (p Conclusion A general aortopathy is present in TS with enlargement of the ascending aorta, which is accelerated in the presence of a bicuspid aortic valve.

  13. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular, and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas; Reimann, Henning M; Waiczies, Helmar; Peper, Eva; Huelnhagen, Till; Seeliger, Erdmann; Schreiber, Adrian; Kettritz, Ralph; Strobel, Klaus; Ku, Min-Chi; Waiczies, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR) for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g., by supporting MR microscopy) and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g., by reducing measuring time); both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (bio)medical imaging, molecular medicine, and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (patho)physiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular, and renal disease will be discussed.

  14. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoralf eNiendorf

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g. by supporting MR microscopy and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g. by reducing measuring time; both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (biomedical imaging, molecular medicine and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (pathophysiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular and renal disease will be discussed.

  15. Routine evaluation of left ventricular diastolic function by cardiovascular magnetic resonance: A practical approach

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    Vido Diane

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR has excellent capabilities to assess ventricular systolic function. Current clinical scenarios warrant routine evaluation of ventricular diastolic function for complete evaluation, especially in congestive heart failure patients. To our knowledge, no systematic assessment of diastolic function over a range of lusitropy has been performed using CMR. Methods and Results Left ventricular diastolic function was assessed in 31 subjects (10 controls who underwent CMR and compared with Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE evaluation of mitral valve (MV and pulmonary vein (PV blood flow. Blood flow in the MV and PV were successfully imaged by CMR for all cases (31/31,100% while TTE evaluated flow in all MV (31/31,100% but only 21/31 PV (68% cases. Velocities of MV flow (E and A measured by CMR correlated well with TTE (r = 0.81, p Conclusion We have shown that there is homology between CMR and TTE for the assessment of diastolic inflow over a wide range of conditions, including normal, impaired relaxation and restrictive. There is excellent agreement of quantitative velocity measurements between CMR and TTE. Diastolic blood flow assessment by CMR can be performed in a single scan, with times ranging from 20 sec to 3 min, and we show that there is good indication for applying CMR to assess diastolic conditions, either as an adjunctive test when evaluating systolic function, or even as a primary test when TTE data cannot be obtained.

  16. Late gadolinium enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance of lamin A/C gene mutation related dilated cardiomyopathy

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    Peuhkurinen Keijo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to identify early features of lamin A/C gene mutation related dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. We characterise myocardial and functional findings in carriers of lamin A/C mutation to facilitate the recognition of these patients using this method. We also investigated the connection between myocardial fibrosis and conduction abnormalities. Methods Seventeen lamin A/C mutation carriers underwent CMR. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE and cine images were performed to evaluate myocardial fibrosis, regional wall motion, longitudinal myocardial function, global function and volumetry of both ventricles. The location, pattern and extent of enhancement in the left ventricle (LV myocardium were visually estimated. Results Patients had LV myocardial fibrosis in 88% of cases. Segmental wall motion abnormalities correlated strongly with the degree of enhancement. Myocardial enhancement was associated with conduction abnormalities. Sixty-nine percent of our asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients showed mild ventricular dilatation, systolic failure or both in global ventricular analysis. Decreased longitudinal systolic LV function was observed in 53% of patients. Conclusions Cardiac conduction abnormalities, mildly dilated LV and depressed systolic dysfunction are common in DCM caused by a lamin A/C gene mutation. However, other cardiac diseases may produce similar symptoms. CMR is an accurate tool to determine the typical cardiac involvement in lamin A/C cardiomyopathy and may help to initiate early treatment in this malignant familiar form of DCM.

  17. Diagnosis and management of ischemic cardiomyopathy: Role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christina; Doesch; Theano; Papavassiliu

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease(CAD) represents an important cause of mortality. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance(CMR) imaging evolved as an imaging modality that allows the assessment of myocardial function, perfusion, contractile reserve and extent of fibrosis in a single comprehensive exam. This review highlights the role of CMR in the differential diagnosis of acute chest pain by detecting the location of obstructive CAD or necrosis and identifying other conditions like stress cardiomyopathy or myocarditis that can present with acute chest pain. Besides, it underlines the prognostic implication of perfusion abnormalities in the setting of acute chest pain. Furthermore, the review addresses the role of CMR to detect significant CAD in patients with stable CAD. It elucidates the accuracy and clinical utility of CMR with respect to other imaging modalitieslike single-photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography. Besides, the prognostic value of CMR stress testing is discussed. Additionally, it summarizes the available CMR techniques to assess myocardial viability and describes algorithm to identify those patient who might profit from revascularization those who should be treated medically. Finally, future promising imaging techniques that will provide further insights into the fundamental disease processes in ischemic cardiomyopathy are discussed.

  18. Velocity encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance to assess left atrial appendage emptying

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    Muellerleile Kai

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of impaired left atrial appendage (LAA function identifies patients who are prone to thrombus formation in the LAA and therefore being at high risk for subsequent cardioembolic stroke. LAA function is typically assessed by measurements of LAA emptying velocities using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE in clinical routine. This study aimed at evaluating the feasibility of assessing LAA emptying by velocity encoded (VENC cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Methods This study included 30 patients with sinus rhythm (n = 18 or atrial fibrillation (n = 12. VENC-CMR velocity measurements were performed perpendicular to the orifice of the LAA. Peak velocities were measured of passive diastolic LAA emptying (e-wave in all patients. Peak velocities of active, late-diastolic LAA emptying (a-wave were assessed in patients with sinus rhythm. Correlation and agreement was analyzed between VENC-CMR and TEE measurements of e- and a-wave peak velocities. Results A significant correlation and good agreement was found between VENC-CMR and TEE measurements of maximal e-wave velocities (r = 0.61, P  Conclusions The assessment of active and passive LAA emptying by VENC-CMR is feasible. Further evaluation is required of potential future clinical applications such as risk stratification for cardioembolic stroke.

  19. The Emerging Role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Evaluation of Metabolic Cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogeni, S; Markousis-Mavrogenis, G; Markussis, V; Kolovou, G

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss the role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) in the diagnosis, risk stratification, and follow-up of metabolic cardiomyopathies. The classification of myocardial diseases, proposed by WHO/ISFC task force, distinguished specific cardiomyopathies, caused by metabolic disorders, into 4 types: 1) endocrine disorders, 2) storage or infiltration disorders (amyloidosis, hemochromatosis and familial storage disorders), 3) nutritional disorders (Kwashiorkor, beri-beri, obesity, and alcohol), and 4) diabetic heart. Thyroid disease, pheochromocytoma, and growth hormone excess or deficiency may contribute to usually reversible dilated cardiomyopathy. Glucogen storage diseases can be presented with myopathy, liver, and heart failure. Lysosomal storage diseases can provoke cardiac hypertrophy, mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias. Hereditary hemochromatosis, an inherited disorder of iron metabolism, leads to tissue iron overload in different organs, including the heart. Cardiac amyloidosis is the result of amyloid deposition in the heart, formed from breakdown of normal or abnormal proteins that leads to increased heart stiffness, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. Finally, nutritional disturbances and metabolic diseases, such as Kwashiorkor, beri-beri, obesity, alcohol consumption, and diabetes mellitus may also lead to severe cardiac dysfunction. CMR, through its capability to reliably assess anatomy, function, inflammation, rest-stress myocardial perfusion, myocardial fibrosis, aortic distensibility, iron and/or fat deposition can serve as an excellent tool for early diagnosis of heart involvement, risk stratification, treatment evaluation, and long term follow-up of patients with metabolic cardiomyopathies. PMID:26197853

  20. Cardiac magnetic resonance: Impact on diagnosis and management of patients with congenital cardiovascular disease

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    Secchi, F., E-mail: francescosecchimd@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); Di Leo, G. [S.C. di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Papini, G.D.E. [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); Nardella, V.G. [Facolta di Medicina e Chirurgia, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); Negura, D.; Carminati, M. [S.C. di Cardiologia Pediatrica, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Sardanelli, F. [S.C. di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Medico-Chirurgiche, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    Aim: To estimate the clinical impact of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with congenital cardiovascular disease (CCD). Materials and methods: Since 2003, 1.5 T CMR was used at our university hospital to evaluate morphology, cardiac kinetics, aortic and pulmonary flow, and vascular anatomy in patients with CCD. The present study considered a consecutive series of these patients from 2003 to 2006. A paediatric cardiologist judged our reports as expected or unexpected and, secondarily, as not reliable (level 0), describing findings already known (level 1), not changing therapy/suggested lifestyle (level 2), changing therapy/suggested lifestyle (level 3) or changing diagnosis (level 4). Results: CMR reports were judged to be expected in 187/214 (87%) and unexpected in 27/214 (13%). Less than 2% of CMRs were judged as levels 0 or 1, 66% as level 2, and 5% as level 4. During 2005-2006 the clinical impact improved toward higher impact levels (p < 0.001, chi-square test). Conclusions: In patients with CCD, more than one in 10 CMR reports were unexpected to cardiologists and over seven in 10 prompted a change of diagnosis or therapy.

  1. Moderate intensity supine exercise causes decreased cardiac volumes and increased outer volume variations: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steding-Ehrenborg, Katarina; Jablonowski, Robert; Arvidsson, Per M;

    2013-01-01

    The effects on left and right ventricular (LV, RV) volumes during physical exercise remains controversial. Furthermore, no previous study has investigated the effects of exercise on longitudinal contribution to stroke volume (SV) and the outer volume variation of the heart. The aim of this study ...... was to determine if LV, RV and total heart volumes (THV) as well as cardiac pumping mechanisms change during physical exercise compared to rest using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR)....

  2. Demonstration of value of optimizing ECG triggering for cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients with congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Knesewitsch Thomas; Meierhofer Christian; Rieger Henrike; Rößler Jürgen; Frank Michael; Martinoff Stefan; Hess John; Stern Heiko; Fratz Sohrab

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Optimal ECG triggering is of paramount importance for correct blood flow quantification during cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). However, optimal ECG triggering and therefore blood flow quantification is impaired in many patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) due to complex QRS patterns. Therefore, a new ECG-trigger algorithm was developed to address triggering problems due to complex QRS patterns. The aim of this study was to test this new ECG-trigger algorit...

  3. Natural history of spontaneous aortic intramural hematoma progression: Six years follow-up with cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao Lei; Fan Zhanming; Zhang Zhaoqi; Ma Xiaohai; Yu Jing

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We described a 6 years follow-up of a spontaneous aortic intramural hematoma (IMH) with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) examination. Since multiple factors may play roles in the natural history of IMH, the patient experienced the course of progression, which included hematoma absorption, ulcer-like lesion, aneurysm and limited dissection. The initial and follow-up CMR examination included 3D CE MRA and non-enhanced "bright blood" pulse sequence. The inherent advantage of outs...

  4. Correction of misaligned slices in multi-slice cardiovascular magnetic resonance using slice-to-volume registration

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkes David J; Schnabel Julia A; Netsch Thomas; Pinder Richard J; Chandler Adam G; Hill Derek LG; Razavi Reza

    2008-01-01

    Abstract A popular technique to reduce respiratory motion for cardiovascular magnetic resonance is to perform a multi-slice acquisition in which a patient holds their breath multiple times during the scan. The feasibility of rigid slice-to-volume registration to correct for misalignments of slice stacks in such images due to differing breath-hold positions is explored. Experimental results indicate that slice-to-volume registration can compensate for the typical misalignments expected. Correc...

  5. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of cardiomyopathy in limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B and 2I

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    Habib Philip

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD are inclusive of 7 autosomal dominant and 14 autosomal recessive disorders featuring progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Studies of cardiac function have not yet been well-defined in deficiencies of dysferlin (LGMD2B and fukutin related protein (LGMD2I. In this study of patients with these two forms of limb girdle muscular dystrophy, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR was used to more specifically define markers of cardiomyopathy including systolic dysfunction, myocardial fibrosis, and diastolic dysfunction. Methods Consecutive patients with genetically-proven LGMD types 2I (n = 7 and 2B (n = 9 and 8 control subjects were enrolled. All subjects underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR on a standard 1.5 Tesla clinical scanner with cine imaging for left ventricular (LV volume and ejection fraction (EF measurement, vector velocity analysis of cine data to calculate myocardial strain, and late post-gadolinium enhancement imaging (LGE to assess for myocardial fibrosis. Results Sixteen LGMD patients (7 LGMD2I, 9 LGMD2B, and 8 control subjects completed CMR. All but one patient had normal LV size and systolic function; one (type 2I had severe dilated cardiomyopathy. Of 15 LGMD patients with normal systolic function, LGE imaging revealed focal myocardial fibrosis in 7 (47%. Peak systolic circumferential strain rates were similar in patients vs. controls: εendo was -23.8 ± 8.5vs. -23.9 ± 4.2%, εepi was -11.5 ± 1.7% vs. -10.1 ± 4.2% (p = NS for all. Five of 7 LGE-positive patients had grade I diastolic dysfunction [2I (n = 2, 2B (n = 3]. that was not present in any LGE-negative patients or controls. Conclusions LGMD2I and LGMD2B generally result in mild structural and functional cardiac abnormalities, though severe dilated cardiomyopathy may occur. Long-term studies are warranted to evaluate the prognostic significance of subclinical fibrosis detected by CMR in these patients.

  6. Myocardial tagging by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance: evolution of techniques--pulse sequences, analysis algorithms, and applications

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    Ibrahim El-Sayed H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR tagging has been established as an essential technique for measuring regional myocardial function. It allows quantification of local intramyocardial motion measures, e.g. strain and strain rate. The invention of CMR tagging came in the late eighties, where the technique allowed for the first time for visualizing transmural myocardial movement without having to implant physical markers. This new idea opened the door for a series of developments and improvements that continue up to the present time. Different tagging techniques are currently available that are more extensive, improved, and sophisticated than they were twenty years ago. Each of these techniques has different versions for improved resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, scan time, anatomical coverage, three-dimensional capability, and image quality. The tagging techniques covered in this article can be broadly divided into two main categories: 1 Basic techniques, which include magnetization saturation, spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM, delay alternating with nutations for tailored excitation (DANTE, and complementary SPAMM (CSPAMM; and 2 Advanced techniques, which include harmonic phase (HARP, displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE, and strain encoding (SENC. Although most of these techniques were developed by separate groups and evolved from different backgrounds, they are in fact closely related to each other, and they can be interpreted from more than one perspective. Some of these techniques even followed parallel paths of developments, as illustrated in the article. As each technique has its own advantages, some efforts have been made to combine different techniques together for improved image quality or composite information acquisition. In this review, different developments in pulse sequences and related image processing techniques are described along with the necessities that led to their invention

  7. On the subjective acceptance during cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging at 7.0 Tesla.

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    Sabrina Klix

    Full Text Available This study examines the subjective acceptance during UHF-CMR in a cohort of healthy volunteers who underwent a cardiac MR examination at 7.0T.Within a period of two-and-a-half years (January 2012 to June 2014 a total of 165 healthy volunteers (41 female, 124 male without any known history of cardiac disease underwent UHF-CMR. For the assessment of the subjective acceptance a questionnaire was used to examine the participants experience prior, during and after the UHF-CMR examination. For this purpose, subjects were asked to respond to the questionnaire in an exit interview held immediately after the completion of the UHF-CMR examination under supervision of a study nurse to ensure accurate understanding of the questions. All questions were answered with "yes" or "no" including space for additional comments.Transient muscular contraction was documented in 12.7% of the questionnaires. Muscular contraction was reported to occur only during periods of scanning with the magnetic field gradients being rapidly switched. Dizziness during the study was reported by 12.7% of the subjects. Taste of metal was reported by 10.1% of the study population. Light flashes were reported by 3.6% of the entire cohort. 13% of the subjects reported side effects/observations which were not explicitly listed in the questionnaire but covered by the question about other side effects. No severe side effects as vomiting or syncope after scanning occurred. No increase in heart rate was observed during the UHF-CMR exam versus the baseline clinical examination.This study adds to the literature by detailing the subjective acceptance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging examinations at a magnetic field strength of 7.0T. Cardiac MR examinations at 7.0T are well tolerated by healthy subjects. Broader observational and multi-center studies including patient cohorts with cardiac diseases are required to gain further insights into the subjective acceptance of UHF

  8. Gender difference in ventricular response to aortic stenosis: insight from cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

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    Joo Myung Lee

    Full Text Available Although left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH and remodeling is associated with cardiac mortality and morbidity, little is known about the impact of gender on the ventricular response in aortic stenosis (AS patients. This study aimed to analyze the differential effect of gender on ventricular remodeling in moderate to severe AS patients.A total of 118 consecutive patients (67±9 years; 63 males with moderate or severe AS (severe 81.4% underwent transthoracic echocardiography and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR within a 1-month period in this two-center prospective registry. The pattern of LV remodeling was assessed using the LV mass index (LVMI and LV remodeling index (LVRI; LV mass/LV end-diastolic volume by CMR. Although there were no differences in AS severity parameters nor baseline characteristics between genders, males showed a significantly higher LVMI (102.6±29.1 g/m2 vs. 86.1±29.2 g/m2, p=0.003 and LVRI (1.1±0.2 vs. 1.0±0.3, p=0.018, regardless of AS severity. The LVMI was significantly associated with aortic valve area (AVA index and valvuloarterial impedance in females, whereas it was not in males, resulting in significant interaction between genders (PInteraction=0.007/0.014 for AVA index/valvuloarterial impedance, respectively. Similarly, the LVRI also showed a significantly different association between male and female subjects with the change in AS severity parameters (PInteraction=0.033/<0.001/0.029 for AVA index/transaortic mean pressure gradient/valvuloarterial impedance, respectively.Males are associated with greater degree of LVH and higher LVRI compared to females at moderate to severe AS. However, females showed a more exaggerated LV remodeling response, with increased severity of AS and hemodynamic loads, than males.

  9. Left ventricular thrombus formation after acute myocardial infarction as assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

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    Delewi, Ronak [Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (Netherlands); Nijveldt, Robin [Department of Cardiology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hirsch, Alexander [Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Marcu, Constantin B.; Robbers, Lourens [Department of Cardiology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hassell, Marriela E.C.J.; Bruin, Rianne H.A. de; Vleugels, Jim; Laan, Anja M. van der; Bouma, Berto J. [Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tio, René A. [Thorax Center, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Tijssen, Jan G.P. [Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Albert C. van [Department of Cardiology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zijlstra, Felix [Thorax Center, Department of Cardiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Piek, Jan J., E-mail: j.j.piek@amc.uva.nl [Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    Introduction: Left ventricular (LV) thrombus formation is a feared complication of myocardial infarction (MI). We assessed the prevalence of LV thrombus in ST-segment elevated MI patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and compared the diagnostic accuracy of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) to cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Also, we evaluated the course of LV thrombi in the modern era of primary PCI. Methods: 200 patients with primary PCI underwent TTE and CMR, at baseline and at 4 months follow-up. Studies were analyzed by two blinded examiners. Patients were seen at 1, 4, 12, and 24 months for assessment of clinical status and adverse events. Results: On CMR at baseline, a thrombus was found in 17 of 194 (8.8%) patients. LV thrombus resolution occurred in 15 patients. Two patients had persistence of LV thrombus on follow-up CMR. On CMR at four months, a thrombus was found in an additional 12 patients. In multivariate analysis, thrombus formation on baseline CMR was independently associated with, baseline infarct size (g) (B = 0.02, SE = 0.02, p < 0.001). Routine TTE had a sensitivity of 21–24% and a specificity of 95–98% compared to CMR for the detection of LV thrombi. Intra- and interobserver variation for detection of LV thrombus were lower for CMR (κ = 0.91 and κ = 0.96) compared to TTE (κ = 0.74 and κ = 0.53). Conclusion: LV thrombus still occurs in a substantial amount of patients after PCI-treated MI, especially in larger infarct sizes. Routine TTE had a low sensitivity for the detection of LV thrombi and the interobserver variation of TTE was large.

  10. Troponin release following endurance exercise: is inflammation the cause? a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

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    O'Hanlon Rory

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aetiology and clinical significance of troponin release following endurance exercise is unclear but may be due to transient myocardial inflammation. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR affords us the opportunity to evaluate the presence of myocardial inflammation and focal fibrosis and is the ideal imaging modality to study this hypothesis. We sought to correlate the relationship between acute bouts of ultra endurance exercise leading to cardiac biomarkers elevation and the presence of myocardial inflammation and fibrosis using CMR. Methods 17 recreation athletes (33.5 +/- 6.5 years were studied before and after a marathon run with troponin, NTproBNP, and CMR. Specific imaging parameters to look for inflammation included T2 weighted images, and T1 weighted spin-echo images before and after an intravenous gadolinium-DTPA to detect myocardial hyperemia secondary to inflammation. Late gadolinium imaging was performed (LGE to detect any focal regions of replacement fibrosis. Results Eleven of the 17 participant had elevations of TnI above levels of cut off for myocardial infarction 6 hrs after the marathon (0.075 +/- 0.02, p = 0.007. Left ventricular volumes were reduced post marathon and a small increase in ejection fraction was noted (64+/- 1% pre, 67+/- 1.2% post, P = 0.014. Right ventricular volumes, stroke volume, and ejection fraction were unchanged post marathon. No athlete fulfilled criteria for myocardial inflammation based on current criteria. No regions of focal fibrosis were seen in any of the participants. Conclusion Exercise induced cardiac biomarker release is not associated with any functional changes by CMR or any detectable myocardial inflammation or fibrosis.

  11. Contribution of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the evaluation of coronary arteries

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    Sophie; Mavrogeni; George; Markousis-Mavrogenis; Genovefa; Kolovou

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance(CMR) allows the nonradiating assessment of coronary arteries; to achieve better image quality cardiorespiratory artefacts should be corrected. Coronary MRA(CMRA) at the mo-ment is indicated only for the detection of abnormal coronary origin, coronary artery ectasia and/or aneu-rysms(class Ⅰ indication) and coronary bypass grafts(class Ⅱ indication). CMRA utilisation for coronary ar-tery disease is not yet part of clinical routine. However, the lack of radiation is of special value for the coronary artery evaluation in children and women. CMRA can assess the proximal part of coronary arteries in almost all cases. The best results have been observed in the evaluation of the left anterior descending and the right coronary artery, while the left circumflex, which is lo-cated far away from the coil elements, is frequently im-aged with reduced quality, compared to the other two. Different studies detected an increase in wall thickness of the coronaries in patients with type Ⅰ diabetes and abnormal renal function. Additionally, the non-contrast enhanced T1-weighed images detected the presence of thrombus in acute myocardial infarction. New tech-niques using delayed gadolinium enhanced imaging promise the direct visualization of inflamed plaques in the coronary arteries. The major advantage of CMRis the potential of an integrated protocol offering as-sessment of coronary artery anatomy, cardiac function, inflammation and stress perfusion-fibrosis in the same study, providing an individualized clinical profile of pa-tients with heart disease.

  12. The role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in candidates for Fontan operation: Proposal of a new Algorithm

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    Ait-Ali Lamia

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To propose a new diagnostic algorithm for candidates for Fontan and identify those who can skip cardiac catheterization (CC. Methods Forty-four candidates for Fontan (median age 4.8 years, range: 2-29 years were prospectively evaluated by trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE, Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR and CC. Before CC, according to clinical, echo and CMR findings, patients were divided in two groups: Group I comprised 18 patients deemed suitable for Fontan without requiring CC; group II comprised 26 patients indicated for CC either in order to detect more details, or for interventional procedures. Results In Group I ("CC not required" no unexpected new information affecting surgical planning was provided by CC. Conversely, in Group II new information was provided by CC in three patients (0 vs 11.5%, p = 0.35 and in six an interventional procedure was performed. During CC, minor complications occurred in one patient from Group I and in three from Group II (6 vs 14%, p = 0.7. Radiation Dose-Area product was similar in the two groups (Median 20 Gycm2, range: 5-40 vs 26.5 Gycm2, range: 9-270 p = 0.37. All 18 Group I patients and 19 Group II patients underwent a total cavo-pulmonary anastomosis; in the remaining seven group II patients, four were excluded from Fontan; two are awaiting Fontan; one refused the intervention. Conclusion In this paper we propose a new diagnostic algorithm in a pre-Fontan setting. An accurate non-invasive evaluation comprising TTE and CMR could select patients who can skip CC.

  13. The effects of breath-holding on pulmonary regurgitation measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance velocity mapping

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    Babu-Narayan Sonya V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary regurgitation is a common and clinically important residual lesion after repair of tetralogy of Fallot. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR phase contrast velocity mapping is widely used for measurement of pulmonary regurgitant fraction. Breath-hold acquisitions, usually acquired during held expiration, are more convenient than the non-breath-hold approach, but we hypothesized that breath-holding might affect the amount of pulmonary regurgitation. Methods Forty-three adult patients with a previous repair of tetralogy of Fallot and residual pulmonary regurgitation were investigated with CMR. In each, pulmonary regurgitant fraction was measured from velocity maps transecting the pulmonary trunk, acquired during held expiration, held inspiration, by non-breath-hold acquisition, and also from the difference of right and left ventricular stroke volume measurements. Results Pulmonary regurgitant fraction was lower when measured by velocity mapping in held expiration compared with held inspiration, non-breath-hold or stroke volume difference (30.8 vs. 37.0, 35.6, 35.4%, p = 0.00017, 0.0035, 0.026. The regurgitant volume was lower in held expiration than in held inspiration (41.9 vs. 48.3, p = 0.0018. Pulmonary forward flow volume was larger during held expiration than during non-breath-hold (132 vs. 124 ml, p = 0.0024. Conclusion Pulmonary regurgitant fraction was significantly lower in held expiration compared with held inspiration, free breathing and stroke volume difference. Altered airway pressure could be a contributory factor. This information is relevant if breath-hold acquisition is to be substituted for non-breath-hold in the investigation of patients with a view to re-intervention.

  14. BOLD cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 3.0 tesla in myocardial ischemia

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    Gebker Rolf

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR to detect stress-inducible myocardial ischemic reactions in the presence of angiographically significant coronary artery disease (CAD. Methods Forty-six patients (34 men; age 65 ± 9 years, with suspected or known coronary artery disease underwent CMR at 3Tesla prior to clinically indicated invasive coronary angiography. BOLD CMR was performed in 3 short axis slices of the heart at rest and during adenosine stress (140 μg/kg/min followed by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE imaging. In all 16 standard myocardial segments, T2* values were derived at rest and under adenosine stress. Quantitative coronary angiography served as the standard of reference and defined normal myocardial segments (i.e. all 16 segments in patients without any CAD, ischemic segments (i.e. supplied by a coronary artery with ≥50% luminal narrowing and non-ischemic segments (i.e. supplied by a non-significantly stenosed coronary artery in patients with significant CAD. Results Coronary angiography demonstrated significant CAD in 23 patients. BOLD CMR at rest revealed significantly lower T2* values for ischemic segments (26.7 ± 11.6 ms compared to normal (31.9 ± 11.9 ms; p Conclusions Rest and stress BOLD CMR at 3Tesla proved feasible and differentiated between ischemic, non-ischemic, and normal myocardial segments in a clinical patient population. BOLD CMR during vasodilator stress identified patients with significant CAD.

  15. Accuracy of electrocardiographic criteria for atrial enlargement: validation with cardiovascular magnetic resonance

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    Manning Warren J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anatomic atrial enlargement is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. However, atrial enlargement may not correlate with clinical measures such as electrocardiographic (ECG criteria. Past studies correlating ECG criteria with anatomic measures mainly used inferior M-mode or two-dimensional echocardiographic data. We sought to determine the accuracy of the ECG to predict anatomic atrial enlargement as determined by volumetric cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Methods ECG criteria for left (LAE and right atrial enlargement (RAE were compared to CMR atrial volume index measurements for 275 consecutive subjects referred for CMR (67% males, 51 ± 14 years. ECG criteria for LAE and RAE were assessed by an expert observer blinded to CMR data. Atrial volume index was computed using the biplane area-length method. Results The prevalence of CMR LAE and RAE was 28% and 11%, respectively, and by any ECG criteria was 82% and 5%, respectively. Though nonspecific, the presence of at least one ECG criteria for LAE was 90% sensitive for CMR LAE. The individual criteria P mitrale, P wave axis 0.04s·mm were 88–99% specific although not sensitive for CMR LAE. ECG was insensitive but 96–100% specific for CMR RAE. Conclusion The presence of at least one ECG criteria for LAE is sensitive but not specific for anatomic LAE. Individual criteria for LAE, including P mitrale, P wave axis 0.04s·mm are highly specific, though not sensitive. ECG is highly specific but insensitive for RAE. Individual ECG P wave changes do not reliably both detect and predict anatomic atrial enlargement.

  16. Longitudinal strain from velocity encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance: a validation study

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    Heiberg Einar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regional myocardial function is typically evaluated by visual assessment by experienced users, or by methods requiring substantial post processing time. Visual assessment is subjective and not quantitative. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop and validate a simple method to derive quantitative measures of regional wall function from velocity encoded Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR, and provide associated normal values for longitudinal strain. Method Both fast field echo (FFE and turbo field echo (TFE velocity encoded CMR images were acquired in three long axis planes in 36 healthy volunteers (13 women, 23 men, age 35±12 years. Strain was also quantified in 10 patients within one week after myocardial infarction. The user manually delineated myocardium in one time frame and strain was calculated as the myocardium was tracked throughout the cardiac cycle using an optimization formulation and mechanical a priori assumptions. A phantom experiment was performed to validate the method with optical tracking of deformation as an independent gold standard. Results There was an excellent agreement between longitudinal strain measured by optical tracking and longitudinal strain measured with TFE velocity encoding. Difference between the two methods was 0.0025 ± 0.085 (ns. Mean global longitudinal strain in the 36 healthy volunteers was −0.18 ± 0.10 (TFE imaging. Intra-observer variability for all segments was 0.00 ± 0.06. Inter-observer variability was −0.02 ± 0.07 (TFE imaging. The intra-observer variability for radial strain was high limiting the applicability of radial strain. Mean longitudinal strain in patients was significantly lower (−0.15± 0.12 compared to healthy volunteers (p Conclusion In conclusion, we have developed and validated a robust and clinically applicable technique that can quantify longitudinal strain and regional myocardial wall function and present the associated normal values

  17. Left ventricular remodeling and hypertrophy in patients with aortic stenosis: insights from cardiovascular magnetic resonance

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    Dweck Marc R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is the gold standard non-invasive method for determining left ventricular (LV mass and volume but has not been used previously to characterise the LV remodeling response in aortic stenosis. We sought to investigate the degree and patterns of hypertrophy in aortic stenosis using CMR. Methods Patients with moderate or severe aortic stenosis, normal coronary arteries and no other significant valve lesions or cardiomyopathy were scanned by CMR with valve severity assessed by planimetry and velocity mapping. The extent and patterns of hypertrophy were investigated using measurements of the LV mass index, indexed LV volumes and the LV mass/volume ratio. Asymmetric forms of remodeling and hypertrophy were defined by a regional wall thickening ≥13 mm and >1.5-fold the thickness of the opposing myocardial segment. Results Ninety-one patients (61±21 years; 57 male with aortic stenosis (aortic valve area 0.93±0.32cm2 were recruited. The severity of aortic stenosis was unrelated to the degree (r2=0.012, P=0.43 and pattern (P=0.22 of hypertrophy. By univariate analysis, only male sex demonstrated an association with LV mass index (P=0.02. Six patterns of LV adaption were observed: normal ventricular geometry (n=11, concentric remodeling (n=11, asymmetric remodeling (n=11, concentric hypertrophy (n=34, asymmetric hypertrophy (n=14 and LV decompensation (n=10. Asymmetric patterns displayed considerable overlap in appearances (wall thickness 17±2mm with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Conclusions We have demonstrated that in patients with moderate and severe aortic stenosis, the pattern of LV adaption and degree of hypertrophy do not closely correlate with the severity of valve narrowing and that asymmetric patterns of wall thickening are common. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Reference Number: NCT00930735

  18. Cardiac remodeling following percutaneous mitral valve repair. Initial results assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

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    Radunski, U.K [University Heart Center, Hamburg (Germany). Cardiology; Franzen, O. [Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark). Cardiology; Barmeyer, A. [Klinikum Dortmund (Germany). Kardiologie; and others

    2014-10-15

    Percutaneous mitral valve repair with the MitraClip device (Abbott Vascular, Redwood City, California, USA) is a novel therapeutic option in patients with mitral regurgitation. This study evaluated the feasibility of cardiac volume measurements by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) to assess reverse myocardial remodeling in patients after MitraClip implantation. 12 patients underwent CMR at baseline (BL) before and at 6 months follow-up (FU) after MitraClip implantation. Cine-CMR was performed in short- and long-axes for the assessment of left ventricular (LV), right ventricular (RV) and left atrial (LA) volumes. Assessment of endocardial contours was not compromised by the device-related artifact. No significant differences in observer variances were observed for LV, RV and LA volume measurements between BL and FU. LV end-diastolic (median 127 [IQR 96-150] vs. 112 [86-150] ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.03) and LV end-systolic (82 [54-91] vs. 69 [48-99] ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.03) volume indices decreased significantly from BL to FU. No significant differences were found for RV end-diastolic (94 [75-103] vs. 99 [77-123] ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.91), RV end-systolic (48 [42-80] vs. 51 [40-81] ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.48), and LA (87 [55-124] vs. 92 [48-137]R ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.20) volume indices between BL and FU. CMR enables the assessment of cardiac volumes in patients after MitraClip implantation. Our CMR findings indicate that percutaneous mitral valve repair results in reverse LV but not in RV or LA remodeling.

  19. Measuring aortic pulse wave velocity using high-field cardiovascular magnetic resonance: comparison of techniques

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    Shaffer Jean M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assessment of arterial stiffness is increasingly used for evaluating patients with different cardiovascular diseases as the mechanical properties of major arteries are often altered. Aortic stiffness can be noninvasively estimated by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV. Several methods have been proposed for measuring PWV using velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR, including transit-time (TT, flow-area (QA, and cross-correlation (XC methods. However, assessment and comparison of these techniques at high field strength has not yet been performed. In this work, the TT, QA, and XC techniques were clinically tested at 3 Tesla and compared to each other. Methods Fifty cardiovascular patients and six volunteers were scanned to acquire the necessary images. The six volunteer scans were performed twice to test inter-scan reproducibility. Patient images were analyzed using the TT, XC, and QA methods to determine PWV. Two observers analyzed the images to determine inter-observer and intra-observer variabilities. The PWV measurements by the three methods were compared to each other to test inter-method variability. To illustrate the importance of PWV using CMR, the degree of aortic stiffness was assessed using PWV and related to LV dysfunction in five patients with diastolic heart failure patients and five matched volunteers. Results The inter-observer and intra-observer variability results showed no bias between the different techniques. The TT and XC results were more reproducible than the QA; the mean (SD inter-observer/intra-observer PWV differences were -0.12(1.3/-0.04(0.4 for TT, 0.2(1.3/0.09(0.9 for XC, and 0.6(1.6/0.2(1.4 m/s for QA methods, respectively. The correlation coefficients (r for the inter-observer/intra-observer comparisons were 0.94/0.99, 0.88/0.94, and 0.83/0.92 for the TT, XC, and QA methods, respectively. The inter-scan reproducibility results showed low variability between the repeated

  20. Non Hodgkin lymphoma metastasis to the heart detected by cardiovascular magnetic resonance; Metastasis cardiaca secundaria al linfoma de Hodgkin detectada por la resonancia magnetica cardiovascular

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    Martinez, Florange; Morales, Marisela; Pedreanez, Norma, E-mail: martinez.florangel@gmail.com [Hospital Cardiologico Infantil Latinoamericano Dr Gilberto Rodriguez Ochoa, Carcacas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Pabon, Luz; Carrillo, Milton [Universidad Central de Venezuela (UCV/HUC), Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Instituto de Hematoncologia. Hospital Universitario; Fernandes, Juliano Lara [Universidade de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    Primary and secondary heart tumors are relatively rare occurrences but usually imply significant treatment decisions. The differential diagnosis among these tumors and other masses can sometimes be difficult and require the use of different imaging modalities to establish a confident verdict. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance CMR imaging is a very useful tool in these cases by allowing for the application of different strategies to better delineate masses, heart structures and adjacent tissues. In this case description, we present a woman with shortness of breath and a paracardiac mass showing how CMR can be applied. (author)

  1. Reproducibility of adenosine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance in multi-vessel symptomatic coronary artery disease

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    Feneley Michael P

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose First-pass perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is increasingly being utilized in both clinical practice and research. However, the reproducibility of this technique remains incompletely evaluated, particularly in patients with severe coronary artery disease (CAD. The purpose of this study was to determine the inter-study reproducibility of adenosine stress CMR in patients with symptomatic multi-vessel CAD and those at low risk for CAD. Methods Twenty patients (10 with CAD, 10 low risk CAD underwent two CMR scans 8 ± 2 days apart. Basal, mid and apical left ventricular short axis slices were acquired using gadolinium 0.05 mmol/kg at peak stress (adenosine, 140 μ/kg/min, 4 min and rest. Myocardial perfusion was evaluated qualitatively by assessing the number of ischemic segments, and semi-quantitatively by determining the myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRi using a normalized upslope method. Inter-study and observer reproducibility were assessed--the latter being defined by the coefficient of variation (CoV, which was calculated from the standard deviation of the differences of the measurements, divided by the mean. Additionally, the percentage of myocardial segments with perfect agreement and inter- and intra-observer MPRi correlation between studies, were also determined. Results The CoV for the number of ischemic segments was 31% with a mean difference of -0.15 ± 0.88 segments and 91% perfect agreement between studies. MPRi was lower in patients with CAD (1.13 ± 0.21 compared to those with low risk CAD (1.59 ± 0.58, p = 0.02. The reproducibility of MPRi was 19% with no significant difference between patients with CAD and those with low risk CAD (p = 0.850. Observer reproducibility for MPRi was high: inter-observer CoV 9%, r = 0.93 and intra-observer CoV 5%, r = 0.94. For trials using perfusion CMR as an endpoint, an estimated sample size of 12 subjects would be required to detect a two-segment change in

  2. Inter-study reproducibility of cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial feature tracking

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    Morton Geraint

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial feature tracking (CMR-FT is a recently described method of post processing routine cine acquisitions which aims to provide quantitative measurements of circumferentially and radially directed ventricular wall strain. Inter-study reproducibility is important for serial assessments however has not been defined for CMR-FT. Methods 16 healthy volunteers were imaged 3 times within a single day. The first examination was performed at 0900 after fasting and was immediately followed by the second. The third, non-fasting scan, was performed at 1400. CMR-FT measures of segmental and global strain parameters were calculated. Left ventricular (LV circumferential and radial strain were determined in the short axis orientation (EccSAX and ErrSAX respectively. LV and right ventricular longitudinal strain and LV radial strain were determined from the 4-chamber orientation (EllLV, EllRV, and ErrLAX respectively. LV volumes and function were also analysed. Inter-study reproducibility and study sample sizes required to demonstrate 5% changes in absolute strain were determined by comparison of the first and second exams. The third exam was used to determine whether diurnal variation affected reproducibility. Results CMR-FT strain analysis inter-study reproducibility was variable. Global strain assessment was more reproducible than segmental analysis. Overall EccSAX was the most reproducible measure of strain: coefficient of variation (CV 38% and 20.3% and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC 0.68 (0.55-0.78 and 0.7 (0.32-0.89 for segmental and global analysis respectively. The least reproducible segmental measure was EllRV: CV 60% and ICC 0.56 (0.41-0.69 whilst the least reproducible global measure was ErrLAX: CV 33.3% and ICC 0.44 (0–0.77. Variable reproducibility was also reflected in the calculated sample sizes, which ranged from 11 (global EccSAX to 156 subjects (segmental EllRV. The

  3. Feasibility and safety of high-dose adenosine perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance

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    Holloway Cameron J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Adenosine is the most widely used vasodilator stress agent for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR perfusion studies. With the standard dose of 140 mcg/kg/min some patients fail to demonstrate characteristic haemodynamic changes: a significant increase in heart rate (HR and mild decrease in systolic blood pressure (SBP. Whether an increase in the rate of adenosine infusion would improve peripheral and, likely, coronary vasodilatation in those patients is unknown. The aim of the present study was to assess the tolerance and safety of a high-dose adenosine protocol in patients with inadequate haemodynamic response to the standard adenosine protocol when undergoing CMR perfusion imaging. Methods 98 consecutive patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD underwent CMR perfusion imaging at 1.5 Tesla. Subjects were screened for contraindications to adenosine, and an electrocardiogram was performed prior to the scan. All patients initially received the standard adenosine protocol (140 mcg/kg/min for at least 3 minutes. If the haemodynamic response was inadequate (HR increase Results All patients successfully completed the CMR scan. Of a total of 98 patients, 18 (18% did not demonstrate evidence of a significant increase in HR or decrease in SBP under the standard adenosine infusion rate. Following the increase in the rate of infusion, 16 out of those 18 patients showed an adequate haemodynamic response. One patient of the standard infusion group and two patients of the high-dose group developed transient advanced AV block. Significantly more patients complained of chest pain in the high-dose group (61% vs. 29%, p = 0.009. On multivariate analysis, age > 65 years and ejection fraction Conclusions A substantial number of patients do not show adequate peripheral haemodynamic response to standard-dose adenosine stress during perfusion CMR imaging. Age and reduced ejection fraction are predictors of inadequate

  4. Determination of Edema in Porcine Coronary Arteries by T2 Weighted Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

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    Falk Erling

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation plays a pivotal role in all stages of atherosclerosis. Since edema is known to be an integral part of inflammation, a noninvasive technique that can identify edema in the coronary artery wall may provide unique information regarding plaque activity. In this study, we aimed to determine whether edema induced in porcine coronary arteries by balloon injury could be reliably detected by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR using a water sensitive T2-weighted short tau inversion recovery sequence (T2-STIR. We also aimed to compare these results to those of conventional T2-weighted (T2W imaging. Methods Edema was induced in the proximal left anterior descending (LAD coronary artery wall in seven pigs by balloon injury. At baseline, and 1-10 days (average four post injury, the proximal LAD was assessed by water sensitive T2-STIR and conventional T2W sequences in cross-sectional planes. CMR images were matched to histopathology, validated against Evans blue as a marker of increased vessel wall permeability, and correlated with the arterial amount of fibrinogen used as an edema surrogate marker. Results Post injury, the T2-STIR images of the injured LAD vessel wall showed a significant 72%, relative signal intensity (SI increase compared with baseline (p = 0.028. Using a threshold value of SI 7 SD above the average SI of the myocardium, T2-STIR detected edema in the vessel wall (i.e. enhancement with a sensitivity of 100 and a specificity of 71. Twelve out of the 14 (86% T2-STIR images displaying coronary artery wall enhancement also showed Evans blue uptake in the corresponding histology. The relative signal intensity showed a linear correlation with the amount of fibrinogen detected on the corresponding histopathology (ρ = 0.750, p = 0.05. The conventional T2W images did not show significant changes in SI post injury. Conclusion T2-STIR CMR enabled detection of coronary artery wall edema and could therefore be a non

  5. Natural history of spontaneous aortic intramural hematoma progression: Six years follow-up with cardiovascular magnetic resonance

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    Zhao Lei

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We described a 6 years follow-up of a spontaneous aortic intramural hematoma (IMH with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR examination. Since multiple factors may play roles in the natural history of IMH, the patient experienced the course of progression, which included hematoma absorption, ulcer-like lesion, aneurysm and limited dissection. The initial and follow-up CMR examination included 3D CE MRA and non-enhanced "bright blood" pulse sequence. The inherent advantage of outstanding contrast with plain scan, which shorten the scan time and avoid potential risk of contrast agent, might make the fast gradient echo sequence as an alternative method when following stable IMH.

  6. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance evaluation of aortic stenosis severity using single plane measurement of effective orifice area

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    Garcia Julio

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE is the standard method for the evaluation of the severity of aortic stenosis (AS. Valve effective orifice area (EOA measured by the continuity equation is one of the most frequently used stenotic indices. However, TTE measurement of aortic valve EOA is not feasible or not reliable in a significant proportion of patients. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR has emerged as a non-invasive alternative to evaluate EOA using velocity measurements. The objectives of this study were: 1 to validate a new CMR method using jet shear layer detection (JSLD based on acoustical source term (AST concept to estimate the valve EOA; 2 to introduce a simplified JSLD method not requiring vorticity field derivation. Methods and results We performed an in vitro study where EOA was measured by CMR in 4 fixed stenoses (EOA = 0.48, 1.00, 1.38 and 2.11 cm2 under the same steady flow conditions (4-20 L/min. The in vivo study included eight (8 healthy subjects and 37 patients with mild to severe AS (0.72 cm2 ≤ EOA ≤ 1.71 cm2. All subjects underwent TTE and CMR examinations. EOA was determinated by TTE with the use of continuity equation method (TTECONT. For CMR estimation of EOA, we used 3 methods: 1 Continuity equation (CMRCONT; 2 Shear layer detection (CMRJSLD, which was computed from the velocity field of a single CMR velocity profile at the peak systolic phase; 3 Single plane velocity truncation (CMRSPVT, which is a simplified version of CMRJSLD method. There was a good agreement between the EOAs obtained in vitro by the different CMR methods and the EOA predicted from the potential flow theory. In the in vivo study, there was good correlation and concordance between the EOA measured by the TTECONT method versus those measured by each of the CMR methods: CMRCONT (r = 0.88, CMRJSLD (r = 0.93 and CMRSPVT (r = 0.93. The intra- and inter- observer variability of EOA measurements was 5 ± 5% and 9 ± 5% for

  7. Ultra-Wideband Sensors for Improved Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cardiovascular Monitoring and Tumour Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Seifert

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The specific advantages of ultra-wideband electromagnetic remote sensing (UWB radar make it a particularly attractive technique for biomedical applications. We partially review our activities in utilizing this novel approach for the benefit of high and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and other applications, e.g., for intensive care medicine and biomedical research. We could show that our approach is beneficial for applications like motion tracking for high resolution brain imaging due to the non-contact acquisition of involuntary head motions with high spatial resolution, navigation for cardiac MRI due to our interpretation of the detected physiological mechanical contraction of the heart muscle and for MR safety, since we have investigated the influence of high static magnetic fields on myocardial mechanics. From our findings we could conclude, that UWB radar can serve as a navigator technique for high and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging and can be beneficial preserving the high resolution capability of this imaging modality. Furthermore it can potentially be used to support standard ECG analysis by complementary information where sole ECG analysis fails. Further analytical investigations have proven the feasibility of this method for intracranial displacements detection and the rendition of a tumour’s contrast agent based perfusion dynamic. Beside these analytical approaches we have carried out FDTD simulations of a complex arrangement mimicking the illumination of a human torso model incorporating the geometry of the antennas applied.

  8. 心血管MRI第二部分--心血管MRI的基本序列和常用技术%Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging:Part II--the basic sequences and common techniques of cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹刚; 贺光军; 赵世华

    2013-01-01

    This article is the second section. The basic contrast behaviors, sequences, and requirements of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging were described in detail. First, three basic fast sequences for CMR imaging and different contrast behaviors were summarized. Second, some common used technique strategies for solving the problems in CMR imaging were presented.%此文为第二部分,着重介绍心血管MRI(CMRI)的基本对比、序列及要求。首先,归纳CMRI的三种基本快速成像序列和图像的对比分类。然后,应对CMRI的技术挑战和难点,讲述CMRI质量控制的常用技术。

  9. Imaging focal and interstitial fibrosis with cardiovascular magnetic resonance in athletes with left ventricular hypertrophy: implications for sporting participation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Waterhouse, Deirdre F

    2012-11-01

    Long-term high-intensity physical activity is associated with morphological changes, termed as the \\'athlete\\'s heart\\'. The differentiation of physiological cardiac adaptive changes in response to high-level exercise from pathological changes consistent with an inherited cardiomyopathy is imperative. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging allows definition of abnormal processes occurring at the tissue level, including, importantly, myocardial fibrosis. It is therefore vital in accurately making this differentiation. In this review, we will review the role of CMR imaging of fibrosis, and detail CMR characterisation of myocardial fibrosis in various cardiomyopathies, and the implications of fibrosis. Additionally, we will outline advances in imaging fibrosis, in particular T1 mapping. Finally we will address the role of CMR in pre-participation screening.

  10. Myocardial area at risk and salvage measured by T2-weighted cardiovascular magnetic resonance: reproducibility and comparison of two T2-weighted protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob; Vejlstrup, Niels; Mathiasen, Anders B;

    2011-01-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and T2-weighted cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides a means to measure myocardial area at risk (AAR) and salvage. Several T2-weighted CMR sequences are in use, but there is no consensus in terms of which sequence to be the preferred. Therefore, the aim...

  11. Myocardial infarct heterogeneity assessment by late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging shows predictive value for ventricular arrhythmia development after acute myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robbers, Lourens F. H. J.; Delewi, Ronak; Nijveldt, Robin; Hirsch, Alexander; Beek, Aernout M.; Kemme, Michiel J. B.; van Beurden, Yvette; van der Laan, Anja M.; van der Vleuten, Pieter A.; Tio, Rene A.; Zijlstra, Felix; Piek, Jan J.; van Rossum, Albert C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association between the proportions of penumbrauvisualized by late gadolinium enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-CMR)uafter acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and the prevalence of ventricular tachycardia (VT). One-hundred and sixty-two AMI

  12. Semi-quantitative assessment of right ventricular function in comparison to a 3D volumetric approach: A cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijveldt, Robin; Germans, Tjeerd; McCann, Gerald; Beek, Aernout; Rossum, van Albert

    2008-01-01

    Right ventricular (RV) volume measurements with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is considered the gold standard, but acquisition and analysis remain timeconsuming. The aim of our study was therefore to investigate the accuracy and performance of a semi-quantitative assessment of RV function

  13. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging assessment of diastolic dysfunction in a population without heart disease: a gender-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asymptomatic left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction is increasingly recognised as an important diagnosis. Our goal was to study the prevalence and gender differences in subclinical LV diastolic dysfunction, using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) at 3 T. We prospectively studied 48 volunteers (19 male and 29 female, mean age 49 ± 7 years) with no evidence of cardiovascular disease. We used CMR to measure left atrium (LA) and LV volumes, LV peak filling rate and transmitral flow. The overall prevalence of LV diastolic dysfunction in our cohort varied between 20 % (based on evaluation of LV filing profiles) and 24 % (based on the evaluation of the transmitral flow). The prevalence of diastolic dysfunction was higher in men than in women, independently of the criteria used (P between 0.004 and 0.022). Indexed LV end-diastolic volume, indexed LV stroke volume, indexed LV mass, indexed LA minimum volume and indexed LA maximum volume were significantly greater in men than in women (P < 0.05). All the subjects had LV ejection fractions within the normal range. It is clinically feasible to study diastolic flow and LV filling with CMR. CMR detected diastolic dysfunction in asymptomatic men and women. (orig.)

  14. Early detection of cardiac involvement in Miyoshi myopathy: 2D strain echocardiography and late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Byoung

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Miyoshi myopathy (MM is an autosomal recessive distal myopathy characterized by early adult onset. Cardiomyopathy is a major clinical manifestation in other muscular dystrophies and an important prognostic factor. Although dysferlin is highly expressed in cardiac muscle, the effect of dysferlin deficiency in cardiac muscle has not been studied. We hypothesized that early myocardial dysfunction could be detected by 2D strain echocardiography and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Method Five consecutive MM patients (3 male in whom we detected the DYSF gene mutation and age-matched healthy control subjects were included. None of the patients had history of cardiac disease or signs and symptoms of overt heart failure. Patients were studied using 2D strain echocardiography and CMR, with 2D strain being obtained using the Automated Function Imaging technique. Results All patients had preserved left ventricular systolic function. However, segmental Peak Systolic Longitudinal Strain (PSLS was decreased in 3 patients. Global PSLS was significantly lower in patients with MM than in control subjects (p = 0.005. Basal anterior septum, basal inferior septum, mid anterior, and mid inferior septum PSLS were significantly lower in patients with MM than in control subjects (P Conclusions Patients with MM showed subclinical involvement of the heart. 2D strain and LGE are sensitive methods for detecting myocardial dysfunction prior to the development of cardiovascular symptoms. The prognostic significance of these findings warrants further longitudinal follow-up.

  15. Cardiac pathologies in female carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and severe dystrophinopathy. DMD carriers rarely present with clinical symptoms, but may suffer from cardiac involvement. Because echocardiographic findings are inconsistent and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) data are limited, this study sought to investigate asymptomatic carriers for cardiac abnormalities using CMRI. Fifteen genetically confirmed DMD carriers (age, 32.3 ± 10.2 years) were prospectively examined on a 1.5T MR system. Cine, T2, and late-gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images were acquired, and were evaluated in consensus by two experienced readers. Left ventricular (LV) parameters were analysed semiautomatically, normalized to BSA. Normalized LV end-diastolic volume was increased in 7 % (73.7 ± 16.8 ml/m2; range, 48-116 ml/m2) and normalized LV end-systolic volume in 20 % (31.5 ± 13.3 ml/m2; range, 15-74 ml/m2). EF was reduced in 33 % (58.4 ± 7.6 %; range, 37-69 %) and normalized LV myocardial mass in 80 % (40.5 ± 6.8 g/m2; range, 31-55 g/m2). In 80 %, regional myocardial thinning was detected in more than one segment. In 13 % and 40 %, apical-lateral accentuation of LV non-compaction was present. LGE was found in 60 % (midmyocardial inferolateral accentuation). Given the high frequency of cardiac pathologies detected by CMRI, regular cardiac risk assessment is advisable for DMD carriers. Besides clinical examination, CMRI is an excellent tool for this purpose. (orig.)

  16. Cardiac pathologies in female carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelhorn, Juliane; Schemuth, Haemi; Nensa, Felix; Nassenstein, Kai; Forsting, Michael; Schlosser, Thomas [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Schoenecker, Anne; Neudorf, Ulrich [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Essen (Germany); Schara, Ulrike [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Essen (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and severe dystrophinopathy. DMD carriers rarely present with clinical symptoms, but may suffer from cardiac involvement. Because echocardiographic findings are inconsistent and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) data are limited, this study sought to investigate asymptomatic carriers for cardiac abnormalities using CMRI. Fifteen genetically confirmed DMD carriers (age, 32.3 ± 10.2 years) were prospectively examined on a 1.5T MR system. Cine, T2, and late-gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images were acquired, and were evaluated in consensus by two experienced readers. Left ventricular (LV) parameters were analysed semiautomatically, normalized to BSA. Normalized LV end-diastolic volume was increased in 7 % (73.7 ± 16.8 ml/m{sup 2}; range, 48-116 ml/m{sup 2}) and normalized LV end-systolic volume in 20 % (31.5 ± 13.3 ml/m{sup 2}; range, 15-74 ml/m{sup 2}). EF was reduced in 33 % (58.4 ± 7.6 %; range, 37-69 %) and normalized LV myocardial mass in 80 % (40.5 ± 6.8 g/m{sup 2}; range, 31-55 g/m{sup 2}). In 80 %, regional myocardial thinning was detected in more than one segment. In 13 % and 40 %, apical-lateral accentuation of LV non-compaction was present. LGE was found in 60 % (midmyocardial inferolateral accentuation). Given the high frequency of cardiac pathologies detected by CMRI, regular cardiac risk assessment is advisable for DMD carriers. Besides clinical examination, CMRI is an excellent tool for this purpose. (orig.)

  17. Strain measurement by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in pediatric cancer survivors: validation of feature tracking against harmonic phase imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jimmy C. [C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, University of Michigan Congenital Heart Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Connelly, James A. [University of Michigan, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Zhao, Lili [University of Michigan, Department of Biostatistics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Agarwal, Prachi P. [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Division of Cardiothoracic Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Dorfman, Adam L. [University of Michigan, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Left ventricular strain may be a more sensitive marker of left ventricular dysfunction than ejection fraction in pediatric cancer survivors after anthracycline therapy, but there is limited validation of strain measurement by feature tracking on cardiovascular magnetic resonance (MR) images. To compare left ventricular circumferential and radial strain by feature tracking vs. harmonic phase imaging analysis (HARP) in pediatric cancer survivors. Twenty-six patients (20.2 ± 5.6 years old) underwent cardiovascular MR at least 5 years after completing anthracycline therapy. Circumferential and radial strain were measured at the base, midventricle and apex from short-axis myocardial tagged images by HARP, and from steady-state free precession images by feature tracking. Left ventricular ejection fraction more closely correlated with global circumferential strain by feature tracking (r = -0.63, P = 0.0005) than by HARP (r = -0.39, P = 0.05). Midventricular circumferential strain did not significantly differ by feature tracking or HARP (-20.8 ± 3.4 vs. -19.5 ± 2.5, P = 0.07), with acceptable limits of agreement. Midventricular circumferential strain by feature tracking strongly correlated with global circumferential strain by feature tracking (r = 0.87, P < 0.0001). Radial strain by feature tracking had poor agreement with HARP, particularly at higher values of radial strain. Intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility was excellent for feature tracking circumferential strain, but reproducibility was poor for feature tracking radial strain. Midventricular circumferential strain by feature tracking is a reliable and reproducible measure of myocardial deformation in patients status post anthracycline therapy, while radial strain measurements are unreliable. Further studies are necessary to evaluate potential relation to long-term outcomes. (orig.)

  18. Gender differences in response to cold pressor test assessed with velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the coronary sinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulin Guy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gender-specific differences in cardiovascular risk are well known, and current evidence supports an existing role of endothelium in these differences. The purpose of this study was to assess non invasively coronary endothelial function in male and female young volunteers by myocardial blood flow (MBF measurement using coronary sinus (CS flow quantification by velocity encoded cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR at rest and during cold pressor test (CPT. Methods Twenty-four healthy volunteers (12 men, 12 women underwent CMR in a 3 Tesla MR imager. Coronary sinus flow was measured at rest and during CPT using non breath-hold velocity encoded phase contrast cine-CMR. Myocardial function and morphology were acquired using a cine steady-state free precession sequence. Results At baseline, mean MBF was 0.63 ± 0.23 mL·g-1·min-1 in men and 0.79 ± 0.21 mL·g-1·min-1 in women. During CPT, the rate pressure product in men significantly increased by 49 ± 36% (p -1·min-1 (p = 0.0022 and by 0.73 ± 0.43 mL·g-1·min-1 (p = 0.0001, respectively. The increase in MBF was significantly higher in women than in men (p = 0.0012. Conclusion CMR coronary sinus flow quantification for measuring myocardial blood flow revealed a higher response of MBF to CPT in women than in men. This finding may reflect gender differences in endothelial-dependent vasodilatation in these young subjects. This non invasive rest/stress protocol may become helpful to study endothelial function in normal physiology and in physiopathology.

  19. Clinical implications of microvascular obstruction and intramyocardial haemorrhage in acute myocardial infarction using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekkers, Sebastiaan C.A.M.; Smulders, Martijn W.; Waltenberger, Johannes; Gorgels, Anton P.M.; Schalla, Simon [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Passos, Valeria Lima [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Methodology and Statistics, Maastricht (Netherlands); Leiner, Tim [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2010-11-15

    To investigate the clinical implications of microvascular obstruction (MVO) and intramyocardial haemorrhage (IMH) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Ninety patients with a first AMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were studied. T2-weighted, cine and late gadolinium-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 5 {+-} 2 and 103 {+-} 11 days. Patients were categorised into three groups based on the presence or absence of MVO and IMH. MVO was observed in 54% and IMH in 43% of patients, and correlated significantly (r = 0.8, p < 0.001). Pre-PCI thrombolysis in myocardial infarction 3 flow was only observed in MVO(-)/IMH(-) patients. Infarct size and impairment of systolic function were largest in MVO(+)/IMH(+) patients (n = 39, 23 {+-} 9% and 47 {+-} 7%), smallest in MVO(-)/IMH(-) patients (n = 41, 8 {+-} 8% and 55 {+-} 8%) and intermediate in MVO(+)/IMH(-) patients (n = 10, 16 {+-} 7% and 51 {+-} 6%, p < 0.001). LVEF increased in all three subgroups at follow-up, but remained intermediate in MVO(+)/IMH(-) and was lowest in MVO(+)/IMH(+) patients. Using random intercept model analysis, only infarct size was an independent predictor for adverse LV remodelling. Intramyocardial haemorrhage and microvascular obstruction are strongly related. Pre-PCI TIMI 3 flow is less frequently observed in patients with MVO and IMH. Only infarct size was an independent predictor of LV remodelling. (orig.)

  20. The deleterious effects of arteriovenous fistula-creation on the cardiovascular system: a longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dundon BK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Benjamin K Dundon,1–3 Kim Torpey,3 Adam J Nelson,1 Dennis TL Wong,1,2 Rae F Duncan,1 Ian T Meredith,2 Randall J Faull,1,3 Stephen G Worthley,1,4 Matthew I Worthley1,4 1Cardiology Department, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Central Adelaide Local Health Network, Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 2Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, MonashHEART, Monash Health, Melbourne, Vic, Australia; 3Central Northern Renal and Transplantation Service, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Central Adelaide Local Health Network, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 4South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, SA, Australia Aim: Arteriovenous fistula-formation remains critical for the provision of hemodialysis in end-stage renal failure patients. Its creation results in a significant increase in cardiac output, with resultant alterations in cardiac stroke volume, systemic blood flow, and vascular resistance. The impact of fistula-formation on cardiac and vascular structure and function has not yet been evaluated via "gold standard" imaging techniques in the modern era of end-stage renal failure care. Methods: A total of 24 patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease undergoing fistula-creation were studied in a single-arm pilot study. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging was undertaken at baseline, and prior to and 6 months following fistula-creation. This gold standard imaging modality was used to evaluate, via standard brachial flow-mediated techniques, cardiac structure and function, aortic distensibility, and endothelial function. Results: At follow up, left ventricular ejection fraction remained unchanged, while mean cardiac output increased by 25.0% (P<0.0001. Significant increases in left and right ventricular end-systolic volumes (21% [P=0.014] and 18% [P<0.01], left and right atrial area (11% [P<0.01] and 9% [P<0.01], and left ventricular mass were observed (12.7% increase (P<0.01. Endothelial

  1. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... 8 MB) Also available in Other Language versions . Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for making ...

  2. Review of cardiovascular imaging in the journal of nuclear cardiology in 2015. Part 1 of 2: Plaque imaging, positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJaroudi, Wael A; Hage, Fadi G

    2016-02-01

    In 2015, many original articles pertaining to cardiovascular imaging with impressive quality were published in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology. In a set of 2 articles, we provide an overview of these contributions to facilitate for the interested reader a quick review of the advancements that occurred in the field over this year. In this first article, we focus on arterial plaque imaging, cardiac positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26542991

  3. Review of cardiovascular imaging in the journal of nuclear cardiology in 2015. Part 1 of 2: Plaque imaging, positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJaroudi, Wael A; Hage, Fadi G

    2016-02-01

    In 2015, many original articles pertaining to cardiovascular imaging with impressive quality were published in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology. In a set of 2 articles, we provide an overview of these contributions to facilitate for the interested reader a quick review of the advancements that occurred in the field over this year. In this first article, we focus on arterial plaque imaging, cardiac positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  4. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of myocardial edema using a short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) black-blood technique:Diagnostic accuracy of visual and semi-quantitative assessment

    OpenAIRE

    h-Ici Darach O; Ridgway John P; Kuehne Titus; Berger Felix; Plein Sven; Sivananthan Mohan; Messroghli Daniel R

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) black-blood technique has been used to visualize myocardial edema, and thus to differentiate acute from chronic myocardial lesions. However, some cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) groups have reported variable image quality, and hence the diagnostic value of STIR in routine clinical practice has been put into question. The aim of our study was to analyze image quality and diagnostic performance of STIR using a set of...

  5. 7 Tesla (T) human cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging using FLASH and SSFP to assess cardiac function: validation against 1.5 T and 3 T

    OpenAIRE

    Suttie, J. J.; DelaBarre, L; Pitcher, A.; van de Moortele, P. F.; Dass, S; Snyder, C. J.; Francis, J M; Metzger, G. J.; Weale, P.; Ugurbil, K; Neubauer, S.; Robson, M; Vaughan, T

    2011-01-01

    We report the first comparison of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) at 1.5 T, 3 T and 7 T field strengths using steady state free precession (SSFP) and fast low angle shot (FLASH) cine sequences. Cardiac volumes and mass measurements were assessed for feasibility, reproducibility and validity at each given field strength using FLASH and SSFP sequences. Ten healthy volunteers underwent retrospectively electrocardiogram (ECG) gated CMR at 1.5 T, 3 T and 7 T using FLASH and SSFP se...

  6. Anomalous origin of the left circumflex coronary artery from the pulmonary artery. A very rare congenital anomaly in an adult patient diagnosed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Giannitsis Evangelos; Ringwald Gerd; Korosoglou Grigorios; Katus Hugo A

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Here we report for the first time on the diagnostic potential of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) to delineate the proximal course of an anomalous left circumflex coronary artery (LCX) originating from the right pulmonary artery in an adult patient with no other form of congenital heart disease. The patient was referred to our institution due to exertional chest discomfort. X-Ray coronary angiography showed a normal left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and right coro...

  7. Bramwell-Hill modeling for local aortic pulse wave velocity estimation: a validation study with velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance and invasive pressure assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Westenberg Jos JM; van Poelgeest Eveline P; Steendijk Paul; Grotenhuis Heynric B; Jukema JW; de Roos Albert

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The Bramwell-Hill model describes the relation between vascular wall stiffness expressed in aortic distensibility and the pulse wave velocity (PWV), which is the propagation speed of the systolic pressure wave through the aorta. The main objective of this study was to test the validity of this model locally in the aorta by using PWV-assessments based on in-plane velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), with invasive pressure measurements serving as the gol...

  8. How do hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutations affect myocardial function in carriers with normal wall thickness? Assessment with cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto Yigal M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical data on myocardial function in HCM mutation carriers (carriers is sparse but suggests that subtle functional abnormalities can be measured with tissue Doppler imaging before the development of overt hypertrophy. We aimed to confirm the presence of functional abnormalities using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR, and to investigate if sensitive functional assessment could be employed to identify carriers. Results 28 carriers and 28 controls were studied. Global left atrial (LA and left ventricular (LV dimensions, segmental peak systolic circumferential strain (SCS and peak diastolic circumferential strain rate (DCSR, as well as the presence of late Gadolinium enhancement (LGE were determined with CMR. Septal and lateral myocardial velocities were measured with echocardiographic tissue Doppler imaging. lv mass and volumes were comparable between groups. Maximal septal to lateral wall thickness ratio (SL ratio was larger in carriers than in controls (1.3 ± 0.2 versus 1.1 ± 0.1, p 1.2 and a peak DCSR -1 was present in 45% of carriers and in none of the controls, yielding a positive predictive value of 100%. Two carriers and 18 controls had a SL ratio 105%.s-1, yielding a negative predictive value of 90%. With multivariate analysis, HCM mutation carriership was an independent determinant of reduced peak SCS and peak DCSR. Conclusions HCM mutation carriership is an independent determinant of reduced peak SCS and peak DCSR when LV wall thickness is within normal limits, and is associated with increased LA volumes and SL ratio. Using SL ratio and peak DCSR has a high accuracy to identify carriers. However, since carriers also display structural abnormalities and focal LGE, we advocate to also evaluate morphology and presence of LGE when screening for carriers.

  9. Regional myocardial function after intracoronary bone marrow cell injection in reperfused anterior wall infarction - a cardiovascular magnetic resonance tagging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnesen Harald

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trials have brought diverse results of bone marrow stem cell treatment in necrotic myocardium. This substudy from the Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Acute Myocardial Infarction trial (ASTAMI explored global and regional myocardial function after intracoronary injection of autologous mononuclear bone marrow cells (mBMC in acute anterior wall myocardial infarction treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Methods Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR tagging was performed 2-3 weeks and 6 months after revascularization in 15 patients treated with intracoronary stem cell injection (mBMC group and in 13 controls without sham injection. Global and regional left ventricular (LV strain and LV twist were correlated to cine CMR and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE. Results In the control group myocardial function as measured by strain improved for the global LV (6 months: -13.1 ± 2.4 versus 2-3 weeks: -11.9 ± 3.4%, p = 0.014 and for the infarct zone (-11.8 ± 3.0 versus -9.3 ± 4.1%, p = 0.001, and significantly more than in the mBMC group (inter-group p = 0.027 for global strain, respectively p = 0.009 for infarct zone strain. LV infarct mass decreased (35.7 ± 20.4 versus 45.7 ± 29.5 g, p = 0.024, also significantly more pronounced than the mBMC group (inter-group p = 0.034. LV twist was initially low and remained unchanged irrespective of therapy. Conclusions LGE and strain findings quite similarly demonstrate subtle differences between the mBMC and control groups. Intracoronary injection of autologous mBMC did not strengthen regional or global myocardial function in this substudy. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00199823

  10. Prognostic value at 5 years of microvascular obstruction after acute myocardial infarction assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klug Gert

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early and late microvascular obstruction (MVO assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR are prognostic markers for short-term clinical endpoints after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI. However, there is a lack of studies with long-term follow-up periods (>24 months. Methods STEMI patients reperfused by primary angioplasty (n = 129 underwent MRI at a median of 2 days after the index event. Early MVO was determined on dynamic Gd first-pass images directly after the administration of 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight Gd-based contrast agent. Furthermore, ejection fraction (EF, %, left ventricular myocardial mass (LVMM and total infarct size (% of LVMM were determined with CMR. Clinical follow-up was conducted after a median of 52 months. The primary endpoint was defined as a composite of death, myocardial re-infarction, stroke, repeat revascularization, recurrence of ischemic symptoms, atrial fibrillation, congestive heart failure and hospitalization. Results Follow-up was completed by 107 patients. 63 pre-defined events occurred during follow-up. Initially, 74 patients showed early MVO. Patients with early MVO had larger infarcts (mean: 24.9 g vs. 15.5 g, p = 0.002 and a lower EF (mean: 39% vs. 46%, p = 0.006. The primary endpoint occurred in 66.2% of patients with MVO and in 42.4% of patients without MVO (p  Conclusion Early MVO, as assessed by first-pass CMR, is an independent long-term prognosticator for morbidity after AMI.

  11. Myocardial extravascular extracellular volume fraction measurement by gadolinium cardiovascular magnetic resonance in humans: slow infusion versus bolus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Bobby L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial extravascular extracellular volume fraction (Ve measures quantify diffuse fibrosis not readily detectable by conventional late gadolinium (Gd enhancement (LGE. Ve measurement requires steady state equilibrium between plasma and interstitial Gd contrast. While a constant infusion produces steady state, it is unclear whether a simple bolus can do the same. Given the relatively slow clearance of Gd, we hypothesized that a bolus technique accurately measures Ve, thus facilitating integration of myocardial fibrosis quantification into cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR workflow routines. Assuming equivalence between techniques, we further hypothesized that Ve measures would be reproducible across scans. Methods In 10 volunteers (ages 20-81, median 33 yr, 3 females, we compared serial Ve measures from a single short axis slice from two scans: first, during a constant infusion, and second, 12-50 min after a bolus (0.2 mmol/kg gadoteridol on another day. Steady state during infusion was defined when serial blood and myocardial T1 data varied Results No subject exhibited LGE near the short axis slices where Ve was measured. The Ve range was 19.3-29.2% and 18.4-29.1% by constant infusion and bolus, respectively. In GEE models, serial Ve measures by constant infusion and bolus did not differ significantly (difference = 0.1%, p = 0.38. For both techniques, Ve was strongly related to age (p Conclusion Myocardial Ve can be measured reliably and accurately 12-50 minutes after a simple bolus. Ve measures are also reproducible across CMR scans. Ve estimation can be integrated into CMR workflow easily, which may simplify research applications involving the quantification of myocardial fibrosis.

  12. Breathing Maneuvers as a Vasoactive Stimulus for Detecting Inducible Myocardial Ischemia – An Experimental Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Kady; Guensch, Dominik P; Shie, Nancy; Lebel, Julie; Friedrich, Matthias G

    2016-01-01

    Background Breathing maneuvers can elicit a similar vascular response as vasodilatory agents like adenosine; yet, their potential diagnostic utility in the presence of coronary artery stenosis is unknown. The objective of the study is to investigate if breathing maneuvers can non-invasively detect inducible ischemia in an experimental animal model when the myocardium is imaged with oxygenation-sensitive cardiovascular magnetic resonance (OS-CMR). Methods and Findings In 11 anesthetised swine with experimentally induced significant stenosis (fractional flow reserve coronary artery (LAD) and 9 control animals, OS-CMR at 3T was performed during two different breathing maneuvers, a long breath-hold; and a combined maneuver of 60s of hyperventilation followed by a long breath-hold. The resulting change of myocardial oxygenation was compared to the invasive measurements of coronary blood flow, blood gases, and oxygen extraction. In control animals, all breathing maneuvers could significantly alter coronary blood flow as hyperventilation decreased coronary blood flow by 34±23%. A long breath-hold alone led to an increase of 97±88%, while the increase was 346±327% (pcoronary blood flow response was attenuated after both hyperventilation and the following breath-hold. This was matched by the observed oxygenation response as breath-holds following hyperventilation consistently yielded a significant difference in the signal of the MRI images between the perfusion territory of the stenosis LAD and remote myocardium. There was no difference between the coronary territories during the other breathing maneuvers or in the control group at any point. Conclusion In an experimental animal model, the response to a combined breathing maneuver of hyperventilation with subsequent breath-holding is blunted in myocardium subject to significant coronary artery stenosis. This maneuver may allow for detecting severe coronary artery stenosis and have a significant clinical potential as a

  13. Mapping of mitral regurgitant defects by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in moderate or severe mitral regurgitation secondary to mitral valve prolapse

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    Raffel Owen C

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose In mitral valve prolapse, determining whether the valve is suitable for surgical repair depends on the location and mechanism of regurgitation. We assessed whether cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR could accurately identify prolapsing or flail mitral valve leaflets and regurgitant jet direction in patients with known moderate or severe mitral regurgitation. Methods CMR of the mitral valve was compared with trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE in 27 patients with chronic moderate to severe mitral regurgitation due to mitral valve prolapse. Contiguous long-axis high temporal resolution CMR cines perpendicular to the valve commissures were obtained across the mitral valve from the medial to lateral annulus. This technique allowed systematic valve inspection and mapping of leaflet prolapse using a 6 segment model. CMR mapping was compared with trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TOE or surgical inspection in 10 patients. Results CMR and TTE agreed on the presence/absence of leaflet abnormality in 53 of 54 (98% leaflets. Prolapse or flail was seen in 36 of 54 mitral valve leaflets examined on TTE. CMR and TTE agreed on the discrimination of prolapse from flail in 33 of 36 (92% leaflets and on the predominant regurgitant jet direction in 26 of the 27 (96% patients. In the 10 patients with TOE or surgical operative findings available, CMR correctly classified presence/absence of segmental abnormality in 49 of 60 (82% leaflet segments. Conclusion Systematic mitral valve assessment using a simple protocol is feasible and could easily be incorporated into CMR studies in patients with mitral regurgitation due to mitral valve prolapse.

  14. The clinical impact of late gadolinium enhancement in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: serial analysis of cardiovascular magnetic resonance images

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    Katoh Hideki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our study aimed to investigate both the clinical implications of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR and the relation of LGE to clinical findings in patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC. Methods We evaluated 20 consecutive patients (2 men, 18 women; median age, 77 years; interquartile range [IQR] 67-82 years who were admitted to our hospital with the diagnosis of TTC. CMR was performed within 1 week after admission, and follow-up studies were conducted 1.5 and 6 months later. Results In 8 patients, CMR imaging during the sub-acute phase revealed LGE in the area matched with wall motion impairment. Cardiogenic shock was more frequently observed in patients with LGE than in those without LGE (38% vs 0%, p = 0.049. The patients with LGE needed a longer duration for ECG normalization and recovery of wall motion than did those without LGE (median 205 days, IQR [152-363] vs 68 days, [43-145], p = 0.005; 15 days, [10-185] vs 7 days, [4-13], p = 0.030, respectively. In 5 of these 8 patients, LGE disappeared within 45-180 days (170, IQR [56-180] of onset. The patients with LGE remaining in the chronic phase had higher peak creatine kinase levels than did those without LGE (median 307 IU/L, IQR [264-460] vs 202 IU/L, [120-218], p = 0.017. Conclusion LGE by CMR in the sub-acute phase may be associated with the severity and prolonged recovery to normal of clinical findings in TTC.

  15. Effect of Papillary Muscles and Trabeculae on Left Ventricular Measurement Using Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

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    Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal [Department of Radiology, Cardiovascular Division, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung-Kwan [Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Wook [Department of Radiology, Cardiovascular Division, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the influence of papillary muscles and trabeculae on left ventricular (LV) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) analysis using three methods of cavity delineation (classic or modified inclusion methods, and the exclusion method) in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This retrospective study included 20 consecutive HCM patients who underwent 1.5-T CMR imaging with short-axis cine stacks of the entire LV. LV measurements were performed using three different methods of manual cavity delineation of the endocardial and epicardial contours: method A, presumed endocardial boundary as seen on short-axis cine images; method B, including solely the cavity and closely adjacent trabeculae; or method C, excluding papillary muscles and trabeculae. Ascending aorta forward flow was measured as reference for LV-stroke volume (SV). Interobserver reproducibility was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients. Method A showed larger end-diastole and end-systole volumes (largest percentage differences of 25% and 68%, respectively, p < 0.05), compared with method C. The ejection fraction was 55.7 ± 6.9% for method A, 68.6 ± 8.4% for B, and 71.7 ± 7.0% for C (p < 0.001). Mean mass was also significantly different: 164.6 ± 47.4 g for A, 176.5 ± 50.5 g for B, and 199.6 ± 53.2 g for C (p < 0.001). LV-SV error was largest with method B (p < 0.001). No difference in interobserver agreement was observed (p > 0.05). In HCM patients, LV measurements are strikingly different dependent on whether papillary muscles and trabeculae are included or excluded. Therefore, a consistent method of LV cavity delineation may be crucial during longitudinal follow-up to avoid misinterpretation and erroneous clinical decision-making.

  16. Towards real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance guided transarterial CoreValve implantation: in vivo evaluation in swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahlert Philipp

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance (rtCMR is considered attractive for guiding TAVI. Owing to an unlimited scan plane orientation and an unsurpassed soft-tissue contrast with simultaneous device visualization, rtCMR is presumed to allow safe device navigation and to offer optimal orientation for precise axial positioning. We sought to evaluate the preclinical feasibility of rtCMR-guided transarterial aortic valve implatation (TAVI using the nitinol-based Medtronic CoreValve bioprosthesis. Methods rtCMR-guided transfemoral (n = 2 and transsubclavian (n = 6 TAVI was performed in 8 swine using the original CoreValve prosthesis and a modified, CMR-compatible delivery catheter without ferromagnetic components. Results rtCMR using TrueFISP sequences provided reliable imaging guidance during TAVI, which was successful in 6 swine. One transfemoral attempt failed due to unsuccessful aortic arch passage and one pericardial tamponade with subsequent death occurred as a result of ventricular perforation by the device tip due to an operating error, this complication being detected without delay by rtCMR. rtCMR allowed for a detailed, simultaneous visualization of the delivery system with the mounted stent-valve and the surrounding anatomy, resulting in improved visualization during navigation through the vasculature, passage of the aortic valve, and during placement and deployment of the stent-valve. Post-interventional success could be confirmed using ECG-triggered time-resolved cine-TrueFISP and flow-sensitive phase-contrast sequences. Intended valve position was confirmed by ex-vivo histology. Conclusions Our study shows that rtCMR-guided TAVI using the commercial CoreValve prosthesis in conjunction with a modified delivery system is feasible in swine, allowing improved procedural guidance including immediate detection of complications and direct functional assessment with reduction of radiation and omission of contrast media.

  17. The intra-observer reproducibility of cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial feature tracking strain assessment is independent of field strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Andreas, E-mail: andreas_schuster@gmx.net [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London British Heart Foundation BHF Centre of Excellence, National Institute of Health Research NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Wellcome Trust and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre, The Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Department of Cardiology and Pulmonology and Heart Research Centre, Georg-August-University, Göttingen (Germany); Morton, Geraint, E-mail: geraint.morton@kcl.ac.uk [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London British Heart Foundation BHF Centre of Excellence, National Institute of Health Research NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Wellcome Trust and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre, The Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Hussain, Shazia T., E-mail: shazia.1.hussain@kcl.ac.uk [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London British Heart Foundation BHF Centre of Excellence, National Institute of Health Research NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Wellcome Trust and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council EPSRC Medical Engineering Centre, The Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-02-15

    Background: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial feature tracking (CMR-FT) is a promising novel method for quantification of myocardial wall mechanics from standard steady-state free precession (SSFP) images. We sought to determine whether magnetic field strength affects the intra-observer reproducibility of CMR-FT strain analysis. Methods: We studied 2 groups, each consisting of 10 healthy subjects, at 1.5 T or 3 T Analysis was performed at baseline and after 4 weeks using dedicated CMR-FT prototype software (Tomtec, Germany) to analyze standard SSFP cine images. Right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) longitudinal strain (Ell{sub RV} and Ell{sub LV}) and LV long-axis radial strain (Err{sub LAX}) were derived from the 4-chamber cine, and LV short-axis circumferential and radial strains (Ecc{sub SAX}, Err{sub SAX}) from the short-axis orientation. Strain parameters were assessed together with LV ejection fraction (EF) and volumes. Intra-observer reproducibility was determined by comparing the first and the second analysis in both groups. Results: In all volunteers resting strain parameters were successfully derived from the SSFP images. There was no difference in strain parameters, volumes and EF between field strengths (p > 0.05). In general Ecc{sub SAX} was the most reproducible strain parameter as determined by the coefficient of variation (CV) at 1.5 T (CV 13.3% and 46% global and segmental respectively) and 3 T (CV 17.2% and 31.1% global and segmental respectively). The least reproducible parameter was Ell{sub RV} (CV 1.5 T 28.7% and 53.2%; 3 T 43.5% and 63.3% global and segmental respectively). Conclusions: CMR-FT results are similar with reasonable intra-observer reproducibility in different groups of volunteers at 1.5 T and 3 T. CMR-FT is a promising novel technique and our data indicate that results might be transferable between field strengths. However there is a considerable amount of segmental variability indicating that further

  18. Acoustic cardiac triggering: a practical solution for synchronization and gating of cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 7 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff Florian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To demonstrate the applicability of acoustic cardiac triggering (ACT for imaging of the heart at ultrahigh magnetic fields (7.0 T by comparing phonocardiogram, conventional vector electrocardiogram (ECG and traditional pulse oximetry (POX triggered 2D CINE acquisitions together with (i a qualitative image quality analysis, (ii an assessment of the left ventricular function parameter and (iii an examination of trigger reliability and trigger detection variance derived from the signal waveforms. Results ECG was susceptible to severe distortions at 7.0 T. POX and ACT provided waveforms free of interferences from electromagnetic fields or from magneto-hydrodynamic effects. Frequent R-wave mis-registration occurred in ECG-triggered acquisitions with a failure rate of up to 30% resulting in cardiac motion induced artifacts. ACT and POX triggering produced images free of cardiac motion artefacts. ECG showed a severe jitter in the R-wave detection. POX also showed a trigger jitter of approximately Δt = 72 ms which is equivalent to two cardiac phases. ACT showed a jitter of approximately Δt = 5 ms only. ECG waveforms revealed a standard deviation for the cardiac trigger offset larger than that observed for ACT or POX waveforms. Image quality assessment showed that ACT substantially improved image quality as compared to ECG (image quality score at end-diastole: ECG = 1.7 ± 0.5, ACT = 2.4 ± 0.5, p = 0.04 while the comparison between ECG vs. POX gated acquisitions showed no significant differences in image quality (image quality score: ECG = 1.7 ± 0.5, POX = 2.0 ± 0.5, p = 0.34. Conclusions The applicability of acoustic triggering for cardiac CINE imaging at 7.0 T was demonstrated. ACT's trigger reliability and fidelity are superior to that of ECG and POX. ACT promises to be beneficial for cardiovascular magnetic resonance at ultra-high field strengths including 7.0 T.

  19. The intra-observer reproducibility of cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial feature tracking strain assessment is independent of field strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial feature tracking (CMR-FT) is a promising novel method for quantification of myocardial wall mechanics from standard steady-state free precession (SSFP) images. We sought to determine whether magnetic field strength affects the intra-observer reproducibility of CMR-FT strain analysis. Methods: We studied 2 groups, each consisting of 10 healthy subjects, at 1.5 T or 3 T Analysis was performed at baseline and after 4 weeks using dedicated CMR-FT prototype software (Tomtec, Germany) to analyze standard SSFP cine images. Right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) longitudinal strain (EllRV and EllLV) and LV long-axis radial strain (ErrLAX) were derived from the 4-chamber cine, and LV short-axis circumferential and radial strains (EccSAX, ErrSAX) from the short-axis orientation. Strain parameters were assessed together with LV ejection fraction (EF) and volumes. Intra-observer reproducibility was determined by comparing the first and the second analysis in both groups. Results: In all volunteers resting strain parameters were successfully derived from the SSFP images. There was no difference in strain parameters, volumes and EF between field strengths (p > 0.05). In general EccSAX was the most reproducible strain parameter as determined by the coefficient of variation (CV) at 1.5 T (CV 13.3% and 46% global and segmental respectively) and 3 T (CV 17.2% and 31.1% global and segmental respectively). The least reproducible parameter was EllRV (CV 1.5 T 28.7% and 53.2%; 3 T 43.5% and 63.3% global and segmental respectively). Conclusions: CMR-FT results are similar with reasonable intra-observer reproducibility in different groups of volunteers at 1.5 T and 3 T. CMR-FT is a promising novel technique and our data indicate that results might be transferable between field strengths. However there is a considerable amount of segmental variability indicating that further refinements are needed before CMR-FT can be fully

  20. Late gadolinium enhancement in cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy complicated by life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petkow-Dimitrow, Pawel; Klimeczek, Piotr; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Pasowicz, Mieczyslaw; Miszalski-Jamka, Tomasz; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Podolec, Piotr; Dubiel, Jacek S.; Tracz, Wieslawa

    2009-01-01

    Background: Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has been shown to be associated with ventricular arrhythmias, however, its prognostic role in predicting sudden cardiac death has not yet been established. Aim: To explore a potential relationship between LGE v

  1. Diagnostic Accuracy of Adenosine Stress Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Following Acute ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction Post Primary Angioplasty

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    Wong Dennis TL

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenosine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR has been proven an effective tool in detection of reversible ischemia. Limited evidence is available regarding its accuracy in the setting of acute coronary syndromes, particularly in evaluating the significance of non-culprit vessel ischaemia. Adenosine stress CMR and recent advances in semi-quantitative image analysis may prove effective in this area. We sought to determine the diagnostic accuracy of semi-quantitative versus visual assessment of adenosine stress CMR in detecting ischemia in non-culprit territory vessels early after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI. Methods Patients were prospectively enrolled in a CMR imaging protocol with rest and adenosine stress perfusion, viability and cardiac functional assessment 3 days after successful primary-PCI for STEMI. Three short axis slices each divided into 6 segments on first pass adenosine perfusion were visually and semi-quantitatively analysed. Diagnostic accuracy of both methods was compared with non-culprit territory vessels utilising quantitative coronary angiography (QCA with significant stenosis defined as ≥70%. Results Fifty patients (age 59 ± 12 years admitted with STEMI were evaluated. All subjects tolerated the adenosine stress CMR imaging protocol with no significant complications. The cohort consisted of 41% anterior and 59% non anterior infarctions. There were a total of 100 non-culprit territory vessels, identified on QCA. The diagnostic accuracy of semi-quantitative analysis was 96% with sensitivity of 99%, specificity of 67%, positive predictive value (PPV of 97% and negative predictive value (NPV of 86%. Visual analysis had a diagnostic accuracy of 93% with sensitivity of 96%, specificity of 50%, PPV of 97% and NPV of 43%. Conclusion Adenosine stress CMR allows accurate detection of non-culprit territory stenosis in patients

  2. Development of a universal dual-bolus injection scheme for the quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance

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    Alfakih Khaled

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dual-bolus protocol enables accurate quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF by first-pass perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. However, despite the advantages and increasing demand for the dual-bolus method for accurate quantification of MBF, thus far, it has not been widely used in the field of quantitative perfusion CMR. The main reasons for this are that the setup for the dual-bolus method is complex and requires a state-of-the-art injector and there is also a lack of post processing software. As a solution to one of these problems, we have devised a universal dual-bolus injection scheme for use in a clinical setting. The purpose of this study is to show the setup and feasibility of the universal dual-bolus injection scheme. Methods The universal dual-bolus injection scheme was tested using multiple combinations of different contrast agents, contrast agent dose, power injectors, perfusion sequences, and CMR scanners. This included 3 different contrast agents (Gd-DO3A-butrol, Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA, 4 different doses (0.025 mmol/kg, 0.05 mmol/kg, 0.075 mmol/kg and 0.1 mmol/kg, 2 different types of injectors (with and without "pause" function, 5 different sequences (turbo field echo (TFE, balanced TFE, k-space and time (k-t accelerated TFE, k-t accelerated balanced TFE, turbo fast low-angle shot and 3 different CMR scanners from 2 different manufacturers. The relation between the time width of dilute contrast agent bolus curve and cardiac output was obtained to determine the optimal predefined pause duration between dilute and neat contrast agent injection. Results 161 dual-bolus perfusion scans were performed. Three non-injector-related technical errors were observed (1.9%. No injector-related errors were observed. The dual-bolus scheme worked well in all the combinations of parameters if the optimal predefined pause was used. Linear regression analysis showed that the optimal duration for the predefined

  3. Sequence optimization to reduce velocity offsets in cardiovascular magnetic resonance volume flow quantification - A multi-vendor study

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    Werner Beat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Eddy current induced velocity offsets are of concern for accuracy in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR volume flow quantification. However, currently known theoretical aspects of eddy current behavior have not led to effective guidelines for the optimization of flow quantification sequences. This study is aimed at identifying correlations between protocol parameters and the resulting velocity error in clinical CMR flow measurements in a multi-vendor study. Methods Nine 1.5T scanners of three different types/vendors were studied. Measurements were performed on a large stationary phantom. Starting from a clinical breath-hold flow protocol, several protocol parameters were varied. Acquisitions were made in three clinically relevant orientations. Additionally, a time delay between the bipolar gradient and read-out, asymmetric versus symmetric velocity encoding, and gradient amplitude and slew rate were studied in adapted sequences as exploratory measurements beyond the protocol. Image analysis determined the worst-case offset for a typical great-vessel flow measurement. Results The results showed a great variation in offset behavior among scanners (standard deviation among samples of 0.3, 0.4, and 0.9 cm/s for the three different scanner types, even for small changes in the protocol. Considering the absolute values, none of the tested protocol settings consistently reduced the velocity offsets below the critical level of 0.6 cm/s neither for all three orientations nor for all three scanner types. Using multilevel linear model analysis, oblique aortic and pulmonary slices showed systematic higher offsets than the transverse aortic slices (oblique aortic 0.6 cm/s, and pulmonary 1.8 cm/s higher than transverse aortic. The exploratory measurements beyond the protocol yielded some new leads for further sequence development towards reduction of velocity offsets; however those protocols were not always compatible with the time

  4. Use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging for TAVR assessment in patients with bioprosthetic aortic valves: Comparison with computed tomography

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    Quail, Michael A., E-mail: m.quail@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Nordmeyer, Johannes [Department of Congenital Heart Disease and Paediatric Cardiology, Deutsches Herzzentrum Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Schievano, Silvia [Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Reinthaler, Markus; Mullen, Michael J. [The Heart Hospital, University College Hospital and Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, UCL, 16-18 Westmoreland Street, London (United Kingdom); Taylor, Andrew M. [Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been successfully used to treat patients with failing aortic bioprostheses. Computed tomography (CT) is the usual method of pre-procedural imaging for TAVR in the native position; however, the optimal modality for valve-in-valve procedures has not been established. CT can assess intracardiac anatomy and is superior to cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in the assessment of coronary artery disease. However, CMR can provide superior haemodynamic information, does not carry the risk of ionising radiation, and may be performed without contrast in patients with renal insufficiency. In this study, we compared CT and CMR for the evaluation of TAVR in a small cohort of patients with existing aortic bioprostheses. Materials and methods: 21 patients with aortic bioprostheses were prospectively evaluated by CT and CMR, as pre-assessment for TAVR; agreement between measurements of aortic geometries was assessed. Results: 16/21 patients had aortic bioprostheses constructed with a metal ring, and 5/21 patients had a metal strut construction. Patients with metal struts had significant metal-artefact on CMR, which compromised image quality in this region. There was good agreement between CT and CMR measurements of aortic geometry. The mean difference (d) in annulus area-derived diameter was 0.5 mm (95% limits of agreement [L.A] 4.2 mm). There was good agreement between modalities for the cross-sectional area of the sinuses of valsalva (d 0.5 cm{sup 2}, L.A 1.4 cm{sup 2}), sinotubular junction (d 0.9 cm{sup 2}, L.A 1.5 cm{sup 2}), and ascending aorta (d 0.6 cm{sup 2}, L.A 1.4 cm{sup 2}). In patients without metal struts, the left coronary artery height d was 0.7 mm and L.A 2.8 mm. Conclusions: Our analysis shows that CMR and CT measurements of aortic geometry show good agreement, including measurement of annulus size and coronary artery location, and thus provide the necessary anatomical information for valve

  5. Preliminary assessment of cardiac short term safety and efficacy of manganese chloride for cardiovascular magnetic resonance in humans

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    Kalaf Jose M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manganese based agents are intracellular and accumulate inside myocytes allowing for different imaging strategies compared to gadolinium contrasts. While previous agents release manganese very slowly in the circulation, MnCl2 allows for rapid Mn2+ uptake in myocytes, creating a memory effect that can be potentially explored. Data on animal models are very encouraging but the safety and efficacy of this approach in humans has not yet been investigated. Therefore, our objectives were to study the safety and efficacy of a rapid infusion of manganese chloride (MnCl2 for cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR in humans. Methods Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent a CMR scan on a 1.5 T scanner. Before the infusion, cardiac function was calculated and images of a short axis mid-ventricular slice were obtained using a 2D and 3D gradient-echo inversion recovery (GRE-IR sequence, a phase-sensitive IR sequence and a single breath-hold segmented IR prepared steady-state precession acquisition for T1 calculations. MnCl2 was infused over three minutes at a total dose of 5 μMol/kg. Immediately after the infusion, and at 15 and 30 minutes later, new images were obtained and cardiac function re-evaluated. Results There was a significant decrease in T1 values compared to baseline, sustained up to 30 minutes after the MnCl2 infusion (pre,839 ± 281 ms; 0 min, 684 ± 99; 15 min, 714 ± 168; 30 min, 706 ± 172, P = 0.003. The 2D and 3D GRE-IR sequence showed the greatest increase in signal-to-noise ratio compared to the other sequences (baseline 6.6 ± 4.2 and 9.7 ± 5.3; 0 min, 11.3 ± 4.1 and 15.0 ± 8.7; 15 min, 10.8 ± 4.0 and 16.9 ± 10.2; 30 min, 10.6 ± 5.2 and 16.5 ± 8.3, P 2 with no major adverse events, despite all reporting transient facial flush. Conclusions In the short term, MnCl2 appears safe for human use. It effectively decreases myocardium T1, maintaining this effect for a relatively long period of time and allowing for the

  6. Myocardial scarring on cardiovascular magnetic resonance in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients with “pure” apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

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    Kim Kyung-Hee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR enables state-of-the-art in vivo evaluations of myocardial fibrosis. Although LGE patterns have been well described in asymmetrical septal hypertrophy, conflicting results have been reported regarding the characteristics of LGE in apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (ApHCM. This study was undertaken to determine 1 the frequency and distribution of LGE and 2 its prognostic implication in ApHCM. Methods Forty patients with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic pure ApHCM (age, 60.2 ± 10.4 years, 31 men were prospectively enrolled. LGE images were acquired using the inversion recovery segmented spoiled-gradient echo and phase-sensitive inversion recovery sequence, and analyzed using a 17-segment model. Summing the planimetered LGE areas in all short axis slices yielded the total volume of late enhancement, which was subsequently presented as a proportion of total LV myocardium (% LGE. Results Mean maximal apical wall thickness was 17.9±2.3mm, and mean left ventricular (LV ejection fraction was 67.7 ± 8.0%. All but one patient presented with electrocardiographic negative T wave inversion in anterolateral leads, with a mean maximum negative T wave of 7.2 ± 4.7mm. Nine patients (22.5% had giant negative T waves, defined as the amplitude of ≥10mm, in electrocardiogram. LGE was detected in 130 segments of 30 patients (75.0%, occupying 4.9 ± 5.5% of LV myocardium. LGE was mainly detected at the junction between left and right ventricles in 12 (30% and at the apex in 28 (70%, although LGE-positive areas were widely distributed, and not limited to the apex. Focal LGE at the non-hypertrophic LV segments was found in some ApHCM patients, even without LGE of hypertrophied apical segments. Over the 2-year follow-up, there was no one achieving the study end-point, defined as all-cause death, sudden cardiac death and hospitalization for heart failure

  7. Use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging for TAVR assessment in patients with bioprosthetic aortic valves: Comparison with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been successfully used to treat patients with failing aortic bioprostheses. Computed tomography (CT) is the usual method of pre-procedural imaging for TAVR in the native position; however, the optimal modality for valve-in-valve procedures has not been established. CT can assess intracardiac anatomy and is superior to cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in the assessment of coronary artery disease. However, CMR can provide superior haemodynamic information, does not carry the risk of ionising radiation, and may be performed without contrast in patients with renal insufficiency. In this study, we compared CT and CMR for the evaluation of TAVR in a small cohort of patients with existing aortic bioprostheses. Materials and methods: 21 patients with aortic bioprostheses were prospectively evaluated by CT and CMR, as pre-assessment for TAVR; agreement between measurements of aortic geometries was assessed. Results: 16/21 patients had aortic bioprostheses constructed with a metal ring, and 5/21 patients had a metal strut construction. Patients with metal struts had significant metal-artefact on CMR, which compromised image quality in this region. There was good agreement between CT and CMR measurements of aortic geometry. The mean difference (d) in annulus area-derived diameter was 0.5 mm (95% limits of agreement [L.A] 4.2 mm). There was good agreement between modalities for the cross-sectional area of the sinuses of valsalva (d 0.5 cm2, L.A 1.4 cm2), sinotubular junction (d 0.9 cm2, L.A 1.5 cm2), and ascending aorta (d 0.6 cm2, L.A 1.4 cm2). In patients without metal struts, the left coronary artery height d was 0.7 mm and L.A 2.8 mm. Conclusions: Our analysis shows that CMR and CT measurements of aortic geometry show good agreement, including measurement of annulus size and coronary artery location, and thus provide the necessary anatomical information for valve-in-valve TAVR planning. However, in patients

  8. Role of Perfusion at Rest in the Diagnosis of Myocardial Infarction Using Vasodilator Stress Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mita B; Mor-Avi, Victor; Kawaji, Keigo; Nathan, Sandeep; Kramer, Christopher M; Lang, Roberto M; Patel, Amit R

    2016-04-01

    In clinical practice, perfusion at rest in vasodilator stress single-photon emission computed tomography is commonly used to confirm myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia and to rule out artifacts. It is unclear whether perfusion at rest carries similar information in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). We sought to determine whether chronic MI is associated with abnormal perfusion at rest on CMR. We compared areas of infarct and remote myocardium in 31 patients who underwent vasodilator stress CMR (1.5 T), had MI confirmed by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE scar), and coronary angiography within 6 months. Stress perfusion imaging during gadolinium first pass was followed by reversal with aminophylline (75 to 125 mg), rest perfusion, and LGE imaging. Resting and peak-stress time-intensity curves were used to obtain maximal upslopes (normalized by blood pool upslopes), which were compared between infarcted and remote myocardial regions of interest. At rest, there was no significant difference between the slopes in the regions of interest supplied by arteries with and without stenosis >70% (0.31 ± 0.16 vs 0.26 ± 0.15 1/s), irrespective of LGE scar. However, at peak stress, we found significant differences (0.20 ± 0.11 vs 0.30 ± 0.22 1/s; p <0.05), reflecting the expected stress-induced ischemia. Similarly, at rest, there was no difference between infarcted and remote myocardium (0.27 ± 0.14 vs 0.30 ± 0.17 1/s), irrespective of stenosis, but significant differences were seen during stress (0.21 ± 0.16 vs 0.28 ± 0.18 1/s; p <0.001), reflecting inducible ischemia. In conclusion, abnormalities in myocardial perfusion at rest associated with chronic MI are not reliably detectable on CMR images. Accordingly, unlike single-photon emission computed tomography, normal CMR perfusion at rest should not be used to rule out chronic MI. PMID:26830261

  9. Final infarct size measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction predicts long-term clinical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønborg, Jacob Thomsen; Vejlstrup, Niels Grove; Kelbæk, Henning Skov;

    2013-01-01

    prognostic evaluation. To evaluate the prognostic importance of the final infarct size measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with STEMI. METHODS AND RESULTS: In an observational study the final infarct size was measured by late gadolinium enhancement CMR 3 months after initial...... admission in 309 patients with STEMI. The clinical endpoint was a composite of all-cause mortality and admission for heart failure. During the follow-up period of median 807 days (IQR: 669-1117) 35 events (5 non-cardiac deaths, 3 cardiac deaths, and 27 admissions for heart failure) were recorded. Patients...

  10. Comprehensive assessment of a post-coronary bypass graft patient with cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging and multi-detector computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pairoj Rerkpattanapipat; Patcharee Paijitprapaporn; Suthipong Jongjirasiri; Jiraporn Laothamatas; Nithi Mahanonda

    2007-01-01

    Coronary bypass graft surgery (CABG) is a revascularization procedure which reduces myocardial ischemia and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in selected patients; however, up to 40% of saphanous vein grafts may degenerate over 10 years. Although coronary angiography is the gold standard to detect graft patency and native vessel disease, sometimes it is difficult to locate the grafts resulting in increased exposure to radiation and contrast administration. This case highlights the utility of cardiac computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging to provide comprehensive noninvasive assessment in a patient post CABG.

  11. Case report: Completely unroofed coronary sinus with a left superior vena cava draining into the left atrium studied by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A persistent left superior vena cava (LSVC) draining through a dilated coronary sinus into the right atrium is a relatively common congenital cardiovascular anomaly. It is readily identified by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). However, a LSVC draining into the left atrium (LA) and associated with unroofing of the coronary sinus, with resulting interatrial communication, is rare and may have important clinical consequences. As with any large atrial septal defect, it can be associated with a higher than expected incidence of pulmonary arterial hypertension, systemic embolization, and brain abscesses. In this report, we present a case of a completely unroofed coronary sinus with a persistent LSVC draining directly into the LA and illustrate the role of CMR in the diagnosis and evaluation of such anomalies

  12. Fetal circulation in left-sided congenital heart disease measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance: a case–control study

    OpenAIRE

    Al Nafisi, Bahiyah; van Amerom, Joshua FP; Forsey, Jonathan; Jaeggi, Edgar; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Macgowan, Christopher K; Seed, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Background The distribution of blood flow in fetuses with congenital heart disease (CHD) is likely to influence fetal growth, organ development, and postnatal outcome, but has previously been difficult to study. We present the first measurements of the distribution of the fetal circulation in left-sided CHD made using phase contrast cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods Twenty-two fetuses with suspected left-sided CHD and twelve normal controls underwent fetal CMR and echocardiography at ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  14. Aortic valve stenotic area calculation from phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance: the importance of short echo time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowan Brett R

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR can potentially quantify aortic valve area (AVA in aortic stenosis (AS using a single-slice phase contrast (PC acquisition at valve level: AVA = aortic flow/aortic velocity-time integral (VTI. However, CMR has been shown to underestimate aortic flow in turbulent high velocity jets, due to intra-voxel dephasing. This study investigated the effect of decreasing intra-voxel dephasing by reducing the echo time (TE on AVA estimates in patients with AS. Method 15 patients with moderate or severe AS, were studied with three different TEs (2.8 ms/2.0 ms/1.5 ms, in the main pulmonary artery (MPA, left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT and 0 cm/1 cm/2.5 cm above the aortic valve (AoV. PC estimates of stroke volume (SV were compared with CMR left ventricular SV measurements and PC peak velocity, VTI and AVA were compared with Doppler echocardiography. CMR estimates of AVA obtained by direct planimetry from cine acquisitions were also compared with the echoAVA. Results With a TE of 2.8 ms, the mean PC SV was similar to the ventricular SV at the MPA, LVOT and AoV0 cm (by Bland-Altman analysis bias ± 1.96 SD, 1.3 ± 20.2 mL/-6.8 ± 21.9 mL/6.5 ± 50.7 mL respectively, but was significantly lower at AoV1 and AoV2.5 (-29.3 ± 31.2 mL/-21.1 ± 35.7 mL. PC peak velocity and VTI underestimated Doppler echo estimates by approximately 10% with only moderate agreement. Shortening the TE from 2.8 to 1.5 msec improved the agreement between ventricular SV and PC SV at AoV0 cm (6.5 ± 50.7 mL vs 1.5 ± 37.9 mL respectively but did not satisfactorily improve the PC SV estimate at AoV1 cm and AoV2.5 cm. Agreement of CMR AVA with echoAVA was improved at TE 1.5 ms (0.00 ± 0.39 cm2 versus TE 2.8 (0.11 ± 0.81 cm2. The CMR method which agreed best with echoAVA was direct planimetry (-0.03 cm2 ± 0.24 cm2. Conclusion Agreement of CMR AVA at the aortic valve level with echo AVA improves with a reduced TE of 1.5 ms

  15. 心血管MRI第一部分--磁共振基本物理原理及成像策略%Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging:Part I--The basic physics and imaging strategies of magnetic resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏宇; 贺光军; 赵世华

    2013-01-01

      MRI以其独特的优势广泛应用于临床,特别是在心血管系统疾病中的诊断价值得到日益体现。心血管MRI(CMR)能无创地一站式评价心血管的解剖、功能、心肌灌注和病变的组织特性,并且评价的可重复性高。CMR成像技术内容丰富,尚具挑战性,需克服心脏自身和随呼吸的运动伪影。MRI的软硬件系统性能不断提高,特别是磁场强度革命性地提升,使得成像技术不断地完善和更新。作者用4个篇章分别阐明上述MRI尤其是CMR的基本成像原理及技术要点,致力于用简明易懂的语言使大多数放射科一线工作者能轻松愉悦地领悟MRI尤其是CMR的魅力。此文为第一部分,归纳MRI基本物理原理及MR图像的产生过程。%Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been widely used in clinical routine, especially in cardiovascular disease diagnosis, due to its prominent advantage. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) can evaluate the anatomy, function, myocardial perfusion and characterization of heart non-invasively in one-stop. Cardiac and respiratory motion is major problem in CMR imaging. It makes CMR imaging be more challenging than any other imaging modality. As the performance of MR hardware and software system uptakes, especially for the substantial increasing of the strength of magnet, the imaging technique is improved persistently. The authors try their best to describe the fundamental physics and key technological points of MR, especially CMR in four successive articles. In first article, the physics of MR and progress of MR image generating were summarized.

  16. Cardiac Sarcoidosis or Giant Cell Myocarditis? On Treatment Improvement of Fulminant Myocarditis as Demonstrated by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogabathina, Hari; Olson, Peter; Rathi, Vikas K.; Biederman, Robert W. W.

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell myocarditis, but not cardiac sarcoidosis, is known to cause fulminant myocarditis resulting in severe heart failure. However, giant cell myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis are pathologically similar, and attempts at pathological differentiation between the two remain difficult. We are presenting a case of fulminant myocarditis that has pathological features suggestive of cardiac sarcoidosis, but clinically mimicking giant cell myocarditis. This patient was treated with cyclosporine and prednisone and recovered well. This case we believe challenges our current understanding of these intertwined conditions. By obtaining a sense of severity of cardiac involvement via delayed hyperenhancement of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, we were more inclined to treat this patient as giant cell myocarditis with cyclosporine. This resulted in excellent improvement of patient's cardiac function as shown by delayed hyperenhancement images, early perfusion images, and SSFP videos. PMID:24826266

  17. Cardiac Sarcoidosis or Giant Cell Myocarditis? On Treatment Improvement of Fulminant Myocarditis as Demonstrated by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Bogabathina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell myocarditis, but not cardiac sarcoidosis, is known to cause fulminant myocarditis resulting in severe heart failure. However, giant cell myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis are pathologically similar, and attempts at pathological differentiation between the two remain difficult. We are presenting a case of fulminant myocarditis that has pathological features suggestive of cardiac sarcoidosis, but clinically mimicking giant cell myocarditis. This patient was treated with cyclosporine and prednisone and recovered well. This case we believe challenges our current understanding of these intertwined conditions. By obtaining a sense of severity of cardiac involvement via delayed hyperenhancement of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, we were more inclined to treat this patient as giant cell myocarditis with cyclosporine. This resulted in excellent improvement of patient’s cardiac function as shown by delayed hyperenhancement images, early perfusion images, and SSFP videos.

  18. 2014 Korean Guidelines for Appropriate Utilization of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Joint Report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yeonyee E. [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yoo Jin [Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung-Kwan [Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong A [Department of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang 411-706 (Korea, Republic of); Na, Jin Oh [Cardiovascular Center, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Dong Hyun [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Jin [Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eui-Young [Division of Cardiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 135-720 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is now widely used in several fields of cardiovascular disease assessment due to recent technical developments. CMR can give physicians information that cannot be found with other imaging modalities. However, there is no guideline which is suitable for Korean people for the use of CMR. Therefore, we have prepared a Korean guideline for the appropriate utilization of CMR to guide Korean physicians, imaging specialists, medical associates and patients to improve the overall medical system performances. By addressing CMR usage and creating these guidelines we hope to contribute towards the promotion of public health. This guideline is a joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology.

  19. 2014 Korean guidelines for appropriate utilization of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging: A joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yeon Yee E. [Dept. of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yoo Jin; Choi, Eui Young [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-04-15

    The use of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is increasing for the assessment of certain cardiovascular diseases, due to recent technical developments. CMR can give physicians information that cannot be found with other imaging modalities. However, there has been no guideline for the use of CMR in Korean people. Therefore, we have prepared a Korean guideline for the appropriate utilization of CMR to guide Korean physicians, imaging specialists, medical associates, and patients to improve the overall performances in medical system. By addressing CMR usage and creating these guidelines, we hope to contribute to the promotion of public health. This guideline is a joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology.

  20. Anomalous origin of the left circumflex coronary artery from the pulmonary artery. A very rare congenital anomaly in an adult patient diagnosed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannitsis Evangelos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Here we report for the first time on the diagnostic potential of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR to delineate the proximal course of an anomalous left circumflex coronary artery (LCX originating from the right pulmonary artery in an adult patient with no other form of congenital heart disease. The patient was referred to our institution due to exertional chest discomfort. X-Ray coronary angiography showed a normal left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD and right coronary artery (RCA, while the LCX was filled retrograde by collateral flow through the LAD and the RCA. The origin of the LCX was postulated to be the pulmonary artery, but the exact origin of the anomalous artery could not be depicted on conventional angiograms. CMR provided the unambiguous depiction of the origin of the anomalous LCX from the right pulmonary artery and the delineation of its proximal course in this case of a very rare coronary anomaly in adults.

  1. 2014 Korean Guidelines for Appropriate Utilization of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Joint Report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is now widely used in several fields of cardiovascular disease assessment due to recent technical developments. CMR can give physicians information that cannot be found with other imaging modalities. However, there is no guideline which is suitable for Korean people for the use of CMR. Therefore, we have prepared a Korean guideline for the appropriate utilization of CMR to guide Korean physicians, imaging specialists, medical associates and patients to improve the overall medical system performances. By addressing CMR usage and creating these guidelines we hope to contribute towards the promotion of public health. This guideline is a joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology

  2. Impact of early, late, and no ST-segment resolution measured by continuous ST Holter monitoring on left ventricular ejection fraction and infarct size as determined by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D.E. Haeck; N.J.W. Verouden; W.J. Kuijt; K.T. Koch; M. Majidi; A. Hirsch; J.G.P. Tijssen; M.W. Krucoff; R.J. de Winter

    2011-01-01

    Background: The goal of this study is to determine the predictive value of ST-segment resolution (STR) early after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), late STR, and no STR for left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and infarct size (IS) by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) at follow-u

  3. Cardiovascular risks and brain function: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study of executive function in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Chuang, Yi-Fang; Eldreth, Dana; Kirk I Erickson; Varma, Vijay; Harris, Gregory; Fried, Linda P.; Rebok, George W.; Tanner, Elizabeth K.; Carlson, Michelle C.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia are associated with cognitive impairment and risk of dementia in older adults. However, the mechanisms linking them are not clear. This study aims to investigate the association between aggregate CV risk, assessed by the Framingham general cardiovascular risk profile, and functional brain activation in a group of community-dwelling older adults. Sixty participants (mean age: 64.6 years) from the Brain Health ...

  4. Longitudinal monitoring of cardiac siderosis using cardiovascular magnetic resonance T2* in patients with thalassemia major on various chelation regimens: a 6-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambati, Srikanth R; Randolph, Rachel E; Mennitt, Kevin; Kleinert, Dorothy A; Weinsaft, Jonathan W; Giardina, Patricia J

    2013-08-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and hepatic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have become reliable noninvasive tools to monitor iron excess in thalassemia major (TM) patients. However, long-term studies are lacking. We reviewed CMR and hepatic MRI T2* imaging on 54 TM patients who had three or more annual measurements. They were managed on various chelation regimens. Patients were grouped according to their degree of cardiac siderosis: severe (T2*, cardiac siderosis (T2*, >20 msec). We looked at the change in cardiac T2*, liver iron concentration (LIC) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) at years 3 and 5. In patients with severe cardiac siderosis, cardiac T2* (mean ± SD) improved from 6.9 ± 1.6 at baseline to 13.6 ± 10.0 by year 5, mean ΔT2* = 6.7 (P = 0.04). Change in cardiac T2* at year 3 was not significant in the severe group. Patients with mild to moderate cardiac siderosis had mean cardiac T2* of 14.6 ± 2.9 at baseline which improved to 26.3 ± 9.5 by year 3, mean ΔT2* =  1.7 (P = 0.01). At baseline, median LICs (mg/g dry weight) in patients with severe, mild-moderate, and no cardiac siderosis were 3.6, 2.8, and 3.3, whereas LVEFs (mean ± SD) (%) were 56.3 ± 10.1, 60 ± 5, and 66 ± 7.6, respectively. No significant correlation was noted between Δ cardiac T2* and Δ LIC, Δ cardiac T2*, and Δ LVEF at years 3 and 5. Throughout the observation period, patients with no cardiac siderosis maintained their cardiac T2* above 20 msec. The majority of patients with cardiac siderosis improve cardiac T2* over time with optimal chelation.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Dementias

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Du, An-Tao; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews recent studies of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, idiopathic Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and vascular dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy can detect structural alteration and biochemical abnormalities in the brain of demented subjects and may help in the differential diagnosis and early detection...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  7. Efficient isotropic magnetic resonators

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, O. J. F.; Gay-Balmaz, P.

    2002-01-01

    We study experimentally and numerically a novel three-dimensional magnetic resonator structure with high isotropy. It is formed by crossed split-ring resonators and has a response independent of the illumination direction in a specific plane. The utilization of such elements to build a finite left-handed medium is discussed. (C) 2002 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Characterising haemodialysis-associated cardiomyopathy using deformation imaging by cardiovascular magnetic resonance tagging and speckle-tracking echocardiography

    OpenAIRE

    Odudu, Aghogho

    2013-01-01

    Haemodialysis patients represent an extreme phenotype of cardiovascular risk with a pattern of disease distinct from that in the general population. Non-traditional risk factors, specific to chronic kidney disease such as hypervolaemia, arterial stiffness and advanced glycation end-product deposition are increasingly recognised. A previously demonstrated non-traditional risk factor associated with worse outcomes is the presence of uraemic cardiomyopathy. This pattern of cardiac morphology and...

  9. Repaired tetralogy of Fallot: the roles of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in evaluating pathophysiology and for pulmonary valve replacement decision support

    OpenAIRE

    Geva Tal

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Surgical management of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) results in anatomic and functional abnormalities in the majority of patients. Although right ventricular volume load due to severe pulmonary regurgitation can be tolerated for many years, there is now evidence that the compensatory mechanisms of the right ventricular myocardium ultimately fail and that if the volume load is not eliminated or reduced by pulmonary valve replacement the dysfunction might be irreversible. Cardiovascular ma...

  10. Consistency of aortic distensibility and pulse wave velocity estimates with respect to the Bramwell-Hill theoretical model: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Cesare Alain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arterial stiffness is considered as an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality, and is increasingly used in clinical practice. This study aimed at evaluating the consistency of the automated estimation of regional and local aortic stiffness indices from cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR data. Results Forty-six healthy subjects underwent carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity measurements (CF_PWV by applanation tonometry and CMR with steady-state free-precession and phase contrast acquisitions at the level of the aortic arch. These data were used for the automated evaluation of the aortic arch pulse wave velocity (Arch_PWV, and the ascending aorta distensibility (AA_Distc, AA_Distb, which were estimated from ascending aorta strain (AA_Strain combined with either carotid or brachial pulse pressure. The local ascending aorta pulse wave velocity AA_PWVc and AA_PWVb were estimated respectively from these carotid and brachial derived distensibility indices according to the Bramwell-Hill theoretical model, and were compared with the Arch_PWV. In addition, a reproducibility analysis of AA_PWV measurement and its comparison with the standard CF_PWV was performed. Characterization according to the Bramwell-Hill equation resulted in good correlations between Arch_PWV and both local distensibility indices AA_Distc (r = 0.71, p AA_Distb (r = 0.60, p Arch_PWV and both theoretical local indices AA_PWVc (r = 0.78, p AA_PWVb (r = 0.78, p Arch_PWV was well related to CF_PWV (r = 0.69, p Conclusions The present work confirmed the consistency and robustness of the regional index Arch_PWV and the local indices AA_Distc and AA_Distb according to the theoretical model, as well as to the well established measurement of CF_PWV, demonstrating the relevance of the regional and local CMR indices.

  11. Age determination of vessel wall hematoma in spontaneous cervical artery dissection: A multi-sequence 3T Cardiovascular Magnetic resonance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habs Maximilian

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously proposed classifications for carotid plaque and cerebral parenchymal hemorrhages are used to estimate the age of hematoma according to its signal intensities on T1w and T2w MR images. Using these classifications, we systematically investigated the value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR in determining the age of vessel wall hematoma (VWH in patients with spontaneous cervical artery dissection (sCAD. Methods 35 consecutive patients (mean age 43.6 ± 9.8 years with sCAD received a cervical multi-sequence 3T CMR with fat-saturated black-blood T1w-, T2w- and TOF images. Age of sCAD was defined as time between onset of symptoms (stroke, TIA or Horner's syndrome and the CMR scan. VWH were categorized into hyperacute, acute, early subacute, late subacute and chronic based on their signal intensities on T1w- and T2w images. Results The mean age of sCAD was 2.0, 5.8, 15.7 and 58.7 days in patients with acute, early subacute, late subacute and chronic VWH as classified by CMR (p Conclusions Signal intensities of VWH in sCAD vary over time and multi-sequence CMR can help to determine the age of an arterial dissection. Furthermore, findings of this study suggest that the time course of carotid hematomas differs from that of cerebral hematomas.

  12. Multimodal cardiovascular magnetic resonance quantifies regional variation in vascular structure and function in patients with coronary artery disease: Relationships with coronary disease severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylintireas Ilias

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR of the vessel wall is highly reproducible and can evaluate both changes in plaque burden and composition. It can also measure aortic compliance and endothelial function in a single integrated examination. Previous studies have focused on patients with pre-identified carotid atheroma. We define these vascular parameters in patients presenting with coronary artery disease and test their relations to its extent and severity. Methods and Results 100 patients with CAD [single-vessel (16%; two-vessel (39%; and three-vessel (42% non-obstructed coronary arteries (3%] were studied. CAD severity and extent was expressed as modified Gensini score (mean modified score 12.38 ± 5.3. A majority of carotid plaque was located in the carotid bulb (CB. Atherosclerosis in this most diseased segment correlated modestly with the severity and extent of CAD, as expressed by the modified Gensini score (R = 0.251, P Conclusions Multimodal vascular CMR shows regional abnormalities of vascular structure and function that correlate modestly with the degree and extent of CAD.

  13. Semi-quantitative assessment of right ventricular function in comparison to a 3D volumetric approach: A cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nijveldt, Robin; Germans, Tjeerd; Rossum, Albert C. van [VU University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands, Utrecht (Netherlands); McCann, Gerald P. [University Hospitals Leicester, Department of Cardiology, Leicester (United Kingdom); Beek, Aernout M. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-11-15

    Right ventricular (RV) volume measurements with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is considered the gold standard, but acquisition and analysis remain time-consuming. The aim of our study was therefore to investigate the accuracy and performance of a semi-quantitative assessment of RV function in CMR, compared to the standard quantitative approach. Seventy-five subjects with pulmonary hypertension (15), anterior myocardial infarction (15), inferior myocardial infarction (15), Brugada syndrome (15) and normal subjects (15) underwent cine CMR. RV end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes were determined to calculate RV ejection fraction (EF). Four-chamber cine images were used to measure tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE). RV fractional shortening (RVFS) was calculated by dividing TAPSE by the RV end-diastolic length. RV EF correlated significantly with TAPSE (r = 0.62, p < 0.01) and RVFS (r = 0.67, p < 0.01). Sensitivity to predict RV dysfunction was comparable between TAPSE and RVFS, with higher specificity for RVFS, but comparable areas under the ROC curve. Intra- and inter-observer variability of RV EF was better than TAPSE (3%/4% versus 7%/15%, respectively). For routine screening in clinical practice, TAPSE and RVFS seem reliable and easy methods to identify patients with RV dysfunction. The 3D volumetric approach is preferred to assess RV function for research purposes or to evaluate treatment response. (orig.)

  14. Improvement of myocardial perfusion reserve detected by cardiovascular magnetic resonance after direct endomyocardial implantation of autologous bone marrow cells in patients with severe coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Chu-Pak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies suggested that bone marrow (BM cell implantation in patients with severe chronic coronary artery disease (CAD resulted in modest improvement in symptoms and cardiac function. This study sought to investigate the functional changes that occur within the chronic human ischaemic myocardium after direct endomyocardial BM cells implantation by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Methods and Results We compared the interval changes of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, myocardial perfusion reserve and the extent of myocardial scar by using late gadolinium enhancement CMR in 12 patients with severe CAD. CMR was performed at baseline and at 6 months after catheter-based direct endomyocardial autologous BM cell (n = 12 injection to viable ischaemic myocardium as guided by electromechanical mapping. In patients randomized to receive BM cell injection, there was significant decrease in percentage area of peri-infarct regions (-23.6%, P = 0.04 and increase in global LVEF (+9.0%, P = 0.02, the percentage of regional wall thickening (+13.1%, P= 0.04 and MPR (+0.25%, P = 0.03 over the target area at 6-months compared with baseline. Conclusions Direct endomyocardial implantation of autologous BM cells significantly improved global LVEF, regional wall thickening and myocardial perfusion reserve, and reduced percentage area of peri-infarct regions in patients with severe CAD.

  15. 心血管MRI第四部分--不同场强的心血管MR成像特点比较%Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging:Part IV--The comparison of imaging features of cardiovascular magnetic resonance scanners with different ifeld strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹刚; 贺光军; 赵世华

    2014-01-01

    该文为第四部分,承接前三部分讲述了当今心血管MR(cardiovascular MR,CMR)的两大主流机型,即1.5 T和3.0 T扫描仪的成像特点。3.0 T系统在很多单位已成为神经系统成像的标准,但对体部,特别是心脏,3.0 T系统的广泛应用则受限于诸多因素,充满着挑战。然而,在更高场强下行CMR成像又具有无可比拟的优越性并成为发展趋势。作者从物理基础开始,归纳了3.0 T对比1.5 T在CMR成像应用中的优缺点和发展前景。%This article is the fourth section. Following the three previous sections, the current major types of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) scanner, 1.5 T and 3.0 T, were presented. 3.0 T system has played a role as the standardization for nervous system imaging in most units. But for body imaging, especially for cardiac imaging, there is much more challenging to perform imaging at 3.0 T than 1.5 T. However, it is the trend of development to perform CMR imaging in higher ifeld strength due to the signiifcant advantages. From the magnetic resonance physics to clinical application of CMR, the 1.5 T and 3.0 T CMR systems were compared in this article.

  16. Pulmonary blood volume indexed to lung volume is reduced in newly diagnosed systemic sclerosis compared to normals – a prospective clinical cardiovascular magnetic resonance study addressing pulmonary vascular changes

    OpenAIRE

    Kanski, Mikael; Arheden, Håkan; Wuttge, Dirk; Bozovic, Gracijela; Hesselstrand, Roger; Ugander, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary involvement, manifested as pulmonary arterial hypertension or pulmonary fibrosis, is the most common cause of death in systemic sclerosis (SSc). We aimed to explore the feasibility of detecting early pulmonary involvement in SSc using recently developed non-invasive quantitative measures of pulmonary physiology using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods: Twenty-seven SSc patients (9 men, 57 +/- 13 years) and 10 healthy controls (3 men, 54 +/- 9 years) underwe...

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  18. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driessen, Mieke M.P. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN) - Netherlands Heart Institute, PO Box 19258, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breur, Johannes M.P.J. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Oorschot, Joep W.M. van; Leiner, Tim [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kimmenade, Roland R.J. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijboom, Folkert J. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  19. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  20. Single spin magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  1. Effects of steroids and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition on circumferential strain in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a cross-sectional and longitudinal study utilizing cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinnett Kathi J

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Steroid use has prolonged ambulation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and combined with advances in respiratory care overall management has improved such that cardiac manifestations have become the major cause of death. Unfortunately, there is no consensus for DMD-associated cardiac disease management. Our purpose was to assess effects of steroid use alone or in combination with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI or angiotension receptor blocker (ARB on cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR derived circumferential strain (εcc. Methods We used CMR to assess effects of corticosteroids alone (Group A or in combination with ACEI or ARB (Group B on heart rate (HR, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, mass (LVM, end diastolic volume (LVEDV and circumferential strain (εcc in a cohort of 171 DMD patients >5 years of age. Treatment decisions were made independently by physicians at both our institution and referral centers and not based on CMR results. Results Patients in Group A (114 studies were younger than those in Group B (92 studies(10 ± 2.4 vs. 12.4 ± 3.2 years, p cc magnitude was lower in Group B than Group A (-13.8 ± 1.9 vs. -12.8 ± 2.0, p = 0.0004, age correction using covariance analysis eliminated this effect. In a subset of patients who underwent serial CMR exams with an inter-study time of ~15 months, εcc worsened regardless of treatment group. Conclusions These results support the need for prospective clinical trials to identify more effective treatment regimens for DMD associated cardiac disease.

  2. Assessment of circumferential endocardial extent of myocardial edema and infarction in patients with reperfused acute myocardial infarction: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Shingo; Tanimoto, Takashi; Hirata, Kumiko; Orii, Makoto; Shiono, Yasutsugu; Shimamura, Kunihiro; Ishibashi, Kohei; Yamano, Takashi; Ino, Yasushi; Kitabata, Hironori; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Kubo, Takashi; Imanishi, Toshio; Akasaka, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    T2 weighted (T2W) images on cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) visualizes myocardial edema, which reflects the myocardial area at risk (AAR) in reperfused acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) demonstrates myocardial infarction. LGE images cover the whole left ventricle, but T2W images are obtained from a few slices of the left ventricle due to the long sequence time, so the quantification of AAR of the entire left ventricle is difficult. We hypothesize that we can quantify AAR with only LGE images if there is a strong correlation between the circumferential endocardial extent of myocardial edema and infarction. Thirty patients with first AMI were enrolled. All patients underwent successfully reperfusion therapy and CMR was performed within the first week after the event. We measured the circumferential extent of edema and infarction on short-axis views (T2 angle and LGE angle), respectively. A total of 82 short-axis slices showed transmural edema on T2W images. Corresponding LGE images were analyzed for the circumferential extent of infarction. The median [interquartile range] of T2 angle and DE angle were 147° [116°-219°] and 134° [104°-200°] in patients with LAD culprit lesion, 91° [87°-101°] and 85° [80°-90°] in LCX, and 110° [94°-123°] and 104° [89°-118°] in RCA, respectively. T2 angle was well correlated with LGE angle (r = 0.99, P infarction in reperfused AMI. Thus, T2 weighted imaging can be skipped to quantify the amount of AAR.

  3. The added value of longitudinal black-blood cardiovascular magnetic resonance angiography in the cross sectional identification of carotid atherosclerotic ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hippe Daniel S

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carotid atherosclerotic ulceration is a significant source of stroke. This study evaluates the efficacy of adding longitudinal black-blood (BB cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR angiography to cross-sectional CMR images in the identification of carotid atherosclerotic ulceration. Methods Thirty-two subjects (30 males and two females with ages between 48 and 83 years scheduled for carotid endarterectomy were imaged on a 1.5T GE Signa scanner using multisequence [3D time-of-flight, T1, proton density, T2, contrast enhanced T1], cross-sectional CMR images and longitudinal BB CMR angiography (0.625 × 0.625 mm/pixel. Two rounds of review (round 1: cross-sectional CMR images alone and round 2: cross-sectional CMR images plus longitudinal BB CMR angiography were conducted for the presence and volume measurements of ulceration. Ulceration was defined as a distinct depression into the plaque containing blood flow signal on cross-sectional CMR and longitudinal BB CMR angiography. Results Of the 32 plaques examined by histology, 17 contained 21 ulcers. Using the longitudinal BB CMR angiography sequence in addition to the cross-sectional CMR images in round 2, the sensitivity improved to 80% for ulcers of at least 6 mm3 in volume by histology and 52.4% for all ulcers, compared to 30% and 23.8% in round 1, respectively. There was a slight decline in specificity from 88.2% to 82.3%, though both the positive and negative predictive values increased modestly from 71.4% to 78.6% and from 48.4% to 58.3%, respectively. Conclusion The addition of longitudinal BB CMR angiography to multisequence cross-sectional CMR images increases accuracy in the identification of carotid atherosclerotic ulceration.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging of right ventricular morphology and function in the assessment of suspected pulmonary hypertension results from the ASPIRE registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swift Andrew J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR imaging is accurate and reproducible for the assessment of right ventricular (RV morphology and function. However, the diagnostic accuracy of CMR derived RV measurements for the detection of pulmonary hypertension (PH in the assessment of patients with suspected PH in the clinic setting is not well described. Methods We retrospectively studied 233 consecutive treatment naïve patients with suspected PH including 39 patients with no PH who underwent CMR and right heart catheterisation (RHC within 48hours. The diagnostic accuracy of multiple CMR measurements for the detection of mPAP ≥ 25 mmHg was assessed using Fisher’s exact test and receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis. Results Ventricular mass index (VMI was the CMR measurement with the strongest correlation with mPAP (r = 0.78 and the highest diagnostic accuracy for the detection of PH (area under the ROC curve of 0.91 compared to an ROC of 0.88 for echocardiography calculated mPAP. Late gadolinium enhancement, VMI ≥ 0.4, retrograde flow ≥ 0.3 L/min/m2 and PA relative area change ≤ 15% predicted the presence of PH with a high degree of diagnostic certainty with a positive predictive value of 98%, 97%, 95% and 94% respectively. No single CMR parameter could confidently exclude the presence of PH. Conclusion CMR is a useful alternative to echocardiography in the evaluation of suspected PH. This study supports a role for the routine measurement of ventricular mass index, late gadolinium enhancement and the use of phase contrast imaging in addition to right heart functional indices in patients undergoing diagnostic CMR evaluation for suspected pulmonary hypertension.

  5. Towards real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance-guided transarterial aortic valve implantation: In vitro evaluation and modification of existing devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladd Mark E

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is considered an attractive alternative for guiding transarterial aortic valve implantation (TAVI featuring unlimited scan plane orientation and unsurpassed soft-tissue contrast with simultaneous device visualization. We sought to evaluate the CMR characteristics of both currently commercially available transcatheter heart valves (Edwards SAPIEN™, Medtronic CoreValve® including their dedicated delivery devices and of a custom-built, CMR-compatible delivery device for the Medtronic CoreValve® prosthesis as an initial step towards real-time CMR-guided TAVI. Methods The devices were systematically examined in phantom models on a 1.5-Tesla scanner using high-resolution T1-weighted 3D FLASH, real-time TrueFISP and flow-sensitive phase-contrast sequences. Images were analyzed for device visualization quality, device-related susceptibility artifacts, and radiofrequency signal shielding. Results CMR revealed major susceptibility artifacts for the two commercial delivery devices caused by considerable metal braiding and precluding in vivo application. The stainless steel-based Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis was also regarded not suitable for CMR-guided TAVI due to susceptibility artifacts exceeding the valve's dimensions and hindering an exact placement. In contrast, the nitinol-based Medtronic CoreValve® prosthesis was excellently visualized with delineation even of small details and, thus, regarded suitable for CMR-guided TAVI, particularly since reengineering of its delivery device toward CMR-compatibility resulted in artifact elimination and excellent visualization during catheter movement and valve deployment on real-time TrueFISP imaging. Reliable flow measurements could be performed for both stent-valves after deployment using phase-contrast sequences. Conclusions The present study shows that the Medtronic CoreValve® prosthesis is potentially suited for real-time CMR-guided placement

  6. Accuracy of a new method for semi-quantitative assessment of right ventricular ejection fraction by cardiovascular magnetic resonance: Right ventricular fractional diameter changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Longitudinal shortening is traditionally considered the predominant part of global right ventricular (RV) systolic function. Less attention has been paid to transverse contraction. The aim of this study was to evaluate RV transverse motion by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in a large cohort of patients and to assess its relationship with RV ejection fraction (RVEF). Study design: We retrospectively analyzed the CMR scans of 300 patients referred to our center in 2010. RVEF was determined from short axis sequences using the volumetric method. Transverse parameters called RV fractional diameter changes were calculated after measuring RV diastolic and systolic diameters at basal and mid-level in short axis view (respectively FBDC and FMDC). We also measured the tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) as a longitudinal reference. Results: Our population was divided into 2 groups according to RVEF. 250 patients had a preserved RVEF (>40%) and 50 had a RV dysfunction (RVEF ≤40%). Transverse and longitudinal motions were significantly reduced in the group with RV dysfunction (p < .0001). After ROC analysis, areas under the curve for FBDC, FMDC and TAPSE, were respectively 0.79, 0.82 and 0.72, with the highest specificity and sensitivity respectively of 88% and 68% for FMDC (threshold at 20%) for predicting RV dysfunction. FMDC had an excellent negative predictive value of 93%. Conclusion: RV fractional diameter changes, especially at the mid-level, appear to be accurate for semi-quantitative assessment of RV function by CMR. A cut-off of 20% for FMDC differentiates patients with a low (EF ≤ 40%) or a preserved RVEF

  7. The protein binding substance Ibuprofen does not affect the T1 time or partition coefficient in contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawel Nadine

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contrast enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR with T1 mapping enables quantification of diffuse myocardial fibrosis. Various factors, however, can interfere with T1 measurements. The purpose of the current study was to assess the effect of co-medication with a typical protein binding drug (Ibuprofen on T1 values in vitro and in vivo. Methods 50 vials were prepared with different concentrations of gadobenate dimeglumine, Ibuprofen and human serum albumin in physiologic NaCl solution and imaged at 1.5T with a spin echo sequence at multiple TRs to measure T1 values and calculate relaxivities. 10 volunteers (5 men; 31±6.3 years were imaged at 1.5T. T1 values for myocardium and blood pool were determined for various time points after administration of 0.15mmol/kg gadobenate dimeglumine using a modified look-locker inversion-recovery sequence before and after administration of Ibuprofen over 24 hours. The partition coefficient was calculated as ΔR1myocardium/ΔR1blood, where R1=1/T1. Results In vitro no significant correlation was found between relaxivity and Ibuprofen concentration, neither in absence (r=−0.15, p=0.40 nor in presence of albumin (r=−0.32, p=0.30. In vivo there was no significant difference in post contrast T1 times of myocardium and blood, respectively and also in the partition coefficient between exam 1 and 2 (p>0.05. There was good agreement of the T1 times of myocardium and blood and the partition coefficient, respectively between exam 1 and 2. Conclusions Contrast enhanced T1 mapping is unaffected by co-medication with the protein binding substance Ibuprofen and has an excellent reproducibility.

  8. T-wave inversions related to left ventricular basal hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis in non-apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: A cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiuyu, E-mail: cxy0202@126.com [Department of Radiology, State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China); Zhao, Shihua, E-mail: zhaoshihua0202@126.com [Department of Radiology, State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China); Zhao, Tao, E-mail: taozhao0202@126.com [Department of Radiology, State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China); Lu, Minjie, E-mail: lmjkan@126.com [Department of Radiology, State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China); Yin, Gang, E-mail: gangyin0202@126.com [Department of Radiology, State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China); Jiang, Shiliang, E-mail: jiangsl-2011@163.com [Department of Radiology, State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China); Prasad, Sanjay, E-mail: s.prasad@rbht.nhs.uk [NIHR Biomedical Research Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital Sydney Street, London, SW3 6NP (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between T-wave inversions and left ventricular (LV) segmental hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with non-apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Methods: 196 consecutive patients with non-apical HCM underwent late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) CMR and 12-lead electrocardiogram. The distribution and magnitude of LV segmental hypertrophy and LGE were assessed according to the AHA 17-segment model and analyzed in relation to T-wave inversions. Results: Of 196 HCM patients, 144 (73%) exhibited T-wave inversions. 144 (73%) patients had evidence of myocardial fibrosis as defined by LGE, and the prevalence of LGE was significantly higher in patients with T-wave inversions compared with those without T-wave inversions (78% vs. 59%, P = 0.008). T-wave inversions were related to basal anterior and basal anteroseptal LGE (20% vs. 10%, P = 0.04 and 68% vs. 46%, P = 0.005, respectively). In addition, T-wave inversions were associated with greater basal anteroseptal and basal inferior wall thickness (19.5 ± 4.7 mm vs. 16.7 ± 4.5 mm, P < 0.001 and 10.9 ± 3.3 mm vs. 9.6 ± 3.0 mm, P = 0.01, respectively). By logistic regression analysis, basal anteroseptal wall thickness and LGE were independent determinants of T-wave inversions (P = 0.005, P = 0.01, respectively). Conclusions: T-wave inversions in HCM are associated with LGE and wall thickness of the left ventricular basal segments. Moreover, basal anteroseptal wall thickness and LGE are independent determinants of T-wave inversions.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... conditions such as: brain tumors stroke infections developmental anomalies hydrocephalus — dilatation of fluid spaces within the brain ( ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining very ...

  11. Resonant magnetic vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using the complex angular momentum method, we provide a semiclassical analysis of electron scattering by a magnetic vortex of Aharonov-Bohm type. Regge poles of the S matrix are associated with surface waves orbiting around the vortex and supported by a magnetic field discontinuity. Rapid variations of sharp characteristic shapes can be observed on scattering cross sections. They correspond to quasibound states which are Breit-Wigner-type resonances associated with surface waves and which can be considered as quantum analogues of acoustic whispering-gallery modes. Such a resonant magnetic vortex could provide a different kind of artificial atom while the semiclassical approach developed here could be profitably extended in various areas of the physics of vortices

  12. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  16. Accelerated cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the mouse heart using self-gated parallel imaging strategies does not compromise accuracy of structural and functional measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörries Carola

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-gated dynamic cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR enables non-invasive visualization of the heart and accurate assessment of cardiac function in mouse models of human disease. However, self-gated CMR requires the acquisition of large datasets to ensure accurate and artifact-free reconstruction of cardiac cines and is therefore hampered by long acquisition times putting high demands on the physiological stability of the animal. For this reason, we evaluated the feasibility of accelerating the data collection using the parallel imaging technique SENSE with respect to both anatomical definition and cardiac function quantification. Results Findings obtained from accelerated data sets were compared to fully sampled reference data. Our results revealed only minor differences in image quality of short- and long-axis cardiac cines: small anatomical structures (papillary muscles and the aortic valve and left-ventricular (LV remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI were accurately detected even for 3-fold accelerated data acquisition using a four-element phased array coil. Quantitative analysis of LV cardiac function (end-diastolic volume (EDV, end-systolic volume (ESV, stroke volume (SV, ejection fraction (EF and LV mass in healthy and infarcted animals revealed no substantial deviations from reference (fully sampled data for all investigated acceleration factors with deviations ranging from 2% to 6% in healthy animals and from 2% to 8% in infarcted mice for the highest acceleration factor of 3.0. CNR calculations performed between LV myocardial wall and LV cavity revealed a maximum CNR decrease of 50% for the 3-fold accelerated data acquisition when compared to the fully-sampled acquisition. Conclusions We have demonstrated the feasibility of accelerated self-gated retrospective CMR in mice using the parallel imaging technique SENSE. The proposed method led to considerably reduced acquisition times, while preserving high

  17. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  19. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  20. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Duodenoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syms, Richard R A; Young, Ian R; Wadsworth, Christopher A; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D; Rea, Marc

    2013-12-01

    A side-viewing duodenoscope capable of both optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The instrument is constructed from MR-compatible materials and combines a coherent fiber bundle for optical imaging, an irrigation channel and a side-opening biopsy channel for the passage of catheter tools with a tip saddle coil for radio-frequency signal reception. The receiver coil is magnetically coupled to an internal pickup coil to provide intrinsic safety. Impedance matching is achieved using a mechanically variable mutual inductance, and active decoupling by PIN-diode switching. (1)H MRI of phantoms and ex vivo porcine liver specimens was carried out at 1.5 T. An MRI field-of-view appropriate for use during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was obtained, with limited artefacts, and a signal-to-noise ratio advantage over a surface array coil was demonstrated. PMID:23807423

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new examination technique used in diagnostic medicine. Its use has increased notably during the last few years in Finland, too. The biological effects of electromagnetic fields used in MRI are quite different from the effects of x-rays. This report introduces the physics and the techniques of MRI; the biological effects of magnetic fields and the hazards associated with the use of MRI systems are briefly discussed. The major national and international recommendations are summarized, too. Furthermore, a description is given how safety aspects are considered in Finnish MRI units. Finally, recommendations are given to restrict the exposure caused by MRI and to ensure the safe use of MRI. Diagnostic applications and clinical or economic aspects fall outside the scope of this report. (orig.)

  3. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  4. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  5. Systemic-to-pulmonary collateral flow in patients with palliated univentricular heart physiology: measurement using cardiovascular magnetic resonance 4D velocity acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valverde Israel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic-to-pulmonary collateral flow (SPCF may constitute a risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality in patients with single-ventricle physiology (SV. However, clinical research is limited by the complexity of multi-vessel two-dimensional (2D cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR flow measurements. We sought to validate four-dimensional (4D velocity acquisition sequence for concise quantification of SPCF and flow distribution in patients with SV. Methods 29 patients with SV physiology prospectively underwent CMR (1.5 T (n = 14 bidirectional cavopulmonary connection [BCPC], age 2.9 ± 1.3 years; and n = 15 Fontan, 14.4 ± 5.9 years and 20 healthy volunteers (age, 28.7 ± 13.1 years served as controls. A single whole-heart 4D velocity acquisition and five 2D flow acquisitions were performed in the aorta, superior/inferior caval veins, right/left pulmonary arteries to serve as gold-standard. The five 2D velocity acquisition measurements were compared with 4D velocity acquisition for validation of individual vessel flow quantification and time efficiency. The SPCF was calculated by evaluating the disparity between systemic (aortic minus caval vein flows and pulmonary flows (arterial and venour return. The pulmonary right to left and the systemic lower to upper body flow distribution were also calculated. Results The comparison between 4D velocity and 2D flow acquisitions showed good Bland-Altman agreement for all individual vessels (mean bias, 0.05±0.24 l/min/m2, calculated SPCF (−0.02±0.18 l/min/m2 and significantly shorter 4D velocity acquisition-time (12:34 min/17:28 min,p 2; Fontan 0.62±0.82 l/min/m2 and not in controls (0.01 + 0.16 l/min/m2, (3 inverse relation of right/left pulmonary artery perfusion and right/left SPCF (Pearson = −0.47,p = 0.01 and (4 upper to lower body flow distribution trend related to the weight (r = 0.742, p  Conclusions 4D

  6. Bramwell-Hill modeling for local aortic pulse wave velocity estimation: a validation study with velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance and invasive pressure assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westenberg Jos JM

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bramwell-Hill model describes the relation between vascular wall stiffness expressed in aortic distensibility and the pulse wave velocity (PWV, which is the propagation speed of the systolic pressure wave through the aorta. The main objective of this study was to test the validity of this model locally in the aorta by using PWV-assessments based on in-plane velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR, with invasive pressure measurements serving as the gold standard. Methods Seventeen patients (14 male, 3 female, mean age ± standard deviation = 57 ± 9 years awaiting cardiac catheterization were prospectively included. During catheterization, intra-arterial pressure measurements were obtained in the aorta at multiple locations 5.8 cm apart. PWV was determined regionally over the aortic arch and locally in the proximal descending aorta. Subsequently, patients underwent a CMR examination to measure aortic PWV and aortic distention. Distensibility was determined locally from the aortic distension at the proximal descending aorta and the pulse pressure measured invasively during catheterization and non-invasively from brachial cuff-assessment. PWV was determined regionally in the aortic arch using through-plane and in-plane velocity-encoded CMR, and locally at the proximal descending aorta using in-plane velocity-encoded CMR. Validity of the Bramwell-Hill model was tested by evaluating associations between distensibility and PWV. Also, theoretical PWV was calculated from distensibility measurements and compared with pressure-assessed PWV. Results In-plane velocity-encoded CMR provides stronger correlation (p = 0.02 between CMR and pressure-assessed PWV than through-plane velocity-encoded CMR (r = 0.69 versus r = 0.26, with a non-significant mean error of 0.2 ± 1.6 m/s for in-plane versus a significant (p = 0.006 error of 1.3 ± 1.7 m/s for through-plane velocity-encoded CMR. The Bramwell-Hill model shows a

  7. Magnetic resonance in neuroborreliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is commonly used in diagnosing infections of the central nervous system. The aim of the study is to evaluate central nervous system changes in neuroborreliosis patients. MR examinations were performed in 44 patients with clinical symptoms, epidemiology and laboratory tests results of neuroborreliosis. Abnormalities were detected in 22 patients. Most of them presented cortico-subcortical atrophy (86%). In 9 cases foci of increased signal in T2-weighted and FLAIR images were observed in white matter. They were single or multiple, located subcorticaly and paraventriculary. In 2 subjects areas of increased signal were found in the brain stem. Central nervous system abnormalities detected with MR are not specific for Lyme disease. They can suggest demyelinating lesions and/or gliosis observed in many nervous system disorders (SM, ADEM, lacunar infarcts). (author)

  8. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  9. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  10. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  11. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks. PMID:27432660

  12. Magnetic resonance energy and topological resonance energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-28

    Ring-current diamagnetism of a polycyclic π-system is closely associated with thermodynamic stability due to the individual circuits. Magnetic resonance energy (MRE), derived from the ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility, was explored in conjunction with graph-theoretically defined topological resonance energy (TRE). For many aromatic molecules, MRE is highly correlative with TRE with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. For all π-systems studied, MRE has the same sign as TRE. The only trouble with MRE may be that some antiaromatic and non-alternant species exhibit unusually large MRE-to-TRE ratios. This kind of difficulty can in principle be overcome by prior geometry-optimisation or by changing spin multiplicity. Apart from the semi-empirical resonance-theory resonance energy, MRE is considered as the first aromatic stabilisation energy (ASE) defined without referring to any hypothetical polyene reference.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ... CD. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) in routine ...

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 4

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 4 deals with the relaxation, irradiation, and other dynamical effects that is specific to systems having resolved structure in their magnetic resonance spectra. This book discusses the anisotropic rotation of molecules in liquids by NMR quadrupolar relaxation; rotational diffusion constants; alternating linewidth effect; and theoretical formulations of the problem. The line shapes in high-resolution NMR; matrix representations of the equations of motion; matrix representations of the equations of motion; and intramolecular hydrogen bonds are also delibera

  19. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Walter A; Truwit, Charles L

    2011-01-01

    Neurosurgeons have become reliant on image-guidance to perform safe and successful surgery both time-efficiently and cost-effectively. Neuronavigation typically involves either rigid (frame-based) or skull-mounted (frameless) stereotactic guidance derived from computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that is obtained days or immediately before the planned surgical procedure. These systems do not accommodate for brain shift that is unavoidable once the cranium is opened and cerebrospinal fluid is lost. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) systems ranging in strength from 0.12 to 3 Tesla (T) have been developed in part because they afford neurosurgeons the opportunity to accommodate for brain shift during surgery. Other distinct advantages of ioMRI include the excellent soft tissue discrimination, the ability to view the surgical site in three dimensions, and the ability to "see" tumor beyond the surface visualization of the surgeon's eye, either with or without a surgical microscope. The enhanced ability to view the tumor being biopsied or resected allows the surgeon to choose a safe surgical corridor that avoids critical structures, maximizes the extent of the tumor resection, and confirms that an intraoperative hemorrhage has not resulted from surgery. Although all ioMRI systems allow for basic T1- and T2-weighted imaging, only high-field (>1.5 T) MRI systems are capable of MR spectroscopy (MRS), MR angiography (MRA), MR venography (MRV), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and brain activation studies. By identifying vascular structures with MRA and MRV, it may be possible to prevent their inadvertent injury during surgery. Biopsying those areas of elevated phosphocholine on MRS may improve the diagnostic yield for brain biopsy. Mapping out eloquent brain function may influence the surgical path to a tumor being resected or biopsied. The optimal field strength for an ioMRI-guided surgical system and the best configuration for that system are as yet

  20. Computation of flow pressure fields from magnetic resonance velocity mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, G Z; Kilner, P J; Wood, N B; Underwood, S R; Firmin, D N

    1996-10-01

    Magnetic resonance phase velocity mapping has unrivalled capacities for acquiring in vivo multi-directional blood flow information. In this study, the authors set out to derive both spatial and temporal components of acceleration, and hence differences of pressure in a flow field using cine magnetic resonance velocity data. An efficient numerical algorithm based on the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible Newtonian fluid was used. The computational approach was validated with in vitro flow phantoms. This work aims to contribute to a better understanding of cardiovascular dynamics and to serve as a basis for investigating pulsatile pressure/flow relationships associated with normal and impaired cardiovascular function. PMID:8892202

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Thoracic Aortic Dissections

    OpenAIRE

    Sax, Steven L.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent noninvasive method for evaluating thoracic aortic dissections. A variety of magnetic resonance scans of aortic dissections are shown, documenting the ability of magnetic resonance to image the true lumen, the false channel, and the intimal septum. Detail is provided on magnetic resonance imaging techniques and findings. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:262-70)

  2. Advances in magnetic resonance 5

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 5 deals with the interpretation of ESR spectra and provides descriptions of experimental apparatus. This book discusses the halogen hyperfine interactions; organic radicals in single crystals; pulsed-Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer; and inhomogenizer and decoupler. The spectrometers for multiple-pulse NMR; weak collision theory of relaxation in the rotating frame; and spin Hamiltonian for the electron spin resonance of irradiated organic single crystals are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the NMR in helium three and m

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscholakoff, D; Higgins, C B

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a completely noninvasive technique for the evaluation of the cardiovascular system. With a multi-section technique and the spin echo pulse sequence the entire heart can be examined within six to ten minutes. All our cardiac MR studies were performed with electrocardiographic (ECG) gating, to obtain adequate resolution of the cardiac structures. With this technique, patients and animals with a variety of cardiac abnormalities were studied. The examined pathologic conditions included acute and chronic myocardial infarctions and their complications, hypertrophic and congestive cardiomyopathies, congenital heart diseases and pericardial diseases. MRI offers an enormous potential for cardiovascular diagnosis, even beyond the demonstration of pathoanatomy, because of the capability for direct tissue characterization and blood flow measurements.

  4. Detection of long-term progression of myocardial fibrosis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy in an affected family: A cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Detection of myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular dysfunction in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the corner stone for further therapeutic studies. Little is known about the ability of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) to evaluate progression of myocardial fibrosis. Aim of our study was to provide CMR data in a previously genotyped DMD family and to evaluate whether progression of myocardial fibrosis could be visualized. Methods and results: DMD genotypes were available in 14 family members. CMR was performed in 4/5 carrier females, in 2/2 affected males and in one healthy family member with normal genotype. Functional images and late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) images in contiguous short-axis orientation were acquired at baseline and follow-up of 1231 days CMR examination could be repeated in three carrier females, in one affected male and in the healthy subject previously scanned. Mean decrease of left ventricular ejection fraction during the follow-up period was 10.5 ± 11.0%, mean progression of LGE volume 11.7 ± 9.5%. Conclusions: Myocardial fibrosis seems to occur prior to global left ventricular dysfunction in DMD diseased males and carrier females. CMR could be used to evaluate progression of myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular function and may thus serve as an important diagnostic tool in the evaluation of therapeutical options in DMD.

  5. Detection of long-term progression of myocardial fibrosis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy in an affected family: A cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walcher, Thomas [Department of Internal Medicine II, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Steinbach, Peter [Institute of Human Genetics, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Spiess, Jochen; Kunze, Markus; Gradinger, Robert; Walcher, Daniel [Department of Internal Medicine II, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Bernhardt, Peter, E-mail: peter.bernhardt@uniklinik-ulm.de [Department of Internal Medicine II, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Background: Detection of myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular dysfunction in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the corner stone for further therapeutic studies. Little is known about the ability of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) to evaluate progression of myocardial fibrosis. Aim of our study was to provide CMR data in a previously genotyped DMD family and to evaluate whether progression of myocardial fibrosis could be visualized. Methods and results: DMD genotypes were available in 14 family members. CMR was performed in 4/5 carrier females, in 2/2 affected males and in one healthy family member with normal genotype. Functional images and late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) images in contiguous short-axis orientation were acquired at baseline and follow-up of 1231 days CMR examination could be repeated in three carrier females, in one affected male and in the healthy subject previously scanned. Mean decrease of left ventricular ejection fraction during the follow-up period was 10.5 {+-} 11.0%, mean progression of LGE volume 11.7 {+-} 9.5%. Conclusions: Myocardial fibrosis seems to occur prior to global left ventricular dysfunction in DMD diseased males and carrier females. CMR could be used to evaluate progression of myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular function and may thus serve as an important diagnostic tool in the evaluation of therapeutical options in DMD.

  6. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Cardiac Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braggion-Santos, Maria Fernanda, E-mail: ferbraggion@yahoo.com.br [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Hospital Universitário - Universidade de Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Hospital Universitário - Universidade de Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Teixeira, Sara Reis [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Volpe, Gustavo Jardim [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Divisão de Cardiologia - Universidade Johns Hopkins, Baltimore (United States); Trad, Henrique Simão [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Schmidt, André [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Cardiac tumors are extremely rare; however, when there is clinical suspicion, proper diagnostic evaluation is necessary to plan the most appropriate treatment. In this context, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) plays an important role, allowing a comprehensive characterization of such lesions. To review cases referred to a CMRI Department for investigation of cardiac and paracardiac masses. To describe the positive case series with a brief review of the literature for each type of lesion and the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation. Between August 2008 and December 2011, all cases referred for CMRI with suspicion of tumor involving the heart were reviewed. Cases with positive histopathological diagnosis, clinical evolution or therapeutic response compatible with the clinical suspicion and imaging findings were selected. Among the 13 cases included in our study, eight (62%) had histopathological confirmation. We describe five benign tumors (myxomas, rhabdomyoma and fibromas), five malignancies (sarcoma, lymphoma, Richter syndrome involving the heart and metastatic disease) and three non-neoplastic lesions (pericardial cyst, intracardiac thrombus and infectious vegetation). CMRI plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiac masses of non-neoplastic and neoplastic origin, contributing to a more accurate diagnosis in a noninvasive manner and assisting in treatment planning, allowing safe clinical follow-up with good reproducibility.

  8. Microvascular obstruction after successful fibrinolytic therapy in acute myocardial infarction. Comparison of reteplase vs reteplase+abciximab: A cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziano Gherli

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. About one third of patients with TIMI 3 after reperfusion have evidence of microvascular obstruction (MO which represents an independent predictor of myocardial wall rupture. This explains all efforts made to prevent MO. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has proved to be particularly useful in detecting MO. The aim of this study was to evaluate with MRI if different fibrinolytic regimens in acute myocardial infarction display different effects on left ventricle (LV volumes and ejection fraction (EF, as well as on myocardial infarct size (MIsz and MO. Methods. Twenty male patients, mean age 58 years, affected by acute myocardial infarction, ten anterior and ten inferior, were treated with: full dose reteplase in ten, and half dose reteplase plus full dose abciximab (R+Abcx in the other ten patients. In the fourth day after hospital admission, MRI STIR T2 images were used to quantify MIsz, while 2dflash cineloops were used after the injection of gadolinium, to quantify LV volumes, EF and to detect MO. Results. LV EF was higher in R+Abcx 51±10 than in reteplase 41±8. MIsz was similar in both treatment groups: however a close relationship was present between MIsz and EF in the reteplase group indicating that the greater the MIsz the lower the EF. In R+Abcx this relationship was no longer present, suggesting a protective effect of the drug on microcirculation. In fact extensive MO was present in 25% of all cases, 80% of which in the reteplase group while only 20% in R+Abcx. Conclusion. R+Abcx prevents MO: compared to traditional fibrinolytic therapy it allows better LV function and most likely improved long term survival.

  9. magnetic resonance imaging,etc.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张福基

    1998-01-01

    magnetic resonance imaging n.[1984] a noninvasive diagnostic technique that produces computerized images of internal body tissues and is based on nuclear magnetic resonance of atoms within he body induced by the application of radio waves磁共振成像(指一种非侵害 性诊断技术,能生成内部身体组织的计算机化影像,其依据是应用无线电波 感生体内原子并使之产磁共振)

  10. Recommendations concerning magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In medicine the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied in the form of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS can be carried out non-invasively. The committee of the Dutch Health Council briefly discusses the qualities and potentialities of the nuclei that will probably be used in future clinical spectroscopy: 31P, 13C, 1H (and possibly 19F and 23Na). The committee discusses several possibilities of combining imaging and spectroscopy. The imaging of nuclei other than protons is also possible with MRS. Potential applications are considered in oncology, cardiology, neurology and hepatology. (Auth.)

  11. Advances in magnetic resonance 8

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 8 describes the magnetic resonance in spin polarization and saturation transfer. This book discusses the theory of chemically induced dynamic spin polarization; basic results for the radical-pair mechanism; and optical spin polarization in molecular crystals. The theory of optical electronic polarization (OEP); NMR in flowing systems; and applications of NMR in a flowing liquid are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the saturation transfer spectroscopy; studies of spin labels in the intermediate and fast motion regions; and spin-density matrix and

  12. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M. P. J.; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj.; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advan

  13. Enhancement of magnetic resonance imaging with metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Slobozhanyuk, A P; Raaijmakers, A J E; Berg, C A T van den; Kozachenko, A V; Dubrovina, I A; Melchakova, I V; Kivshar, Yu S; Belov, P A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the cornerstone technique for diagnostic medicine, biology, and neuroscience. This imaging method is highly innovative, noninvasive and its impact continues to grow. It can be used for measuring changes in the brain after enhanced neural activity, detecting early cancerous cells in tissue, as well as for imaging nanoscale biological structures, and controlling fluid dynamics, and it can be beneficial for cardiovascular imaging. The MRI performance is characterized by a signal-to-noise ratio, however the spatial resolution and image contrast depend strongly on the scanner design. Here, we reveal how to exploit effectively the unique properties of metasurfaces for the substantial improvement of MRI efficiency. We employ a metasurface created by an array of wires placed inside the MRI scanner under an object, and demonstrate a giant enhancement of the magnetic field by means of subwavelength near-field manipulation with the metasurface, thus strongly increasing the scanner sen...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  15. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  16. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  17. Magnetometer of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer that measures magnetic fields, between 2,500 gauss and 5,000 gauss, with an accuracy of a few parts per million. The circuit of the magnetometer, based on a marginal oscillator, permits a continuous tunning in the frequency range comprised between 10.0 MHz, with a signal to noise ratio of about 20. The radiofrequency amplifier is of the cascode type in integrated circuit and it operates with two 9V batteries. The modulation is at 35 Hz and it is provided by an external oscillator. The instrument is compact, inexpensive and easy to operate; it can also be used for didactic purposes to show the phenomenon of magnetic nuclear resonance and its main characteristics. (author)

  18. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors

  19. Pediatric Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Goyal, Ankur; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a radiation-free imaging modality with excellent contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities. Since ionizing radiation is an important concern in the pediatric population, MRI serves as a useful alternative to computed tomography (CT) and also provides additional clues to diagnosis, not discernible on other investigations. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), urography, angiography, enterography, dynamic multiphasic imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging provide wealth of information. The main limitations include, long scan time, need for sedation/anesthesia, cost and lack of widespread availability. With the emergence of newer sequences and variety of contrast agents, MRI has become a robust modality and may serve as a one-stop shop for both anatomical and functional information. PMID:26916887

  20. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad;

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to char...... a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging....

  1. Ultra-high frequency magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Magill, Arthur W.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of radiofrequency probe design for Ultra High Frequency Magnetic Resonance Imaging (7T). The signal-to-noise ratio available in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is determined by the static magnetic field strength, causing a continued drive toward higher fields to enable faster image acquisition at finer spatial resolution. The resonant frequency increases linearly with static field strength. At 7T the proton resonant frequency is 300MHz, with a wavelength...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital cardiac abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging will not replace echocardiography as the simplest and most definitive method of establishing a noninvasive diagnosis in young patients with congenital cardiac malformations, nor will it replace radionuclide angiography for relatively noninvasive detection and quantitation of cardiac shunts. Magnetic resonance imaging is a complementary noninvasive imaging procedure that can answer some questions left in doubt by echocardiography (mainly extracardiac artery and vein assessments) or radionuclide angiography and used as a preferred follow-up imaging method in certain clinical circumstances. In addition, MRI can be a first-line modality for cardiovascular imaging in older patients in whom adequate echo windows are not available. Angiocardiography remains necessary to provide vital physiological data, i.e., chamber pressures, shunt volumes, oxygen saturations, and pulmonary vascular resistance; however, MRI could negate some follow-up catheterizations in appropriate clinical circumstances. High-resolution proton MRI tomography should ultimately permit the accurate evaluation of ventricular volumes, myocardial mass, and the assessment of regional wall motion and ejection fractions. Paramagnetic substances such as manganese ion may ultimately provide a basis for myocardial perfusion imaging. The potential for MRI evaluation of tissue characterization, noninvasive blood-flow measurements, and myocardial metabolism assessment in intriguing and awaits clinical evaluation

  3. Geometria da valva mitral derivada da ressonância magnética cardiovascular na avaliação da gravidade da regurgitação mitral Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging-derived mitral valve geometry in determining mitral regurgitation severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Mauricio Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A regurgitação mitral é a doença valvar cardíaca mais comum em todo o mundo. A ressonância magnética pode ser uma ferramenta útil para analisar os parâmetros da valva mitral. OBJETIVO: diferenciar padrões geométricos da valva mitral em pacientes com diferentes gravidades por regurgitação mitral (RM com base na ressonância magnética cardiovascular. MÉTODOS: Sessenta e três pacientes foram submetidos à ressonância magnética cardiovascular. Os parâmetros da valva mitral analisados foram: área (mm2 e ângulo (graus de tenting, altura do ventrículo (mm, altura do tenting (mm, folheto anterior, comprimento posterior do folheto (leaflet e diâmetro do anulo (mm. Os pacientes foram divididos em dois grupos, um incluindo pacientes que necessitaram de cirurgia da valva mitral e o outro os que não. RESULTADOS: Trinta e seis pacientes apresentaram de RM discreta a leve (1-2+ e 27 RM de moderada a grave (3-4+. Dez (15,9% dos 63 pacientes foram submetidos à cirurgia. Pacientes com RM mais grave tiveram maior diâmetro sistólico final do ventrículo esquerdo (38,6 ± 10,2 vs. 45,4 ± 16,8, p BACKGROUND: Mitral regurgitation is the most common valvular heart disease worldwide. Magnetic resonance may be a useful tool to analyze mitral valve parameters. OBJECTIVE: To distinguish mitral valve geometric patterns in patients with different severities of mitral regurgitation (MR based on cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. METHODS: Sixty-three patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. Mitral valve parameters analyzed were: tenting area (mm2 and angle (degrees, ventricle height (mm, tenting height (mm, anterior leaflet, posterior leaflet length and annulus diameter (mm. Patients were divided into two groups, one including patients who required mitral valve surgery and another which did not. RESULTS: Thirty-six patients had trace to mild (1-2+ MR and 27 had moderate to severe MR (3-4+. Ten (15.9% out of

  4. Comparison of cardiovascular magnetic resonance feature tracking and tagging for the assessment of left ventricular systolic strain in acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We compared feature tracking (FT) and tagging quantification of myocardial strain in acute MI. • This is the first study assessing FT strain assessment in acute MI. • FT was more robust and had better myocardial tracking than tagging. • FT had better interobserver agreement and FT analysis was quicker. • FT has stronger correlation with global and segmental infarct size, area at risk (oedema), myocardial salvage and infarct transmurality. • FT is feasible in acute MI and is likely to become the preferred quantification method. - Abstract: Aims: To assess the feasibility of feature tracking (FT)-measured systolic strain post acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and compare strain values to those obtained with tagging. Methods: Cardiovascular MRI at 1.5 T was performed in 24 patients, 2.2 days post STEMI. Global and segmental circumferential (Ecc) and longitudinal (Ell) strain were assessed using FT and tagging, and correlated with total and segmental infarct size, area at risk and myocardial salvage. Results: All segments tracked satisfactorily with FT (p < 0.001 vs. tagging). Total analysis time per patient was shorter with FT (38.2 ± 3.8 min vs. 63.7 ± 10.3 min, p < 0.001 vs. tagging). Global Ecc and Ell were higher with FT than with tagging, apart from FT Ecc using the average of endocardial and epicardial contours (−13.45 ± 4.1 [FT] vs. −13.85 ± 3.9 [tagging], p = 0.66). Intraobserver and interobserver agreement for global strain were excellent for FT (ICC 0.906–0.990) but interobserver agreement for tagging was lower (ICC < 0.765). Interobserver and intraobserver agreement for segmental strain was good for both techniques (ICC > 0.7) apart from tagging Ell, which was poor (ICC = 0.15). FT-derived Ecc significantly correlated with total infarct size (r = 0.44, p = 0.03) and segmental infarct extent (r = 0.44, p < 0.01), and best distinguished transmurally infarcted segments (AUC 0.77) and infarcted from

  5. Comparison of cardiovascular magnetic resonance feature tracking and tagging for the assessment of left ventricular systolic strain in acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Jamal N., E-mail: jk211@le.ac.uk; Singh, Anvesha, E-mail: as707@le.ac.uk; Nazir, Sheraz A., E-mail: sn191@le.ac.uk; Kanagala, Prathap, E-mail: pk214@le.ac.uk; Gershlick, Anthony H., E-mail: agershlick@aol.com; McCann, Gerry P., E-mail: gerry.mccann@uhl-tr.nhs.uk

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • We compared feature tracking (FT) and tagging quantification of myocardial strain in acute MI. • This is the first study assessing FT strain assessment in acute MI. • FT was more robust and had better myocardial tracking than tagging. • FT had better interobserver agreement and FT analysis was quicker. • FT has stronger correlation with global and segmental infarct size, area at risk (oedema), myocardial salvage and infarct transmurality. • FT is feasible in acute MI and is likely to become the preferred quantification method. - Abstract: Aims: To assess the feasibility of feature tracking (FT)-measured systolic strain post acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and compare strain values to those obtained with tagging. Methods: Cardiovascular MRI at 1.5 T was performed in 24 patients, 2.2 days post STEMI. Global and segmental circumferential (Ecc) and longitudinal (Ell) strain were assessed using FT and tagging, and correlated with total and segmental infarct size, area at risk and myocardial salvage. Results: All segments tracked satisfactorily with FT (p < 0.001 vs. tagging). Total analysis time per patient was shorter with FT (38.2 ± 3.8 min vs. 63.7 ± 10.3 min, p < 0.001 vs. tagging). Global Ecc and Ell were higher with FT than with tagging, apart from FT Ecc using the average of endocardial and epicardial contours (−13.45 ± 4.1 [FT] vs. −13.85 ± 3.9 [tagging], p = 0.66). Intraobserver and interobserver agreement for global strain were excellent for FT (ICC 0.906–0.990) but interobserver agreement for tagging was lower (ICC < 0.765). Interobserver and intraobserver agreement for segmental strain was good for both techniques (ICC > 0.7) apart from tagging Ell, which was poor (ICC = 0.15). FT-derived Ecc significantly correlated with total infarct size (r = 0.44, p = 0.03) and segmental infarct extent (r = 0.44, p < 0.01), and best distinguished transmurally infarcted segments (AUC 0.77) and infarcted from

  6. Fast magnetization reversal of nanoclusters in resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Yukalov, V. I.; Yukalova, E. P.

    2012-01-01

    An effective method for ultrafast magnetization reversal of nanoclusters is suggested. The method is based on coupling a nanocluster to a resonant electric circuit. This coupling causes the appearance of a magnetic feedback field acting on the cluster, which drastically shortens the magnetization reversal time. The influence of the resonator properties, nanocluster parameters, and external fields on the magnetization dynamics and reversal time is analyzed. The magnetization reversal time can ...

  7. Wide-range nuclear magnetic resonance detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturman, J. C.; Jirberg, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Compact and easy to use solid state nuclear magnetic resonance detector is designed for measuring field strength to 20 teslas in cryogenically cooled magnets. Extremely low noise and high sensitivity make detector applicable to nearly all types of analytical nuclear magnetic resonance measurements and can be used in high temperature and radiation environments.

  8. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  9. Hyperpolarized Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP) technology has enabled a new paradigm for renal imaging investigations. It allows standard magnetic resonance imaging complementary renal metabolic and functional fingerprints within seconds without the use of ionizing radiation....... Increasing evidence supports its utility in preclinical research in which the real-time interrogation of metabolic turnover can aid the physiological and pathophysiological metabolic and functional effects in ex vivo and in vivo models. The method has already been translated to humans, although the clinical...

  10. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging.

  11. Introduction to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manatt, Stanley L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to try to give a short overview of what the status is on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's a subject where one really has to spend some time to look at the physics in detail to develop a proper working understanding. I feel it's not appropriate to present to you density matrices, Hamiltonians of all sorts, and differential equations representing the motion of spins. I'm really going to present some history and status, and show a few very simple concepts involved in NMR. It is a form of radio frequency spectroscopy and there are a great number of nuclei that can be studied very usefully with the technique. NMR requires a magnet, a r.f. transmitter/receiver system, and a data acquisition system.

  12. Determinants of Left Ventricular Mass and Hypertrophy in Hemodialysis Patients Assessed by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Rajan K.; Oliver, Scott; Patrick B. Mark; Powell, Joanna R.; McQuarrie, Emily P.; Traynor, James P.; Dargie, Henry J; Jardine, Alan G

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent risk factor for premature cardiovascular death in hemodialysis (HD) patients and one of the three forms of uremic cardiomyopathy. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a volume-independent technique to assess cardiac structure. We used CMR to assess the determinants of left ventricular mass (LVM) and LVH in HD patients.

  13. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of hemochromatosis arthropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to compare plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of hemochromatosis arthropathy of the knees of ten patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis. Both modalities enabled visualisation of bony degenerative changes; magnetic resonance imaging enabled additional visualization of deformity of both cartilage and menisci. Magnetic resonance imaging failed reliably to confirm the presence of intra-articular iron in the patients studied. No correlation was observed between synovial fluid magnetic resonance signal values, corresponding serum ferritin levels, or the severity of the observed degenerative changes. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of hemochromatosis arthropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eustace, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Buff, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); McCarthy, C. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); MacMathuana, P. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Gilligan, P. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Ennis, J.T. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    1994-10-01

    This study was undertaken to compare plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of hemochromatosis arthropathy of the knees of ten patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis. Both modalities enabled visualisation of bony degenerative changes; magnetic resonance imaging enabled additional visualization of deformity of both cartilage and menisci. Magnetic resonance imaging failed reliably to confirm the presence of intra-articular iron in the patients studied. No correlation was observed between synovial fluid magnetic resonance signal values, corresponding serum ferritin levels, or the severity of the observed degenerative changes. (orig.)

  16. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the charcoal heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grill Howard

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a case of malignant melanoma metastasis to the heart presenting as complete heart block. The highlight of the case is to demonstrate that silent cardiac metastasis is not uncommon and CMR has the potential to characterize these cardiac metastases and should be used routinely as a screening tool for those cancers with a high chance of cardiac involvement.

  17. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance President's page

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer Christopher M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The year 2009 has been a busy one for the SCMR. With health care reform in the headlines, SCMR is committed to expanding the use of CMR in clinical practice and research. Progress is being made quickly as the U.S. moves towards approval of payment for flow and in Europe, publication of the CMR registry is nigh. The impact factor of JCMR jumped up and the program for the 2010 meeting in Phoenix looks outstanding. All in all, SCMR is making advancements in many fronts.

  18. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance President's page

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    The year 2009 has been a busy one for the SCMR. With health care reform in the headlines, SCMR is committed to expanding the use of CMR in clinical practice and research. Progress is being made quickly as the U.S. moves towards approval of payment for flow and in Europe, publication of the CMR registry is nigh. The impact factor of JCMR jumped up and the program for the 2010 meeting in Phoenix looks outstanding. All in all, SCMR is making advancements in many fronts.

  19. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance President's page

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The year 2009 has been a busy one for the SCMR. With health care reform in the headlines, SCMR is committed to expanding the use of CMR in clinical practice and research. Progress is being made quickly as the U.S. moves towards approval of payment for flow and in Europe, publication of the CMR registry is nigh. The impact factor of JCMR jumped up and the program for the 2010 meeting in Phoenix looks outstanding. All in all, SCMR is making advancements in many fronts.

  20. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in pericardial diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Francone Marco; Bogaert Jan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The pericardium and pericardial diseases in particular have received, in contrast to other topics in the field of cardiology, relatively limited interest. Today, despite improved knowledge of pathophysiology of pericardial diseases and the availability of a wide spectrum of diagnostic tools, the diagnostic challenge remains. Not only the clinical presentation may be atypical, mimicking other cardiac, pulmonary or pleural diseases; in developed countries a shift for instance in the ep...

  1. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance guided electrophysiology studies

    OpenAIRE

    Lardo Albert C; Kolandaivelu Aravindan; Halperin Henry R

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Catheter ablation is a first line treatment for many cardiac arrhythmias and is generally performed under x-ray fluoroscopy guidance. However, current techniques for ablating complex arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia are associated with suboptimal success rates and prolonged radiation exposure. Pre-procedure 3D CMR has improved understanding of the anatomic basis of complex arrhythmias and is being used for planning and guidance of ablation procedure...

  2. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the charcoal heart

    OpenAIRE

    Grill Howard; Yamrozik June; Williams Ronald B; Rathi Vikas K; Biederman Robert WW

    2008-01-01

    Abstract We report a case of malignant melanoma metastasis to the heart presenting as complete heart block. The highlight of the case is to demonstrate that silent cardiac metastasis is not uncommon and CMR has the potential to characterize these cardiac metastases and should be used routinely as a screening tool for those cancers with a high chance of cardiac involvement.

  3. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Neurosarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T Ginat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurosarcoidosis is an uncommon condition with protean manifestations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is often used in the diagnostic evaluation and follow-up of patients with neurosarcoidosis. Therefore, familiarity with the variety of MRI appearances is important. In this pictorial essay, the range of possible patterns of involvement in neurosarcoidosis are depicted and discussed. These include intracranial and spine leptomeningeal involvement, cortical and cerebral white matter lesions, corpus callosum involvement, sellar and suprasellar involvement, periventricular involvement, cranial nerve involvement, cavernous sinus involvement, hydrocephalus, dural involvement, ischemic lesions, perivascular involvement, orbit lesions, osseous involvement, nerve root involvement, and spinal cord intramedullary involvement. Differential diagnoses for each pattern of involvement of neurosarcoidosis are also provided.

  5. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C;

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C;

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  8. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  9. Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The origine of nuclear magnetic resonance signal is reminded and different ways for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging are presented, especially, modifications of tissus relaxation times. Investigations have focused on development of agents incorporating either paramagnetic ions or stable free radicals. Pharmacological and toxicological aspects are developed. The diagnostic potential of these substances is illustrated by the example of gadolinium complexes

  10. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of erythrocyte membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapman, D.; Kamat, V.B.; Gier, J. de; Penkett, S.A.

    1968-01-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for studying molecular interactions in biological membranes has been investigated using erythrocyte membrane fragments. Sonic dispersion of these fragments produces a sharp and well-defined high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum. The sp

  12. Magnetic non-collinear neutron wave resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Khaidukov, Yu N

    2009-01-01

    The expression are received for amplitude of neutron reflection from layered magnetic non-collinear structure (neutron wave resonator (NWR)). It is showed the magnetic non-collinear NWR is characterized by the system of pairs of resonances for the spin flipped neutrons. The conditions are defined at which amplifying of spin-flipped neutron flux in wave resonator is multiple increased in comparison with amplifying of neutron absorption.

  13. Stepped Impedance Resonators for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Akgun, Can E.; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J.; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) multi-element transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections referred to as step...

  14. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Yumin Hou

    2013-01-01

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE osci...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in mucopolysaccharidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Seijun; Tanaka, Akemi; Kawawaki, Hisashi; Hattori, Hideji; Matsuoka, Osamu; Murata, Ryosuke; Isshiki, Gen; Inoue, Yuichi

    1988-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images in six patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS), two with type I S, one with type II A, two with type III B, and one with type VI MPS, were reviewed and compared with reported pathological findings and with CT scans. We used a Picker International MR imager with a 0.5-tesla superconducting magnet. The pulse sequences involved the inversion recovery technique (TR, 2,100 msec ; TI, 600 msec ; TE, 40 msec) for the T/sub 1/-weighted images and spin echo technique (TR, 1,800 msec ; TE, 120 msec) for the T/sub 2/-weighted images. The TC scanner was a Somatom 2 or DR3. In the patients with type II A and type VI MPS, there were multi-focal lesions of various sizes that showed prolonged T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ in the white matter. These lesions, which were not detected by CT, seemed to be correlated with the pathological findings of cavitation and dilated periadventitial space with viscous fluid. In the patients with type II A and type III B MPS, the T/sub 2/-weighted images showed a reduced contrast between gray and white matters, which may be related to the deposition of glycolipids and mucopolysaccharides in the lysosomes of the neurons and astrocytes of the gray and white matters. These findings seemed to be correlated with the clinical finding of mental retardation. In the patient of type II A MPS, there were lesions that showed prolonged T/sub 2/ of the periventricular white matter, suggesting periventricular edema. But CT hardly detected these lesions. In the patients with type I S MPS, no abnormal findings were found in MR imaging. It was concluded that MR imaging was far more sensitive for the detection of MPS lesions than CT, and was a useful method for differential diagnosis in MPS.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in mucopolysaccharidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images in six patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS), two with type I S, one with type II A, two with type III B, and one with type VI MPS, were reviewed and compared with reported pathological findings and with CT scans. We used a Picker International MR imager with a 0.5-tesla superconducting magnet. The pulse sequences involved the inversion recovery technique (TR, 2,100 msec ; TI, 600 msec ; TE, 40 msec) for the T1-weighted images and spin echo technique (TR, 1,800 msec ; TE, 120 msec) for the T2-weighted images. The TC scanner was a Somatom 2 or DR3. In the patients with type II A and type VI MPS, there were multi-focal lesions of various sizes that showed prolonged T1 and T2 in the white matter. These lesions, which were not detected by CT, seemed to be correlated with the pathological findings of cavitation and dilated periadventitial space with viscous fluid. In the patients with type II A and type III B MPS, the T2-weighted images showed a reduced contrast between gray and white matters, which may be related to the deposition of glycolipids and mucopolysaccharides in the lysosomes of the neurons and astrocytes of the gray and white matters. These findings seemed to be correlated with the clinical finding of mental retardation. In the patient of type II A MPS, there were lesions that showed prolonged T2 of the periventricular white matter, suggesting periventricular edema. But CT hardly detected these lesions. In the patients with type I S MPS, no abnormal findings were found in MR imaging. It was concluded that MR imaging was far more sensitive for the detection of MPS lesions than CT, and was a useful method for differential diagnosis in MPS. (author)

  17. Functional magnetic resonance imaging by visual stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated functional magnetic resonance images obtained in 8 healthy subjects in response to visual stimulation using a conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging system with multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging. Activation in the visual cortex was clearly demonstrated by the multi-slice experiment with a task-related change in signal intensity. In addition to the primary visual cortex, other areas were also activated by a complicated visual task. Multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging offers high temporal resolution and allows the three-dimensional analysis of brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides a useful noninvasive method of mapping brain function. (author)

  18. Magnetic resonance in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres. (orig.)

  19. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  20. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovich, Dmitry; Baryshnikova, Kseniia; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    All-dielectric “magnetic light” nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here an approach for enhancing of magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of the magnetic moment, tailoring the latter in the dynamical range of 100% and delivering enhancement up to 36% relative to performances of standalone spherical particles. The proposed approach provides pathways for designs of all-dielectric metamaterials and metasurfaces with strong magnetic responses.

  1. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  2. Contribution to nuclear magnetic resonance imager using permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After some recalls of nuclear magnetic resonance, ways to get a stable and homogeneous magnetic field are studied with permanent magnets. Development of correction coils on integrated circuits has been particularly stressed. Gradient coil specific systems have been studied taking in account ferromagnetic material presence. Antenna system has been improved and possibility of image obtention with the prototype realized has been shown

  3. International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Join the ISMRM Journals History & Mission Central Office Society Award Winners Strategic Plan Policies Corporate Members Contact ... E-Library Virtual Meetings Connect With Us International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 2300 Clayton Road, ...

  4. Magnetic moment of the Roper resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, T. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Gegelia, J., E-mail: gegelia@kph.uni-mainz.de [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); High Energy Physics Institute of TSU, 0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Scherer, S. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2012-08-29

    The magnetic moment of the Roper resonance is calculated in the framework of a low-energy effective field theory of the strong interactions. A systematic power-counting procedure is implemented by applying the complex-mass scheme.

  5. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ultrasound Video: Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  6. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) ... Recently posted: Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids Dementia Video: General Ultrasound Video: Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Radiology and ...

  7. Magnetic moment of the Roper resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, T.; Gegelia, J.; Scherer, S.

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic moment of the Roper resonance is calculated in the framework of a low-energy effective field theory of the strong interactions. A systematic power-counting procedure is implemented by applying the complex-mass scheme.

  8. Advanced magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Peng; 曹鹏

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is a well-known non-invasive technique that provides spectra (by MR spectroscopy, MRS) and images (by magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) of the examined tissue with detailed metabolic, structural, and functional information. This doctoral work is focused on advanced methodologies and applications of MRS for probing cellular and molecular changes in vivo. A single-voxel diffusion-weighted (DW) MRS method was first developed for monitoring the size changes of intramyocellu...

  9. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  10. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Current Capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Peter L.; Crooks, Lawrence E.; Margulis, Alexander R.; Kaufman, Leon

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging can produce tomographic images of the body without ionizing radiation. Images of the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities have been obtained and normal structures and pathology have been identified. Soft tissue contrast with this method is superior to that with x-ray computerized tomography and its spatial resolution is approaching that of x-ray computerized tomography. In addition, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging enables us to image along the sag...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging with a Dielectric Lens

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez, F.; Marrufo, O.; MARTIN,R; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, metamaterials have been introduced to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of magnetic resonance images with very promising results. However, the use polymers in the generation of high quality images in magnetic resonance imaging has not been fully been investigated. These investigations explored the use of a dielectric periodical array as a lens to improve the image SNR generated with single surface coils. Commercial polycarbonate glazing sheets were used together with a circula...

  12. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Markovich, Dmitry; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    All-dielectric "magnetic light" nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here a new approach for increasing magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer nanoantenna. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of magnetic polarizability, tailoring the later in the dynamical range of 100 % and enhancement up to 36 % relative to performances of standalone spherical particles....

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  14. Spiral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as detected by cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Nessim; Williams, Ronald B; Yarmozik, June A; Biederman, Robert W W

    2014-03-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetically determined heart muscle disease; characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Spiral HCM is described as having a counterclockwise rotation pattern of hypertrophy along with variable degrees of fibrosis. A 34-year-old female presented with symptoms suggestive of heart failure. Echocardiography showed concentric LVH with normal contractility. Cardiac MRI showed asymmetric septal hypertrophy with mid-cavity obliteration and a spiral pattern of variably increasing wall thickness. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) demonstrated several areas of abnormal postgadolinium uptake. We report a case of spiral HCM. We should consider cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as the reference standard for diagnosing HCM. PMID:24749165

  15. Coherence of magnetic resonators in a metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The coherence of periodic magnetic resonators (MRs under oblique incidence is studied using simulations. The correlated phase of interaction including both the retardation effect and relative phase difference between two MRs is defined, and it plays a key role in the MR interaction. The correlated phase is anisotropic, as is the coherence condition. The coherence condition is the same as the Wood's anomaly and verified by the Fano resonance. This study shows that the applications of the Fano resonance of periodic MRs will become widespread owing to achieving the Fano resonance simply by tuning the incident angle.

  16. Acupuncture Effects on Cardiac Functions Measured by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Feline Model

    OpenAIRE

    Tzu-chi Lee; Jen-Hwey Chiu; Weng-Yih Tseng; Leang-Shin Wu; Krishna Kaphle; Jen-Hsou Lin; Chen-Haw Shih; Ying-Ling Wu

    2010-01-01

    The usefulness of acupuncture (AP) as a complementary and/or alternative therapy in animals is well established but more research is needed on its clinical efficacy relative to conventional therapy, and on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of AP. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI), an important tool in monitoring cardiovascular diseases, provides a reliable method to monitor the effects of AP on the cardiovascular system. This controlled experiment monitored the effect electro-a...

  17. 170 Nanometer Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging using Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Thurber, K R; Smith, D D; Thurber, Kent R.; Harrell, Lee E.; Smith, Doran D.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the semiconductor GaAs with 170 nanometer slice separation and resolve two regions of reduced nuclear spin polarization density separated by only 500 nanometers. This is achieved by force detection of the magnetic resonance, Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM), in combination with optical pumping to increase the nuclear spin polarization. Optical pumping of the GaAs creates spin polarization up to 12 times larger than the thermal nuclear spin polarization at 5 K and 4 T. The experiment is sensitive to sample volumes containing $\\sim 4 \\times 10^{11}$ $^{71}$Ga$/\\sqrt{Hz}$. These results demonstrate the ability of force-detected magnetic resonance to apply magnetic resonance imaging to semiconductor devices and other nanostructures.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of iliotibial band syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, E F; Pope, T; Martin, D F; Curl, W W

    1994-01-01

    Seven cases of iliotibial band syndrome and the pathoanatomic findings of each, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging, are presented. These findings were compared with magnetic resonance imaging scans of 10 age- and sex-matched control knees without evidence of lateral knee pain. Magnetic resonance imaging signal consistent with fluid was seen deep to the iliotibial band in the region of the lateral femoral epicondyle in five of the seven cases. Additionally, when compared with the control group, patients with iliotibial band syndrome demonstrated a significantly thicker iliotibial band over the lateral femoral epicondyle (P iliotibial band in the disease group was 5.49 +/- 2.12 mm, as opposed to 2.52 +/- 1.56 mm in the control group. Cadaveric dissections were performed on 10 normal knees to further elucidate the exact nature of the area under the iliotibial band. A potential space, i.e., a bursa, was found between the iliotibial band and the knee capsule. This series suggests that magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates objective evidence of iliotibial band syndrome and can be helpful when a definitive diagnosis is essential. Furthermore, correlated with anatomic dissection, magnetic resonance imaging identifies this as a problem within a bursa beneath the iliotibial band and not a problem within the knee joint.

  19. Generation of nuclear magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two generation techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance images, the retro-projection and the direct transformation method are studied these techniques are based on the acquisition of NMR signals which phases and frequency components are codified in space by application of magnetic field gradients. The construction of magnet coils is discussed, in particular a suitable magnet geometry with polar pieces and air gap. The obtention of image contrast by T1 and T2 relaxation times reconstructed from generated signals using sequences such as spin-echo, inversion-recovery and stimulated echo, is discussed. The mathematical formalism of matrix solution for Bloch equations is also presented. (M.C.K.)

  20. Magnetic resonance of magnetic fluid and magnetoliposome preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Paulo C. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil)]. E-mail: pcmor@unb.br; Santos, Judes G. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Skeff Neto, K. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Pelegrini, Fernando [Universidade Federal de Goias, Instituto de Fisica, 74001-970 Goiania-GO (Brazil); Cuyper, Marcel de [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Campus Kortrijk, Interdisciplinary Research Centre, B-8500 Kortrijk (Belgium)

    2005-05-15

    In this study, magnetic resonance was used to investigate lauric acid-coated magnetite-based magnetic fluid particles and particles which are surrounded by a double layer of phospholipid molecules (magnetoliposomes). The data reveal the presence of monomers and dimers in both samples. Whereas evidence for a thermally induced disruption of dimers is found in the magnetic fluid, apparently, the bilayer phospholipid envelop prevents the dissociation in the magnetoliposome samples.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mala; Tanna, Neil; Margolies, Laurie

    2014-12-01

    Silicone breast implants have significantly evolved since their introduction half a century ago, yet implant rupture remains a common and expected complication, especially in patients with earlier-generation implants. Magnetic resonance imaging is the primary modality for assessing the integrity of silicone implants and has excellent sensitivity and specificity, and the Food and Drug Administration currently recommends periodic magnetic resonance imaging screening for silent silicone breast implant rupture. Familiarity with the types of silicone implants and potential complications is essential for the radiologist. Signs of intracapsular rupture include the noose, droplet, subcapsular line, and linguine signs. Signs of extracapsular rupture include herniation of silicone with a capsular defect and extruded silicone material. Specific sequences including water and silicone suppression are essential for distinguishing rupture from other pathologies and artifacts. Magnetic resonance imaging provides valuable information about the integrity of silicone implants and associated complications.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, C.B.; Hricak, H.

    1987-01-01

    This text provides reference to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the body. Beginning with explanatory chapters on the physics, instrumentation, and interpretation of MRI, it proceeds to the normal anatomy of the neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Other chapters cover magnetic resonance imaging of blood flow, the larynx, the lymph nodes, and the spine, as well as MRI in obstetrics. The text features detailed coverage of magnetic resonance imaging of numerous disorders and disease states, including neck disease, thoracic disease; breast disease; congenital and acquired heart disease; vascular disease; diseases of the liver, pancreas, and spleen; diseases of the kidney, adrenals, and retroperitoneum; diseases of the male and female pelvis; and musculoskeletal diseases. Chapters on the biological and environmental hazards of MRI, the current clinical status of MRI in comparison to other imaging modalities, and economic considerations are also included.

  3. Tutte polynomial in functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Castillón, Marlly V.

    2015-09-01

    Methods of graph theory are applied to the processing of functional magnetic resonance images. Specifically the Tutte polynomial is used to analyze such kind of images. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging provide us connectivity networks in the brain which are represented by graphs and the Tutte polynomial will be applied. The problem of computing the Tutte polynomial for a given graph is #P-hard even for planar graphs. For a practical application the maple packages "GraphTheory" and "SpecialGraphs" will be used. We will consider certain diagram which is depicting functional connectivity, specifically between frontal and posterior areas, in autism during an inferential text comprehension task. The Tutte polynomial for the resulting neural networks will be computed and some numerical invariants for such network will be obtained. Our results show that the Tutte polynomial is a powerful tool to analyze and characterize the networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  4. MAGNETIC RESONANCE SEMIOTICS OF BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Serebryakova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer (BC that is the most common malignancy in women presents an indubitable threat to their life and health. The basis for this investigation was magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data of 203 women with histologically verified malignan- cies. The patients' mean age was 53±10.2 years. The paper describes the magnetic resonance semiotics of BC; the authors have developed criteria for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance mammography used in the differential diagnosis of nodules.Due to high soft-tissue contrast, the use of thin sections, and the possibility of examining in any projection, MRI allows one not only to accurately visualize a pathological mass as compared with X-ray mammography or ultrasound study, but also to characterize its vascularization, which is a major criteria for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast nodules.

  5. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  6. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridjonsson, E. O.; Creber, S. A.; Vrouwenvelder, J. S.; Johns, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, ... magnetic field is not harmful in itself, implanted medical devices that contain metal may malfunction or cause problems ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. ... still during imaging. A person who is very large may not fit into the opening of certain ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... allergies and whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. MRI has been used for scanning patients since ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... number of abrupt onset or long-standing symptoms. It can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors ...

  15. Magnetic force microscopy using tip magnetization modulated by ferromagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the tip–sample distance should be reduced to analyze the microscopic magnetic domain structure with high spatial resolution. However, achieving a small tip–sample distance has been difficult because of superimposition of interaction forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces induced by the sample surface. In this study, we propose a new method of MFM using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to extract only the magnetic field near the sample surface. In this method, the magnetization of a magnetic cantilever is modulated by FMR to separate the magnetic field and topographic structure. We demonstrate the modulation of the magnetization of the cantilever and the identification of the polarities of a perpendicular magnetic medium. (paper)

  16. Progress in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Emsley, J W; Sutcliffe, L H

    2013-01-01

    Progress in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Part 1 is a two-chapter text that reviews significant developments in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications.The first chapter discusses NMR studies of molecules physisorbed on homogeneous surfaces. This chapter also describes the phase changes in the adsorbed layer detected by following the variation in the NMR parameters. The second chapter examines the process to obtain a plotted, data reduced Fourier transform NMR spectrum. This chapter highlights the pitfalls that can cause a decrease in information content in a NMR spectrum. The

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging with a Dielectric Lens

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez, F; Martin, R; Rodriguez, A O

    2009-01-01

    Recently, metamaterials have been introduced to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of magnetic resonance images with very promising results. However, the use polymers in the generation of high quality images in magnetic resonance imaging has not been fully been investigated. These investigations explored the use of a dielectric periodical array as a lens to improve the image SNR generated with single surface coils. Commercial polycarbonate glazing sheets were used together with a circular coil to generate phantom images at 3 Tesla on a clinical MR imager.

  18. The progress of coronary magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a kind of disease with high morbidity and mortality. The early detection and treatment has important significance to patient. With the features of noninvasive, no radiation, good soft tissue contrast and multi parameter, and displaying anatomy in arbitrary plane, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was gradually applied in coronary artery imaging. In this paper, the main sequence and scanning technology of coronary MRI were reviewed, factors that affecting the quality of coronary magnetic resonance imaging were summarized, and the main advantages and disadvantages were concluded. (authors)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mink, J.H.; Reicher, M.A.; Crues, J.V.

    1987-01-01

    Introducing a comprehensive, practical guide to the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting and evaluating knee disorders and planning arthroscopic surgery) This book integrates MRI findings with pertinent anatomy, physiology, and clinical signs to assist radiologists in selecting imaging protocols and interpreting scans. Detailed chapters focus on magnetic resonance imaging of the menisci and ligaments and evaluation of osteonecrosis, osteochondrosis, and osteochondritis. The authors demonstrate the potential of MRI for diagnosing various knee disorders such as arthritis, fractures, popliteal cysts, synovial disease, plicae, popliteal artery aneurysms, tumors, and bone marrow disorders.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance of thermally oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The more recent developments in the spectroscopy of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance on Oriented Nuclei (NMRON) are reviewed; both theoretical and experimental advances are summarised with applications to On-Line and Off-Line determination of magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole hyperfine parameters. Some emphasis is provided on solid state considerations with indications of where likely enhancements in technique will lead in conventional hyperfine studies. (orig.)

  1. Multi-dimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Biomedical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaśpar, Jan; Hána, Karel; Smrčka, Pavel; Brada, Jiří; Beneš, Jiří; Šunka, Pavel

    2007-11-01

    The basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging covering physical principles and basic imaging techniques will be presented as a strong tool in biomedical engineering. Several applications of MRI in biomedical research practiced at the MRI laboratory of the FBMI CTU including other laboratory instruments and activities are introduced.

  3. Interactive Real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau

    Real-time acquisition, reconstruction and interactively changing the slice position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been possible for years. However, the current clinical use of interactive real-time MRI is limited due to an inherent low spatial and temporal resolution. This PhD proje...

  4. Intralabyrinthine schwannoma shown by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeed, S.R. (Univ. Dept. of Otolaryngology, Manchester Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom)); Birzgalis, A.R. (Univ. Dept. of Otolaryngology, Manchester Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom)); Ramsden, R.T. (Univ. Dept. of Otolaryngology, Manchester Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    Intralabyrinthine schwannomas are rare benign tumours which present with progressive or fluctuant audiovestibular symptoms and may mimic Menieres disease. The size and position of these lesions make preoperative diagnosis unusual and most are discovered incidentally at labyrinthectomy. A case is reported which was diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed at surgery. (orig.)

  5. Breast magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Bo La; Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mi Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Despite the high sensitivity of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pathologic confirmation by biopsy is essential because of limited specificity. MRI-guided biopsy is required in patients with lesions only seen on MRI. We review preprocedural considerations and the technique of MRI-guided biopsy, challenging situations and trouble-shooting, and correlation of radiologic and pathologic findings.

  6. Sports health magnetic resonance imaging challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Gary A; Stadnick, Michael E; Awh, Mark H

    2010-11-01

    Injuries to the Lisfranc ligament complex are often suspected, particularly in the setting of midfoot pain without radiographic abnormality. Knowledge of the anatomy and magnetic resonance imaging findings of injuries to this region is helpful for the diagnosing and treating physicians.

  7. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  8. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  9. Use of Magnetic Resonance in Pancreaticobiliary Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, David D B; LeBedis, Christina A; Soto, Jorge A; Gupta, Avneesh

    2016-05-01

    This article presents the magnetic resonance protocols, imaging features, diagnostic criteria, and complications of commonly encountered emergencies in pancreaticobiliary imaging. Pancreatic trauma, bile leak, acute cholecystitis, biliary obstruction, and pancreatitis are discussed. Various classifications and complications that can arise with these conditions, as well as artifacts that may mimic pathology, are also included. PMID:27150328

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute tendon ruptures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daffner, R.H.; Lupetin, A.R.; Dash, N.; Riemer, B.L.

    1986-11-01

    The diagnosis of acute tendon ruptures of the extensor mechanism of the knee or the Achilles tendon of the ankle may usually be made by clinical means. Massive soft tissue swelling accompanying these injuries often obscures the findings, however. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can rapidly demonstrate these tendon ruptures. Examples of the use of MRI for quadriceps tendon, and Achilles tendon rupture are presented.

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on the status of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from theoretical and clinical perspectives, reviewing NMR theory and relaxation parameters relevant to NMR imaging. Also reviews literature related to modern imaging strategies, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast agents, in vivo spectroscopy, spectroscopic imaging, clinical applications, and…

  12. Magnetic Resonance Lithography with Nanometer Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad AlGhannam

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose an approach for super-resolution optical lithography which is based on the inverse of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The technique uses atomic coherence in an ensemble of spin systems whose final state population can be optically detected. In principle, our method is capable of producing arbitrary one and two dimensional high-resolution patterns with high contrast.

  13. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    2001-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing rad

  15. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soernes, A.R

    1998-07-01

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system.

  16. Imaging Intelligence with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Caprihan, Arvind; Barrow, Ranee; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([to the first power]H-MRS) is a technique for the assay of brain neurochemistry "in vivo." N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the most prominent metabolite visible within the [to the first power]H-MRS spectrum, is found primarily within neurons. The current study was designed to further elucidate NAA-cognition…

  17. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yumin

    2013-12-01

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters-shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  18. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs, which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  19. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Yumin, E-mail: ymhou@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-12-15

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  1. The working principle of magnetic resonance therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Brizhik, Larissa; Fermi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe briefly the basic aspects of magnetic resonance therapy, registered as TMR therapy. Clinical studies have shown that application of this therapy significantly accelerates wound healing and, in particular, healing of the diabetic foot disease. To understand the working principle of this therapy, we analyze relevant to it biological effects produced by magnetic fields. Based on these data, we show that there is a hierarchy of the possible physical mechanisms, which can produce such effects. The mutual interplay between the mechanisms can lead to a synergetic outcome delayed in time, which can affect the physiological state of the organism. In particular, we show that soliton mediated charge transport during the redox processes in living organisms is sensitive to magnetic fields, so that such fields can facilitate redox processes in particular, and can stimulate the healing effect of the organism in general. This and other non-thermal resonant mechanisms of the biological effects of mag...

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance properties of lunar samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, D.; Weeks, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of Na-23, Al-27, and P-31 in fines samples 10084,60 and 14163,168 and in crystalline rock samples 12021,55 and 14321,166, have been recorded over a range of frequencies up to 20 MHz. A shift in the field at which maximum absorption occurs for all of the spectra relative to the field at which maximum absorption occurs for terrestrial analogues is attributed to a sample-dependent magnetic field at the Na, Al, and P sites opposing the laboratory field. The magnitude of these fields internal to the samples is sample dependent and varies from 5 to 10 G. These fields do not correlate with the iron content of the samples. However, the presence of single-domain particles of iron distributed throughout the plagioclase fraction that contains the principal fraction of Na and Al is inferred from electron magnetic resonance spectra shapes.

  3. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1994-01-01

    The Community College Division is pleased to report progress of NASA funded research at West Virginia State College. During this reporting period, the project research group has continued with activities to develop instrumentation capability designed to monitor resonant cavity frequencies in the atmospheric region between the Earth's surface and the ionosphere. In addition, the project's principal investigator, Dr. Craig Spaniol, and NASA technical officer, Dr. John Sutton, have written and published technical papers intended to expand the scientific and technical framework needed for project research. This research continues to provide an excellent example of government and education working together to provide significant research in the college environment. This cooperative effort has provided many students with technical project work which compliments their education.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokrollahi, H., E-mail: Shokrollahi@sutech.ac.ir [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorramdin, A. [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Isapour, Gh. [Department of Materials and Engineering, Hakim Sabzevari University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants. - Highlights: • This paper studies the physics of MRI as a powerful diagnostic technique. • MRI uses the differentiation between healthy and pathological tissues. • The relaxation times can be shortened by the use of a magnetic contrast agent. • The magnetic nanoparticles act as contrast agents, helping to increase the resolution. • Different synthesis methods can influence the magnetic resonance behavior.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR): principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basis for the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the ability of certain nuclei possessing both intrinsic angular momentum or ''spin'' I and magnetic moment to absorb electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency range. In principle, there are approximately 200 nuclei which may be investigated using the NMR technique. The NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum provides a variety of qualitative and quantitative analytical applications. The most obvious applications consist of the measurements of nuclear properties, such as spin number and nuclear magnetic moment. In liquids, the fine structure of resonance spectra provides a tool for chemical identification and molecular structure analysis. Other applications include the measurements of self-diffusion coefficients, magnetic fields and field homogeneity, inter-nuclear distances, and, in some cases, the water content of biological materials. (author)

  6. 21 CFR 892.1000 - Magnetic resonance diagnostic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnetic resonance diagnostic device. 892.1000... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1000 Magnetic resonance diagnostic device. (a) Identification. A magnetic resonance diagnostic device is intended for general diagnostic...

  7. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance contains three articles which review quite fundamentally different aspects of coherent spectroscopy. An enormous variety of effects can be observed when optical and spin resonances are coupled, usually by a combination of radio frequency and laser irradiation. The first article reviews these effects and pays particular attention to developing a theoretical framework which is as similar as possible for the optical and spin cases. Subsequent articles examine deuterium relaxation in molecular solids, and the spatiotemporal growth of multiple spin coheren

  8. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B.; Mewis, Ryan E.; Highton, Louise A. R.; Kenny, Stephen M.; Green, Gary G. R.; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G.; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all 1H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10-3 Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application.

  9. Thin layer and nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part of this text, magnetometers with sensitive elements in the form of thin cylindrical ferromagnetic layers are described. These layers are anisotropic, uniaxial, C orientated and single domains. In the second part of the text, the principles of the nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer realized at the LETI are presented. This instrument is accurate, of high efficiency, and isotropic. Very small variations in magnetic field intensity (10-7 oersteds) can be detected with a 1Hz pass band at zero frequency

  10. Magnetic resonance semiotics of breast fibroadenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Serebryakova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various benign breast abnormalities are diagnosed in 60% of women in Russia today. This is associated with failure of preoperative recognition of the histological class of an identified nodular mass – its detection is an indication for surgical treatment. By using 67 histologically verified breast fibroadenomas (FA as an example, the authors describe their magnetic resonance semiotics and present the differential diagnostic criteria used during dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance mammography. FAs are characterized by well-defined uniform outlines, homogeneous internal structure, centrifugal and homogeneous accumulation of contrast media through- out the study, without deforming the breast vasculature around. One of the criteria that permit differential diagnosis of FA with malignan- cies is their estimated vascularization.

  11. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid;

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus)......). In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient's hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup.......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus...

  12. Contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavieille, J.; Amalric, R.; Stanoyevitch, J.F.; Hopf, M.A.; Antipoff, G.M.; Roux, H.

    1986-11-01

    The authors report their experience with magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology, established on more than 250 examinations. The method seems interesting for the study of discal and somatic spine diseases, and especially for the evaluation of tumor extension, the diagnosis of herniated disc, the diagnosis of spondylodiscitis, the exploration of the cervico-occipital joint. As compared to tomodensitometry, this method presents at the same time advantages and drawbacks. Peripherally, magnetic resonance imaging is useful for the exploration of bony tumors and evaluation of their extension. It gives excellent images of the knees and the hips where it seems to improve the results of tomodensitometry and bony scintigraphy in the diagnosis of osteonecrosis. It is likely that advances will broaden the scope of the indications and capabilities of this method.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in tuberculous meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pui, M.H.; Memon, W.A. [Aga Khan Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for distinguishing tuberculosis from other types of meningoencephalitis. MRIs of 100 patients with tuberculous (50), pyogenic (33), viral (14), or fungal (3) meningoencephalitis were analyzed independently by 2 radiologists. Number, size, location, signal characteristics, surrounding edema, and contrast enhancement pattern of nodular lesions; location and pattern of meningeal enhancement; extent of infarct or encephalitis and hydrocephalus were evaluated. Contrast-enhancing nodular lesions were detected in patients with tuberculous (43 of 50 patients), pyogenic (9 of 33), and fungal (3 of 3) infections. No nodules were detected in patients with viral meningoencephalitis. Using the criteria of 1 or more solid rim or homogeneously enhancing nodules smaller than 2 cm, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing tuberculous meningitis were 86.0%, 90.0% and 88.0%, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in distinguishing tuberculous from pyogenic, viral and fungal meningoencephalitis. (author)

  14. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.;

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper review...... myocardial perfusion imaging with MR contrast agents: methods, validation and experiences from clinical studies. Unresolved issues still restrict the use of these techniques to research although clinical applications are within reach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/8......Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...

  15. High speed functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, A M

    2002-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been undertaken by the except where indicated by reference, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre at the University of Nottingham during the period from October 1998 to October 2001. This thesis documents the implementation and application of a novel high-speed imaging technique, the multi-slice, echo shifted, echo planar imaging technique. This was implemented on the Nottingham 3 T imaging system, for functional magnetic resonance imaging. The technique uses echo shifting over the slices in a multi-slice echo planar imaging acquisition scheme, making the echo time longer than the repetition time per slice. This allows for rapid volumar sampling of the blood oxygen level dependent effect in the human brain. The new high-speed technique was used to investigate the variability of measuring the timing differences between haemodynamic responses, at the same cortical location, to simple cued motor tasks. The technique was also used in an investigation into motor cortex functional connect...

  16. Female pelvic anatomy: magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of magnetic resonance imaging was evaluated in this study. Conventional imaging methods like sonography and X-ray computerised tomography generally provide accurate data. Magnetic resonance imaging appears to be very suitable for studying the pelvis because it has the capacity to produce direct multidirectional images. By recording alterations in T1 and T2 values, it provides a wide range of information. A 1.5 T imaging system was used. Pulse sequences used always included T1 and T2 weighted spin-echo scans. The T2 scan was performed in the best plane for the organ of interest. The comparison between these different acquisitions provides good tissue differentiation. Results of 73 studies are exposed

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging for acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is characterized by acute chemical injury of the pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissue. The increased frequency of death in acute pancreatitis is directly correlated with the degree and progress of pancreatic necrosis. Moreover, the occurrence of some local complications in acute pancreatitis, such as pancreatic hemorrhage, peripancreatic abscess or large pseudocyst, and pseudoaneurysm, could influence the choice of treatment for these patients. Magnetic resonance...

  18. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging of the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Choon; Hua; Thng; Tong; San; Koh; David; J; Collins; Dow; Mu; Koh

    2010-01-01

    Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies quantify the microcirculatory status of liver parenchyma and liver lesions, and can be used for the detection of liver metastases, assessing the effectiveness of antiangiogenic therapy, evaluating tumor viability after anticancer therapy or ablation, and diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and its severity. In this review, we discuss the basic concepts of perfusion MRI using tracer kinetic modeling, the common kinetic models applied for analyses, the MR scanning t...

  19. "PALPATION BY IMAGING": MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELASTOGRAPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Xu; Pei-yi Gao

    2006-01-01

    Elasticity is an important physical property of human tissues.There is a tremendous difference in elasticity between normal and pathological tissues.Noninvasive evaluation of the elasticity of human tissues would be valuable for clinical practice.Magnetic resonance elastography(MRE)is a recently developed noninvasive imaging technique that can directly visualize and quantitatively measure tissue elasticity.This article reviewed the MRE technique and its current status.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Elastography: Inversions in Bounded Media

    OpenAIRE

    Kolipaka, Arunark; McGee, Kiaran P.; Manduca, Armando; Romano, Anthony J; Glaser, Kevin J.; Araoz, Philip A; Ehman, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a noninvasive imaging technique capable of quantifying and spatially resolving the shear stiffness of soft tissues by visualization of synchronized mechanical wave displacement fields. However, MRE inversions generally assume that the measured tissue motion consists primarily of shear waves propagating in a uniform, infinite medium. This assumption is not valid in organs such as the heart, eye, bladder, skin, fascia, bone and spinal cord in which the s...

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up ...

  2. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Gur, Raquel E.; Gur, Ruben C.

    2010-01-01

    The integration of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with cognitive and affective neuroscience paradigms enables examination of the brain systems underlying the behavioral deficits manifested in schizophrenia; there have been a remarkable increase in the number of studies that apply fMRI in neurobiological studies of this disease. This article summarizes features of fMRI methodology and highlights its application in neurobehavioral studies in schizophrenia. Such work has helped elu...

  3. Waveguide volume probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to a probe for use within the field of nuclear magnetic resonance, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). One embodiment relates to an RF probe for magnetic resonance imaging and/or spectroscopy comprising a conductive...... non-magnetic hollow waveguide having an internal volume and at least one open end, one or more capacitors and at least a first conductive non-magnetic wire, wherein said first conductive wire connects at least one of said one or more capacitors to opposite walls of one open end of the waveguide...

  4. Electro-Mechanical Resonant Magnetic Field Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Temnykh, A B; Temnykh, Alexander B.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a new type of magnetic field sensor which is termed an Electro-Mechanical Resonant Sensor (EMRS). The key part of this sensor is a small conductive elastic element with low damping rate and therefore a high Q fundamental mode of frequency $f_1$. An AC current is driven through the elastic element which, in the presence of a magnetic field, causes an AC force on the element. When the frequency of the AC current matches the resonant frequency of the element, maximum vibration of the element occurs and this can be measured precisely by optical means. We have built and tested a model sensor of this type using for the elastic element a length of copper wire of diameter 0.030 mm formed into a loop shape. The wire motion was measured using a light emitting diode photo-transistor assembly. This sensor demonstrated a sensitivity better than 0.001G for an applied magnetic field of $ \\sim 1$G and a good selectivity for the magnetic field direction. The sensitivity can be easily improved by a factor of $\\sim ...

  5. Compact low field magnetic resonance imaging magnet: Design and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciandrone, M.; Placidi, G.; Testa, L.; Sotgiu, A.

    2000-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed with a very large instrument that allows the patient to be inserted into a region of uniform magnetic field. The field is generated either by an electromagnet (resistive or superconductive) or by a permanent magnet. Electromagnets are designed as air cored solenoids of cylindrical symmetry, with an inner bore of 80-100 cm in diameter. In clinical analysis of peripheral regions of the body (legs, arms, foot, knee, etc.) it would be better to adopt much less expensive magnets leaving the most expensive instruments to applications that require the insertion of the patient in the magnet (head, thorax, abdomen, etc.). These "dedicated" apparati could be smaller and based on resistive magnets that are manufactured and operated at very low cost, particularly if they utilize an iron yoke to reduce power requirements. In order to obtain good field uniformity without the use of a set of shimming coils, we propose both particular construction of a dedicated magnet, using four independently controlled pairs of coils, and an optimization-based strategy for computing, a posteriori, the optimal current values. The optimization phase could be viewed as a low-cost shimming procedure for obtaining the desired magnetic field configuration. Some experimental measurements, confirming the effectiveness of the proposed approach (construction and optimization), have also been reported. In particular, it has been shown that the adoption of the proposed optimization based strategy has allowed the achievement of good uniformity of the magnetic field in about one fourth of the magnet length and about one half of its bore. On the basis of the good experimental results, the dedicated magnet can be used for MRI of peripheral regions of the body and for animal experimentation at very low cost.

  6. First national meeting of magnetic resonance and hyperfine interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Works performed at CNEA's: Magnetic Resonance Division; Moessbauer Spectroscopy; Solid State Physics Division; Nuclear magnetic Resonance Laboratory and Theoretical Physics Group; Mossbauer Spectroscopy Group; Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance; Physics and Materials Group; Perturbed Angular Correlation and Moessbauer Spectroscopy and Physics Department. (M.E.L.)

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive imaging method based on the detecting signal from hydrogen nuclei of water molecules and fat. Performances of MRI are continuously increasing, and its domains of investigation of the human body are growing in both morphological and functional study. MRI also allows It also performing advanced management of tumours especially in the brain, by combining anatomical information (morphological MRI), functional (diffusion, perfusion and BOLD contrast) and metabolic (tissue composition in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). The MRI techniques have an important role in cancerology. These techniques allow essential information for the diagnosis and answering therapist's questions before, during or after the treatment. The MR allows clarifying the localization of expanding processes, the differential diagnosis between brain tumour and a lesion confined by another structural aspect, the diagnosis of the tumoral aspect of a lesion, the histological ranking in case of glial tumour and the extension of its localization as well as the therapeutic follow-up (pre-therapeutic and post-therapeutics assessments). A better combination between the morphological, functional and metabolic studies, as well as integrating new technical developments, especially while using a multichannel bird cage coils the 3T magnet and suitable computing software, would allow significant improvements of the exploration strategies and management of brain tumors.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  9. Nanodiamond graphitization: a magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of the high-temperature nanodiamond-to-onion transformation. 1H, 13C NMR and EPR spectra of the initial nanodiamond samples and those annealed at 600, 700, 800 and 1800 ° C were measured. For the samples annealed at 600 to 800 ° C, our NMR data reveal the early stages of the surface modification, as well as a progressive increase in sp2 carbon content with increased annealing temperature. Such quantitative experimental data were recorded for the first time. These findings correlate with EPR data on the sensitivity of the dangling bond EPR line width to air content, progressing with rising annealing temperature, that evidences consequent graphitization of the external layers of the diamond core. The sample annealed at 1800 ° C shows complete conversion of nanodiamond particles into carbon onions. (paper)

  10. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); University of Munich - Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  11. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  12. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed

  13. Magnetic Field Gradient Calibration as an Experiment to Illustrate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described that encompasses both qualitative and quantitative pedagogical goals. Qualitatively, the experiment illustrates how images are obtained in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitatively, students experience the…

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory, quadrennial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This quadrennial report of the nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory gives an overview of the main activities. Among the different described activities, only one is interesting for the INIS database: it concerns the Solid NMR of cements used for radioactive wastes storage. In this case, the NMR is used to characterize the structure of the material and the composition, structure and kinetics of formation of the alteration layer which is formed at the surface of concrete during water leaching conditions. The NMR methodology is given. (O.M.)

  15. Cardiac magnetic resonance in clinical cardiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas; Kumar; Rodrigo; Bagur

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, cardiac magnetic resonance(CMR) has transformed from a research tool to a widely used diagnostic method in clinical cardiology. This method can now make useful, unique contributions to the work-up of patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease. Advantages of CMR, compared to other imaging methods, include very high resolution imaging with a spatial resolution up to 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm in plane, a large array of different imaging sequences to provide in vivo tissue characterization, and radiationfree imaging. The present manuscript highlights the relevance of CMR in the current clinical practice and new perspectives in cardiology.

  16. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  17. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging and human genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengstschlaeger, Markus [Medical Genetics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: markus.hengstschlaeger@meduniwien.ac.at

    2006-02-15

    The use of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in addition to prenatal genetic testing and sonography, has the potential to improve prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders. MRI plays an important role in the evaluation of fetal abnormalities and malformations. Fetal MRI often enables a differential diagnosis, a determination of the extent of the disorder, the prognosis, and an improvement in therapeutic management. For counseling of parents, as well as to basically understand how genetic aberrations affect fetal development, it is of great importance to correlate different genotypes with fetal MRI data.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in Kimura's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although early diagnosis of Kimura's disease, a rare chronic inflammatory disorder most commonly presenting with asymmetric swelling in the head and neck region, is helpful in avoiding unnecessary diagnostic tests and starting prompt treatment, only a few reports emphasized radiological findings in detail. Magnetic resonance imaging findings showing the infiltrative nature of the disease and diffuse loss of fat tissue even in nonpalpable normally appearing regions of the head and neck in a young man with Kimura's disease are presented in this report. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of cervical myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chosa, Hirofumi; Yamano, Kouichirou; Ihara, Fumitoshi; Ueda, Yoshiaki; Maekawa, Masayuki; Tokuhisa, Ginichirou; Kuwano, Tadashi; Kamo, Yoshi; Nomura, Shigeharu (Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1990-03-01

    Forty-three patients operated for cervical myelopathy were examined with a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging. Cord compression was demonstrated directly on the sagittal image in cases of cervical disc herniation, cervical spondylosis and O.P. L.L. Herniated disc material was seen positive on axial image. But factors of cord compression in cases of cervical spondylosis and O.P. L.L. were not clearly confirmed, so additional examinations such as myelogram, tomogram and CT was needed. (author).

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Liquids and Solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper outlines the basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance, trying wherever possible to compare and contrast the method with that of slow neutron scattering as a technique for studying the properties of condensed phases and especially of molecular and atomic motions. It is emphasized that this is not a review of nmr for an expert audience but has a pedagogical aim. It is hoped to give persons with a main interest in neutron scattering some appreciation of the scope and limitations of the nmr method. This is illustrated by recent results on one substance which covers many but by no means all of the important points. (author)

  1. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deblaere, Karel [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital, MR Department - 1K12, Ghent (Belgium); Achten, Eric [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-01-15

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  2. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic Resonance of Pelvic and Gastrointestinal Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Kaewlai, Rathachai; Dattwyler, Matthew; Abujudeh, Hani H; Singh, Ajay K

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is gaining increased acceptance in the emergency setting despite the continued dominance of computed tomography. MR has the advantages of more precise tissue characterization, superior soft tissue contrast, and a lack of ionizing radiation. Traditional barriers to emergent MR are being overcome by streamlined imaging protocols and newer rapid-acquisition sequences. As the utilization of MR imaging in the emergency department increases, a strong working knowledge of the MR appearance of the most commonly encountered abdominopelvic pathologies is essential. In this article, MR imaging protocols and findings of acute pelvic, scrotal, and gastrointestinal pathologies are discussed. PMID:27150327

  4. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology. An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissenbaum, M A; Adamis, M K

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has revolutionized the assessment of pathology involving the musculoskeletal system. The soft tissue contrast, superb resolution, multiplanar acquisition potential, and the ability to monitor physiologic processes combine the best features of other imaging modalities. The sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging for a wide range of disease processes matches or supersedes conventional radiology, nuclear medicine, and clinical examination. This article provides a brief overview of the use of MR imaging for some of the more common clinical situations confronting the rheumatologist.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic neuroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashihara, Kengo; Murata, Hideaki; Ito, Haruhide; Onishi, Hiroaki; Kadoya, Masumi; Suzuki, Masayuki.

    1989-03-01

    Thirteen patients with acoustic neuroma were studied on a 1.5T superconductive magnetic resonance (MR) imager. Acoustic neuromas appeared as lower signal intensity than the surrounding brain stem on T1 weighted image (W.I.), and as higher signal intensity on T2 W.I.. Axial and coronal sections of T1 W.I. were very useful in observing the tumor in the auditory canal and in investigating the anatomical relations of the tumor and the surrounding structures. MR imaging is very excellent examination to make early diagnosis of the acoustic neuroma and preoperative anatomical evaluation.

  7. Magnetic resonance-guided prostate interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haker, Steven J; Mulkern, Robert V; Roebuck, Joseph R; Barnes, Agnieska Szot; Dimaio, Simon; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare M C

    2005-10-01

    We review our experience using an open 0.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) interventional unit to guide procedures in the prostate. This system allows access to the patient and real-time MR imaging simultaneously and has made it possible to perform prostate biopsy and brachytherapy under MR guidance. We review MR imaging of the prostate and its use in targeted therapy, and describe our use of image processing methods such as image registration to further facilitate precise targeting. We describe current developments with a robot assist system being developed to aid radioactive seed placement. PMID:16924169

  8. MRCP. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography; MRCP. Magnetresonanzcholangiopankreatografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinner, Sonja [Wisconsin-Madison Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Lauenstein, Thomas [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Duesseldorf (Germany). Radiologie

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a special MR technique to display and analyze the biliary tract and pancreatic ducts. MRCP sequences are equivalent to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for diagnostic purposes due to technical developments of the classical T2 weighted MRCP sequences and the availability of contrast enhanced T1 weighted sequences. Therefore, MRCP plays a fundamental role in the diagnoses of hepatobliary and pancreatic diseases, which are presented in this review article as are technical details of sequence acquisitions and the underlying anatomy.

  9. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  10. Contrast Agent in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vu-Quang, Hieu

    2015-01-01

    for chemotherapy. The nanoparticles were 150 nm in size with spherical shape, which contained PFOB in the inner core and Dox and ICG in the polymeric shell. More importantly, they could target folate receptor expressing cancer cells, which provide positive in vitro and in vivo NIR and 19F MRI results. In project......Nanoparticles have been employed as contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to improve sensitivity and accuracy in diagnosis. In addition, these contrast agents are potentially combined with other therapeutic compounds or near infrared bio-imaging (NIR) fluorophores to obtain...... theranostic or dual imaging purposes, respectively. There were two main types of MRI contrast agent that were synthesized during this PhD project including fluorine containing nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles. In regard of fluorine containing nanoparticles, there were two types contrast agent...

  11. Magnetic levitation of metamaterial bodies enhanced with magnetostatic surface resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Urzhumov, Yaroslav; Bingham, Chris; Padilla, Willie; Smith, David R

    2011-01-01

    We propose that macroscopic objects built from negative-permeability metamaterials may experience resonantly enhanced magnetic force in low-frequency magnetic fields. Resonant enhancement of the time-averaged force originates from magnetostatic surface resonances (MSR) which are analogous to the electrostatic resonances of negative-permittivity particles, well known as surface plasmon resonances in optics. We generalize the classical problem of MSR of a homogeneous object to include anisotropic metamaterials, and consider the most extreme case of anisotropy where the permeability is negative in one direction but positive in the others. It is shown that deeply subwavelength objects made of such indefinite (hyperbolic) media exhibit a pronounced magnetic dipole resonance that couples strongly to uniform or weakly inhomogeneous magnetic field and provides strong enhancement of the magnetic force, enabling applications such as enhanced magnetic levitation.

  12. Detailing Radio Frequency Heating Induced by Coronary Stents: A 7.0 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Study

    OpenAIRE

    Davide Santoro; Lukas Winter; Alexander Müller; Julia Vogt; Wolfgang Renz; Celal Ozerdem; Andreas Grässl; Valeriy Tkachenko; Jeanette Schulz-Menger; Thoralf Niendorf

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity gain of ultrahigh field Magnetic Resonance (UHF-MR) holds the promise to enhance spatial and temporal resolution. Such improvements could be beneficial for cardiovascular MR. However, intracoronary stents used for treatment of coronary artery disease are currently considered to be contra-indications for UHF-MR. The antenna effect induced by a stent together with RF wavelength shortening could increase local radiofrequency (RF) power deposition at 7.0 T and bears the potential ...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Norman, D.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers on technological advancement and diagnostic uses g magnetic resonance imaging. A comparative evaluation with computerized tomography is presented. Topics covered are imaging principles g magnetic resonance;instrumentation of magnetic resonance (MR);pathophysiology;quality and limitations g images;NMR imaging of brain and spinal cord;MR spectroscopy and its applications;neuroanatomy;Congenital malformations of brain and MR imaging;planning g MR imaging of spine and head and neck imaging.

  14. Remote magnetic targeting of iron oxide nanoparticles for cardiovascular diagnosis and therapeutic drug delivery: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bietenbeck, Michael; Florian, Anca; Faber, Cornelius; Sechtem, Udo; Yilmaz, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for an accurate assessment of both functional and structural cardiac parameters, and thereby appropriate diagnosis and validation of cardiovascular diseases. The diagnostic yield of cardiovascular MRI examinations is often increased by the use of contrast agents that are almost exclusively based on gadolinium compounds. Another clinically approved contrast medium is composed of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs). These particles may expand the field of contrast-enhanced cardiovascular MRI as recently shown in clinical studies focusing on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and atherosclerosis. Furthermore, IONs open up new research opportunities such as remote magnetic drug targeting (MDT). The approach of MDT relies on the coupling of bioactive molecules and magnetic nanoparticles to form an injectable complex. This complex, in turn, can be attracted to and retained at a desired target inside the body with the help of applied magnetic fields. In comparison to common systemic drug applications, MDT techniques promise both higher concentrations at the target site and lower concentrations elsewhere in the body. Moreover, concurrent or subsequent MRI can be used for noninvasive monitoring of drug distribution and successful delivery to the desired organ in vivo. This review does not only illustrate the basic conceptual and biophysical principles of IONs, but also focuses on new research activities and achievements in the cardiovascular field, mainly in the management of AMI. Based on the presentation of successful MDT applications in preclinical models of AMI, novel approaches and the translational potential of MDT are discussed. PMID:27486321

  15. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Alwatban, A Z W

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G. Allan

    1999-11-01

    The lung presents both challenges and opportunities for study by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The technical challenges arise from respiratory and cardiac motion, limited signal from the tissues, and unique physical structure of the lung. These challenges are heightened in magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) where the spatial resolution may be up to a million times higher than that of conventional MRI. The development of successful techniques for MRM of the lung present enormous opportunities for basic studies of lung structure and function, toxicology, environmental stress, and drug discovery by permitting investigators to study this most essential organ nondestructively in the live animal. Over the last 15 years, scientists at the Duke Center for In Vivo Microscopy have developed techniques for MRM in the live animal through an interdisciplinary program of biology, physics, chemistry, electrical engineering, and computer science. This talk will focus on the development of specialized radiofrequency coils for lung imaging, projection encoding methods to limit susceptibility losses, specialized support structures to control and monitor physiologic motion, and the most recent development of hyperpolarized gas imaging with ^3He and ^129Xe.

  17. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical application in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) provides a non-invasive method of studying metabolism in vivo. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) defines neuro chemistry on a regional basis by acquiring a radiofrequency signal with chemical shift from one or many voxels or volumes previously selected on MRI. The tissue's chemical environment determines the frequency of a metabolite peak in an MRS spectrum. Candidates for MRS include: 1H, 31P, 13C, 23Na, 7Li, 19F, 14N, 15N, 17O, 39K The most commonly studied nuclei are 1H and 31P. This lecture is focused on Proton (1H) Spectroscopy. Proton MRS can be added on to conventional MR imaging protocols. It can be used to serially monitor biochemical changes in tumors, stroke, epilepsy, metabolic disorders, infections, and neurodegenerative diseases.The MR spectra do not come labeled with diagnoses. They require interpretation and should always be correlated with the MR images before making a final diagnosis. As a general rule, the single voxel, short TE technique is used to make the initial diagnosis, because the signal-to-noise is high and all metabolites are represented. Multi-voxel, long TE techniques are used to further characterize different regions of a mass and to assess brain parenchyma around or adjacent to the mass. Multi-voxel, long TE techniques are also used to assess response to therapy and to search for tumor recurrence. Each metabolite appears at a specific ppm, and each one reflects specific cellular and biochemical processes

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in adnexial torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Ronald Meira Castro; Quadros, Marianne Siquara de [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa], e-mail: rtrindade@einstein.br; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Rosemberg, Michelle; Racy, Marcelo de Castro Jorge; Tachibana, Adriano [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Imaging Service

    2010-01-15

    Adnexial torsion is an unusual event, but a major cause of abdominal pain in women. It is often associated with ovarian tumor or cyst, but can occur in normal ovaries, especially in children. The twisting of adnexial structures may involve the ovary or tube, but frequently affects both. In most cases, it is unilateral, with slight predilection for the right size. In imaging findings, increased ovarian volume and adnexial masses are observed, with reduced or absent vascularisation. In cases of undiagnosed or untreated complete twist, hemorrhagic necrosis may occur leading to complications; in that, peritonitis is the most frequent. Early diagnosis helps preventing irreversible damage with conservative treatment, thereby saving the ovary. Limitations in performing physical examination, possible inconclusive results in ultrasound and exposure to radiation in computed tomography makes magnetic resonance imaging a valuable tool in emergency assessment of gynecological diseases. The objective of this study was to report two confirmed cases of adnexial twist, emphasizing the contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of this condition. (author)

  19. General review of magnetic resonance elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Gavin; Kruse, Scott A; Lomas, David J

    2016-01-28

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an innovative imaging technique for the non-invasive quantification of the biomechanical properties of soft tissues via the direct visualization of propagating shear waves in vivo using a modified phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence. Fundamentally, MRE employs the same physical property that physicians utilize when performing manual palpation - that healthy and diseased tissues can be differentiated on the basis of widely differing mechanical stiffness. By performing "virtual palpation", MRE is able to provide information that is beyond the capabilities of conventional morphologic imaging modalities. In an era of increasing adoption of multi-parametric imaging approaches for solving complex problems, MRE can be seamlessly incorporated into a standard MRI examination to provide a rapid, reliable and comprehensive imaging evaluation at a single patient appointment. Originally described by the Mayo Clinic in 1995, the technique represents the most accurate non-invasive method for the detection and staging of liver fibrosis and is currently performed in more than 100 centers worldwide. In this general review, the mechanical properties of soft tissues, principles of MRE, clinical applications of MRE in the liver and beyond, and limitations and future directions of this discipline -are discussed. Selected diagrams and images are provided for illustration. PMID:26834944

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea (ed.) [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2013-08-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  1. Resonances and dipole moments in dielectric, magnetic, and magnetodielectric cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, A.; Arslanagic, Samel; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2011-01-01

    An eigenfunction solution to the problem of plane wave scattering by dielectric, magnetic, and magnetodielectric cylinders is used for a systematic investigation of their resonances. An overview of the resonances with electric and magnetic dipole moments, needed in, e.g., the synthesis of metamat......An eigenfunction solution to the problem of plane wave scattering by dielectric, magnetic, and magnetodielectric cylinders is used for a systematic investigation of their resonances. An overview of the resonances with electric and magnetic dipole moments, needed in, e.g., the synthesis...

  2. Important advances in technology and unique applications related to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G; Shah, Dipan J

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance has become a well-established imaging modality and is considered the gold standard for myocardial tissue viability assessment and ventricular volumes quantification. Recent technological hardware and software advancements in magnetic resonance imaging technology have allowed the development of new methods that can improve clinical cardiovascular diagnosis and prognosis. The advent of a new generation of higher magnetic field scanners can be beneficial to various clinical applications. Also, the development of faster acquisition techniques have allowed mapping of the magnetic relaxation properties T1, T2, and T2* in the myocardium that can be used to quantify myocardial diffuse fibrosis, determine the presence of edema or inflammation, and measure iron within the myocardium, respectively. Another recent major advancement in CMR has been the introduction of three-dimension (3D) phase contrast imaging, also known as 4D flow. The following review discusses key advances in cardiac magnetic resonance technology and their potential to improve clinical cardiovascular diagnosis and outcomes.

  3. Ultra-high-field magnetic resonance: Why and when?

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Ewald

    2010-01-01

    This paper briefly summarizes the development of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy in medicine. Aspects of magnetic resonancephysics and -technology relevant at ultra-high magnetic fields as well as current limitations are highlighted. Based on the first promising studies, potential clinical applications at 7 Tesla are suggested. Other aims are to stimulate awareness of the potential of ultra-high field magnetic resonance and to stimulate active participation in much needed basic or...

  4. Purely electric and magnetic dipole resonances in metamaterial dielectric resonators through perturbation theory inspired geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Campione, Salvatore; Warne, Larry K; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe a methodology for tailoring the design of metamaterial dielectric resonators, which represent a promising path toward low-loss metamaterials at optical frequencies. We first describe a procedure to decompose the far field scattered by subwavelength resonators in terms of multipolar field components, providing explicit expressions for the multipolar far fields. We apply this formulation to confirm that an isolated high-permittivity cube resonator possesses frequency separated electric and magnetic dipole resonances, as well as a magnetic quadrupole resonance in close proximity to the electric dipole resonance. We then introduce multiple dielectric gaps to the resonator geometry in a manner suggested by perturbation theory, and demonstrate the ability to overlap the electric and magnetic dipole resonances, thereby enabling directional scattering by satisfying the first Kerker condition. We further demonstrate the ability to push the quadrupole resonance away from the degenerate dipole ...

  5. Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keevil, Stephen F [Department of Medical Physics, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Guy' s Hospital, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Division of Imaging Sciences, King' s College London, Guy' s Campus, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-21

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications. (topical review)

  6. Atrial and ventricular volume and function in persistent and permanent atrial fibrillation, a magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkelsen, Susette Krohn; Groenning, Bjoern Aaris; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup;

    2005-01-01

    Left atrial size is independently related to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and atrial fibrillation (AF) is strongly associated with atrial size. Our aims were to report atrial and ventricular dimensions in patients with AF evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to assess t...

  7. Magnetic resonance tracking of fluorescent nanodiamond fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance techniques (electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)) are used for tracking the multi-stage process of the fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) produced by high-energy electron irradiation, annealing, and subsequent nano-milling. Pristine commercial high pressure and high temperature microdiamonds (MDs) with mean size 150 μm contain ∼5  ×  1018 spins/g of singlet (S = 1/2) substitutional nitrogen defects P1, as well as sp3 C–C dangling bonds in the crystalline lattice. The half-field X-band EPR clearly shows (by the appearance of the intense ‘forbidden’ g = 4.26 line) that high-energy electron irradiation and annealing of MDs induce a large amount (∼5  ×  1017 spins/g) of triplet (S = 1) magnetic centers, which are identified as negatively charged nitrogen vacancy defects (NV−). This is supported by EPR observations of the ‘allowed’ transitions between Zeeman sublevels of the triplet state. After progressive milling of the fluorescent MDs down to an ultrasubmicron scale (≤100 nm), the relative abundance of EPR active NV− defects in the resulting fluorescent NDs (FND) substantially decreases and, vice versa, the content of C-inherited singlet defects correlatively increases. In the fraction of the finest FNDs (mean particle size <20 nm), which are contained in the dried supernatant of ultracentrifuged aqueous dispersion of FNDs, the NV− content is found to be reduced by one order of magnitude whereas the singlet defects content increases up to ∼2  ×  1019 spins/g. In addition, another triplet-type defect, which is characterized by the g = 4.00 ‘forbidden’ line, appears. On reduction of the particle size below the 20 nm limit, the ‘allowed’ EPR lines become practically unobservable, whereas the ‘forbidden’ lines remain as a reliable fingerprint of the presence of NV− centers in small ND systems. The same size reduction causes the

  8. Basic concepts from magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has grown exponentially, due in part to excellent anatomic and pathologic detail provided by the modality, as recent technological advances that have led to more rapid acquisition times. Radiology residents in different parts of the world now receive training in MR images from their first year of residence, included the pulse sequences training spin-echo, gradient-echo, inversion-recovery, echo-planar image and MR angiographic sequences, commonly used in medical imaging. However, to optimize the use of this type of study, it has been necessary to understand the basic concepts of physics, included the concepts of recovery T1, degradation T2* and T2, repetition time, echo time, and the effects of chemical shift. Additionally, it has been important to understand the contrast weighting for better representation of specific tissues and thus perform an appropriate differential diagnosis of various pathological processes. (author)

  9. Valuation for magnetic resonance of neuro tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increased incidence of neuro tuberculosis (NTB), due to the world epidemic of resistant strains and AIDS, has made of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging the study of choice for the early detection of lesions that lead the clinicians to an effective treatment. We present our experience with six cases of NTB, with meningoencephalic (4 cases), spinal, (1 case) and epidural (1 case) involvement. We identified basal arachnoiditis that was also seen on CT. Two cases demonstrated non-classifying tuberculomas, the spinal lesion consisted of casseifying tuberculoma that responded to treatment and disappeared on a follow up MR study. Epidural involvement consisted of Pott's disease with displacement and edema of the spinal cord. The differential diagnosis of these lesions includes mycoses, cysticercosis, sarcoidosis and leptomeningeal metastases

  10. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Consumer Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Martin; Schilke, Oliver; Weber, Bernd;

    2011-01-01

    of prior fMRI research related to consumer behavior and highlights the features that make fMRI an attractive method for consumer and marketing research. The authors discuss advantages and limitations and illustrate the proposed procedures with an applied study, which investigates loss aversion when buying......Although the field of psychology is undergoing an immense shift toward the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the application of this methodology to consumer research is relatively new. To assist consumer researchers in understanding fMRI, this paper elaborates on the findings...... and selling a common product. Results reveal a significantly stronger activation in the amygdala while consumers estimate selling prices versus buying prices, suggesting that loss aversion is associated with the processing of negative emotion. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  11. Pulsed nuclear-electronic magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Morley, Gavin W; Mohammady, M Hamed; Aeppli, Gabriel; Kay, Christopher W M; Jeschke, Gunnar; Monteiro, Tania S

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed magnetic resonance is a wide-reaching technology allowing the quantum state of electronic and nuclear spins to be controlled on the timescale of nanoseconds and microseconds respectively. The time required to flip either dilute electronic or nuclear spins is orders of magnitude shorter than their decoherence times, leading to several schemes for quantum information processing with spin qubits. We investigate instead the novel regime where the eigenstates approximate 50:50 superpositions of the electronic and nuclear spin states forming "nuclear-electronic" qubits. Here we demonstrate quantum control of these states, using bismuth-doped silicon, in just 32 ns: orders of magnitude shorter than previous experiments where pure nuclear states were used. The coherence times of our states are over four orders of magnitude longer, being 1 ms or more at 8 K, and are limited by the naturally-occurring 29Si nuclear spin impurities. There is quantitative agreement between our experiments and no-free-parameter anal...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with panhypopituitarism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzi Mucelli, R.S. [Ist. di Radiologia, Univ. di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara (Italy); Frezza, F. [Ist. di Radiologia, Univ. di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara (Italy); Magnaldi, S. [Ist. di Radiologia, Univ. di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara (Italy); Proto, G. [Servizio di Endocrinologia, Ospedale Civile di Udine (Italy)

    1992-02-01

    Primary panhypopituitarism consists of functional deficiency of the anterior pituitary lobe, which appears during infancy or adolescence. The magnetic resonance findings in 10 patients with a history of primary hypopituitarism are presented. The findings include: reduced pituitary size in all cases; partially (8 cases) or totally (2 cases) empty sella; thin (4 cases), partially visible (3 cases) or absent (2 cases) pituitary stalk; absence of the posterior lobe in 9 cases; bright spot corresponding to an ectopic posterior lobe in 8 cases. These findings are similar to those already reported in pituitary dwarfism and may help understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, which seems to be related to a pituitary stalk lesion. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging after exposure to microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Adrian

    1993-01-01

    A number of physiological changes were demonstrated in bone, muscle, and blood from exposure of humans and animals to microgravity. Determining mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures for long-duration space missions is an important NASA goal. Historically, NASA has had to rely on tape measures, x-ray, and metabolic balance studies with collection of excreta and blood specimens to obtain this information. The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the possibility of greatly extending these early studies in ways not previously possible; MRI is also non-invasive and safe; i.e., no radiation exposure. MRI provides both superb anatomical images for volume measurements of individual structures and quantification of chemical/physical changes induced in the examined tissues. This investigation will apply MRI technology to measure muscle, intervertebral disc, and bone marrow changes resulting from exposure to microgravity.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.H.; Nathanson, J.A.; Fox, A.J.; Pelz, D.M.; Lownie, S.P.

    1995-06-01

    In order to demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the brain in patients with clinical brain death, high-field MRI was performed on 5 patients using conventional T1-weighted and T2-weighted imaging. The study showed MRI exhibited similar features for all of the patients, features which were not found in MRI of comatose patients who were not clinically brain dead. It was stated that up to now the most important limitation in MRI of patients with suspected brain death has been the extreme difficulty of moving them out of the intensive care setting. If this problem can be overcome, and it appears possible with with the advent of MRI-compatible ventilators and noninvasive monitoring, MRI could become an excellent alternative for confirming clinical diagnosis of brain death for such patients. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1993-01-01

    The West Virginia State College Community College Division NASA Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) study is described. During this contract period, the two most significant and professionally rewarding events were the presentation of the research activity at the Sir Isaac Newton Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the second Day of Discovery Conference, focusing on economic recovery in West Virginia. An active antenna concept utilizing a signal feedback principle similar to regenerative receivers used in early radio was studied. The device has potential for ELF research and other commercial applications for improved signal reception. Finally, work continues to progress on the development of a prototype monitoring station. Signal monitoring, data display, and data storage are major areas of activity. In addition, we plan to continue our dissemination of research activity through presentations at seminars and other universities.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foram Gala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies.

  17. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...... is based on determination of the left-ventricular endocardial and epicardial borders. Since manual border detection is laborious, automated segmentation is highly desirable as a fast, objective and reproducible alternative. Automated segmentation will thus enhance comparability between and within cardiac...... studies and increase accuracy by allowing acquisition of thinner MRI-slices. This abstract demonstrates that statistical models of shape and appearance, namely the deformable models: Active Appearance Models, can successfully segment cardiac MRIs....

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in occult spinal dysraphism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective study was carried out in 100 cases of suspected occult spinal dysraphic anomalies with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in order to determine its diagnostic efficacy as the initial imaging modality. MR imaging provided accurate preoperative information in 91 out of 92 cases (98.9%). Some of the unusual and interesting findings in the series were: presence of intrinsic cord abnormality in 19 out of 21 cases (90.4%) with a normal plain radiography, 4 cases of diastematomyelia with a dermoid in the dorsal and lumbar region associated with syringohydromyelia, intradural fibrous/glial bands, syringo-hydromyelia/myelomalacia of the conus with tethered cord syndrome having a normally paced conus, and myelocystocele. It is concluded that MRI is an excellent primary diagnostic tool, together with a plain radiography, for complete preoperative evaluation of mid-line spinal anomalies. 14 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs

  19. Safety of magnetic resonance contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, V M

    2001-08-01

    Intravenous contrast media, specifically the gadolinium chelates, are well accepted for use in the clinical practice of magnetic resonance imaging. The gadolinium chelates are considered to be very safe and lack (in intravenous use) the nephrotoxicity found with iodinated contrast media. Minor adverse reactions, including nausea and hives, occur in a low percentage of cases. The four agents currently available in the United States cannot be differentiated on the basis of these adverse reactions. Severe anaphylactoid reactions are also known to occur with all agents, although these are uncommon. This review discusses the safety issues involved with intravenous administration of the gadolinium chelates and off-label use. The latter is common in clinical practice and permits broader application of these agents. PMID:11687717

  20. Quantum information processing and nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Cummins, H K

    2001-01-01

    as spectrometer pulse sequence programs. Quantum computers are information processing devices which operate by and exploit the laws of quantum mechanics, potentially allowing them to solve problems which are intractable using classical computers. This dissertation considers the practical issues involved in one of the more successful implementations to date, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Techniques for dealing with systematic errors are presented, and a quantum protocol is implemented. Chapter 1 is a brief introduction to quantum computation. The physical basis of its efficiency and issues involved in its implementation are discussed. NMR quantum information processing is reviewed in more detail in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 considers some of the errors that may be introduced in the process of implementing an algorithm, and high-level ways of reducing the impact of these errors by using composite rotations. Novel general expressions for stabilising composite rotations are presented in Chapter 4 and a new class o...

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral disc degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Masao (Kitakyushu City Yahata Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Kira, Hideaki; Fujiki, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Hinoue, Kaichi

    1993-02-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration with findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventeen autopsied (from 7 patients) and 21 surgical (from 20 patients) intervertebral discs were used as specimens for histopathological examination. In addition, 21 intervertebral discs were examined on T2-weighted images. Histopathological findings from both autopsied and surgical specimens were well correlated with MRI findings. In particular, T2-weighted images reflected increased collagen fibers and rupture within the fibrous ring accurately. However, when severely degenerated intervertebral discs and hernia protruding the posterior longitudinal ligament existed, histological findings were not concordant well with T2-weighted images. Morphological appearances of autopsy specimens, divided into four on T2-weighted images, were well consistent with histological degeneration. This morphological classification, as shown on T2-weighted images, could also be used in the evaluation of intervertebral disc degeneration. (N.K.).

  2. Monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David Alberg

    2008-01-01

    -angiogenic treatment is presented in the first manuscript. In the second and third manuscript, two separate methods of quantifying perfusion, blood volume and vessel permeability are presented. The methods are used to show that drug delivery to a xenografted tumor is plausible and to show possible vascular maturation......When a tumor reaches a certain size it can no longer rely on passive perfusion for nutrition. The tumor therefore emits signaling molecules which stimulating surrounding vessels to divide and grow towards the tumor, a process known as angiogenesis. Very little angiogenesis is present in healthy...... and the involved signaling molecules. Subsequently, a short review of contrast agents and perfusion measurements is given. Finally, methods for monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed. A method for monitoring early stages of angiogenesis as well as the effect of anti...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-10-28

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  4. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hochhegger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation.

  5. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance petrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Boqin; Dunn, Keh-Jim

    2005-02-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) opens a wide area for exploration in petrophysics and has significant impact to petroleum logging technology. When there are multiple fluids with different diffusion coefficients saturated in a porous medium, this information can be extracted and clearly delineated from CPMG measurements of such a system either using regular pulsing sequences or modified two window sequences. The 2D NMR plot with independent variables of T2 relaxation time and diffusion coefficient allows clear separation of oil and water signals in the rocks. This 2D concept can be extended to general studies of fluid-saturated porous media involving other combinations of two or more independent variables, such as chemical shift and T1/T2 relaxation time (reflecting pore size), proton population and diffusion contrast, etc. PMID:15833623

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, K.S.; Brockwell, J.; Chan, F.L.; Janus, E.D.; Lam, K.S.L.

    1995-02-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a rare genetic disorder in which cholestanol and cholesterol accumulate in the nervous system and other tissues. It has an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Most patients are of low intelligence with poor school performance. Specific clinical manifestations include xanthomas of the tendons. Furthermore, patients develop cataracts and a slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia. There is slight mental deterioration. Death usually occurs in the sixth or seventh decade and is often due to unrelated causes. Plasma cholesterol levels are normal or only moderately elevated. The pattern of serum lipids is normal, and only serum cholestanol is significantly increased. Radiological features of the disease are infrequently described in the literature. We report a case of CTX in which magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to image the brain, lumbar spine and the tendinous xanthomas of the lower limbs. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance findings in lipoid pneumonia.

    OpenAIRE

    Bréchot, J M; Buy, J N; Laaban, J P; Rochemaure, J

    1991-01-01

    A case of exogenous lipoid pneumonia was documented by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Although strongly suggesting the presence of fat on T1 weighted images, magnetic resonance does not produce images specific for this condition. Computed tomography is the best imaging modality for its diagnosis.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the saccular otolithic mass.

    OpenAIRE

    Sbarbati, A; Leclercq, F; Antonakis, K; Osculati, F.

    1992-01-01

    The frog's inner ear was studied in vivo by high spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla. The vestibule, the internal acoustic meatus, and the auditory tube have been identified. The large otolithic mass contained in the vestibule showed a virtual absence of magnetic resonance signal probably due to its composition of closely packed otoconia.

  9. Parametric resonance in vircator with applied magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoryev, V.P.; Koval, T.V. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-11-01

    The investigation of electromagnetic oscillations excitation in the vircator with an external magnetic field is carried out. The conditions of producing of cyclotron wave parametric resonance with virtual cathode oscillations harmonics have been obtained where the radiation power resonance character depends on the magnetic field value.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Energy Storage Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez Reina, Rafael

    In today's society there is high demand to have access to energy for portable devices in different forms. Capacitors with high performance in small package to achieve high charge/discharge rates, and batteries with their ability to store electricity and make energy mobile are part of this demand. The types of internal dielectric material strongly affect the characteristics of a capacitor, and its applications. In a battery, the choice of the electrolyte plays an important role in the Solid Electrolyte Interphase (SEI) formation, and the cathode material for high output voltage. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are research techniques that exploit the magnetic properties of the electron and certain atomic nuclei to determine physical and chemical properties of the atoms or molecules in which they are contained. Both EPR and NMR spectroscopy technique can yield meaningful structural and dynamic information. Three different projects are discussed in this dissertation. First, High energy density capacitors where EPR measurements described herein provide an insight into structural and chemical differences in the dielectric material of a capacitor. Next, as the second project, Electrolyte solutions where an oxygen-17 NMR study has been employed to assess the degree of preferential solvation of Li+ ions in binary mixtures of EC (ethylene carbonate) and DMC (dimethyl carbonate) containing LiPF6 (lithium hexafluo-rophosphate) which may be ultimately related to the SEI formation mechanism. The third project was to study Bismuth fluoride as cathode material for rechargeable batteries. The objective was to study 19F and 7Li MAS NMR of some nanocomposite cathode materials as a conversion reaction occurring during lithiation and delithation of the BiF3/C nanocomposite.

  11. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  12. Compact electrically detected magnetic resonance setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) is a commonly used technique for the study of spin-dependent transport processes in semiconductor materials and electro-optical devices. Here, we present the design and implementation of a compact setup to measure EDMR, which is based on a commercially available benchtop electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer. The electrical detection part uses mostly off-the-shelf electrical components and is thus highly customizable. We present a characterization and calibration procedure for the instrument that allowed us to quantitatively reproduce results obtained on a silicon-based reference sample with a “large-scale” state-of-the-art instrument. This shows that EDMR can be used in novel contexts relevant for semiconductor device fabrication like clean room environments and even glove boxes. As an application example, we present data on a class of environment-sensitive objects new to EDMR, semiconducting organic microcrystals, and discuss similarities and differences to data obtained for thin-film devices of the same molecule

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in clinically-definite multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty-two patients with clinically-definite multiple sclerosis were examined by magnetic resonance imaging using a 1.5-T instrument. Magnetic resonance imaging detected an abnormality in 90% of patients. In four patients, no lesions were demonstrated. The number, size and site of the lesions by magnetic resonance imaging were compared with the patients' clinical status and other variables. The Kurtzke disability status scale score increased in patients with corpus callosum atrophy, brainstem and basal ganglia lesions, and correlated with the total number of lesions. No correlation was shown between the findings of magnetic resonance imaging and disease duration, age, sex or pattern-reversal visual-evoked potentials. The variety of magnetic resonance images that could be obtained in patients with clinically-definite multiple sclerosis is highlighted. 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  14. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Nikhil [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India)], E-mail: nikhil_ms26@yahoo.co.in; Kakar, Arun K. [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India); Chowdhury, Veena [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India); Gulati, Praveen [MR Centre, A-23 Green Park, New Delhi (India); Shankar, L. Ravi [Department of Radioiodine Uptake and Imaging, Institute of Nucler Medicine and Allied Sciences (INMAS), Timarpur, New Delhi (India); Vindal, Anubhav [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India)

    2007-12-15

    Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy of solitary thyroid nodules and its correlation with histopathology. Materials and methods: In this study, magnetic resonance spectroscopy was carried out on 26 patients having solitary thyroid nodules. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was performed on a 1.5 T super conductive system with gradient strength of 33 mTs. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done after MRS. All 26 patients underwent surgery either because of cytopathologically proven malignancy or because of cosmetic reasons. Findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared with histopathology of thyroid specimens. Results and conclusion: It was seen that presence or absence of choline peak correlates very well with presence or absence of malignant foci with in the nodule (sensitivity = 100%; specificity = 88.88%). These results indicate that magnetic resonance spectroscopy may prove to be an useful diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid.

  15. Systemic Hemodynamic Atherothrombotic Syndrome and Resonance Hypothesis of Blood Pressure Variability: Triggering Cardiovascular Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) exhibits different variabilities and surges with different time phases, from the shortest beat-by-beat to longest yearly changes. We hypothesized that the synergistic resonance of these BP variabilites generates an extraordinarily large dynamic surge in BP and triggers cardiovascular events (the resonance hypothesis). The power of pulses is transmitted to the peripheral sites without attenuation by the large arteries, in individuals with stiffened arteries. Thus, the effect of a BP surge on cardiovascular risk would be especially exaggerated in high-risk patients with vascular disease. Based on this concept, our group recently proposed a new theory of systemic hemodynamic atherothromboltic syndrome (SHATS), a vicious cycle of hemodynamic stress and vascular disease that advances organ damage and triggers cardiovascular disease. Clinical phenotypes of SHATS are large-artery atherothombotic diseases such as stroke, coronary artery disease, and aortic and pheripheral artery disease; small-artery diseases, and microcirculation-related disease such as vascular cognitive dysfunction, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. The careful consideration of BP variability and vascular diseases such as SHATS, and the early detection and management of SHATS, will achieve more effective individualized cardiovascular protection. In the near future, information and communication technology-based 'anticipation medicine' predicted by the changes of individual BP values could be a promising approach to achieving zero cardiovascular events. PMID:27482253

  16. Systemic Hemodynamic Atherothrombotic Syndrome and Resonance Hypothesis of Blood Pressure Variability: Triggering Cardiovascular Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kario, Kazuomi

    2016-07-01

    Blood pressure (BP) exhibits different variabilities and surges with different time phases, from the shortest beat-by-beat to longest yearly changes. We hypothesized that the synergistic resonance of these BP variabilites generates an extraordinarily large dynamic surge in BP and triggers cardiovascular events (the resonance hypothesis). The power of pulses is transmitted to the peripheral sites without attenuation by the large arteries, in individuals with stiffened arteries. Thus, the effect of a BP surge on cardiovascular risk would be especially exaggerated in high-risk patients with vascular disease. Based on this concept, our group recently proposed a new theory of systemic hemodynamic atherothromboltic syndrome (SHATS), a vicious cycle of hemodynamic stress and vascular disease that advances organ damage and triggers cardiovascular disease. Clinical phenotypes of SHATS are large-artery atherothombotic diseases such as stroke, coronary artery disease, and aortic and pheripheral artery disease; small-artery diseases, and microcirculation-related disease such as vascular cognitive dysfunction, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. The careful consideration of BP variability and vascular diseases such as SHATS, and the early detection and management of SHATS, will achieve more effective individualized cardiovascular protection. In the near future, information and communication technology-based 'anticipation medicine' predicted by the changes of individual BP values could be a promising approach to achieving zero cardiovascular events. PMID:27482253

  17. Travelling Wave Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3 Tesla

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez, F; Martin, R.; Marrufo, O.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2013-01-01

    Waveguides have been successfully used to generate magnetic resonance images at 7 T with whole-body systems. The bore limits the magnetic resonance signal transmitted because its specific cut-off frequency is greater than the majority of resonant frequencies. This restriction can be overcome by using a parallel-plate waveguide whose cut-off frequency is zero for the transversal electric modes and it can propagate any frequency. To investigate the potential benefits for whole-body imaging at 3...

  18. Electric and magnetic dipole couplings in split ring resonator metamaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Jing; Sun Guang-Yong; and Zhu Wei-Ren

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,the electric and the magnetic dipole couplings between the outer and the inner rings of a single split ring resonator (SRR) are investigated.We numerically demonstrate that the magnetic resonance frequency can be substantially modified by changing the couplings of the electric and magnetic dipoles,and give a theoretical expression of the magnetic resonance frequency.The results in this work are expected to be conducive to a deeper understanding of the SRR and other similar metamaterials,and provide new guidance for complex metamaterials design with a tailored electromagnetic response.

  19. Characterization of human breast disease using phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and proton magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis provides the fundamental characterization and differentiation of breast tissues using in vivo and ex vivo MR techniques in the hope that these techniques and experimental findings will be used on a larger scale and in a predictive manner in order to improve the specificity of diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. In this dissertation, clinical studies were performed using proton magnetic resonance imaging and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectro-scopy (31P MRS) to characterize and differentiate malignant breast tumors, benign breast tumors and normal breast tissues in vivo. These studies were carried out following the methodical characterization of chemical extracts of malignant breast tumor, benign breast tumor and normal breast parenchymal surgical tissue specimens using high resolution 31P MRS. Alterations in breast tissue metabolism, as a result of pathological processes, were postulated to be responsible for measurable differences between malignant breast tumors, benign breast tumors and normal breast tissues using magnetic resonance techniques. (author). 365 refs.; 37 figs.; 25 tabs

  20. Experiments in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong; Lu, Wei; Choi, J.-H.; Chia, H. J.; Mirsaidov, U. M.; Guchhait, S.; Cambou, A. D.; Cardenas, R.; Park, K.; Markert, J. T.

    2006-03-01

    We report our group's effort in the construction of an 8-T, ^3 He cryostat based nuclear magnetic resonance force microscope (NMRFM). The probe has two independent 3-D of piezoelectric x-y-z positioners for precise positioning of a fiber optic interferometer and a sample/gradient-producing magnet with respect to a micro-cantilever. The piezoelectric positioners have a very uniform controllable step size with virtually no backlash. A novel RF tuning circuit board design is implemented which allows us to simply swap out one RF component board with another for experiments involving different nuclear species. We successfully fabricated and are characterizing 50μm x50μm x0.2μm double torsional oscillators. We have also been characterizing ultrasoft cantilevers whose spring constant is on the order of 10-4 N/m. We also report NMRFM data for ammonium dihydrogen phosphate(ADP) at room temperature using our 1.2-T system. Observed features include the correct shift of the NMR peak with carrier frequency, increases in signal amplitude with both RF field strength and frequency modulation amplitude, and signal oscillation (spin nutation) as a function of tipping RF pulse length. Experiments in progress on NH4MgF3 (at 1.2 T) and MgB2 (at 8.1 T) will also be briefly reviewed. Robert A. Welch Foundation grant No.F-1191 and the National Science Foundation grant No. DMR-0210383.

  1. Italian registry of cardiac magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francone, Marco [Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Di Cesare, Ernesto, E-mail: ernesto.dicesare@cc.univaq.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche Applicate e Biotecnologie, Università di L’Aquila (Italy); Cademartiri, Filippo [Cardio-Vascular Imaging Unit, Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Monastier di Treviso, TV (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center University, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pontone, Gianluca [IRCCS Centro Cardiologico Monzino (Italy); Lovato, Luigi [Policlinico S. Orsola Bologna (Italy); Matta, Gildo [Azienda ospedaliera G Brotzu Cagliari (Italy); Secchi, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, Milan (Italy); Maffei, Erica [Cardio-Vascular Imaging Unit, Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Monastier di Treviso, TV (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center University, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pradella, Silvia [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi (Italy); Carbone, Iacopo [Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Marano, Riccardo [Policlinico Gemelli, Università Cattolica Roma (Italy); Bacigalupo, Lorenzo [Ospedale Galliera, Genova (Italy); Chiodi, Elisabetta [Ospedale S. Anna Ferrara (Italy); Donato, Rocco [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria G. Martino, Me (Italy); Sbarbati, Stefano [Ospedale Madre Giuseppina Vannini, Roma (Italy); De Cobelli, Francesco [IRCCS S. Raffaele, Università Vita Salute, Milano (Italy); Di Renzi, Paolo [Fate Bene Fratelli Isola tiberina, Roma (Italy); Ligabue, Guido; Mancini, Andrea [Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria Policlinico di Modena (Italy); Palmieri, Francesco [Diparimento di Diagnostica per immagini e radiologia interventistica, Ospedale S. Maria delle Grazie, Pozzuoli, Napoli (Italy); and others

    2014-01-15

    Objectives: Forty sites were involved in this multicenter and multivendor registry, which sought to evaluate indications, spectrum of protocols, impact on clinical decision making and safety profile of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Materials and methods: Data were prospectively collected on a 6-month period and included 3376 patients (47.2 ± 19 years; range 1–92 years). Recruited centers were asked to complete a preliminary general report followed by a single form/patient. Referral physicians were not required to exhibit any specific certificate of competency in CMR imaging. Results: Exams were performed with 1.5 T scanners in 96% of cases followed by 3 T (3%) and 1 T (1%) magnets and contrast was administered in 84% of cases. The majority of cases were performed for the workup of inflammatory heart disease/cardiomyopathies representing overall 55.7% of exams followed by the assessment of myocardial viability and acute infarction (respectively 6.9% and 5.9% of patients). In 49% of cases the final diagnosis provided was considered relevant and with impact on patient's clinical/therapeutic management. Safety evaluation revealed 30 (0.88%) clinical events, most of which due to patient's preexisting conditions. Radiological reporting was recorded in 73% of exams. Conclusions: CMR is performed in a large number of centers in Italy with relevant impact on clinical decision making and high safety profile.

  2. Quantitative perfusion imaging in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recognized for its superior tissue contrast while being non-invasive and free of ionizing radiation. Due to the development of new scanner hardware and fast imaging techniques during the last decades, access to tissue and organ functions became possible. One of these functional imaging techniques is perfusion imaging with which tissue perfusion and capillary permeability can be determined from dynamic imaging data. Perfusion imaging by MRI can be performed by two approaches, arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. While the first method uses magnetically labelled water protons in arterial blood as an endogenous tracer, the latter involves the injection of a contrast agent, usually gadolinium (Gd), as a tracer for calculating hemodynamic parameters. Studies have demonstrated the potential of perfusion MRI for diagnostics and also for therapy monitoring. The utilization and application of perfusion MRI are still restricted to specialized centers, such as university hospitals. A broad application of the technique has not yet been implemented. The MRI perfusion technique is a valuable tool that might come broadly available after implementation of standards on European and international levels. Such efforts are being promoted by the respective professional bodies. (orig.)

  3. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the author except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a transtympanic electrode implanted onto the surface of the cochlea. This approach would however, result in electromotive forces (EMFs) being induced by the time varying magnetic field, which would lead to current flow and heating, as well as deflection of the metallic electrode within the static magnetic field, and image distortion due to the magnetic susceptibility difference. A gold-plated tungsten electrode with a zero magnetic susceptibility was developed to avoid image distortion. Used with carbon leads and a carbon reference pad, it enabled safe, distortion-free fMRI studies of deaf subjects. The study revealed activation of the primary auditory cortex. This fMRI procedure can be used to demonstrate whether the auditory pathway is fully intact, and may provide a useful method for pre-operative assessment of candidates for cochlear implantation. Glucose is the energy source on which the function of the human brain is entirely dependent. Failure to

  4. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwatban, Adnan Z.W

    2002-07-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the author except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a transtympanic electrode implanted onto the surface of the cochlea. This approach would however, result in electromotive forces (EMFs) being induced by the time varying magnetic field, which would lead to current flow and heating, as well as deflection of the metallic electrode within the static magnetic field, and image distortion due to the magnetic susceptibility difference. A gold-plated tungsten electrode with a zero magnetic susceptibility was developed to avoid image distortion. Used with carbon leads and a carbon reference pad, it enabled safe, distortion-free fMRI studies of deaf subjects. The study revealed activation of the primary auditory cortex. This fMRI procedure can be used to demonstrate whether the auditory pathway is fully intact, and may provide a useful method for pre-operative assessment of candidates for cochlear implantation. Glucose is the energy source on which the function of the human brain is entirely dependent. Failure to

  5. Controlling interactions between highly-magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic $^7$S$_3$ chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on Dysprosium and Erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  6. Multi-color magnetic particle imaging for cardiovascular interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegele, Julian; Vaalma, Sarah; Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Barkhausen, Jörg; Vogt, Florian M.; Borgert, Jörn; Rahmer, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) uses magnetic fields to visualize the spatial distribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs). Guidance of cardiovascular interventions is seen as one possible application of MPI. To safely guide interventions, the vessel lumen as well as all required interventional devices have to be visualized and be discernible from each other. Until now, different tracer concentrations were used for discerning devices from blood in MPI, because only one type of SPIO could be imaged at a time. Recently, it was shown for 3D MPI that it is possible to separate different signal sources in one volume of interest, i.e. to visualize and discern different SPIOs or different binding states of the same SPIO. The approach was termed multi-color MPI. In this work, the use of multi-color MPI for differentiation of a SPIO coated guide wire (Terumo Radifocus 0.035″) from the lumen of a vessel phantom filled with diluted Resovist is demonstrated. This is achieved by recording dedicated system functions of the coating material containing solid Resovist and of liquid Resovist, which allows separation of their respective signal in the image reconstruction process. Assigning a color to the different signal sources results in a differentiation of guide wire and vessel phantom lumen into colored images.

  7. Resonant modes of vortex structures in soft-magnetic nanodiscs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present micromagnetic finite-element simulations on the dynamic response of a soft-magnetic disc exposed to an oscillatory field applied in the disc plane. The disc is magnetized in a vortex state. At lower frequencies (about 200 MHz in our example) we find a motion of the vortex core on an elliptical orbit as a resonant mode. At higher frequencies, the out-of-plane component of the magnetization becomes resonant by the excitation of standing magnetostatic waves

  8. Quantifying mixing using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Emilio J; McCarthy, Kathryn L; Bacca, Lori A; Hartt, William H; McCarthy, Michael J

    2012-01-25

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media (1, 2). The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile (1)H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  9. Quantifying mixing using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Emilio J; McCarthy, Kathryn L; Bacca, Lori A; Hartt, William H; McCarthy, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media (1, 2). The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile (1)H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  10. Non-resonant magnetic braking on JET and TEXTOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Y.; Liang, Y.; Shaing, K.C.;

    2012-01-01

    The non-resonant magnetic braking effect induced by a non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation is investigated on JET and TEXTOR. The collisionality dependence of the torque induced by the n = 1, where n is the toroidal mode number, magnetic perturbation generated by the error field correction coil...

  11. Resonant Mode Reduction in Radiofrequency Volume Coils for Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoliang Zhang; Daniel Vigneron; Ye Li; Duan Xu; Yong Pang; Zhentian Xie

    2011-01-01

    In a multimodal volume coil, only one mode can generate homogeneous Radiofrequency (RF) field for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The existence of other modes may increase the volume coil design difficulties and potentially decreases coil performance. In this study, we introduce common-mode resonator technique to high and ultrahigh field volume coil designs to reduce the resonant mode while maintain the homogeneity of the RF field. To investigate the design method, the common-mode resonator was r...

  12. Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-03-07

    This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of a brain abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 13 patients with brain abscesses, and the alternation of MRI findings, as correlated with the progression of brain-abscess formation, was reviewed. In the cerebritis stage, spin-echo images showed a high intensity, and inversion-recovery images, a low intensity, due to inflammation and edema. The spin-echo images were very sensitive in delineating the brain edema; however, it was difficult to distinguish the inflammation from the surrounding edema. In the capsule stage, due to the accumulation of purulent material, the central necrotic area was demonstrated as a low-intensity area, while the capsule of the abscess was revealed as an iso-intensity ring on the inversion-recovery images. The central necrotic area also decreased in intensity on spin-echo images in the later period of this stage. With contrast enhancement (Gd-DTPA), the SR image showed the capsule as a high-intensity ring. MRI was found to be a useful method for estimating the process of the formation of a brain abscess. (author)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of a brain abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oikawa, Akihiro; Kagawa, Mizuo; Yatoh, Seiji; Izawa, Masahiro; Ujiie, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Jun; Onda, Hideaki; Kitamura, Kohichi

    1988-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 13 patients with brain abscesses, and the alternation of MRI findings, as correlated with the progression of brain-abscess formation, was reviewed. In the cerebritis stage, spin-echo images showed a high intensity, and inversion-recovery images, a low intensity, due to inflammation and edema. The spin-echo images were very sensitive in delineating the brain edema; however, it was difficult to distinguish the inflammation from the surrounding edema. In the capsule stage, due to the accumulation of purulent material, the central necrotic area was demonstrated as a low-intensity area, while the capsule of the abscess was revealed as an iso-intensity ring on the inversion-recovery images. The central necrotic area also decreased in intensity on spin-echo images in the later period of this stage. With contrast enhancement (Gd-DTPA), the SR image showed the capsule as a high-intensity ring. MRI was found to be a useful method for estimating the process of the formation of a brain abscess.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of cystic periventricular leukomalacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoi, Nobuaki; Nomura, Junko; Nowatari, Masahiko; Ohta, Takeo; Kamohara, Takashi; Yashiro, Kimio (Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-08-01

    A study was performed to assess the values of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in evaluation and the follow up of patients with cystic periventricular leukomalacia. Ten patients selected for MR imaging were diagnosed as having periventricular cystic lesions based on US scans. The range of gestational ages was 27 to 32 weeks, and the range of birth weights was 927 to 2,046 g. Twenty MR examinations were carried out using a 0.5 T superconducting system (Resona; Yokogawa). On the first MR examinations, taken by 6 months of age, low signal intensity lesions within the periventricular white matter, moderate ventriculomegaly with irregularity of the ventricular wall and delayed myelination were observed. These were the MR findings observed in the subacute stage of PVL. On the second or the third MR examinations, taken after 12 months of age, increased signal intensity in periventricular white matter on T{sub 2} weighted images decreased volume of periventricular white matter and centrum semiovale and the ventriculomagaly with irregularity of ventricular wall were observed. However, progressions of myelination were proved to be not delayed in comparison with age matched controls. These were thought to be the MR findings of late stage of PVL. As the US findings of PVL have good correlation with pathologic changes revealed at autopsy, MR imaging can depict myelination and detect PVL lesion beyond the neonatal period. These observations demonstrate the value of the MR imaging for the follow up of the patients with PVL beyond the time of fontanel closure. (author).

  16. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging without contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martirosian, Petros; Graf, Hansjoerg; Schick, Fritz [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Section on Experimental Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Boss, Andreas; Schraml, Christina; Schwenzer, Nina F.; Claussen, Claus D. [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Principles of magnetic resonance imaging techniques providing perfusion-related contrast weighting without administration of contrast media are reported and analysed systematically. Especially common approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion imaging allowing quantitative assessment of specific perfusion rates are described in detail. The potential of ASL for perfusion imaging was tested in several types of tissue. After a systematic comparison of technical aspects of continuous and pulsed ASL techniques the standard kinetic model and tissue properties of influence to quantitative measurements of perfusion are reported. For the applications demonstrated in this paper a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL perfusion preparation approach followed by true fast imaging with steady precession (true FISP) data recording was developed and implemented on whole-body scanners operating at 0.2, 1.5 and 3 T for quantitative perfusion measurement in various types of tissue. ASL imaging provides a non-invasive tool for assessment of tissue perfusion rates in vivo. Images recorded from kidney, lung, brain, salivary gland and thyroid gland provide a spatial resolution of a few millimetres and sufficient signal to noise ratio in perfusion maps after 2-5 min of examination time. Newly developed ASL techniques provide especially high image quality and quantitative perfusion maps in tissues with relatively high perfusion rates (as also present in many tumours). Averaging of acquisitions and image subtraction procedures are mandatory, leading to the necessity of synchronization of data recording to breathing in abdominal and thoracic organs. (orig.)

  17. Exploring brain function with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since its invention in the early 1990s, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has rapidly assumed a leading role among the techniques used to localize brain activity. The spatial and temporal resolution provided by state-of-the-art MR technology and its non-invasive character, which allows multiple studies of the same subject, are some of the main advantages of fMRI over the other functional neuroimaging modalities that are based on changes in blood flow and cortical metabolism. This paper describes the basic principles and methodology of fMRI and some aspects of its application to functional activation studies. Attention is focused on the physiology of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast mechanism and on the acquisition of functional time-series with echo planar imaging (EPI). We also provide an introduction to the current strategies for the correction of signal artefacts and other image processing techniques. In order to convey an idea of the numerous applications of fMRI, we will review some of the recent results in the fields of cognitive and sensorimotor psychology and physiology

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Neuromyelitis Optica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Sun Kyung; Song, Chang June; Park, Woon Ju; Lee, In Ho; Son, Eun Hee [Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    To report the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of the spinal cord and brain in patients of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Between January 2001 and March 2010, the MR images (spinal cord, brain, and orbit) and the clinical and serologic findings of 11 NMO patients were retrospectively reviewed. The contrast-enhancement of the spinal cord was performed (20/23). The presence and pattern of the contrast-enhancement in the spinal cord were classified into 5 types. Acute myelitis was monophasic in 8 patients (8/11, 72.7%); and optic neuritis preceded acute myelitis in most patients. Longitudinally extensive cord lesion (average, 7.3 vertebral segments) was involved. The most common type was the diffuse and subtle enhancement of the spinal cord with a multifocal nodular, linear or segmental intense enhancement (45%). Most of the brain lesions (5/11, 10 lesions) were located in the brain stem, thalamus and callososeptal interphase. Anti-Ro autoantibody was positive in 2 patients, and they showed a high relapse rate of acute myelitis. Anti-NMO IgG was positive in 4 patients (4/7, 66.7%). The imaging findings of acute myelitis in NMO may helpful in making an early diagnosis of NMO which can result in a severe damage to the spinal cord, and to make a differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and inflammatory diseases of the spinal cord such as toxocariasis.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of primary vaginal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, M.B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: ben.taylor@christie-tr.nwest.nhs.uk; Dugar, N. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester (United Kingdom); Davidson, S.E. [Radiation Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester (United Kingdom); Carrington, B.M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-15

    Aims: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of vaginal carcinoma and to suggest a role for MRI in its management. Materials and methods: Twenty-five patients with primary vaginal carcinoma treated at our institution between 1996 and 2005 were included in the study. The MRI examinations were reviewed and tumour dimensions, signal characteristics and involvement of pelvic structures were documented, as were sites of enlarged lymph nodes and metastases. Details of patient treatment and outcome were obtained from the clinical notes. Results: The median patient age was 54 years (range 31-86 years). Tumour maximum diameter ranged from 1.6-11.3 cm (mean 3.7 cm). Most tumours were of iso-intense signal to muscle on T1-weighted images and hyper-intense to muscle on T2-weighted images. Eighty-eight percent of patients had tumour extending beyond the vagina and 56% of patients had Figo stage III or above tumours. Sixteen patients were treated with radiotherapy (two with chemoradiotherapy), five with surgery and four with supportive care. Ten patients (40%) died of their disease during the study period. The MRI stage of the tumour correlated with survival. Conclusion: MRI identified over 95% of primary vaginal tumours in the present study, enabled radiological staging, which correlated with outcome, and provided information of use in treatment planning.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging structured reporting in infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoliu-Fornas, Guillermina; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis

    2016-06-01

    Our objective was to define and propose a standardized magnetic resonance (MR) imaging structured report in patients with infertility to have clinical completeness on possible diagnosis and severity. Patients should be studied preferable on 3T equipment with a surface coil. Standard MR protocol should include high-resolution fast spin-echo T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted images and gradient-echo T1-weighted fat suppression images. The report should include ovaries (polycystic, endometrioma, tumor), oviduct (hydrosalpinx, hematosalpinx, pyosalpinx, peritubal anomalies), uterus (agenesia, hypoplasia, unicornuate, uterus didelphys, bicornuate, septate uterus), myometrium (leiomyomas, adenomyosis), endometrium (polyps, synechia, atrophy, neoplasia), cervix and vagina (isthmoceles, mucosal-parietal irregularity, stenosis, neoplasia), peritoneum (deep endometriosis), and urinary system-associated abnormalities. To be clinically useful, radiology reports must be structured, use standardized terminology, and convey actionable information. The structured report must comprise complete, comprehensive, and accurate information, allowing radiologists to continuously interact with patients and referring physicians to confirm that the information is used properly to affect the decision making process. PMID:27105717