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Sample records for cardiovascular image analysis

  1. Design and validation of Segment - freely available software for cardiovascular image analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Engblom Henrik; Carlsson Marcus; Ugander Martin; Sjögren Jane; Heiberg Einar; Arheden Håkan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Commercially available software for cardiovascular image analysis often has limited functionality and frequently lacks the careful validation that is required for clinical studies. We have already implemented a cardiovascular image analysis software package and released it as freeware for the research community. However, it was distributed as a stand-alone application and other researchers could not extend it by writing their own custom image analysis algorithms. We believ...

  2. Cardiovascular molecular MR imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, H J; van der Meer, R. W.; Roos, A. (Anna); Bax, J J

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular molecular imaging is a rapidly evolving field of research, aiming to image and quantify molecular and cellular targets in vivo. MR imaging has some inherent properties that make it very suitable for cardiovascular molecular imaging. Until now, only a limited number of studies have been published on cardiovascular molecular imaging using MR imaging. Review In the current review, MR techniques that have already shown potential are discussed. Metabolic MR imaging can ...

  3. Design and validation of Segment - freely available software for cardiovascular image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Commercially available software for cardiovascular image analysis often has limited functionality and frequently lacks the careful validation that is required for clinical studies. We have already implemented a cardiovascular image analysis software package and released it as freeware for the research community. However, it was distributed as a stand-alone application and other researchers could not extend it by writing their own custom image analysis algorithms. We believe that the work required to make a clinically applicable prototype can be reduced by making the software extensible, so that researchers can develop their own modules or improvements. Such an initiative might then serve as a bridge between image analysis research and cardiovascular research. The aim of this article is therefore to present the design and validation of a cardiovascular image analysis software package (Segment) and to announce its release in a source code format. Results Segment can be used for image analysis in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Some of its main features include loading of DICOM images from all major scanner vendors, simultaneous display of multiple image stacks and plane intersections, automated segmentation of the left ventricle, quantification of MRI flow, tools for manual and general object segmentation, quantitative regional wall motion analysis, myocardial viability analysis and image fusion tools. Here we present an overview of the validation results and validation procedures for the functionality of the software. We describe a technique to ensure continued accuracy and validity of the software by implementing and using a test script that tests the functionality of the software and validates the output. The software has been made freely available for research purposes in a source code format on the project home page http

  4. Design and validation of Segment - freely available software for cardiovascular image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercially available software for cardiovascular image analysis often has limited functionality and frequently lacks the careful validation that is required for clinical studies. We have already implemented a cardiovascular image analysis software package and released it as freeware for the research community. However, it was distributed as a stand-alone application and other researchers could not extend it by writing their own custom image analysis algorithms. We believe that the work required to make a clinically applicable prototype can be reduced by making the software extensible, so that researchers can develop their own modules or improvements. Such an initiative might then serve as a bridge between image analysis research and cardiovascular research. The aim of this article is therefore to present the design and validation of a cardiovascular image analysis software package (Segment) and to announce its release in a source code format. Segment can be used for image analysis in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Some of its main features include loading of DICOM images from all major scanner vendors, simultaneous display of multiple image stacks and plane intersections, automated segmentation of the left ventricle, quantification of MRI flow, tools for manual and general object segmentation, quantitative regional wall motion analysis, myocardial viability analysis and image fusion tools. Here we present an overview of the validation results and validation procedures for the functionality of the software. We describe a technique to ensure continued accuracy and validity of the software by implementing and using a test script that tests the functionality of the software and validates the output. The software has been made freely available for research purposes in a source code format on the project home page (http://segment.heiberg.se). Segment

  5. Molecular cardiovascular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although huge and long-lasting research efforts have been spent on the development of new diagnostic techniques investigating cardiovascular diseases, still fundamental challenges exist; the main challenge being the diagnosis of a suspected or known coronary artery disease or its consequences (myocardial infarction, heart failure etc.). Beside morphological techniques, functional imaging modalities are available in clinical diagnostic algorithms, whereas molecular cardiovascular imaging techniques are still under development. This review summarizes clinical-diagnostical challenges of modern cardiovascular medicine as well as the potential of new molecular imaging techniques to face these. (orig.)

  6. Design and validation of Segment - freely available software for cardiovascular image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engblom Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Commercially available software for cardiovascular image analysis often has limited functionality and frequently lacks the careful validation that is required for clinical studies. We have already implemented a cardiovascular image analysis software package and released it as freeware for the research community. However, it was distributed as a stand-alone application and other researchers could not extend it by writing their own custom image analysis algorithms. We believe that the work required to make a clinically applicable prototype can be reduced by making the software extensible, so that researchers can develop their own modules or improvements. Such an initiative might then serve as a bridge between image analysis research and cardiovascular research. The aim of this article is therefore to present the design and validation of a cardiovascular image analysis software package (Segment and to announce its release in a source code format. Results Segment can be used for image analysis in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography (CT, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and positron emission tomography (PET. Some of its main features include loading of DICOM images from all major scanner vendors, simultaneous display of multiple image stacks and plane intersections, automated segmentation of the left ventricle, quantification of MRI flow, tools for manual and general object segmentation, quantitative regional wall motion analysis, myocardial viability analysis and image fusion tools. Here we present an overview of the validation results and validation procedures for the functionality of the software. We describe a technique to ensure continued accuracy and validity of the software by implementing and using a test script that tests the functionality of the software and validates the output. The software has been made freely available for research purposes in a source code format on the project home

  7. Cardiovascular Molecular Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Khanicheh, Elham

    2009-01-01

    Although there have been significant improvements in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases they still remain the main cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Currently available diagnostic approaches may not be adequate to detect pathologic changes during the early disease stages, which may be valuable for risk stratification and also to assess a response to a therapy. Therefore molecular imaging techniques such as Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEU) molecular imaging to noninvasively i...

  8. Nuclear imaging of cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear imaging methods provide noninvasive indexes of myocardial function, perfusion, and metabolism and are well accepted in clinical cardiology. Advances in prevention and treatment of cardiac disease have resulted in decreasing cardiovascular mortality in industrialized nations. The improvement in therapeutic options has increased the demand for diagnostic tests that might guide clinical decision making. Information beyond the pure anatomic characterization of coronary stenoses is required. Nuclear imaging can be used for early detection and monitoring of the severity and extent of disease. The prognostic potential of such functional testing is being increasingly appreciated and used to guide therapy, thereby resulting in improvement of the quality and cost-effectiveness of the workup of patients with cardiovascular disease. Extensive clinical validation has resulted in growing acceptance of these techniques. Furthermore, ongoing improvement of imaging techniques and development of new radiopharmaceuticals will pave the way for disease-specific, molecular-targeted cardiac imaging in the future. (orig.)

  9. Image processing in cardiovascular radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past ten years digital image processing has contributed decisively to the advance of cardiovascular radiology. Not only images of better diagnostic value could be produced, but also in many cases the risk for the patient was diminished. In this paper three topics are discussed: One of the principal methods is digital angiography especially with functional imaging. In addition, because of the rapid progress of digital imaging data compression became a major issue. Finally there is a good chance that 3D-processing of MRI data will at least partly replace the present invasive techniques

  10. Cardiovascular molecular imaging of apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolters, S.L.; Reutelingsperger, C.P.M. [Maastricht University, Department of Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Corsten, M.F.; Hofstra, L. [Maastricht University, Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, P.O. Box 616, Maastricht (Netherlands); Narula, J. [University of California Irvine, Department of Cardiology, Irvine (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Molecular imaging strives to visualise processes at the molecular and cellular level in vivo. Understanding these processes supports diagnosis and evaluation of therapeutic efficacy on an individual basis and thereby makes personalised medicine possible. Apoptosis is a well-organised mode of cell suicide that plays a role in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Apoptosis is associated with loss of cardiomyocytes following myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic plaque instability, congestive heart failure and allograft rejection of the transplanted heart. Thus, apoptosis constitutes an attractive target for molecular imaging of CVD. Our current knowledge about the molecular players and mechanisms underlying apoptosis offers a rich palette of potential molecular targets for molecular imaging. However, only a few have been successfully developed so far. This review highlights aspects of the molecular machinery and biochemistry of apoptosis relevant to the development of molecular imaging probes. It surveys the role of apoptosis in four major areas of CVD and portrays the importance and future perspectives of apoptosis imaging. The annexin A5 imaging protocol is emphasised since it is the most advanced protocol to measure apoptosis in both preclinical and clinical studies. (orig.)

  11. Molecular imaging in cardiovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized and developing countries. In clinical practice, the in-vivo identification of atherosclerotic lesions, which can lead to complications such as heart attack or stroke, remains difficult. Imaging techniques provide the reference standard for the detection of clinically significant atherosclerotic changes in the coronary and carotid arteries. The assessment of the luminal narrowing is feasible, while the differentiation of stable and potentially unstable or vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is currently not possible using non-invasive imaging. With high spatial resolution and high soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a suitable method for the evaluation of the thin arterial wall. In clinical practice, native MRI of the vessel wall already allows the differentiation and characterization of components of atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries and the aorta. Additional diagnostic information can be gained by the use of non-specific MRI contrast agents. With the development of targeted molecular probes, that highlight specific molecules or cells, pathological processes can be visualized at a molecular level with high spatial resolution. In this review article, the development of pathophysiological changes leading to the development of the arterial wall are introduced and discussed. Additionally, principles of contrast enhanced imaging with non-specific contrast agents and molecular probes will be discussed and latest developments in the field of molecular imaging of the vascular wall will be introduced.

  12. Artificial intelligence as a diagnostic adjunct in cardiovascular nuclear imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiologist and/or nuclear medicine physician is literally bombarded with information from today's diagnostic imaging technologies. As a consequence of this, whereas a decade ago the emphasis in medical image analysis was on improving the extraction of diagnostic information by developing and using more sophisticated imaging modalities, today those working on the development of medical imaging technology are struggling to find ways to handle all gathered information effectively. This chapter gives an introduction to the area of artificial intelligence, with an emphasis on the research ongoing in cardiovascular nuclear imaging. This chapter has reviewed the place of artificial intelligence in cardiovascular nuclear imaging. It is intended to provide a general sense of this new and emerging field, an insight into some of its specific methodologies and applications, and a closer look at the several AI approaches currently being applied in cardiovascular nuclear imaging

  13. Quantitative cardiovascular magnetic resonance for molecular imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lanza Gregory M; Caruthers Shelton D; Winter Patrick M; Wickline Samuel A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) molecular imaging aims to identify and map the expression of important biomarkers on a cellular scale utilizing contrast agents that are specifically targeted to the biochemical signatures of disease and are capable of generating sufficient image contrast. In some cases, the contrast agents may be designed to carry a drug payload or to be sensitive to important physiological factors, such as pH, temperature or oxygenation. In this review, examp...

  14. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging - a pictorial review

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Dahya; Spottiswoode, Bruce S.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is a powerful problem-solving tool and arguably offers the most comprehensive assessment of cardiac morphology and function, as well as the opportunity of rebuilding the bridge between cardiologists and radiologists. The role of CMR-trained imaging physicists is also valuable, and many CMR centres harmoniously incorporate these three sub-specialty fields. This paper comprises an overview of several CMR techniques, outlining both the strengths...

  15. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging - a pictorial review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Dahya

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR is a powerful problem-solving tool and arguably offers the most comprehensive assessment of cardiac morphology and function, as well as the opportunity of rebuilding the bridge between cardiologists and radiologists. The role of CMR-trained imaging physicists is also valuable, and many CMR centres harmoniously incorporate these three sub-specialty fields. This paper comprises an overview of several CMR techniques, outlining both the strengths and limitations of the modality.

  16. MACD: an imaging marker for cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganz, Melanie; de Bruijne, Marleen; Nielsen, Mads

    2010-01-01

    Despite general acceptance that a healthy lifestyle and the treatment of risk factors can prevent the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), CVD are the most common cause of death in Europe and the United States. It has been shown that abdominal aortic calcifications (AAC) correlate strongly...... with coronary artery calcifications. Hence an early detection of aortic calcified plaques helps to predict the risk of related coronary diseases. Also since two thirds of the adverse events have no prior symptoms, possibilities to screen for risk in low cost imaging are important. To this end the Morphological...... imaging markers described. Finally we present that the MACD index predicts cardiovascular death with a hazard ratio of approximately four....

  17. The future of the cardiovascular image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the future of the cardiovascular image is presented, it is important to know the advantages and disadvantages of the current image methods to apply them in each case. The characteristics of the methods are presented: X R simple plate, the cardiac ultrasound, the image by magnetic resonance, the computed tomography, the helicoid tomography, the SPECT of myocardial perfusion, the PET and the PET/CT and the used radiopharmaceuticals. The SPECT of myocardial perfusion is the more used method around the world for the evacuation of the coronary illness. It has a high sensitivity (between 90 and 97%), it is a non-invasive treatment (morbidity of 0.01%), of relative low cost and it is useful in the diagnosis of ischemia in groups of high risk like diabetics, dyslipidemia, obese and hypertension. (Author)

  18. The clinical impact of late gadolinium enhancement in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: serial analysis of cardiovascular magnetic resonance images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoh Hideki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our study aimed to investigate both the clinical implications of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR and the relation of LGE to clinical findings in patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC. Methods We evaluated 20 consecutive patients (2 men, 18 women; median age, 77 years; interquartile range [IQR] 67-82 years who were admitted to our hospital with the diagnosis of TTC. CMR was performed within 1 week after admission, and follow-up studies were conducted 1.5 and 6 months later. Results In 8 patients, CMR imaging during the sub-acute phase revealed LGE in the area matched with wall motion impairment. Cardiogenic shock was more frequently observed in patients with LGE than in those without LGE (38% vs 0%, p = 0.049. The patients with LGE needed a longer duration for ECG normalization and recovery of wall motion than did those without LGE (median 205 days, IQR [152-363] vs 68 days, [43-145], p = 0.005; 15 days, [10-185] vs 7 days, [4-13], p = 0.030, respectively. In 5 of these 8 patients, LGE disappeared within 45-180 days (170, IQR [56-180] of onset. The patients with LGE remaining in the chronic phase had higher peak creatine kinase levels than did those without LGE (median 307 IU/L, IQR [264-460] vs 202 IU/L, [120-218], p = 0.017. Conclusion LGE by CMR in the sub-acute phase may be associated with the severity and prolonged recovery to normal of clinical findings in TTC.

  19. Non-cardiovascular findings in clinical cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadimi Mahani, Maryam [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Morani, Ajaykumar C. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Lu, Jimmy C.; Dorfman, Adam L. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Fazeli Dehkordy, Soudabeh [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Providence Hospital and Medical Centers, Department of Graduate Medical Education, Southfield, MI (United States); Jeph, Sunil [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Geisinger Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Danville, PA (United States); Agarwal, Prachi P. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Division of Cardiothoracic Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-04-15

    With increasing use of pediatric cardiovascular MRI, it is important for all imagers to become familiar with the spectrum of non-cardiovascular imaging findings that can be encountered. This study aims to ascertain the prevalence and nature of these findings in pediatric cardiovascular MRIs performed at our institution. We retrospectively evaluated reports of all cardiovascular MRI studies performed at our institute from January 2008 to October 2012 in patients younger than18 years. Most studies (98%) were jointly interpreted by a pediatric cardiologist and a radiologist. We reviewed the electronic medical records of all cases with non-cardiovascular findings, defined as any imaging finding outside the cardiovascular system. Non-cardiovascular findings were classified into significant and non-significant, based on whether they were known at the time of imaging or they required additional workup or a change in management. In 849 consecutive studies (mean age 9.7 ± 6.3 years), 145 non-cardiovascular findings were found in 140 studies (16.5% of total studies). Overall, 51.0% (74/145) of non-cardiovascular findings were in the abdomen, 30.3% (44/145) were in the chest, and 18.6% (27/145) were in the spine. A total of 19 significant non-cardiovascular findings were observed in 19 studies in individual patients (2.2% of total studies, 47% male, mean age 5.9 ± 6.7 years). Significant non-cardiovascular findings included hepatic adenoma, arterially enhancing focal liver lesions, asplenia, solitary kidney, pelvicaliectasis, renal cystic diseases, gastric distention, adrenal hemorrhage, lung hypoplasia, air space disease, bronchial narrowing, pneumomediastinum and retained surgical sponge. Non-cardiovascular findings were seen in 16.5% of cardiovascular MRI studies in children, of which 2.2% were clinically significant findings. Prevalence and nature of these non-cardiovascular findings are different from those reported in adults. Attention to these findings is important

  20. Imaging of cardiovascular malformations in Williams syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the imaging methods for cardiovascular malformations in Williams syndrome(WS). Methods: Thirteen cases of WS (7 males and 6 females) aged 10 months to 13 years were involved in this study. All patients underwent chest X-ray radiography, electrocardiography, echocardiography and physical examination. 3 cases underwent electronic beam computed tomography (EBCT), cardiac catheterization and angiography were performed in 8 cases. Results: Twelve patients were referred to our hospital for cardiac murmur and 1 case for cyanosis after birth. 7 patients were found with 'elfin-like' facial features, 6 patients with pulmonary arterial stenosis, 2 cases with patent ductus arteriosus, 2 cases with severe pulmonary hypertension and 1 case with total endocardial cushion defect. Sudden death occurred in 2 patients during and after catheterization, respectively. Conclusions: Conventional angiography is the golden standard for the diagnosis of cardiovascular malformations in WS. Noninvasive methods such as MSCT and MRI should be suggested because of the risk of sudden death in conventional angiography. (authors)

  1. Imaging of cardiovascular risk in patients with Turner's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, A; Weir-McCall, J R; Webb, D J; van Beek, E J R; Mirsadraee, S

    2015-08-01

    Turner's syndrome is a disorder defined by an absent or structurally abnormal second X chromosome and affects around 1 in 2000 newborn females. The standardised mortality ratio in Turner's syndrome is around three-times higher than in the general female population, mainly as a result of cardiovascular disorders. Most striking is the early age at which Turner's syndrome patients develop the life-threatening complications of cardiovascular disorders compared to the general population. The cardiovascular risk stratification in Turner's syndrome is challenging and imaging is not systematically used. The aim of this article is to review cardiovascular risks in this group of patients and discuss a systematic imaging approach for early identification of cardiovascular disorders in these patients. PMID:25917542

  2. Evidence Base for Quality Control Activities in Cardiovascular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Mehdi; Kramer, Christopher M; Hecht, Harvey S; Jaber, Wael A; Marwick, Thomas H

    2016-03-01

    Quality control is pervasive in most modern business, but, surprisingly, is in its infancy in medicine in general-and cardiovascular imaging in particular. The increasing awareness of the cost of cardiovascular imaging, matched by a desire to show benefits from imaging to patient outcome, suggests that this deficiency should be reassessed. Demonstration of improved quality has been proposed to require a focus on several domains: laboratory organization, patient selection, image acquisition, image interpretation, and results communication. Improvement in these steps will require adoption of a variety of interventions, including laboratory accreditation, appropriate use criteria, and continuous quality control and enhancements in reporting, but the evidence base for the benefit of interventions on these steps has been sparse. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the current status and future goals of developing the evidence base for these processes in cardiovascular imaging. PMID:26965731

  3. Analysis of an automated background correction method for cardiovascular MR phase contrast imaging in children and young adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigsby, Cynthia K.; Hilpipre, Nicholas; Boylan, Emma E.; Popescu, Andrada R.; Deng, Jie [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); McNeal, Gary R. [Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc., Customer Solutions Group, Cardiovascular MR R and D, Chicago, IL (United States); Zhang, Gang [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago Research Center, Biostatistics Research Core, Chicago, IL (United States); Choi, Grace [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Greiser, Andreas [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool for evaluating vessel blood flow. Inherent errors in acquisition, such as phase offset, eddy currents and gradient field effects, can cause significant inaccuracies in flow parameters. These errors can be rectified with the use of background correction software. To evaluate the performance of an automated phase contrast MRI background phase correction method in children and young adults undergoing cardiac MR imaging. We conducted a retrospective review of patients undergoing routine clinical cardiac MRI including phase contrast MRI for flow quantification in the aorta (Ao) and main pulmonary artery (MPA). When phase contrast MRI of the right and left pulmonary arteries was also performed, these data were included. We excluded patients with known shunts and metallic implants causing visible MRI artifact and those with more than mild to moderate aortic or pulmonary stenosis. Phase contrast MRI of the Ao, mid MPA, proximal right pulmonary artery (RPA) and left pulmonary artery (LPA) using 2-D gradient echo Fast Low Angle SHot (FLASH) imaging was acquired during normal respiration with retrospective cardiac gating. Standard phase image reconstruction and the automatic spatially dependent background-phase-corrected reconstruction were performed on each phase contrast MRI dataset. Non-background-corrected and background-phase-corrected net flow, forward flow, regurgitant volume, regurgitant fraction, and vessel cardiac output were recorded for each vessel. We compared standard non-background-corrected and background-phase-corrected mean flow values for the Ao and MPA. The ratio of pulmonary to systemic blood flow (Qp:Qs) was calculated for the standard non-background and background-phase-corrected data and these values were compared to each other and for proximity to 1. In a subset of patients who also underwent phase contrast MRI of the MPA, RPA, and LPA a comparison was made between standard non

  4. Analysis of an automated background correction method for cardiovascular MR phase contrast imaging in children and young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool for evaluating vessel blood flow. Inherent errors in acquisition, such as phase offset, eddy currents and gradient field effects, can cause significant inaccuracies in flow parameters. These errors can be rectified with the use of background correction software. To evaluate the performance of an automated phase contrast MRI background phase correction method in children and young adults undergoing cardiac MR imaging. We conducted a retrospective review of patients undergoing routine clinical cardiac MRI including phase contrast MRI for flow quantification in the aorta (Ao) and main pulmonary artery (MPA). When phase contrast MRI of the right and left pulmonary arteries was also performed, these data were included. We excluded patients with known shunts and metallic implants causing visible MRI artifact and those with more than mild to moderate aortic or pulmonary stenosis. Phase contrast MRI of the Ao, mid MPA, proximal right pulmonary artery (RPA) and left pulmonary artery (LPA) using 2-D gradient echo Fast Low Angle SHot (FLASH) imaging was acquired during normal respiration with retrospective cardiac gating. Standard phase image reconstruction and the automatic spatially dependent background-phase-corrected reconstruction were performed on each phase contrast MRI dataset. Non-background-corrected and background-phase-corrected net flow, forward flow, regurgitant volume, regurgitant fraction, and vessel cardiac output were recorded for each vessel. We compared standard non-background-corrected and background-phase-corrected mean flow values for the Ao and MPA. The ratio of pulmonary to systemic blood flow (Qp:Qs) was calculated for the standard non-background and background-phase-corrected data and these values were compared to each other and for proximity to 1. In a subset of patients who also underwent phase contrast MRI of the MPA, RPA, and LPA a comparison was made between standard non

  5. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance and computed tomography imaging for the assessment of cardiovascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Graça, Bruno Miguel Silva Rosa da

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is responsible for diverse cardiovascular complications such as increased atherosclerosis in large arteries (carotids, aorta, and femoral arteries) and increased coronary atherosclerosis. A number of noninvasive tests are now available to detect coronary atherosclerotic disease, myocardial dysfunction and myocardial ischemia. The potential of cardiovascular imaging for the assessment of cardiovascular complications of type 2 diabetic patients is an active field of res...

  6. Cardiovascular Imaging in the Electrophysiology Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis, Laura; Prat, Susanna; Sitges, Marta

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, rapid technological advances have allowed the development of new electrophysiological procedures that would not have been possible without the parallel development of imaging techniques used to plan and guide these procedures and monitor their outcomes. Ablation of atrial fibrillation is among the interventions with the greatest need for imaging support. Echocardiography allows the appropriate selection of patients and the detection of thrombi that would contraindicate the intervention; cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are also essential in planning this procedure, by allowing a detailed anatomical study of the pulmonary veins. In addition, in cardiac resynchronization therapy, echocardiography plays a central role in both patient selection and, later, in device adjustment and in assessing the effectiveness of the technique. More recently, ablation of ventricular tachycardias has been established as a treatment option; this would not be possible without planning using an imaging study such as cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of myocardial scarring. PMID:27107802

  7. Echocardiography in the Era of Multimodality Cardiovascular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoy Nalin Shah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Echocardiography remains the most frequently performed cardiac imaging investigation and is an invaluable tool for detailed and accurate evaluation of cardiac structure and function. Echocardiography, nuclear cardiology, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and cardiovascular-computed tomography comprise the subspeciality of cardiovascular imaging, and these techniques are often used together for a multimodality, comprehensive assessment of a number of cardiac diseases. This paper provides the general cardiologist and physician with an overview of state-of-the-art modern echocardiography, summarising established indications as well as highlighting advances in stress echocardiography, three-dimensional echocardiography, deformation imaging, and contrast echocardiography. Strengths and limitations of echocardiography are discussed as well as the growing role of real-time three-dimensional echocardiography in the guidance of structural heart interventions in the cardiac catheter laboratory.

  8. Cardiovascular PET-CT imaging: a new frontier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, P D; Williams, M C; Newby, D E

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular positron-emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET-CT) has recently emerged as an imaging technology with the potential to simultaneously describe both anatomical structures and physiological processes in vivo. The scope for clinical application of this technique is vast, but to date this promise has not been realised. Nonetheless, significant research activity is underway to explore these possibilities and it is likely that the knowledge gained will have important diagnostic and therapeutic implications in due course. This review provides a brief overview of the current state of cardiovascular PET-CT and the likely direction of future developments. PMID:26951964

  9. Phase-gated cine cardiovascular MR imaging without electrocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cine cardiovascular MR imaging remains dependent on adequate electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings, often in the setting of arrhythmia, decreased R waves, and/or artifactual waves. The authors employed a gating strategy based on phase changes from cardiac motion (phase gating). With incorporation of an additional section or echo for monitoring such motion-related phase changes during constant phase encoding, imaging and timing data were obtained simultaneously. Following noise filtering, a search algorithm located regular phase perturbations in the timing data related to cardiac cycles. The resulting artificial ECG signals were then used in a standard retrospective gating scheme. This strategy has been used to study acquired and congenital cardiovascular abnormalities. The phase-gated images have resembled those from prospective and retrospective ECG-referenced strategies

  10. Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The 19th Scandinavian Conference on Image Analysis was held at the IT University of Copenhagen in Denmark during June 15-17, 2015. The SCIA conference series has been an ongoing biannual event for more than 30 years and over the years it has nurtured a world-class regional research and development....... The topics of the accepted papers range from novel applications of vision systems, pattern recognition, machine learning, feature extraction, segmentation, 3D vision, to medical and biomedical image analysis. The papers originate from all the Scandinavian countries and several other European countries...

  11. Cardiovascular involvement by osteosarcoma: an analysis of 20 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yedururi, Sireesha; Morani, Ajaykumar C.; Gladish, Gregory W. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Vallabhaneni, Srilakshmi [Medstar Harbor Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Anderson, Peter M. [Levine Children' s Hospital/Levine Cancer Institute, Department of Pediatrics Hematology/Oncology/BMT, Carolinas Healthcare System, Charlotte, NC (United States); Hughes, Dennis; Daw, Najat C. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Pediatrics, Houston, TX (United States); Wang, Wei-Lien [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Pathology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Although hematogenous spread of osteosarcoma is well known, the imaging findings of cardiovascular involvement by osteosarcoma are seldom reported and can be difficult to recognize. The enhanced resolution of modern CT and MRI scanners may lead to better detection of cardiovascular involvement. To describe the key imaging findings and clinical behavior of cardiovascular involvement by osteosarcoma. We retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings and clinical characteristics of 20 patients with cardiovascular involvement by osteosarcoma identified by two pediatric radiologists from a review of imaging studies at our institution from 2007 to 2013. At initial diagnosis, the median age of the patients was 15.1 years (range 4.8-24.6 years), and 7 (35%) patients had detectable metastases. Median time to detection of cardiovascular metastases was 1.8 years (range 0-7.3 years). Sixteen patients died of disease; 4 have survived a median of 7.4 years since initial diagnosis. The sites of cardiovascular involvement were the systemic veins draining the primary and metastatic osteosarcoma, pulmonary arteries, pulmonary veins draining the pulmonary metastases, and heart. A dilated and mineralized terminal pulmonary arteriole is an early sign of metastatic osteosarcoma in the lung. Unfamiliarity with the imaging features resulted in under-recognition and misinterpretation of intravascular tumor thrombus as bland thrombus. Knowledge of imaging findings in the era of modern imaging modalities has enhanced our ability to detect cardiovascular involvement and lung metastases early and avoid misinterpreting tumor thrombus in draining systemic veins or pulmonary arteries as bland thrombus. (orig.)

  12. Correlation of chronic kidney disease, diabetes and peripheral artery disease with cardiovascular events in patients using stress myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normal stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) studies generally suggest an excellent prognosis for cardiovascular events. Chronic kidney disease (CKD), diabetes and peripheral artery disease (PAD) have been established as the risk factors for cardiovascular events. However, whether these risk factors significantly predict cardiovascular events in patients with normal stress MPI is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of these risk factors in patients with normal stress MPI. Patients with normal stress MPI (n=372, male=215 and female=157, age=69 years, CKD without hemodialysis=95, diabetes=99, PAD=19, previous coronary artery disease=116) were followed up for 14 months. Normal stress MPI was defined as a summed stress score of 2 and/or persistent proteinuria. Cardiovascular events included cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure requiring hospitalization. Cardiovascular events occurred in 20 of 372 patients (5.4%). In univariate Cox regression analysis, PAD, diabetes, diabetic retinopathy, insulin use, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, CKD, left ventricular ejection fraction and pharmacological stress tests were significant predictors of cardiovascular events. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, PAD, diabetes and CKD were independent and significant predictors for cardiovascular events, and their number was the strongest predictor for cardiovascular events (hazard ratio=21.7, P<0.001). PAD, diabetes and CKD are coexisting, independent and significant risk factors for cardiovascular events, CKD being the strongest predictor. The number of coexisting risk factors is important in predicting cardiovascular events in patients with normal stress MPI. (author)

  13. The future of the cardiovascular image; El futuro de la imagen cardiovascular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna M, J.A. [Hospital Angeles del Pedregal, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    In this work the future of the cardiovascular image is presented, it is important to know the advantages and disadvantages of the current image methods to apply them in each case. The characteristics of the methods are presented: X R simple plate, the cardiac ultrasound, the image by magnetic resonance, the computed tomography, the helicoid tomography, the SPECT of myocardial perfusion, the PET and the PET/CT and the used radiopharmaceuticals. The SPECT of myocardial perfusion is the more used method around the world for the evacuation of the coronary illness. It has a high sensitivity (between 90 and 97%), it is a non-invasive treatment (morbidity of 0.01%), of relative low cost and it is useful in the diagnosis of ischemia in groups of high risk like diabetics, dyslipidemia, obese and hypertension. (Author)

  14. Advanced 3-D analysis, client-server systems, and cloud computing-Integration of cardiovascular imaging data into clinical workflows of transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenhagen, Paul; Zimmermann, Mathis; Falkner, Juergen

    2013-06-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis is highly prevalent in the aging populations of industrialized countries and is associated with poor prognosis. Surgical valve replacement has been the only established treatment with documented improvement of long-term outcome. However, many of the older patients with aortic stenosis (AS) are high-risk or ineligible for surgery. For these patients, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a treatment alternative. The TAVR procedure is characterized by a lack of visualization of the operative field. Therefore, pre- and intra-procedural imaging is critical for patient selection, pre-procedural planning, and intra-operative decision-making. Incremental to conventional angiography and 2-D echocardiography, multidetector computed tomography (CT) has assumed an important role before TAVR. The analysis of 3-D CT data requires extensive post-processing during direct interaction with the dataset, using advance analysis software. Organization and storage of the data according to complex clinical workflows and sharing of image information have become a critical part of these novel treatment approaches. Optimally, the data are integrated into a comprehensive image data file accessible to multiple groups of practitioners across the hospital. This creates new challenges for data management requiring a complex IT infrastructure, spanning across multiple locations, but is increasingly achieved with client-server solutions and private cloud technology. This article describes the challenges and opportunities created by the increased amount of patient-specific imaging data in the context of TAVR. PMID:24282750

  15. Statistical Analysis of Cardiovascular Data from FAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealey, Meghan

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts show signs of cardiac atrophy during spaceflight. Prolonged bed rest studies on Earth are used to further study the effects on certain cardiovascular measurements of astronauts in space. A study was performed to see if the duration of bed rest and the gender of the subject had any effect on these measurements. The data collected from the subjects of the bed rest study included various blood and cardiac outcomes, such as blood and plasma volume, hemoglobin count, hematocrit percentage, left ventricular mass, stroke volume, mitral E and A wave velocities, etc. My main responsibility for this project was to analyze the bed rest data given in order to characterize the effects of gender, weight, in-bed and post-bed days, and duration of bed rest on the multiple cardiovascular outcomes measured. I used a mixed- effects linear regression analysis on the data. From this, I was able to fit the best model for each outcome, which was then used to make predictions for future bed rest studies. Concluding the analysis, we found that gender had an effect on the left ventricular mass, left ventricular diastolic volume, and stroke volume of subjects entering bed rest. We also found that weight had an effect on the left ventricular systolic volume of subjects entering bed rest. The duration of bed rest also had an effect on recovery for most of the outcomes. The only outcome where duration was not significant at all was left ventricular mass. Overall, we can conclude that gender and duration do affect astronauts' cardiovascular measurements when in spaceflight. Astronauts also show an increased susceptibility to orthostatic intolerance during spaceflight. In order to study the effects on orthostatic intolerance of astronauts, tilt tests were performed on bed rest subjects here on Earth. As a second project, I used the method of maximum likelihood to compare different functions of a set of eight cardiovascular measurements (e.g. heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood

  16. High field magnetic resonance imaging of rodents in cardiovascular research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhoutte, Laetitia; Gerber, Bernhard L; Gallez, Bernard; Po, Chrystelle; Magat, Julie; Jean-Luc, Balligand; Feron, Olivier; Moniotte, Stéphane

    2016-07-01

    Transgenic and gene knockout rodent models are primordial to study pathophysiological processes in cardiovascular research. Over time, cardiac MRI has become a gold standard for in vivo evaluation of such models. Technical advances have led to the development of magnets with increasingly high field strength, allowing specific investigation of cardiac anatomy, global and regional function, viability, perfusion or vascular parameters. The aim of this report is to provide a review of the various sequences and techniques available to image mice on 7-11.7 T magnets and relevant to the clinical setting in humans. Specific technical aspects due to the rise of the magnetic field are also discussed. PMID:27287250

  17. Automatic quantitative analysis of cardiac MR perfusion images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeuwer, Marcel; Spreeuwers, Luuk; Quist, Marcel

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique for imaging cardiovascular diseases. The introduction of cardiovascular MRI into clinical practice is however hampered by the lack of efficient and accurate image analysis methods. This paper focuses on the evaluation of blood perfusion in the

  18. Towards automatic quantitative analysis of cardiac MR perfusion images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeuwer, M.; Quist, M.; Spreeuwers, L.J.; Paetsch, I.; Al-Saadi, N.; Nagel, E.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique for imaging cardiovascular diseases. The introduction of cardiovascular MRI into clinical practice is however hampered by the lack of efficient and reliable automatic image analysis methods. This paper focuses on the automatic evaluation of th

  19. Cardiovascular drugs and erectile dysfunction - a symmetry analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lotte; Hallas, Jesper; Madsen, Kenneth Grønkjaer; Pottegård, Anton

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Erectile dysfunction is a common problem among patients with cardiovascular diseases and the influence of cardiovascular drugs is much debated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short term potential for different cardiovascular drugs to affect the risk of being prescribed a drug...... against erectile dysfunction. METHODS: We employed a symmetry analysis design and included all Danish male individuals born before 1950 who filled their first ever prescription for a cardiovascular drug and a 5-phosphodiesterase inhibitor within a 6 month interval during 2002-2012. If the cardiovascular...... drug induces erectile dysfunction, this would manifest as a non-symmetrical distribution of subjects being prescribed the cardiovascular drug first vs. persons following the opposite pattern. Furthermore, we calculated the number of patients needed to treat for one additional patient to be treated for...

  20. Molecular imaging in cardiovascular diseases; Molekulare kardiovaskulaere MRT-Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botnar, R.M. [King' s College London (United Kingdom). Imaging Sciences; St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ebersberger, H. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine; Noerenberg, D. [Charite, Berlin (Germany). Inst. for Radiology; and others

    2015-02-15

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized and developing countries. In clinical practice, the in-vivo identification of atherosclerotic lesions, which can lead to complications such as heart attack or stroke, remains difficult. Imaging techniques provide the reference standard for the detection of clinically significant atherosclerotic changes in the coronary and carotid arteries. The assessment of the luminal narrowing is feasible, while the differentiation of stable and potentially unstable or vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is currently not possible using non-invasive imaging. With high spatial resolution and high soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a suitable method for the evaluation of the thin arterial wall. In clinical practice, native MRI of the vessel wall already allows the differentiation and characterization of components of atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries and the aorta. Additional diagnostic information can be gained by the use of non-specific MRI contrast agents. With the development of targeted molecular probes, that highlight specific molecules or cells, pathological processes can be visualized at a molecular level with high spatial resolution. In this review article, the development of pathophysiological changes leading to the development of the arterial wall are introduced and discussed. Additionally, principles of contrast enhanced imaging with non-specific contrast agents and molecular probes will be discussed and latest developments in the field of molecular imaging of the vascular wall will be introduced.

  1. Multi-color magnetic particle imaging for cardiovascular interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegele, Julian; Vaalma, Sarah; Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Barkhausen, Jörg; Vogt, Florian M.; Borgert, Jörn; Rahmer, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) uses magnetic fields to visualize the spatial distribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs). Guidance of cardiovascular interventions is seen as one possible application of MPI. To safely guide interventions, the vessel lumen as well as all required interventional devices have to be visualized and be discernible from each other. Until now, different tracer concentrations were used for discerning devices from blood in MPI, because only one type of SPIO could be imaged at a time. Recently, it was shown for 3D MPI that it is possible to separate different signal sources in one volume of interest, i.e. to visualize and discern different SPIOs or different binding states of the same SPIO. The approach was termed multi-color MPI. In this work, the use of multi-color MPI for differentiation of a SPIO coated guide wire (Terumo Radifocus 0.035″) from the lumen of a vessel phantom filled with diluted Resovist is demonstrated. This is achieved by recording dedicated system functions of the coating material containing solid Resovist and of liquid Resovist, which allows separation of their respective signal in the image reconstruction process. Assigning a color to the different signal sources results in a differentiation of guide wire and vessel phantom lumen into colored images.

  2. The role of noninvasive imaging in promoting cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Valentin; Vahl, Torsten P

    2010-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide, and its prevalence is likely to increase in the near future. The morbidity and mortality associated with CVD causes an enormous economic burden, which has become a major problem for many societies across the globe. The current prevention strategies are aimed at identifying and reducing established risk factors for atherosclerosis including hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, obesity, smoking, and sedentary lifestyle. However, some of our prevention goals, such as reducing LDL cholesterol, change dramatically once a subject has been diagnosed with coronary atherosclerosis. At the present time, atherosclerosis is frequently diagnosed relatively late in the course of the disease, when a patient develops symptoms or presents with acute events such as an acute coronary syndrome or a stroke. Several studies have demonstrated that novel noninvasive imaging techniques have the potential to identify subclinical atherosclerosis and high-risk plaques. Early detection of subclinical atherosclerosis may enable clinicians to improve the control of cardiovascular risk factors in affected patients earlier, thereby helping to prevent some of the manifestations of CVD. PMID:20574768

  3. A Speedy Cardiovascular Diseases Classifier Using Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wah Ching Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Each year, some 30 percent of global deaths are caused by cardiovascular diseases. This figure is worsening due to both the increasing elderly population and severe shortages of medical personnel. The development of a cardiovascular diseases classifier (CDC for auto-diagnosis will help address solve the problem. Former CDCs did not achieve quick evaluation of cardiovascular diseases. In this letter, a new CDC to achieve speedy detection is investigated. This investigation incorporates the analytic hierarchy process (AHP-based multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA to develop feature vectors using a Support Vector Machine. The MCDA facilitates the efficient assignment of appropriate weightings to potential patients, thus scaling down the number of features. Since the new CDC will only adopt the most meaningful features for discrimination between healthy persons versus cardiovascular disease patients, a speedy detection of cardiovascular diseases has been successfully implemented.

  4. Tracers and contrast agents in cardiovascular imaging: present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This brief article addresses the current status and future potential of nuclear medicine, X-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. The currently perceived advantages and disadvantages, as well as the possible future roles, of each of the modalities with regard to the evaluation of coronary artery disease are delineated. The certain advent of Mr and US myocardial contrast agents, combined with the inexorable pressures of health care reform, will alter the future usage patterns of all four modalities. Future debates about which modality should be used in which clinical situation will be based not on 'anatomy vs function', nor on the issues of cost effectiveness and patient outcomes

  5. Korean Society of Cardiovascular Imaging Guidelines for Cardiac Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Korean Society of Cardiovascular Imaging (KOCSI) has issued a guideline for the use of cardiac CT imaging in order to assist clinicians and patients in providing adequate level of medical service. In order to establish a guideline founded on evidence based medicine, it was designed based on comprehensive data such as questionnaires conducted in international and domestic hospitals, intensive journal reviews, and with experts in cardiac radiology. The recommendations of this guideline should not be used as an absolute standard and medical professionals can always refer to methods non-adherent to this guideline when it is considered more reasonable and beneficial to an individual patient's medical situation. The guideline has its limitation and should be revised appropriately with the advancement medical equipment technology and public health care system. The guideline should not be served as a measure for standard of care. KOCSI strongly disapproves the use of the guideline to be used as the standard of expected practice in medical litigation processes.

  6. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging findings in children with myocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Guiying; Yang Xi; Su Ying; Xu Jimin; Wen Zhaoying

    2014-01-01

    Background Myocarditis is a common,potentially life-threatening disease that presents a wide rang of symptoms in children,as an important underlying etiology of other myocardial diseases such as dilated and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.The incidence of nonfatal myocarditis is probably greater than that of the one actually diagnosed,which is the result of the challenges of establishing the diagnosis in standard clinical settings.Currently,no single clinical or imaging finding confirms the diagnosis of myocarditis with absolute certainty.Historically,clinical exam,electrocardiogram (ECG),serology and echocardiography had an unsatisfactory diagnostic accuracy in myocarditis.Endomyocardial biopsy remains as a widely accepted standard,but may not be suitable for every patient,especially for those with less severe disease.Our aim was to find the changes in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging of children with myocarditis diagnosed by clinical criteria.Methods We studied 25 children (18 male,7 female; aged from 5-17 years) with diagnosed myocarditis by clinical criteria.CMR included function analyses,T2-weighted imaging,T1-weighted imaging before and after i.v.gadolinium injection (early gadolinium enhancement (EGE) and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE)).Results The T2 ratio was elevated in 21 children (84%,11 in anterolateral (44%),5 in inferolateral (20%),and 5 in septum (20%)),EGE was present in 9 children (36%,3 in anterolateral (12%),4 in inferolateral (20%),and 2 in septum (8%)),and LGE was present in 5 children (20%,2 in anterolateral (8%),1 in inferolateral (4%),1 in septum (4%),and 1 in midwall of left ventricular (LV) wall).In 9 children (36%),two (or more) out of three sequences (T2,EGE,LGE) were abnormal.Conclusions The CMR findings in children with clinically diagnosed myocarditis vary within the groups,including regional or global myocardial signal increase in T2-weighted images,EGE and LGE in T1

  7. Spinal imaging and image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    This book is instrumental to building a bridge between scientists and clinicians in the field of spine imaging by introducing state-of-the-art computational methods in the context of clinical applications.  Spine imaging via computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and other radiologic imaging modalities, is essential for noninvasively visualizing and assessing spinal pathology. Computational methods support and enhance the physician’s ability to utilize these imaging techniques for diagnosis, non-invasive treatment, and intervention in clinical practice. Chapters cover a broad range of topics encompassing radiological imaging modalities, clinical imaging applications for common spine diseases, image processing, computer-aided diagnosis, quantitative analysis, data reconstruction and visualization, statistical modeling, image-guided spine intervention, and robotic surgery. This volume serves a broad audience as  contributions were written by both clinicians and researchers, which reflects the inte...

  8. Prognostic value of tissue Doppler imaging for predicting ventricular arrhythmias and cardiovascular mortality in ischaemic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Olsen, Flemming Javier; Storm, Katrine;

    2016-01-01

    .0 vs. 5.7 ± 1.8 cm/s, P = 0.020). Global a' remained an independent predictor of VT/VF/CVD after multivariable adjustment for age, gender, β-blocker therapy, and deceleration time (HR = 1.25 [1.02, 1.54], P = 0.032). Regional analysis revealed that a depressed a' in the inferior wall drives the......AIMS: Only 30% of patients receiving an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) for primary prevention receive appropriately therapy. We sought to investigate the value of tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) to predict ventricular tachycardia (VT), ventricular fibrillation (VF), and cardiovascular...

  9. Advanced biomedical image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    "This book covers the four major areas of image processing: Image enhancement and restoration, image segmentation, image quantification and classification, and image visualization. Image registration, storage, and compression are also covered. The text focuses on recently developed image processing and analysis operators and covers topical research"--Provided by publisher.

  10. Alterations in vascular function in primary aldosteronism: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging study

    OpenAIRE

    Mark, P. B.; Boyle, S; Zimmerli, L U; McQuarrie, E.P.; Delles, C.; Freel, E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Excess aldosterone is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Aldosterone has a permissive effect on vascular fibrosis. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) allows study of vascular function by measuring aortic distensibility. We compared aortic distensibility in primary aldosteronism (PA), essential hypertension (EH) and normal controls and explored the relationship between aortic distensibility and pulse wave velocity (PWV). Methods: We studied PA (n=14)...

  11. Retinal imaging and image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramoff, M.D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindne

  12. Whole body cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to stratify symptomatic and asymptomatic atherosclerotic burden in patients with isolated cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Weir-McCall, Jonathan R.; Duce, Suzanne L.; Gandy, Stephen J.; Matthew, Shona Z.; Martin, Patricia; Cassidy, Deirdre B.; McCormick, Lynne; Belch, Jill J. F.; Struthers, Allan D.; Helen M Colhoun; Houston, J. Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to use whole body cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (WB CVMR) to assess the heart and arterial network in a single examination, so as to describe the burden of atherosclerosis and subclinical disease in participants with symptomatic single site vascular disease. Methods: 64 patients with a history of symptomatic single site vascular disease (38 coronary artery disease (CAD), 9 cerebrovascular disease, 17 peripheral arterial disease (PAD)) underwen...

  13. Whole body cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to stratify symptomatic and asymptomatic atherosclerotic burden in patients with isolated cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Weir-McCall, Jonathan R.; Duce, Suzanne L.; Gandy, Stephen J.; Matthew, Shona Z.; Martin, Patricia; Cassidy, Deirdre B.; McCormick, Lynne; Belch, Jill J. F.; Struthers, Allan D.; Helen M Colhoun; Houston, J. Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to use whole body cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (WB CVMR) to assess the heart and arterial network in a single examination, so as to describe the burden of atherosclerosis and subclinical disease in participants with symptomatic single site vascular disease. Methods 64 patients with a history of symptomatic single site vascular disease (38 coronary artery disease (CAD), 9 cerebrovascular disease, 17 peripheral arterial disease (PAD)) underwent ...

  14. Imaging of cardiovascular risk in patients with Turner's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner's syndrome is a disorder defined by an absent or structurally abnormal second X chromosome and affects around 1 in 2000 newborn females. The standardised mortality ratio in Turner's syndrome is around three-times higher than in the general female population, mainly as a result of cardiovascular disorders. Most striking is the early age at which Turner's syndrome patients develop the life-threatening complications of cardiovascular disorders compared to the general population. The cardiovascular risk stratification in Turner's syndrome is challenging and imaging is not systematically used. The aim of this article is to review cardiovascular risks in this group of patients and discuss a systematic imaging approach for early identification of cardiovascular disorders in these patients

  15. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging of hypoplastic left heart syndrome in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) plays an important complementary role to echocardiography and conventional angiography in the evaluation of hypoplastic left heart syndrome. This imaging modality is particularly useful for assessing cardiovascular postsurgical changes, extracardiac vascular anatomy, ventricular and valvular function, and a variety of complications. The purpose of this article is to provide a contemporary review of the role of CMR in the management of untreated and surgically palliated hypoplastic left heart syndrome in children. (orig.)

  16. Imaging of cardiovascular risk in patients with Turner's syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Marin, A.; Weir-McCall, J.R.; Webb, D J; van Beek, E J R; Mirsadraee, S.

    2015-01-01

    Turner's syndrome is a disorder defined by an absent or structurally abnormal second X chromosome and affects around 1 in 2000 newborn females. The standardised mortality ratio in Turner's syndrome is around three-times higher than in the general female population, mainly as a result of cardiovascular disorders. Most striking is the early age at which Turner's syndrome patients develop the life-threatening complications of cardiovascular disorders compared to the general population. The cardi...

  17. Comparative and functional analysis of cardiovascular-related genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-09-01

    The ability to detect putative cis-regulatory elements in cardiovascular-related genes has been accelerated by the availability of genomic sequence data from numerous vertebrate species and the recent development of comparative genomic tools. This improvement is anticipated to lead to a better understanding of the complex regulatory architecture of cardiovascular (CV) genes and how genetic variants in these non-coding regions can potentially play a role in cardiovascular disease. This manuscript reviews a recently established database dedicated to the comparative sequence analysis of 250 human CV genes of known importance, 37 of which currently contain sequence comparison data for organisms beyond those of human, mouse and rat. These data have provided a glimpse into the variety of possible insights from deep vertebrate sequence comparisons and the identification of putative gene regulatory elements.

  18. Measurement of cardiovascular state using attractor reconstruction analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Charlton, Peter Harcourt; Camporota, Luigi; Smith, John; Nandi, Manasi; Christie, Mark Ian; Aston, Philip; Beale, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Attractor reconstruction (AR) analysis has been used previously to quantify the variability in arterial blood pressure (ABP) signals. Since ABP signals are only available in a minority of clinical scenarios, we sought to determine whether AR could also be performed on more widely available photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals. AR analysis was performed on simultaneous ABP and PPG signals before, during and after a change in cardiovascular state. A novel quality metric was used to eliminate window...

  19. Color Medical Image Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 20th century, medical imaging has been dominated by monochrome imaging modalities such as x-ray, computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. As a result, color information has been overlooked in medical image analysis applications. Recently, various medical imaging modalities that involve color information have been introduced. These include cervicography, dermoscopy, fundus photography, gastrointestinal endoscopy, microscopy, and wound photography. However, in comparison to monochrome images, the analysis of color images is a relatively unexplored area. The multivariate nature of color image data presents new challenges for researchers and practitioners as the numerous methods developed for monochrome images are often not directly applicable to multichannel images. The goal of this volume is to summarize the state-of-the-art in the utilization of color information in medical image analysis.

  20. Visualization Software for Real-time, Image-guided Therapeutics in Cardiovascular Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Pintilie, Stefan; Biswas, Labonny; Anderson, Kevan; Dick, Sandy; Wright, Graham; Radau, Perry

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces RtViewer, a four-dimensional (3D + time) real-time visualization software for guiding cardiovascular interventions that is open source and freely available. RtViewer was designed to be part of a pipeline that can connect it to a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, actively tracked catheters, and navigational devices. The architecture and features of RtViewer will be described with examples of guiding percutaneous cardiovascular interventions. The paper concludes wi...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Wealth of Cardiovascular Information

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Sangeeta; Chryssos, Emanuel D.; Parker, Hugh

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is a relatively new noninvasive imaging modality that provides insight into multiple facets of the human myocardium not available by other imaging modalities. This one test allows for the assessment of ventricular and valvular function, ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies, congenital heart disease, and cardiac tumors. It has been coined by many as “one-stop shopping.” As with any imaging modality, it is important to understand not only the indications ...

  2. Evaluation of an improved technique for automated center lumen line definition in cardiovascular image data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate a new method for automated definition of a center lumen line in vessels in cardiovascular image data. This method, called VAMPIRE, is based on improved detection of vessel-like structures. A multiobserver evaluation study was conducted involving 40 tracings in clinical CTA data of carotid arteries to compare VAMPIRE with an established technique. This comparison showed that VAMPIRE yields considerably more successful tracings and improved handling of stenosis, calcifications, multiple vessels, and nearby bone structures. We conclude that VAMPIRE is highly suitable for automated definition of center lumen lines in vessels in cardiovascular image data. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of an improved technique for automated center lumen line definition in cardiovascular image data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gratama van Andel, Hugo A.F. [Erasmus MC-University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Medical Informatics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC-University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Centre-University of Amsterdam, Department of Medical Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meijering, Erik; Vrooman, Henri A.; Stokking, Rik [Erasmus MC-University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Medical Informatics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC-University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lugt, Aad van der; Monye, Cecile de [Erasmus MC-University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2006-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate a new method for automated definition of a center lumen line in vessels in cardiovascular image data. This method, called VAMPIRE, is based on improved detection of vessel-like structures. A multiobserver evaluation study was conducted involving 40 tracings in clinical CTA data of carotid arteries to compare VAMPIRE with an established technique. This comparison showed that VAMPIRE yields considerably more successful tracings and improved handling of stenosis, calcifications, multiple vessels, and nearby bone structures. We conclude that VAMPIRE is highly suitable for automated definition of center lumen lines in vessels in cardiovascular image data. (orig.)

  4. Highly accelerated cardiovascular MR imaging using many channel technology: concepts and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niendorf, Thoralf [RWTH Aachen, University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Sodickson, Daniel K. [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Center for Biomedical Imaging, New York, NY (United States)

    2008-01-15

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CVMRI) is of proven clinical value in the non-invasive imaging of cardiovascular diseases. CVMRI requires rapid image acquisition, but acquisition speed is fundamentally limited in conventional MRI. Parallel imaging provides a means for increasing acquisition speed and efficiency. However, signal-to-noise (SNR) limitations and the limited number of receiver channels available on most MR systems have in the past imposed practical constraints, which dictated the use of moderate accelerations in CVMRI. High levels of acceleration, which were unattainable previously, have become possible with many-receiver MR systems and many-element, cardiac-optimized RF-coil arrays. The resulting imaging speed improvements can be exploited in a number of ways, ranging from enhancement of spatial and temporal resolution to efficient whole heart coverage to streamlining of CVMRI work flow. In this review, examples of these strategies are provided, following an outline of the fundamentals of the highly accelerated imaging approaches employed in CVMRI. Topics discussed include basic principles of parallel imaging; key requirements for MR systems and RF-coil design; practical considerations of SNR management, supported by multi-dimensional accelerations, 3D noise averaging and high field imaging; highly accelerated clinical state-of-the art cardiovascular imaging applications spanning the range from SNR-rich to SNR-limited; and current trends and future directions. (orig.)

  5. Cardiovascular MRI in congenital heart disease. An imaging atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This new and unique clinical resource offers rapid access to high-quality images covering a broad spectrum of paediatric and adult cardiac pathologies visualized using MRI and CT. Key images of each condition and a clear interpretation of their MR appearances allow for greater understanding of the pathology. Focus is given to the planning of imaging planes, techniques and sequences to obtain the best images and improve MR assessment. This text would benefit all health professionals involved in imaging congenital cardiac disease. (orig.)

  6. Cardiovascular MRI in congenital heart disease. An imaging atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Shankar; Price, Gemma; Tann, Oliver; Hughes, Marina; Muthurangu, Vivek; Taylor, Andrew M. [UCL Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom). Centre for Cardiovascular MR

    2010-07-01

    This new and unique clinical resource offers rapid access to high-quality images covering a broad spectrum of paediatric and adult cardiac pathologies visualized using MRI and CT. Key images of each condition and a clear interpretation of their MR appearances allow for greater understanding of the pathology. Focus is given to the planning of imaging planes, techniques and sequences to obtain the best images and improve MR assessment. This text would benefit all health professionals involved in imaging congenital cardiac disease. (orig.)

  7. Document image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bunke, H; Baird, H

    1994-01-01

    Interest in the automatic processing and analysis of document images has been rapidly increasing during the past few years. This book addresses the different subfields of document image analysis, including preprocessing and segmentation, form processing, handwriting recognition, line drawing and map processing, and contextual processing.

  8. Imaging of cardiovascular dynamics in early mouse embryos with swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, Irina V.; Liebling, Michael; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2009-02-01

    Congenital cardiovascular defects are very common, occurring in 1% of live births, and cardiovascular failures are the leading cause of birth defect-related deaths in infants. To improve diagnostics, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular abnormalities, we need to understand not only how cells form the heart and vessels but also how physical factors such as heart contraction and blood flow influence heart development and changes in the circulatory network. Mouse models are an excellent resource for studying cardiovascular development and disease because of the resemblance to humans, rapid generation time, and availability of mutants with cardiovascular defects linked to human diseases. In this work, we present results on development and application of Doppler Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography (DSS-OCT) for imaging of cardiovascular dynamics and blood flow in the mouse embryonic heart and vessels. Our studies demonstrated that the spatial and temporal resolution of the DSS-OCT makes it possible to perform sensitive measurements of heart and vessel wall movements and to investigate how contractile waves facilitate the movement of blood through the circulatory system.

  9. Update of the Echocardiography Core Syllabus of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI).

    OpenAIRE

    Cosyns, Bernard; Garbi, Madalina; Separovic, Jadranka; Pasquet, Agnes; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2013-01-01

    The update of the Echocardiography Core Syllabus of European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI) is now available online. The Echocardiography Core Syllabus enumerates the elements of knowledge to be taught, represents a framework for the development of local training curricula and provides expected learning outcomes to the echocardiography learner.

  10. Cardiac pathology and morphology relevant to cardiovascular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this overview of coronary, valvular, and myocardial heart disease the structural abnormalities associated with these disorders have been described. Cardiac imaging attempts to portray the structural and functional abnormalities of the heart that cause symptomatic cardiac disease

  11. Diagnosis and management of ischemic cardiomyopathy: Role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Doesch, Christina; Papavassiliu, Theano

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) represents an important cause of mortality. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging evolved as an imaging modality that allows the assessment of myocardial function, perfusion, contractile reserve and extent of fibrosis in a single comprehensive exam. This review highlights the role of CMR in the differential diagnosis of acute chest pain by detecting the location of obstructive CAD or necrosis and identifying other conditions like stress cardiomyopathy o...

  12. Computational Chemical Imaging for Cardiovascular Pathology: Chemical Microscopic Imaging Accurately Determines Cardiac Transplant Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Saumya; Reddy, Vijaya B.; Bhargava, Rohit; Raman, Jaishankar

    2015-01-01

    Rejection is a common problem after cardiac transplants leading to significant number of adverse events and deaths, particularly in the first year of transplantation. The gold standard to identify rejection is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is complex, cumbersome and requires a lot of expertise in the correct interpretation of stained biopsy sections. Traditional histopathology cannot be used actively or quickly during cardiac interventions or surgery. Our objective was to develop a stain-less approach using an emerging technology, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging to identify different components of cardiac tissue by their chemical and molecular basis aided by computer recognition, rather than by visual examination using optical microscopy. We studied this technique in assessment of cardiac transplant rejection to evaluate efficacy in an example of complex cardiovascular pathology. We recorded data from human cardiac transplant patients’ biopsies, used a Bayesian classification protocol and developed a visualization scheme to observe chemical differences without the need of stains or human supervision. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we observed probabilities of detection greater than 95% for four out of five histological classes at 10% probability of false alarm at the cellular level while correctly identifying samples with the hallmarks of the immune response in all cases. The efficacy of manual examination can be significantly increased by observing the inherent biochemical changes in tissues, which enables us to achieve greater diagnostic confidence in an automated, label-free manner. We developed a computational pathology system that gives high contrast images and seems superior to traditional staining procedures. This study is a prelude to the development of real time in situ imaging systems, which can assist interventionists and surgeons actively during procedures. PMID:25932912

  13. Computational chemical imaging for cardiovascular pathology: chemical microscopic imaging accurately determines cardiac transplant rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Tiwari

    Full Text Available Rejection is a common problem after cardiac transplants leading to significant number of adverse events and deaths, particularly in the first year of transplantation. The gold standard to identify rejection is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is complex, cumbersome and requires a lot of expertise in the correct interpretation of stained biopsy sections. Traditional histopathology cannot be used actively or quickly during cardiac interventions or surgery. Our objective was to develop a stain-less approach using an emerging technology, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic imaging to identify different components of cardiac tissue by their chemical and molecular basis aided by computer recognition, rather than by visual examination using optical microscopy. We studied this technique in assessment of cardiac transplant rejection to evaluate efficacy in an example of complex cardiovascular pathology. We recorded data from human cardiac transplant patients' biopsies, used a Bayesian classification protocol and developed a visualization scheme to observe chemical differences without the need of stains or human supervision. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we observed probabilities of detection greater than 95% for four out of five histological classes at 10% probability of false alarm at the cellular level while correctly identifying samples with the hallmarks of the immune response in all cases. The efficacy of manual examination can be significantly increased by observing the inherent biochemical changes in tissues, which enables us to achieve greater diagnostic confidence in an automated, label-free manner. We developed a computational pathology system that gives high contrast images and seems superior to traditional staining procedures. This study is a prelude to the development of real time in situ imaging systems, which can assist interventionists and surgeons actively during procedures.

  14. [Recommendations of the ESC guidelines regarding cardiovascular imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechtem, U; Greulich, S; Ong, P

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis and risk stratification in the ESC guidelines for the management of patients with stable coronary artery disease. Demonstration of myocardial ischaemia guides the decision which further diagnostic and therapeutic strategy should be followed in these patients. One should, however, not forget that there are no randomised studies supporting this type of management. In patients with a low pretest probability coronary CT angiography is the optimal tool to exclude coronary artery stenoses rapidly and effectively. In the near future, however, better data is needed showing how much cardiac imaging is really necessary and how cost-effective it is in patients with stable coronary artery disease. PMID:27388914

  15. Imaging of murine embryonic cardiovascular development using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yongyang; Degenhardt, Karl R.; Astrof, Sophie; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    We have demonstrated the capability of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) system to image full development of mouse embryonic cardiovascular system. Monitoring morphological changes of mouse embryonic heart occurred in different embryonic stages helps identify structural or functional cardiac anomalies and understand how these anomalies lead to congenital heart diseases (CHD) present at birth. In this study, mouse embryo hearts ranging from E9.5 to E15.5 were prepared and imaged in vitro. A customized spectral domain OCT system was used for imaging, with a central wavelength of 1310nm, spectral bandwidth of ~100nm and imaging speed of 47kHz A-scans/s. Axial resolution of this system was 8.3µm in air, and transverse resolution was 6.2 µm with 5X objective. Key features of mouse embryonic cardiovascular development such as vasculature remodeling into circulatory system, separation of atria and ventricles and emergence of valves could be clearly seen in three-dimensional OCT images. Optical clearing was applied to overcome the penetration limit of OCT system. With high resolution, fast imaging speed, 3D imaging capability, OCT proves to be a promising biomedical imaging modality for developmental biology studies, rivaling histology and micro-CT.

  16. Impact of Medical Therapy on Atheroma Volume Measured by Different Cardiovascular Imaging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad C. N. Sinno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a systemic disease that affects most vascular beds. The gold standard of atherosclerosis imaging has been invasive intravascular ultrasound (IVUS. Newer noninvasive imaging modalities like B-mode ultrasound, cardiac computed tomography (CT, positron emission tomography (PET, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI have been used to assess these vascular territories with high accuracy and reproducibility. These imaging modalities have lately been used for the assessment of the atherosclerotic plaque and the response of its volume to several medical therapies used in the treatment of patients with cardiovascular disease. To study the impact of these medications on atheroma volume progression or regression, imaging modalities have been used on a serial basis providing a unique opportunity to monitor the effect these antiatherosclerotic strategies exert on plaque burden. As a result, studies incorporating serial IVUS imaging, quantitative coronary angiography (QCA, B-mode ultrasound, electron beam computed tomography (EBCT, and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging have all been used to evaluate the impact of therapeutic strategies that modify cholesterol and blood pressure on the progression/regression of atherosclerotic plaque. In this review, we intend to summarize the impact of different therapies aimed at halting the progression or even result in regression of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease evaluated by different imaging modalities.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the cardiovascular system: normal and pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole body nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the cardiovascular system was carried out in early clinical trials in 244 volunteers and patients using a 3.5 KGauss (0.35 T) unit. The spin echo technique with multiple imaging parameters was used. Blood vessels were clearly discriminated from solid organs and lesions because little or no intraluminal signal is seen with laminar blood flow at normal velocities, whereas a more intense image is generated by solid organs. Characteristic flow signals were observed in normal patients and were accentuated by varying the imaging parameters. Cardiac chambers were well delineated in some patients on nongated images. In one case, internal topography of the ventricles was exquisitely displayed on a gated image. Intraluminal pathology, such as dissection of the aorta, aneurysms of the aorta and left ventricle, and aortic atheroma, was clearly demonstrated. Patency of coronary arterial bypass grafts was shown. Abnormal flow patterns due to slow or turbulent flow were accentuated on images using the second spin echo. The preliminary experience indicated the considerable potential of NMR imaging in the evaluation of cardiovascular disease

  18. Cardiovascular hybrid imaging using PET/MRI; Kardiovaskulaere Hybridbildgebung mit PET/MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nensa, Felix; Schlosser, Thomas [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie

    2014-12-15

    The following overview provides a summary of the state of the art and research as well as potential clinical applications of cardiovascular PET/MR imaging. PET/MRI systems have been clinically available for a few years, and their use in cardiac imaging has been successfully demonstrated. At this period in time, some of the technical difficulties that arose at the beginning have been solved; in particular with respect to MRI-based attenuation correction, caution should be exercised with PET quantification. In addition, many promising technical options are still in the developmental stage, such as MRI-based motion correction of PET data resulting from simultaneous MR acquisition, and are not yet available for cardiovascular imaging. On the other hand, PET/MRI has been used to demonstrate significant pathologies such as acute and chronic myocardial infarction, myocarditis or cardiac sarcoidosis; future applications in clinical routine or within studies appear to be possible. In coming years additional studies will have to be performed to prove diagnostic gain at a reasonable cost-benefit ratio before valid conclusions are possible regarding the clinical utility and future of cardiovascular PET/MR imaging.

  19. Multi-target photoacoustic molecular imaging of cardiovascular inflammatory biomarkers using bioconjugated gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, S.; Tripathy, S.; Carson, A.; Lavery, L. L.; Zhang, H.; Agarwal, A.; Kotov, N.; Villanueva, F. S.; Kim, K.

    2011-03-01

    Multiple cardiovascular inflammatory biomarkers were simultaneously imaged in vivo using antibody conjugated gold nanorods (GNRs) injected into a mouse model of vascular injury stimulated by a photochemical reaction of Rose Bengal dye to green light. Mixed solutions of ICAM-1 antibody conjugated GNRs (715 nm) and E-selectin antibody conjugated GNRs (800 nm) were injected to bind to their respective inflammatory markers on the luminal surface of the inferior vena cava of a mouse. Photoacoustic intensity was measured by a commercial ultrasound probe synchronized to a pulsed laser (10-18 mJ/cm2) at 715 nm or 800 nm clearly identified the upregulation of targeted biomarkers. Histopathology on the harvested tissues confirmed inflammation. The feasibility of simultaneous photoacoustic molecular imaging of inflammation responses in cardiovascular system using a commercial ultrasound system has been demonstrated in vivo.

  20. A moving image system for cardiovascular nuclear medicine. A dedicated auxiliary device for the total capacity imaging system for multiple plane dynamic colour display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent device of the authors, the dedicated multiplane dynamic colour image display system for nuclear medicine, is discussed. This new device is a hardware-based auxiliary moving image system (AMIS) attached to the total capacity image processing system of the authors' department. The major purpose of this study is to develop the dedicated device so that cardiovascular nuclear medicine and other dynamic studies will include the ability to assess the real time delicate processing of the colour selection, edge detection, phased analysis, etc. The auxiliary system consists of the interface for image transferring, four IC refresh memories of 64x64 matrix with 10 bit count depth, a digital 20-in colour TV monitor, a control keyboard and a control panel with potentiometers. This system has five major functions for colour display: (1) A microcomputer board can select any one of 40 different colour tables preset in the colour transformation RAM. This key also provides edge detection at a certain level of the count by leaving the optional colour and setting the rest of the levels at 0 (black); (2) The arithmetic processing circuit performs the operation of the fundamental rules, permitting arithmetic processes of the two images; (3) The colour level control circuit is operated independently by four potentiometers for four refresh image memories, so that the gain and offset of the colour level can be manually and visually controlled to the satisfaction of the operator; (4) The simultaneous CRT display of the maximum four images with or without cinematic motion is possible; (5) The real time movie interval is also adjustable by hardware, and certain frames can be freezed with overlapping of the dynamic frames. Since this system of AMIS is linked with the whole capacity image processing system of the CPU size of 128kW, etc., clinical applications are not limited to cardiovascular nuclear medicine. (author)

  1. Unmasking Silent Endothelial Activation in the Cardiovascular System Using Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belliere, Julie; Martinez de Lizarrondo, Sara; Choudhury, Robin P; Quenault, Aurélien; Le Béhot, Audrey; Delage, Christine; Chauveau, Dominique; Schanstra, Joost P; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Vivien, Denis; Gauberti, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial activation is a hallmark of cardiovascular diseases, acting either as a cause or a consequence of organ injury. To date, we lack suitable methods to measure endothelial activation in vivo. In the present study, we developed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method allowing non-invasive endothelial activation mapping in the vasculature of the main organs affected during cardiovascular diseases. In clinically relevant contexts in mice (including systemic inflammation, acute and chronic kidney diseases, diabetes mellitus and normal aging), we provided evidence that this method allows detecting endothelial activation before any clinical manifestation of organ failure in the brain, kidney and heart with an exceptional sensitivity. In particular, we demonstrated that diabetes mellitus induces chronic endothelial cells activation in the kidney and heart. Moreover, aged mice presented activated endothelial cells in the kidneys and the cerebrovasculature. Interestingly, depending on the underlying condition, the temporospatial patterns of endothelial activation in the vascular beds of the cardiovascular system were different. These results demonstrate the feasibility of detecting silent endothelial activation occurring in conditions associated with high cardiovascular risk using molecular MRI. PMID:26379785

  2. Cardiovascular assessment of patients with Ullrich-Turner's Syndrome on Doppler echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro Ana Valéria Barros de

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the cardiovascular features of Ullrich-Turner's syndrome using echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging, and to correlate them with the phenotype and karyotype of the patients. The diagnostic concordance between the 2 methods was also assessed. METHODS: Fifteen patients with the syndrome were assessed by echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (cardiac chambers, valves, and aorta. Their ages ranged from 10 to 28 (mean of 16.7 years. The karyotype was analyzed in 11 or 25 metaphases of peripheral blood lymphocytes, or both. RESULTS: The most common phenotypic changes were short stature and spontaneous absence of puberal development (100%; 1 patient had a cardiac murmur. The karyotypes detected were as follows: 45,X (n=7, mosaics (n=5, and deletions (n=3. No echocardiographic changes were observed. In regard to magnetic resonance imaging, coarctation and dilation of the aorta were found in 1 patient, and isolated dilation of the aorta was found in 4 patients. CONCLUSION: The frequencies of coarctation and dilation of the aorta detected on magnetic resonance imaging were similar to those reported in the literature (5.5% to 20%, and 6.3% to 29%, respectively. This confirmed the adjuvant role of magnetic resonance imaging to Doppler echocardiography for diagnosing cardiovascular alterations in patients with Ullrich-Turner's syndrome.

  3. Image Analysis of Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, John C

    2015-09-01

    The structure of foods, both natural and processed ones, is controlled by many variables ranging from biology to chemistry and mechanical forces. The structure also controls many of the properties of the food, including consumer acceptance, taste, mouthfeel, appearance, and so on, and nutrition. Imaging provides an important tool for measuring the structure of foods. This includes 2-dimensional (2D) images of surfaces and sections, for example, viewed in a microscope, as well as 3-dimensional (3D) images of internal structure as may be produced by confocal microscopy, or computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The use of images also guides robotics for harvesting and sorting. Processing of images may be needed to calibrate colors, reduce noise, enhance detail, and delineate structure and dimensions. Measurement of structural information such as volume fraction and internal surface areas, as well as the analysis of object size, location, and shape in both 2- and 3-dimensional images is illustrated and described, with primary references and examples from a wide range of applications. PMID:26270611

  4. Extra-cardiac findings in cardiovascular magnetic resonance: what the imaging cardiologist needs to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jonathan C L; Lyen, Stephen M; Loughborough, William; Amadu, Antonio Matteo; Baritussio, Anna; Dastidar, Amardeep Ghosh; Manghat, Nathan E; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is an established non-invasive technique to comprehensively assess cardiovascular structure and function in a variety of acquired and inherited cardiac conditions. A significant amount of the neck, thorax and upper abdomen are imaged at the time of routine clinical CMR, particularly in the initial multi-slice axial and coronal images. The discovery of unsuspected disease at the time of imaging has ethical, financial and medico-legal implications. Extra-cardiac findings at the time of CMR are common, can be important and can change clinical management. Certain patient groups undergoing CMR are at particular risk of important extra-cardiac findings as several of the cardiovascular risk factors for atherosclerosis are also risk factors for malignancy. Furthermore, the presence of certain extra-cardiac findings may contribute to the interpretation of the primary cardiac pathology as some cardiac conditions have multi-systemic extra-cardiac involvement. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the type of extra-cardiac findings that may become apparent on CMR, subdivided by anatomical location. We focus on normal variant anatomy that may mimic disease, common incidental extra-cardiac findings and important imaging signs that help distinguish sinister pathology from benign disease. We also aim to provide a framework to the approach and potential further diagnostic work-up of incidental extra-cardiac findings discovered at the time of CMR. However, it is beyond the scope of this review to discuss and determine the clinical significance of extracardiac findings at CMR. PMID:27156861

  5. Left ventricular thrombus formation after acute myocardial infarction as assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Left ventricular (LV) thrombus formation is a feared complication of myocardial infarction (MI). We assessed the prevalence of LV thrombus in ST-segment elevated MI patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and compared the diagnostic accuracy of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) to cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Also, we evaluated the course of LV thrombi in the modern era of primary PCI. Methods: 200 patients with primary PCI underwent TTE and CMR, at baseline and at 4 months follow-up. Studies were analyzed by two blinded examiners. Patients were seen at 1, 4, 12, and 24 months for assessment of clinical status and adverse events. Results: On CMR at baseline, a thrombus was found in 17 of 194 (8.8%) patients. LV thrombus resolution occurred in 15 patients. Two patients had persistence of LV thrombus on follow-up CMR. On CMR at four months, a thrombus was found in an additional 12 patients. In multivariate analysis, thrombus formation on baseline CMR was independently associated with, baseline infarct size (g) (B = 0.02, SE = 0.02, p < 0.001). Routine TTE had a sensitivity of 21–24% and a specificity of 95–98% compared to CMR for the detection of LV thrombi. Intra- and interobserver variation for detection of LV thrombus were lower for CMR (κ = 0.91 and κ = 0.96) compared to TTE (κ = 0.74 and κ = 0.53). Conclusion: LV thrombus still occurs in a substantial amount of patients after PCI-treated MI, especially in larger infarct sizes. Routine TTE had a low sensitivity for the detection of LV thrombi and the interobserver variation of TTE was large.

  6. Left ventricular thrombus formation after acute myocardial infarction as assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delewi, Ronak [Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (Netherlands); Nijveldt, Robin [Department of Cardiology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hirsch, Alexander [Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Marcu, Constantin B.; Robbers, Lourens [Department of Cardiology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hassell, Marriela E.C.J.; Bruin, Rianne H.A. de; Vleugels, Jim; Laan, Anja M. van der; Bouma, Berto J. [Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tio, René A. [Thorax Center, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Tijssen, Jan G.P. [Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Albert C. van [Department of Cardiology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zijlstra, Felix [Thorax Center, Department of Cardiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Piek, Jan J., E-mail: j.j.piek@amc.uva.nl [Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    Introduction: Left ventricular (LV) thrombus formation is a feared complication of myocardial infarction (MI). We assessed the prevalence of LV thrombus in ST-segment elevated MI patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and compared the diagnostic accuracy of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) to cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Also, we evaluated the course of LV thrombi in the modern era of primary PCI. Methods: 200 patients with primary PCI underwent TTE and CMR, at baseline and at 4 months follow-up. Studies were analyzed by two blinded examiners. Patients were seen at 1, 4, 12, and 24 months for assessment of clinical status and adverse events. Results: On CMR at baseline, a thrombus was found in 17 of 194 (8.8%) patients. LV thrombus resolution occurred in 15 patients. Two patients had persistence of LV thrombus on follow-up CMR. On CMR at four months, a thrombus was found in an additional 12 patients. In multivariate analysis, thrombus formation on baseline CMR was independently associated with, baseline infarct size (g) (B = 0.02, SE = 0.02, p < 0.001). Routine TTE had a sensitivity of 21–24% and a specificity of 95–98% compared to CMR for the detection of LV thrombi. Intra- and interobserver variation for detection of LV thrombus were lower for CMR (κ = 0.91 and κ = 0.96) compared to TTE (κ = 0.74 and κ = 0.53). Conclusion: LV thrombus still occurs in a substantial amount of patients after PCI-treated MI, especially in larger infarct sizes. Routine TTE had a low sensitivity for the detection of LV thrombi and the interobserver variation of TTE was large.

  7. Risk stratification in cardiovascular disease primary prevention - scoring systems, novel markers, and imaging techniques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zannad, Faiez

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to review and discuss current methods of risk stratification for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention, emerging biomarkers, and imaging techniques, and their relative merits and limitations. This report is based on discussions that took place among experts in the area during a special CardioVascular Clinical Trialists workshop organized by the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Drug Therapy in September 2009. Classical risk factors such as blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels remain the cornerstone of risk estimation in primary prevention but their use as a guide to management is limited by several factors: (i) thresholds for drug treatment vary with the available evidence for cost-effectiveness and benefit-to-risk ratios; (ii) assessment may be imprecise; (iii) residual risk may remain, even with effective control of dyslipidemia and hypertension. Novel measures include C-reactive protein, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) , genetic markers, and markers of subclinical organ damage, for which there are varying levels of evidence. High-resolution ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging to assess carotid atherosclerotic lesions have potential but require further validation, standardization, and proof of clinical usefulness in the general population. In conclusion, classical risk scoring systems are available and inexpensive but have a number of limitations. Novel risk markers and imaging techniques may have a place in drug development and clinical trial design. However, their additional value above and beyond classical risk factors has yet to be determined for risk-guided therapy in CVD prevention.

  8. Medical Image Analysis Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    To improve the quality of photos sent to Earth by unmanned spacecraft. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed a computerized image enhancement process that brings out detail not visible in the basic photo. JPL is now applying this technology to biomedical research in its Medical lrnage Analysis Facility, which employs computer enhancement techniques to analyze x-ray films of internal organs, such as the heart and lung. A major objective is study of the effects of I stress on persons with heart disease. In animal tests, computerized image processing is being used to study coronary artery lesions and the degree to which they reduce arterial blood flow when stress is applied. The photos illustrate the enhancement process. The upper picture is an x-ray photo in which the artery (dotted line) is barely discernible; in the post-enhancement photo at right, the whole artery and the lesions along its wall are clearly visible. The Medical lrnage Analysis Facility offers a faster means of studying the effects of complex coronary lesions in humans, and the research now being conducted on animals is expected to have important application to diagnosis and treatment of human coronary disease. Other uses of the facility's image processing capability include analysis of muscle biopsy and pap smear specimens, and study of the microscopic structure of fibroprotein in the human lung. Working with JPL on experiments are NASA's Ames Research Center, the University of Southern California School of Medicine, and Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, Downey, California.

  9. Ambient temperature and risk of cardiovascular hospitalization: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung, Dung; Thai, Phong K; Guo, Yuming; Morawska, Lidia; Rutherford, Shannon; Chu, Cordia

    2016-04-15

    The association between temperatures and risk of cardiovascular mortality has been recognized but the association drawn from previous meta-analysis was weak due to the lack of sufficient studies. This paper presented a review with updated reports in the literature about the risk of cardiovascular hospitalization in relation to different temperature exposures and examined the dose-response relationship of temperature-cardiovascular hospitalization by change in units of temperature, latitudes, and lag days. The pooled effect sizes were calculated for cold, heat, heatwave, and diurnal variation using random-effects meta-analysis, and the dose-response relationship of temperature-cardiovascular admission was modelled using random-effect meta-regression. The Cochrane Q-test and index of heterogeneity (I(2)) were used to evaluate heterogeneity, and Egger's test was used to evaluate publication bias. Sixty-four studies were included in meta-analysis. The pooled results suggest that for a change in temperature condition, the risk of cardiovascular hospitalization increased 2.8% (RR, 1.028; 95% CI, 1.021-1.035) for cold exposure, 2.2% (RR, 1.022; 95% CI, 1.006-1.039) for heatwave exposure, and 0.7% (RR, 1.007; 95% CI, 1.002-1.012) for an increase in diurnal temperature. However no association was observed for heat exposure. The significant dose-response relationship of temperature - cardiovascular admission was found with cold exposure and diurnal temperature. Increase in one-day lag caused a marginal reduction in risk of cardiovascular hospitalizations for cold exposure and diurnal variation, and increase in latitude was associated with a decrease in risk of cardiovascular hospitalizations for diurnal temperature only. There is a significant short-term effect of cold exposure, heatwave and diurnal variation on cardiovascular hospitalizations. Further research is needed to understand the temperature-cardiovascular relationship for different climate areas. PMID:26871555

  10. Clinical application of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (resistive type) on cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) imaging in diagnosing cardiovascular disease, 27 subjects were examined using a 0.1-Tesla resistive type (ASAHI MARK-J). In 10 normal subjects, four cardiac chambers, interventricular septum, aorta, pulmonary vessels and vena cava were clearly identified in NMR imaging. In two patients with old anteroseptal myocardial infarction, anteroseptal wall thinning and left ventricular aneurysm with mural thrombi were demonstrated. In two cases of antrolateral and posterolateral myocardial infarction, however, infarcted areas were not identified in NMR imaging. In one patient with congestive cardiomyopathy, enlarged left ventricle without hypertrophy was recognized. In two patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, NMR imaging disclosed thickened left ventricular wall associated with its narrowed cavity. A mural thrombus in the right ventricle was distinctly visualized in one patient with cardio-vascular Behcet's disease. In two patients with mitral valve stenosis, enlarged left atrium with a mural thrombus was clearly demonstrated in both cross and longitudinal sections. In three patients with thoratic aortic aneurysm, local dilatation of aorta and mural thrombi were recognized. In four patients with dissecting aortic aneurysm, double channels with an intimal flap in the aorta were visualized in NMR imaging. Mean T1 values and standard deviations of left ventricle, left ventricular wall, and thrombi were 593+-89, 341+-20, 316+-84 msec, respectively. Mean T1 values of thrombi were ordinally shorter than those of left ventricule. But some thrombi which might be expected fresh had longer T1 values. (J.P.N.)

  11. Automatic Heart Sound Analysis for Cardiovascular Disease Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    As doenças cardiovasculares são a maior causa de morte em todo o mundo, ultrapassando de forma significativa a mortalidade devida aos diabetes e ao cancro. Dado o envelhecimento acentuado da população mundial e atendendo a que a incidência das doenças crónicas, em particular das doenças cardiovasculares, está fortemente correlacionada com a idade, observa-se uma nova tendência de cuidados de saúde focada nos cuidados de saúde preventivos, com vista a reduzir o número de episódi...

  12. Radar image analysis utilizing junctive image metamorphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Peter G.; Gouge, Sally B.; Gouge, Jim O.

    1998-09-01

    A feasibility study was initiated to investigate the ability of algorithms developed for medical sonogram image analysis, to be trained for extraction of cartographic information from synthetic aperture radar imagery. BioComputer Research Inc. has applied proprietary `junctive image metamorphosis' algorithms to cancer cell recognition and identification in ultrasound prostate images. These algorithms have been shown to support automatic radar image feature detection and identification. Training set images were used to develop determinants for representative point, line and area features, which were used on test images to identify and localize the features of interest. The software is computationally conservative; operating on a PC platform in real time. The algorithms are robust; having applicability to be trained for feature recognition on any digital imagery, not just those formed from reflected energy, such as sonograms and radar images. Applications include land mass characterization, feature identification, target recognition, and change detection.

  13. Image sequence analysis

    CERN Document Server

    1981-01-01

    The processing of image sequences has a broad spectrum of important applica­ tions including target tracking, robot navigation, bandwidth compression of TV conferencing video signals, studying the motion of biological cells using microcinematography, cloud tracking, and highway traffic monitoring. Image sequence processing involves a large amount of data. However, because of the progress in computer, LSI, and VLSI technologies, we have now reached a stage when many useful processing tasks can be done in a reasonable amount of time. As a result, research and development activities in image sequence analysis have recently been growing at a rapid pace. An IEEE Computer Society Workshop on Computer Analysis of Time-Varying Imagery was held in Philadelphia, April 5-6, 1979. A related special issue of the IEEE Transactions on Pattern Anal­ ysis and Machine Intelligence was published in November 1980. The IEEE Com­ puter magazine has also published a special issue on the subject in 1981. The purpose of this book ...

  14. Cardiac remodeling following percutaneous mitral valve repair - initial results assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radunski, U K; Franzen, O; Barmeyer, A;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Percutaneous mitral valve repair with the MitraClip device (Abbott Vascular, Redwood City, California, USA) is a novel therapeutic option in patients with mitral regurgitation. This study evaluated the feasibility of cardiac volume measurements by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging...... mitral valve repair results in reverse LV but not in RV or LA remodeling. KEY POINTS: • Volume measurements by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging are feasible following percutaneous mitral valve repair despite device-related artifacts.• A significant reduction of left ventricular volume was found...... end-systolic (48 [42 - 80] vs. 51 [40 - 81] ml/m(2); p = 0.48), and LA (87 [55 - 124] vs. 92 [48 - 137] ml/m(2); p = 0.20) volume indices between BL and FU. CONCLUSION: CMR enables the assessment of cardiac volumes in patients after MitraClip implantation. Our CMR findings indicate that percutaneous...

  15. Cardiovascular CT angiography in neonates and children: Image quality and potential for radiation dose reduction with iterative image reconstruction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate image quality (IQ) of low-radiation-dose paediatric cardiovascular CT angiography (CTA), comparing iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) with filtered back-projection (FBP) and estimate the potential for further dose reductions. Forty neonates and children underwent low radiation CTA with or without ECG synchronisation. Data were reconstructed with FBP, IRIS and SAFIRE. For ECG-synchronised studies, half-dose image acquisitions were simulated. Signal noise was measured and IQ graded. Effective dose (ED) was estimated. Mean absolute and relative image noise with IRIS and full-dose SAFIRE was lower than with FBP (P < 0.001), while SNR and CNR were higher (P < 0.001). Image noise was also lower and SNR and CNR higher in half-dose SAFIRE studies compared with full-and half-dose FBP studies (P < 0.001). IQ scores were higher for IRIS, full-dose SAFIRE and half-dose SAFIRE than for full-dose FBP and higher for half-dose SAFIRE than for half-dose FBP (P < 0.05). Median weight-specific ED was 0.3 mSv without and 1.36 mSv with ECG synchronisation. The estimated ED of half-dose SAFIRE studies was 0.68 mSv. IR improves image noise, SNR, CNR and subjective IQ compared with FBP in low-radiation-dose paediatric CTA and allows further dose reductions without compromising diagnostic IQ. (orig.)

  16. Bio-Imaging and Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedanthan, Rajesh; Choi, Brian G.; Baber, Usman; Narula, Jagat; Fuster, Valentin

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide and also exerts a significant economic burden, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Detection of subclinical CVD, before an individual experiences a major event, may therefore offer the potential to prevent or delay morbidity and mortality, if combined with an appropriate care response. In this review, we discuss imaging technologies that can be used to detect subclinical atherosclerotic CVD (carotid ultrasound, coronary artery calcification) and non-atherosclerotic CVD (echocardiography). We review these imaging modalities, including aspects such as rationale, relevance, feasibility, utilization, and access in LMICs. The potential gains in detecting subclinical CVD may be substantial in LMICs, if earlier detection leads to earlier engagement with the health care system to prevent or delay cardiac events, morbidity, and premature mortality. Thus, dedicated studies examining the feasibility, utility, and cost-effectiveness of detecting subclinical CVD in LMICs are warranted. PMID:25245465

  17. Impact of long-term meditation practice on cardiovascular reactivity during perception and reappraisal of affective images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Sergei V; Reva, Natalia V; Loktev, Konstantin V; Korenyok, Vladimir V; Aftanas, Lyubomir I

    2015-03-01

    Meditation has been found to be an efficient strategy for coping with stress in healthy individuals and in patients with psychosomatic disorders. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the psychophysiological mechanisms of beneficial effects of meditation on cardiovascular reactivity. We examined effects of long-term Sahaja Yoga meditation on cardiovascular reactivity during affective image processing under "unregulated" and "emotion regulation" conditions. Twenty two experienced meditators and 20 control subjects participated in the study. Under "unregulated" conditions participants were shown neutral and affective images and were asked to attend to them. Under "emotion regulation" conditions they down-regulated negative affect through reappraisal of negative images or up-regulated positive affect through reappraisal of positive images. Under "unregulated" conditions while anticipating upcoming images meditators vs. controls did not show larger pre-stimulus total peripheral resistance and greater cardiac output for negative images in comparison with neutral and positive ones. Control subjects showed TPR decrease for negative images only when they consciously intended to reappraise them (i.e. in the "emotion regulation" condition). Both meditators and controls showed comparable cardiovascular reactivity during perception of positive stimuli, whereas up-regulating of positive affect was associated with more pronounced cardiac activation in meditators. The findings provide some insight into understanding the beneficial influence of meditation on top-down control of emotion and cardiovascular reactivity. PMID:25583571

  18. Image Semantic Analysis and Understanding

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Zhongzhi

    2010-01-01

    Image understanding is widely used in many areas like satellite imaging, robotic technologies, sensory networks, medical and biomedical imaging, intelligent transportation systems, etc. But it is difficult by traditional image processing. Recently semantic analysis has become an active research topic aimed at resolving the gap between low level image features and high level semantics which is a promoting approach in image understanding. This talk highlights the sophisticated methodologies of ...

  19. Digital image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber-Hansen, Rikke; Vainer, Ben; Steiniche, Torben

    2012-01-01

    Digital image analysis (DIA) is increasingly implemented in histopathological research to facilitate truly quantitative measurements, decrease inter-observer variation and reduce hands-on time. Originally, efforts were made to enable DIA to reproduce manually obtained results on histological slides...... optimized for light microscopy and the human eye. With improved technical methods and the acknowledgement that computerized readings are different from analysis by human eye, recognition has been achieved that to really empower DIA, histological slides must be optimized for the digital 'eye', with...... reproducible results correlating with clinical findings. In this review, we focus on the basic expectations and requirements for DIA to gain wider use in histopathological research and diagnostics. With a reference to studies that specifically compare DIA with conventional methods, this review discusses...

  20. Diagnosis and management of ischemic cardiomyopathy: Role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doesch, Christina; Papavassiliu, Theano

    2014-11-26

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) represents an important cause of mortality. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging evolved as an imaging modality that allows the assessment of myocardial function, perfusion, contractile reserve and extent of fibrosis in a single comprehensive exam. This review highlights the role of CMR in the differential diagnosis of acute chest pain by detecting the location of obstructive CAD or necrosis and identifying other conditions like stress cardiomyopathy or myocarditis that can present with acute chest pain. Besides, it underlines the prognostic implication of perfusion abnormalities in the setting of acute chest pain. Furthermore, the review addresses the role of CMR to detect significant CAD in patients with stable CAD. It elucidates the accuracy and clinical utility of CMR with respect to other imaging modalities like single-photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography. Besides, the prognostic value of CMR stress testing is discussed. Additionally, it summarizes the available CMR techniques to assess myocardial viability and describes algorithm to identify those patient who might profit from revascularization those who should be treated medically. Finally, future promising imaging techniques that will provide further insights into the fundamental disease processes in ischemic cardiomyopathy are discussed. PMID:25429329

  1. Diagnosis and management of ischemic cardiomyopathy: Role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christina; Doesch; Theano; Papavassiliu

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease(CAD) represents an important cause of mortality. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance(CMR) imaging evolved as an imaging modality that allows the assessment of myocardial function, perfusion, contractile reserve and extent of fibrosis in a single comprehensive exam. This review highlights the role of CMR in the differential diagnosis of acute chest pain by detecting the location of obstructive CAD or necrosis and identifying other conditions like stress cardiomyopathy or myocarditis that can present with acute chest pain. Besides, it underlines the prognostic implication of perfusion abnormalities in the setting of acute chest pain. Furthermore, the review addresses the role of CMR to detect significant CAD in patients with stable CAD. It elucidates the accuracy and clinical utility of CMR with respect to other imaging modalitieslike single-photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography. Besides, the prognostic value of CMR stress testing is discussed. Additionally, it summarizes the available CMR techniques to assess myocardial viability and describes algorithm to identify those patient who might profit from revascularization those who should be treated medically. Finally, future promising imaging techniques that will provide further insights into the fundamental disease processes in ischemic cardiomyopathy are discussed.

  2. Alterations in vascular function in primary aldosteronism: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, P B; Boyle, S; Zimmerli, L U; McQuarrie, E P; Delles, C; Freel, E M

    2014-02-01

    Excess aldosterone is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Aldosterone has a permissive effect on vascular fibrosis. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) allows study of vascular function by measuring aortic distensibility. We compared aortic distensibility in primary aldosteronism (PA), essential hypertension (EH) and normal controls and explored the relationship between aortic distensibility and pulse wave velocity (PWV). We studied PA (n=14) and EH (n=33) subjects and age-matched healthy controls (n=17) with CMR, including measurement of aortic distensibility, and measured PWV using applanation tonometry. At recruitment, PA and EH patients had similar blood pressure and left ventricular mass. Subjects with PA had significantly lower aortic distensibility and higher PWV compared with EH and healthy controls. These changes were independent of other factors associated with reduced aortic distensibility, including ageing. There was a significant relationship between increasing aortic stiffness and age in keeping with physical and vascular ageing. As expected, aortic distensibility and PWV were closely correlated. These results demonstrate that PA patients display increased arterial stiffness compared with EH, independent of vascular ageing. The implication is that aldosterone invokes functional impairment of arterial function. The long-term implications of arterial stiffening in aldosterone excess require further study. PMID:23884211

  3. Cardiovascular coupling analysis with high-resolution joint symbolic dynamics in patients suffering from acute schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besides the well-known cardiac risk factors for schizophrenia, increasing concerns have been raised regarding the cardiac side-effects of antipsychotic medications. A bivariate analysis of autonomic regulation, based on cardiovascular coupling, can provide additional information about heart rate (HR) and blood pressure regulatory patterns within the complex interactions of the cardiovascular system. We introduce a new high-resolution coupling analysis method (HRJSD) based on joint symbolic dynamics (JSD), which is characterized by three symbols, a threshold (individual dynamic variability, physiological) for time series transformation and eight coupling pattern families. This is based on a redundancy reduction strategy used to quantify and characterize cardiovascular couplings. In this study, short-term (30 min) HR and systolic blood pressure (SP) time series of 42 unmedicated (UNMED) and 42 medicated patients (MED) suffering from acute schizophrenia were analysed to establish the suitability of the new method for quantifying the effects of antipsychotics on cardiovascular couplings. We were able to demonstrate that HRJSD, applying the threshold based on spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) estimation, revealed eight significant pattern families that were able to quantify the anti-cholinergic effects of antipsychotics and the related changes of cardiovascular regulation (coupling) in MED in comparison to UNMED. This was in contrast to the simple JSD, BRS (sequence method) and only partly to standard linear HR variability indices. HRJSD provides strong evidence that autonomic regulation in MED seems to be, to some extent, predominated by invariable HR responses in combination with alternating SP values in contrast to UNMED, indicating an impairment of the baroreflex control feedback loop in MED. Surrogate data analysis was applied to test for the significance and nonlinearity of cardiovascular couplings in the original data due to medical treatment with

  4. Assessment of radiation dose in nuclear cardiovascular imaging using realistic computational models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Nuclear cardiology plays an important role in clinical assessment and has enormous impact on the management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Pediatric patients at different age groups are exposed to a spectrum of radiation dose levels and associated cancer risks different from those of adults in diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures. Therefore, comprehensive radiation dosimetry evaluations for commonly used myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and viability radiotracers in target population (children and adults) at different age groups are highly desired. Methods: Using Monte Carlo calculations and biological effects of ionizing radiation VII model, we calculate the S-values for a number of radionuclides (Tl-201, Tc-99m, I-123, C-11, N-13, O-15, F-18, and Rb-82) and estimate the absorbed dose and effective dose for 12 MPI radiotracers in computational models including the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-yr-old, and adult male and female computational phantoms. Results: For most organs, 201Tl produces the highest absorbed dose whereas 82Rb and 15O-water produce the lowest absorbed dose. For the newborn baby and adult patient, the effective dose of 82Rb is 48% and 77% lower than that of 99mTc-tetrofosmin (rest), respectively. Conclusions: 82Rb results in lower effective dose in adults compared to 99mTc-labeled tracers. However, this advantage is less apparent in children. The produced dosimetric databases for various radiotracers used in cardiovascular imaging, using new generation of computational models, can be used for risk-benefit assessment of a spectrum of patient population in clinical nuclear cardiology practice

  5. Assessment of radiation dose in nuclear cardiovascular imaging using realistic computational models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Tianwu [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva 4 CH-1211 (Switzerland); Lee, Choonsik [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20852 (United States); Bolch, Wesley E. [Departments of Nuclear and Radiological and Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Zaidi, Habib, E-mail: habib.zaidi@hcuge.ch [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva 4 CH-1211 (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva University, Geneva CH-1205 (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Nuclear cardiology plays an important role in clinical assessment and has enormous impact on the management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Pediatric patients at different age groups are exposed to a spectrum of radiation dose levels and associated cancer risks different from those of adults in diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures. Therefore, comprehensive radiation dosimetry evaluations for commonly used myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and viability radiotracers in target population (children and adults) at different age groups are highly desired. Methods: Using Monte Carlo calculations and biological effects of ionizing radiation VII model, we calculate the S-values for a number of radionuclides (Tl-201, Tc-99m, I-123, C-11, N-13, O-15, F-18, and Rb-82) and estimate the absorbed dose and effective dose for 12 MPI radiotracers in computational models including the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-yr-old, and adult male and female computational phantoms. Results: For most organs, {sup 201}Tl produces the highest absorbed dose whereas {sup 82}Rb and {sup 15}O-water produce the lowest absorbed dose. For the newborn baby and adult patient, the effective dose of {sup 82}Rb is 48% and 77% lower than that of {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin (rest), respectively. Conclusions: {sup 82}Rb results in lower effective dose in adults compared to {sup 99m}Tc-labeled tracers. However, this advantage is less apparent in children. The produced dosimetric databases for various radiotracers used in cardiovascular imaging, using new generation of computational models, can be used for risk-benefit assessment of a spectrum of patient population in clinical nuclear cardiology practice.

  6. ANALYSIS OF FUNDUS IMAGES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    A method classifying objects man image as respective arterial or venous vessels comprising: identifying pixels of the said modified image which are located on a line object, determining which of the said image points is associated with crossing point or a bifurcation of the respective line object......; (e) vessel length. Furthermore methods for detecting size and positions of features of eye fundus images.......A method classifying objects man image as respective arterial or venous vessels comprising: identifying pixels of the said modified image which are located on a line object, determining which of the said image points is associated with crossing point or a bifurcation of the respective line object......, wherein a crossing point is represented by an image point which is the intersection of four line segments, performing a matching operation on pairs of said line segments for each said crossing point, to determine the path of blood vessels in the image, thereby classifying the line objects in the original...

  7. Cardiovascular ultrahigh field magnetic resonance imaging. Challenges, technical solutions and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This involves high spatial resolution cardiac imaging with ultrahigh magnetic fields (7 T) and clinically acceptable image quality. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a field strength of 1.5 T using a spatial resolution of (2 x 2 x 6-8) mm3. Cardiac MRI at ultrahigh field strength makes use of multitransmit/receive radiofrequency (RF) technology and development of novel technology that utilizes the traits of ultrahigh field MRI. Enhanced spatial resolution which is superior by a factor of 6-10 to what can be achieved by current clinical cardiac MRI. The relative spatial resolution (pixels per anatomical structure) comes close to what can be accomplished by current cardiac MRI in small rodents. Feasibility studies demonstrate the gain in spatial resolution at 7.0 T due to the sensitivity advantage inherent to ultrahigh magnetic fields. Please stay tuned and please put further weight behind the solution of the remaining technical problems of cardiac MRI at 7.0 T. (orig.)

  8. Cardiovascular imaging in the diagnosis and monitoring of cardiotoxicity: role of echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Concetta; Longobardo, Luca; Cadeddu, Christian; Monte, Ines; Novo, Giuseppina; Dell'Oglio, Sonia; Pepe, Alessia; Madonna, Rosalinda; Tocchetti, Carlo G; Mele, Donato

    2016-05-01

    The evaluation by cardiovascular imaging of chemotherapy patients became a central topic in the last several years. The use of drugs for the treatment of cancers increased, and new molecules and protocols were developed to improve outcomes in these patients. Although, these novel approaches also produced a progressive increase in side effects, particularly myocardial dysfunction. Imaging of the heart was highly accurate in the early diagnosis of cancer therapeutics related-cardiac dysfunction. Echocardiography is the first-line method to assess ventricular function alterations, and it is required to satisfy the need for an early, easy and accurate diagnosis to stratify the risk of heart failure and manage treatments. A careful monitoring of cardiac function during the course of therapy should prevent the onset of severe heart impairment. This review provides an overview of the most important findings of the role of echocardiography in the management of chemotherapy-treated patients to create a clear and complete description of the efficacy of conventional measurements, the importance of comprehensive heart evaluations, the additional role of new echocardiographic techniques, the utility of integrated studies using other imaging tools and the positions of the most important international societies on this topic. PMID:27183524

  9. The use of multimodality cardiovascular imaging to assess right ventricular size and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surkova, Elena; Muraru, Denisa; Iliceto, Sabino; Badano, Luigi P

    2016-07-01

    Right ventricular (RV) size and function have been found to be important predictors of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with various conditions. However, non-invasive assessment of the RV is a challenging task due to its complex anatomy and location in the chest. Although cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is considered a "gold standard" for RV assessment, the development of novel echocardiographic techniques, including three-dimensional (3DE) and two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography (2DSTE) opened new exciting opportunities in RV imaging. 3DE has proven accurate in measuring RV volumes and ejection fraction when compared with CMR while 2DSTE plays a critical role in measuring RV myocardial deformation, which is a powerful predictor of patients' functional capacity and survival. Cardiac computed tomography provides an accurate and reproducible assessment of the RV volumes and can be considered a reliable alternative for patients who are not suitable for either echocardiography or CMR. The purpose of this review is to summarize currently available data on the role of the different noninvasive cardiac imaging modalities in assessment of RV size, function and mechanics, with an emphasis on the benefits of novel imaging techniques and on how the latter can be applied in the various clinical settings. PMID:27057977

  10. Cardiovascular whole-body MR imaging in patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine patients with peripheral-arterial-occlusive-disease (PAOD) for systemic effects associated with atherosclerosis using a comprehensive state-of-the-art whole-body MR examination protocol. The protocol comprises the assessment of the complete arterial vasculature (except coronary arteries), the brain, and the heart. Materials and methods: Multi-station whole-body 3D MR angiography was performed in sixty consecutive patients with clinical suspicion for PAOD at 1.5 T (Magnetom Avanto, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). Functional and delayed enhancement cardiac images were acquired, as well as FLAIR images of the brain and TOF angiography of intracranial vessels. MR and DSA images were assessed by independent observers for artherosclerotic manifestations and other pathology. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of vascular pathology was calculated for MR data using conventional DSA of the symptomatic region as standard-of-reference. Results: Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of significant vascular stenosis (>70% luminal narrowing) was 94% and 96% (PPV 87%, NPV 98%). Significant microangiopathic tissue alterations (n=7) and/or cerebral infarction (n=18) were diagnosed in 23/60 patients. Thirty-eight of 60 patients presented with systolic left ventricular wall motion abnormalities. In 24 patients subendocardial or transmural delayed enhancement was detected in corresponding regions, indicating prior myocardial infarction. Conclusion: For patients with PAOD and suspected systemic atherosclerotic disease a comprehensive diagnosis of accompanying cardiovascular pathology and therefore staging of systemic atherosclerotic disease is feasible within one MR examination. (orig.)

  11. Retinal vascular imaging in early life: insights into processes and risk of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling-Jun; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Wong, Tien Yin

    2016-04-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally. In recent years, studies have shown that the origins of CVD may be traced to vascular and metabolic processes in early life. Retinal vascular imaging is a new technology that allows detailed non-invasive in vivo assessment and monitoring of the microvasculature. In this systematic review, we described the application of retinal vascular imaging in children and adolescents, and we examined the use of retinal vascular imaging in understanding CVD risk in early life. We reviewed all publications with quantitative retinal vascular assessment in two databases: PubMed and Scopus. Early life CVD risk factors were classified into four groups: birth risk factors, environmental risk factors, systemic risk factors and conditions linked to future CVD development. Retinal vascular changes were associated with lower birth weight, shorter gestational age, low-fibre and high-sugar diet, lesser physical activity, parental hypertension history, childhood hypertension, childhood overweight/obesity, childhood depression/anxiety and childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus. In summary, there is increasing evidence supporting the view that structural changes in the retinal microvasculature are associated with CVD risk factors in early life. Thus, the retina is a useful site for pre-clinical assessment of microvascular processes that may underlie the future development of CVD in adulthood. PMID:26435039

  12. Variation Analysis of Sphygmogram to Assess Cardiovascular System under Meditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Yi Liu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we studied how meditation affects the characteristics of the cardiovascular system, mainly based on blood pressure waveforms (BPW. Four parameters derived from BPW include the rising slope (h1/t1, normalized height of T wave (h3/h1, normalized height of V3 valley (h4/h1 and normalized height of D wave (h5/h1, where t1 and hi, i = 1, … ,5 are quantitative features of the BPW waveform pattern. A larger value of h1/t1 reflects better heart ejection ability and aorta compliance. A larger value of h3/h1 may infer an arterial system with good elasticity. The decrease (increase of h4/h1 parameter indicates the decrease (increase of peripheral resistance of vessels. A larger value of h5/h1 indicates better artery elasticity and aortic valve function. In comparison with the control group, Zen-meditation practitioners have more after-meditation h1/t1, h3/h1 and h5/h1 increase, with more h4/h1 decrease, with statistical significance (P < 0.05. The observation allows us to infer that Zen meditation may effectively improve relevant characteristics of the cardiovascular system.

  13. A Data Mining Approach for Cardiovascular Disease Diagnosis Using Heart Rate Variability and Images of Carotid Arteries

    OpenAIRE

    Hyeongsoo Kim; Musa Ibrahim M. Ishag; Minghao Piao; Taeil Kwon; Keun Ho Ryu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed not only an extraction methodology of multiple feature vectors from ultrasound images for carotid arteries (CAs) and heart rate variability (HRV) of electrocardiogram signal, but also a suitable and reliable prediction model useful in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). For inventing the multiple feature vectors, we extract a candidate feature vector through image processing and measurement of the thickness of carotid intima-media (IMT). As a complementar...

  14. Effect of antioxidant vitamin supplementation on cardiovascular outcomes: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yizhou Ye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antioxidant vitamin (vitamin E, beta-carotene, and vitamin C are widely used for preventing major cardiovascular outcomes. However, the effect of antioxidant vitamin on cardiovascular events remains unclear. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We searched PubMed, EmBase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the proceedings of major conferences for relevant literature. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials that reported on the effects of antioxidant vitamin on cardiovascular outcomes as compared to placebo. Outcomes analyzed were major cardiovascular events, myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiac death, total death, and any possible adverse events. We used the I(2 statistic to measure heterogeneity between trials and calculated risk estimates for cardiovascular outcomes with random-effect meta-analysis. Independent extraction was performed by two reviewers and consensus was reached. Of 293 identified studies, we included 15 trials reporting data on 188209 participants. These studies reported 12749 major cardiovascular events, 6699 myocardial infarction, 3749 strokes, 14122 total death, and 5980 cardiac deaths. Overall, antioxidant vitamin supplementation as compared to placebo had no effect on major cardiovascular events (RR, 1.00; 95%CI, 0.96-1.03, myocardial infarction (RR, 0.98; 95%CI, 0.92-1.04, stroke (RR, 0.99; 95%CI, 0.93-1.05, total death (RR, 1.03; 95%CI, 0.98-1.07, cardiac death (RR, 1.02; 95%CI, 0.97-1.07, revascularization (RR, 1.00; 95%CI, 0.95-1.05, total CHD (RR, 0.96; 95%CI, 0.87-1.05, angina (RR, 0.98; 95%CI, 0.90-1.07, and congestive heart failure (RR, 1.07; 95%CI, 0.96 to 1.19. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Antioxidant vitamin supplementation has no effect on the incidence of major cardiovascular events, myocardial infarction, stroke, total death, and cardiac death.

  15. A Data Mining Approach for Cardiovascular Disease Diagnosis Using Heart Rate Variability and Images of Carotid Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeongsoo Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we proposed not only an extraction methodology of multiple feature vectors from ultrasound images for carotid arteries (CAs and heart rate variability (HRV of electrocardiogram signal, but also a suitable and reliable prediction model useful in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease (CVD. For inventing the multiple feature vectors, we extract a candidate feature vector through image processing and measurement of the thickness of carotid intima-media (IMT. As a complementary way, the linear and/or nonlinear feature vectors are also extracted from HRV, a main index for cardiac disorder. The significance of the multiple feature vectors is tested with several machine learning methods, namely Neural Networks, Support Vector Machine (SVM, Classification based on Multiple Association Rule (CMAR, Decision tree induction and Bayesian classifier. As a result, multiple feature vectors extracted from both CAs and HRV (CA+HRV showed higher accuracy than the separative feature vectors of CAs and HRV. Furthermore, the SVM and CMAR showed about 89.51% and 89.46%, respectively, in terms of diagnosing accuracy rate after evaluating the diagnosis or prediction methods using the finally chosen multiple feature vectors. Therefore, the multiple feature vectors devised in this paper can be effective diagnostic indicators of CVD. In addition, the feature vector analysis and prediction techniques are expected to be helpful tools in the decisions of cardiologists.

  16. Sleep apnea-hypopnea quantification by cardiovascular data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Camargo, Sabrina; Anteneodo, Celia; Kurths, Juergen; Penzel, Thomas; Wessel, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Sleep apnea is the most common sleep disturbance and it is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disorders. Its detection relies on a polysomnography, a combination of diverse exams. In order to detect changes due to sleep disturbances such as sleep apnea occurrences, without the need of combined recordings, we mainly analyze systolic blood pressure signals (maximal blood pressure value of each beat to beat interval). Nonstationarities in the data are uncovered by a segmentation procedure, which provides local quantities that are correlated to apnea-hypopnea events. Those quantities are the average length and average variance of stationary patches. By comparing them to an apnea score previously obtained by polysomnographic exams, we propose an apnea quantifier based on blood pressure signal. This furnishes an alternative procedure for the detection of apnea based on a single time series, with an accuracy of 82%.

  17. A novel high resolution, high sensitivity SPECT detector for molecular imaging of cardiovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in western countries. Understanding the rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques and monitoring the effect of innovative therapies of heart failure is of fundamental importance. A flexible, high resolution, high sensitivity detector system for molecular imaging with radionuclides on small animal models has been designed for this aim. A prototype has been built using tungsten pinhole and LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to Hamamatsu Flat Panel PMTs. Compact individual-channel readout has been designed, built and tested. Measurements with phantoms as well as pilot studies on mice have been performed, the results show that the myocardial perfusion in mice can be determined with sufficient precision. The detector will be improved replacing the Hamamatsu Flat Panel with Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) to allow integration of the system with MRI scanners. Application of LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to photosensor with high photon detection efficiency and excellent energy resolution will allow dual-label imaging to monitor simultaneously the cardiac perfusion and the molecular targets under investigation during the heart therapy.

  18. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoralf eNiendorf

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g. by supporting MR microscopy and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g. by reducing measuring time; both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (biomedical imaging, molecular medicine and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (pathophysiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular and renal disease will be discussed.

  19. Hyperspectral image analysis. A tutorial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amigo Rubio, Jose Manuel; Babamoradi, Hamid; Elcoroaristizabal Martin, Saioa

    2015-01-01

    This tutorial aims at providing guidelines and practical tools to assist with the analysis of hyperspectral images. Topics like hyperspectral image acquisition, image pre-processing, multivariate exploratory analysis, hyperspectral image resolution, classification and final digital image processing...... to differentiate between several types of plastics by using Near infrared hyperspectral imaging and Partial Least Squares - Discriminant Analysis. Thus, the reader is guided through every single step and oriented in order to adapt those strategies to the user's case....... will be exposed, and some guidelines given and discussed. Due to the broad character of current applications and the vast number of multivariate methods available, this paper has focused on an industrial chemical framework to explain, in a step-wise manner, how to develop a classification methodology...

  20. Cardiovascular events in Japanese asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes: a 1-year interim report of a J-ACCESS 2 investigation using myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diabetic patients have a high risk for cardiovascular events. The role of myocardial perfusion imaging was investigated in asymptomatic diabetic patients to evaluate short-term prognosis in a Japanese population. A total of 506 asymptomatic patients ≥50 years of age who had carotid artery maximum intima-media thickness ≥1.1 mm, urinary albumin excretion of ≥30 mg/g creatinine, with additional criteria of abdominal obesity, low HDL cholesterol, high triglyceride level, and hypertension were enrolled and followed up over a 3-year period. Gated SPECT with stress-rest protocol was performed and analyzed by summed defect scores and QGS software. One-year cardiovascular events were analyzed. Myocardial ischemia was observed in 17% of patients, and abnormal perfusion findings of ischemia and/or scar were observed in 32% of patients. By the end of the 1-year follow-up, 33 (6.5%) cardiovascular events occurred including 6 all-cause deaths. Patients with summed stress score (SSS) >8 had a higher incidence of either death or cardiovascular events. Event-free survival rates for SSS 0-3, 4-8, 9-13, and ≥14 were 0.96, 0.95, 0.82, and 0.76, respectively. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that significant variables were SSS, history of cerebrovascular accident, and electrocardiographic abnormality at rest. The 1-year interim summary showed that cardiovascular events were significantly higher in patients with SPECT abnormality, although hard cardiac event rate was relatively low. Targeted treatment strategy is required for asymptomatic but potentially high-risk diabetic patients. (orig.)

  1. Cardiovascular events in Japanese asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes: a 1-year interim report of a J-ACCESS 2 investigation using myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Kenichi [Kanazawa University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kanazawa (Japan); Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu [Osaka University, Center for Advanced Science and Innovation, Osaka (Japan); Kusuoka, Hideo [National Hospital Organization Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Izumi, Tohru [Kitasato University, Department of Cardiology and Internal Medicine, Sagamihara (Japan); Kashiwagi, Atsunori [Shiga University of Medical Science, Department of Medicine, Ohtsu (Japan); Kawamori, Ryuzo [Juntendo University, Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Shimamoto, Kazuaki [Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Second Department of Internal Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Yamada, Nobuhiro [University of Tsukuba, Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tsukuba (Japan); Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, 465 Kajii-cho, Kawara-machi, Hirokoji, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    Diabetic patients have a high risk for cardiovascular events. The role of myocardial perfusion imaging was investigated in asymptomatic diabetic patients to evaluate short-term prognosis in a Japanese population. A total of 506 asymptomatic patients {>=}50 years of age who had carotid artery maximum intima-media thickness {>=}1.1 mm, urinary albumin excretion of {>=}30 mg/g creatinine, with additional criteria of abdominal obesity, low HDL cholesterol, high triglyceride level, and hypertension were enrolled and followed up over a 3-year period. Gated SPECT with stress-rest protocol was performed and analyzed by summed defect scores and QGS software. One-year cardiovascular events were analyzed. Myocardial ischemia was observed in 17% of patients, and abnormal perfusion findings of ischemia and/or scar were observed in 32% of patients. By the end of the 1-year follow-up, 33 (6.5%) cardiovascular events occurred including 6 all-cause deaths. Patients with summed stress score (SSS) >8 had a higher incidence of either death or cardiovascular events. Event-free survival rates for SSS 0-3, 4-8, 9-13, and {>=}14 were 0.96, 0.95, 0.82, and 0.76, respectively. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that significant variables were SSS, history of cerebrovascular accident, and electrocardiographic abnormality at rest. The 1-year interim summary showed that cardiovascular events were significantly higher in patients with SPECT abnormality, although hard cardiac event rate was relatively low. Targeted treatment strategy is required for asymptomatic but potentially high-risk diabetic patients. (orig.)

  2. Position paper of the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) on PET imaging of atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucerius, Jan [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital RWTH Aachen, RWTH Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC), Department of Nuclear Medicine and Cardiovascular Research Institute (CARIM), P. Debyelaan 25, HX, Maastricht (Netherlands); Hyafil, Fabien [Bichat University Hospital, Inserm 1148, DHU FIRE, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Verberne, Hein J. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Twente, Department of Biomedical Photonic Imaging, Faculty of Science and Technology, Enschede (Netherlands); Lindner, Oliver [Heart and Diabetes Center NRW, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Institute of Radiology, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Sciagra, Roberto [University of Florence, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences, Florence (Italy); Agostini, Denis [Normandie Universite, Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHU Cote de Nacre, Caen (France); Uebleis, Christopher [Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenchen (Germany); Gimelli, Alessia [Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa (Italy); Hacker, Marcus [Medical University Vienna, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided therapy, Vienna (Austria); Collaboration: on behalf of the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

    2016-04-15

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death not only in Europe but also in the rest of the World. Preventive measures, however, often fail and cardiovascular disease may manifest as an acute coronary syndrome, stroke or even sudden death after years of silent progression. Thus, there is a considerable need for innovative diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to improve the quality of care and limit the burden of cardiovascular diseases. During the past 10 years, several retrospective and prospective clinical studies have been published using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques. However, the current variety of imaging protocols used for vascular (arterial) imaging with FDG PET considerably limits the ability to compare results between studies and to build large multicentre imaging registries. Based on the existing literature and the experience of the Members of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) Cardiovascular Committee, the objective of this position paper was to propose optimized and standardized protocols for imaging and interpretation of PET scans in atherosclerosis. These recommendations do not, however, replace the individual responsibility of healthcare professionals to make appropriate decisions in the circumstances of the individual study protocols used and the individual patient, in consultation with the patient and, where appropriate and necessary, the patient's guardian or carer. These recommendations suffer from the absence of conclusive evidence on many of the recommendations. Therefore, they are not intended and should not be used as ''strict guidelines'' but should, as already mentioned, provide a basis for standardized clinical atherosclerosis PET imaging protocols, which are subject to further and continuing evaluation and improvement. However, this EANM position paper might indeed be a first step towards &apos

  3. Position paper of the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) on PET imaging of atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death not only in Europe but also in the rest of the World. Preventive measures, however, often fail and cardiovascular disease may manifest as an acute coronary syndrome, stroke or even sudden death after years of silent progression. Thus, there is a considerable need for innovative diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to improve the quality of care and limit the burden of cardiovascular diseases. During the past 10 years, several retrospective and prospective clinical studies have been published using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques. However, the current variety of imaging protocols used for vascular (arterial) imaging with FDG PET considerably limits the ability to compare results between studies and to build large multicentre imaging registries. Based on the existing literature and the experience of the Members of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) Cardiovascular Committee, the objective of this position paper was to propose optimized and standardized protocols for imaging and interpretation of PET scans in atherosclerosis. These recommendations do not, however, replace the individual responsibility of healthcare professionals to make appropriate decisions in the circumstances of the individual study protocols used and the individual patient, in consultation with the patient and, where appropriate and necessary, the patient's guardian or carer. These recommendations suffer from the absence of conclusive evidence on many of the recommendations. Therefore, they are not intended and should not be used as ''strict guidelines'' but should, as already mentioned, provide a basis for standardized clinical atherosclerosis PET imaging protocols, which are subject to further and continuing evaluation and improvement. However, this EANM position paper might indeed be a first step towards &apos

  4. Automatic quantitative analysis of cardiac MR perfusion images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeuwer, Marcel M.; Spreeuwers, Luuk J.; Quist, Marcel J.

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique for imaging cardiovascular diseases. The introduction of cardiovascular MRI into clinical practice is however hampered by the lack of efficient and accurate image analysis methods. This paper focuses on the evaluation of blood perfusion in the myocardium (the heart muscle) from MR images, using contrast-enhanced ECG-triggered MRI. We have developed an automatic quantitative analysis method, which works as follows. First, image registration is used to compensate for translation and rotation of the myocardium over time. Next, the boundaries of the myocardium are detected and for each position within the myocardium a time-intensity profile is constructed. The time interval during which the contrast agent passes for the first time through the left ventricle and the myocardium is detected and various parameters are measured from the time-intensity profiles in this interval. The measured parameters are visualized as color overlays on the original images. Analysis results are stored, so that they can later on be compared for different stress levels of the heart. The method is described in detail in this paper and preliminary validation results are presented.

  5. Stochastic geometry for image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Descombes, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This book develops the stochastic geometry framework for image analysis purpose. Two main frameworks are  described: marked point process and random closed sets models. We derive the main issues for defining an appropriate model. The algorithms for sampling and optimizing the models as well as for estimating parameters are reviewed.  Numerous applications, covering remote sensing images, biological and medical imaging, are detailed.  This book provides all the necessary tools for developing an image analysis application based on modern stochastic modeling.

  6. Effect of folic acid supplementation on cardiovascular outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hao Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Folic acid is widely used to lower homocysteine concentrations and prevent adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, the effect of folic acid on cardiovascular events is not clear at the present time. We carried out a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effects of folic acid supplementation on cardiovascular outcomes. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We systematically searched Medline, EmBase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, reference lists of articles, and proceedings of major meetings for relevant literature. We included randomized placebo-controlled trials that reported on the effects of folic acid on cardiovascular events compared to placebo. Of 1594 identified studies, we included 16 trials reporting data on 44841 patients. These studies reported 8238 major cardiovascular events, 2001 strokes, 2917 myocardial infarctions, and 6314 deaths. Folic acid supplementation as compared to placebo had no effect on major cardiovascular events (RR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.93-1.04, stroke (RR, 0.89; 95% CI,0.78-1.01, myocardial infarction (RR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.93-1.07, or deaths from any cause (RR, 1.00;95% CI, 0.96-1.05. Moreover, folic acid as compared to placebo also had no effect on the following secondary outcomes: risk of revascularization (RR, 1.05; 95%CI, 0.95-1.16, acute coronary syndrome (RR, 1.06; 95%CI, 0.97-1.15, cancer (RR, 1.08; 95%CI, 0.98-1.21, vascular death (RR, 0.94; 95%CI,0.88-1.02, or non-vascular death (RR, 1.06; 95%CI, 0.97-1.15. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Folic acid supplementation does not effect on the incidence of major cardiovascular events, stroke, myocardial infarction or all cause mortality.

  7. Deployment of an Advanced Electrocardiographic Analysis (A-ECG) to Detect Cardiovascular Risk in Career Firefighters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, B. A.; Storer, T. W.; Abrazado, M.; Watne, R.; Schlegel, T. T.; Batalin, M.; Kaiser, W.; Smith, D. L.; Cooper, C. B.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Sudden cardiac death is the leading cause of line of duty death among firefighters, accounting for approximately 45% of fatalities annually. Firefighters perform strenuous muscular work while wearing heavy, encapsulating personal protective equipment in high ambient temperatures, under chaotic and emotionally stressful conditions. These factors can precipitate sudden cardiac events like myocardial infarction, serious dysrhythmias, or cerebrovascular accidents in firefighters with underlying cardiovascular disease. Screening for cardiovascular risk factors is recommended but not always followed in this population. PHASER is a project charged with identifying and prioritizing risk factors in emergency responders. We have deployed an advanced ECG (A-ECG) system developed at NASA for improved sensitivity and specificity in the detection of cardiac risk. METHODS Forty-four professional firefighters were recruited to perform comprehensive baseline assessments including tests of aerobic performance and laboratory tests for fasting lipid profiles and glucose. Heart rate and conventional 12-lead ECG were obtained at rest and during incremental treadmill exercise testing (XT). In addition, a 5-min resting 12-lead A-ECG was obtained in a subset of firefighters (n=18) and transmitted over a secure networked system to a physician collaborator at NASA for advanced-ECG analysis. This A-ECG system has been proven, using myocardial perfusion and other imaging, to accurately identify a number of cardiac pathologies including coronary artery disease (CAD), left ventricular hypertrophy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, and ischemic cardiomyopathy. RESULTS Subjects mean (SD) age was 43 (8) years, weight 91 (13) kg, and BMI of 28 (3) kg/square meter. Maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) was 39 (9) ml/kg/min. This compares with the 45th %ile in healthy reference values and a recommended standard of 42 ml/kg/min for firefighters. The metabolic threshold (VO

  8. Topological analysis of weather images

    OpenAIRE

    MUBI, GREGOR

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis computational topology is used to analyse weather data. The goal is to analyse weather images and discern, if it is possible to expose certain parameters, which could improve humid mass classification. For this reason we were observing how those masses appear and merge on sequences of images. We used topological method named persistence. For data analysis we obtained weather radar images. We also wrote around 20 scripts in computing environment MATLAB, which served for data co...

  9. Multispectral analysis of multimodal images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An increasing number of multimodal images represent a valuable increase in available image information, but at the same time it complicates the extraction of diagnostic information across the images. Multispectral analysis (MSA) has the potential to simplify this problem substantially as unlimited number of images can be combined, and tissue properties across the images can be extracted automatically. Materials and methods. We have developed a software solution for MSA containing two algorithms for unsupervised classification, an EM-algorithm finding multinormal class descriptions and the k-means clustering algorithm, and two for supervised classification, a Bayesian classifier using multinormal class descriptions and a kNN-algorithm. The software has an efficient user interface for the creation and manipulation of class descriptions, and it has proper tools for displaying the results. Results. The software has been tested on different sets of images. One application is to segment cross-sectional images of brain tissue (T1- and T2-weighted MR images) into its main normal tissues and brain tumors. Another interesting set of images are the perfusion maps and diffusion maps, derived images from raw MR images. The software returns segmentation that seem to be sensible. Discussion. The MSA software appears to be a valuable tool for image analysis with multimodal images at hand. It readily gives a segmentation of image volumes that visually seems to be sensible. However, to really learn how to use MSA, it will be necessary to gain more insight into what tissues the different segments contain, and the upcoming work will therefore be focused on examining the tissues through for example histological sections

  10. Gabor Analysis for Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole; Feichtinger, Hans G.; Paukner, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    , it characterizes a function by its transform over phase space, which is the time–frequency plane (TF-plane) in a musical context or the location–wave-number domain in the context of image processing. Since the transition from the signal domain to the phase space domain introduces an enormous amount...

  11. Shape analysis in medical image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, João

    2014-01-01

    This book contains thirteen contributions from invited experts of international recognition addressing important issues in shape analysis in medical image analysis, including techniques for image segmentation, registration, modelling and classification, and applications in biology, as well as in cardiac, brain, spine, chest, lung and clinical practice. This volume treats topics such as, anatomic and functional shape representation and matching; shape-based medical image segmentation; shape registration; statistical shape analysis; shape deformation; shape-based abnormity detection; shape tracking and longitudinal shape analysis; machine learning for shape modeling and analysis; shape-based computer-aided-diagnosis; shape-based medical navigation; benchmark and validation of shape representation, analysis and modeling algorithms. This work will be of interest to researchers, students, and manufacturers in the fields of artificial intelligence, bioengineering, biomechanics, computational mechanics, computationa...

  12. Clinical implications of microvascular obstruction and intramyocardial haemorrhage in acute myocardial infarction using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekkers, Sebastiaan C.A.M.; Smulders, Martijn W.; Waltenberger, Johannes; Gorgels, Anton P.M.; Schalla, Simon [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Passos, Valeria Lima [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Methodology and Statistics, Maastricht (Netherlands); Leiner, Tim [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2010-11-15

    To investigate the clinical implications of microvascular obstruction (MVO) and intramyocardial haemorrhage (IMH) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Ninety patients with a first AMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were studied. T2-weighted, cine and late gadolinium-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 5 {+-} 2 and 103 {+-} 11 days. Patients were categorised into three groups based on the presence or absence of MVO and IMH. MVO was observed in 54% and IMH in 43% of patients, and correlated significantly (r = 0.8, p < 0.001). Pre-PCI thrombolysis in myocardial infarction 3 flow was only observed in MVO(-)/IMH(-) patients. Infarct size and impairment of systolic function were largest in MVO(+)/IMH(+) patients (n = 39, 23 {+-} 9% and 47 {+-} 7%), smallest in MVO(-)/IMH(-) patients (n = 41, 8 {+-} 8% and 55 {+-} 8%) and intermediate in MVO(+)/IMH(-) patients (n = 10, 16 {+-} 7% and 51 {+-} 6%, p < 0.001). LVEF increased in all three subgroups at follow-up, but remained intermediate in MVO(+)/IMH(-) and was lowest in MVO(+)/IMH(+) patients. Using random intercept model analysis, only infarct size was an independent predictor for adverse LV remodelling. Intramyocardial haemorrhage and microvascular obstruction are strongly related. Pre-PCI TIMI 3 flow is less frequently observed in patients with MVO and IMH. Only infarct size was an independent predictor of LV remodelling. (orig.)

  13. Flightspeed Integral Image Analysis Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David R.

    2009-01-01

    The Flightspeed Integral Image Analysis Toolkit (FIIAT) is a C library that provides image analysis functions in a single, portable package. It provides basic low-level filtering, texture analysis, and subwindow descriptor for applications dealing with image interpretation and object recognition. Designed with spaceflight in mind, it addresses: Ease of integration (minimal external dependencies) Fast, real-time operation using integer arithmetic where possible (useful for platforms lacking a dedicated floatingpoint processor) Written entirely in C (easily modified) Mostly static memory allocation 8-bit image data The basic goal of the FIIAT library is to compute meaningful numerical descriptors for images or rectangular image regions. These n-vectors can then be used directly for novelty detection or pattern recognition, or as a feature space for higher-level pattern recognition tasks. The library provides routines for leveraging training data to derive descriptors that are most useful for a specific data set. Its runtime algorithms exploit a structure known as the "integral image." This is a caching method that permits fast summation of values within rectangular regions of an image. This integral frame facilitates a wide range of fast image-processing functions. This toolkit has applicability to a wide range of autonomous image analysis tasks in the space-flight domain, including novelty detection, object and scene classification, target detection for autonomous instrument placement, and science analysis of geomorphology. It makes real-time texture and pattern recognition possible for platforms with severe computational restraints. The software provides an order of magnitude speed increase over alternative software libraries currently in use by the research community. FIIAT can commercially support intelligent video cameras used in intelligent surveillance. It is also useful for object recognition by robots or other autonomous vehicles

  14. Insulin resistance and risk of incident cardiovascular events in adults without diabetes: meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin B Gast

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucose, insulin and Homeostasis Model Assessment Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR are markers of insulin resistance. The objective of this study is to compare fasting glucose, fasting insulin concentrations and HOMA-IR in strength of association with incident cardiovascular disease. METHODS: We searched the PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, ScienceDirect and Cochrane Library databases from inception to March, 2011, and screened reference lists. Cohort studies or nested case-control studies that investigated the association between fasting glucose, fasting insulin or HOMA-IR and incident cardiovascular disease, were eligible. Two investigators independently performed the article selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment. Cardiovascular endpoints were coronary heart disease (CHD, stroke or combined cardiovascular disease. We used fixed and random-effect meta-analyses to calculate the pooled relative risk for CHD, stroke and combined cardiovascular disease, comparing high to low concentrations of glucose, insulin or HOMA-IR. Study heterogeneity was calculated with the I(2 statistic. To enable a comparison between cardiovascular disease risks for glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR, we calculated pooled relative risks per increase of one standard deviation. RESULTS: We included 65 studies (involving 516,325 participants in this meta-analysis. In a random-effect meta-analysis the pooled relative risk of CHD (95% CI; I(2 comparing high to low concentrations was 1.52 (1.31, 1.76; 62.4% for glucose, 1.12 (0.92, 1.37; 41.0% for insulin and 1.64 (1.35, 2.00; 0% for HOMA-IR. The pooled relative risk of CHD per one standard deviation increase was 1.21 (1.13, 1.30; 64.9% for glucose, 1.04 (0.96, 1.12; 43.0% for insulin and 1.46 (1.26, 1.69; 0.0% for HOMA-IR. CONCLUSIONS: The relative risk of cardiovascular disease was higher for an increase of one standard deviation in HOMA-IR compared to an increase of one standard deviation in fasting

  15. Effect of Papillary Muscles and Trabeculae on Left Ventricular Measurement Using Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the influence of papillary muscles and trabeculae on left ventricular (LV) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) analysis using three methods of cavity delineation (classic or modified inclusion methods, and the exclusion method) in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This retrospective study included 20 consecutive HCM patients who underwent 1.5-T CMR imaging with short-axis cine stacks of the entire LV. LV measurements were performed using three different methods of manual cavity delineation of the endocardial and epicardial contours: method A, presumed endocardial boundary as seen on short-axis cine images; method B, including solely the cavity and closely adjacent trabeculae; or method C, excluding papillary muscles and trabeculae. Ascending aorta forward flow was measured as reference for LV-stroke volume (SV). Interobserver reproducibility was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients. Method A showed larger end-diastole and end-systole volumes (largest percentage differences of 25% and 68%, respectively, p < 0.05), compared with method C. The ejection fraction was 55.7 ± 6.9% for method A, 68.6 ± 8.4% for B, and 71.7 ± 7.0% for C (p < 0.001). Mean mass was also significantly different: 164.6 ± 47.4 g for A, 176.5 ± 50.5 g for B, and 199.6 ± 53.2 g for C (p < 0.001). LV-SV error was largest with method B (p < 0.001). No difference in interobserver agreement was observed (p > 0.05). In HCM patients, LV measurements are strikingly different dependent on whether papillary muscles and trabeculae are included or excluded. Therefore, a consistent method of LV cavity delineation may be crucial during longitudinal follow-up to avoid misinterpretation and erroneous clinical decision-making

  16. Effect of Papillary Muscles and Trabeculae on Left Ventricular Measurement Using Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal [Department of Radiology, Cardiovascular Division, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung-Kwan [Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Wook [Department of Radiology, Cardiovascular Division, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the influence of papillary muscles and trabeculae on left ventricular (LV) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) analysis using three methods of cavity delineation (classic or modified inclusion methods, and the exclusion method) in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This retrospective study included 20 consecutive HCM patients who underwent 1.5-T CMR imaging with short-axis cine stacks of the entire LV. LV measurements were performed using three different methods of manual cavity delineation of the endocardial and epicardial contours: method A, presumed endocardial boundary as seen on short-axis cine images; method B, including solely the cavity and closely adjacent trabeculae; or method C, excluding papillary muscles and trabeculae. Ascending aorta forward flow was measured as reference for LV-stroke volume (SV). Interobserver reproducibility was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients. Method A showed larger end-diastole and end-systole volumes (largest percentage differences of 25% and 68%, respectively, p < 0.05), compared with method C. The ejection fraction was 55.7 ± 6.9% for method A, 68.6 ± 8.4% for B, and 71.7 ± 7.0% for C (p < 0.001). Mean mass was also significantly different: 164.6 ± 47.4 g for A, 176.5 ± 50.5 g for B, and 199.6 ± 53.2 g for C (p < 0.001). LV-SV error was largest with method B (p < 0.001). No difference in interobserver agreement was observed (p > 0.05). In HCM patients, LV measurements are strikingly different dependent on whether papillary muscles and trabeculae are included or excluded. Therefore, a consistent method of LV cavity delineation may be crucial during longitudinal follow-up to avoid misinterpretation and erroneous clinical decision-making.

  17. Linear Feedback Analysis of Cardiovascular System using Seismocardiogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Jiřina

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with an analysis of relationship between heart rate described by a sequence of cardiac interbeat intervals and mechanical activity of heart represented by a sequence of systolic forces. Both the quantities were determined from seismocardiograms recorded from healthy subjects under two different experimental conditions. The method of the linear feedback baroreflex approach originally developed in [1], [2] and [3] was applied for the analysis. Different character of obtained results in comparison to those described in [1], [2] or [3], is explained by differences between frequency properties of the recorded sequences of the systolic forces and values of systolic blood pressure.

  18. a Multivariate Image Analysis Toolbox

    OpenAIRE

    Hagen, Reidar Strand

    2005-01-01

    The toolkit has been implemented as planned: The ground work for visualisation mappings and relationships between datasets have been finished. Wavelet transforms have been to compress datasets in order to reduce computational time. Principal Component Analysis and other transforms are working. Examples of use have been provided, and several ways of visualizing them have been provided. Multivariate Image Analysis is viable on regular Workstations.

  19. Cardiac remodeling following percutaneous mitral valve repair. Initial results assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radunski, U.K [University Heart Center, Hamburg (Germany). Cardiology; Franzen, O. [Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark). Cardiology; Barmeyer, A. [Klinikum Dortmund (Germany). Kardiologie; and others

    2014-10-15

    Percutaneous mitral valve repair with the MitraClip device (Abbott Vascular, Redwood City, California, USA) is a novel therapeutic option in patients with mitral regurgitation. This study evaluated the feasibility of cardiac volume measurements by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) to assess reverse myocardial remodeling in patients after MitraClip implantation. 12 patients underwent CMR at baseline (BL) before and at 6 months follow-up (FU) after MitraClip implantation. Cine-CMR was performed in short- and long-axes for the assessment of left ventricular (LV), right ventricular (RV) and left atrial (LA) volumes. Assessment of endocardial contours was not compromised by the device-related artifact. No significant differences in observer variances were observed for LV, RV and LA volume measurements between BL and FU. LV end-diastolic (median 127 [IQR 96-150] vs. 112 [86-150] ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.03) and LV end-systolic (82 [54-91] vs. 69 [48-99] ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.03) volume indices decreased significantly from BL to FU. No significant differences were found for RV end-diastolic (94 [75-103] vs. 99 [77-123] ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.91), RV end-systolic (48 [42-80] vs. 51 [40-81] ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.48), and LA (87 [55-124] vs. 92 [48-137]R ml/m{sup 2}; p=0.20) volume indices between BL and FU. CMR enables the assessment of cardiac volumes in patients after MitraClip implantation. Our CMR findings indicate that percutaneous mitral valve repair results in reverse LV but not in RV or LA remodeling.

  20. Document image analysis: A primer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rangachar Kasturi; Lawrence O’Gorman; Venu Govindaraju

    2002-02-01

    Document image analysis refers to algorithms and techniques that are applied to images of documents to obtain a computer-readable description from pixel data. A well-known document image analysis product is the Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software that recognizes characters in a scanned document. OCR makes it possible for the user to edit or search the document’s contents. In this paper we briefly describe various components of a document analysis system. Many of these basic building blocks are found in most document analysis systems, irrespective of the particular domain or language to which they are applied. We hope that this paper will help the reader by providing the background necessary to understand the detailed descriptions of specific techniques presented in other papers in this issue.

  1. Pocket pumped image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotov, I.V., E-mail: kotov@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); O' Connor, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Murray, N. [Centre for Electronic Imaging, Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The pocket pumping technique is used to detect small electron trap sites. These traps, if present, degrade CCD charge transfer efficiency. To reveal traps in the active area, a CCD is illuminated with a flat field and, before image is read out, accumulated charges are moved back and forth number of times in parallel direction. As charges are moved over a trap, an electron is removed from the original pocket and re-emitted in the following pocket. As process repeats one pocket gets depleted and the neighboring pocket gets excess of charges. As a result a “dipole” signal appears on the otherwise flat background level. The amplitude of the dipole signal depends on the trap pumping efficiency. This paper is focused on trap identification technique and particularly on new methods developed for this purpose. The sensor with bad segments was deliberately chosen for algorithms development and to demonstrate sensitivity and power of new methods in uncovering sensor defects.

  2. Ultra-Wideband Sensors for Improved Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cardiovascular Monitoring and Tumour Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Seifert

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The specific advantages of ultra-wideband electromagnetic remote sensing (UWB radar make it a particularly attractive technique for biomedical applications. We partially review our activities in utilizing this novel approach for the benefit of high and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and other applications, e.g., for intensive care medicine and biomedical research. We could show that our approach is beneficial for applications like motion tracking for high resolution brain imaging due to the non-contact acquisition of involuntary head motions with high spatial resolution, navigation for cardiac MRI due to our interpretation of the detected physiological mechanical contraction of the heart muscle and for MR safety, since we have investigated the influence of high static magnetic fields on myocardial mechanics. From our findings we could conclude, that UWB radar can serve as a navigator technique for high and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging and can be beneficial preserving the high resolution capability of this imaging modality. Furthermore it can potentially be used to support standard ECG analysis by complementary information where sole ECG analysis fails. Further analytical investigations have proven the feasibility of this method for intracranial displacements detection and the rendition of a tumour’s contrast agent based perfusion dynamic. Beside these analytical approaches we have carried out FDTD simulations of a complex arrangement mimicking the illumination of a human torso model incorporating the geometry of the antennas applied.

  3. Imaging spectroscopy for scene analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Robles-Kelly, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This book presents a detailed analysis of spectral imaging, describing how it can be used for the purposes of material identification, object recognition and scene understanding. The opportunities and challenges of combining spatial and spectral information are explored in depth, as are a wide range of applications. Features: discusses spectral image acquisition by hyperspectral cameras, and the process of spectral image formation; examines models of surface reflectance, the recovery of photometric invariants, and the estimation of the illuminant power spectrum from spectral imagery; describes

  4. Multispectral Imaging Broadens Cellular Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Amnis Corporation, a Seattle-based biotechnology company, developed ImageStream to produce sensitive fluorescence images of cells in flow. The company responded to an SBIR solicitation from Ames Research Center, and proposed to evaluate several methods of extending the depth of field for its ImageStream system and implement the best as an upgrade to its commercial products. This would allow users to view whole cells at the same time, rather than just one section of each cell. Through Phase I and II SBIR contracts, Ames provided Amnis the funding the company needed to develop this extended functionality. For NASA, the resulting high-speed image flow cytometry process made its way into Medusa, a life-detection instrument built to collect, store, and analyze sample organisms from erupting hydrothermal vents, and has the potential to benefit space flight health monitoring. On the commercial end, Amnis has implemented the process in ImageStream, combining high-resolution microscopy and flow cytometry in a single instrument, giving researchers the power to conduct quantitative analyses of individual cells and cell populations at the same time, in the same experiment. ImageStream is also built for many other applications, including cell signaling and pathway analysis; classification and characterization of peripheral blood mononuclear cell populations; quantitative morphology; apoptosis (cell death) assays; gene expression analysis; analysis of cell conjugates; molecular distribution; and receptor mapping and distribution.

  5. Association between osteoarthritis and cardiovascular disease: systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Andrew J.; STUBBS, Brendon; Mamas, Mamas A.; Myint, Phyo K; Smith, Toby O.

    2016-01-01

    Background: To examine for a possible relationship between osteoarthritis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Design: A systematic review and meta-analysis Methods: Published and unpublished literature from: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, OpenGrey and clinical trial registers. Search to 22nd November 2014. Cohort, case-control, randomised and non-randomised controlled trial papers reporting the prevalence of CVD in osteoarthritis were included. Results: Fifteen studies with 32,2...

  6. Leucocyte telomere length and risk of cardiovascular disease: systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Haycock, Philip C; Heydon, Emma E.; Kaptoge, Stephen; Butterworth, Adam S.; Thompson, Alex; Willeit, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between leucocyte telomere length and risk of cardiovascular disease. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Studies published up to March 2014 identified through searches of Medline, Web of Science, and Embase. Eligibility criteria Prospective and retrospective studies that reported on associations between leucocyte telomere length and coronary heart disease (defined as non-fatal myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease death, or cor...

  7. The association of hypertriglyceridemia with cardiovascular events and pancreatitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Murad M Hassan; Hazem Ahmad; Coto-Yglesias Fernando; Dzyubak Svitlana; Gupta Shabnum; Bancos Irina; Lane Melanie A; Erwin Patricia J; Berglund Lars; Elraiyah Tarig; Montori Victor M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Hypertriglyceridemia may be associated with important complications. The aim of this study is to estimate the magnitude of association and quality of supporting evidence linking hypertriglyceridemia to cardiovascular events and pancreatitis. Methods We conducted a systematic review of multiple electronic bibliographic databases and subsequent meta-analysis using a random effects model. Studies eligible for this review followed patients longitudinally and evaluated quantita...

  8. Garlic powder intake and cardiovascular risk factors: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Jin Sook; Kim, Ji Yeon; Paek, Ju Eun; Lee, You Jin; Kim, Haeng-Ran; Park, Dong-Sik; Kwon, Oran

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Although preclinical studies suggest that garlic has potential preventive effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, clinical trials and reports from systematic reviews or meta-analyses present inconsistent results. The contradiction might be attributed to variations in the manufacturing process that can markedly influence the composition of garlic products. To investigate this issue further, we performed a meta-analysis of the effects of garlic powder on CVD ...

  9. Quantitative histogram analysis of images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holub, Oliver; Ferreira, Sérgio T.

    2006-11-01

    A routine for histogram analysis of images has been written in the object-oriented, graphical development environment LabVIEW. The program converts an RGB bitmap image into an intensity-linear greyscale image according to selectable conversion coefficients. This greyscale image is subsequently analysed by plots of the intensity histogram and probability distribution of brightness, and by calculation of various parameters, including average brightness, standard deviation, variance, minimal and maximal brightness, mode, skewness and kurtosis of the histogram and the median of the probability distribution. The program allows interactive selection of specific regions of interest (ROI) in the image and definition of lower and upper threshold levels (e.g., to permit the removal of a constant background signal). The results of the analysis of multiple images can be conveniently saved and exported for plotting in other programs, which allows fast analysis of relatively large sets of image data. The program file accompanies this manuscript together with a detailed description of two application examples: The analysis of fluorescence microscopy images, specifically of tau-immunofluorescence in primary cultures of rat cortical and hippocampal neurons, and the quantification of protein bands by Western-blot. The possibilities and limitations of this kind of analysis are discussed. Program summaryTitle of program: HAWGC Catalogue identifier: ADXG_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXG_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computers: Mobile Intel Pentium III, AMD Duron Installations: No installation necessary—Executable file together with necessary files for LabVIEW Run-time engine Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested: WindowsME/2000/XP Programming language used: LabVIEW 7.0 Memory required to execute with typical data:˜16MB for starting and ˜160MB used for

  10. On the Subjective Acceptance during Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 7.0 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klix, Sabrina; Els, Antje; Paul, Katharina; Graessl, Andreas; Oezerdem, Celal; Weinberger, Oliver; Winter, Lukas; Thalhammer, Christof; Huelnhagen, Till; Rieger, Jan; Mehling, Heidrun; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study examines the subjective acceptance during UHF-CMR in a cohort of healthy volunteers who underwent a cardiac MR examination at 7.0T. Methods Within a period of two-and-a-half years (January 2012 to June 2014) a total of 165 healthy volunteers (41 female, 124 male) without any known history of cardiac disease underwent UHF-CMR. For the assessment of the subjective acceptance a questionnaire was used to examine the participants experience prior, during and after the UHF-CMR examination. For this purpose, subjects were asked to respond to the questionnaire in an exit interview held immediately after the completion of the UHF-CMR examination under supervision of a study nurse to ensure accurate understanding of the questions. All questions were answered with “yes” or “no” including space for additional comments. Results Transient muscular contraction was documented in 12.7% of the questionnaires. Muscular contraction was reported to occur only during periods of scanning with the magnetic field gradients being rapidly switched. Dizziness during the study was reported by 12.7% of the subjects. Taste of metal was reported by 10.1% of the study population. Light flashes were reported by 3.6% of the entire cohort. 13% of the subjects reported side effects/observations which were not explicitly listed in the questionnaire but covered by the question about other side effects. No severe side effects as vomiting or syncope after scanning occurred. No increase in heart rate was observed during the UHF-CMR exam versus the baseline clinical examination. Conclusions This study adds to the literature by detailing the subjective acceptance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging examinations at a magnetic field strength of 7.0T. Cardiac MR examinations at 7.0T are well tolerated by healthy subjects. Broader observational and multi-center studies including patient cohorts with cardiac diseases are required to gain further insights into the subjective

  11. Image fusion for art analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zitová, Barbara; Beneš, Miroslav; Blažek, Jan

    Bellingham: SPIE, 2011 - (Stork D. G., Coddington J., Bentkowska-Kafel A.), s. 786908-1-786908-9 ISBN 978-0-8194-8406-2. ISSN 0277-786X. [IS&T/SPIE Electronic Imaging. San Francisco Airport (US), 23.01.2011-27.01.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/08/1593; GA MŠk 1M0572 Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR(CZ) M100750901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : image fusion * visualization * art analysis Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/ZOI/zitova-image fusion for art analysis.pdf

  12. Introduction to Medical Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    This book is a result of a collaboration between DTU Informatics at the Technical University of Denmark and the Laboratory of Computer Vision and Media Technology at Aalborg University. It is partly based on the book ”Image and Video Processing”, second edition by Thomas Moeslund. The aim of the...... book is to present the fascinating world of medical image analysis in an easy and interesting way. Compared to many standard books on image analysis, the approach we have chosen is less mathematical and more casual. Some of the key algorithms are exemplified in C-code. Please note that the code is...... neither optimal nor complete and merely serves as an additional input for comprehending the algorithms. It is no secret that this book is written by two authors. The keen reader will therefore note changes in style and language throughout the text....

  13. Signal and image multiresolution analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ouahabi, Abdelialil

    2012-01-01

    Multiresolution analysis using the wavelet transform has received considerable attention in recent years by researchers in various fields. It is a powerful tool for efficiently representing signals and images at multiple levels of detail with many inherent advantages, including compression, level-of-detail display, progressive transmission, level-of-detail editing, filtering, modeling, fractals and multifractals, etc.This book aims to provide a simple formalization and new clarity on multiresolution analysis, rendering accessible obscure techniques, and merging, unifying or completing

  14. Space-Time Analysis to Identify Areas at Risk of Mortality from Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliany C. O. Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at identifying areas that were at risk of mortality due to cardiovascular disease in residents aged 45 years or older of the cities of Cuiabá and Várzea Grande between 2009 and 2011. We conducted an ecological study of mortality rates related to cardiovascular disease. Mortality rates were calculated for each census tract by the Local Empirical Bayes estimator. High- and low-risk clusters were identified by retrospective space-time scans for each year using the Poisson probability model. We defined the year and month as the temporal analysis unit and the census tracts as the spatial analysis units adjusted by age and sex. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the socioeconomic and environmental variables by risk classification. High-risk clusters showed higher income ratios than low-risk clusters, as did temperature range and atmospheric particulate matter. Low-risk clusters showed higher humidity than high-risk clusters. The Eastern region of Várzea Grande and the central region of Cuiabá were identified as areas at risk of mortality due to cardiovascular disease in individuals aged 45 years or older. High mortality risk was associated with socioeconomic and environmental factors. More high-risk clusters were observed at the end of the dry season.

  15. Teaching image analysis at DIKU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The early development of computer vision at Department of Computer Science at University of Copenhagen (DIKU) is briefly described. The different disciplines in computer vision are introduced, and the principles for teaching two courses, an image analysis course, and a robot lab class are outlined....

  16. Statistical Analysis of Risk Factors for Cardiovascular disease in Malakand Division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salahud Din

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have been conducted to investigate the incidence of cardiovascular disease and to determine the possible risk factors for the disease. In this study, a Statistical method of odds ratio analysis was performed to look at the association of one of the type of cardiovascular disease known as myocardial infarction with various risk factors such as diabetes, cholesterol, hypertension, sex, smoking, obesity, family history and age in Malakand division. A total of 700 patients were examined and their personal and medical data were collected. For each patient, the phenomenon of myocardial infarction was studied in relation to different risk factors. The analyses suggest that hypertension, smoking, diabetes, cholesterol level and family history were important risk factors for the occurrence of myocardial infarction.

  17. Imaging focal and interstitial fibrosis with cardiovascular magnetic resonance in athletes with left ventricular hypertrophy: implications for sporting participation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Waterhouse, Deirdre F

    2012-11-01

    Long-term high-intensity physical activity is associated with morphological changes, termed as the \\'athlete\\'s heart\\'. The differentiation of physiological cardiac adaptive changes in response to high-level exercise from pathological changes consistent with an inherited cardiomyopathy is imperative. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging allows definition of abnormal processes occurring at the tissue level, including, importantly, myocardial fibrosis. It is therefore vital in accurately making this differentiation. In this review, we will review the role of CMR imaging of fibrosis, and detail CMR characterisation of myocardial fibrosis in various cardiomyopathies, and the implications of fibrosis. Additionally, we will outline advances in imaging fibrosis, in particular T1 mapping. Finally we will address the role of CMR in pre-participation screening.

  18. Bayesian network modeling: A case study of an epidemiologic system analysis of cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster-Parra, P; Tauler, P; Bennasar-Veny, M; Ligęza, A; López-González, A A; Aguiló, A

    2016-04-01

    An extensive, in-depth study of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) seems to be of crucial importance in the research of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in order to prevent (or reduce) the chance of developing or dying from CVD. The main focus of data analysis is on the use of models able to discover and understand the relationships between different CVRF. In this paper a report on applying Bayesian network (BN) modeling to discover the relationships among thirteen relevant epidemiological features of heart age domain in order to analyze cardiovascular lost years (CVLY), cardiovascular risk score (CVRS), and metabolic syndrome (MetS) is presented. Furthermore, the induced BN was used to make inference taking into account three reasoning patterns: causal reasoning, evidential reasoning, and intercausal reasoning. Application of BN tools has led to discovery of several direct and indirect relationships between different CVRF. The BN analysis showed several interesting results, among them: CVLY was highly influenced by smoking being the group of men the one with highest risk in CVLY; MetS was highly influence by physical activity (PA) being again the group of men the one with highest risk in MetS, and smoking did not show any influence. BNs produce an intuitive, transparent, graphical representation of the relationships between different CVRF. The ability of BNs to predict new scenarios when hypothetical information is introduced makes BN modeling an Artificial Intelligence (AI) tool of special interest in epidemiological studies. As CVD is multifactorial the use of BNs seems to be an adequate modeling tool. PMID:26777431

  19. Evaluation of radiolabelled annexin A5 for scintigraphic imaging of cell processes (necrosis/apoptosis) in cardiovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annexin A5, a 35KDa protein, specifically binds with high affinity to phosphatidylserine (P.S.) which is actively redistributed to the external leaflet of plasmic membranes in apoptotic cells and activated platelets. Annexin A5 radiolabelled with 99mTc(99mTc-ANX5) was developed by Strauss (stanford, Usa) to image apoptosis in vivo: tumours cells apoptosis induced by chemo-radiotherapy, ischemia/reperfusion lesions in animals and patients, graft rejection. Additionally, many in vitro data suggest that annexin A5 also stains necrosis (membrane disruption), which occurs in all types of cell death. This preclinical work aimed to evaluate the potential interest of 99mTc-ANX5 imaging as a clinical tool in cardiovascular diseases. Four studies performed in rat models of myocardial infarction by coronary ligation and ischemia-reperfusion, and in rat models of subacute and acute (isoproterenol-induced) myocarditis show the ability of 99mTc-ANX5 to detect in vivo cardio myocytes death by apoptosis and necrosis. Another study demonstrates that 99mTc-ANX5 is highly accurate to evaluate in vivo the biological activity of parietal thrombus in a rat model of elastase-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm. These results suggest that 99mTc-ANX5 imaging could be used in patients for non invasive diagnosis, prognostic evaluation in acute myocarditis and in various thrombotic cardiovascular diseases. (author)

  20. Cardiovascular risk assessment in the treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: a secondary analysis of the MOZART trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Steven C.; Ang, Brandon; Hernandez, Carolyn; Bettencourt, Ricki; Jain, Rashmi; Salotti, Joanie; Richards, Lisa; Kono, Yuko; Bhatt, Archana; Aryafar, Hamed; Lin, Grace Y.; Valasek, Mark A.; Sirlin, Claude B.; Brouha, Sharon; Loomba, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk and mortality. No US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved therapies for NASH are available; clinical trials to date have not yet systematically assessed for changes in cardiovascular risk. This study examines the prospective utility of cardiovascular risk assessments, the Framingham risk score (FRS) and coronary artery calcium (CAC) score, as endpoints in a NASH randomized clinical trial, and assesses whether histologic improvements lead to lower cardiovascular risk. Methods: Secondary analysis of a 24-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (MOZART) in which 50 biopsy-proven NASH patients received oral ezetimibe 10 mg daily (n = 25) versus placebo (n = 25). Biochemical profiling, FRS, CAC scores, liver biopsies were obtained at baseline and endpoint. Results: Ezetimibe improved FRS whereas placebo did not (4.4 ± 6.2 to 2.9 ± 4.8, p = 0.038; 3.0 ± 4.4 to 2.9 ± 4.2, p = 0.794). CAC scores did not change with ezetimibe or placebo (180.4 ± 577.2 to 194.1 ± 623.9, p = 0.293; 151.4 ± 448.9 to 183.3 ± 555.7, p = 0.256). Ezetimibe improved FRS and CAC scores in more patients than placebo (48% versus 23%, p = 0.079, and 21% versus 0%, p = 0.090, respectively), though not significantly. No differences were noted in cardiovascular risk scores among histologic responders versus nonresponders. Conclusions: Ezetimibe improved FRS whereas placebo did not. FRS and CAC scores improved in a greater proportion of patients with ezetimibe; this trend did not reach significance. These findings indicate the utility and feasibility of monitoring cardiovascular risk in a NASH trial. The utility of CAC scores may be higher in trials of longer duration (⩾52 weeks) and with older patients (age ⩾45). ClinicalTrials.gov registration: NCT01766713. PMID:26929777

  1. Assessment of radiation dose in nuclear cardiovascular imaging using realistic computational models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Tianwu; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E.; Zaidi, Habib

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Nuclear cardiology plays an important role in clinical assessment and has enormous impact on the management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Pediatric patients at different age groups are exposed to a spectrum of radiation dose levels and associated cancer risks different from those

  2. Use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging for TAVR assessment in patients with bioprosthetic aortic valves: Comparison with computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quail, Michael A., E-mail: m.quail@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Nordmeyer, Johannes [Department of Congenital Heart Disease and Paediatric Cardiology, Deutsches Herzzentrum Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Schievano, Silvia [Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Reinthaler, Markus; Mullen, Michael J. [The Heart Hospital, University College Hospital and Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, UCL, 16-18 Westmoreland Street, London (United Kingdom); Taylor, Andrew M. [Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been successfully used to treat patients with failing aortic bioprostheses. Computed tomography (CT) is the usual method of pre-procedural imaging for TAVR in the native position; however, the optimal modality for valve-in-valve procedures has not been established. CT can assess intracardiac anatomy and is superior to cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in the assessment of coronary artery disease. However, CMR can provide superior haemodynamic information, does not carry the risk of ionising radiation, and may be performed without contrast in patients with renal insufficiency. In this study, we compared CT and CMR for the evaluation of TAVR in a small cohort of patients with existing aortic bioprostheses. Materials and methods: 21 patients with aortic bioprostheses were prospectively evaluated by CT and CMR, as pre-assessment for TAVR; agreement between measurements of aortic geometries was assessed. Results: 16/21 patients had aortic bioprostheses constructed with a metal ring, and 5/21 patients had a metal strut construction. Patients with metal struts had significant metal-artefact on CMR, which compromised image quality in this region. There was good agreement between CT and CMR measurements of aortic geometry. The mean difference (d) in annulus area-derived diameter was 0.5 mm (95% limits of agreement [L.A] 4.2 mm). There was good agreement between modalities for the cross-sectional area of the sinuses of valsalva (d 0.5 cm{sup 2}, L.A 1.4 cm{sup 2}), sinotubular junction (d 0.9 cm{sup 2}, L.A 1.5 cm{sup 2}), and ascending aorta (d 0.6 cm{sup 2}, L.A 1.4 cm{sup 2}). In patients without metal struts, the left coronary artery height d was 0.7 mm and L.A 2.8 mm. Conclusions: Our analysis shows that CMR and CT measurements of aortic geometry show good agreement, including measurement of annulus size and coronary artery location, and thus provide the necessary anatomical information for valve

  3. Use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging for TAVR assessment in patients with bioprosthetic aortic valves: Comparison with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been successfully used to treat patients with failing aortic bioprostheses. Computed tomography (CT) is the usual method of pre-procedural imaging for TAVR in the native position; however, the optimal modality for valve-in-valve procedures has not been established. CT can assess intracardiac anatomy and is superior to cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in the assessment of coronary artery disease. However, CMR can provide superior haemodynamic information, does not carry the risk of ionising radiation, and may be performed without contrast in patients with renal insufficiency. In this study, we compared CT and CMR for the evaluation of TAVR in a small cohort of patients with existing aortic bioprostheses. Materials and methods: 21 patients with aortic bioprostheses were prospectively evaluated by CT and CMR, as pre-assessment for TAVR; agreement between measurements of aortic geometries was assessed. Results: 16/21 patients had aortic bioprostheses constructed with a metal ring, and 5/21 patients had a metal strut construction. Patients with metal struts had significant metal-artefact on CMR, which compromised image quality in this region. There was good agreement between CT and CMR measurements of aortic geometry. The mean difference (d) in annulus area-derived diameter was 0.5 mm (95% limits of agreement [L.A] 4.2 mm). There was good agreement between modalities for the cross-sectional area of the sinuses of valsalva (d 0.5 cm2, L.A 1.4 cm2), sinotubular junction (d 0.9 cm2, L.A 1.5 cm2), and ascending aorta (d 0.6 cm2, L.A 1.4 cm2). In patients without metal struts, the left coronary artery height d was 0.7 mm and L.A 2.8 mm. Conclusions: Our analysis shows that CMR and CT measurements of aortic geometry show good agreement, including measurement of annulus size and coronary artery location, and thus provide the necessary anatomical information for valve-in-valve TAVR planning. However, in patients

  4. Both cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular comorbidity are related to health status in well-controlled type 2 diabetes patients: a cross-sectional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wermeling Paulien R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes patients have a decreased health-related quality of life compared to healthy persons, especially regarding physical functioning and well-being. Health-related quality of life is even lower in type 2 diabetes patients when other diseases co-exist. In contrast to earlier studies, we assessed the associations between the number and type of comorbidities and health status in well-controlled type 2 diabetes patients, in whom treatment goals for HbA1c, blood pressure and cholesterol had been reached. Approximately one in five type 2 diabetes patients belongs to this group. Methods Cross-sectional analysis was performed in 2086 well-controlled (HbA1c ≤58 mmol/mol, systolic blood pressure ≤145 mmHg, total cholesterol ≤5.2 mmol/l and not using insulin type 2 diabetes patients in general practice. Both number and type (cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular of comorbidities were determined for each patient. Health status was assessed with the questionnaires Short Form-36 (SF-36 and EuroQol (EQ. The SF-36 generates eight dimensions of health and a Physical and Mental Component Score (PCS and MCS, scale: 0–100. The EQ consists of two parts: EQ-5D and EQ Visual Analogue Scale. Multivariable linear regression analysis was used to assess if number and type of comorbidities were associated with health status. Results Well-controlled type 2 diabetes patients with comorbidities had a much lower health status, with a decrease ranging from -1.5 for the MCS to -26.3 for role limitations due to physical problems, compared to those without. Health status decreased when the number of comorbidities increased, except for mental health, role limitations due to emotional problems, MCS and both EQ measures. In patients with both cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular comorbidity, physical functioning, role limitations due to physical problems and PCS were significantly lower than in patients with only cardiovascular comorbidity

  5. Astronomical Image and Data Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Starck, J.-L

    2006-01-01

    With information and scale as central themes, this comprehensive survey explains how to handle real problems in astronomical data analysis using a modern arsenal of powerful techniques. It treats those innovative methods of image, signal, and data processing that are proving to be both effective and widely relevant. The authors are leaders in this rapidly developing field and draw upon decades of experience. They have been playing leading roles in international projects such as the Virtual Observatory and the Grid. The book addresses not only students and professional astronomers and astrophysicists, but also serious amateur astronomers and specialists in earth observation, medical imaging, and data mining. The coverage includes chapters or appendices on: detection and filtering; image compression; multichannel, multiscale, and catalog data analytical methods; wavelets transforms, Picard iteration, and software tools. This second edition of Starck and Murtagh's highly appreciated reference again deals with to...

  6. Target identification by image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetz, V; Prochnow, H; Brönstrup, M; Sasse, F

    2016-05-01

    Covering: 1997 to the end of 2015Each biologically active compound induces phenotypic changes in target cells that are characteristic for its mode of action. These phenotypic alterations can be directly observed under the microscope or made visible by labelling structural elements or selected proteins of the cells with dyes. A comparison of the cellular phenotype induced by a compound of interest with the phenotypes of reference compounds with known cellular targets allows predicting its mode of action. While this approach has been successfully applied to the characterization of natural products based on a visual inspection of images, recent studies used automated microscopy and analysis software to increase speed and to reduce subjective interpretation. In this review, we give a general outline of the workflow for manual and automated image analysis, and we highlight natural products whose bacterial and eucaryotic targets could be identified through such approaches. PMID:26777141

  7. Image Analysis and Multiphase Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, E. C.; Mota, M.; Pons, M.N.

    2001-01-01

    The applications of visualisation and image analysis to bioreactors can be found in two main areas: the characterisation of biomass (fungi, bacteria, yeasts, animal and plant cells, etc), in terms of size, morphology and physiology, that is the far most developed, and the characterisation of the multiphase behaviour of the reactors (flow patterns, velocity fields, bubble size and shape distribution, foaming), that may require sophisticated visualisation techniques.

  8. Doppler-Derived Trigger Signals for High-Frame-Rate Mouse Cardiovascular Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Aristizábal, Orlando; Mamou, Jonathan; Turnbull, Daniel H.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    The availability of an electrocardiogram (ECG) waveform in the adult mouse has permitted the measurement of fast, dynamic cardiac events where data acquisition is synchronized to the R-wave of the ECG waveform. These methods can easily attain one thousand frames/s at ultrasound frequencies greater than 20 MHz. With the heart being the first organ to develop, normal cardiovascular function is crucial to the viability of the developing embryo. Thus, translating such methodologies to analyze emb...

  9. Application of infrared thermal imaging in the study of preventing cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases with Chinese medicine health food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ziru; Zhang, Xusheng

    2009-08-01

    To explore the assessing technique which could objectively reflect the characteristics of Chinese medicine in the prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, four balance features of infrared thermal images (ITI) corresponding to the up and down, left and right, proximal and distal balance of blood circulation of human body were studied. First, the ITI features of the middle-aged and elderly people with lipid abnormality history were compared with those of the healthy youth. It was found that the balance state of the youth was significantly better than that of the middle-aged and elderly, Ppathology basis of the influences of Shengyi on the four balance features and its relationship with the clinical outcome deserves further study. So the prospect of infrared thermal imaging is indicated as the suitable evaluation technique which could objectively reflect the whole balance regulation advantage of Chinese medicinal compounds.

  10. Image Processing and Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starck, Jean-Luc; Murtagh, Fionn D.; Bijaoui, Albert

    1998-07-01

    Powerful techniques have been developed in recent years for the analysis of digital data, especially the manipulation of images. This book provides an in-depth introduction to a range of these innovative, avant-garde data-processing techniques. It develops the reader's understanding of each technique and then shows with practical examples how they can be applied to improve the skills of graduate students and researchers in astronomy, electrical engineering, physics, geophysics and medical imaging. What sets this book apart from others on the subject is the complementary blend of theory and practical application. Throughout, it is copiously illustrated with real-world examples from astronomy, electrical engineering, remote sensing and medicine. It also shows how many, more traditional, methods can be enhanced by incorporating the new wavelet and multiscale methods into the processing. For graduate students and researchers already experienced in image processing and data analysis, this book provides an indispensable guide to a wide range of exciting and original data-analysis techniques.

  11. Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in people with diabetes: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    De Berardis, Giorgia; Sacco, Michele; Strippoli, Giovanni F.M.; Pellegrini, Fabio; Graziano, Giusi; Tognoni, Gianni; Nicolucci, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the benefits and harms of low dose aspirin in people with diabetes and no cardiovascular disease. Design Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Data sources Medline (1966-November 2008), the Cochrane central register of controlled trials (Cochrane Library 2008;issue 4), and reference lists of retrieved articles. Review methods Randomised trials of aspirin compared with placebo or no aspirin in people with diabetes and no pre-existing cardiovascular disease were e...

  12. Quantitative multi-image analysis for biomedical Raman spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedegaard, Martin A B; Bergholt, Mads S; Stevens, Molly M

    2016-05-01

    Imaging by Raman spectroscopy enables unparalleled label-free insights into cell and tissue composition at the molecular level. With established approaches limited to single image analysis, there are currently no general guidelines or consensus on how to quantify biochemical components across multiple Raman images. Here, we describe a broadly applicable methodology for the combination of multiple Raman images into a single image for analysis. This is achieved by removing image specific background interference, unfolding the series of Raman images into a single dataset, and normalisation of each Raman spectrum to render comparable Raman images. Multivariate image analysis is finally applied to derive the contributing 'pure' biochemical spectra for relative quantification. We present our methodology using four independently measured Raman images of control cells and four images of cells treated with strontium ions from substituted bioactive glass. We show that the relative biochemical distribution per area of the cells can be quantified. In addition, using k-means clustering, we are able to discriminate between the two cell types over multiple Raman images. This study shows a streamlined quantitative multi-image analysis tool for improving cell/tissue characterisation and opens new avenues in biomedical Raman spectroscopic imaging. PMID:26833935

  13. Mesh Processing in Medical Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The following topics are dealt with: mesh processing; medical image analysis; interactive freeform modeling; statistical shape analysis; clinical CT images; statistical surface recovery; automated segmentation; cerebral aneurysms; and real-time particle-based representation....

  14. Mesh Processing in Medical Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The following topics are dealt with: mesh processing; medical image analysis; interactive freeform modeling; statistical shape analysis; clinical CT images; statistical surface recovery; automated segmentation; cerebral aneurysms; and real-time particle-based representation.......The following topics are dealt with: mesh processing; medical image analysis; interactive freeform modeling; statistical shape analysis; clinical CT images; statistical surface recovery; automated segmentation; cerebral aneurysms; and real-time particle-based representation....

  15. Strengths and Limitations of Current Adult Nomograms for the Aorta Obtained by Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantinotti, Massimiliano; Giordano, Raffaele; Clemente, Alberto; Assanta, Nadia; Murzi, Michele; Murzi, Bruno; Crocetti, Maura; Marotta, Marco; Scalese, Marco; Kutty, Shelby; Iervasi, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    Normalized measurements for the evaluation of aortic disease severity are preferred to the adoption of generic cutoff values. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the strengths and limitations of currently available aortic nomograms by echocardiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A literature search was conducted accessing the National Library of Medicine using the keywords normal values, aorta, echocardiography, CT, and MRI. Addition of these keywords further refined the results: reference values, nomograms, aortic arch, and adults. Thirty studies were included in the final analysis. Despite the strengths noted in the recent investigations, multiple methodological and numerical limitations emerged. The numerical limitations included sample size limitation in most of the studies (only few investigations consisted of >800 subjects and many had 70-300), lack of aortic arch measurements, and paucity of data for non-Caucasian subjects. Methodological limitations consisted of lack of standardization in measurements (systole vs. diastole, internal vs. external border, axial vs. orthogonal planes), heterogeneity and data normalization issues (various age intervals used, body size often not evaluated, data expressed as observed values rather than estimated values by z-score), and study design issues. The designs were mostly retrospective with poorly defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The nomograms presented range of normality with significant differences, but also with some reproducible pattern. Despite recent advances, multiple methodological or numerical limitations exist in adult nomograms for the aorta. Comprehensive nomograms of aortic dimensions at multiple levels including the aortic arch for different imaging techniques, involving a wide sample size, and using standardized methodology for measurements and data normalization are warranted. The availability of robust nomograms may encourage the use of personalized

  16. An analysis of the effects of smoking and other cardiovascular risk factors on obliteration rates after arteriovenous malformation radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the relationships of smoking and other cardiovascular disease risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and gender) to rates of radiosurgery-induced obliteration of arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Methods and Materials: We evaluated follow-up imaging and clinical data in 329 AVM patients who received gamma knife radiosurgery at the University of Pittsburgh between 1987 and 1994. There were 113 smokers, 29 hypertensives, 5 diabetics, 4 hypercholesterolemics, 159 male patients, and 170 female patients. All patients had regular clinical or imaging follow-up for a minimum of 3 years after radiosurgery. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that smoking had no effect on AVM obliteration (p>0.43). Hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia had no discernible effect on AVM obliteration in this study (p>0.78). However, females aged 12-49 had a statistically significant lower in-field obliteration rate than males (78% vs. 89%, p=0.0102). Conclusion: Smoking has no effect on AVM obliteration. Hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia had no discernible effect in this study. Further study is needed to establish whether estrogen has a vascular protective effect that could partially limit radiosurgical AVM obliteration, as suggested by this study

  17. The spectral analysis of photoplethysmography to evaluate an independent cardiovascular risk factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhi PG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pratiksha G Gandhi,1 Gundu HR Rao2 1IPC Heart Care Centre, Mumbai, India; 2University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USABackground: In this study, we evaluate homeostatic markers correlated to autonomic nervous and endothelial functions in a population of coronary artery disease (CAD patients versus a control group. Since CAD is the highest risk marker for sudden cardiac death, the study objective is to determine whether an independent cardiovascular risk score based on these markers can be used alongside known conventional cardiovascular risk markers to strengthen the understanding of a patient's vascular state.Materials and methods: Sixty-five subjects (13 women with a mean age of 62.9 years (range 40–80 years who were diagnosed with CAD using coronary angiography (group 1 and seventy-two subjects (29 women with a mean age of 45.1 years (range 18–85 years who claimed they were healthy (group 2 were included in the study. These subjects underwent examination with the TM-Oxi and SudoPath systems at IPC Heart Care Centers in Mumbai, India. The TM-Oxi system takes measurements from a blood pressure device and a pulse oximeter. The SudoPath measures galvanic skin response to assess the sudomotor pathway function. Spectral analysis of the photoplethysmograph (PTG waveform and electrochemical galvanic skin response allow the TM-Oxi and SudoPath systems to calculate several homeostatic markers, such as the PTG index (PTGi, PTG very low frequency index (PTGVLFi, and PTG ratio (PTGr. The focus of this study was to evaluate these markers (PTGi, PTGVLFi, and PTGr in CAD patients against a control group, and to calculate an independent cardiovascular risk factor score: the PTG cardiovascular disease risk score (PTG CVD, calculated solely from these markers. We compared PTGi, PTGVLFi, PTGr, and PTG CVD scores between the CAD patient group and the healthy control group. Statistical analyses were performed using receiver operating characteristic curves to

  18. Automated image analysis of uterine cervical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjing; Gu, Jia; Ferris, Daron; Poirson, Allen

    2007-03-01

    Cervical Cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide and the leading cause of cancer mortality of women in developing countries. If detected early and treated adequately, cervical cancer can be virtually prevented. Cervical precursor lesions and invasive cancer exhibit certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician with a Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system. In colposcopy, epithelium that turns white after application of acetic acid is called acetowhite epithelium. Acetowhite epithelium is one of the major diagnostic features observed in detecting cancer and pre-cancerous regions. Automatic extraction of acetowhite regions from cervical images has been a challenging task due to specular reflection, various illumination conditions, and most importantly, large intra-patient variation. This paper presents a multi-step acetowhite region detection system to analyze the acetowhite lesions in cervical images automatically. First, the system calibrates the color of the cervical images to be independent of screening devices. Second, the anatomy of the uterine cervix is analyzed in terms of cervix region, external os region, columnar region, and squamous region. Third, the squamous region is further analyzed and subregions based on three levels of acetowhite are identified. The extracted acetowhite regions are accompanied by color scores to indicate the different levels of acetowhite. The system has been evaluated by 40 human subjects' data and demonstrates high correlation with experts' annotations.

  19. Principal component analysis of cardiovascular risk traits in three generations cohort among Indian Punjabi population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badaruddoza

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The current study focused to determine significant cardiovascular risk factors through principal component factor analysis (PCFA among three generations on 1827 individuals in three generations including 911 males (378 from offspring, 439 from parental and 94 from grand-parental generations and 916 females (261 from offspring, 515 from parental and 140 from grandparental generations. The study performed PCFA with orthogonal rotation to reduce 12 inter-correlated variables into groups of independent factors. The factors have been identified as 2 for male grandparents, 3 for male offspring, female parents and female grandparents each, 4 for male parents and 5 for female offspring. This data reduction method identified these factors that explained 72%, 84%, 79%, 69%, 70% and 73% for male and female offspring, male and female parents and male and female grandparents respectively, of the variations in original quantitative traits. The factor 1 accounting for the largest portion of variations was strongly loaded with factors related to obesity (body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, waist to hip ratio (WHR, and thickness of skinfolds among all generations with both sexes, which has been known to be an independent predictor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The second largest components, factor 2 and factor 3 for almost all generations reflected traits of blood pressure phenotypes loaded, however, in male offspring generation it was observed that factor 2 was loaded with blood pressure phenotypes as well as obesity. This study not only confirmed but also extended prior work by developing a cumulative risk scale from factor scores. Till today, such a cumulative and extensive scale has not been used in any Indian studies with individuals of three generations. These findings and study highlight the importance of global approach for assessing the risk and need for studies that elucidate how these different cardiovascular risk factors

  20. The deleterious effects of arteriovenous fistula-creation on the cardiovascular system: a longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dundon BK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Benjamin K Dundon,1–3 Kim Torpey,3 Adam J Nelson,1 Dennis TL Wong,1,2 Rae F Duncan,1 Ian T Meredith,2 Randall J Faull,1,3 Stephen G Worthley,1,4 Matthew I Worthley1,4 1Cardiology Department, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Central Adelaide Local Health Network, Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 2Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, MonashHEART, Monash Health, Melbourne, Vic, Australia; 3Central Northern Renal and Transplantation Service, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Central Adelaide Local Health Network, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 4South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, SA, Australia Aim: Arteriovenous fistula-formation remains critical for the provision of hemodialysis in end-stage renal failure patients. Its creation results in a significant increase in cardiac output, with resultant alterations in cardiac stroke volume, systemic blood flow, and vascular resistance. The impact of fistula-formation on cardiac and vascular structure and function has not yet been evaluated via "gold standard" imaging techniques in the modern era of end-stage renal failure care. Methods: A total of 24 patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease undergoing fistula-creation were studied in a single-arm pilot study. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging was undertaken at baseline, and prior to and 6 months following fistula-creation. This gold standard imaging modality was used to evaluate, via standard brachial flow-mediated techniques, cardiac structure and function, aortic distensibility, and endothelial function. Results: At follow up, left ventricular ejection fraction remained unchanged, while mean cardiac output increased by 25.0% (P<0.0001. Significant increases in left and right ventricular end-systolic volumes (21% [P=0.014] and 18% [P<0.01], left and right atrial area (11% [P<0.01] and 9% [P<0.01], and left ventricular mass were observed (12.7% increase (P<0.01. Endothelial

  1. Two-modality γ detection of blood volume by camera imaging and nonimaging stethoscope for kinetic studies of cardiovascular control in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eclancher, Bernard; Chambron, Jacques; Dumitresco, Barbu; Karman, Miklos; Pszota, Agnes; Simon, Atilla; Didon-Poncelet, Anna; Demangeat, Jean

    2002-04-01

    The quantification of rapid hemodynamic reactions to wide and slow breathing movements has been performed, by two modalities (gamma) -left ventriculography of 99mTc-labeled blood volume, in anterior oblique incidence on standing and even exercising healthy volunteers and cardiac patients. A highly sensitive stethoscope delivered whole (gamma) -counts acquired at 30 msec intervals in a square field of view including the left ventricle, in a one dimensional low resolution imaging mode for beat to beat analysis. A planar 2D (gamma) -camera imaging of the same cardiac area was then performed without cardiac gating for alternate acquisitions during deep inspiration and deep expiration, completed by a 3D MRI assessment of the stethoscope detection field. Young healthy volunteers displayed wide variations of diastolic times and stroke volumes, as a result of enhanced baroreflex control, together with +/- 16% variations of the stethoscope's background blood volume counts. Any of the components of these responses were shifted, abolished or even inverted as a result of either obesity, hypertension, aging or cardiac pathologies. The assessment of breathing control of the cardiovascular system by the beat to beat (gamma) -ventriculography combined with nuclear 2D and 3D MRI imaging is a kinetic method allowing the detection of functional anomalies in still ambulatory patients.

  2. Cardiovascular age of aviation personnel:based on the principal component analysis of heart rate and blood pressure variability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛有国; 王守岩; 张玉海; 王兴邦; 张立藩

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To introduce a method to calculate cardiovascular age, a new, accurate and much simpler index for assessing cardiovascular autonomic regulatory function, based on statistical analysis of heart rate and blood pressure variability (HRV and BPV) and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) data. Methods: Firstly, HRV and BPV of 89 healthy aviation personnel were analyzed by the conventional autoregressive (AR) spectral analysis and their spontaneous BRS was obtained by the sequence method. Secondly, principal component analysis was conducted over original and derived indices of HRV, BPV and BRS data and the relevant principal components, Pciorig and Pcideri (I=1, 2, 3,...) were obtained. Finally, the equation for calculating cardiovascular age was obtained by multiple regression with the chronological age being assigned as the dependent variable and the principal components significantly related to age as the regressors. Results: The first four principal components of original indices accounted for over 90% of total variance of the indices, so did the first three principal components of derived indices. So, these seven principal components could reflect the information of cardiovascular autonomic regulation which was embodied in the 17 indices of HRV, BPV and BRS exactly with a minimal loss of information. Of the seven principal components, PC2orig, PC4orig and PC2deri were negatively correlated with the chronological age (P<0.05), whereas the PC3orig was positively correlated with the chronological age (P<0.01). The cardiovascular age thus calculated from the regression equation was significantly correlated with the chronological age among the 89 aviation personnel (r=0.73, P<0.01). Conclusion: The cardiovascular age calculated based on a multi-variate analysis of HRV, BPV and BRS could be regarded as a comprehensive indicator reflecting the age dependency of autonomic regulation of cardiovascular system in healthy aviation personnel.

  3. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging assessment of diastolic dysfunction in a population without heart disease: a gender-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asymptomatic left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction is increasingly recognised as an important diagnosis. Our goal was to study the prevalence and gender differences in subclinical LV diastolic dysfunction, using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) at 3 T. We prospectively studied 48 volunteers (19 male and 29 female, mean age 49 ± 7 years) with no evidence of cardiovascular disease. We used CMR to measure left atrium (LA) and LV volumes, LV peak filling rate and transmitral flow. The overall prevalence of LV diastolic dysfunction in our cohort varied between 20 % (based on evaluation of LV filing profiles) and 24 % (based on the evaluation of the transmitral flow). The prevalence of diastolic dysfunction was higher in men than in women, independently of the criteria used (P between 0.004 and 0.022). Indexed LV end-diastolic volume, indexed LV stroke volume, indexed LV mass, indexed LA minimum volume and indexed LA maximum volume were significantly greater in men than in women (P < 0.05). All the subjects had LV ejection fractions within the normal range. It is clinically feasible to study diastolic flow and LV filling with CMR. CMR detected diastolic dysfunction in asymptomatic men and women. (orig.)

  4. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging assessment of diastolic dysfunction in a population without heart disease: a gender-based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graca, Bruno; Donato, Paulo; Caseiro-Alves, Filipe [University of Coimbra, Medical Imaging Department, University Centre Hospitals of Coimbra, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); Ferreira, Maria Joao [University of Coimbra, Cardiology Department, University Centre Hospitals of Coimbra, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); Castelo-Branco, Miguel [University of Coimbra, Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal)

    2014-01-15

    Asymptomatic left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction is increasingly recognised as an important diagnosis. Our goal was to study the prevalence and gender differences in subclinical LV diastolic dysfunction, using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) at 3 T. We prospectively studied 48 volunteers (19 male and 29 female, mean age 49 ± 7 years) with no evidence of cardiovascular disease. We used CMR to measure left atrium (LA) and LV volumes, LV peak filling rate and transmitral flow. The overall prevalence of LV diastolic dysfunction in our cohort varied between 20 % (based on evaluation of LV filing profiles) and 24 % (based on the evaluation of the transmitral flow). The prevalence of diastolic dysfunction was higher in men than in women, independently of the criteria used (P between 0.004 and 0.022). Indexed LV end-diastolic volume, indexed LV stroke volume, indexed LV mass, indexed LA minimum volume and indexed LA maximum volume were significantly greater in men than in women (P < 0.05). All the subjects had LV ejection fractions within the normal range. It is clinically feasible to study diastolic flow and LV filling with CMR. CMR detected diastolic dysfunction in asymptomatic men and women. (orig.)

  5. Association between alcohol and cardiovascular disease: Mendelian randomisation analysis based on individual participant data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Michael V; Dale, Caroline E; Zuccolo, Luisa; Silverwood, Richard J; Guo, Yiran; Ye, Zheng; Prieto-Merino, David; Dehghan, Abbas; Trompet, Stella; Wong, Andrew; Cavadino, Alana; Drogan, Dagmar; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Yesupriya, Ajay; Leusink, Maarten; Sundstrom, Johan; Hubacek, Jaroslav A; Pikhart, Hynek; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Panayiotou, Andrie G; Borinskaya, Svetlana A; Finan, Chris; Shah, Sonia; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Folkersen, Lasse; Eriksson, Per; Ricceri, Fulvio; Melander, Olle; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Gamble, Dale M; Rayaprolu, Sruti; Ross, Owen A; McLachlan, Stela; Vikhireva, Olga; Sluijs, Ivonne; Scott, Robert A; Adamkova, Vera; Flicker, Leon; van Bockxmeer, Frank M; Power, Christine; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Meade, Tom; Marmot, Michael G; Ferro, Jose M; Paulos-Pinheiro, Sofia; Humphries, Steve E; Talmud, Philippa J; Leach, Irene Mateo; Verweij, Niek; Linneberg, Allan; Skaaby, Tea; Doevendans, Pieter A; Cramer, Maarten J; van der Harst, Pim; Klungel, Olaf H; Dowling, Nicole F; Dominiczak, Anna F; Kumari, Meena; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Weikert, Cornelia; Boeing, Heiner; Ebrahim, Shah; Gaunt, Tom R; Price, Jackie F; Lannfelt, Lars; Peasey, Anne; Kubinova, Ruzena; Pajak, Andrzej; Malyutina, Sofia; Voevoda, Mikhail I; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H; Norman, Paul E; Hankey, Graeme J; Bergmann, Manuela M; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Cooper, Jackie; Palmen, Jutta; Spiering, Wilko; de Jong, Pim A; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Ikram, M Arfan; Ford, Ian; Hyppönen, Elina; Almeida, Osvaldo P; Wareham, Nicholas J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Hamsten, Anders; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Tjønneland, Anne; Tolstrup, Janne S; Rimm, Eric; Beulens, Joline W J; Verschuren, W M Monique; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Hofker, Marten H; Wannamethee, S Goya; Whincup, Peter H; Morris, Richard; Vicente, Astrid M; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Jukema, J Wouter; Meschia, James; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sharp, Stephen J; Fornage, Myriam; Kooperberg, Charles; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Dai, James Y; Lanktree, Matthew B; Siscovick, David S; Jorgenson, Eric; Spring, Bonnie; Coresh, Josef; Buxbaum, Sarah G; Schreiner, Pamela J; Ellison, R Curtis; Tsai, Michael Y; Patel, Sanjay R; Redline, Susan; Johnson, Andrew D; Hoogeveen, Ron C; Hakonarson, Hakon; Rotter, Jerome I; Boerwinkle, Eric; de Bakker, Paul I W; Kivimaki, Mika; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Sattar, Naveed; Lawlor, Debbie A; Whittaker, John; Davey Smith, George; Mukamal, Kenneth; Psaty, Bruce M; Wilson, James G; Lange, Leslie A; Hamidovic, Ajna; Hingorani, Aroon D; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bobak, Martin; Leon, David A; Langenberg, Claudia; Palmer, Tom M; Reiner, Alex P; Keating, Brendan J; Dudbridge, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Objective To use the rs1229984 variant in the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B gene (ADH1B) as an instrument to investigate the causal role of alcohol in cardiovascular disease. Design Mendelian randomisation meta-analysis of 56 epidemiological studies. Participants 261 991 individuals of European descent, including 20 259 coronary heart disease cases and 10 164 stroke events. Data were available on ADH1B rs1229984 variant, alcohol phenotypes, and cardiovascular biomarkers. Main outcome measures Odds ratio for coronary heart disease and stroke associated with the ADH1B variant in all individuals and by categories of alcohol consumption. Results Carriers of the A-allele of ADH1B rs1229984 consumed 17.2% fewer units of alcohol per week (95% confidence interval 15.6% to 18.9%), had a lower prevalence of binge drinking (odds ratio 0.78 (95% CI 0.73 to 0.84)), and had higher abstention (odds ratio 1.27 (1.21 to 1.34)) than non-carriers. Rs1229984 A-allele carriers had lower systolic blood pressure (−0.88 (−1.19 to −0.56) mm Hg), interleukin-6 levels (−5.2% (−7.8 to −2.4%)), waist circumference (−0.3 (−0.6 to −0.1) cm), and body mass index (−0.17 (−0.24 to −0.10) kg/m2). Rs1229984 A-allele carriers had lower odds of coronary heart disease (odds ratio 0.90 (0.84 to 0.96)). The protective association of the ADH1B rs1229984 A-allele variant remained the same across all categories of alcohol consumption (P=0.83 for heterogeneity). Although no association of rs1229984 was identified with the combined subtypes of stroke, carriers of the A-allele had lower odds of ischaemic stroke (odds ratio 0.83 (0.72 to 0.95)). Conclusions Individuals with a genetic variant associated with non-drinking and lower alcohol consumption had a more favourable cardiovascular profile and a reduced risk of coronary heart disease than those without the genetic variant. This suggests that reduction of alcohol consumption, even for light to moderate drinkers, is beneficial for

  6. Physical Activity and Self-Reported Cardiovascular Comorbidities in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis: Evidence from a Cross-Sectional Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motl, Robert W.; Fernhall, Bo; McAuley, Edward; Cutter, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Background This study examined the possibility of a linear, inverse association between physical activity and the number of self-reported cardiovascular comorbidities in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods The sample included 561 persons with MS who completed demographic, cardiovascular comorbidity, disability status, and physical activity self-report assessments, and then wore an accelerometer for 7 days. The data were analyzed using bivariate correlation and multiple linear regression analyses. Results Bivariate correlation analysis indicated that there were statistically significant, inverse associations between the number of self-reported cardiovascular comorbidities and objectively measured (r = −0.192, p = 0.0001) and self-reported (r = −0.151, p = 0.0001) physical activity. The first multiple linear regression indicated that objectively measured physical activity was significantly associated with the number of self-reported cardiovascular comorbidities (B = −0.003, SE B = 0.001, β = −0.128), even after controlling for confounding variables. The second multiple linear regression indicated that self-reported physical activity, too, was significantly associated with the number of self-reported cardiovascular comorbidities (B = −0.011, SE B = 0.004, β = −0.114), even after controlling for confounding variables. Conclusion Physical activity was associated with the number of self-reported cardiovascular comorbidities, independent of disability status and other possible confounding variables, in persons with MS. PMID:21597305

  7. Proteomics with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis in cardiovascular research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Sun-Ah; Wang, Qing K

    2006-01-01

    Proteomics is a large-scale, comprehensive study of the proteins of a cell or organism. It is a unique means of characterizing proteins that are expressed in a cell or tissue at any given time-point and of identifying any modifications that they may undergo. Thus, it is a powerful technology that can detect and identify the changes of the structure and function of proteins in response to intra- and extracellular environmental signals or disease states. As proteomics can establish a link for genes and proteins with a disease, it will play an important role in defining the molecular determinants of a disease and in identifying targets for drug discoveries and diagnostics. We have carried out the first proteomics study for coronary artery disease (CAD) and found that the expression of the ferritin light chain was significantly increased in CAD tissues. In this chapter, we use the CAD study as an example to demonstrate the procedures involved in proteomics analysis. The proteome is visualized by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, a powerful and widely used method for proteomics, and the proteins of interest are then identified by mass spectrometry. This technique should be useful in characterizing cardiovascular diseases and in defining signaling pathways for cardiovascular development and physiology. PMID:17085802

  8. Deployment of an Advanced Electrocardiographic Analysis (A-ECG) to Detect Cardiovascular Risk in Career Firefighters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, B. A.; Storer, T. W.; Abrazado, M.; Watne, R.; Schlegel, T. T.; Batalin, M.; Kaiser, W.; Smith, D. L.; Cooper, C. B.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sudden cardiac death is the leading cause of line of duty death among firefighters, accounting for approximately 45% of fatalities annually. Firefighters perform strenuous muscular work while wearing heavy, encapsulating personal protective equipment in high ambient temperatures, under chaotic and emotionally stressful conditions. These factors can precipitate sudden cardiac events like myocardial infarction, serious dysrhythmias, or cerebrovascular accidents in firefighters with underlying cardiovascular disease. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to deploy and then evaluate the contribution of resting advanced ECG (A-ECG) in addition to other screening tools (family history, lipid profiles, and cardiopulmonary exercise tests, XT) in assessment of an individual fs cardiac risk profile. METHODS: Forty-four career firefighters were recruited to perform comprehensive baseline assessments including tests of aerobic performance, fasting lipids and glucose. Five-min resting 12-lead A-ECGs were obtained in a subset of firefighters (n=21) and transmitted over a secure networked system to a NASA physician collaborator. Using myocardial perfusion and other imaging as the gold standard, A-ECG scoring has been proven useful in accurately identifying a number of cardiac pathologies including coronary artery disease (CAD), left ventricular hypertrophy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and non-ischemic and ischemic cardiomyopathy. RESULTS: Subjects f mean (SD) age was 43 (8) years, weight 91 (13) kg, and BMI 28 (3) kg/m2. Fifty-one percent of subjects had .3 cardiovascular risk factors. One subject had ST depression on XT ECG, at least one positive A-ECG score for CAD, and documented CAD based on cardiology referral. While all other subjects, including those with fewer risk factors, higher aerobic fitness, and normal exercise ECGs, were classified as healthy by A-ECG, there was no trend for association between risk factors and any of 20 A-ECG parameters in the

  9. Erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular events in diabetic men: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohide Yamada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown that erectile dysfunction (ED influences the risk of cardiovascular events (CV events. However, a meta-analysis of the overall risk of CV events associated with ED in patients with diabetes has not been performed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We searched MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library for pertinent articles (including references published between 1951 and April 22, 2012. English language reports of original observational cohort studies and cross-sectional studies were included. Pooled effect estimates were obtained by random effects meta-analysis. A total of 3,791 CV events were reported in 3 cohort studies and 9 cross-sectional studies (covering 22,586 subjects. Across the cohort studies, the overall odds ratio (OR of diabetic men with ED versus those without ED was 1.74 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.34-2.27; P0.05. Moreover, meta-regression analysis found no relationship between the method used to assess ED (questionnaire or interview, mean age, mean hemoglobin A(1c, mean body mass index, or mean duration of diabetes and the risk of CV events or CHD. In the cross-sectional studies, the OR of diabetic men with ED versus those without ED was 3.39 (95% CI: 2.58-4.44; P<0.001 for CV events (N = 9, 3.43 (95% CI: 2.46-4.77; P<0.001 for CHD (N = 7, and 2.63 (95% CI: 1.41-4.91; P = 0.002 for peripheral vascular disease (N = 5. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: ED was associated with an increased risk of CV events in diabetic patients. Prevention and early detection of cardiovascular disease are important in the management of diabetes, especially in view of the rapid increase in its prevalence.

  10. Myocardial infarct heterogeneity assessment by late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging shows predictive value for ventricular arrhythmia development after acute myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robbers, Lourens F. H. J.; Delewi, Ronak; Nijveldt, Robin; Hirsch, Alexander; Beek, Aernout M.; Kemme, Michiel J. B.; van Beurden, Yvette; van der Laan, Anja M.; van der Vleuten, Pieter A.; Tio, Rene A.; Zijlstra, Felix; Piek, Jan J.; van Rossum, Albert C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association between the proportions of penumbrauvisualized by late gadolinium enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-CMR)uafter acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and the prevalence of ventricular tachycardia (VT). One-hundred and sixty-two AMI

  11. Image analysis in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-destructive testing in nuclear power plants remains a major EDF objective for the coming decades. To facilitate diagnosis, the expert must be provided with elaborate decision-making aids: contrasted images, noise-free signals, pertinent parameters, ''meaningful'' images. In the field of industrial radiography, the inspector's offer of a portable system for digitalization and subsequent processing of radiographs (ENTRAIGUES) is an improvement in the inspection of primary circuit nozzles. Three major directions were followed: - improvement of images and localization of flaws (2D approach); techniques such as Markov modelling were evaluated and tested, - development of a system which can be transported on site, for digitalization, processing and subsequent archiving on inspection radiographs, known as ENTRAIGUES, - development of a program for aid in analysis of digitized radiographs (''bread-board'' version), offering an ergonomic interface and push-button processing, which is the software component in ENTRAIGUES and uses sophisticated methods: contrast enhancement, background flattening, segmentation. An other objective is to reconstruct a three-dimensional volume on the basis of a few radiographs taken at different incidences and to estimate the flaw orientation within a piece understudy. This information makes sense to experts, with regards to the deterioration rate of the flaw; the equipment concerned includes the formed bends in the primary coolant nozzles. This reconstruction problem is ill-posed and a solution can be obtained by introducing a priori information on the solution. The first step of our algorithm is a classical iterative reconstruction A.R.T. type method (Algebraic Reconstruction Techniques) which provides a rough volumic reconstructed tridimensional zone containing the flaw. Then, on this reconstructed zone, we apply a Bayesian restoration method introducing a Markov Random Field (MRF) modelling. Conclusive results have been obtained. (author

  12. Ramadan fasting is not usually associated with the risk of cardiovascular events: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turin, Tanvir C; Ahmed, Salim; Shommu, Nusrat S; Afzal, Arfan R; Al Mamun, Mohammad; Qasqas, Mahdi; Rumana, Nahid; Vaska, Marcus; Berka, Noureddine

    2016-01-01

    Over one billion Muslims worldwide fast during the month of Ramadan. Ramadan fasting brings about some changes in the daily lives of practicing Muslims, especially in their diet and sleep patterns, which are associated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Over the years, many original studies have made the effort to identify the possible impact of the Ramadan fast on cardiovascular diseases. This systematic review and meta-analysis is an attempt to present the summary of key findings from those articles and an appraisal of selected literature. A systematic search using keywords of ";Ramadan fasting" and ";cardiovascular diseases" was conducted in primary research article and gray-literature repositories, in combination with hand searching and snow balling. Fifteen studies were finally selected for data extraction on the outcomes of stroke, myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. The analysis revealed that the incidence of cardiovascular events during the Ramadan fast was similar to the nonfasting period. Ramadan fast is not associated with any change in incidence of acute cardiovascular disease. PMID:27186152

  13. Ramadan fasting is not usually associated with the risk of cardiovascular events: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvir C Turin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over one billion Muslims worldwide fast during the month of Ramadan. Ramadan fasting brings about some changes in the daily lives of practicing Muslims, especially in their diet and sleep patterns, which are associated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Over the years, many original studies have made the effort to identify the possible impact of the Ramadan fast on cardiovascular diseases. This systematic review and meta-analysis is an attempt to present the summary of key findings from those articles and an appraisal of selected literature. A systematic search using keywords of “;Ramadan fasting” and “;cardiovascular diseases” was conducted in primary research article and gray-literature repositories, in combination with hand searching and snow balling. Fifteen studies were finally selected for data extraction on the outcomes of stroke, myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. The analysis revealed that the incidence of cardiovascular events during the Ramadan fast was similar to the nonfasting period. Ramadan fast is not associated with any change in incidence of acute cardiovascular disease.

  14. Non-invasive in-vivo imaging of stem cells after transplantation in cardiovascular tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Kastrup, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy for degenerative diseases, including ischemic heart disease is now a clinical reality. In the search for the optimal cell type for each patient category, many different stem cell subpopulations have been used. In addition, different cell processing procedures and delivery methods...... improvements. To better understand the underlying mechanisms of these results, a reverse translation from bedside to bench has been opened. Non-invasive cell tracking after implantation has a pivotal role in this translation. Imaging based methods can help elucidate important issues such as retention......, migration and efficacy of the transplanted cells. Great effort is being made in finding new and better imaging techniques for different imaging modalities, and much have already been learned. But there are still many unanswered questions. In this review, we give an overview of the imaging modalities used...

  15. THE ANALYSIS OF MAJOR RISK FACTORS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES AMONG INHABITANTS OF THE NORTH REGION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, N V; Markova, S V; Antipina, U D; Sivtseva, T P; Savvina, I L

    2015-01-01

    Last years the problem of organism's adaptation to severe climate-environmental conditions of the Far North has been intensively developed. The Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) is the most northern republic of the Russian Federation. People have created a unique way of life, language, original culture on this cold part of the earth and have carried centuries later. This unique experience has been saved up throughout many centuries and generated in natural environment of habitation and passed from generation to generation. Last years the changes of living conditions of indigenous population, urbanization and globalisation, deterioration of ecological conditions exhausted reserve possibilities of organism. Among the indigenous population health change has menacing character, especially among the children's population. The analysis of major risk factors of the development of cardiovascular diseases among the indigenous population of the north has been carried out in this research. PMID:26887120

  16. Spreadsheet-like image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Paul

    1992-08-01

    This report describes the design of a new software system being built by the Army to support and augment automated nondestructive inspection (NDI) on-line equipment implemented by the Army for detection of defective manufactured items. The new system recalls and post-processes (off-line) the NDI data sets archived by the on-line equipment for the purpose of verifying the correctness of the inspection analysis paradigms, of developing better analysis paradigms and to gather statistics on the defects of the items inspected. The design of the system is similar to that of a spreadsheet, i.e., an array of cells which may be programmed to contain functions with arguments being data from other cells and whose resultant is the output of that cell's function. Unlike a spreadsheet, the arguments and the resultants of a cell may be a matrix such as a two-dimensional matrix of picture elements (pixels). Functions include matrix mathematics, neural networks and image processing as well as those ordinarily found in spreadsheets. The system employs all of the common environmental supports of the Macintosh computer, which is the hardware platform. The system allows the resultant of a cell to be displayed in any of multiple formats such as a matrix of numbers, text, an image, or a chart. Each cell is a window onto the resultant. Like a spreadsheet if the input value of any cell is changed its effect is cascaded into the resultants of all cells whose functions use that value directly or indirectly. The system encourages the user to play what-of games, as ordinary spreadsheets do.

  17. Analysis of cardiovascular oscillations: A new approach to the early prediction of pre-eclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malberg, H.; Bauernschmitt, R.; Voss, A.; Walther, T.; Faber, R.; Stepan, H.; Wessel, N.

    2007-03-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a serious disorder with high morbidity and mortality occurring during pregnancy; 3%-5% of all pregnant women are affected. Early prediction is still insufficient in clinical practice. Although most pre-eclamptic patients show pathological uterine perfusion in the second trimester, this parameter has a positive predictive accuracy of only 30%, which makes it unsuitable for early, reliable prediction. The study is based on the hypothesis that alterations in cardiovascular regulatory behavior can be used to predict PE. Ninety-six pregnant women in whom Doppler investigation detected perfusion disorders of the uterine arteries were included in the study. Twenty-four of these pregnant women developed PE after the 30th week of gestation. During pregnancy, additional several noninvasive continuous blood pressure recordings were made over 30 min under resting conditions by means of a finger cuff. The time series extracted of systolic as well as diastolic beat-to-beat pressures and the heart rate were studied by variability and coupling analysis to find predictive factors preceding genesis of the disease. In the period between the 18th and 26th weeks of pregnancy, three special variability and baroreflex parameters were able to predict PE several weeks before clinical manifestation. Discriminant function analysis of these parameters was able to predict PE with a sensitivity and specificity of 87.5% and a positive predictive value of 70%. The combined clinical assessment of uterine perfusion and cardiovascular variability demonstrates the best current prediction several weeks before clinical manifestation of PE.

  18. Texture analysis methodologies for magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Materka, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    Methods for the analysis of digital-image texture are reviewed. The functions of MaZda, a computer program for quantitative texture analysis developed within the framework of the European COST (Cooperation in the Field of Scientific and Technical Research) B11 program, are introduced. Examples of texture analysis in magnetic resonance images are discussed.

  19. The Emerging Role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Evaluation of Metabolic Cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogeni, S; Markousis-Mavrogenis, G; Markussis, V; Kolovou, G

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss the role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) in the diagnosis, risk stratification, and follow-up of metabolic cardiomyopathies. The classification of myocardial diseases, proposed by WHO/ISFC task force, distinguished specific cardiomyopathies, caused by metabolic disorders, into 4 types: 1) endocrine disorders, 2) storage or infiltration disorders (amyloidosis, hemochromatosis and familial storage disorders), 3) nutritional disorders (Kwashiorkor, beri-beri, obesity, and alcohol), and 4) diabetic heart. Thyroid disease, pheochromocytoma, and growth hormone excess or deficiency may contribute to usually reversible dilated cardiomyopathy. Glucogen storage diseases can be presented with myopathy, liver, and heart failure. Lysosomal storage diseases can provoke cardiac hypertrophy, mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias. Hereditary hemochromatosis, an inherited disorder of iron metabolism, leads to tissue iron overload in different organs, including the heart. Cardiac amyloidosis is the result of amyloid deposition in the heart, formed from breakdown of normal or abnormal proteins that leads to increased heart stiffness, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. Finally, nutritional disturbances and metabolic diseases, such as Kwashiorkor, beri-beri, obesity, alcohol consumption, and diabetes mellitus may also lead to severe cardiac dysfunction. CMR, through its capability to reliably assess anatomy, function, inflammation, rest-stress myocardial perfusion, myocardial fibrosis, aortic distensibility, iron and/or fat deposition can serve as an excellent tool for early diagnosis of heart involvement, risk stratification, treatment evaluation, and long term follow-up of patients with metabolic cardiomyopathies. PMID:26197853

  20. Curvelet Based Offline Analysis of SEM Images

    OpenAIRE

    Shirazi, Syed Hamad; Haq, Nuhman ul; Hayat, Khizar; Naz, Saeeda; Haque, Ihsan ul

    2014-01-01

    Manual offline analysis, of a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image, is a time consuming process and requires continuous human intervention and efforts. This paper presents an image processing based method for automated offline analyses of SEM images. To this end, our strategy relies on a two-stage process, viz. texture analysis and quantification. The method involves a preprocessing step, aimed at the noise removal, in order to avoid false edges. For texture analysis, the proposed method ...

  1. A comparative analysis of protein targets of withdrawn cardiovascular drugs in human and mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yuqi; Wang, Jingwen; Wang, Yanjie; Huang, Jingfei

    2012-01-01

    Background Mouse is widely used in animal testing of cardiovascular disease. However, a large number of cardiovascular drugs that have been experimentally proved to work well on mouse were withdrawn because they caused adverse side effects in human. Methods In this study, we investigate whether binding patterns of withdrawn cardiovascular drugs are conserved between mouse and human through computational dockings and molecular dynamic simulations. In addition, we also measured the level of con...

  2. Standardized image interpretation and post processing in cardiovascular magnetic resonance: Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) Board of Trustees Task Force on Standardized Post Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz-Menger, J.; Bluemke, D.A.; Bremerich, J; Flamm, S.D.; Fogel, M.A.; Friedrich, M.G.; Kim, R. J.; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, F.; Kramer, C.M.; Pennell, D. J.; Plein, S; Nagel, E.

    2013-01-01

    With mounting data on its accuracy and prognostic value, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is becoming an increasingly important diagnostic tool with growing utility in clinical routine. Given its versatility and wide range of quantitative parameters, however, agreement on specific standards for the interpretation and post-processing of CMR studies is required to ensure consistent quality and reproducibility of CMR reports. This document addresses this need by providing consensus recomm...

  3. Integration of an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system into a new environmental chamber to facilitate long term in vivo imaging of cardiovascular development in higher vertebrate embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Lars; Happel, Christoph M.; Thommes, Jan;

    2010-01-01

    cardiovascular development. Here we demonstrate, to the best of our knowledge, the first realization of an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system integrated into a new environmental incubation chamber (EIC) to facilitate real-time in vivo imaging of cardiovascular development in chick embryos. The EIC...... provides stable conditions for embryonic development with respect to temperature, humidity, and oxygen levels. An OCT probe is integrated into the EIC and facilitates visualization of embryos at micrometer resolution, including the acquisition of M-mode, Doppler OCT, and Doppler M-mode data....

  4. ECG-based gating in ultra high field cardiovascular magnetic resonance using an independent component analysis approach

    OpenAIRE

    Krug, Johannes W; Rose, Georg; Clifford, Gari D.; Oster, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Background In Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR), the synchronization of image acquisition with heart motion is performed in clinical practice by processing the electrocardiogram (ECG). The ECG-based synchronization is well established for MR scanners with magnetic fields up to 3 T. However, this technique is prone to errors in ultra high field environments, e.g. in 7 T MR scanners as used in research applications. The high magnetic fields cause severe magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects w...

  5. Analysis of the risk factors of cardiovascular diseases after renal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-ping CHEN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the risk factors of occurrence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD after renal transplantation. Methods The follow-up data of 1106 cases of renal transplantation, performed in 309 hospital of PLA from May 2009 to Nov. 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were evaluated for postoperative cardiac events, and the post-transplant risk factors of CVD were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazard model. Observation was done before operation, and 7d, 1st, 3rd, 6th and 12th month after transplantation, then once every half year, till march of 2014 as the end of the study. Results Tow hundred and sixteen patients (19.5% developed at least one cardiovascular event in the post-transplant period. Forty-seven cases (6.32% of primary CVD occurred during the first 3 months, and it occurred in 125 cases (11.30% during the first year, which made up 26.81% and 47.89% of the total CVD patients. There were 19 patients died from CVD, which made up 37.3% of the 51 total death. Multivariate analysis showed that Age > 50 years (OR=2.39, 95% CI, 1.15-3.60, existence of diabetes before transplantation (OR=3.18, 95% CI, 1.56-6.42, pre-transplantaion CVD (OR=3.85, 95% CI, 2.15-7.54, diabetic nephropathy as the primary disease (OR=2.12, 95% CI, 1.14-3.98, pre-transplantation dialysis duration as long as 12 months (OR=1.27, 95% CI, 0.98-1.38, post-transplantaion serum creatinine >200μmol/L (OR=2.78, 95% CI, 1.35-4.53, delayed recovery of graft function (DGF (OR=1.24, 95% CI, 1.02-1.42, acute rejection (AR (OR=2.98, 95% CI, 1.56-5.72 and graft renal failure (OR=4.86, 95% CI, 3.15-7.78 were the significant risk factors of CVD after renal transplantation. Conclusions The incidence of cardiovascular disease in patients under gone renal transplants continues to be high. Therefore, the multivariate risk factors of CVD should be identified and rectified in order to prevent occurrence of CVD in post transplant period, and promote the survival

  6. Effect of hormone replacement therapy on cardiovascular outcomes: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dicheng Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT is widely used to controlling menopausal symptoms and prevent adverse cardiovascular events. However, the benefit and risk of HRT on cardiovascular outcomes remains controversial. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We systematically searched the PubMed, EmBase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases for obtaining relevant literature. All eligible trials reported on the effects of HRT on cardiovascular outcomes. We did a random effects meta-analysis to obtain summary effect estimates for the clinical outcomes with use of relative risks calculated from the raw data of included trials. Of 1903 identified studies, we included 10 trials reporting data on 38908 postmenopausal women. Overall, we noted that estrogen combined with medroxyprogesterone acetate therapy as compared to placebo had no effect on coronary events (RR, 1.07; 95%CI: 0.91-1.26; P = 0.41, myocardial infarction (RR, 1.09; 95%CI: 0.85-1.41; P = 0.48, stroke (RR, 1.21; 95%CI: 1.00-1.46; P = 0.06, cardiac death (RR, 1.19; 95%CI: 0.91-1.56; P = 0.21, total death (RR, 1.06; 95%CI: 0.81-1.39; P = 0.66, and revascularization (RR, 0.95; 95%CI: 0.83-1.08; P = 0.43. In addition, estrogen therapy alone had no effect on coronary events (RR, 0.93; 95%CI: 0.80-1.08; P = 0.33, myocardial infarction (RR, 0.95; 95%CI: 0.78-1.15; P = 0.57, cardiac death (RR, 0.86; 95%CI: 0.65-1.13; P = 0.27, total mortality (RR, 1.02; 95%CI: 0.89-1.18; P = 0.73, and revascularization (RR, 0.77; 95%CI: 0.45-1.31; P = 0.34, but associated with a 27% increased risk for incident stroke (RR, 1.27; 95%CI: 1.06-1.53; P = 0.01. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Hormone replacement therapy does not effect on the incidence of coronary events, myocardial infarction, cardiac death, total mortality or revascularization. However, it might contributed an important role on the risk of incident stroke.

  7. Microscopy image segmentation tool: Robust image data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a software package called Microscopy Image Segmentation Tool (MIST). MIST is designed for analysis of microscopy images which contain large collections of small regions of interest (ROIs). Originally developed for analysis of porous anodic alumina scanning electron images, MIST capabilities have been expanded to allow use in a large variety of problems including analysis of biological tissue, inorganic and organic film grain structure, as well as nano- and meso-scopic structures. MIST provides a robust segmentation algorithm for the ROIs, includes many useful analysis capabilities, and is highly flexible allowing incorporation of specialized user developed analysis. We describe the unique advantages MIST has over existing analysis software. In addition, we present a number of diverse applications to scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy

  8. Cardiovascular measurement and cardiac function analysis with electron beam computed tomography in health Chinese people (50 cases report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantitatively measure cardiovascular diameters and function parameters by using electron beam computed tomography, EBCT. Methods: Men 50 health Chinese people accepted EBCT common transverse and short-axis enhanced movie scan (27 men, 23 women, average age 47.7 years.). The transverse scan was used to measure the diameters of the ascending aorta, descending aorta, pulmonary artery and left atrium. The movie study was used to measure the left ventricular myocardium thickness and analysis global, sectional and segmental function of the right and left ventricles. Results: The cardiovascular diameters and cardiac functional parameters were calculated. The diameters and most functional parameters (end syspoble volume, syspole volume, ejection fraction, cardiac-output, cardiac index) of normal Chinese men were greater than those of women (P>0.05). However, the EDV and MyM(myocardium mass) of both ventricles were significant (p<0.01). Conclusion: EBCT is a minimally invasive method for cardiovascular measurement and cardiac function evaluation

  9. Arterial blood pressure measurement and pulse wave analysis--their role in enhancing cardiovascular assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Alberto P; Butlin, Mark; Walsh, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The most common method of clinical measurement of arterial blood pressure is by means of the cuff sphygmomanometer. This instrument has provided fundamental quantitative information on arterial pressure in individual subjects and in populations and facilitated estimation of cardiovascular risk related to levels of blood pressure obtained from the brachial cuff. Although the measurement is taken in a peripheral limb, the values are generally assumed to reflect the pressure throughout the arterial tree in large conduit arteries. Since the arterial pressure pulse becomes modified as it travels away from the heart towards the periphery, this is generally true for mean and diastolic pressure, but not for systolic pressure, and so pulse pressure. The relationship between central and peripheral pulse pressure depends on propagation characteristics of arteries. Hence, while the sphygmomanometer gives values of two single points on the pressure wave (systolic and diastolic pressure), there is additional information that can be obtained from the time-varying pulse waveform that enables an improved quantification of the systolic load on the heart and other central organs. This topical review will assess techniques of pressure measurement that relate to the use of the cuff sphygmomanometer and to the non-invasive registration and analysis of the peripheral and central arterial pressure waveform. Improved assessment of cardiovascular function in relation to treatment and management of high blood pressure will result from future developments in the indirect measurement of arterial blood pressure that involve the conventional cuff sphygmomanometer with the addition of information derived from the peripheral arterial pulse. PMID:19940350

  10. Integration of an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system into an examination incubator to facilitate in vivo imaging of cardiovascular development in higher vertebrate embryos under stable physiological conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Happel, Christoph M.; Thrane, Lars; Thommes, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    significance, should be documented under physiological conditions. However, previous studies were mostly carried out outside of an incubator or under suboptimal environmental conditions. Here we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first detailed description of an optical coherence tomography (OCT......) system integrated into an examination incubator to facilitate real-time in vivo imaging of cardiovascular development under physiological environmental conditions. We demonstrate the suitability of this OCT examination incubator unit for use in cardiovascular development studies by examples of proof of...... principle experiments. We, furthermore, point out the need for use of examination incubators for physiological OCT examinations by documenting the effects of room climate (22 ◦C) on the performance of the cardiovascular system of chick embryos (HH-stages 16/17). Upon exposure to room climate, chick embryos...

  11. Image registration with uncertainty analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Katherine M.

    2011-03-22

    In an image registration method, edges are detected in a first image and a second image. A percentage of edge pixels in a subset of the second image that are also edges in the first image shifted by a translation is calculated. A best registration point is calculated based on a maximum percentage of edges matched. In a predefined search region, all registration points other than the best registration point are identified that are not significantly worse than the best registration point according to a predetermined statistical criterion.

  12. Retinal image analysis: preprocessing and feature extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image processing, analysis and computer vision techniques are found today in all fields of medical science. These techniques are especially relevant to modern ophthalmology, a field heavily dependent on visual data. Retinal images are widely used for diagnostic purposes by ophthalmologists. However, these images often need visual enhancement prior to apply a digital analysis for pathological risk or damage detection. In this work we propose the use of an image enhancement technique for the compensation of non-uniform contrast and luminosity distribution in retinal images. We also explore optic nerve head segmentation by means of color mathematical morphology and the use of active contours.

  13. Digital-image processing and image analysis of glacier ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Joan J.

    2013-01-01

    This document provides a methodology for extracting grain statistics from 8-bit color and grayscale images of thin sections of glacier ice—a subset of physical properties measurements typically performed on ice cores. This type of analysis is most commonly used to characterize the evolution of ice-crystal size, shape, and intercrystalline spatial relations within a large body of ice sampled by deep ice-coring projects from which paleoclimate records will be developed. However, such information is equally useful for investigating the stress state and physical responses of ice to stresses within a glacier. The methods of analysis presented here go hand-in-hand with the analysis of ice fabrics (aggregate crystal orientations) and, when combined with fabric analysis, provide a powerful method for investigating the dynamic recrystallization and deformation behaviors of bodies of ice in motion. The procedures described in this document compose a step-by-step handbook for a specific image acquisition and data reduction system built in support of U.S. Geological Survey ice analysis projects, but the general methodology can be used with any combination of image processing and analysis software. The specific approaches in this document use the FoveaPro 4 plug-in toolset to Adobe Photoshop CS5 Extended but it can be carried out equally well, though somewhat less conveniently, with software such as the image processing toolbox in MATLAB, Image-Pro Plus, or ImageJ.

  14. Relationships of OPG Genetic Polymorphisms with Susceptibility to Cardiovascular Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, De-Hua; Zhou, Peng-Zhen; Xiu, Xiao-Lin; Zhou, Guang-Hui; Sun, Yu-Xia; Song, Chun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine whether genetic polymorphisms in the osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene contribute to increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). MATERIAL AND METHODS Electronic databases were searched carefully without any language restriction. Analyses of data were conducted using STATA software. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were also calculated. RESULTS Seven clinical case-control studies that enrolled 1170 CVD patients and 1194 healthy subjects were included. The results indicated that OPG gene polymorphism might be closely associated with susceptibility to CVD, especially for rs2073617 T>C and rs2073618 G>C polymorphisms. Ethnicity-stratified analysis indicated that genetic polymorphism in the OPG were closely related with the pathogenesis of CVD among Asians (all P0.05). CONCLUSIONS Our meta-analysis provided quantitative evidence that OPG gene polymorphism may be closely related to an increased risk of CVD, especially for rs2073617 T>C and rs2073618 G>C polymorphisms. PMID:27068490

  15. Parametric image of rMBF using factor analysis and cluster analysis on H215 dynamic myocardial PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composition of parametric image (PI) of rMBF measured by H215O PET has been the goal of many research efforts. However, this has been difficult to accomplish because of the low SNR of the TAC of each voxel, and the complex kinetic model which includes parameters to correct partial volume and spillover effects. To develop a method to make a PI of rMBF by combining factor analysis and cluster analysis on H215O dynamic myocardial PET. First, right and left ventricular input functions and their factor images were obtained by applying the factor analysis to dynamic frames. By subtracting the factor images from the original dynamic frames, tissue image was obtained in which the vascular components were excluded. Cluster analysis, which averaged voxels with the same shape TACs (NeuroImage, 9:554-61, 1999), was applied to the pure tissue image to reduce calculation time and to improve SNR of the PI. Image quality and contrast was significantly improved in comparison to either the factor image of tissue or the subtracted image composed by subtracting the initial 30 sec-image from the 2 min one. Computation time was less than 1 min on the workstation 333 MHz with CPU. Parametric image developed in this study will serve as an important investigative tool for cardiovascular disease

  16. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Marfan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Dormand, Helen; Mohiaddin, Raad H

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an overview of Marfan syndrome with an emphasis on cardiovascular complications and cardiovascular imaging. Both pre- and post-operative imaging is addressed with an explanation of surgical management. All relevant imaging modalities are discussed with a particular focus on cardiovascular MR.

  17. Where Does It Lead? Imaging Features of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices on Chest Radiograph and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzman, Rotem S.; Blondin, Dirk; Furst, Gunter; Scherer, Axel; R Miese, Falk; Kroepil, Patric [University of Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Winter, Joachim [University Hospital Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Abbara, Suhny [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (US)

    2011-10-15

    Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are being increasingly employed in patients suffering from cardiac rhythm disturbances. The principal objective of this article is to familiarize radiologists with pacemakers and ICDs on chest radiographs and CT scans. Therefore, the preferred lead positions according to pacemaker types and anatomic variants are introduced in this study. Additionally, the imaging features of incorrect lead positions and defects, as well as complications subsequent to pacemaker implantation are demonstrated herein.

  18. Non-Contrast Enhanced Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Characterizing Chronic Myocardial Infarctions

    OpenAIRE

    Kali, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is the leading cause of morbidity and death globally. Non-invasive characterization of chronic MIs is of significant clinical importance due to its association with adverse cardiac outcomes such as cardiac arrhythmias, heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. Late Gadolinium Enhancement (LGE) MRI has evolved into a robust non-invasive imaging technique for characterizing chronic MIs and identifying new pathophysiological substrates of adverse cardiac outcomes within...

  19. Where Does It Lead? Imaging Features of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices on Chest Radiograph and CT

    OpenAIRE

    Lanzman, Rotem S.; Winter, Joachim; Blondin, Dirk; Fürst, Günter; Scherer, Axel; Miese, Falk R; Abbara, Suhny; Kröpil, Patric

    2011-01-01

    Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are being increasingly employed in patients suffering from cardiac rhythm disturbances. The principal objective of this article is to familiarize radiologists with pacemakers and ICDs on chest radiographs and CT scans. Therefore, the preferred lead positions according to pacemaker types and anatomic variants are introduced in this study. Additionally, the imaging features of incorrect lead positions and defects, as well as complica...

  20. Some developments in multivariate image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucheryavskiy, Sergey

    Multivariate image analysis (MIA), one of the successful chemometric applications, now is used widely in different areas of science and industry. Introduced in late 80s it has became very popular with hyperspectral imaging, where MIA is one of the most efficient tools for exploratory analysis and...... analyzing patterns on these plots and the original image allow to do interactive analysis, to get some hidden information, build a supervised classification model, and much more. In the present work several alternative methods to original principal component analysis (PCA) for building the projection...... classification. MIA considers all image pixels as objects and their color values (or spectrum in the case of hyperspectral images) as variables. So it gives data matrices with hundreds of thousands samples in the case of laboratory scale images and even more for aerial photos, where the number of pixels could be...

  1. Colour model analysis for microscopic image processing

    OpenAIRE

    García-Rojo Marcial; González Jesús; Déniz Oscar; González Roberto; Bueno Gloria

    2008-01-01

    Abstract This article presents a comparative study between different colour models (RGB, HSI and CIEL*a*b*) applied to a very large microscopic image analysis. Such analysis of different colour models is needed in order to carry out a successful detection and therefore a classification of different regions of interest (ROIs) within the image. This, in turn, allows both distinguishing possible ROIs and retrieving their proper colour for further ROI analysis. This analysis is not commonly done ...

  2. Discovering beautiful attributes for aesthetic image analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Marchesotti, Luca; Murray, Naila; Perronnin, Florent

    2014-01-01

    Aesthetic image analysis is the study and assessment of the aesthetic properties of images. Current computational approaches to aesthetic image analysis either provide accurate or interpretable results. To obtain both accuracy and interpretability by humans, we advocate the use of learned and nameable visual attributes as mid-level features. For this purpose, we propose to discover and learn the visual appearance of attributes automatically, using a recently introduced database, called AVA, w...

  3. Digital Image Analysis for Detechip Code Determination

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus Lyon; Wilson, Mark V.; Kerry A. Rouhier; David J. Symonsbergen; Kiran Bastola; Ishwor Thapa; Holmes, Andrea E.; Sharmin M. Sikich; Abby Jackson

    2012-01-01

    DETECHIP® is a molecular sensing array used for identification of a large variety of substances. Previous methodology for the analysis of DETECHIP® used human vision to distinguish color changes induced by the presence of the analyte of interest. This paper describes several analysis techniques using digital images of DETECHIP® . Both a digital camera and flatbed desktop photo scanner were used to obtain Jpeg images. Color information within these digital images was obt...

  4. Digital Image Analysis for Detechip Code Determination

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus Lyon; Wilson, Mark V.; Holmes, Andrea E.; Sharmin M. Sikich; Abby Jackson; Kerry A. Rouhier; David J. Symonsbergen; Kiran Bastola

    2012-01-01

    DETECHIP® is a molecular sensing array used for identification of a large variety of substances. Previous methodology for the analysis of DETECHIP® used human vision to distinguish color changes induced by the presence of the analyte of interest. This paper describes several analysis techniques using digital images of DETECHIP®. Both a digital camera and flatbed desktop photo scanner were used to obtain Jpeg images. Color information within these digital images was obtained through the me...

  5. Digital Image Analysis for DETCHIP® Code Determination

    OpenAIRE

    Lyon, Marcus; Wilson, Mark V.; Kerry A. Rouhier; David J. Symonsbergen; Bastola, Kiran; Thapa, Ishwor; Holmes, Andrea E.; Sharmin M. Sikich; Jackson, Abby

    2012-01-01

    DETECHIP® is a molecular sensing array used for identification of a large variety of substances. Previous methodology for the analysis of DETECHIP® used human vision to distinguish color changes induced by the presence of the analyte of interest. This paper describes several analysis techniques using digital images of DETECHIP®. Both a digital camera and flatbed desktop photo scanner were used to obtain Jpeg images. Color information within these digital images was obtained through the measur...

  6. Textural Measurements for Retinal Image Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad, Suraya

    2015-01-01

    This thesis present research work conducted in the field of retina image analysis. More specifically, the work is directed at the application of texture analysis technique for the segmentation of common retinal landmark and for retina image classification. The main challenge in this research is in identifying the suitable texture measurement for retina images. In this research we proposed the used of texture measurement based on Binary Robust Independent Elementary Features (BRIEF). BRIEF mea...

  7. A 3D image analysis tool for SPECT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Despina; Wang, Qiang; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Maurer, Alan H.; Knight, Linda C.; Kantor, Steve; Fisher, Robert S.; Simonian, Hrair P.; Parkman, Henry P.

    2005-04-01

    We have developed semi-automated and fully-automated tools for the analysis of 3D single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. The focus is on the efficient boundary delineation of complex 3D structures that enables accurate measurement of their structural and physiologic properties. We employ intensity based thresholding algorithms for interactive and semi-automated analysis. We also explore fuzzy-connectedness concepts for fully automating the segmentation process. We apply the proposed tools to SPECT image data capturing variation of gastric accommodation and emptying. These image analysis tools were developed within the framework of a noninvasive scintigraphic test to measure simultaneously both gastric emptying and gastric volume after ingestion of a solid or a liquid meal. The clinical focus of the particular analysis was to probe associations between gastric accommodation/emptying and functional dyspepsia. Employing the proposed tools, we outline effectively the complex three dimensional gastric boundaries shown in the 3D SPECT images. We also perform accurate volume calculations in order to quantitatively assess the gastric mass variation. This analysis was performed both with the semi-automated and fully-automated tools. The results were validated against manual segmentation performed by a human expert. We believe that the development of an automated segmentation tool for SPECT imaging of the gastric volume variability will allow for other new applications of SPECT imaging where there is a need to evaluate complex organ function or tumor masses.

  8. Bayesian sequential meta-analysis design in evaluating cardiovascular risk in a new antidiabetic drug development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Hui; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Amy Xia, H; Liu, Thomas; Hennessey, Violeta

    2014-04-30

    Recently, the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research at the Food and Drug Administration released a guidance that makes recommendations about how to demonstrate that a new antidiabetic therapy to treat type 2 diabetes is not associated with an unacceptable increase in cardiovascular risk. One of the recommendations from the guidance is that phases II and III trials should be appropriately designed and conducted so that a meta-analysis can be performed. In addition, the guidance implies that a sequential meta-analysis strategy could be adopted. That is, the initial meta-analysis could aim at demonstrating the upper bound of a 95% confidence interval (CI) for the estimated hazard ratio to be drug application or a biologics license application. Subsequently after the marketing authorization, a final meta-analysis would need to show the upper bound to be drug development program for evaluating cardiovascular risk. PMID:24343859

  9. 心血管MRI第二部分--心血管MRI的基本序列和常用技术%Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging:Part II--the basic sequences and common techniques of cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹刚; 贺光军; 赵世华

    2013-01-01

    This article is the second section. The basic contrast behaviors, sequences, and requirements of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging were described in detail. First, three basic fast sequences for CMR imaging and different contrast behaviors were summarized. Second, some common used technique strategies for solving the problems in CMR imaging were presented.%此文为第二部分,着重介绍心血管MRI(CMRI)的基本对比、序列及要求。首先,归纳CMRI的三种基本快速成像序列和图像的对比分类。然后,应对CMRI的技术挑战和难点,讲述CMRI质量控制的常用技术。

  10. Milk Consumption and Mortality from All Causes, Cardiovascular Disease, and Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Susanna C.; Alessio Crippa; Nicola Orsini; Alicja Wolk; Karl Michaëlsson

    2015-01-01

    Results from epidemiological studies of milk consumption and mortality are inconsistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies assessing the association of non-fermented and fermented milk consumption with mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. PubMed was searched until August 2015. A two-stage, random-effects, dose-response meta-analysis was used to combine study-specific results. Heterogeneity among studies was assessed with the I ...

  11. Priority setting for the prevention and control of cardiovascular diseases: multi-criteria decision analysis in four eastern Mediterranean countries

    OpenAIRE

    Ghandour, Rula; Shoaibi, Azza; Khatib, Rana; Abu Rmeileh, Niveen; UNAL, Belgin; Sözmen, Kaan; Kılıç, Bülent; Fouad, Fouad; Al Ali, Radwan; Ben Romdhane, Habiba; Aissi, Wafa; Ahmad, Balsam; Capewell, Simon; Critchley, Julia; Husseini, Abdullatif

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the feasibility of using a simple multi-criteria decision analysis method with policy makers/key stakeholders to prioritize cardiovascular disease (CVD) policies in four Mediterranean countries: Palestine, Syria, Tunisia and Turkey. Methods A simple multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) method was piloted. A mixed methods study was used to identify a preliminary list of policy options in each country. These policies were rated by different policymakers/stakeho...

  12. Multispectral Image Analysis for Astaxanthin Coating Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungqvist, Martin Georg; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht;

    2012-01-01

    only with fish oil. In this study, multispectral image analysis of pellets captured reflection in 20 wavelengths (385–1050 nm). Linear discriminant analysis (LDA), principal component analysis, and support vector machine were used as statistical analysis. The features extracted from the multispectral...... images were pixel spectral values as well as using summary statistics such as the mean or median value of each pellet. Classification using LDA on pellet mean or median values showed overall good results. Multispectral imaging is a promising technique for noninvasive on-line quality food and feed...

  13. Factor analysis of images in medical diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factor analysis is based on the assumption that characteristics measured on a set of objects are the external manifestation of other latent variables - factors. The analysis allows to find the relations between the factors and the measured characteristics. Image components are sought which are expressed differently in different pictures. The method is demonstrated and documented on sets of images from dynamic radionuclide studies of the kidneys, livers and hearts. The importance of factor analysis for diagnosis consists in the selective imaging of partial anatomic structures which cannot be directly observed in the original pictures. The use of factor analysis is conditional on the use of efficient computer technology. (M.D.). 14 figs

  14. Myocardial tagging by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance: evolution of techniques--pulse sequences, analysis algorithms, and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim El-Sayed H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR tagging has been established as an essential technique for measuring regional myocardial function. It allows quantification of local intramyocardial motion measures, e.g. strain and strain rate. The invention of CMR tagging came in the late eighties, where the technique allowed for the first time for visualizing transmural myocardial movement without having to implant physical markers. This new idea opened the door for a series of developments and improvements that continue up to the present time. Different tagging techniques are currently available that are more extensive, improved, and sophisticated than they were twenty years ago. Each of these techniques has different versions for improved resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, scan time, anatomical coverage, three-dimensional capability, and image quality. The tagging techniques covered in this article can be broadly divided into two main categories: 1 Basic techniques, which include magnetization saturation, spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM, delay alternating with nutations for tailored excitation (DANTE, and complementary SPAMM (CSPAMM; and 2 Advanced techniques, which include harmonic phase (HARP, displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE, and strain encoding (SENC. Although most of these techniques were developed by separate groups and evolved from different backgrounds, they are in fact closely related to each other, and they can be interpreted from more than one perspective. Some of these techniques even followed parallel paths of developments, as illustrated in the article. As each technique has its own advantages, some efforts have been made to combine different techniques together for improved image quality or composite information acquisition. In this review, different developments in pulse sequences and related image processing techniques are described along with the necessities that led to their invention

  15. Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients treated with hemodialysis: Epidemiological analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Dejan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in patients treated with hemodialysis (HD. The annual cardiovascular mortality rate in these patients is 9%. Left ventricular (LV hypertrophy, ischemic heart disease and heart failure are the most prevalent cardiovascular causes of death. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of traditional and nontraditional risk factors for cardiovascular complications, to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular complications and overall and cardiovascular mortality rate in patients on HD. Methods. We investigated a total of 115 patients undergoing HD for at least 6 months. First, a cross-sectional study was performed, followed by a two-year follow-up study. Beside standard biochemical parameters, we also determined cardiac troponins and echocardiographic parameters of LV morphology and function (LV mass index, LV fractional shortening, LV ejection fraction. The results were analyzed using the Student's t test and Mann-Whitney U test. Results. The patients with adverse outcome had significantly lower serum albumin (p < 0.01 and higher serum homocystein, troponin I and T, and LV mass index (p < 0.01. Hyperhomocysteinemia, anemia, hypertriglyceridemia and uncontrolled hypertension had the highest prevalence (86.09%, 76.52%, 43.48% and 36.52%, respectively among all investigated cardiovascular risk factors. Hypertrophy of the LV was presented in 71.31% of the patients and congestive heart failure in 8.70%. Heart valve calcification was found in 48.70% of the patients, pericardial effusion in 25.22% and disrrhythmia in 20.87% of the investigated patients. The average annual overall mortality rate was 13.74%, while average cardiovascular mortality rate was 8.51%. Conclusion. Patients on HD have high risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  16. Meta-Analysis of Anxiety as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emdin, Connor A; Odutayo, Ayodele; Wong, Christopher X; Tran, Jenny; Hsiao, Allan J; Hunn, Benjamin H M

    2016-08-15

    Whether anxiety is a risk factor for a range of cardiovascular diseases is unclear. We aimed to determine the association between anxiety and a range of cardiovascular diseases. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for cohort studies that included participants with and without anxiety, including subjects with anxiety, worry, posttraumatic stress disorder, phobic anxiety, and panic disorder. We examined the association of anxiety with cardiovascular mortality, major cardiovascular events (defined as the composite of cardiovascular death, stroke, coronary heart disease, and heart failure), stroke, coronary heart disease, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. We identified 46 cohort studies containing 2,017,276 participants and 222,253 subjects with anxiety. Anxiety was associated with a significantly elevated risk of cardiovascular mortality (relative risk [RR] 1.41, CI 1.13 to 1.76), coronary heart disease (RR 1.41, CI 1.23 to 1.61), stroke (RR 1.71, CI 1.18 to 2.50), and heart failure (RR 1.35, CI 1.11 to 1.64). Anxiety was not significantly associated with major cardiovascular events or atrial fibrillation although CIs were wide. Phobic anxiety was associated with a higher risk of coronary heart disease than other anxiety disorders, and posttraumatic stress disorder was associated with a higher risk of stroke. Results were broadly consistent in sensitivity analyses. Anxiety disorders are associated with an elevated risk of a range of different cardiovascular events, including stroke, coronary heart disease, heart failure, and cardiovascular death. Whether these associations are causal is unclear. PMID:27324160

  17. Magnesium and the risk of cardiovascular events: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Qu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prospective studies that have examined the association between dietary magnesium intake and serum magnesium concentrations and the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD events have reported conflicting findings. We undertook a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between dietary magnesium intake and serum magnesium concentrations and the risk of total CVD events. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed systematic searches on MEDLINE, EMBASE, and OVID up to February 1, 2012 without limits. Categorical, linear, and nonlinear, dose-response, heterogeneity, publication bias, subgroup, and meta-regression analysis were performed. The analysis included 532,979 participants from 19 studies (11 studies on dietary magnesium intake, 6 studies on serum magnesium concentrations, and 2 studies on both with 19,926 CVD events. The pooled relative risks of total CVD events for the highest vs. lowest category of dietary magnesium intake and serum magnesium concentrations were 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.78 to 0.92 and 0.77 (0.66 to 0.87, respectively. In linear dose-response analysis, only serum magnesium concentrations ranging from 1.44 to 1.8 mEq/L were significantly associated with total CVD events risk (0.91, 0.85 to 0.97 per 0.1 mEq/L (P(nonlinearity= 0.465. However, significant inverse associations emerged in nonlinear models for dietary magnesium intake (P(nonlinearity= 0.024. The greatest risk reduction occurred when intake increased from 150 to 400 mg/d. There was no evidence of publication bias. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: There is a statistically significant nonlinear inverse association between dietary magnesium intake and total CVD events risk. Serum magnesium concentrations are linearly and inversely associated with the risk of total CVD events.

  18. Cardiac pathologies in female carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and severe dystrophinopathy. DMD carriers rarely present with clinical symptoms, but may suffer from cardiac involvement. Because echocardiographic findings are inconsistent and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) data are limited, this study sought to investigate asymptomatic carriers for cardiac abnormalities using CMRI. Fifteen genetically confirmed DMD carriers (age, 32.3 ± 10.2 years) were prospectively examined on a 1.5T MR system. Cine, T2, and late-gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images were acquired, and were evaluated in consensus by two experienced readers. Left ventricular (LV) parameters were analysed semiautomatically, normalized to BSA. Normalized LV end-diastolic volume was increased in 7 % (73.7 ± 16.8 ml/m2; range, 48-116 ml/m2) and normalized LV end-systolic volume in 20 % (31.5 ± 13.3 ml/m2; range, 15-74 ml/m2). EF was reduced in 33 % (58.4 ± 7.6 %; range, 37-69 %) and normalized LV myocardial mass in 80 % (40.5 ± 6.8 g/m2; range, 31-55 g/m2). In 80 %, regional myocardial thinning was detected in more than one segment. In 13 % and 40 %, apical-lateral accentuation of LV non-compaction was present. LGE was found in 60 % (midmyocardial inferolateral accentuation). Given the high frequency of cardiac pathologies detected by CMRI, regular cardiac risk assessment is advisable for DMD carriers. Besides clinical examination, CMRI is an excellent tool for this purpose. (orig.)

  19. Cardiac pathologies in female carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelhorn, Juliane; Schemuth, Haemi; Nensa, Felix; Nassenstein, Kai; Forsting, Michael; Schlosser, Thomas [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Schoenecker, Anne; Neudorf, Ulrich [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Essen (Germany); Schara, Ulrike [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Essen (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and severe dystrophinopathy. DMD carriers rarely present with clinical symptoms, but may suffer from cardiac involvement. Because echocardiographic findings are inconsistent and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) data are limited, this study sought to investigate asymptomatic carriers for cardiac abnormalities using CMRI. Fifteen genetically confirmed DMD carriers (age, 32.3 ± 10.2 years) were prospectively examined on a 1.5T MR system. Cine, T2, and late-gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images were acquired, and were evaluated in consensus by two experienced readers. Left ventricular (LV) parameters were analysed semiautomatically, normalized to BSA. Normalized LV end-diastolic volume was increased in 7 % (73.7 ± 16.8 ml/m{sup 2}; range, 48-116 ml/m{sup 2}) and normalized LV end-systolic volume in 20 % (31.5 ± 13.3 ml/m{sup 2}; range, 15-74 ml/m{sup 2}). EF was reduced in 33 % (58.4 ± 7.6 %; range, 37-69 %) and normalized LV myocardial mass in 80 % (40.5 ± 6.8 g/m{sup 2}; range, 31-55 g/m{sup 2}). In 80 %, regional myocardial thinning was detected in more than one segment. In 13 % and 40 %, apical-lateral accentuation of LV non-compaction was present. LGE was found in 60 % (midmyocardial inferolateral accentuation). Given the high frequency of cardiac pathologies detected by CMRI, regular cardiac risk assessment is advisable for DMD carriers. Besides clinical examination, CMRI is an excellent tool for this purpose. (orig.)

  20. Natural user interfaces in medical image analysis cognitive analysis of brain and carotid artery images

    CERN Document Server

    Ogiela, Marek R

    2014-01-01

    This unique text/reference highlights a selection of practical applications of advanced image analysis methods for medical images. The book covers the complete methodology for processing, analysing and interpreting diagnostic results of sample CT images. The text also presents significant problems related to new approaches and paradigms in image understanding and semantic image analysis. To further engage the reader, example source code is provided for the implemented algorithms in the described solutions. Features: describes the most important methods and algorithms used for image analysis; e

  1. Genetic Identification and Risk Factor Analysis of Asymptomatic Bacterial Colonization on Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xian-Ming; An, Yi; Li, Xue-Bin; Guo, Ji-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacterial colonization of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) is widespread and increases the risk of clinical CIED infection. The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of bacterial colonization of generator pockets in patients without signs of infection and to analyze the relationship with clinical infection and risk factors. From June 2011 to December 2012, 78 patients underwent CIED replacement or upgrade. Exclusion criteria included a clinical diagnosis of CIED infection, bacteremia, or infective endocarditis. All patients were examined for evidence of bacterial 16S rDNA on the device and in the surrounding tissues. Infection cases were recorded during follow-up. The bacterial-positive rate was 38.5% (30 cases); the coagulase-negative Staphylococcus detection rate was the highest (9 cases, 11.5%). Positive bacterial DNA results were obtained from pocket tissue in 23.1% of patients (18 cases), and bacterial DNA was detected on the device in 29.5% of patients (23 cases). During follow-up (median 24.6 months), two patients (6.7%, 2/30) became symptomatic with the same species of microorganism, S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Multivariable logistic regression analysis found that the history of bacterial infection, use of antibiotics, application of antiplatelet drugs, replacement frequency, and renal insufficiency were independent risk factors for asymptomatic bacterial colonization. PMID:25530969

  2. Genetic Identification and Risk Factor Analysis of Asymptomatic Bacterial Colonization on Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Ming Chu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Asymptomatic bacterial colonization of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs is widespread and increases the risk of clinical CIED infection. The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of bacterial colonization of generator pockets in patients without signs of infection and to analyze the relationship with clinical infection and risk factors. From June 2011 to December 2012, 78 patients underwent CIED replacement or upgrade. Exclusion criteria included a clinical diagnosis of CIED infection, bacteremia, or infective endocarditis. All patients were examined for evidence of bacterial 16S rDNA on the device and in the surrounding tissues. Infection cases were recorded during follow-up. The bacterial-positive rate was 38.5% (30 cases; the coagulase-negative Staphylococcus detection rate was the highest (9 cases, 11.5%. Positive bacterial DNA results were obtained from pocket tissue in 23.1% of patients (18 cases, and bacterial DNA was detected on the device in 29.5% of patients (23 cases. During follow-up (median 24.6 months, two patients (6.7%, 2/30 became symptomatic with the same species of microorganism, S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Multivariable logistic regression analysis found that the history of bacterial infection, use of antibiotics, application of antiplatelet drugs, replacement frequency, and renal insufficiency were independent risk factors for asymptomatic bacterial colonization.

  3. Multidirectional flow analysis by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in aneurysm development following repair of aortic coarctation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stalder Aurelien F

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aneurysm formation is a life-threatening complication after operative therapy in coarctation. The identification of patients at risk for the development of such secondary pathologies is of high interest and requires a detailed understanding of the link between vascular malformation and altered hemodynamics. The routine morphometric follow-up by magnetic resonance angiography is a well-established technique. However, the intrinsic sensitivity of magnetic resonance (MR towards motion offers the possibility to additionally investigate hemodynamic consequences of morphological changes of the aorta. We demonstrate two cases of aneurysm formation 13 and 35 years after coarctation surgery based on a Waldhausen repair with a subclavian patch and a Vosschulte repair with a Dacron patch, respectively. Comprehensive flow visualization by cardiovascular MR (CMR was performed using a flow-sensitive, 3-dimensional, and 3-directional time-resolved gradient echo sequence at 3T. Subsequent analysis included the calculation of a phase contrast MR angiography and color-coded streamline and particle trace 3D visualization. Additional quantitative evaluation provided regional physiological information on blood flow and derived vessel wall parameters such as wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index. The results highlight the individual 3D blood-flow patterns associated with the different vascular pathologies following repair of aortic coarctation. In addition to known factors predisposing for aneurysm formation after surgical repair of coarctation these findings indicate the importance of flow sensitive CMR to follow up hemodynamic changes with respect to the development of vascular disease.

  4. 7 Tesla (T) human cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging using FLASH and SSFP to assess cardiac function: validation against 1.5 T and 3 T

    OpenAIRE

    Suttie, J. J.; DelaBarre, L; Pitcher, A.; van de Moortele, P. F.; Dass, S; Snyder, C. J.; Francis, J M; Metzger, G. J.; Weale, P.; Ugurbil, K; Neubauer, S.; Robson, M; Vaughan, T

    2011-01-01

    We report the first comparison of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) at 1.5 T, 3 T and 7 T field strengths using steady state free precession (SSFP) and fast low angle shot (FLASH) cine sequences. Cardiac volumes and mass measurements were assessed for feasibility, reproducibility and validity at each given field strength using FLASH and SSFP sequences. Ten healthy volunteers underwent retrospectively electrocardiogram (ECG) gated CMR at 1.5 T, 3 T and 7 T using FLASH and SSFP se...

  5. Role of multimodality cardiac imaging in preoperative cardiovascular evaluation before noncardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathala Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The preoperative cardiac assessment of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery is common in the daily practice of medical consultants, anesthesiologists, and surgeons. The number of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery worldwide is increasing. Currently, there are several noninvasive diagnostic tests available for preoperative evaluation. Both nuclear cardiology with myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and stress echocardiography are well-established techniques for preoperative cardiac evaluation. Recently, some studies demonstrated that both coronary angiography by gated multidetector computed tomography and stress cardiac magnetic resonance might potentially play a role in preoperative evaluation as well, but more studies are needed to assess the role of these new modalities in preoperative risk stratification. A common question that arises in preoperative evaluation is if further preoperative testing is needed, which preoperative test should be used. The preferred stress test is the exercise electrocardiogram (ECG. Stress imaging with exercise or pharmacologic stress agents is to be considered in patients with abnormal rest ECG or patients who are unable to exercise. After reviewing this article, the reader should develop an understanding of the following: (1 the magnitude of the cardiac preoperative morbidity and mortality, (2 how to select a patient for further preoperative testing, (3 currently available noninvasive cardiac testing for the detection of coronary artery disease and assessment of left ventricular function, and (4 an approach to select the most appropriate noninvasive cardiac test, if needed.

  6. Clinical values dataset processing through cluster analysis to find cardiovascular risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, C. M.; Legnani, W. E.; Armentano, R. L.

    2016-04-01

    The scope of this work is to show another way to grouping population with clinical variables measured in health centres and to assign a cardiovascular risk indicator. To do this, two different datasets were used, one coming from France and another coming from Uruguay. The well proved Framingham index was used to validate the results. The preliminary results are very auspicious to encourage the research and get deeper knowledge of the cardiovascular risk indicators.

  7. Digital Image Analysis for Detechip Code Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Lyon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available DETECHIP® is a molecular sensing array used for identification of a large variety of substances. Previous methodology for the analysis of DETECHIP® used human vision to distinguish color changes induced by the presence of the analyte of interest. This paper describes several analysis techniques using digital images of DETECHIP®. Both a digital camera and flatbed desktop photo scanner were used to obtain Jpeg images. Color information within these digital images was obtained through the measurement of redgreen-blue (RGB values using software such as GIMP, Photoshop and ImageJ. Several different techniques were used to evaluate these color changes. It was determined that the flatbed scanner produced in the clearest and more reproducible images. Furthermore, codes obtained using a macro written for use within ImageJ showed improved consistency versus pervious methods.

  8. Digital Image Analysis for Detechip Code Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Lyon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available DETECHIP® is a molecular sensing array used for identification of a large variety of substances. Previous methodology for the analysis of DETECHIP® used human vision to distinguish color changes induced by the presence of the analyte of interest. This paper describes several analysis techniques using digital images of DETECHIP® . Both a digital camera and flatbed desktop photo scanner were used to obtain Jpeg images. Color information within these digital images was obtained through the measurement of redgreen-blue (RGB values using software such as GIMP, Photoshop and ImageJ. Several different techniques were used to evaluate these color changes. It was determined that the flatbed scanner produced in the clearest and more reproducible images. Furthermore, codes obtained using a macro written for use within ImageJ showed improved consistency versus pervious methods.

  9. Representation learning for histopathology image analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Arevalo Ovalle, John Edilson

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Nowadays, automatic methods for image representation and analysis have been successfully applied in several medical imaging problems leading to the emergence of novel research areas like digital pathology and bioimage informatics. The main challenge of these methods is to deal with the high visual variability of biological structures present in the images, which increases the semantic gap between their visual appearance and their high level meaning. Particularly, the visual variabil...

  10. Particle Pollution Estimation Based on Image Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chenbin; Tsow, Francis; Zou, Yi; Tao, Nongjian

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to fine particles can cause various diseases, and an easily accessible method to monitor the particles can help raise public awareness and reduce harmful exposures. Here we report a method to estimate PM air pollution based on analysis of a large number of outdoor images available for Beijing, Shanghai (China) and Phoenix (US). Six image features were extracted from the images, which were used, together with other relevant data, such as the position of the sun, date, time, geographic...

  11. Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis through Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Mittal

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most common inflammatory arthropathy worldwide, but may be less prevalent in Asian populations causing pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function in joints. The spectrum of magnetic resonance imaging findings encountered in the musculoskeletal system in this disease but these images often found non-productive due to noise present in the image and creates troublesome situation for analysis point of view. The role of image processing in rheumatoid arthritis lies, not in diagnosis, but in evaluation of the integrity of structures affected by the disease process. Since Magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive to synovial changes than any radiography tech, and may permit quantification of changes in disease activity, as well as evaluation of the effects of drug therapy, and of complications of the disease and its treatment. So analyzing the Magnetic resonance images through image processing tool of Matlab provides easy going approach for diagnosis of the disease.

  12. Materials characterization through quantitative digital image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Philliber; B. Antoun; B. Somerday; N. Yang

    2000-07-01

    A digital image analysis system has been developed to allow advanced quantitative measurement of microstructural features. This capability is maintained as part of the microscopy facility at Sandia, Livermore. The system records images digitally, eliminating the use of film. Images obtained from other sources may also be imported into the system. Subsequent digital image processing enhances image appearance through the contrast and brightness adjustments. The system measures a variety of user-defined microstructural features--including area fraction, particle size and spatial distributions, grain sizes and orientations of elongated particles. These measurements are made in a semi-automatic mode through the use of macro programs and a computer controlled translation stage. A routine has been developed to create large montages of 50+ separate images. Individual image frames are matched to the nearest pixel to create seamless montages. Results from three different studies are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the system.

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging of right ventricular morphology and function in the assessment of suspected pulmonary hypertension results from the ASPIRE registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swift Andrew J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR imaging is accurate and reproducible for the assessment of right ventricular (RV morphology and function. However, the diagnostic accuracy of CMR derived RV measurements for the detection of pulmonary hypertension (PH in the assessment of patients with suspected PH in the clinic setting is not well described. Methods We retrospectively studied 233 consecutive treatment naïve patients with suspected PH including 39 patients with no PH who underwent CMR and right heart catheterisation (RHC within 48hours. The diagnostic accuracy of multiple CMR measurements for the detection of mPAP ≥ 25 mmHg was assessed using Fisher’s exact test and receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis. Results Ventricular mass index (VMI was the CMR measurement with the strongest correlation with mPAP (r = 0.78 and the highest diagnostic accuracy for the detection of PH (area under the ROC curve of 0.91 compared to an ROC of 0.88 for echocardiography calculated mPAP. Late gadolinium enhancement, VMI ≥ 0.4, retrograde flow ≥ 0.3 L/min/m2 and PA relative area change ≤ 15% predicted the presence of PH with a high degree of diagnostic certainty with a positive predictive value of 98%, 97%, 95% and 94% respectively. No single CMR parameter could confidently exclude the presence of PH. Conclusion CMR is a useful alternative to echocardiography in the evaluation of suspected PH. This study supports a role for the routine measurement of ventricular mass index, late gadolinium enhancement and the use of phase contrast imaging in addition to right heart functional indices in patients undergoing diagnostic CMR evaluation for suspected pulmonary hypertension.

  14. Viewing angle analysis of integral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Wu, Chun-Hong; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Lan

    2007-12-01

    Integral imaging (II) is a technique capable of displaying 3D images with continuous parallax in full natural color. It is becoming the most perspective technique in developing next generation three-dimensional TV (3DTV) and visualization field due to its outstanding advantages. However, most of conventional integral images are restricted by its narrow viewing angle. One reason is that the range in which a reconstructed integral image can be displayed with consistent parallax is limited. The other is that the aperture of system is finite. By far many methods , an integral imaging method to enhance the viewing angle of integral images has been proposed. Nevertheless, except Ren's MVW (Maximum Viewing Width) most of these methods involve complex hardware and modifications of optical system, which usually bring other disadvantages and make operation more difficult. At the same time the cost of these systems should be higher. In order to simplify optical systems, this paper systematically analyzes the viewing angle of traditional integral images instead of modified ones. Simultaneously for the sake of cost the research was based on computer generated integral images (CGII). With the analysis result we can know clearly how the viewing angle can be enhanced and how the image overlap or image flipping can be avoided. The result also promotes the development of optical instruments. Based on theoretical analysis, preliminary calculation was done to demonstrate how the other viewing properties which are closely related with the viewing angle, such as viewing distance, viewing zone, lens pitch, and etc. affect the viewing angle.

  15. Image Analysis of Videokymographic Data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novozámský, Adam; Sedlář, Jiří; Zita, Aleš; Šroubek, Filip; Flusser, Jan; Švec, J. G.; Vydrová, J.; Zitová, Barbara

    Piscataway: IEEE, 2015, s. 78-82. ISBN 978-1-4799-8339-1. ISSN 1522-4880. [IEEE International Conference on Image Processing 2015, ICIP 2015. Québec City (CA), 27.09.2015-30.09.2015] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA04010877; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-29225S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : videokymography * medical imaging * data segmentation Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/ZOI/novozamsky-0450604.pdf

  16. Robust image analysis of Beadchip microarrays

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalina, Jan; Schlenker, A.

    Prague, 2015. [AMISTAT 2015. Analytical Methods in Statistics. 10.11.2015-13.11.2015, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : microarray * robust image analysis * noise * outlying measurements * background effect Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  17. Facial Image Analysis in Anthropology: A Review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalina, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2011), s. 141-153. ISSN 0323-1119 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : face * computer-assisted methods * template matching * geometric morphopetrics * robust image analysis Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  18. Depth-based selective image reconstruction using spatiotemporal image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Tetsuji; Sumi, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Manabu; Seki, Akinobu

    1999-03-01

    In industrial plants, a remote monitoring system which removes physical tour inspection is often considered desirable. However the image sequence given from the mobile inspection robot is hard to see because interested objects are often partially occluded by obstacles such as pillars or fences. Our aim is to improve the image sequence that increases the efficiency and reliability of remote visual inspection. We propose a new depth-based image processing technique, which removes the needless objects from the foreground and recovers the occluded background electronically. Our algorithm is based on spatiotemporal analysis that enables fine and dense depth estimation, depth-based precise segmentation, and accurate interpolation. We apply this technique to a real time sequence given from the mobile inspection robot. The resulted image sequence is satisfactory in that the operator can make correct visual inspection with less fatigue.

  19. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Benadiba, Carine; Goossens, Katty; Kasas, Sandor; Dietler, Giovanni; Willaert, Ronnie; Sahli, Hichem

    2016-08-01

    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput) automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale). Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i) first the input image is decomposed into a 'cartoon' part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii) on the 'cartoon' image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii) quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in osteoblasts grown in

  20. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Benadiba, Carine; Goossens, Katty; Kasas, Sandor; Dietler, Giovanni; Willaert, Ronnie; Sahli, Hichem

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput) automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale). Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i) first the input image is decomposed into a ‘cartoon’ part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii) on the ‘cartoon’ image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii) quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in osteoblasts

  1. Evaluation of 2 different x-ray digital systems designed for cardiovascular angiography: patient dosimetry data and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was the comparative assessment of dose and image quality performance of a new flat-panel detector (F.D.) and an image intensifier (II) charge coupled device (C.C.D.) installed in a Catheterization laboratory (Cathlab). Poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) plates were used to simulate different patient size (10,15,20,25,30 cm). Entrance dose to the phantom and image quality of a test object (Leeds T.O.R. 18-F.G.) were measured. For analysis of image quality, two methods were used. Firstly, images were evaluated directly on the monitor (low contrast resolution and high spatial resolution). Secondly, a numerical method was used (noise and signal-to-noise ratio). Finally a preliminary patient dose survey for the two most common interventional cardiology procedures (coronary angiography C.A. and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty - P.T.C.A.) was performed. Dose area product (D.A.P.), fluoroscopy time (F.T.) and total number of frames (No. frames) were collected. The results showed that both systems performed within international recommendations; the F.D. system seems superior to the II system, in terms of entrance doses of the phantom and image quality. Surprisingly, however, this potential dose reduction is not reflected in the patient data; D.A.P. values of patient data were not significantly reduced with the new system. This underlines the need for a careful set-up of the system and a more detailed analysis of the procedure. (authors)

  2. Cardiovascular risks and brain function: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study of executive function in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Chuang, Yi-Fang; Eldreth, Dana; Kirk I Erickson; Varma, Vijay; Harris, Gregory; Fried, Linda P.; Rebok, George W.; Tanner, Elizabeth K.; Carlson, Michelle C.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia are associated with cognitive impairment and risk of dementia in older adults. However, the mechanisms linking them are not clear. This study aims to investigate the association between aggregate CV risk, assessed by the Framingham general cardiovascular risk profile, and functional brain activation in a group of community-dwelling older adults. Sixty participants (mean age: 64.6 years) from the Brain Health ...

  3. Malware Analysis Using Visualized Image Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KyoungSoo Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel malware visual analysis method that contains not only a visualization method to convert binary files into images, but also a similarity calculation method between these images. The proposed method generates RGB-colored pixels on image matrices using the opcode sequences extracted from malware samples and calculates the similarities for the image matrices. Particularly, our proposed methods are available for packed malware samples by applying them to the execution traces extracted through dynamic analysis. When the images are generated, we can reduce the overheads by extracting the opcode sequences only from the blocks that include the instructions related to staple behaviors such as functions and application programming interface (API calls. In addition, we propose a technique that generates a representative image for each malware family in order to reduce the number of comparisons for the classification of unknown samples and the colored pixel information in the image matrices is used to calculate the similarities between the images. Our experimental results show that the image matrices of malware can effectively be used to classify malware families both statically and dynamically with accuracy of 0.9896 and 0.9732, respectively.

  4. Image processing and analysis software development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presented in this project is aimed at developing a software 'IMAGE GALLERY' to investigate various image processing and analysis techniques. The work was divided into two parts namely the image processing techniques and pattern recognition, which further comprised of character and face recognition. Various image enhancement techniques including negative imaging, contrast stretching, compression of dynamic, neon, diffuse, emboss etc. have been studied. Segmentation techniques including point detection, line detection, edge detection have been studied. Also some of the smoothing and sharpening filters have been investigated. All these imaging techniques have been implemented in a window based computer program written in Visual Basic Neural network techniques based on Perception model have been applied for face and character recognition. (author)

  5. Mass media, secular trends, and the future of cardiovascular disease health promotion: an interpretive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, J R; Viswanath, K; Hertog, J

    1999-12-01

    Mass media roles in promoting cardiovascular health in the context of lessons learned from major U.S. community studies, changing media technology, and emergent models of media-community partnerships are discussed. Three principal issues are explored: (1) implications of the current expansion, convergence, and harmonization of mass media technology;(2) recent trends in media coverage of heart disease and population practices; and (3) implications for the future relationship between the media and public health in cardiovascular health promotion. It is concluded that classic campaign models focusing on individual-level change have evolved to recognize environmental-level influences on behavior. Emergent public health campaign models have moved toward "agenda-building," in which the focus is on a more unified approach to influencing public and community agendas for social, behavioral, and policy change. Recent developments among the commercial mass media may offer new opportunities for public health partnerships to promote cardiovascular health. PMID:10641818

  6. In silico analysis of Progeria: A genetic disease and natural cardiovascular disorders preventive compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shraddha Mulange

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria (also known as "Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome"(HGPS is an extremely rare, severe, genetic condition wherein symptoms resembling aspects of aging are manifested at an early age. The basic objective of this study is how is it responsible for faster ageing than normal? The study of its bioinformatics aspect explaining where the mutation occurs in normal LMNA gene to form mutated Progerin. We explain its sequential and structural aspects in domain and motif. Structural visualization by Marker view software provides the linear structure of LMNA and mutated LMNA. We studied the properties and specificity of Lonafarnib (an edible drug available in market against Progerin with Docking. Cardiovascular disorders are the major symptoms occurred in Progerin patients. Therefore we found 32 natural compounds with their sources having anti cardiovascular disorders activity. We checked its docking properties and ADMET properties. From this we came to conclude 11 most effective, edible, naturally occurring compounds for cardiovascular disorders in Progerin patients.

  7. Principal component analysis of scintimammographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifazzi, Claudio; Cinti, Maria Nerina; Vincentis, Giuseppe De; Finos, Livio; Muzzioli, Valerio; Betti, Margherita; Nico, Lanconelli; Tartari, Agostino; Pani, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    The recent development of new gamma imagers based on scintillation array with high spatial resolution, has strongly improved the possibility of detecting sub-centimeter cancer in Scintimammography. However, Compton scattering contamination remains the main drawback since it limits the sensitivity of tumor detection. Principal component image analysis (PCA), recently introduced in scintimam nographic imaging, is a data reduction technique able to represent the radiation emitted from chest, breast healthy and damaged tissues as separated images. From these images a Scintimammography can be obtained where the Compton contamination is "removed". In the present paper we compared the PCA reconstructed images with the conventional scintimammographic images resulting from the photopeak (Ph) energy window. Data coming from a clinical trial were used. For both kinds of images the tumor presence was quantified by evaluating the t-student statistics for independent sample as a measure of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Since the absence of Compton scattering, the PCA reconstructed images shows a better noise suppression and allows a more reliable diagnostics in comparison with the images obtained by the photopeak energy window, reducing the trend in producing false positive. PMID:17646004

  8. Cardiovascular risk profile: Cross-sectional analysis of motivational determinants, physical fitness and physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiers Henri

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular risk factors are associated with physical fitness and, to a lesser extent, physical activity. Lifestyle interventions directed at enhancing physical fitness in order to decrease the risk of cardiovascular diseases should be extended. To enable the development of effective lifestyle interventions for people with cardiovascular risk factors, we investigated motivational, social-cognitive determinants derived from the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB and other relevant social psychological theories, next to physical activity and physical fitness. Methods In the cross-sectional Utrecht Police Lifestyle Intervention Fitness and Training (UP-LIFT study, 1298 employees (aged 18 to 62 were asked to complete online questionnaires regarding social-cognitive variables and physical activity. Cardiovascular risk factors and physical fitness (peak VO2 were measured. Results For people with one or more cardiovascular risk factors (78.7% of the total population, social-cognitive variables accounted for 39% (p In addition to the prediction of intention to engage in physical activity and physical active behavior, we explored the impact of the intensity of physical activity. The intentsity of physical activity was only significantly related to physical active behavior (beta = .253, p 2 = .06, p 2 = .23, p For people with one or more cardiovascular risk factors, 39.9% had positive intentions to engage in physical activity and were also physically active, and 10.5% had a low intentions but were physically active. 37.7% had low intentions and were physically inactive, and about 11.9% had high intentions but were physically inactive. Conclusions This study contributes to our ability to optimize cardiovascular risk profiles by demonstrating an important association between physical fitness and social-cognitive variables. Physical fitness can be predicted by physical active behavior as well as by self-efficacy and the intensity of

  9. Cardiovascular group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  10. Reduced radiation dose and improved image quality at cardiovascular CT angiography by automated attenuation-based tube voltage selection: intra-individual comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the effect of automated tube voltage selection on radiation dose and image quality at cardiovascular CT angiography (CTA). We retrospectively analysed paired studies in 72 patients (41 male, 60.5 ± 16.5 years), who had undergone CTA acquisitions of the heart or aorta both before and after the implementation of an automated x-ray tube voltage selection algorithm (ATVS). All other parameters were kept identical between the two acquisitions. Subjective image quality (IQ) was rated and objective IQ was measured by image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and figure of merit (FOM). Image quality parameters and effective dose were compared between acquisitions. Overall subjective image quality improved with the percentage of cases scored as adequate or higher increasing from 79 % to 92 % after implementation of ATVS (P = 0.03). SNR (14.1 ± 5.9, 15.7 ± 6.1, P = 0.009), CNR (11.6 ± 5.3, 13.2 ± 5.6, P = 0.011), and FOM (19.9 ± 23.3, 43.8 ± 51.1, P < 0.001) were significantly higher after implementation of ATVS. Mean image noise (24.1 ± 8.4 HU, 22.7 ± 7.1 HU, P = 0.048) and mean effective dose (10.6 ± 5.9 mSv, 8.8 ± 5.0 mSv, P = 0.003) were significantly lower after implementation of ATVS. Automated tube voltage selection can operator-independently optimize cardiovascular CTA image acquisition parameters with improved image quality at reduced dose. (orig.)

  11. Present and future of clinical cardiovascular PET imaging in Europe - a position statement by the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This position statement was prepared by the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology and summarises the current and future potential of PET as a clinical cardiovascular diagnostic imaging tool. The first section describes how methodological developments have positively influenced the transition of PET from a research tool towards a clinical diagnostic test. In the second section, evidence in support of its superior diagnostic accuracy, its value to guide decision making and to predict outcome and its cost effectiveness is summarised. The third section finally outlines new PET-based approaches and concepts, which will likely influence clinical cardiovascular medicine in the future. The notion that integration of cardiac PET into healthcare systems and disease management algorithms will advance quality of care is increasingly supported by the literature highlighted in this statement. (orig.)

  12. Assessment of cardiovascular reactivity by fractal and recurrence quantification analysis of heart rate and pulse transit time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naschitz, J E; Rosner, I; Shaviv, N; Khorshidi, I; Sundick, S; Isseroff, H; Fields, M; Priselac, R M; Yeshurun, D; Sabo, E; Itzhak, R

    2003-02-01

    Methods used for the assessment of cardiovascular reactivity are flawed by nonlinear dynamics of the cardiovascular responses to stimuli. In an attempt to address this issue, we utilized a short postural challenge, recorded beat-to-beat heart rate (HR) and pulse transit time (PTT), assessed the data by fractal and recurrence quantification analysis, and processed the obtained variables by multivariate statistics. A 10-min supine phase of the head-up tilt test was followed by recording 600 cardiac cycles on tilt, that is, 5-10 min. Three groups of patients were studied, each including 20 subjects matched for age and gender--healthy subjects, patients with essential hypertension (HT), and patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). The latter group was studied on account of the well-known dysautonomia of CFS patients, which served as contrast against the cardiovascular reactivity of the healthy population. A total of 52 variables of the HR and PTT were determined in each subject. The multivariate model identified the best predictors for the assessment of reactivity of healthy subjects vs CFS. Based on these predictors, the "Fractal & Recurrence Analysis-based Score" (FRAS) was calculated: FRAS=76.2+0.04*HR-supine-DET -12.9*HR-tilt-R/L -0.31*HR-tilt-s.d. -19.27*PTT-tilt-R/L -9.42*PTT-tilt-WAVE. The median values and IQR of FRAS in the groups were: healthy=-1.85 (IQR 1.89), hypertensives=+0.52 (IQR 5.78), and CFS=-24.2 (5.34) (HT vs healthy subjects: P=0.0036; HT vs CFS: P<0.0001). Since the FRAS differed significantly between the three groups, it appears likely that the FRAS may recognize phenotypes of cardiovascular reactivity. PMID:12574789

  13. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the right ventricle

    OpenAIRE

    Alpendurada, Francisco Diogo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Whilst most of the attention has been devoted to the left ventricle in cardiovascular disease, the right ventricle has been somewhat neglected. In the last decades, there has been a renewal of interest in the right ventricle, in part driven by advances in cardiovascular imaging. Methods: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance is arguably the best imaging modality for the study of the right ventricle. In this research thesis, cardiovascular magnetic resonance w...

  14. Multispectral dual isotope and NMR image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dual isotope scintigraphy and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging produce image data that is intrinsically multispectral. That is multiple images of the same anatomic region are generated with different gray scale distribution and morphologic content that is largely redundant. Image processing technology, originally developed by NASA for satellite imaging, is available for multispectral analysis. These methods have been applied to provide tissue characterization. Tissue specific information encoded in the grapy scale data from dual isotope and NMR studies may be extracted using multispectral pattern recognition methods. The authors used table lookup minimum distance, maximum likelihood and cluster analysis techniques with data sets from Ga-67 / Tc-99m, 1-131 labeled antibodies / Tc-99m, Tc-99m perfusion / Xe-133 ventilation, and NMR studies. The results show; tissue characteristic signatures exist in dual isotope and NMR imaging, and these spectral signatures are identifiable using multispectral image analysis and provide tissue classification maps with scatter diagrams that facilitate interpretation and assist in elucidating subtle changes

  15. Quantitative Analysis in Multimodality Molecular Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET offers the possibility of truly quantitative (physiological) measurements of tracer concentration in vivo. However, there are several issues limiting both visual qualitative interpretation and quantitative analysis capabilities of reconstructed PET images that must be considered in order to fully realize this potential. The major challenges to quantitative PET can be categorized in 5 classes: (i) factors related to imaging system performance and data acquisition protocols (instrumentation and measurement factors), (ii) those related to the physics of photon interaction with biologic tissues (physical factors), (iii) image reconstruction (reconstruction factors), (iv) factors related to patient motion and other physiological issues (physiological factors), and (v) Methodological factors: issues related to difficulties in developing accurate tracer kinetic models, especially at the voxel level. This paper reflects the tremendous increase in interest in quantitative molecular imaging using PET as both clinical and research imaging modality in the past decade. It offers an overview of the entire range of quantitative PET imaging from basic principles to various steps required for obtaining quantitatively accurate data from dedicated standalone PET and combined PET/CT and PET/MR systems including data collection methods and algorithms used to correct for physical degrading factors as well as image processing and analysis techniques and their clinical and research applications. Impact of physical degrading factors including attenuation of photons and contribution from photons scattered in the patient and partial volume effect on the diagnostic quality and quantitative accuracy of PET data will be discussed. Considerable advances have been made and much worthwhile research focused on the development of quantitative imaging protocols incorporating accurate data correction techniques and sophisticated image reconstruction algorithms. The fundamental concepts of

  16. Spatio-temporal (2D+T) non-rigid registration of real-time 3D echocardiography and cardiovascular MR image sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we describe a method to non-rigidly co-register a 2D slice sequence from real-time 3D echocardiography with a 2D cardiovascular MR image sequence. This is challenging because the imaging modalities have different spatial and temporal resolution. Non-rigid registration is required for accurate alignment due to imprecision of cardiac gating and natural motion variations between cardiac cycles. In our approach the deformation field between the imaging modalities is decoupled into temporal and spatial components. First, temporal alignment is performed to establish temporal correspondence between a real-time 3D echocardiography frame and a cardiovascular MR frame. Spatial alignment is then performed using an adaptive non-rigid registration algorithm based on local phase mutual information on each temporally aligned image pair. Experiments on seven volunteer datasets are reported. Evaluation of registration errors based on expert-identified landmarks shows that the spatio-temporal registration algorithm gives a mean registration error of 3.56 ± 0.49 and 3.54 ± 0.27 mm for the short and long axis sequences, respectively.

  17. Elemental analysis of some herbal plants used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases by NAA and AAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elemental analysis of some herbal plants used in the ayurveda for curing of cardiovascular diseases has been performed using the techniques of neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The concentration of elements Mn, Na, K and Cl has been estimated by NAA using a 252Cf neutron source and a high purity germanium detector coupled to a multichannel analyzer, while the elements, Ca, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Pb, Zn, Ni, Cd and Hg were analysed by ASS using a Perkin Elmer 3100 instrument. (author)

  18. Genomics in cardiovascular diseases: analysis of the importance of the toll-like receptor signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bustamante J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available J Bustamante,1 E Tamayo,2 J Herreros3,41Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Hospital Universitario La Princesa, Madrid, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Hospital Clinico Universitario de Valladolid, Valladolid, 3Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Hospital Universitario Valdecilla, Santander, 4Biomedical Engineering Institute of Santander, Santander, SpainAbstract: The development of techniques for genomics study makes it possible for us to further our knowledge about the physiopathology of various immunological or infectious diseases. These techniques improve our understanding of the development and evolution of such diseases, including those of cardiovascular origin, whilst they help to bring about the design of new therapeutic strategies. We are reviewing the genetic alterations of immunity in said field, and focusing on the signaling pathway of toll-like receptors because not only does this play a decisive role in response to microorganisms, it is also heavily involved in modulating the inflammatory response to tissue damage, a side effect of numerous cardiovascular diseases. These alterations in tissue homeostasis are present under a wide range of circumstances, such as reperfusion ischemia (myocardial infarction phenomena, arteriosclerosis, or valvulopathy.Keywords: genome-wide association study, single-nucleotide polymorphism, innate immune system, ischemic/reperfusion, myocardial infarction

  19. Cardiovascular disease risk in women with premature ovarian insufficiency : A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeters van Lennep, Jeanine E; Heida, Karst Y; Bots, Michiel L; Hoek, Annemieke

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: The purpose of this review was to assess the relationship between premature ovarian insufficiency (POI), defined as natural menopause <40 years, and risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), stroke and overall cardiovascular disease (CVD). METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a systematic search in

  20. Cardiovascular disease after treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma: an analysis of nine collaborative EORTC-LYSA trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V.; Giusti, Francesco; Vogelius, Ivan R.;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease after treatment is an important concern in cancer survivors. However, knowledge of cardiotoxicity is limited by the retrospective nature of data, which often does not contain details of treatment exposure. To facilitate individual risk counselling of patients, w...

  1. Cardiovascular disease after treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma : an analysis of nine collaborative EORTC-LYSA trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maraldo, Maja V.; Giusti, Francesco; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Lundemann, Michael; van der Kaaij, Marleen A. E.; Ramadan, Safaa; Meulemans, Bart; Henry-Amar, Michel; Aleman, Berthe M. P.; Raemaekers, John; Meijnders, Paul; Moser, Elisabeth C.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Feugier, Pierre; Casasnovas, Olivier; Fortpied, Catherine; Specht, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease after treatment is an important concern in cancer survivors. However, knowledge of cardiotoxicity is limited by the retrospective nature of data, which often does not contain details of treatment exposure. To facilitate individual risk counselling of patients, we ai

  2. Analysis of production of the decellularized scaffolds and their potential use in cardiovascular surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brumberg V.A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Data on application of decellularized scaffolds and tissue-engineered vascular conduits in the field of cardiovascular surgery have been analyzed, and also techniques for their procurement have been studied. For finding, selection and synthesis resources of research data from the systems Pubmed, ScienceDirect were used. The preference was given to the most informative, comprehensive and contemporary publications.

  3. Cardiovascular disease-risk benefits of clean fuel technology and policy: A statistical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, Paul, E-mail: paulg@iastate.ed [Economics Department, 481 Heady Hall, Iowa State University, Ames Iowa 50011 (United States); Lazarus, William [Applied Economics Department, 253 COB, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55455 (United States); Shapouri, Hosein; Conway, Roger [Office of Energy Policy and New Uses, 400 Independence Avenue, SW (Rm.4059 So. Bldg), United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250 (United States); Bachewe, Fantu [Applied Economics Department, 253 COB, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55455 (United States); Fischer, Amelia [Economics Department, 481 Heady Hall, Iowa State University, Ames Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    The hypothesis of this study is that there is a statistical relationship between the cardiovascular disease mortality rate and the intensity of fuel consumption (measured in gallons/square mile) at a particular location. We estimate cross-sectional regressions of the mortality rate due to cardiovascular disease against the intensity of fuel consumption using local data for the entire US, before the US Clean Air Act (CAA) in 1974 and after the most recent policy revisions in 2004. The cardiovascular disease rate improvement estimate suggests that up to 60 cardiovascular disease deaths per 100,000 residents are avoided in the largest urban areas with highest fuel consumption per square mile. In New York City, for instance, the mortality reduction may be worth about $30.3 billion annually. Across the US, the estimated Value of Statistical Life (VSL) benefit is $202.7 billion annually. There are likely three inseparable reasons that contributed importantly to this welfare improvement. First, the CAA regulations banned leaded gasoline, and mandated reduction in specific chemicals and smog components. Second, technologies such as the Catalytic Converter (CC) for the automobile and the low particulate diesel engine were adopted. Third, biofuels have had important roles, making the adoption of clean air technology possible and substituting for high emission fuels.

  4. Cardiovascular disease - risk benefits of clean fuel technology and policy. A statistical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, Paul; Fischer, Amelia [Economics Department, 481 Heady Hall, Iowa State University, Ames Iowa 50011 (United States); Lazarus, William; Bachewe, Fantu [Applied Economics Department, 253 COB, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55455 (United States); Shapouri, Hosein; Conway, Roger [Office of Energy Policy and New Uses, 400 Independence Avenue, SW (Rm.4059 So. Bldg), United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    The hypothesis of this study is that there is a statistical relationship between the cardiovascular disease mortality rate and the intensity of fuel consumption (measured in gallons/square mile) at a particular location. We estimate cross-sectional regressions of the mortality rate due to cardiovascular disease against the intensity of fuel consumption using local data for the entire US, before the US Clean Air Act (CAA) in 1974 and after the most recent policy revisions in 2004. The cardiovascular disease rate improvement estimate suggests that up to 60 cardiovascular disease deaths per 100,000 residents are avoided in the largest urban areas with highest fuel consumption per square mile. In New York City, for instance, the mortality reduction may be worth about $30.3 billion annually. Across the US, the estimated Value of Statistical Life (VSL) benefit is $202.7 billion annually. There are likely three inseparable reasons that contributed importantly to this welfare improvement. First, the CAA regulations banned leaded gasoline, and mandated reduction in specific chemicals and smog components. Second, technologies such as the Catalytic Converter (CC) for the automobile and the low particulate diesel engine were adopted. Third, biofuels have had important roles, making the adoption of clean air technology possible and substituting for high emission fuels. (author)

  5. Evaluation of factor analysis and other functional images in exercise gated blood-pool study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factor analysis, a new method of functional imaging, has been applied to cardiovascular nuclear medicine. Because of the difficulty of its interpretation, it has not been popular as a method for detecting abnormal wall motion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of factor analysis in exercise gated blood-pool study in patients with ischemic heart disease. In our factor analysis, left ventricular region of interest (LVROI) was extracted to exclude the surrounding radioactivities. The new method was compared with the conventional factor analysis using whole region (whole ROI method), and the other functional images, i.e. stroke volume, ejection fraction and phase images. At first we tried 3-factor analysis of the LVROI method, which resulted in many uninterpretable factors. Whereas in 2-factor analysis no uninterpretable factors were extracted. In comparison with cine-mode display, the LVROI method with 2-factor analysis showed the best sensitivity (85%) and specificity (100%). In exercise gated blood-pool study, it became easier to detect abnormal wall motion by comparing the factor image at exercise with resting image. In conclusion, the 2-factor analysis using the LVROI method greatly improved the limitation of conventional factor analysis, and will be useful in detecting wall motion abnormality in patients with ischemic heart disase. (author)

  6. Analyses of Results From Cardiovascular Safety Trials With DPP-4 Inhibitors: Cardiovascular Outcomes, Predefined Safety Outcomes, and Pooled Analysis and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannucci, Edoardo; Mosenzon, Ofri; Avogaro, Angelo

    2016-08-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration requires that the cardiovascular (CV) safety of all new drugs for diabetes be demonstrated through pooled analyses of phase III studies or specifically designed trials. This requirement prompted several placebo-controlled, noninferiority CV safety trials in high-risk patients; to date, all completed trials showed that dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors do not increase or reduce the risk of major CV events. These results apparently contrast with those of pooled analyses and meta-analyses of previous, smaller trials with metabolic end points, which had suggested a reduction of risk. However, the design of CV trials, which were required to demonstrate safety, is not adequate (for duration, management of concurrent therapies, etc.) for the assessment of potential therapeutic benefits. In addition, CV safety trials enroll patients at high risk of CV events, who are different from those included in earlier trials with metabolic end points. Differences in characteristics of patients enrolled probably account for most of the discrepancy in CV outcomes between CV safety studies and earlier trials. The availability of several large-scale trials with longer duration provides the unique opportunity for assessment of the safety of DPP-4 inhibitors not only with respect to major CV events but also with reference to other safety issues. For example, CV safety trials can be a source of information for pancreatitis, cancer, or hypoglycemia. PMID:27440833

  7. Accelerated cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the mouse heart using self-gated parallel imaging strategies does not compromise accuracy of structural and functional measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörries Carola

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-gated dynamic cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR enables non-invasive visualization of the heart and accurate assessment of cardiac function in mouse models of human disease. However, self-gated CMR requires the acquisition of large datasets to ensure accurate and artifact-free reconstruction of cardiac cines and is therefore hampered by long acquisition times putting high demands on the physiological stability of the animal. For this reason, we evaluated the feasibility of accelerating the data collection using the parallel imaging technique SENSE with respect to both anatomical definition and cardiac function quantification. Results Findings obtained from accelerated data sets were compared to fully sampled reference data. Our results revealed only minor differences in image quality of short- and long-axis cardiac cines: small anatomical structures (papillary muscles and the aortic valve and left-ventricular (LV remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI were accurately detected even for 3-fold accelerated data acquisition using a four-element phased array coil. Quantitative analysis of LV cardiac function (end-diastolic volume (EDV, end-systolic volume (ESV, stroke volume (SV, ejection fraction (EF and LV mass in healthy and infarcted animals revealed no substantial deviations from reference (fully sampled data for all investigated acceleration factors with deviations ranging from 2% to 6% in healthy animals and from 2% to 8% in infarcted mice for the highest acceleration factor of 3.0. CNR calculations performed between LV myocardial wall and LV cavity revealed a maximum CNR decrease of 50% for the 3-fold accelerated data acquisition when compared to the fully-sampled acquisition. Conclusions We have demonstrated the feasibility of accelerated self-gated retrospective CMR in mice using the parallel imaging technique SENSE. The proposed method led to considerably reduced acquisition times, while preserving high

  8. Quantitative analysis of qualitative images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockney, David; Falco, Charles M.

    2005-03-01

    We show optical evidence that demonstrates artists as early as Jan van Eyck and Robert Campin (c1425) used optical projections as aids for producing their paintings. We also have found optical evidence within works by later artists, including Bermejo (c1475), Lotto (c1525), Caravaggio (c1600), de la Tour (c1650), Chardin (c1750) and Ingres (c1825), demonstrating a continuum in the use of optical projections by artists, along with an evolution in the sophistication of that use. However, even for paintings where we have been able to extract unambiguous, quantitative evidence of the direct use of optical projections for producing certain of the features, this does not mean that paintings are effectively photographs. Because the hand and mind of the artist are intimately involved in the creation process, understanding these complex images requires more than can be obtained from only applying the equations of geometrical optics.

  9. Analysis of Cardiovascular Diseases Costs and Their Effective Factors in Tabriz Hospitalized Patients, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Cardiovascular diseases are the most important chronic diseases with significant negative effects on the individuals’ quality of life and communities’ economic productivity. Objectives The present study aimed to analyze the costs of cardiovascular diseases and identify the related factors in hospitalized patients of Tabriz Shahid Madani hospital in 2015. Patients and Methods This paper was a cross-sectional study. Cost information was obtained by a bottom-up approach from the patients and their families’ perspective. A number of 285 patients were randomly selected to participate in the study. For data collection, the study deployed a researcher-made questionnaire whose validity and reliability were confirmed by statistical tests. First, the collected data were analyzed using descriptive methods. And then, the researchers used t-test and ANOVA to analyze the relationship between demographic variables and the different types of cost. Tukey test was used to compare differences between groups groups, the researchers used. Results The Study findings showed that the total cost of cardiovascular diseases was 13,074,700 Rials (US$462 per patient. The details of the costs of cardiovascular diseases also showed that direct medical costs, direct non-medical costs, and indirect costs were 10,909,100 Rials (US$386, 109’940 Rials (US$38.90, and 1,066,200 Rials (37.73 US$ which were 83.4%, 8.4% and 8.2% of the total costs, respectively. Statistical analyses indicated a significant relationship between gender, marital status, education, job status, location, type of disease, type of admission, and the reason for hospitalization and some types of assessed costs (P < 0.05. Conclusions The study showed that the costs associated with cardiovascular diseases were not reasonable for many of these patients and their families. This certainly requires more consideration by managers and policy makers in the health care sector and the implementation of

  10. Analysis of Image Segmentation Algorithms Using MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Khare

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Image segmentation has played an important role in computer vision especially for human tracking. The result of image segmentation is a set of segments that collectively cover the entire image or a set of contours extracted from the image. Its accuracy but very elusive is very crucial in areas as medical, remote sensing and image retrieval where it may contribute to save, sustain and protect human life. This paper presents the analysis and implementation using MATLAB features and one best result can be selected for any algorithm using the subjective evaluation. We considered the techniques under the following five groups: Edge-based, Clustering-based, Region-based, Threshold-based and Graph-based.

  11. Implicitly Weighted Methods in Robust Image Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kalina, J. (Jan)

    2012-01-01

    This paper is devoted to highly robust statistical methods with applications to image analysis. The methods of the paper exploit the idea of implicit weighting, which is inspired by the highly robust least weighted squares regression estimator. We use a correlation coefficient based on implicit weighting of individual pixels as a highly robust similarity measure between two images. The reweighted least weighted squares estimator is considered as an alternative regression estimator with a clea...

  12. Mathematical foundations of image processing and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pinoli, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical Imaging is currently a rapidly growing field in applied mathematics, with an increasing need for theoretical mathematics. This book, the second of two volumes, emphasizes the role of mathematics as a rigorous basis for imaging sciences. It provides a comprehensive and convenient overview of the key mathematical concepts, notions, tools and frameworks involved in the various fields of gray-tone and binary image processing and analysis, by proposing a large, but coherent, set of symbols and notations, a complete list of subjects and a detailed bibliography. It establishes a bridg

  13. Overweight in childhood, adolescence and adulthood and cardiovascular risk in later life: pooled analysis of three british birth cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hae Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Overweight and obesity in adulthood are established risk factors for adverse cardiovascular outcomes, but the contribution of overweight in childhood to later cardiovascular risk is less clear. Evidence for a direct effect of childhood overweight would highlight early life as an important target for cardiovascular disease prevention. The aim of this study was to assess whether overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescence contribute to excess cardiovascular risk in adults. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Data from three British birth cohorts, born in 1946, 1958 and 1970, were pooled for analysis (n = 11,447. Individuals were categorised, based on body mass index (BMI, as being of normal weight or overweight/obese in childhood, adolescence and adulthood. Eight patterns of overweight were defined according to weight status at these three stages. Logistic regression models were fitted to assess the associations of patterns of overweight with self-reported type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and coronary heart disease (CHD in adulthood (34-53 years. Compared to cohort members who were never overweight, those who were obese in adulthood had increased risk of all outcomes. For type 2 diabetes, the odds ratio was higher for obese adults who were also overweight or obese in childhood and adolescence (OR 12.6; 95% CI 6.6 to 24.0 than for those who were obese in adulthood only (OR 5.5; 95% CI 3.4 to 8.8. There was no such effect of child or adolescent overweight on hypertension. For CHD, there was weak evidence of increased risk among those with overweight in childhood. The main limitations of this study concern the use of self-reported outcomes and the generalisability of findings to contemporary child populations. CONCLUSIONS: Type 2 diabetes and to a lesser extent CHD risk may be affected by overweight at all stages of life, while hypertension risk is associated more strongly with weight status in adulthood.

  14. Characteristics and popular topics of latest researches into the effects of air particulate matter on cardiovascular system by bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaofeng; Guo, Xinbiao; Li, Haicun; An, Xinying; Zhao, Yingguang

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, many epidemiological and toxicological studies have investigated the adverse effects of air particulate matter (PM) on the cardiovascular system. However, it is difficult for the researchers to have a timely and effective overall command of the latest characteristics and popular topics in such a wide field. Different from the previous reviews, in which the research characteristics and trends are empirically concluded by experts, we try to have a comprehensive evaluation of the above topics for the first time by bibliometric analysis, a quantitative tool in information exploration. This study aims to introduce the bibliometric method into the field of PM and cardiovascular system. The articles were selected by searching PubMed/MEDLINE (from 2007 to 2012) using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms "particulate matter" and "cardiovascular system". A total of 935 eligible articles and 1895 MeSH terms were retrieved and processed by the software Thomson Data Analyzer (TDA). The bibliographic information and the MeSH terms of these articles were classified and analyzed to summarize the research characteristics. The top 200 high-frequency MeSH terms (the cumulative frequency percentage was 74.2%) were clustered for popular-topic conclusion. We summarized the characteristics of published articles, of researcher collaborations and of the contents. Ten clusters of MeSH terms are presented. Six popular topics are concluded and elaborated for reference. Our study presents an overview of the characteristics and popular topics in the field of PM and cardiovascular system in the past five years by bibliometric tools, which may provide a new perspective for future researchers. PMID:23480197

  15. Design Criteria For Networked Image Analysis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, Cliff; Nitteberg, Alan

    1982-01-01

    Image systems design is currently undergoing a metamorphosis from the conventional computing systems of the past into a new generation of special purpose designs. This change is motivated by several factors, notably among which is the increased opportunity for high performance with low cost offered by advances in semiconductor technology. Another key issue is a maturing in understanding of problems and the applicability of digital processing techniques. These factors allow the design of cost-effective systems that are functionally dedicated to specific applications and used in a utilitarian fashion. Following an overview of the above stated issues, the paper presents a top-down approach to the design of networked image analysis systems. The requirements for such a system are presented, with orientation toward the hospital environment. The three main areas are image data base management, viewing of image data and image data processing. This is followed by a survey of the current state of the art, covering image display systems, data base techniques, communications networks and software systems control. The paper concludes with a description of the functional subystems and architectural framework for networked image analysis in a production environment.

  16. 2014 Korean guidelines for appropriate utilization of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging: A joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is increasing for the assessment of certain cardiovascular diseases, due to recent technical developments. CMR can give physicians information that cannot be found with other imaging modalities. However, there has been no guideline for the use of CMR in Korean people. Therefore, we have prepared a Korean guideline for the appropriate utilization of CMR to guide Korean physicians, imaging specialists, medical associates, and patients to improve the overall performances in medical system. By addressing CMR usage and creating these guidelines, we hope to contribute to the promotion of public health. This guideline is a joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology.

  17. 2014 Korean guidelines for appropriate utilization of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging: A joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yeon Yee E. [Dept. of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yoo Jin; Choi, Eui Young [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-04-15

    The use of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is increasing for the assessment of certain cardiovascular diseases, due to recent technical developments. CMR can give physicians information that cannot be found with other imaging modalities. However, there has been no guideline for the use of CMR in Korean people. Therefore, we have prepared a Korean guideline for the appropriate utilization of CMR to guide Korean physicians, imaging specialists, medical associates, and patients to improve the overall performances in medical system. By addressing CMR usage and creating these guidelines, we hope to contribute to the promotion of public health. This guideline is a joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology.

  18. 2014 Korean Guidelines for Appropriate Utilization of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Joint Report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yeonyee E. [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yoo Jin [Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung-Kwan [Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong A [Department of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang 411-706 (Korea, Republic of); Na, Jin Oh [Cardiovascular Center, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 152-703 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Dong Hyun [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Jin [Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eui-Young [Division of Cardiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 135-720 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is now widely used in several fields of cardiovascular disease assessment due to recent technical developments. CMR can give physicians information that cannot be found with other imaging modalities. However, there is no guideline which is suitable for Korean people for the use of CMR. Therefore, we have prepared a Korean guideline for the appropriate utilization of CMR to guide Korean physicians, imaging specialists, medical associates and patients to improve the overall medical system performances. By addressing CMR usage and creating these guidelines we hope to contribute towards the promotion of public health. This guideline is a joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology.

  19. 2014 Korean Guidelines for Appropriate Utilization of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Joint Report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is now widely used in several fields of cardiovascular disease assessment due to recent technical developments. CMR can give physicians information that cannot be found with other imaging modalities. However, there is no guideline which is suitable for Korean people for the use of CMR. Therefore, we have prepared a Korean guideline for the appropriate utilization of CMR to guide Korean physicians, imaging specialists, medical associates and patients to improve the overall medical system performances. By addressing CMR usage and creating these guidelines we hope to contribute towards the promotion of public health. This guideline is a joint report of the Korean Society of Cardiology and the Korean Society of Radiology

  20. Image analysis of insulation mineral fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, H; Lee, T; Jeulin, D; Hanton, D; Hobbs, L W

    2000-12-01

    We present two methods for measuring the diameter and length of man-made vitreous fibres based on the automated image analysis of scanning electron microscopy images. The fibres we want to measure are used in materials such as glass wool, which in turn are used for thermal and acoustic insulation. The measurement of the diameters and lengths of these fibres is used by the glass wool industry for quality control purposes. To obtain reliable quality estimators, the measurement of several hundred images is necessary. These measurements are usually obtained manually by operators. Manual measurements, although reliable when performed by skilled operators, are slow due to the need for the operators to rest often to retain their ability to spot faint fibres on noisy backgrounds. Moreover, the task of measuring thousands of fibres every day, even with the help of semi-automated image analysis systems, is dull and repetitive. The need for an automated procedure which could replace manual measurements is quite real. For each of the two methods that we propose to accomplish this task, we present the sample preparation, the microscope setting and the image analysis algorithms used for the segmentation of the fibres and for their measurement. We also show how a statistical analysis of the results can alleviate most measurement biases, and how we can estimate the true distribution of fibre lengths by diameter class by measuring only the lengths of the fibres visible in the field of view. PMID:11106965

  1. Objective facial photograph analysis using imaging software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Annette M; Tollefson, Travis T

    2010-05-01

    Facial analysis is an integral part of the surgical planning process. Clinical photography has long been an invaluable tool in the surgeon's practice not only for accurate facial analysis but also for enhancing communication between the patient and surgeon, for evaluating postoperative results, for medicolegal documentation, and for educational and teaching opportunities. From 35-mm slide film to the digital technology of today, clinical photography has benefited greatly from technological advances. With the development of computer imaging software, objective facial analysis becomes easier to perform and less time consuming. Thus, while the original purpose of facial analysis remains the same, the process becomes much more efficient and allows for some objectivity. Although clinical judgment and artistry of technique is never compromised, the ability to perform objective facial photograph analysis using imaging software may become the standard in facial plastic surgery practices in the future. PMID:20511080

  2. AN OVERVIEW OF DOCUMENT IMAGE ANALYSIS SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Andrei Tigora

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of Document Image Analysis Systems, their composing modules, the approaches these modules use, as well as uses for these applications. One of the main goals is to present some of the most important technologies and methods behind the Document Image Analysis domain in order to evaluate the best approach when dealing with real-world documents. The other main goal is to ensure a foundation for those starting to build such complex software systems and to give an el...

  3. Comprehensive assessment of a post-coronary bypass graft patient with cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging and multi-detector computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pairoj Rerkpattanapipat; Patcharee Paijitprapaporn; Suthipong Jongjirasiri; Jiraporn Laothamatas; Nithi Mahanonda

    2007-01-01

    Coronary bypass graft surgery (CABG) is a revascularization procedure which reduces myocardial ischemia and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in selected patients; however, up to 40% of saphanous vein grafts may degenerate over 10 years. Although coronary angiography is the gold standard to detect graft patency and native vessel disease, sometimes it is difficult to locate the grafts resulting in increased exposure to radiation and contrast administration. This case highlights the utility of cardiac computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging to provide comprehensive noninvasive assessment in a patient post CABG.

  4. The effectiveness and cost effectiveness of dark chocolate consumption as prevention therapy in people at high risk of cardiovascular disease: best case scenario analysis using a Markov model

    OpenAIRE

    Zomer, Ella; Owen, Alice; Magliano, Dianna J; Liew, Danny; Reid, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To model the long term effectiveness and cost effectiveness of daily dark chocolate consumption in a population with metabolic syndrome at high risk of cardiovascular disease. Design Best case scenario analysis using a Markov model. Setting Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle study. Participants 2013 people with hypertension who met the criteria for metabolic syndrome, with no history of cardiovascular disease and not receiving antihypertensive therapy. Main outcome measures ...

  5. Mortality from Cardiovascular Diseases in the Elderly: Comparative Analysis of Two Five-year Periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grasiela Piuvezam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in Brazil. The better understanding of the spatial and temporal distribution of mortality from cardiovascular diseases in the Brazilian elderly population is essential to support more appropriate health actions for each region of the country.Objective:To describe and to compare geospatially the rates of mortality from cardiovascular disease in elderly individuals living in Brazil by gender in two 5-year periods: 1996 to 2000 and 2006 to 2010.Methods:This is an ecological study, for which rates of mortality were obtained from DATASUS and the population rates from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística. An average mortality rate for cardiovascular disease in elderly by gender was calculated for each period. The spatial autocorrelation was evaluated by TerraView 4.2.0 through global Moran index and the formation of clusters by the index of local Moran-LISA.Results:There was an increase, in the second 5-year period, in the mortality rates in the Northeast and North regions, parallel to a decrease in the South, South-East and Midwest regions. Moreover, there was the formation of clusters with high mortality rates in the second period in Roraima among females, and in Ceará, Pernambuco and Roraima among males.Conclusion:The increase in mortality rates in the North and Northeast regions is probably related to the changing profile of mortality and improvement in the quality of information, a result of the increase in surveillance and health care measures in these regions.

  6. The spectral analysis of photoplethysmography to evaluate an independent cardiovascular risk factor

    OpenAIRE

    Maarek, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Pratiksha G Gandhi,1 Gundu HR Rao2 1IPC Heart Care Centre, Mumbai, India; 2University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USABackground: In this study, we evaluate homeostatic markers correlated to autonomic nervous and endothelial functions in a population of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients versus a control group. Since CAD is the highest risk marker for sudden cardiac death, the study objective is to determine whether an independent cardiovascular risk score based on these markers can be ...

  7. Analysis of Genetic Markers for Cardiovascular Disorders in a Portuguese population with Familial Hypercholesterolaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, A.; Santos, T.; M. Bourbon

    2011-01-01

    Familial Hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is a genetic disorder leading to an increase in levels of total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol promoting atherosclerosis (ATH) and premature cardiovascular disease (CVD). Inflammation has been considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of CVD, namely the activity of pro-inflammatory cytokines and acute phase proteins. Genetic and oxidative stress markers may contribute to ATH and CVD outcome. We intended to investigate the role of genetic, ...

  8. [Simulation Analysis of the Pulse Signal on the Electricity Network of Cardiovascular System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Yin, Yanfei; Zhang, Defa; Wang, Menghong; Bi, Yongqiang

    2015-12-01

    Pulse waves contain abundant physiological and pathological information of human body. Research of the relationship between pulse wave and human cardiovascular physiological parameters can not only help clinical diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, but also contribute to develop many new medical instruments. Based on the traditional double elastic cavity model, the human cardiovascular system was established by using the electric network model in this paper. The change of wall pressure and blood flow in artery was simulated. And the influence of the peripheral resistance and vessel compliance to the distribution of blood flow in artery was analyzed. The simulation results were compared with the clinical monitoring results to predict the physiological and pathological state of human body. The result showed that the simulation waveform of arterial wall pressure and blood flow was stabile after the second cardiac cycle. With the increasing of peripheral resistance, the systolic blood pressure of artery increased, the diastolic blood pressure had no significant change, and the pulse pressure of artery increased gradually. With the decreasing of vessel compliance, the vasoactivity became worse and the pulse pressure increased correspondingly. The simulation results were consistent with the clinical monitoring results. The increasing of peripheral resistance and decreasing of vascular compliance indicated that the incidence of hypertension and atherosclerosis was increased. PMID:27079088

  9. Curvelet based offline analysis of SEM images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Hamad Shirazi

    Full Text Available Manual offline analysis, of a scanning electron microscopy (SEM image, is a time consuming process and requires continuous human intervention and efforts. This paper presents an image processing based method for automated offline analyses of SEM images. To this end, our strategy relies on a two-stage process, viz. texture analysis and quantification. The method involves a preprocessing step, aimed at the noise removal, in order to avoid false edges. For texture analysis, the proposed method employs a state of the art Curvelet transform followed by segmentation through a combination of entropy filtering, thresholding and mathematical morphology (MM. The quantification is carried out by the application of a box-counting algorithm, for fractal dimension (FD calculations, with the ultimate goal of measuring the parameters, like surface area and perimeter. The perimeter is estimated indirectly by counting the boundary boxes of the filled shapes. The proposed method, when applied to a representative set of SEM images, not only showed better results in image segmentation but also exhibited a good accuracy in the calculation of surface area and perimeter. The proposed method outperforms the well-known Watershed segmentation algorithm.

  10. Image analysis in high-content screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederlein, Antje; Meyenhofer, Felix; White, Daniel; Bickle, Marc

    2009-11-01

    The field of High Content Screening (HCS) has evolved from a technology used exclusively by the pharmaceutical industry for secondary drug screening, to a technology used for primary drug screening and basic research in academia. The size and the complexity of the screens have been steadily increasing. This is reflected in the fact that the major challenges facing the field at the present are data mining and data storage due to the large amount of data generated during HCS. On the one hand, technological progress of fully automated image acquisition platforms, and on the other hand advances in the field of automated image analysis have made this technology more powerful and more accessible to less specialized users. Image analysis solutions for many biological problems exist and more are being developed to increase both the quality and the quantity of data extracted from the images acquired during the screens. We highlight in this review some of the major challenges facing automatic high throughput image analysis and present some of the software solutions available on the market or from academic open source solutions. PMID:19531001

  11. Medical image analysis with artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J; Trundle, P; Ren, J

    2010-12-01

    Given that neural networks have been widely reported in the research community of medical imaging, we provide a focused literature survey on recent neural network developments in computer-aided diagnosis, medical image segmentation and edge detection towards visual content analysis, and medical image registration for its pre-processing and post-processing, with the aims of increasing awareness of how neural networks can be applied to these areas and to provide a foundation for further research and practical development. Representative techniques and algorithms are explained in detail to provide inspiring examples illustrating: (i) how a known neural network with fixed structure and training procedure could be applied to resolve a medical imaging problem; (ii) how medical images could be analysed, processed, and characterised by neural networks; and (iii) how neural networks could be expanded further to resolve problems relevant to medical imaging. In the concluding section, a highlight of comparisons among many neural network applications is included to provide a global view on computational intelligence with neural networks in medical imaging. PMID:20713305

  12. Hyperspectral Image Analysis of Food Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngren, Morten

    Assessing the quality of food is a vital step in any food processing line to ensurethe best food quality and maximum profit for the farmer and food manufacturer.Traditional quality evaluation methods are often destructive and labourintensive procedures relying on wet chemistry or subjective human...... inspection.Near-infrared spectroscopy can address these issues by offering a fast and objectiveanalysis of the food quality. A natural extension to these single spectrumNIR systems is to include image information such that each pixel holds a NIRspectrum. This augmented image information offers several...... extensions to the analysis offood quality. This dissertation is concerned with hyperspectral image analysisused to assess the quality of single grain kernels. The focus is to highlight thebenefits and challenges of using hyperspectral imaging for food quality presentedin two research directions. Initially...

  13. Dynamic Chest Image Analysis: Model-Based Perfusion Analysis in Dynamic Pulmonary Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Kiuru Aaro; Kormano Martti; Svedström Erkki; Liang Jianming; Järvi Timo

    2003-01-01

    The "Dynamic Chest Image Analysis" project aims to develop model-based computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected with the dynamic pulmonary imaging technique. We have proposed and evaluated a multiresolutional method with an explicit ventilation model for ventilation analysis. This paper presents a new model-based method for pulmonary perfusion ana...

  14. Automated Functional Analysis in Dynamic Medical Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichý, Ondřej

    Praha : Katedra matematiky, FSv ČVUT v Praze, 2012, s. 19-20. [Aplikovaná matematika – Rektorysova soutěž. Praha (CZ), 07.12.2012] Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Factor Analysis * Dynamic Sequence * Scintigraphy Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/AS/tichy-automated functional analysis in dynamic medical imaging.pdf

  15. Image Analysis by Methods of Dimension Reduction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravec, P.; Snášel, V.; Frolov, A.; Húsek, Dušan; Řezanková, H.; Polyakov, P.Y.

    Los Alamitos: IEEE Computer Society, 2007, s. 272-277. ISBN 0-7695-2894-5. [CISIM'07. International Conference on Computer Information Systems and Industrial Management Applications /6./. Elk (PL), 28.06.2007-30.06.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/05/0079 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : image analysis * methods of dimension reduction * cluster analysis Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  16. Analysis of the effectiveness of moderate levels of physical activity to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, A Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Martin Garcia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: a. The determination of the efficacy of physical activity in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease; b. The Analysis of the relative changes in the levels of cardiovascular disease risk according to different intensities of physical activity (low-moderate. Methodology: The search was performed for studies with PUBMED data base. Then, the mean effect size of the studies included in the meta-analysis was calculated and Egger's test was applied to rule out any possible publication bias. Upon detection of heterogeneity, we proceeded to an analysis of the moderating variables. Results: A mean effect size of 0.762 (95% confidence interval 0678-0857 was obtained. Then The Egger test was applied which yielded a p-value of 0.67 (CI 0.95, such that the absence of publication bias was confirmed. The analysis of the moderating variables determined that the ensuing years (p = 0.000, 95% CI and the countries of study (p = 0.0096; 95% CI in part explain the heterogeneity detected. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the practice of physical activity at moderate intensities provides a protective effect on the individuals who make physical activity by reducing the risk these individuals to cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pennycook, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Provides the first comprehensive treatment of the physics and applications of this mainstream technique for imaging and analysis at the atomic level Presents applications of STEM in condensed matter physics, materials science, catalysis, and nanoscience Suitable for graduate students learning microscopy, researchers wishing to utilize STEM, as well as for specialists in other areas of microscopy Edited and written by leading researchers and practitioners

  18. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines for reporting cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations

    OpenAIRE

    van Rossum Albert C; Raman Subha V; McConnell Michael V; Lawson Mark A; Higgins Charles B; Friedrich Matthias G; Bogaert Jan G; Bluemke David; Hundley W Gregory; Flamm Scott; Kramer Christopher M; Nagel Eike; Neubauer Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract These reporting guidelines are recommended by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) to provide a framework for healthcare delivery systems to disseminate cardiac and vascular imaging findings related to the performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) examinations.

  19. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Maceira Alicia M; Mohiaddin Raad H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue char...

  20. Optimization of cardiovascular stent against restenosis: factorial design-based statistical analysis of polymer coating conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayathri Acharya

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to optimize the physicodynamic conditions of polymeric system as a coating substrate for drug eluting stents against restenosis. As Nitric Oxide (NO has multifunctional activities, such as regulating blood flow and pressure, and influencing thrombus formation, a continuous and spatiotemporal delivery of NO loaded in the polymer based nanoparticles could be a viable option to reduce and prevent restenosis. To identify the most suitable carrier for S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, a NO prodrug, stents were coated with various polymers, such as poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, polyethylene glycol (PEG and polycaprolactone (PCL, using solvent evaporation technique. Full factorial design was used to evaluate the effects of the formulation variables in polymer-based stent coatings on the GSNO release rate and weight loss rate. The least square regression model was used for data analysis in the optimization process. The polymer-coated stents were further assessed with Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis (FTIR, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM images and platelet adhesion studies. Stents coated with PCL matrix displayed more sustained and controlled drug release profiles than those coated with PLGA and PEG. Stents coated with PCL matrix showed the least platelet adhesion rate. Subsequently, stents coated with PCL matrix were subjected to the further optimization processes for improvement of surface morphology and enhancement of the drug release duration. The results of this study demonstrated that PCL matrix containing GSNO is a promising system for stent surface coating against restenosis.

  1. Good relationships between computational image analysis and radiological physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Good relationships between computational image analysis and radiological physics have been constructed for increasing the accuracy of medical diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy in radiological physics. Computational image analysis has been established based on applied mathematics, physics, and engineering. This review paper will introduce how computational image analysis is useful in radiation therapy with respect to radiological physics

  2. Good relationships between computational image analysis and radiological physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Kamezawa, Hidemi; Jin, Ze; Nakamoto, Takahiro; Soufi, Mazen

    2015-09-01

    Good relationships between computational image analysis and radiological physics have been constructed for increasing the accuracy of medical diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy in radiological physics. Computational image analysis has been established based on applied mathematics, physics, and engineering. This review paper will introduce how computational image analysis is useful in radiation therapy with respect to radiological physics.

  3. Good relationships between computational image analysis and radiological physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimura, Hidetaka, E-mail: arimurah@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Division of Medical Quantum Science, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University (Japan); Kamezawa, Hidemi; Jin, Ze; Nakamoto, Takahiro; Soufi, Mazen [Division of Medical Quantum Science, Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University (Japan)

    2015-09-30

    Good relationships between computational image analysis and radiological physics have been constructed for increasing the accuracy of medical diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy in radiological physics. Computational image analysis has been established based on applied mathematics, physics, and engineering. This review paper will introduce how computational image analysis is useful in radiation therapy with respect to radiological physics.

  4. Web Based Distributed Coastal Image Analysis System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project develops Web based distributed image analysis system processing the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data to provide decision...

  5. Frequency domain analysis of knock images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High speed imaging-based knock analysis has mainly focused on time domain information, e.g. the spark triggered flame speed, the time when end gas auto-ignition occurs and the end gas flame speed after auto-ignition. This study presents a frequency domain analysis on the knock images recorded using a high speed camera with direct photography in a rapid compression machine (RCM). To clearly visualize the pressure wave oscillation in the combustion chamber, the images were high-pass-filtered to extract the luminosity oscillation. The luminosity spectrum was then obtained by applying fast Fourier transform (FFT) to three basic colour components (red, green and blue) of the high-pass-filtered images. Compared to the pressure spectrum, the luminosity spectra better identify the resonant modes of pressure wave oscillation. More importantly, the resonant mode shapes can be clearly visualized by reconstructing the images based on the amplitudes of luminosity spectra at the corresponding resonant frequencies, which agree well with the analytical solutions for mode shapes of gas vibration in a cylindrical cavity. (paper)

  6. ImageJ: Image processing and analysis in Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasband, W. S.

    2012-06-01

    ImageJ is a public domain Java image processing program inspired by NIH Image. It can display, edit, analyze, process, save and print 8-bit, 16-bit and 32-bit images. It can read many image formats including TIFF, GIF, JPEG, BMP, DICOM, FITS and "raw". It supports "stacks", a series of images that share a single window. It is multithreaded, so time-consuming operations such as image file reading can be performed in parallel with other operations.

  7. Clinical evaluation of cardiovascular disease by gated-MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in the operating field of 0.35 and 1.5 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the cardiovascular disease, 21 patients were examined using 0.35 and 1.5 Tesla superconductive type (Magnetom, Siemens). In our study, all patients were performed using ECG-gated MRI. Therefore, the cardiac chambers were discriminated clearly from the myocardial wall compared to non-gated MRI. Gated-MRI was performed in 6 normal persons in the operating field at 0.35 and 1.5 Tesla. The image of the latter showed superior than that of the former because of high S/N ratio. In myocardial infarction, infarct area was demonstrated as the wall thinning in 4 of 5 patients. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy showed thickened left ventricle associated with its narrowed cavity in 7 patients. In the remaining such as congenital and valvular heart disease, global and regional cardiac morphology were assessed noninvasively by gated MRI. In addition, gated MRI was also applied to the diagnosis of peripheral vascular diseases. In dissecting aneurysm, double channels with an intimal flap in the aorta were clearly visualized. And in the aortitis syndrome, aortic dilatation and stenosis were also assessed noninvasively. In conclusion, gated MRI in diagnosing various abnormalities of cardiovascular disease was confirmed. (author)

  8. Analysis of X-ray radiation doses from different types of intervention for cardiovascular patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the X-ray radiation dose to patients from different cardiovascular interventional procedures and analyze the dose-affecting factors. Methods: In accordance with the A, B, C operators, 442 patients undergoing cardiovascular interventional procedures were collected, including single coronary angiography (CAG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA), congenital heart disease intervention (CHD) and permanent cardiac pacemaker implantation (PCPI), to observe dose area product (DAP), cumulative radiation dose (CD), fluoroscopy time. Results: CD values of patients in groups of CAG, PCI, RFCA, CHD, PCPI were (0.34 ±0.23), (1.33 ±0.76), (0.71 ±0.43), (0.27 ±0.22) and (0.92±0.42) Gy and DAP values were (34.18 ±23.33), (135.92 ±81.14), (79.79 ±50.66),(27.93 ±23.66), and (94.60 ±48.11 ) Gy·cm2, respectively. Fluoroscopy time were (4.82 ±3.73), (16.64 ±9.01), (17.04 ± 15.29), (9.60 ±5.97) and (7.31 ±6.45) min. DAP values and fluoroscopy time were highly correlated (r=0.84, P<0.05). Conclusions: There is significant difference in radiation dose for cardiovascular interventional procedures. Radiation dose and fluoroscopy time are directly related to surgeons' proficiency in operations. Improvement of operation proficiency should be carried out to reduce the patients' radiation dose. (authors)

  9. Computed image analysis of neutron radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Similar with X-radiography, using neutron like penetrating particle, there is in practice a nondestructive technique named neutron radiology. When the registration of information is done on a film with the help of a conversion foil (with high cross section for neutrons) that emits secondary radiation (β,γ) that creates a latent image, the technique is named neutron radiography. A radiographic industrial film that contains the image of the internal structure of an object, obtained by neutron radiography, must be subsequently analyzed to obtain qualitative and quantitative information about the structural integrity of that object. There is possible to do a computed analysis of a film using a facility with next main components: an illuminator for film, a CCD video camera and a computer (PC) with suitable software. The qualitative analysis intends to put in evidence possibly anomalies of the structure due to manufacturing processes or induced by working processes (for example, the irradiation activity in the case of the nuclear fuel). The quantitative determination is based on measurements of some image parameters: dimensions, optical densities. The illuminator has been built specially to perform this application but can be used for simple visual observation. The illuminated area is 9x40 cm. The frame of the system is a comparer of Abbe Carl Zeiss Jena type, which has been adapted to achieve this application. The video camera assures the capture of image that is stored and processed by computer. A special program SIMAG-NG has been developed at INR Pitesti that beside of the program SMTV II of the special acquisition module SM 5010 can analyze the images of a film. The major application of the system was the quantitative analysis of a film that contains the images of some nuclear fuel pins beside a dimensional standard. The system was used to measure the length of the pellets of the TRIGA nuclear fuel. (authors)

  10. Characterising haemodialysis-associated cardiomyopathy using deformation imaging by cardiovascular magnetic resonance tagging and speckle-tracking echocardiography

    OpenAIRE

    Odudu, Aghogho

    2013-01-01

    Haemodialysis patients represent an extreme phenotype of cardiovascular risk with a pattern of disease distinct from that in the general population. Non-traditional risk factors, specific to chronic kidney disease such as hypervolaemia, arterial stiffness and advanced glycation end-product deposition are increasingly recognised. A previously demonstrated non-traditional risk factor associated with worse outcomes is the presence of uraemic cardiomyopathy. This pattern of cardiac morphology and...

  11. Recent Advances in Morphological Cell Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyong Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the recent advances in image processing methods for morphological cell analysis. The topic of morphological analysis has received much attention with the increasing demands in both bioinformatics and biomedical applications. Among many factors that affect the diagnosis of a disease, morphological cell analysis and statistics have made great contributions to results and effects for a doctor. Morphological cell analysis finds the cellar shape, cellar regularity, classification, statistics, diagnosis, and so forth. In the last 20 years, about 1000 publications have reported the use of morphological cell analysis in biomedical research. Relevant solutions encompass a rather wide application area, such as cell clumps segmentation, morphological characteristics extraction, 3D reconstruction, abnormal cells identification, and statistical analysis. These reports are summarized in this paper to enable easy referral to suitable methods for practical solutions. Representative contributions and future research trends are also addressed.

  12. The BioImage Study: novel approaches to risk assessment in the primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease--study design and objectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muntendam, Pieter; McCall, Carol; Sanz, Javier;

    2010-01-01

    eligibility criteria were randomized to a telephonic health survey only (survey only: n = 865), standard risk assessment (Framingham only: n = 718), or comprehensive risk assessment in a dedicated mobile facility equipped with advanced imaging tools (n = 6,104). Baseline examination included assessment of...... cardiovascular risk factors and screening for subclinical (asymptomatic) atherosclerosis with quantification of coronary artery calcification by computed tomography (CT), measurement of intima-media thickness, presence of carotid atherosclerotic plaques and abdominal aortic aneurysm by ultrasound, and ankle......The identification of asymptomatic individuals at risk for near-term atherothrombotic events to ensure optimal preventive treatment remains a challenging goal. In the BioImage Study, novel approaches are tested in a typical health-plan population. Based on certain demographic and risk...

  13. Analysis of the risk factors of cardiovascular diseases after renal transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Li-Ping; Cai, Ming; Qian, Ye-yong; Shi, Bing-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the risk factors of occurrence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) after renal transplantation. Methods The follow-up data of 1106 cases of renal transplantation, performed in 309 hospital of PLA from May 2009 to Nov. 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were evaluated for postoperative cardiac events, and the post-transplant risk factors of CVD were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazard model. Observation was done before operation, and 7d, 1st, 3rd, 6th and ...

  14. Milk Consumption and Mortality from All Causes, Cardiovascular Disease, and Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Susanna C; Crippa, Alessio; Orsini, Nicola; Wolk, Alicja; Michaëlsson, Karl

    2015-09-01

    Results from epidemiological studies of milk consumption and mortality are inconsistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies assessing the association of non-fermented and fermented milk consumption with mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. PubMed was searched until August 2015. A two-stage, random-effects, dose-response meta-analysis was used to combine study-specific results. Heterogeneity among studies was assessed with the I² statistic. During follow-up periods ranging from 4.1 to 25 years, 70,743 deaths occurred among 367,505 participants. The range of non-fermented and fermented milk consumption and the shape of the associations between milk consumption and mortality differed considerably between studies. There was substantial heterogeneity among studies of non-fermented milk consumption in relation to mortality from all causes (12 studies; I² = 94%), cardiovascular disease (five studies; I² = 93%), and cancer (four studies; I² = 75%) as well as among studies of fermented milk consumption and all-cause mortality (seven studies; I² = 88%). Thus, estimating pooled hazard ratios was not appropriate. Heterogeneity among studies was observed in most subgroups defined by sex, country, and study quality. In conclusion, we observed no consistent association between milk consumption and all-cause or cause-specific mortality. PMID:26378576

  15. Milk Consumption and Mortality from All Causes, Cardiovascular Disease, and Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna C. Larsson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Results from epidemiological studies of milk consumption and mortality are inconsistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies assessing the association of non-fermented and fermented milk consumption with mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. PubMed was searched until August 2015. A two-stage, random-effects, dose-response meta-analysis was used to combine study-specific results. Heterogeneity among studies was assessed with the I2 statistic. During follow-up periods ranging from 4.1 to 25 years, 70,743 deaths occurred among 367,505 participants. The range of non-fermented and fermented milk consumption and the shape of the associations between milk consumption and mortality differed considerably between studies. There was substantial heterogeneity among studies of non-fermented milk consumption in relation to mortality from all causes (12 studies; I2 = 94%, cardiovascular disease (five studies; I2 = 93%, and cancer (four studies; I2 = 75% as well as among studies of fermented milk consumption and all-cause mortality (seven studies; I2 = 88%. Thus, estimating pooled hazard ratios was not appropriate. Heterogeneity among studies was observed in most subgroups defined by sex, country, and study quality. In conclusion, we observed no consistent association between milk consumption and all-cause or cause-specific mortality.

  16. A Cyclostationarity Analysis Applied to Scaled Images

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saic, Stanislav; Mahdian, Babak

    Berlin : Springer, 2009 - (Leung, C.; Lee, M.; Chan, J.), s. 683-690 ISBN 978-3-642-10682-8. - (Lecture Notes in Computer Science. 5864). [ICONIP 2009. International Conference on Neural Information Processing /16./. Bangkok (TH), 01.12.2009-05.12.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/08/0470 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Interpolation * scaling * cyclostationary * authentication * image forensics Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/ZOI/babak-a cyclostationarity analysis applied to scaled images.pdf

  17. Digital image sequence processing, compression, and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Todd R

    2004-01-01

    IntroductionTodd R. ReedCONTENT-BASED IMAGE SEQUENCE REPRESENTATIONPedro M. Q. Aguiar, Radu S. Jasinschi, José M. F. Moura, andCharnchai PluempitiwiriyawejTHE COMPUTATION OF MOTIONChristoph Stiller, Sören Kammel, Jan Horn, and Thao DangMOTION ANALYSIS AND DISPLACEMENT ESTIMATION IN THE FREQUENCY DOMAINLuca Lucchese and Guido Maria CortelazzoQUALITY OF SERVICE ASSESSMENT IN NEW GENERATION WIRELESS VIDEO COMMUNICATIONSGaetano GiuntaERROR CONCEALMENT IN DIGITAL VIDEOFrancesco G.B. De NataleIMAGE SEQUENCE RESTORATION: A WIDER PERSPECTIVEAnil KokaramVIDEO SUMMARIZATIONCuneyt M. Taskiran and Edward

  18. Progress in computer vision and image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bunke, Horst; Sánchez, Gemma; Otazu, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    This book is a collection of scientific papers published during the last five years, showing a broad spectrum of actual research topics and techniques used to solve challenging problems in the areas of computer vision and image analysis. The book will appeal to researchers, technicians and graduate students. Sample Chapter(s). Chapter 1: An Appearance-Based Method for Parametric Video Registration (2,352 KB). Contents: An Appearance-Based Method for Parametric Video Registration (X Orriols et al.); Relevance of Multifractal Textures in Static Images (A Turiel); Potential Fields as an External

  19. Overweight in Childhood, Adolescence and Adulthood and Cardiovascular Risk in Later Life: Pooled Analysis of Three British Birth Cohorts

    OpenAIRE

    Park, MH; Sovio, U.; Viner, RM; Hardy, RJ; Kinra, S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Overweight and obesity in adulthood are established risk factors for adverse cardiovascular outcomes, but the contribution of overweight in childhood to later cardiovascular risk is less clear. Evidence for a direct effect of childhood overweight would highlight early life as an important target for cardiovascular disease prevention. The aim of this study was to assess whether overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescence contribute to excess cardiovascular risk in adults. ...

  20. Evaluating an implementation strategy in cardiovascular prevention to improve prescribing of statins in Germany: an intention to treat analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Heidemarie; Hirsch, Oliver; Kaufmann-Kolle, Petra; Krones, Tanja; Becker, Annette; Sönnichsen, Andreas C; Baum, Erika; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prescription of statins is an evidence-based treatment to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with elevated cardiovascular risk or with a cardiovascular disorder (CVD). In spite of this, many of these patients do not receive statins. METHODS: We evaluated the impact of a brief educational intervention in cardiovascular prevention in primary care physicians' prescribing behaviour regarding statins beyond their participation in a randomised controlled trial (...

  1. Analysis of renal nuclear medicine images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine imaging of the renal system involves producing time-sequential images showing the distribution of a radiopharmaceutical in the renal system. Producing numerical and graphical data from nuclear medicine studies requires defining regions of interest (ROIs) around various organs within the field of view, such as the left kidney, right kidney and bladder. Automating this process has several advantages: a saving of a clinician's time; enhanced objectivity and reproducibility. This thesis describes the design, implementation and assessment of an automatic ROI generation system. The performance of the system described in this work is assessed by comparing the results to those obtained using manual techniques. Since nuclear medicine images are inherently noisy, the sequence of images is reconstructed using the first few components of a principal components analysis in order to reduce the noise in the images. An image of the summed reconstructed sequence is then formed. This summed image is segmented by using an edge co-occurrence matrix as a feature space for simultaneously classifying regions and locating boundaries. Two methods for assigning the regions of a segmented image to organ class labels are assessed. The first method is based on using Dempster-Shafer theory to combine uncertain evidence from several sources into a single evidence; the second method makes use of a neural network classifier. The use of each technique in classifying the regions of a segmented image are assessed in separate experiments using 40 real patient-studies. A comparative assessment of the two techniques shows that the neural network produces more accurate region labels for the kidneys. The optimum neural system is determined experimentally. Results indicate that combining temporal and spatial information with a priori clinical knowledge produces reasonable ROIs. Consistency in the neural network assignment of regions is enhanced by taking account of the contextual

  2. Autonomous Image Analysis for Future Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, V. C.; Morris, R. L.; Ruzon, M. A.; Bandari, E.; Roush, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    To explore high priority landing sites and to prepare for eventual human exploration, future Mars missions will involve rovers capable of traversing tens of kilometers. However, the current process by which scientists interact with a rover does not scale to such distances. Specifically, numerous command cycles are required to complete even simple tasks, such as, pointing the spectrometer at a variety of nearby rocks. In addition, the time required by scientists to interpret image data before new commands can be given and the limited amount of data that can be downlinked during a given command cycle constrain rover mobility and achievement of science goals. Experience with rover tests on Earth supports these concerns. As a result, traverses to science sites as identified in orbital images would require numerous science command cycles over a period of many weeks, months or even years, perhaps exceeding rover design life and other constraints. Autonomous onboard science analysis can address these problems in two ways. First, it will allow the rover to preferentially transmit "interesting" images, defined as those likely to have higher science content. Second, the rover will be able to anticipate future commands. For example, a rover might autonomously acquire and return spectra of "interesting" rocks along with a high-resolution image of those rocks in addition to returning the context images in which they were detected. Such approaches, coupled with appropriate navigational software, help to address both the data volume and command cycle bottlenecks that limit both rover mobility and science yield. We are developing fast, autonomous algorithms to enable such intelligent on-board decision making by spacecraft. Autonomous algorithms developed to date have the ability to identify rocks and layers in a scene, locate the horizon, and compress multi-spectral image data. We are currently investigating the possibility of reconstructing a 3D surface from a sequence of images

  3. Image analysis for ophthalmological diagnosis image processing of Corvis ST images using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Koprowski, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This monograph focuses on the use of analysis and processing methods for images from the Corvis® ST tonometer. The presented analysis is associated with the quantitative, repeatable and fully automatic evaluation of the response of the eye, eyeball and cornea to an air-puff. All the described algorithms were practically implemented in MATLAB®. The monograph also describes and provides the full source code designed to perform the discussed calculations. As a result, this monograph is intended for scientists, graduate students and students of computer science and bioengineering as well as doctors wishing to expand their knowledge of modern diagnostic methods assisted by various image analysis and processing methods.

  4. Gliptins and Cardiovascular Outcomes: A Comparative and Critical Analysis after TECOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Samit; Sinha, Binayak

    2016-01-01

    The issue related to macrovascular outcomes and intensive glycemic control was hotly debated after the publication of landmark trials like ACCORD, ADVANCE, and VADT. The only benefits seem to come from intervening early on in the disease process as indicated by the 10-year UKPDS follow-up. To complicate matters USFDA made it mandatory for modern drugs to conduct cardiovascular safety trials in high-risk populations after the 2008 rosiglitazone scare. This led to all the modern group of drugs designing cardiovascular safety trials (gliptins, GLP-1 agonists, and SGLT-2 inhibitors) to meet USFDA regulatory requirements. We saw publication of the first 2 randomized trials with gliptins published a year and a half back. On the face value SAVOR TIMI and EXAMINE satisfied the primary composite CV end-points. However, issues related to significant increase in heart failure and all-cause 7-day on-treatment mortality created a lot of confusion. FDA reanalysis of these data (especially SAVOR) raises a lot of doubts as far as CV safety of these groups of drugs was concerned. Hence, all eyes were on TECOS, which was published this year. We take a microscopic look at these trials trying to understand where we stand as from now on this issue. PMID:26649315

  5. Gliptins and Cardiovascular Outcomes: A Comparative and Critical Analysis after TECOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samit Ghosal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue related to macrovascular outcomes and intensive glycemic control was hotly debated after the publication of landmark trials like ACCORD, ADVANCE, and VADT. The only benefits seem to come from intervening early on in the disease process as indicated by the 10-year UKPDS follow-up. To complicate matters USFDA made it mandatory for modern drugs to conduct cardiovascular safety trials in high-risk populations after the 2008 rosiglitazone scare. This led to all the modern group of drugs designing cardiovascular safety trials (gliptins, GLP-1 agonists, and SGLT-2 inhibitors to meet USFDA regulatory requirements. We saw publication of the first 2 randomized trials with gliptins published a year and a half back. On the face value SAVOR TIMI and EXAMINE satisfied the primary composite CV end-points. However, issues related to significant increase in heart failure and all-cause 7-day on-treatment mortality created a lot of confusion. FDA reanalysis of these data (especially SAVOR raises a lot of doubts as far as CV safety of these groups of drugs was concerned. Hence, all eyes were on TECOS, which was published this year. We take a microscopic look at these trials trying to understand where we stand as from now on this issue.

  6. A systematic review of image segmentation methodology, used in the additive manufacture of patient-specific 3D printed models of the cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, N; Velasco Forte, M; Tandon, A; Valverde, I

    2016-01-01

    Background Shortcomings in existing methods of image segmentation preclude the widespread adoption of patient-specific 3D printing as a routine decision-making tool in the care of those with congenital heart disease. We sought to determine the range of cardiovascular segmentation methods and how long each of these methods takes. Methods A systematic review of literature was undertaken. Medical imaging modality, segmentation methods, segmentation time, segmentation descriptive quality (SDQ) and segmentation software were recorded. Results Totally 136 studies met the inclusion criteria (1 clinical trial; 80 journal articles; 55 conference, technical and case reports). The most frequently used image segmentation methods were brightness thresholding, region growing and manual editing, as supported by the most popular piece of proprietary software: Mimics (Materialise NV, Leuven, Belgium, 1992–2015). The use of bespoke software developed by individual authors was not uncommon. SDQ indicated that reporting of image segmentation methods was generally poor with only one in three accounts providing sufficient detail for their procedure to be reproduced. Conclusions and implication of key findings Predominantly anecdotal and case reporting precluded rigorous assessment of risk of bias and strength of evidence. This review finds a reliance on manual and semi-automated segmentation methods which demand a high level of expertise and a significant time commitment on the part of the operator. In light of the findings, we have made recommendations regarding reporting of 3D printing studies. We anticipate that these findings will encourage the development of advanced image segmentation methods. PMID:27170842

  7. Quantitative Analysis in Nuclear Medicine Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    This book provides a review of image analysis techniques as they are applied in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. Driven in part by the remarkable increase in computing power and its ready and inexpensive availability, this is a relatively new yet rapidly expanding field. Likewise, although the use of radionuclides for diagnosis and therapy has origins dating back almost to the discovery of natural radioactivity itself, radionuclide therapy and, in particular, targeted radionuclide therapy has only recently emerged as a promising approach for therapy of cancer and, to a lesser extent, other diseases. As effort has, therefore, been made to place the reviews provided in this book in a broader context. The effort to do this is reflected by the inclusion of introductory chapters that address basic principles of nuclear medicine imaging, followed by overview of issues that are closely related to quantitative nuclear imaging and its potential role in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. ...

  8. Automated quantitative image analysis of nanoparticle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Chaitanya R.; Gao, Bo; Tao, Andrea R.; Arya, Gaurav

    2015-05-01

    The ability to characterize higher-order structures formed by nanoparticle (NP) assembly is critical for predicting and engineering the properties of advanced nanocomposite materials. Here we develop a quantitative image analysis software to characterize key structural properties of NP clusters from experimental images of nanocomposites. This analysis can be carried out on images captured at intermittent times during assembly to monitor the time evolution of NP clusters in a highly automated manner. The software outputs averages and distributions in the size, radius of gyration, fractal dimension, backbone length, end-to-end distance, anisotropic ratio, and aspect ratio of NP clusters as a function of time along with bootstrapped error bounds for all calculated properties. The polydispersity in the NP building blocks and biases in the sampling of NP clusters are accounted for through the use of probabilistic weights. This software, named Particle Image Characterization Tool (PICT), has been made publicly available and could be an invaluable resource for researchers studying NP assembly. To demonstrate its practical utility, we used PICT to analyze scanning electron microscopy images taken during the assembly of surface-functionalized metal NPs of differing shapes and sizes within a polymer matrix. PICT is used to characterize and analyze the morphology of NP clusters, providing quantitative information that can be used to elucidate the physical mechanisms governing NP assembly.The ability to characterize higher-order structures formed by nanoparticle (NP) assembly is critical for predicting and engineering the properties of advanced nanocomposite materials. Here we develop a quantitative image analysis software to characterize key structural properties of NP clusters from experimental images of nanocomposites. This analysis can be carried out on images captured at intermittent times during assembly to monitor the time evolution of NP clusters in a highly automated

  9. Pain related inflammation analysis using infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Mrinal Kanti; Bardhan, Shawli; Das, Kakali; Bhattacharjee, Debotosh; Nath, Satyabrata

    2016-05-01

    Medical Infrared Thermography (MIT) offers a potential non-invasive, non-contact and radiation free imaging modality for assessment of abnormal inflammation having pain in the human body. The assessment of inflammation mainly depends on the emission of heat from the skin surface. Arthritis is a disease of joint damage that generates inflammation in one or more anatomical joints of the body. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent appearing form of arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most threatening form of them. In this study, the inflammatory analysis has been performed on the infrared images of patients suffering from RA and OA. For the analysis, a dataset of 30 bilateral knee thermograms has been captured from the patient of RA and OA by following a thermogram acquisition standard. The thermograms are pre-processed, and areas of interest are extracted for further processing. The investigation of the spread of inflammation is performed along with the statistical analysis of the pre-processed thermograms. The objectives of the study include: i) Generation of a novel thermogram acquisition standard for inflammatory pain disease ii) Analysis of the spread of the inflammation related to RA and OA using K-means clustering. iii) First and second order statistical analysis of pre-processed thermograms. The conclusion reflects that, in most of the cases, RA oriented inflammation affects bilateral knees whereas inflammation related to OA present in the unilateral knee. Also due to the spread of inflammation in OA, contralateral asymmetries are detected through the statistical analysis.

  10. Neighbourhood socioeconomic status and cardiovascular risk factors: a multilevel analysis of nine cities in the Czech Republic and Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erbel Raimund

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown that deprived neighbourhoods have higher cardiovascular mortality and morbidity rates. Inequalities in the distribution of behaviour related risk factors are one possible explanation for this trend. In our study, we examined the association between cardiovascular risk factors and neighbourhood characteristics. To assess the consistency of associations the design is cross-national with data from nine industrial towns from the Czech Republic and Germany. Methods We combined datasets from two population based studies, one in Germany ('Heinz Nixdorf Recall (HNR Study', and one in the Czech Republic ('Health, Alcohol and Psychosocial Factors in Eastern Europe (HAPIEE Study'. Participation rates were 56% in the HNR and 55% in the HAPIEE study. The subsample for this particular analysis consists of 11,554 men and women from nine German and Czech towns. Census based information on social characteristics of 326 neighbourhoods were collected from local administrative authorities. We used unemployment rate and overcrowding as area-level markers of socioeconomic status (SES. The cardiovascular risk factors obesity, hypertension, smoking and physical inactivity were used as response variables. Regression models were complemented by individual-level social status (education and relevant covariates. Results Smoking, obesity and low physical activity were more common in deprived neighbourhoods in Germany, even when personal characteristics including individual education were controlled for. For hypertension associations were weak. In the Czech Republic associations were observed for smoking and physical inactivity, but not for obesity and hypertension when individual-level covariates were adjusted for. The strongest association was found for smoking in both countries: in the fully adjusted model the odds ratio for 'high unemployment rate' was 1.30 [95% CI 1.02–1.66] in the Czech Republic and 1.60 [95% CI 1.29

  11. Image analysis for measuring rod network properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongjae; Choi, Jungkyu; Nam, Jaewook

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, metallic nanowires have been attracting significant attention as next-generation flexible transparent conductive films. The performance of films depends on the network structure created by nanowires. Gaining an understanding of their structure, such as connectivity, coverage, and alignment of nanowires, requires the knowledge of individual nanowires inside the microscopic images taken from the film. Although nanowires are flexible up to a certain extent, they are usually depicted as rigid rods in many analysis and computational studies. Herein, we propose a simple and straightforward algorithm based on the filtering in the frequency domain for detecting the rod-shape objects inside binary images. The proposed algorithm uses a specially designed filter in the frequency domain to detect image segments, namely, the connected components aligned in a certain direction. Those components are post-processed to be combined under a given merging rule in a single rod object. In this study, the microscopic properties of the rod networks relevant to the analysis of nanowire networks were measured for investigating the opto-electric performance of transparent conductive films and their alignment distribution, length distribution, and area fraction. To verify and find the optimum parameters for the proposed algorithm, numerical experiments were performed on synthetic images with predefined properties. By selecting proper parameters, the algorithm was used to investigate silver nanowire transparent conductive films fabricated by the dip coating method.

  12. Liver Ultrasound Image Analysis using Enhancement Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smriti Sahu, Maheedhar Dubey, Mohammad Imroze Khan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Liver cancer is the sixth most common malignanttumour and the third most common cause ofcancer-related deaths worldwide. Chronic Liverdamage affects up to 20% of our population. It hasmany causes - viral infections (Hepatitis B and C,toxins, genetic, metabolic and autoimmune diseases.The rate of liver cancer in Australia has increasedfour-fold in the past 20 years. For detection andqualitative diagnosis of liver diseases, Ultrasound(US image is an easy-to-use and minimally invasiveimaging modality. Medical images are oftendeteriorated by noise due to various sources ofinterferences and other phenomena known asSpeckle noise. Therefore it is required to apply somedigital image processing techniques for smoothingor suppression of speckle noise in ultrasoundimages. This paper attempts to undertake the studythree types of the image enhancement techniquesincluding, Shock Filter, Contrast Limited AdaptiveHistogram Equalization (CLAHE and Spatialfilter. These smoothing techniques are comparedusing performance matrices Peak Signal to NoiseRatio (PSNR and Mean Square Error (MSE. Ithas been observed that the Spatial high pass filtergives the better performance than others for liverultrasound image analysis.

  13. The synthesis and analysis of color images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandell, Brian A.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for performing the synthesis and analysis of digital color images. The method is based on two principles. First, image data are represented with respect to the separate physical factors, surface reflectance and the spectral power distribution of the ambient light, that give rise to the perceived color of an object. Second, the encoding is made efficiently by using a basis expansion for the surface spectral reflectance and spectral power distribution of the ambient light that takes advantage of the high degree of correlation across the visible wavelengths normally found in such functions. Within this framework, the same basic methods can be used to synthesize image data for color display monitors and printed materials, and to analyze image data into estimates of the spectral power distribution and surface spectral reflectances. The method can be applied to a variety of tasks. Examples of applications include the color balancing of color images, and the identification of material surface spectral reflectance when the lighting cannot be completely controlled.

  14. Scalable histopathological image analysis via active learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Shaoting; Liu, Wei; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2014-01-01

    Training an effective and scalable system for medical image analysis usually requires a large amount of labeled data, which incurs a tremendous annotation burden for pathologists. Recent progress in active learning can alleviate this issue, leading to a great reduction on the labeling cost without sacrificing the predicting accuracy too much. However, most existing active learning methods disregard the "structured information" that may exist in medical images (e.g., data from individual patients), and make a simplifying assumption that unlabeled data is independently and identically distributed. Both may not be suitable for real-world medical images. In this paper, we propose a novel batch-mode active learning method which explores and leverages such structured information in annotations of medical images to enforce diversity among the selected data, therefore maximizing the information gain. We formulate the active learning problem as an adaptive submodular function maximization problem subject to a partition matroid constraint, and further present an efficient greedy algorithm to achieve a good solution with a theoretically proven bound. We demonstrate the efficacy of our algorithm on thousands of histopathological images of breast microscopic tissues. PMID:25320821

  15. Semiautomatic digital imaging system for cytogenetic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes a digital image processing system, developed indigenously at BARC for size measurement of microscopic biological objects such as cell, nucleus and micronucleus in mouse bone marrow; cytochalasin-B blocked human lymphocytes in-vitro; numerical counting and karyotyping of metaphase chromosomes of human lymphocytes. Errors in karyotyping of chromosomes by the imaging system may creep in due to lack of well-defined position of centromere or extensive bending of chromosomes, which may result due to poor quality of preparation. Good metaphase preparations are mandatory for precise and accurate analysis by the system. Additional new morphological parameters about each chromosome have to be incorporated to improve the accuracy of karyotyping. Though the experienced cytogenetisist is the final judge; however, the system assists him/her to carryout analysis much faster as compared to manual scoring. Further, experimental studies are in progress to validate different software packages developed for various cytogenetic applications. (author)

  16. Molecular Analysis of Oral Bacteria in Heart Valve of Patients With Cardiovascular Disease by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Francisco Artur Forte; Forte, Clarissa Pessoa Fernandes; Silva, Paulo Goberlânio de Barros; Lopes, Camile B; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Santos, Ândrea Kely Campos Ribeiro Dos; Sobrinho, Carlos Roberto Martins Rodrigues; Mota, Mário Rogério Lima; Sousa, Fabrício Bitu; Alves, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes

    2015-11-01

    Structural deficiencies and functional abnormalities of heart valves represent an important cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and a number of diseases, such as aortic stenosis, have been recently associated with infectious agents. This study aimed to analyze oral bacteria in dental plaque, saliva, and cardiac valves of patients with cardiovascular disease. Samples of supragingival plaque, subgingival plaque, saliva, and cardiac valve tissue were collected from 42 patients with heart valve disease. Molecular analysis of Streptococcus mutans, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Treponema denticola was performed through real-time PCR. The micro-organism most frequently detected in heart valve samples was the S. mutans (89.3%), followed by P. intermedia (19.1%), P. gingivalis (4.2%), and T. denticola (2.1%). The mean decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT) was 26.4 ± 6.9 (mean ± SD), and according to the highest score of periodontal disease observed for each patient, periodontal pockets > 4 mm and dental calculus were detected in 43.4% and 34.7% of patients, respectively. In conclusion, oral bacteria, especially S. mutans, were found in the cardiac valve samples of patients with a high rate of caries and gingivitis/periodontitis. PMID:26632711

  17. Morphological Analysis of Cryogenic Spray Images

    OpenAIRE

    Ganu, Hrishikesh V.; Raghunandan, B. N.

    2008-01-01

    This study gives the development of a new technique for analyzing images of Cryogenic sprays, to estimate the drop-size distribution. It has a sound mathematical basis, in the form of Mathematical Morphology, and we have tried to build up a formulation for a granulometry, starting from the elementary operations of Dilation and Erosion. An axiomatic foundation for granulometry has also been discussed. We have taken an actual LN2 spray photograph for analysis, to illustrate the use of Morpholog...

  18. Nuclear Image Analysis Study of Neuroendocrine Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Meeja; Baek, Taehwa; Baek, Jongho; Son, Hyunjin; Kang, Dongwook; Kim, Jooheon; Lee, Hyekyung

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a subjective disagreement about nuclear chromatin in the field of pathology. Objective values of red, green, and blue (RGB) light intensities for nuclear chromatin can be obtained through a quantitative analysis using digital images. Methods We examined 10 cases of well differentiated neuroendocrine tumors of the rectum, small cell lung carcinomas, and moderately differentiated squamous cell lung carcinomas respectively. For each case, we selected 30 representative cells a...

  19. Biomedical Image Analysis by Program "Vision Assistant" and "Labview"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Izak

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces application in image analysis of biomedical images. General task is focused on analysis and diagnosis biomedical images obtained from program ImageJ. There are described methods which can be used for images in biomedical application. The main idea is based on particle analysis, pattern matching techniques. For this task was chosensophistication method by program Vision Assistant, which is a part of program LabVIEW.

  20. BioImage Suite: An integrated medical image analysis suite: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Papademetris, Xenophon; Jackowski, Marcel P; Rajeevan, Nallakkandi; DiStasio, Marcello; Okuda, Hirohito; Constable, R. Todd; Staib, Lawrence H.

    2006-01-01

    BioImage Suite is an NIH-supported medical image analysis software suite developed at Yale. It leverages both the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) and the Insight Toolkit (ITK) and it includes many additional algorithms for image analysis especially in the areas of segmentation, registration, diffusion weighted image processing and fMRI analysis. BioImage Suite has a user-friendly user interface developed in the Tcl scripting language. A final beta version is freely available for download 1

  1. Prognostic value of cardiovascular MR imaging biomarkers on outcome in peripheral arterial disease: a 6-year follow-up pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Harrie; Westenberg, Jos; Setz-Pels, Wikke; Kersten, Erik; Tielbeek, Alexander; Duijm, Lucien; Post, Johannes; Teijink, Joep; de Roos, Albert

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to explore the prognostic value of outcome of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (MR) imaging biomarkers in patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in comparison with traditional risk factors. Forty-two consecutive patients (mean age 64 ± 11 years, 22 men) referred for contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) were included. At baseline a comprehensive cardiovascular MRI examination was performed: CE-MRA of the infra-renal aorta and run-off vessels, carotid vessel wall imaging, cardiac cine imaging and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) assessment. Patients were categorized for outcome at 72 ± 5 months follow-up. One patient was lost to follow-up. Over 6 years, six patients had died (mortality rate 14.6 %), six patients (14.6 %) had experienced a cardiac event and three patients (7.3 %) a cerebral event. The mean MRA stenosis class (i.e., average stenosis severity visually scored over 27 standardized segments) was a significant independent predictor for all-cause mortality (beta 3.0 ± standard error 1.3, p = 0.02). Descending aorta PWV, age and diabetes mellitus were interrelated with stenosis severity but none of these were significant independent predictors. For cardiac morbidity, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and mean MRA stenosis class were associated, but only LVEF was a significant independent predictor (beta -0.14 ± 0.05, p = 0.005). Diabetes mellitus was a significant independent predictor for cerebral morbidity (beta 2.8 ± 1.3, p = 0.03). Significant independent predictors for outcome in PAD are mean MRA stenosis class for all-cause mortality, LVEF for cardiac morbidity and diabetes mellitus for cerebral morbidity. PMID:27209283

  2. Meta-analysis of psoriasis, cardiovascular disease, and associated risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Iben Marie; Ellervik, Christina; Yazdanyar, Shiva;

    2013-01-01

    .2-1.9), peripheral vascular disease (OR 1.5; 95% CI 1.2-1.8), atherosclerosis (OR 1.1; 95% CI 1.1-1.2), diabetes (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.5-2.5), hypertension (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.6-2.0), dyslipidemia (OR 1.5; 95% CI 1.4-1.7), obesity by body mass index (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.4-2.2), obesity by abdominal fat (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1...... significant associations, with the exception of dyslipidemia. LIMITATIONS: The heterogeneity of the studies makes clinical interpretation challenging. CONCLUSIONS: In aggregate, psoriasis was associated with ischemic heart disease and cardiovascular risk factors. The association was only significant...... for hospital-based studies, except for dyslipidemia, which was also significant in population-based studies....

  3. Variations in cardiovascular disease under-diagnosis in England: national cross-sectional spatial analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walford Hannah

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is under-diagnosis of cardiovascular disease (CVD in the English population, despite financial incentives to encourage general practices to register new cases. We compared the modelled (expected and diagnosed (observed prevalence of three cardiovascular conditions- coronary heart disease (CHD, hypertension and stroke- at local level, their geographical variation, and population and healthcare predictors which might influence diagnosis. Methods Cross-sectional observational study in all English local authorities (351 and general practices (8,372 comparing model-based expected prevalence with diagnosed prevalence on practice disease registers. Spatial analyses were used to identify geographic clusters and variation in regression relationships. Results A total of 9,682,176 patients were on practice CHD, stroke and transient ischaemic attack, and hypertension registers. There was wide spatial variation in observed: expected prevalence ratios for all three diseases, with less than five per cent of expected cases diagnosed in some areas. London and the surrounding area showed statistically significant discrepancies in observed: expected prevalence ratios, with observed prevalence much lower than the epidemiological models predicted. The addition of general practitioner supply as a variable yielded stronger regression results for all three conditions. Conclusions Despite almost universal access to free primary healthcare, there may be significant and highly variable under-diagnosis of CVD across England, which can be partially explained by persistent inequity in GP supply. Disease management studies should consider the possible impact of under-diagnosis on population health outcomes. Compared to classical regression modelling, spatial analytic techniques can provide additional information on risk factors for under-diagnosis, and can suggest where healthcare resources may be most needed.

  4. The triple line pattern on carotid intima media thickness imaging and its relationship to cardiovascular risk factors in patients on lipid lowering therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh TA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tania A Singh,1 Todd C Villines,2 Allen J Taylor31Division of Cardiology, Medstar Georgetown University Hospital, 2Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, 3Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA Background: Carotid intima media thickness (CIMT infrequently identifies a triple line pattern (TLP in the visualization of the internal elastic lamina. We examined the prevalence and predictors of the TLP among a consecutive series of subjects enrolled in a CIMT clinical trial, and also the effects of lipid lowering therapy.Methods: Baseline CIMT studies of subjects with known heart disease, or high risk for heart disease, were evaluated from a single site of the Arterial Biology for the Investigation of the Treatment Effects of Reducing Cholesterol 6-HDL and LDL Treatment Strategies in Atherosclerosis trial (N=120. One sonographer obtained four views of the right and left far wall common CIMT, using a 13 MHz ultrasound probe. Images were blindly reviewed for the presence of the TLP. The TLP was defined as absent (0, possible (1, or definite (2. A composite score from all four views was calculated. A patient was defined as having the TLP if the composite score was ≥4. Univariate predictors of the TLP were explored. Follow-up ultrasounds at 14 months were also reviewed for presence of the TLP.Results: The prevalence of the TLP at baseline was 22.5%. Among cardiovascular risk variables, systolic blood pressure was significantly higher in subjects displaying the TLP (141.3±15.6 mmHg versus 133.1±18.4 mmHg; P=0.036. There were no differences among those with, and without, the TLP, with respect to other cardiovascular risk variables (age, sex, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, C-reactive protein, glucose, weight, waist girth, tobacco use, medications, quantitative CIMT, or image quality. During ongoing lipid lowering therapy, the prevalence of the TLP increased to 54

  5. Independent Component Analysis for Magnetic Resonance Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San-Kan Lee

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Independent component analysis (ICA has recently received considerable interest in applications of magnetic resonance (MR image analysis. However, unlike its applications to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI where the number of data samples is greater than the number of signal sources to be separated, a dilemma encountered in MR image analysis is that the number of MR images is usually less than the number of signal sources to be blindly separated. As a result, at least two or more brain tissue substances are forced into a single independent component (IC in which none of these brain tissue substances can be discriminated from another. In addition, since the ICA is generally initialized by random initial conditions, the final generated ICs are different. In order to resolve this issue, this paper presents an approach which implements the over-complete ICA in conjunction with spatial domain-based classification so as to achieve better classification in each of ICA-demixed ICs. In order to demonstrate the proposed over-complete ICA, (OC-ICA experiments are conducted for performance analysis and evaluation. Results show that the OC-ICA implemented with classification can be very effective, provided the training samples are judiciously selected.

  6. Suitability of UK Biobank Retinal Images for Automatic Analysis of Morphometric Properties of the Vasculature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J MacGillivray

    Full Text Available To assess the suitability of retinal images held in the UK Biobank--the largest retinal data repository in a prospective population-based cohort--for computer assisted vascular morphometry, generating measures that are commonly investigated as candidate biomarkers of systemic disease.Non-mydriatic fundus images from both eyes of 2,690 participants--people with a self-reported history of myocardial infarction (n=1,345 and a matched control group (n=1,345--were analysed using VAMPIRE software. These images were drawn from those of 68,554 UK Biobank participants who underwent retinal imaging at recruitment. Four operators were trained in the use of the software to measure retinal vascular tortuosity and bifurcation geometry.Total operator time was approximately 360 hours (4 minutes per image. 2,252 (84% of participants had at least one image of sufficient quality for the software to process, i.e. there was sufficient detection of retinal vessels in the image by the software to attempt the measurement of the target parameters. 1,604 (60% of participants had an image of at least one eye that was adequately analysed by the software, i.e. the measurement protocol was successfully completed. Increasing age was associated with a reduced proportion of images that could be processed (p=0.0004 and analysed (p<0.0001. Cases exhibited more acute arteriolar branching angles (p=0.02 as well as lower arteriolar and venular tortuosity (p<0.0001.A proportion of the retinal images in UK Biobank are of insufficient quality for automated analysis. However, the large size of the UK Biobank means that tens of thousands of images are available and suitable for computational analysis. Parametric information measured from the retinas of participants with suspected cardiovascular disease was significantly different to that measured from a matched control group.

  7. The Prevalence of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Hyperintensity in Migraine Patients and Its Association with Migraine Headache Characteristics and Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Toghae

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the frequency of hyperintense foci in migraine patients and the relationship with migraine headache characteristics and cardiovascular risk factors. Methods: Ninety patients with migraine headache (70 without aura and 20 with aura were enrolled and interviewed. Information on their headache (severity, frequency, and mean disease duration and other related data was obtained by completing a clinical checklist. Subsequently, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was performed and each patient was then evaluated for hyperintense lesions. Results: Of the 90 patients, 29 (32% had silent hyperintense lesions on their MRI. The mean age of the patients with hyperintense foci was 41 years while those with no lesions was 33 years (p0.050. The lesions were found significantly more frequently in the patients who experienced chronic migraine (p=0.032. Conclusion: Our study adds weight to the theory that disease duration has a key role in the formation of hyperintense brain lesions. Certain cardiovascular risk factors such as sex, smoking, serum cholesterol, and BMI, do not affect the presence or absence of such lesions, suggesting that the relationship between migraine and these lesions may be directly due to the effects of migraine itself.

  8. Multispectral laser imaging for advanced food analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senni, L.; Burrascano, P.; Ricci, M.

    2016-07-01

    A hardware-software apparatus for food inspection capable of realizing multispectral NIR laser imaging at four different wavelengths is herein discussed. The system was designed to operate in a through-transmission configuration to detect the presence of unwanted foreign bodies inside samples, whether packed or unpacked. A modified Lock-In technique was employed to counterbalance the significant signal intensity attenuation due to transmission across the sample and to extract the multispectral information more efficiently. The NIR laser wavelengths used to acquire the multispectral images can be varied to deal with different materials and to focus on specific aspects. In the present work the wavelengths were selected after a preliminary analysis to enhance the image contrast between foreign bodies and food in the sample, thus identifying the location and nature of the defects. Experimental results obtained from several specimens, with and without packaging, are presented and the multispectral image processing as well as the achievable spatial resolution of the system are discussed.

  9. SimVascular 2.0: an Integrated Open Source Pipeline for Image-Based Cardiovascular Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Hongzhi; Merkow, Jameson; Updegrove, Adam; Schiavazzi, Daniele; Wilson, Nathan; Shadden, Shawn; Marsden, Alison

    2015-11-01

    SimVascular (www.simvascular.org) is currently the only fully open source software package that provides a complete pipeline from medical image based modeling to patient specific blood flow simulation and analysis. It was initially released in 2007 and has contributed to numerous advances in fundamental hemodynamics research, surgical planning, and medical device design. However, early versions had several major barriers preventing wider adoption by new users, large-scale application in clinical and research studies, and educational access. In the past years, SimVascular 2.0 has made significant progress by integrating open source alternatives for the expensive commercial libraries previously required for anatomic modeling, mesh generation and the linear solver. In addition, it simplified the across-platform compilation process, improved the graphical user interface and launched a comprehensive documentation website. Many enhancements and new features have been incorporated for the whole pipeline, such as 3-D segmentation, Boolean operation for discrete triangulated surfaces, and multi-scale coupling for closed loop boundary conditions. In this presentation we will briefly overview the modeling/simulation pipeline and advances of the new SimVascular 2.0.

  10. Remote Sensing Digital Image Analysis An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, John A

    2013-01-01

    Remote Sensing Digital Image Analysis provides the non-specialist with a treatment of the quantitative analysis of satellite and aircraft derived remotely sensed data. Since the first edition of the book there have been significant developments in the algorithms used for the processing and analysis of remote sensing imagery; nevertheless many of the fundamentals have substantially remained the same.  This new edition presents material that has retained value since those early days, along with new techniques that can be incorporated into an operational framework for the analysis of remote sensing data. The book is designed as a teaching text for the senior undergraduate and postgraduate student, and as a fundamental treatment for those engaged in research using digital image processing in remote sensing.  The presentation level is for the mathematical non-specialist.  Since the very great number of operational users of remote sensing come from the earth sciences communities, the text is pitched at a leve...

  11. The Association between Sulfonylurea Use and All-Cause and Cardiovascular Mortality: A Meta-Analysis with Trial Sequential Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvaki Rados, Dimitris; Catani Pinto, Lana; Reck Remonti, Luciana; Bauermann Leitão, Cristiane; Gross, Jorge Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Background Sulfonylureas are an effective and inexpensive treatment for type 2 diabetes. There is conflicting data about the safety of these drugs regarding mortality and cardiovascular outcomes. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the safety of the sulfonylureas most frequently used and to use trial sequential analysis (TSA) to analyze whether the available sample was powered enough to support the results. Methods and Findings Electronic databases were reviewed from 1946 (Embase) or 1966 (MEDLINE) up to 31 December 2014. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of at least 52 wk in duration evaluating second- or third-generation sulfonylureas in the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes and reporting outcomes of interest were included. Primary outcomes were all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Additionally, myocardial infarction and stroke events were evaluated. Data were summarized with Peto odds ratios (ORs), and the reliability of the results was evaluated with TSA. Forty-seven RCTs with 37,650 patients and 890 deaths in total were included. Sulfonylureas were not associated with all-cause (OR 1.12 [95% CI 0.96 to 1.30]) or cardiovascular mortality (OR 1.12 [95% CI 0.87 to 1.42]). Sulfonylureas were also not associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (OR 0.92 [95% CI 0.76 to 1.12]) or stroke (OR 1.16 [95% CI 0.81 to 1.66]). TSA could discard an absolute difference of 0.5% between the treatments, which was considered the minimal clinically significant difference. The major limitation of this review was the inclusion of studies not designed to evaluate safety outcomes. Conclusions Sulfonylureas are not associated with increased risk for all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, or stroke. Current evidence supports the safety of sulfonylureas; an absolute risk of 0.5% could be firmly discarded. Review registration PROSPERO CRD42014004330 PMID:27071029

  12. Nursing image: an evolutionary concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei-Adaryani, Morteza; Salsali, Mahvash; Mohammadi, Eesa

    2012-12-01

    A long-term challenge to the nursing profession is the concept of image. In this study, we used the Rodgers' evolutionary concept analysis approach to analyze the concept of nursing image (NI). The aim of this concept analysis was to clarify the attributes, antecedents, consequences, and implications associated with the concept. We performed an integrative internet-based literature review to retrieve English literature published from 1980-2011. Findings showed that NI is a multidimensional, all-inclusive, paradoxical, dynamic, and complex concept. The media, invisibility, clothing style, nurses' behaviors, gender issues, and professional organizations are the most important antecedents of the concept. We found that NI is pivotal in staff recruitment and nursing shortage, resource allocation to nursing, nurses' job performance, workload, burnout and job dissatisfaction, violence against nurses, public trust, and salaries available to nurses. An in-depth understanding of the NI concept would assist nurses to eliminate negative stereotypes and build a more professional image for the nurse and the profession. PMID:23343236

  13. Simple Low Level Features for Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcoz, Paolo

    As human beings, we perceive the world around us mainly through our eyes, and give what we see the status of “reality”; as such we historically tried to create ways of recording this reality so we could augment or extend our memory. From early attempts in photography like the image produced in 1826 by the French inventor Nicéphore Niépce (Figure 2.1) to the latest high definition camcorders, the number of recorded pieces of reality increased exponentially, posing the problem of managing all that information. Most of the raw video material produced today has lost its memory augmentation function, as it will hardly ever be viewed by any human; pervasive CCTVs are an example. They generate an enormous amount of data each day, but there is not enough “human processing power” to view them. Therefore the need for effective automatic image analysis tools is great, and a lot effort has been put in it, both from the academia and the industry. In this chapter, a review of some of the most important image analysis tools are presented.

  14. The analysis of a reference value for baroreflex sensitivity and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy prevalence in a Chinese population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is rapidly growing in all populations worldwide. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is easily applied as a diagnostic test to a large number of individuals in the general population. However, no study has reported the normal reference values of BRS for the CAN diagnostic test in a Chinese population. The aim of this study was to estimate the normative reference value of BRS, and assess CAN prevalence in our cross-sectional dataset. Methods We conducted a large-scale, community-based, cross-sectional study in a Chinese population. We performed data analysis on 2,092 subjects. Cardiovascular autonomic function was assessed using spontaneous BRS. A total of 349 healthy subjects were used to perform analysis for the reference value for BRS. The CAN prevalence was calculated in the overall sample, and in patients with diabetes mellitus, patients with hypertension and patients with metabolic syndrome. Results In the overall sample, the reference value for total power (TP.brs) was more than 1.96 ms/mmHg. The cut-off points of 1.74 ms/mmHg and 2.53 ms/mmHg were set as high frequency (HF.brs) and low frequency (LF.brs), respectively. CAN diagnostic tests based on the reference value were performed. The estimated CAN prevalence in the overall sample was 20.41% using the BRS test. CAN prevalence was 33.18%, 28.69% and 28.57% in patients with diabetes mellitus, patients with hypertension and patients with metabolic syndrome, respectively. Conclusions Our findings provided reference values for BRS. Estimated CAN prevalence was high in this Chinese population, which has become a major public health problem in China. PMID:24521230

  15. Cardiovascular MR T2-STIR imaging does not discriminate between intramyocardial haemorrhage and microvascular obstruction during the subacute phase of a reperfused myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Esben Søvsø Szocska; Pedersen, Steen Fjord; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Microvascular obstruction (MVO) and intramyocardial haemorrhage (IMH) are known complications of myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion injury. Whereas MVO is an established marker for a poor clinical outcome, the clinical significance of IMH remains less well defined. Cardiovascular MR (CMR...... macroscopic evaluation and T1 weighted CMR) was produced in 13 pigs by a 65-min balloon occlusion of the mid left anterior descending artery, followed by reperfusion. Eight days after injury, all pigs underwent CMR imaging and subsequently the hearts were assessed by gross pathology. RESULTS: CMR identified...... MVO in all hearts. CMR and pathology showed that IMH was present in 6 of 13 (46%) infarcts. The sensitivity and specificity of T2-STIR hypointense signal core for identification of IMH was 100% and 29%, respectively. T2-values between hypointense signal core in the pigs with and without IMH were...

  16. X-ray diffraction imaging and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first papers dealing with the very important application of x-ray diffraction to crystal structure analysis were also published in 1912 by W.L. Bragg, while a student at Cambridge. Bragg performed an analysis of the Laue diffraction pattern of zinc blend and determined the correct structure of the crystal lattice. There have been many practical applications for x-ray diffraction techniques. Historically conventional x-ray machines were used as generators and film used as the recording medium. Prior to 1966, all attempts to directly image x-ray diffraction patterns used a large format x-ray image intensifier tube of the same type as conventionally used for medical and industrial fluoroscopy. Since the 1960's numerous electro-optical systems have been developed which are far better suited for real-time viewing and recording of x-ray diffraction patterns. Modern x-ray diffraction imaging systems incorporating rotating anode and pulsed x-ray generators, synchrotron x-ray sources, and optimized electro-optical systems have been used to orient single crystals, to study crystal lattice rotation accompanying plastic deformation, to measure the rate of grain boundary migration during recrystallization annealing of cold-worked metals, to determine the physical state of exploding metals, to rapidly measure residual stress (strain), to study the dynamics of structural phase transitions in ferroelectric crystals, to monitor the amorphous to crystalline phase transformation of rapidly solidified metals, and to record topographic images of lattice defects in quartz, gallium arsenide and nickel alloy turbine blade crystals

  17. Uses of software in digital image analysis: a forensic report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukesh; Jha, Shailendra

    2010-02-01

    Forensic image analysis is required an expertise to interpret the content of an image or the image itself in legal matters. Major sub-disciplines of forensic image analysis with law enforcement applications include photo-grammetry, photographic comparison, content analysis and image authentication. It has wide applications in forensic science range from documenting crime scenes to enhancing faint or indistinct patterns such as partial fingerprints. The process of forensic image analysis can involve several different tasks, regardless of the type of image analysis performed. Through this paper authors have tried to explain these tasks, which are described in to three categories: Image Compression, Image Enhancement & Restoration and Measurement Extraction. With the help of examples like signature comparison, counterfeit currency comparison and foot-wear sole impression using the software Canvas and Corel Draw.

  18. Automatic prediction of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events using heart rate variability analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Melillo

    Full Text Available There is consensus that Heart Rate Variability is associated with the risk of vascular events. However, Heart Rate Variability predictive value for vascular events is not completely clear. The aim of this study is to develop novel predictive models based on data-mining algorithms to provide an automatic risk stratification tool for hypertensive patients.A database of 139 Holter recordings with clinical data of hypertensive patients followed up for at least 12 months were collected ad hoc. Subjects who experienced a vascular event (i.e., myocardial infarction, stroke, syncopal event were considered as high-risk subjects. Several data-mining algorithms (such as support vector machine, tree-based classifier, artificial neural network were used to develop automatic classifiers and their accuracy was tested by assessing the receiver-operator characteristics curve. Moreover, we tested the echographic parameters, which have been showed as powerful predictors of future vascular events.The best predictive model was based on random forest and enabled to identify high-risk hypertensive patients with sensitivity and specificity rates of 71.4% and 87.8%, respectively. The Heart Rate Variability based classifier showed higher predictive values than the conventional echographic parameters, which are considered as significant cardiovascular risk factors.Combination of Heart Rate Variability measures, analyzed with data-mining algorithm, could be a reliable tool for identifying hypertensive patients at high risk to develop future vascular events.

  19. Contextual socioeconomic determinants of cardiovascular risk factors in rural south-west China: a multilevel analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geater Alan

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined independent influences of contextual variables on cardiovascular risk factors in Shilin county, Yunnan province, South-west China. Methods Three villages were selected from each of the ten townships based on probability proportional to size. In each selected village, 200 individuals aged ≥ 45 years were chosen based on simple random sampling method. From 6006 individuals, information on demographic characteristics, smoking and drinking status was obtained by interview. Blood pressure, height, weight, and waist and hip girth were measured. Fasting blood sugar was measured in a 10-percent subsample. Contextual data were from official reports. Multi-level regression modelling with adjustment for individual and contextual variables was used. Results Contextual variables associated with CVD risk factors included: remoteness of village with higher blood pressure and fasting blood sugar, high proportion of Yi minority with drinking, high literacy rate with a lower rate of smoking and a lower mean waist-hip ratio, and high average income with lower systolic blood pressure and body mass index (BMI but higher FBS. Conclusion While contextual SES is associated with a few CVD risk factors, villages with high level of income are worse off in fasting blood sugar. Strategies of economic development should be reviewed to avoid adverse effects on health.

  20. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Cardiovascular Symptoms in Four Major Racial/Ethnic Groups of Midlife Women: A Secondary Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Im, Eun-Ok; Ham, Ok Kyung; Chee, Eunice; Chee, Wonshik

    2015-01-01

    Ethnic minority midlife women frequently do not recognize cardiovascular symptoms that they experience during the menopausal transition. Racial/ethnic differences in cardiovascular symptoms are postulated as a plausible reason for their lack of knowledge and recognition of the symptoms. The purpose of this study was to explore racial/ethnic differences in midlife women’s cardiovascular symptoms and to determine the factors related to these symptoms in each racial/ethnic group. This was a seco...

  1. Cardiovascular whole-body MR imaging in patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease; Kardiovaskulaere MR-Ganzkoerperbildgebung bei Patienten mit symptomatischer Atherosklerose der peripheren Gefaesse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenchel, M.; Kramer, U.; Stauder, N.; Bretschneider, C.; Klumpp, B.; Claussen, C.D.; Miller, S. [Abt. fuer Radiologie, Eberhard-Karls-Univ. Tuebingen (Germany); Jost, D.; Scheule, A. [Abt. fuer Herz-, Thorax- und Gefaesschirurgie, Eberhard-Karls-Univ. Tuebingen (Germany); Naegele, T. [Abt. Neuroradiologie, Eberhard-Karls-Univ. Tuebingen (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Purpose: To examine patients with peripheral-arterial-occlusive-disease (PAOD) for systemic effects associated with atherosclerosis using a comprehensive state-of-the-art whole-body MR examination protocol. The protocol comprises the assessment of the complete arterial vasculature (except coronary arteries), the brain, and the heart. Materials and methods: Multi-station whole-body 3D MR angiography was performed in sixty consecutive patients with clinical suspicion for PAOD at 1.5 T (Magnetom Avanto, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). Functional and delayed enhancement cardiac images were acquired, as well as FLAIR images of the brain and TOF angiography of intracranial vessels. MR and DSA images were assessed by independent observers for artherosclerotic manifestations and other pathology. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of vascular pathology was calculated for MR data using conventional DSA of the symptomatic region as standard-of-reference. Results: Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of significant vascular stenosis (>70% luminal narrowing) was 94% and 96% (PPV 87%, NPV 98%). Significant microangiopathic tissue alterations (n=7) and/or cerebral infarction (n=18) were diagnosed in 23/60 patients. Thirty-eight of 60 patients presented with systolic left ventricular wall motion abnormalities. In 24 patients subendocardial or transmural delayed enhancement was detected in corresponding regions, indicating prior myocardial infarction. Conclusion: For patients with PAOD and suspected systemic atherosclerotic disease a comprehensive diagnosis of accompanying cardiovascular pathology and therefore staging of systemic atherosclerotic disease is feasible within one MR examination. (orig.)

  2. A Grid Information Infrastructure for Medical Image Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Rogulin, D.; F. Estrella(UWE); Hauer, T.; McClatchey, R.; Solomonides, T

    2004-01-01

    The storage and manipulation of digital images and the analysis of the information held in those images are essential requirements for next-generation medical information systems. The medical community has been exploring collaborative approaches for managing image data and exchanging knowledge and Grid technology [1] is a promising approach to enabling distributed analysis across medical institutions and for developing new collaborative and cooperative approaches for image analysis without th...

  3. Noise analysis in laser speckle contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shuai; Chen, Yu; Dunn, Andrew K.; Boas, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is becoming an established method for full-field imaging of blood flow dynamics in animal models. A reliable quantitative model with comprehensive noise analysis is necessary to fully utilize this technique in biomedical applications and clinical trials. In this study, we investigated several major noise sources in LSCI: periodic physiology noise, shot noise and statistical noise. (1) We observed periodic physiology noise in our experiments and found that its sources consist principally of motions induced by heart beats and/or ventilation. (2) We found that shot noise caused an offset of speckle contrast (SC) values, and this offset is directly related to the incident light intensity. (3) A mathematical model of statistical noise was also developed. The model indicated that statistical noise in speckle contrast imaging is related to the SC values and the total number of pixels used in the SC calculation. Our experimental results are consistent with theoretical predications, as well as with other published works.

  4. Application of digital subtraction angiography for serial rotatostereoradiography utilizing a cardio-vascular image analyzer ACIA-320

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to obtain cerebral angiograms in a three dimensional stereoscopic view through 180 deg using a single injection of contrast media, a new radiodiagnostic device utilizing a gantry rotated through 180 deg in 1.8 seconds was devised. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was integrated into this system using an Avio Cardio Vascular Image Analizer ACIA-320. A rotating ring, USZ-30, a fluoroscopic device using television, was utilized as a gantry, in which an X-ray tube and an image intensifier (I.I.) were installed. An X-ray tube (Circlex 0.6W/0.8PG 38B), a 9 inch I.I. (Philips 9/5 High Lens), a television unit AX-2000A), and a plumbicon camera tube (QX-1072) were used. The distance between the X-ray focus and I.I. was designed at 100 cm. The gantry was rotated through 180 deg in 1.8 seconds utilizing a Tsubaki motor power unit (Tsubaki SCU Motor: Type 022DMLB). DSA requires two rotations of the gantry, one for the plain radiograms and a second for angiograms. All images were stored in the digital multimemory of a DMM-80T which has an ability of 256 x 256 x 8 bits x 320 frames. Angiograms were subtracted automatically after indicating the initial rotated points of the plain and angiogram images using 4 ROI time density curves. Subtracted images were corrected using 8 gamma correction patterns with LEVEL and WIDTH changes resulting in excellent contrast images. These images were viewed in a rotational mode using an endless circulating display of the memories. These angiograms were then transferred onto a video disc recorder (VM-1000M), and the two other special modes could be displayed. Oscillating mode shows the images in oscillating manner (fan head motion), and progressive oscillating mode shows the images also in oscillating manner with advancing videomemory per each oscillation. (J.P.N.)

  5. Indices of cardiovascular function derived from peripheral pulse wave analysis using radial applanation tonometry: a measurement repeatability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crilly, Mike; Coch, Christoph; Bruce, Margaret; Clark, Hazel; Williams, David

    2007-08-01

    Pulse wave analysis (PWA) using applanation tonometry is a non-invasive technique for assessing cardiovascular function. It produces three important indices: ejection duration index (ED%), augmentation index adjusted for heart rate (AIX@75), and subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR%). The aim of this study was to assess within- and between-observer repeatability of these measurements. After resting supine for 15 minutes, 20 ambulant patients (16 male) in sinus rhythm underwent four PWA measurements on a single occasion. Two nurses (A & B) independently and alternately undertook PWA measurements using the same equipment (Omron HEM-757; SphygmoCor with Millar hand-held tonometer) blind to the other nurse's PWA measurements. Within- and between-observer differences were analysed using the Bland-Altman ;limits of agreement' approach (mean difference +/- 2 standard deviations, 2SD). Mean age was 56 (blood pressure, BP 136/79; pulse rate 64). BP/PWA measurements remained stable during assessment. Based on the average of two PWA measurements the mean +/- 2SD between-observer difference in ED% was 0.3 +/- 2.0; AIX@75 1.0 +/- 3.9; and SEVR% 1.7 +/- 14.2. Based on a single PWA measurement the between-observer difference was ED% 0.3 +/- 3.3; AIX@75 1.7 +/- 6.9; and SEVR% 0.6 +/- 22.6. Within-observer differences for nurse-A were ED% 0.0 +/- 5.4; AIX@75 1.5 +/- 7.0; and SEVR% 1.7 +/- 39.0 (nurse-B: 0.1 +/- 3.8; 0.1 +/- 8.0; and 0.6 +/- 23.3, respectively). PWA demonstrates high levels of repeatability even when used by relatively inexperienced staff and has the potential to be included in the routine cardiovascular assessment of ambulant patients. PMID:17848475

  6. Long-term vitamin E supplementation fails to reduce lipid peroxidation in people at cardiovascular risk: analysis of underlying factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palumbo Gaetana

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antioxidant supplementation with vitamin E had no effect in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD in three recent large, randomized clinical trials. In order to reassess critically the role of vitamin E in CVD prevention, it is important to establish whether these results are related to a lack of antioxidant action. Methods We examined the in vivo antioxidant effect of vitamin E (300 mg/day for about three years in 144 participants in the Primary Prevention Project (females and males, aged ≥ 50 y, with at least one major CV risk factor, but no history of CVD. Urinary 8-epi-PGF2α (isoprostane F2α-III or 15-F2t-isoP, a validated biomarker of lipid peroxidation, was measured by mass spectrometry. Results Urinary excretion of 8-epi-PGF2α [pg/mg creatinine, median (range] was 141 (67–498 in treated and 148 (76–561 in untreated subjects (p = 0.10. Taking into account possible confounding variables, multiple regression analysis confirmed that vitamin E had no significant effect on this biomarker. Levels of 8-epi-PGF2α were in the normal range for most subjects, except smokers and those with uncontrolled blood pressure or hyperglycemia. Conclusions Prolonged vitamin E supplementation did not reduce lipid peroxidation in subjects with major cardiovascular risk factors. The observation that the rate of lipid peroxidation was near normal in a large proportion of subjects may help explain why vitamin E was not effective as an antioxidant in the PPP study and was ineffective for CVD prevention in large scale trials.

  7. Non-destructive analysis of extracellular matrix development in cardiovascular tissue-engineered constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuemen, M; Nguyen, D V A; Raffius, J; Flanagan, T C; Dietrich, M; Frese, J; Schmitz-Rode, T; Jockenhoevel, S

    2013-05-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, there is an increasing demand for non-destructive methods to quantify the synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) components such as collagens, elastin or sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) in vitro as a quality control before clinical use. In this study, procollagen I carboxyterminal peptide (PICP), procollagen III aminoterminal peptide (PIIINP), tropoelastin and sGAGs are investigated for their potential use as non-destructive markers in culture medium of statically cultivated cell-seeded fibrin gels. Measurement of PICP as marker for type I collagen synthesis, and PIIINP as marker of type III collagen turnover, correlated well with the hydroxyproline content of the fibrin gels, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.98 and 0.97, respectively. The measurement of tropoelastin as marker of elastin synthesis correlated with the amount of elastin retained in fibrin gels with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.99. sGAGs were retained in fibrin gels, but were not detectable in culture medium at any time of measurement. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the potential of PICP and tropoelastin as non-destructive culture medium markers for collagen and elastin synthesis. To our knowledge, this is the first study in cardiovascular tissue engineering investigating the whole of here proposed biomarkers of ECM synthesis to monitor the maturation process of developing tissue non-invasively, but for comprehensive assessment of ECM development, these biomarkers need to be investigated in further studies, employing dynamic cultivation conditions and more complex tissue constructs. PMID:23307024

  8. Analysis of image quality based on perceptual preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Liqin; Hua, Yuning; Zhao, Guangzhou; Qi, Yaping

    2007-11-01

    This paper deals with image quality analysis considering the impact of psychological factors involved in assessment. The attributes of image quality requirement were partitioned according to the visual perception characteristics and the preference of image quality were obtained by the factor analysis method. The features of image quality which support the subjective preference were identified, The adequacy of image is evidenced to be the top requirement issues to the display image quality improvement. The approach will be beneficial to the research of the image quality subjective quantitative assessment method.

  9. 心血管MRI第四部分--不同场强的心血管MR成像特点比较%Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging:Part IV--The comparison of imaging features of cardiovascular magnetic resonance scanners with different ifeld strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹刚; 贺光军; 赵世华

    2014-01-01

    该文为第四部分,承接前三部分讲述了当今心血管MR(cardiovascular MR,CMR)的两大主流机型,即1.5 T和3.0 T扫描仪的成像特点。3.0 T系统在很多单位已成为神经系统成像的标准,但对体部,特别是心脏,3.0 T系统的广泛应用则受限于诸多因素,充满着挑战。然而,在更高场强下行CMR成像又具有无可比拟的优越性并成为发展趋势。作者从物理基础开始,归纳了3.0 T对比1.5 T在CMR成像应用中的优缺点和发展前景。%This article is the fourth section. Following the three previous sections, the current major types of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) scanner, 1.5 T and 3.0 T, were presented. 3.0 T system has played a role as the standardization for nervous system imaging in most units. But for body imaging, especially for cardiac imaging, there is much more challenging to perform imaging at 3.0 T than 1.5 T. However, it is the trend of development to perform CMR imaging in higher ifeld strength due to the signiifcant advantages. From the magnetic resonance physics to clinical application of CMR, the 1.5 T and 3.0 T CMR systems were compared in this article.

  10. Effect of Diabetes on Brain Structure: The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes MR Imaging Baseline Data

    OpenAIRE

    Bryan, R. Nick; Bilello, Michel; Davatzikos, Christos; Lazar, Ronald M.; Murray, Anne; Horowitz, Karen; Lovato, James; Miller, Michael E.; Williamson, Jeff; Launer, Lenore J

    2014-01-01

    The results of this study show that measures of longer duration of diabetes or biochemical severity correlated primarily with brain atrophy, but not with white matter lesion volume, which is the major MR imaging marker of small vessel ischemic disease.

  11. Estimated glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria for prediction of cardiovascular outcomes : a collaborative meta-analysis of individual participant data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsushita, Kunihiro; Coresh, Josef; Sang, Yingying; Chalmers, John; Fox, Caroline; Guallar, Eliseo; Jafar, Tazeen; Jassal, Simerjot K.; Landman, Gijs W. D.; Muntner, Paul; Roderick, Paul; Sairenchi, Toshimi; Schoettker, Ben; Shankar, Anoop; Shlipak, Michael; Tonelli, Marcello; Townend, Jonathan; van Zuilen, Arjan; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Yamashita, Kentaro; Gansevoort, Ron; Sarnak, Mark; Warnock, David G.; Woodward, Mark; Arnlov, Johan; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Background The usefulness of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria for prediction of cardiovascular outcomes is controversial. We aimed to assess the addition of creatinine-based eGFR and albuminuria to traditional risk factors for prediction of cardiovascular risk with a meta-

  12. Estimated glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria for prediction of cardiovascular outcomes: a collaborative meta-analysis of individual participant data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsushita, K.; Coresh, J.; Sang, Y.; Chalmers, J.; Fox, C.; Guallar, E.; Jafar, T.; Jassal, S.K.; Landman, G.W.; Muntner, P.; Roderick, P.; Sairenchi, T.; Schottker, B.; Shankar, A.; Shlipak, M.; Tonelli, M.; Townend, J.; Zuilen, A. van; Yamagishi, K.; Yamashita, K.; Gansevoort, R.; Sarnak, M.; Warnock, D.G.; Woodward, M.; Arnlov, J.; Wetzels, J.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The usefulness of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria for prediction of cardiovascular outcomes is controversial. We aimed to assess the addition of creatinine-based eGFR and albuminuria to traditional risk factors for prediction of cardiovascular risk with a meta

  13. Geometria da valva mitral derivada da ressonância magnética cardiovascular na avaliação da gravidade da regurgitação mitral Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging-derived mitral valve geometry in determining mitral regurgitation severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Mauricio Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A regurgitação mitral é a doença valvar cardíaca mais comum em todo o mundo. A ressonância magnética pode ser uma ferramenta útil para analisar os parâmetros da valva mitral. OBJETIVO: diferenciar padrões geométricos da valva mitral em pacientes com diferentes gravidades por regurgitação mitral (RM com base na ressonância magnética cardiovascular. MÉTODOS: Sessenta e três pacientes foram submetidos à ressonância magnética cardiovascular. Os parâmetros da valva mitral analisados foram: área (mm2 e ângulo (graus de tenting, altura do ventrículo (mm, altura do tenting (mm, folheto anterior, comprimento posterior do folheto (leaflet e diâmetro do anulo (mm. Os pacientes foram divididos em dois grupos, um incluindo pacientes que necessitaram de cirurgia da valva mitral e o outro os que não. RESULTADOS: Trinta e seis pacientes apresentaram de RM discreta a leve (1-2+ e 27 RM de moderada a grave (3-4+. Dez (15,9% dos 63 pacientes foram submetidos à cirurgia. Pacientes com RM mais grave tiveram maior diâmetro sistólico final do ventrículo esquerdo (38,6 ± 10,2 vs. 45,4 ± 16,8, p BACKGROUND: Mitral regurgitation is the most common valvular heart disease worldwide. Magnetic resonance may be a useful tool to analyze mitral valve parameters. OBJECTIVE: To distinguish mitral valve geometric patterns in patients with different severities of mitral regurgitation (MR based on cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. METHODS: Sixty-three patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. Mitral valve parameters analyzed were: tenting area (mm2 and angle (degrees, ventricle height (mm, tenting height (mm, anterior leaflet, posterior leaflet length and annulus diameter (mm. Patients were divided into two groups, one including patients who required mitral valve surgery and another which did not. RESULTS: Thirty-six patients had trace to mild (1-2+ MR and 27 had moderate to severe MR (3-4+. Ten (15.9% out of

  14. From Pixels to Geographic Objects in Remote Sensing Image Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Addink, E.A.; Van Coillie, Frieke M.B.; Jong, Steven M. de

    2012-01-01

    Traditional image analysis methods are mostly pixel-based and use the spectral differences of landscape elements at the Earth surface to classify these elements or to extract element properties from the Earth Observation image. Geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) has received considerabl

  15. Image analysis and platform development for automated phenotyping in cytomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Kuan

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the empirical study of image analysis in HT/HC screen study. Often a HT/HC screening produces extensive amounts that cannot be manually analyzed. Thus, an automated image analysis solution is prior to an objective understanding of the raw image data. Compared to general a

  16. An Analysis of Pyramidal Image Fusion Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Meek, T. R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of multiresolution image fusion techniques to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and Landsat imagery. Results were acquired through the development and application of image fusion software to test images. The test images were fused using six image fusion techniques that are the combinations from three types of image decomposition algorithms (ratio of low pass [RoLP] pyramids, gradient pyramids, and morphological pyramids) and two types of fusion algorithms (se...

  17. Comparative Analysis of Various Image Fusion Techniques For Biomedical Images: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayera Nahvi,

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Image Fusion is a process of combining the relevant information from a set of images, into a single image, wherein the resultant fused image will be more informative and complete than any of the input images. This paper discusses implementation of DWT technique on different images to make a fused image having more information content. As DWT is the latest technique for image fusion as compared to simple image fusion and pyramid based image fusion, so we are going to implement DWT as the image fusion technique in our paper. Other methods such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA based fusion, Intensity hue Saturation (IHS Transform based fusion and high pass filtering methods are also discussed. A new algorithm is proposed using Discrete Wavelet transform and different fusion techniques including pixel averaging, min-max and max-min methods for medical image fusion. KEYWORDS:

  18. Cardiovascular MR T2-STIR imaging does not discriminate between intramyocardial haemorrhage and microvascular obstruction during the subacute phase of a reperfused myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Esben Søvsø Szocska; Pedersen, Steen Fjord; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke; Kjærgaard, Uffe; Schmidt, Nikolaj Hjort; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Kim, Won Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Microvascular obstruction (MVO) and intramyocardial haemorrhage (IMH) are known complications of myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion injury. Whereas MVO is an established marker for a poor clinical outcome, the clinical significance of IMH remains less well defined. Cardiovascular MR (CMR) and T2 weighted short tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR) imaging have been used to detect IMH and to explore its clinical importance. IMH is typically identified within the area-at-risk as a hypointense signal core on T2-STIR images. Because MVO will also appear as a hypointense signal core, T2-STIR imaging may not be an optimal method for assessing IMH. In this study, we sought to investigate the ability of T2-STIR to discriminate between MVO with IMH in a porcine myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion model that expressed MVO with and without IMH. Method MVO with and without IMH (defined from both macroscopic evaluation and T1 weighted CMR) was produced in 13 pigs by a 65-min balloon occlusion of the mid left anterior descending artery, followed by reperfusion. Eight days after injury, all pigs underwent CMR imaging and subsequently the hearts were assessed by gross pathology. Results CMR identified MVO in all hearts. CMR and pathology showed that IMH was present in 6 of 13 (46%) infarcts. The sensitivity and specificity of T2-STIR hypointense signal core for identification of IMH was 100% and 29%, respectively. T2-values between hypointense signal core in the pigs with and without IMH were similar (60.4±3 ms vs 63.0±4 ms). Conclusions T2-STIR did not allow identification of IMH in areas with MVO in a porcine model of myocardial ischaemic/reperfusion injury in the subacute phase of a reperfused myocardial infarction. PMID:27110375

  19. Dose reduction of up to 89% while maintaining image quality in cardiovascular CT achieved with prospective ECG gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londt, John H.; Shreter, Uri; Vass, Melissa; Hsieh, Jiang; Ge, Zhanyu; Adda, Olivier; Dowe, David A.; Sabllayrolles, Jean-Louis

    2007-03-01

    We present the results of dose and image quality performance evaluation of a novel, prospective ECG-gated Coronary CT Angiography acquisition mode (SnapShot Pulse, LightSpeed VCT-XT scanner, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and compare it to conventional retrospective ECG gated helical acquisition in clinical and phantom studies. Image quality phantoms were used to measure noise, slice sensitivity profile, in-plane resolution, low contrast detectability and dose, using the two acquisition modes. Clinical image quality and diagnostic confidence were evaluated in a study of 31 patients scanned with the two acquisition modes. Radiation dose reduction in clinical practice was evaluated by tracking 120 consecutive patients scanned with the prospectively gated scan mode. In the phantom measurements, the prospectively gated mode resulted in equivalent or better image quality measures at dose reductions of up to 89% compared to non-ECG modulated conventional helical scans. In the clinical study, image quality was rated excellent by expert radiologist reviewing the cases, with pathology being identical using the two acquisition modes. The average dose to patients in the clinical practice study was 5.6 mSv, representing 50% reduction compared to a similar patient population scanned with the conventional helical mode.

  20. Cardiac Sarcoidosis or Giant Cell Myocarditis? On Treatment Improvement of Fulminant Myocarditis as Demonstrated by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Bogabathina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell myocarditis, but not cardiac sarcoidosis, is known to cause fulminant myocarditis resulting in severe heart failure. However, giant cell myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis are pathologically similar, and attempts at pathological differentiation between the two remain difficult. We are presenting a case of fulminant myocarditis that has pathological features suggestive of cardiac sarcoidosis, but clinically mimicking giant cell myocarditis. This patient was treated with cyclosporine and prednisone and recovered well. This case we believe challenges our current understanding of these intertwined conditions. By obtaining a sense of severity of cardiac involvement via delayed hyperenhancement of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, we were more inclined to treat this patient as giant cell myocarditis with cyclosporine. This resulted in excellent improvement of patient’s cardiac function as shown by delayed hyperenhancement images, early perfusion images, and SSFP videos.

  1. Computerised image analysis of biocrystallograms originating from agricultural products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens-Otto; Henriksen, Christian B.; Laursen, J.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    1999-01-01

    Procedures are presented for computerised image analysis of iocrystallogram images, originating from biocrystallization investigations of agricultural products. The biocrystallization method is based on the crystallographic phenomenon that when adding biological substances, such as plant extracts...

  2. Multifractal analysis of central (electrocardiography) and peripheral (laser Doppler flowmetry) cardiovascular time series from healthy human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of the cardiovascular system (CVS) activity is important for several purposes, including better understanding of heart physiology, diagnosis and forecast of cardiac events. The central CVS, through the study of heart rate variability (HRV), has been shown to exhibit multifractal properties, possibly evolving with physiologic or pathologic states of the organism. An additional viewpoint on the CVS is provided at the peripheral level by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF), which enables local blood perfusion monitoring. We report here for the first time a multifractal analysis of LDF signals through the computation of their multifractal spectra. The method for estimation of the multifractal spectra, based on the box method, is first described and tested on a priori known synthetic multifractal signals, before application to LDF data. Moreover, simultaneous recordings of both central HRV and peripheral LDF signals, and corresponding multifractal analyses, are performed to confront their properties. With the scales chosen on the partition functions to compute Renyi exponents, LDF signals appear to have broader multifractal spectra compared to HRV. Various conditions for LDF acquisitions are tested showing larger multifractal spectra for signals recorded on fingers than on forearms. The results uncover complex interactions at central and peripheral CVS levels

  3. Cardiovascular disease and impoverishment averted due to a salt reduction policy in South Africa: an extended cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, David A; Olson, Zachary D; Verguet, Stéphane; Nugent, Rachel A; Jamison, Dean T

    2016-02-01

    The South African Government recently set targets to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) by lowering salt consumption. We conducted an extended cost-effectiveness analysis (ECEA) to model the potential health and economic impacts of this salt policy. We used surveys and epidemiologic studies to estimate reductions in CVD resulting from lower salt intake. We calculated the average out-of-pocket (OOP) cost of CVD care, using facility fee schedules and drug prices. We estimated the reduction in OOP expenditures and government subsidies due to the policy. We estimated public and private sector costs of policy implementation. We estimated financial risk protection (FRP) from the policy as (1) cases of catastrophic health expenditure (CHE) averted or (2) cases of poverty averted. We also performed a sensitivity analysis. We found that the salt policy could reduce CVD deaths by 11%, with similar health gains across income quintiles. The policy could save households US$ 4.06 million (2012) in OOP expenditures (US$ 0.29 per capita) and save the government US$ 51.25 million in healthcare subsidies (US$ 2.52 per capita) each year. The cost to the government would be only US$ 0.01 per capita; hence, the policy would be cost saving. If the private sector food reformulation costs were passed on to consumers, food expenditures would increase by expenditures and providing FRP, particularly for the middle class. The policy could also provide large government savings on health care. PMID:25841771

  4. A non-invasive clinical application of wave intensity analysis based on ultrahigh temporal resolution phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biglino Giovanni

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wave intensity analysis, traditionally derived from pressure and velocity data, can be formulated using velocity and area. Flow-velocity and area can both be derived from high-resolution phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (PC-CMR. In this study, very high temporal resolution PC-CMR data is processed using an integrated and semi-automatic technique to derive wave intensity. Methods Wave intensity was derived in terms of area and velocity changes. These data were directly derived from PC-CMR using a breath-hold spiral sequence accelerated with sensitivity encoding (SENSE. Image processing was integrated in a plug-in for the DICOM viewer OsiriX, including calculations of wave speed and wave intensity. Ascending and descending aortic data from 15 healthy volunteers (30 ± 6 years data were used to test the method for feasibility, and intra- and inter-observer variability. Ascending aortic data were also compared with results from 15 patients with coronary heart disease (61 ± 13 years to assess the clinical usefulness of the method. Results Rapid image acquisition (11 s breath-hold and image processing was feasible in all volunteers. Wave speed was physiological (5.8 ± 1.3 m/s ascending aorta, 5.0 ± 0.7 m/s descending aorta and the wave intensity pattern was consistent with traditionally formulated wave intensity. Wave speed, peak forward compression wave in early systole and peak forward expansion wave in late systole at both locations exhibited overall good intra- and inter-observer variability. Patients with coronary heart disease had higher wave speed (p Conclusion A non-invasive, semi-automated and reproducible method for performing wave intensity analysis is presented. Its application is facilitated by the use of a very high temporal resolution spiral sequence. A formulation of wave intensity based on area change has also been proposed, involving no assumptions about the cross

  5. Image analysis methods for gamma-hadron separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-hadron separation is essential in VHE gamma-ray astronomy. In order to separate gamma-ray- from proton-induced air shower images obtained with the H.E.S.S. imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, image analysis methods are applied to these camera images. Different classifiers are evaluated in a multivariate analysis framework to test the combined separation power and to check for correlations. The results are presented here.

  6. Using grid technologies to face medical image analysis challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Montagnat, Johan; Breton, Vincent; Magnin, Isabelle

    2003-01-01

    International audience The availability of digital imagers inside hospitals and their ever growing inspection capabilities have established digital medical images as a key component of many pathologies diagnosis, follow-up and treatment. To face the growing image analysis requirements, automated medical image processing algorithms have been developed over the two past decades. In parallel, medical image databases have been set up in health centers. Some attempts have been made to cross dat...

  7. Direct identification of fungi using image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dørge, Thorsten Carlheim; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    1999-01-01

    Filamentous fungi have often been characterized, classified or identified with a major emphasis on macromorphological characters, i.e. the size, texture and color of fungal colonies grown on one or more identification media. This approach has been rejcted by several taxonomists because of the sub......Filamentous fungi have often been characterized, classified or identified with a major emphasis on macromorphological characters, i.e. the size, texture and color of fungal colonies grown on one or more identification media. This approach has been rejcted by several taxonomists because...... of the subjectivity in the visual evaluation and quantification (if any)of such characters and the apparent large variability of the features. We present an image analysis approach for objective identification and classification of fungi. The approach is exemplified by several isolates of nine different species...... of the genus Penicillium, known to be very difficult to identify correctly. The fungi were incubated on YES and CYA for one week at 25 C (3 point inoculation) in 9 cm Petri dishes. The cultures are placed under a camera where a digital image of the front of the colonies is acquired under optimal illumination...

  8. MORPHOLOGICAL GRANULOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF SEDIMENT IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoganand Balagurunathan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Sediments are routinely analyzed in terms of the sizing characteristics of the grains of which they are composed. Via sieving methods, the grains are separated and a weight-based size distribution constructed. Various moment parameters are computed from the size distribution and these serve as sediment characteristics. This paper examines the feasibility of a fully electronic granularity analysis using digital image processing. The study uses a random model of three-dimensional grains in conjunction with the morphological method of granulometric size distributions. The random model is constructed to simulate sand, silt, and clay particle distributions. Owing to the impossibility of perfectly sifting small grains so that they do not touch, the model is used in both disjoint and non-disjoint modes, and watershed segmentation is applied in the non-disjoint model. The image-based granulometric size distributions are transformed so that they take into account the necessity to view sediment fractions at different magnifications and in different frames. Gray-scale granulometric moments are then computed using both ordinary and reconstructive granulometries. The resulting moments are then compared to moments found from real grains in seven different sediments using standard weight-based size distributions.

  9. Automative Multi Classifier Framework for Medical Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Edbert Rajan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Medical image processing is the technique used to create images of the human body for medical purposes. Nowadays, medical image processing plays a major role and a challenging solution for the critical stage in the medical line. Several researches have done in this area to enhance the techniques for medical image processing. However, due to some demerits met by some advanced technologies, there are still many aspects that need further development. Existing study evaluate the efficacy of the medical image analysis with the level-set shape along with fractal texture and intensity features to discriminate PF (Posterior Fossa tumor from other tissues in the brain image. To develop the medical image analysis and disease diagnosis, to devise an automotive subjective optimality model for segmentation of images based on different sets of selected features from the unsupervised learning model of extracted features. After segmentation, classification of images is done. The classification is processed by adapting the multiple classifier frameworks in the previous work based on the mutual information coefficient of the selected features underwent for image segmentation procedures. In this study, to enhance the classification strategy, we plan to implement enhanced multi classifier framework for the analysis of medical images and disease diagnosis. The performance parameter used for the analysis of the proposed enhanced multi classifier framework for medical image analysis is Multiple Class intensity, image quality, time consumption.

  10. Blind Analysis of CT Image Noise Using Residual Denoised Images

    CERN Document Server

    Roychowdhury, Sohini; Alessio, Adam

    2016-01-01

    CT protocol design and quality control would benefit from automated tools to estimate the quality of generated CT images. These tools could be used to identify erroneous CT acquisitions or refine protocols to achieve certain signal to noise characteristics. This paper investigates blind estimation methods to determine global signal strength and noise levels in chest CT images. Methods: We propose novel performance metrics corresponding to the accuracy of noise and signal estimation. We implement and evaluate the noise estimation performance of six spatial- and frequency- based methods, derived from conventional image filtering algorithms. Algorithms were tested on patient data sets from whole-body repeat CT acquisitions performed with a higher and lower dose technique over the same scan region. Results: The proposed performance metrics can evaluate the relative tradeoff of filter parameters and noise estimation performance. The proposed automated methods tend to underestimate CT image noise at low-flux levels...

  11. Role of risk stratification by SPECT, PET, and hybrid imaging in guiding management of stable patients with ischaemic heart disease: expert panel of the EANM cardiovascular committee and EACVI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acampa, Wanda; Gaemperli, Oliver; Gimelli, Alessia; Knaapen, Paul; Schindler, Thomas H; Verberne, Hein J; Zellweger, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Risk stratification has become increasingly important in the management of patients with suspected or known ischaemic heart disease (IHD). Recent guidelines recommend that these patients have their care driven by risk assessment. The purpose of this position statement is to summarize current evidence on the value of cardiac single-photon emission computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and hybrid imaging in risk stratifying asymptomatic or symptomatic patients with suspected IHD, patients with stable disease, patients after coronary revascularization, heart failure patients, and specific patient population. In addition, this position statement evaluates the impact of imaging results on clinical decision-making and thereby its role in patient management. The document represents the opinion of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) Cardiovascular Committee and of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI) and intends to stimulate future research in this field. PMID:25902767

  12. Blind Analysis of CT Image Noise Using Residual Denoised Images

    OpenAIRE

    Roychowdhury, Sohini; Hollraft, Nathan; Alessio, Adam

    2016-01-01

    CT protocol design and quality control would benefit from automated tools to estimate the quality of generated CT images. These tools could be used to identify erroneous CT acquisitions or refine protocols to achieve certain signal to noise characteristics. This paper investigates blind estimation methods to determine global signal strength and noise levels in chest CT images. Methods: We propose novel performance metrics corresponding to the accuracy of noise and signal estimation. We implem...

  13. Cardiovascular and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This year's cardiovascular section demonstrates a continued growth in the number of digests on cardivascular and general interventional topics and continued progress in MRI studies. The reader will also notice fewer digests on DSA and percutaneous stone removal compared with the 1985 and 1986 Year Books. While newer technology, such as extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, has significantly reduced the number of percutaneous procedures for renal calculi, other interventional procedures, such as those involving fibrinolysis, are increasing by leaps and bounds. A number of digests on benign and malignant bile duct strictures continue to shed light on the management of these difficult cases. While abscess drainage is growing and well accepted by most surgeons, articles on esophageal dilatations seem to be declining in the radiology literature, probably on the basis of fewer operations being performed by us and more being performed by endoscopists. Digests on MRI in the cardiovascular system continue to report excellent images of the aorta and of congenital heart disease

  14. Image sequence analysis in nuclear medicine: (1) Parametric imaging using statistical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a review of parametric imaging methods on Nuclear Medicine. A Parametric Image is an image in which each pixel value is a function of the value of the same pixel of an image sequence. The Local Model Method is the fitting of each pixel time activity curve by a model which parameter values form the Parametric Images. The Global Model Method is the modelling of the changes between two images. It is applied to image comparison. For both methods, the different models, the identification criterion, the optimization methods and the statistical properties of the images are discussed. The analysis of one or more Parametric Images is performed using 1D or 2D histograms. The statistically significant Parametric Images, (Images of significant Variances, Amplitudes and Differences) are also proposed

  15. Some selected quantitative methods of thermal image analysis in Matlab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, Robert

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents a new algorithm based on some selected automatic quantitative methods for analysing thermal images. It shows the practical implementation of these image analysis methods in Matlab. It enables to perform fully automated and reproducible measurements of selected parameters in thermal images. The paper also shows two examples of the use of the proposed image analysis methods for the area of ​​the skin of a human foot and face. The full source code of the developed application is also provided as an attachment. The main window of the program during dynamic analysis of the foot thermal image. PMID:26556680

  16. Dynamic Chest Image Analysis: Model-Based Perfusion Analysis in Dynamic Pulmonary Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jianming; Järvi, Timo; Kiuru, Aaro; Kormano, Martti; Svedström, Erkki

    2003-12-01

    The "Dynamic Chest Image Analysis" project aims to develop model-based computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected with the dynamic pulmonary imaging technique. We have proposed and evaluated a multiresolutional method with an explicit ventilation model for ventilation analysis. This paper presents a new model-based method for pulmonary perfusion analysis. According to perfusion properties, we first devise a novel mathematical function to form a perfusion model. A simple yet accurate approach is further introduced to extract cardiac systolic and diastolic phases from the heart, so that this cardiac information may be utilized to accelerate the perfusion analysis and improve its sensitivity in detecting pulmonary perfusion abnormalities. This makes perfusion analysis not only fast but also robust in computation; consequently, perfusion analysis becomes computationally feasible without using contrast media. Our clinical case studies with 52 patients show that this technique is effective for pulmonary embolism even without using contrast media, demonstrating consistent correlations with computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine (NM) studies. This fluoroscopical examination takes only about 2 seconds for perfusion study with only low radiation dose to patient, involving no preparation, no radioactive isotopes, and no contrast media.

  17. Dynamic Chest Image Analysis: Model-Based Perfusion Analysis in Dynamic Pulmonary Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiuru Aaro

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The "Dynamic Chest Image Analysis" project aims to develop model-based computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected with the dynamic pulmonary imaging technique. We have proposed and evaluated a multiresolutional method with an explicit ventilation model for ventilation analysis. This paper presents a new model-based method for pulmonary perfusion analysis. According to perfusion properties, we first devise a novel mathematical function to form a perfusion model. A simple yet accurate approach is further introduced to extract cardiac systolic and diastolic phases from the heart, so that this cardiac information may be utilized to accelerate the perfusion analysis and improve its sensitivity in detecting pulmonary perfusion abnormalities. This makes perfusion analysis not only fast but also robust in computation; consequently, perfusion analysis becomes computationally feasible without using contrast media. Our clinical case studies with 52 patients show that this technique is effective for pulmonary embolism even without using contrast media, demonstrating consistent correlations with computed tomography (CT and nuclear medicine (NM studies. This fluoroscopical examination takes only about 2 seconds for perfusion study with only low radiation dose to patient, involving no preparation, no radioactive isotopes, and no contrast media.

  18. Cardiovascular ultrahigh field magnetic resonance imaging. Challenges, technical solutions and opportunities; Ultrahochfeld-MR-Tomographie in der Kardiologie. Herausforderungen, Loesungen und Chancen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niendorf, T. [Max-Delbrueck Centrum fuer Molekulare Medizin, Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Berlin (Germany); Charite Medical Faculty and the Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Campus Berlin-Buch, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Schulz-Menger, J. [Max-Delbrueck Centrum fuer Molekulare Medizin, Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Berlin (Germany); Charite Medical Faculty and the Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Campus Berlin-Buch, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); HELIOS Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Abteilung Kardiologie und Nephrologie, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    This involves high spatial resolution cardiac imaging with ultrahigh magnetic fields (7 T) and clinically acceptable image quality. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a field strength of 1.5 T using a spatial resolution of (2 x 2 x 6-8) mm{sup 3}. Cardiac MRI at ultrahigh field strength makes use of multitransmit/receive radiofrequency (RF) technology and development of novel technology that utilizes the traits of ultrahigh field MRI. Enhanced spatial resolution which is superior by a factor of 6-10 to what can be achieved by current clinical cardiac MRI. The relative spatial resolution (pixels per anatomical structure) comes close to what can be accomplished by current cardiac MRI in small rodents. Feasibility studies demonstrate the gain in spatial resolution at 7.0 T due to the sensitivity advantage inherent to ultrahigh magnetic fields. Please stay tuned and please put further weight behind the solution of the remaining technical problems of cardiac MRI at 7.0 T. (orig.) [German] Es handelt sich um die raeumlich hochaufgeloeste MR-Bildgebung des menschlichen Herzens mit klinisch akzeptabler Bildqualitaet bei einer Magnetfeldstaerke von 7,0 T. Gemeint ist die Herz-MRT bei 1,5 T mit einer klinisch ueblichen raeumlichen Aufloesung von etwa (2 x 2 x 6-8) mm{sup 3}. Ultrahochfeld-MRT des Herzens in Verbindung mit mehrkanaligen Sende- und Empfangshochfrequenzantennen sowie technische Entwicklungen zur Ausnutzung der Vorteile der Ultrahochfeld-MRT. Verbesserung der raeumlichen Aufloesung bei 7,0 T um den Faktor 6-10 gegenueber der Herz-MRT bei 1,5 T. Umsetzung einer relativen raeumlichen Aufloesung - Bildelemente per anatomischer Struktur - die in die Naehe der tierexperimentellen Herz-MRT an kleinen Nagern rueckt. Festzuhalten ist eine deutliche Verbesserung der raeumlichen Aufloesung mittels Herz-MRT bei 7,0 T, die sich im Versuchsstadium inklusive Machbarkeitsstudien befindet. Verfolgung der Machbarkeitsstudien sowie Beteiligung an

  19. Performance Analysis of Noise Reduction Technologies in Brain MRI Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheela.V.K

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advancement in icon-based analysis for the treatment of diseases which are affected on internal organs of human body drives medical imaging processing into an important technique among various methods of psychoanalysis. Among all the available imaging modalities magnetic resonance imaging techniques are extensively used for the analysis and discussion of diseases in soft tissue. MRI image provides insight into the anatomical structure within the body. Accuracy of the construction of the target within the body depends upon the overall imaging process. The quality of MRI image determines the effectiveness in feature extraction, analysis, recognition and quantitative measurements. The primary factors which decrease the visibility of the structure are blurring effect and noises. This leads to the need of removal of noise from MRI images as a function of the preprocessing technique in image processing; usually noise filters are employed for this function. In this paper analyzes the operation of different noise filters.

  20. Applications of Digital Image Analysis in Experimental Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Lyngbye, J. : Ph.D.

    1992-01-01

    The present thesis "Application of Digital Image Analysis in Experimental Mechanics" has been prepared as a part of Janus Lyngbyes Ph.D. study during the period December 1988 to June 1992 at the Department of Building technology and Structural Engineering, University of Aalborg, Denmark. In this thesis attention will be focused on optimal use and analysis of the information of digital images. This is realized during investigation and application of parametric methods in digital image analysis...

  1. Evaluation of osseointegration using image analysis and visualization of 2D and 3D image data

    OpenAIRE

    Sarve, Hamid

    2011-01-01

    Computerized image analysis, the discipline of using computers to automatically extract information from digital images, is a powerful tool for automating time consuming analysis tasks. In this thesis, image analysis and visualization methods are developed to facilitate the evaluation of osseointegration, i.e., the biological integration of a load-carrying implant in living bone. Adequate osseointegration is essential in patients who are in need of implant treatment. New implant types, w...

  2. 心血管MRI第一部分--磁共振基本物理原理及成像策略%Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging:Part I--The basic physics and imaging strategies of magnetic resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏宇; 贺光军; 赵世华

    2013-01-01

      MRI以其独特的优势广泛应用于临床,特别是在心血管系统疾病中的诊断价值得到日益体现。心血管MRI(CMR)能无创地一站式评价心血管的解剖、功能、心肌灌注和病变的组织特性,并且评价的可重复性高。CMR成像技术内容丰富,尚具挑战性,需克服心脏自身和随呼吸的运动伪影。MRI的软硬件系统性能不断提高,特别是磁场强度革命性地提升,使得成像技术不断地完善和更新。作者用4个篇章分别阐明上述MRI尤其是CMR的基本成像原理及技术要点,致力于用简明易懂的语言使大多数放射科一线工作者能轻松愉悦地领悟MRI尤其是CMR的魅力。此文为第一部分,归纳MRI基本物理原理及MR图像的产生过程。%Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been widely used in clinical routine, especially in cardiovascular disease diagnosis, due to its prominent advantage. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) can evaluate the anatomy, function, myocardial perfusion and characterization of heart non-invasively in one-stop. Cardiac and respiratory motion is major problem in CMR imaging. It makes CMR imaging be more challenging than any other imaging modality. As the performance of MR hardware and software system uptakes, especially for the substantial increasing of the strength of magnet, the imaging technique is improved persistently. The authors try their best to describe the fundamental physics and key technological points of MR, especially CMR in four successive articles. In first article, the physics of MR and progress of MR image generating were summarized.

  3. Breast arterial calcifications : A systematic review and meta-analysis of their determinants and their association with cardiovascular events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Eva J E; de Jong, Pim; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Mali, Willem P Th M; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Beulens, Joline W J

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Breast arterial calcifications (BAC), regularly observed at mammography, are medial calcifications and as such an expression of arteriosclerosis. Our objective was to evaluate and summarize the available evidence on the associations of BAC with cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascul

  4. Amniotic fluid stem cells morph into a cardiovascular lineage: analysis of a chemically induced cardiac and vascular commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maioli M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Margherita Maioli,1–3 Giovanni Contini,1 Sara Santaniello,1,2 Pasquale Bandiera,1 Gianfranco Pigliaru,1,2 Raimonda Sanna,5 Salvatore Rinaldi,3 Alessandro P Delitala,1 Andrea Montella,1,5 Luigi Bagella,1,6 Carlo Ventura2–41Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, 2Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Stem Cell Engineering, National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems, Bologna, 3Department of Regenerative Medicine, Rinaldi Fontani Institute, Florence, 4Cardiovascular Department, S Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, 5Facility of Genetic and Developmental Biology, AOU Sassari, Sassari, Italy; 6Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Center for Biotechnology, College of Science and Technology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Mouse embryonic stem cells were previously observed along with mesenchymal stem cells from different sources, after being treated with a mixed ester of hyaluronan with butyric and retinoic acids, to show a significant increase in the yield of cardiogenic and vascular differentiated elements. The aim of the present study was to determine if stem cells derived from primitive fetal cells present in human amniotic fluid (hAFSCs and cultured in the presence of a mixture of hyaluronic (HA, butyric (BU, and retinoic (RA acids show a higher yield of differentiation toward the cardiovascular phenotype as compared with untreated cells. During the differentiation process elicited by exposure to HA + BU + RA, genes controlling pluripotency and plasticity of stem cells, such as Sox2, Nanog, and Oct4, were significantly downregulated at the transcriptional level. At this point, a significant increase in expression of genes controlling the appearance of cardiogenic and vascular lineages in HA + BU + RA-treated cells was observed. The protein expression levels typical of cardiac and vascular phenotypes, evaluated by Western blotting

  5. Dynamic chest image analysis: model-based pulmonary perfusion analysis with pyramid images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jianming; Haapanen, Arto; Jaervi, Timo; Kiuru, Aaro J.; Kormano, Martti; Svedstrom, Erkki; Virkki, Raimo

    1998-07-01

    The aim of the study 'Dynamic Chest Image Analysis' is to develop computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected at different phases of the respiratory/cardiac cycles in a short period of time. We have proposed a framework for ventilation study with an explicit ventilation model based on pyramid images. In this paper, we extend the framework to pulmonary perfusion study. A perfusion model and the truncated pyramid are introduced. The perfusion model aims at extracting accurate, geographic perfusion parameters, and the truncated pyramid helps in understanding perfusion at multiple resolutions and speeding up the convergence process in optimization. Three cases are included to illustrate the experimental results.

  6. Multi-resolution physiological modeling for the analysis of cardiovascular pathologies

    OpenAIRE

    Ojeda Avellaneda, David

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents three main contributions in the context of modeling and simulation of physiological systems. The first one is a formalization of the methodology involved in multi-formalism and multi-resolution modeling. The second one is the presentation and improvement of a modeling and simulation framework integrating a range of tools that help the definition, analysis, usage and sharing of complex mathematical models. The third contribution is the application of this modeling framewor...

  7. Link Graph Analysis for Adult Images Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Kharitonov, Evgeny; Muchnik, Ilya; Romanenko, Fedor; Belyaev, Dmitry; Kotlyarov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    In order to protect an image search engine's users from undesirable results adult images' classifier should be built. The information about links from websites to images is employed to create such a classifier. These links are represented as a bipartite website-image graph. Each vertex is equipped with scores of adultness and decentness. The scores for image vertexes are initialized with zero, those for website vertexes are initialized according to a text-based website classifier. An iterative algorithm that propagates scores within a website-image graph is described. The scores obtained are used to classify images by choosing an appropriate threshold. The experiments on Internet-scale data have shown that the algorithm under consideration increases classification recall by 17% in comparison with a simple algorithm which classifies an image as adult if it is connected with at least one adult site (at the same precision level).

  8. Time-variant partial directed coherence in analysis of the cardiovascular system. A methodological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-variant partial directed coherence (tvPDC) is used for the first time in a multivariate analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), respiratory movements (RMs) and (systolic) arterial blood pressure. It is shown that respiration-related HRV components which also occur at other frequencies besides the RM frequency (= respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA) can be identified. These additional components are known to be an effect of the 'half-the-mean-heart-rate-dilemma' ('cardiac aliasing' CA). These CA components may contaminate the entire frequency range of HRV and can lead to misinterpretation of the RSA analysis. TvPDC analysis of simulated and clinical data (full-term neonates and sedated patients) reveals these contamination effects and, in addition, the respiration-related CA components can be separated from the RSA component and the Traube–Hering–Mayer wave. It can be concluded that tvPDC can be beneficially applied to avoid misinterpretations in HRV analyses as well as to quantify partial correlative interaction properties between RM and RSA

  9. Imaging biomarkers in multiple Sclerosis: From image analysis to population imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillot, Christian; Edan, Gilles; Commowick, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    The production of imaging data in medicine increases more rapidly than the capacity of computing models to extract information from it. The grand challenges of better understanding the brain, offering better care for neurological disorders, and stimulating new drug design will not be achieved without significant advances in computational neuroscience. The road to success is to develop a new, generic, computational methodology and to confront and validate this methodology on relevant diseases with adapted computational infrastructures. This new concept sustains the need to build new research paradigms to better understand the natural history of the pathology at the early phase; to better aggregate data that will provide the most complete representation of the pathology in order to better correlate imaging with other relevant features such as clinical, biological or genetic data. In this context, one of the major challenges of neuroimaging in clinical neurosciences is to detect quantitative signs of pathological evolution as early as possible to prevent disease progression, evaluate therapeutic protocols or even better understand and model the natural history of a given neurological pathology. Many diseases encompass brain alterations often not visible on conventional MRI sequences, especially in normal appearing brain tissues (NABT). MRI has often a low specificity for differentiating between possible pathological changes which could help in discriminating between the different pathological stages or grades. The objective of medical image analysis procedures is to define new quantitative neuroimaging biomarkers to track the evolution of the pathology at different levels. This paper illustrates this issue in one acute neuro-inflammatory pathology: Multiple Sclerosis (MS). It exhibits the current medical image analysis approaches and explains how this field of research will evolve in the next decade to integrate larger scale of information at the temporal, cellular

  10. Image pattern recognition supporting interactive analysis and graphical visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggins, James M.

    1992-01-01

    Image Pattern Recognition attempts to infer properties of the world from image data. Such capabilities are crucial for making measurements from satellite or telescope images related to Earth and space science problems. Such measurements can be the required product itself, or the measurements can be used as input to a computer graphics system for visualization purposes. At present, the field of image pattern recognition lacks a unified scientific structure for developing and evaluating image pattern recognition applications. The overall goal of this project is to begin developing such a structure. This report summarizes results of a 3-year research effort in image pattern recognition addressing the following three principal aims: (1) to create a software foundation for the research and identify image pattern recognition problems in Earth and space science; (2) to develop image measurement operations based on Artificial Visual Systems; and (3) to develop multiscale image descriptions for use in interactive image analysis.

  11. Image quality analysis of digital mammographic equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The image quality assessment of a radiographic phantom image is one of the fundamental points in a complete quality control programme. The good functioning result of all the process must be an image with an appropriate quality to carry out a suitable diagnostic. Nowadays, the digital radiographic equipments are replacing the traditional film-screen equipments and it is necessary to update the parameters to guarantee the quality of the process. Contrast-detail phantoms are applied to digital radiography to study the threshold contrast detail sensitivity at operation conditions of the equipment. The phantom that is studied in this work is C.D.M.A.M. 3.4, which facilitates the evaluation of image contrast and detail resolution. One of the most extended indexes to measure the image quality in an objective way is the Image Quality Figure (I.Q.F.). This parameter is useful to calculate the image quality taking into account the contrast and detail resolution of the image analysed. The contrast-detail curve is useful as a measure of the image quality too, because it is a graphical representation in which the hole thickness and diameter are plotted for each contrast-detail combination detected in the radiographic image of the phantom. It is useful for the comparison of the functioning of different radiographic image systems, for phantom images under the same exposition conditions. The aim of this work is to study the image quality of different images contrast-detail phantom C.D.M.A.M. 3.4, carrying out the automatic detection of the contrast-detail combination and to establish a parameter which characterize in an objective way the mammographic image quality. This is useful to compare images obtained at different digital mammographic equipments to study the functioning of the equipments. (authors)

  12. Temporal Analysis of Image-Rivalry Suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Rishi Bhardwaj; Robert P. O'shea

    2012-01-01

    During binocular rivalry, perception alternates between two different images presented one to each eye. At any moment, one image is visible, dominant, while the other is invisible, suppressed. Alternations in perception during rivalry could involve competition between eyes, eye-rivalry, or between images, image-rivalry, or both. We measured response criteria, sensitivities, and thresholds to brief contrast increments to one of the rival stimuli in conventional rivalry displays and in a displa...

  13. Principal component analysis of psoriasis lesions images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maletti, Gabriela Mariel; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2003-01-01

    A set of RGB images of psoriasis lesions is used. By visual examination of these images, there seem to be no common pattern that could be used to find and align the lesions within and between sessions. It is expected that the principal components of the original images could be useful during future...

  14. Migraine and cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo E. Bigal

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Migraine, especially migraine with aura is an established risk factor for ischemic lesions of the brain. Recent evidence has also linked migraine with and without aura to a broader range of ischemic vascular disorders including angina, myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization, claudication and cardiovascular mortality. The topic is therefore of considerable interest. Accordingly, herein we review the association between migraine and cardiovascular disease. We start by briefly presenting diagnostic criteria for migraine and revising its pathophysiology. We follow by summarizing the evidence on the topic. We then briefly present the results of a recent meta-analysis. We close by highlighting results of a large epidemiological study conducted after the publication of the meta-analysis.

  15. Mesh Processing in Medical-Image Analysis-a Tutorial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Joshua A.; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Zhang, Yongjie

    2012-01-01

    Medical-image analysis requires an understanding of sophisticated scanning modalities, constructing geometric models, building meshes to represent domains, and downstream biological applications. These four steps form an image-to-mesh pipeline. For research in this field to progress, the imaging...

  16. Analysis of Digital Images Using Morphlogical Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresha M

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to transform the digital images into different forms. Image processingtechniques are used with wide varieties of applications. The requirement is different for differentapplications. This study is mainly focused on how to transform the image using mathematical morphologyso that it can be suitable for the respective applications.Mathematical morphology has been chosen to explain how images are used to illustrate mathematical settheoretic operations, suchas union, intersection by means of morphological operations like dilation anderosion.These techniques are implemented in MATLAB using image processing algorithms. MATLAB is anexcellent tool to accomplish these tasks

  17. Three modality image registration of brain SPECT/CT and MR images for quantitative analysis of dopamine transporter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yuzuho; Takeda, Yuta; Hara, Takeshi; Zhou, Xiangrong; Matsusako, Masaki; Tanaka, Yuki; Hosoya, Kazuhiko; Nihei, Tsutomu; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Important features in Parkinson's disease (PD) are degenerations and losses of dopamine neurons in corpus striatum. 123I-FP-CIT can visualize activities of the dopamine neurons. The activity radio of background to corpus striatum is used for diagnosis of PD and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). The specific activity can be observed in the corpus striatum on SPECT images, but the location and the shape of the corpus striatum on SPECT images only are often lost because of the low uptake. In contrast, MR images can visualize the locations of the corpus striatum. The purpose of this study was to realize a quantitative image analysis for the SPECT images by using image registration technique with brain MR images that can determine the region of corpus striatum. In this study, the image fusion technique was used to fuse SPECT and MR images by intervening CT image taken by SPECT/CT. The mutual information (MI) for image registration between CT and MR images was used for the registration. Six SPECT/CT and four MR scans of phantom materials are taken by changing the direction. As the results of the image registrations, 16 of 24 combinations were registered within 1.3mm. By applying the approach to 32 clinical SPECT/CT and MR cases, all of the cases were registered within 0.86mm. In conclusions, our registration method has a potential in superimposing MR images on SPECT images.

  18. Image segmentation by iterative parallel region growing with application to data compression and image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Image segmentation can be a key step in data compression and image analysis. However, the segmentation results produced by most previous approaches to region growing are suspect because they depend on the order in which portions of the image are processed. An iterative parallel segmentation algorithm avoids this problem by performing globally best merges first. Such a segmentation approach, and two implementations of the approach on NASA's Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) are described. Application of the segmentation approach to data compression and image analysis is then described, and results of such application are given for a LANDSAT Thematic Mapper image.

  19. Analysis of Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis Gel Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes and proposes solutions to some of the currently most important problems in pattern recognition and image analysis of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) images. 2DGE is the leading technique to separate individual proteins in biological samples with many biological and...... methods based on image analysis techniques in order to significantly accelerate this key technology. The methods described and developed fall into three categories: image segmentation, point pattern matching, and a unified approach simultaneously segmentation the image and matching the spots. The main...... pharmaceutical applications, e.g., drug development. The technique results in an image, where the proteins appear as dark spots on a bright background. However, the analysis of these images is very time consuming and requires a large amount of manual work so there is a great need for fast, objective, and robust...

  20. Subclinical cardiovascular changes in pediatric solid organ transplant recipients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Nasser, Yasser; Moura, Marta C; Mertens, Luc; McCrindle, Brian W; Parekh, Rulan S; Ng, Vicky L; Church, Peter C; Mouzaki, Marialena

    2016-06-01

    CV disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality following solid organ transplantation in adults. While the prevalence of multiple cardiometabolic risk factors is increased in pediatric solid organ transplant recipients, it is not clear whether they have subclinical CV changes. cIMT, central pWV, and CAC are indicative of subclinical CV disease, and, in adults, predict future CV events. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate the prevalence of subclinical CV changes, as measured by cIMT, pWV, and CAC among pediatric solid organ transplant recipients. We searched MEDLINE(®) and EMBASE and conducted meta-analysis for studies that evaluated cIMT, central pWV, and CAC among pediatric solid organ transplant recipients (kidney, lung, intestine and liver). The search identified nine eligible studies that included a total of 259 patients and 685 healthy controls. Eight studies reported on kidney transplant recipients and one study on a combined cohort of kidney and liver transplant recipients. The mean cIMT of transplant recipients was significantly higher than that of healthy controls (mean difference = 0.05 mm, 95% CI 0.02-0.07; p transplant recipients compared to healthy controls. No studies assessing for CAC were found. There were limited data regarding subclinical CV disease following pediatric solid organ transplantation. In conclusion, kidney transplantation in childhood is associated with a higher prevalence of subclinical CV changes compared to healthy children. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether children have increased CV morbidity and mortality after transplantation. PMID:26890272

  1. Cardiovascular risk factor management of myocardial infarction patients with and without diabetes in the Netherlands between 2002 and 2006: a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data

    OpenAIRE

    Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Geleijnse, J M; Giltay, E.J.; Kromhout, D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We examined levels and trends in cardiovascular risk factors and drug treatment in myocardial infarction (MI) patients with and without diabetes. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of baseline Alpha Omega Trial data, a randomised controlled trial. Setting: 32 hospitals in the Netherlands. Participants: In total, we had 1014 MI patients with diabetes (74% men) and 3823 without diabetes (79% men) aged 60-80 years, analysed over the period 2002-2006. Results: Between 2002 and 2006, a si...

  2. Cardiovascular risk factor management of myocardial infarction patients with and without diabetes in the Netherlands between 2002 and 2006: a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data

    OpenAIRE

    Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S.; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Giltay, Erik J.; Kromhout, Daan; ,

    2012-01-01

    Objective We examined levels and trends in cardiovascular risk factors and drug treatment in myocardial infarction (MI) patients with and without diabetes. Design Cross-sectional analysis of baseline Alpha Omega Trial data, a randomised controlled trial. Setting 32 hospitals in the Netherlands. Participants In total, we had 1014 MI patients with diabetes (74% men) and 3823 without diabetes (79% men) aged 60–80 years, analysed over the period 2002–2006. Results Between 2002 and 2006, a signifi...

  3. Analysis of engineering drawings and raster map images

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, Thomas C

    2013-01-01

    Presents up-to-date methods and algorithms for the automated analysis of engineering drawings and digital cartographic maps Discusses automatic engineering drawing and map analysis techniques Covers detailed accounts of the use of unsupervised segmentation algorithms to map images

  4. Analysis of verification image using electronic portal imaging devices (EPID)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Shinichi; Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Hasegawa, Hironori; Satoh, Kazuhiko; Sakurai, Kuniaki; Kawagoe, Yasumitsu; Kusumi, Yoshimi [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Hospital

    1999-05-01

    We studied the evaluation of patient set-up error by verification image using electronic portal imaging devices (EPID). We analyzed which cleared 3 mm in our hospital for visual by using a distance measurement function. The body parts examined included the head and neck, thorax, pelvis and abdomen. The items that were evaluated included shell, Pb block, multi-leaf collimator and landmark. Patient set-up error was 10.4%, with that for the pelvis especially poor. The visual false rate was 17.9%. The result for the abdomen was poor because of the absence of landmark. We showed a decrease in patient set-up error by using EPID and improvement of radiotherapy. (author)

  5. Image analysis for dental bone quality assessment using CBCT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suprijanto; Epsilawati, L.; Hajarini, M. S.; Juliastuti, E.; Susanti, H.

    2016-03-01

    Cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) is one of X-ray imaging modalities that are applied in dentistry. Its modality can visualize the oral region in 3D and in a high resolution. CBCT jaw image has potential information for the assessment of bone quality that often used for pre-operative implant planning. We propose comparison method based on normalized histogram (NH) on the region of inter-dental septum and premolar teeth. Furthermore, the NH characteristic from normal and abnormal bone condition are compared and analyzed. Four test parameters are proposed, i.e. the difference between teeth and bone average intensity (s), the ratio between bone and teeth average intensity (n) of NH, the difference between teeth and bone peak value (Δp) of NH, and the ratio between teeth and bone of NH range (r). The results showed that n, s, and Δp have potential to be the classification parameters of dental calcium density.

  6. PIZZARO: Forensic analysis and restoration of image and video data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kamenický, Jan; Bartoš, Michal; Flusser, Jan; Mahdian, Babak; Kotera, Jan; Novozámský, Adam; Saic, Stanislav; Šroubek, Filip; Šorel, Michal; Zita, Aleš; Zitová, Barbara; Šíma, Z.; Švarc, P.; Hořínek, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 264, č. 1 (2016), s. 153-166. ISSN 0379-0738 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20102013064; GA ČR GA13-29225S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Image forensic analysis * Image restoration * Image tampering detection * Image source identification Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 2.140, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/ZOI/kamenicky-0459504.pdf

  7. Automated analysis of protein subcellular location in time series images

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yanhua; Osuna-Highley, Elvira; Hua, Juchang; Nowicki, Theodore Scott; Stolz, Robert; McKayle, Camille; Murphy, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Image analysis, machine learning and statistical modeling have become well established for the automatic recognition and comparison of the subcellular locations of proteins in microscope images. By using a comprehensive set of features describing static images, major subcellular patterns can be distinguished with near perfect accuracy. We now extend this work to time series images, which contain both spatial and temporal information. The goal is to use temporal features to improve...

  8. Textural Analysis of Fatique Crack Surfaces: Image Pre-processing

    OpenAIRE

    H. Lauschmann

    2000-01-01

    For the fatique crack history reconstitution, new methods of quantitative microfractography are beeing developed based on the image processing and textural analysis. SEM magnifications between micro- and macrofractography are used. Two image pre-processing operatins were suggested and proved to prepare the crack surface images for analytical treatment: 1. Normalization is used to transform the image to a stationary form. Compared to the generally used equalization, it conserves the shape of b...

  9. Scaling properties of image textures: A detrending fluctuation analysis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose; Rodriguez, Eduardo; Cervantes, Ilse; Carlos Echeverria, Juan

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the application of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to study roughness features of images. Unidimensional sequences at different image orientations are extracted and their average scaling exponent is estimated. In this form, the existence of anisotropies can be detected when considerable variations in the scaling exponent at different image orientation are observed. Different images from grass to solar granulation are analyzed and the underlying physics of such results is briefly commented.

  10. Image analysis of normal exfoliated gingival cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the nuclear diameter (ND, cell diameter (CD and nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio (N:C and their variation with age and sex in normal gingival smears. Study Design: Gingival smears were collected from 320 apparently healthy individuals. After fixation in 95% alcohol, the smears were stained using standard papanicolaou laboratory procedure. The cell and nuclear diameters were measured using image analysis software (KS lite 2.0. Statistical analysis of the data was done using one-way ANOVA, Students ′t′ test and Tukey-HSD procedure. Results: The results showed an increase in ND from the 1-20 group to 21-40 age group in males. Above 40 years, there was a decrease in ND. In females, the ND was high in 21-40 age group; and then from 41 years, ND gradually decreased but the difference was not significant. The CD in males and females was low in the 1-20 age group and then it gradually increased. However, the difference was not significant between the ages 20 and 60 years. After 60, there was a decrease in CD. Similar changes are also seen in the ratio N:C in both males and females. The ND, CD and N:C irrespective of the age were high in females. The difference in CD was insignificant, except in the 0-20 age group, where females had significantly more cell diameters. Irrespective of the gender, the ND, CD and N:C increased from 0-20 age group to 20-40 age group. After 40, there is a steady decrease in ND, CD and N:C. Conclusion: Age-related and sex-related alterations are observed in gingival smears.

  11. Cardiovascular alcification in diabetic nephropathy patients in uremic stage and analysis on its risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of arterial vascular calcification (VC) in uremic patients undergoing diabetic nephropathy (DN) and explore its risk factors. Methods: Demographic and clinical data were collected in the patients latest diagnosed as uremia and not received dialysis treatment. The uremic patients were divided into DN group and non-diabetic nephropathy (NDN) group. And 20 healthy subjects were chosen as control group from the Physical Examination Room. The patients'sex and ages were similar in the 3 groups. VC was semi-quantitatively evaluated by plain radiographic films from abdomen, pelvis and hands. The clinical and laboratorial parameters related to VC were detected and analyzed. Results: 1)The present study included 20 (51.28%) DN uremic patients and 19 (48.72%) NDN uremic patients. The average diabetic duration in the DN patients was (8.11 ± 7.39) years. 2)Among the 39 uremic patients, VC was found on radiographic films in 29 cases (74.36%), including 23 cases (58.97%) with the con-score 1-3 and 6 cases (15.38%) with 3-6 scores. And VC was not detected in control group. Bone density analysis showed that osteopenia occupied 14 cases (35.90%) in all and the T-score was-0.81 ± 0.87. 3)Linear correlation analysis revealed that VC was correlated with serum calcium and phosphate (r=0.026, P0.05). VC score was significantly correlated with the diabetic duration (r=0.790, P<0.001). Logistic regression revealed that the diabetes duration was the independent risk factors (P<0.05) for VC. The reflections of serum calcium and phosphate were rejected. 4)The prevalence of VC in DN group (95.0%) was higher than that in NDN group (42.1%, P<0.05). And the VC score in DN group(3.18 ± 1.77) was higher than that in NDN group (1.56 ± 0.97, P<0.05). Conclusion: There is a higher VC prevalence rate and more VC severity in DN uremic patients than in NDN patients. Diabetes duration is an independent risk factor for VC. Preventing from the high serum glucose

  12. IMAGE ANALYSIS FOR MODELLING SHEAR BEHAVIOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Lopez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Through laboratory research performed over the past ten years, many of the critical links between fracture characteristics and hydromechanical and mechanical behaviour have been made for individual fractures. One of the remaining challenges at the laboratory scale is to directly link fracture morphology of shear behaviour with changes in stress and shear direction. A series of laboratory experiments were performed on cement mortar replicas of a granite sample with a natural fracture perpendicular to the axis of the core. Results show that there is a strong relationship between the fracture's geometry and its mechanical behaviour under shear stress and the resulting damage. Image analysis, geostatistical, stereological and directional data techniques are applied in combination to experimental data. The results highlight the role of geometric characteristics of the fracture surfaces (surface roughness, size, shape, locations and orientations of asperities to be damaged in shear behaviour. A notable improvement in shear understanding is that shear behaviour is controlled by the apparent dip in the shear direction of elementary facets forming the fracture.

  13. Image analysis of neuropsychological test responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen L.; Hiller, Darren L.

    1996-04-01

    This paper reports recent advances in the development of an automated approach to neuropsychological testing. High performance image analysis algorithms have been developed as part of a convenient and non-invasive computer-based system to provide an objective assessment of patient responses to figure-copying tests. Tests of this type are important in determining the neurological function of patients following stroke through evaluation of their visuo-spatial performance. Many conventional neuropsychological tests suffer from the serious drawback that subjective judgement on the part of the tester is required in the measurement of the patient's response which leads to a qualitative neuropsychological assessment that can be both inconsistent and inaccurate. Results for this automated approach are presented for three clinical populations: patients suffering right hemisphere stroke are compared with adults with no known neurological disorder and a population comprising normal school children of 11 years is presented to demonstrate the sensitivity of the technique. As well as providing a more reliable and consistent diagnosis this technique is sufficiently sensitive to monitor a patient's progress over a period of time and will provide the neuropsychologist with a practical means of evaluating the effectiveness of therapy or medication administered as part of a rehabilitation program.

  14. Convergence analysis in near-field imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is devoted to the mathematical analysis of the direct and inverse modeling of the diffraction by a perfectly conducting grating surface in the near-field regime. It is motivated by our effort to analyze recent significant numerical results, in order to solve a class of inverse rough surface scattering problems in near-field imaging. In a model problem, the diffractive grating surface is assumed to be a small and smooth deformation of a plane surface. On the basis of the variational method, the direct problem is shown to have a unique weak solution. An analytical solution is introduced as a convergent power series in the deformation parameter by using the transformed field and Fourier series expansions. A local uniqueness result is proved for the inverse problem where only a single incident field is needed. On the basis of the analytic solution of the direct problem, an explicit reconstruction formula is presented for recovering the grating surface function with resolution beyond the Rayleigh criterion. Error estimates for the reconstructed grating surface are established with fully revealed dependence on such quantities as the surface deformation parameter, measurement distance, noise level of the scattering data, and regularity of the exact grating surface function. (paper)

  15. Patients with knee osteoarthritis undergoing total knee arthroplasty have a lower risk of subsequent severe cardiovascular events: propensity score and instrumental variable analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yan Lin

    Full Text Available This population-based study investigated the subsequent cardiovascular risk of patients with knee osteoarthritis underwent total knee arthroplasty in Taiwan.This was a population-based follow-up study of 22931 patients diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis between 2008 and 2011. Each patient was followed for 3 years or until death. Treatment was dichotomized into conservative treatment and TKA. The association between TKA and cardiovascular disease (CVD events was analyzed using propensity score analysis and instrumental variable analysis and two-stage least-squares regression model.Patients with knee osteoarthritis who underwent TKA had a lower 3-year cumulative risk of stroke and acute myocardial infarction (AMI. After adjusting for measured risk and confounding factors, propensity score showed a 0.56 fold (adjusted OR = 0.56; 95% CI, 0.51-0.61; p<0.001 risk for CVD in those with TKA. Use of instrumental variable analysis for adjusting measured and unmeasured factors and two-stage least squares regression model revealed that the average treatment effect of TKA was statistically associated with a decreased 7% risk of CVD events (95% CI, 0.2%-13.6%.Our study revealed that patients with knee osteoarthritis who underwent TKA had a lower risk of suffering from a future severe cardiovascular event. This benefit may be attributed to an improvement in physical activity, reduction of psychosocial stress, and/or a decreased use of NSAIDs as a result of having undergone TKA.

  16. Risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality among diabetic patients prescribed rosiglitazone or pioglitazone: a meta-analysis of retrospective cohort studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xin; YANG Li; ZHAI Suo-di

    2012-01-01

    Background The difference of cardiovascular effects between rosiglitazone and pioglitazone treatment for diabetic patients has not been thoroughly studied.We performed a meta-analysis to compare the risk of cardiovascular adverse effects in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with rosiglitazone compared to pioglitazone.Methods The Cochrane Library,PubMed,and Embase were searched to identify retrospective cohort studies assessing cardiovascular outcomes with rosiglitazone and pioglitazone.Meta-analysis of retrospective cohort studies was conducted using RevMan 5.0 software to calculate risk ratios.Results Of the 74 references identified,eight studies involving 945 286 patients fit the inclusion criteria for the analysis.The results of meta-analyses showed that,compared with pioglitazone,rosiglitazone therapy significantly increased the risk of myocardial infarction (risk ratios (RR) 1.17,95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.32; P=0.01),the risk of heart failure (RR 1.18,95% CI 1.02-1.36; P=0.03),and total mortality (RR 1.13,95% CI 1.08-1.20; P <0.00001).Conclusion Compared with pioglitazone,rosiglitazone was associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction,heart failure,and all-cause mortality in diabetic patients.

  17. New approaches in intelligent image analysis techniques, methodologies and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamatsu, Kazumi

    2016-01-01

    This book presents an Introduction and 11 independent chapters, which are devoted to various new approaches of intelligent image processing and analysis. The book also presents new methods, algorithms and applied systems for intelligent image processing, on the following basic topics: Methods for Hierarchical Image Decomposition; Intelligent Digital Signal Processing and Feature Extraction; Data Clustering and Visualization via Echo State Networks; Clustering of Natural Images in Automatic Image Annotation Systems; Control System for Remote Sensing Image Processing; Tissue Segmentation of MR Brain Images Sequence; Kidney Cysts Segmentation in CT Images; Audio Visual Attention Models in Mobile Robots Navigation; Local Adaptive Image Processing; Learning Techniques for Intelligent Access Control; Resolution Improvement in Acoustic Maps. Each chapter is self-contained with its own references. Some of the chapters are devoted to the theoretical aspects while the others are presenting the practical aspects and the...

  18. CMOS Image Sensor with On-Chip Image Compression: A Review and Performance Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milin Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Demand for high-resolution, low-power sensing devices with integrated image processing capabilities, especially compression capability, is increasing. CMOS technology enables the integration of image sensing and image processing, making it possible to improve the overall system performance. This paper reviews the current state of the art in CMOS image sensors featuring on-chip image compression. Firstly, typical sensing systems consisting of separate image-capturing unit and image-compression processing unit are reviewed, followed by systems that integrate focal-plane compression. The paper also provides a thorough review of a new design paradigm, in which image compression is performed during the image-capture phase prior to storage, referred to as compressive acquisition. High-performance sensor systems reported in recent years are also introduced. Performance analysis and comparison of the reported designs using different design paradigm are presented at the end.

  19. Automatic target recognition in SAR images using multilinear analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Porgès, Tristan; Favier, Gérard

    2011-01-01

    International audience Multilinear analysis provides a powerful mathematical framework for analyzing synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images resulting from the interaction of multiple factors like sky luminosity and viewing angles, while preserving their original shape. In this paper, we propose a multilinear principal component analysis (MPCA) algorithm for target recognition in SAR images. First, we form a high order tensor with the training image set and we apply the higher-order singular...

  20. ANALYSIS OF SST IMAGES BY WEIGHTED ENSEMBLE TRANSFORM KALMAN FILTER

    OpenAIRE

    Sai, Gorthi; Beyou, Sébastien; Memin, Etienne

    2011-01-01

    International audience This paper presents a novel, efficient scheme for the analysis of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) ocean images. We consider the estimation of the velocity fields and vorticity values from a sequence of oceanic images. The contribution of this paper lies in proposing a novel, robust and simple approach based onWeighted Ensemble Transform Kalman filter (WETKF) data assimilation technique for the analysis of real SST images, that may contain coast regions or large areas o...

  1. Facial Image Analysis Based on Local Binary Patterns: A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, D.; Shan, C.; Ardebilian, M.; Chen, L.

    2011-01-01

    Facial image analysis, including face detection, face recognition,facial expression analysis, facial demographic classification, and so on, is an important and interesting research topic in the computervision and image processing area, which has many important applications such as human-computer

  2. Slide Set: Reproducible image analysis and batch processing with ImageJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanes, Benjamin A

    2015-11-01

    Most imaging studies in the biological sciences rely on analyses that are relatively simple. However, manual repetition of analysis tasks across multiple regions in many images can complicate even the simplest analysis, making record keeping difficult, increasing the potential for error, and limiting reproducibility. While fully automated solutions are necessary for very large data sets, they are sometimes impractical for the small- and medium-sized data sets common in biology. Here we present the Slide Set plugin for ImageJ, which provides a framework for reproducible image analysis and batch processing. Slide Set organizes data into tables, associating image files with regions of interest and other relevant information. Analysis commands are automatically repeated over each image in the data set, and multiple commands can be chained together for more complex analysis tasks. All analysis parameters are saved, ensuring transparency and reproducibility. Slide Set includes a variety of built-in analysis commands and can be easily extended to automate other ImageJ plugins, reducing the manual repetition of image analysis without the set-up effort or programming expertise required for a fully automated solution. PMID:26554504

  3. The Role of DNA Methylation in Cardiovascular Risk and Disease: Methodological Aspects, Study Design, and Data Analysis for Epidemiological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jia; Agha, Golareh; Baccarelli, Andrea A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that genetic, environmental, behavioral, and clinical factors contribute to cardiovascular disease development. How these risk factors interact at the cellular level to cause cardiovascular disease is not well known. Epigenetic epidemiology enables researchers to explore critical links between genomic coding, modifiable exposures, and manifestation of disease phenotype. One epigenetic link, DNA methylation, is potentially an important mechanism underlying these associations. In the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the number of epidemiological studies investigating cardiovascular risk factors and outcomes in relation to DNA methylation, but many gaps remain in our understanding of the underlying cause and biological implications. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the biology and mechanisms of DNA methylation and its role in cardiovascular disease. In addition, we summarize the current evidence base in epigenetic epidemiology studies relevant to cardiovascular health and disease and discuss the limitations, challenges, and future directions of the field. Finally, we provide guidelines for well-designed epigenetic epidemiology studies, with particular focus on methodological aspects, study design, and analytical challenges. PMID:26837743

  4. Noninvasive quantification of myocardial perfusion heterogeneity by Markovian analysis in SPECT nuclear imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of mortality worldwide, and third of these deaths are caused by coronary artery disease and rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. The heterogeneous alteration of the coronary microcirculation is an early phenomenon associated with many cardiovascular risk factors that can strongly predict the subsequent development of coronary artery disease, and lead to the appearance of myocardial perfusion heterogeneity. Nuclear medicine allows the study of myocardial perfusion in clinical routine through scintigraphic scans performed after injection of a radioactive tracer of coronary blood flow. Analysis of scintigraphic perfusion images currently allows the detection of myocardial ischemia, but the ability of the technique to measure the perfusion heterogeneity in apparently normally perfused areas is unknown. The first part of this thesis focuses on a retrospective clinical study to determine the feasibility of myocardial perfusion heterogeneity quantification measured by Thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in diabetic patients compared with healthy subjects. The clinical study has demonstrated the ability of routine thallium-201 SPECT imaging to quantify greater myocardial perfusion heterogeneity in diabetic patients compared with normal subjects. The second part of this thesis tests the hypothesis that the myocardial perfusion heterogeneity could be quantified in small animal SPECT imaging by Thallium-201 and/or Technetium-99m-MIBI in an experimental study using two animal models of diabetes, and is correlated with histological changes. The lack of difference in myocardial perfusion heterogeneity between control and diabetic animals suggests that animal models are poorly suited, or that the technology currently available does not seem satisfactory to obtain similar results as the clinical study. (author)

  5. Marathon run: cardiovascular adaptation and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predel, Hans-Georg

    2014-11-21

    The first marathon run as an athletic event took place in the context of the Olympic Games in 1896 in Athens, Greece. Today, participation in a 'marathon run' has become a global phenomenon attracting young professional athletes as well as millions of mainly middle-aged amateur athletes worldwide each year. One of the main motives for these amateur marathon runners is the expectation that endurance exercise (EE) delivers profound beneficial health effects. However, with respect to the cardiovascular system, a controversial debate has emerged whether the marathon run itself is healthy or potentially harmful to the cardiovascular system, especially in middle-aged non-elite male amateur runners. In this cohort, exercise-induced increases in cardiac biomarkers-troponin and brain natriuretic peptide-and acute functional cardiac alterations have been observed and interpreted as potential cardiac damage. Furthermore, in the cohort of 40- to 65-year-old males engaged in intensive EE, a significant risk for the development of atrial fibrillation has been identified. Fortunately, recent studies demonstrated a normalization of the cardiac biomarkers and the functional alterations within a short time frame. Therefore, these alterations may be perceived as physiological myocardial reactions to the strenuous exercise and the term 'cardiac fatigue' has been coined. This interpretation is supported by a recent analysis of 10.9 million marathon runners demonstrating that there was no significantly increased overall risk of cardiac arrest during long-distance running races. In conclusion, intensive and long-lasting EE, e.g. running a full-distance Marathon, results in high cardiovascular strain whose clinical relevance especially for middle-aged and older athletes is unclear and remains a matter of controversy. Furthermore, there is a need for evidence-based recommendations with respect to medical screening and training strategies especially in male amateur runners over the age of

  6. Analysis of adipose tissue distribution using whole-body magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Diana; Schwarz, Tobias; Dinkel, Julien; Delorme, Stefan; Teucher, Birgit; Kaaks, Rudolf; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Heimann, Tobias

    2011-03-01

    Obesity is an increasing problem in the western world and triggers diseases like cancer, type two diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. In recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a clinically viable method to measure the amount and distribution of adipose tissue (AT) in the body. However, analysis of MRI images by manual segmentation is a tedious and time-consuming process. In this paper, we propose a semi-automatic method to quantify the amount of different AT types from whole-body MRI data with less user interaction. Initially, body fat is extracted by automatic thresholding. A statistical shape model of the abdomen is then used to differentiate between subcutaneous and visceral AT. Finally, fat in the bone marrow is removed using morphological operators. The proposed method was evaluated on 15 whole-body MRI images using manual segmentation as ground truth for adipose tissue. The resulting overlap for total AT was 93.7% +/- 5.5 with a volumetric difference of 7.3% +/- 6.4. Furthermore, we tested the robustness of the segmentation results with regard to the initial, interactively defined position of the shape model. In conclusion, the developed method proved suitable for the analysis of AT distribution from whole-body MRI data. For large studies, a fully automatic version of the segmentation procedure is expected in the near future.

  7. Spectral analysis of systemic and cerebral cardiovascular variabilities in preterm infants: relationship with clinical risk index for babies (CRIB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frequency spectrum analysis of circulatory signals has been proposed as a potential method for clinical risk assessment of preterm infants by previous studies. In this study, we examined the relationships between various spectral measures derived from systemic and cerebral cardiovascular variabilities and the clinical risk index for babies (CRIB II). Physiological data collected from 17 early low birth weight infants within 1–3 h after birth were analysed. Spectral and cross-spectral analyses were performed on heart rate variability, blood pressure variability and cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy measures such as oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobins (HbO2 and HHb) and tissue oxygenation index (TOI). In addition, indices related to cardiac baroreflex sensitivity and cerebral autoregulation were derived from the very low, low- and mid-frequency ranges (VLF, LF and MF). Moderate correlations with CRIB II were identified from mean arterial pressure (MAP) normalized MF power (r = 0.61, P = 0.009), LF MAP–HHb coherence (r = 0.64, P = 0.006), TOI VLF percentage power (r = 0.55, P = 0.023) and LF baroreflex gain (r = −0.61, P = 0.01 after logarithmic transformation), with the latter two parameters also highly correlated with gestational age (r = −0.75, P = 0.0005 and r = 0.70, P = 0.002, respectively). The relationships between CRIB II and various spectral measures of arterial baroreflex and cerebral autoregulation functions have provided further justification for these measures as possible markers of clinical risks and predictors of adverse outcome in preterm infants

  8. Comparative study on individual aromatase inhibitors on cardiovascular safety profile: a network meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao XH

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Xihe Zhao,1 Lei Liu,2 Kai Li,1 Wusheng Li,1 Li Zhao,1 Huawei Zou1 1Department of Oncology, 2Department of General Surgery, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs: anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane have now become standard adjuvant endocrine treatment for postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer complementing chemotherapy and surgery. Because of the absence of direct head-to-head comparisons of these AIs, an indirect comparison is needed for individual treatment choice. In this network systemic assessment, the cardiovascular (CV side effects in using anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane based on original studies on AIs vs placebo or tamoxifen were compared. We integrated all available direct and indirect evidences. The odds ratio (OR of severe CV events for indirect comparisons between exemestane and anastrozole was 1.41 (95% confidence interval [CI] =0.49–2.78, letrozole and anastrozole was 1.80 (95% CI =0.40–3.92, and letrozole and exemestane was 1.46 (95% CI =0.34–3.4. OR of subgroup risk for AIs and tamoxifen were all >1 except for thrombolism risk subgroup. The results showed that the total and severe CV risk ranking is letrozole, exemestane, and anastrozole in descending order. None of the AIs showed advantages in CV events than tamoxifen except for thromboembolism event incidence. Keywords: CV risk, breast cancer, AI, network meta-analysis

  9. Analysis of Images from Experiments Investigating Fragmentation of Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, C; Hurricane, O

    2007-09-10

    Image processing techniques have been used extensively to identify objects of interest in image data and extract representative characteristics for these objects. However, this can be a challenge due to the presence of noise in the images and the variation across images in a dataset. When the number of images to be analyzed is large, the algorithms used must also be relatively insensitive to the choice of parameters and lend themselves to partial or full automation. This not only avoids manual analysis which can be time consuming and error-prone, but also makes the analysis reproducible, thus enabling comparisons between images which have been processed in an identical manner. In this paper, we describe our approach to extracting features for objects of interest in experimental images. Focusing on the specific problem of fragmentation of materials, we show how we can extract statistics for the fragments and the gaps between them.

  10. Dehazing method through polarimetric imaging and multi-scale analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Shao, Xiaopeng; Liu, Fei; Wang, Lin

    2015-05-01

    An approach for haze removal utilizing polarimetric imaging and multi-scale analysis has been developed to solve one problem that haze weather weakens the interpretation of remote sensing because of the poor visibility and short detection distance of haze images. On the one hand, the polarization effects of the airlight and the object radiance in the imaging procedure has been considered. On the other hand, one fact that objects and haze possess different frequency distribution properties has been emphasized. So multi-scale analysis through wavelet transform has been employed to make it possible for low frequency components that haze presents and high frequency coefficients that image details or edges occupy are processed separately. According to the measure of the polarization feather by Stokes parameters, three linear polarized images (0°, 45°, and 90°) have been taken on haze weather, then the best polarized image min I and the worst one max I can be synthesized. Afterwards, those two polarized images contaminated by haze have been decomposed into different spatial layers with wavelet analysis, and the low frequency images have been processed via a polarization dehazing algorithm while high frequency components manipulated with a nonlinear transform. Then the ultimate haze-free image can be reconstructed by inverse wavelet reconstruction. Experimental results verify that the dehazing method proposed in this study can strongly promote image visibility and increase detection distance through haze for imaging warning and remote sensing systems.

  11. PIZZARO: Forensic analysis and restoration of image and video data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenicky, Jan; Bartos, Michal; Flusser, Jan; Mahdian, Babak; Kotera, Jan; Novozamsky, Adam; Saic, Stanislav; Sroubek, Filip; Sorel, Michal; Zita, Ales; Zitova, Barbara; Sima, Zdenek; Svarc, Petr; Horinek, Jan

    2016-07-01

    This paper introduces a set of methods for image and video forensic analysis. They were designed to help to assess image and video credibility and origin and to restore and increase image quality by diminishing unwanted blur, noise, and other possible artifacts. The motivation came from the best practices used in the criminal investigation utilizing images and/or videos. The determination of the image source, the verification of the image content, and image restoration were identified as the most important issues of which automation can facilitate criminalists work. Novel theoretical results complemented with existing approaches (LCD re-capture detection and denoising) were implemented in the PIZZARO software tool, which consists of the image processing functionality as well as of reporting and archiving functions to ensure the repeatability of image analysis procedures and thus fulfills formal aspects of the image/video analysis work. Comparison of new proposed methods with the state of the art approaches is shown. Real use cases are presented, which illustrate the functionality of the developed methods and demonstrate their applicability in different situations. The use cases as well as the method design were solved in tight cooperation of scientists from the Institute of Criminalistics, National Drug Headquarters of the Criminal Police and Investigation Service of the Police of the Czech Republic, and image processing experts from the Czech Academy of Sciences. PMID:27182830

  12. Generalized cost-effectiveness analysis of a package of interventions to reduce cardiovascular disease in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souto Alberto

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic diseases, represented mainly by cardiovascular disease (CVD and cancer, are increasing in developing countries and account for 53% of chronic diseases in Argentina. There is strong evidence that a reduction of 50% of the deaths due to CVD can be attributed to a reduction in smoking, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. Generalized cost-effectiveness analysis (GCE is a methodology designed by WHO to inform decision makers about the extent to which current or new interventions represent an efficient use of resources. We aimed to use GCE analysis to identify the most efficient interventions to decrease CVD. Methods Six individual interventions (treatment of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking cessation and combined clinical strategies to reduce the 10 year CVD Risk and two population-based interventions (cooperation between government, consumer associations and bakery chambers to reduce salt in bread, and mass education strategies to reduce hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and obesity were selected for analysis. Estimates of effectiveness were entered into age and sex specific models to predict their impact in terms of age-weighted and discounted DALYs saved (disability-adjusted life years. To translate the age- and sex-adjusted incidence of CVD events into health changes, we used risk model software developed by WHO (PopMod. Costs of services were measured in Argentine pesos, and discounted at an annual rate of 3%. Different budgetary impact scenarios were explored. Results The average cost-effectiveness ratio in argentine pesos (ARS$ per DALY for the different interventions were: (i less salt in bread $151; (ii mass media campaign $547; (iii combination drug therapy provided to subjects with a 20%, 10% and 5% global CVD risk, $3,599, $4,113 and $4,533, respectively; (iv high blood pressure (HBP lowering therapy $7,716; (v tobacco cessation with bupropion $ 33,563; and (iv high-cholesterol lowering therapy

  13. Spatio-spectral image analysis using classical and neural algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, S. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Gisler, G.R.; Theiler, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Remote imaging at high spatial resolution has a number of environmental, industrial, and military applications. Analysis of high-resolution multi-spectral images usually involves either spectral analysis of single pixels in a multi- or hyper-spectral image or spatial analysis of multi-pixels in a panchromatic or monochromatic image. Although insufficient for some pattern recognition applications individually, the combination of spatial and spectral analytical techniques may allow the identification of more complex signatures that might not otherwise be manifested in the individual spatial or spectral domains. We report on some preliminary investigation of unsupervised classification methodologies (using both ``classical`` and ``neural`` algorithms) to identify potentially revealing features in these images. We apply dimension-reduction preprocessing to the images, duster, and compare the clusterings obtained by different algorithms. Our classification results are analyzed both visually and with a suite of objective, quantitative measures.

  14. Dynamic infrared imaging in identification of breast cancer tissue with combined image processing and frequency analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joro, R; Lääperi, A-L; Soimakallio, S; Järvenpää, R; Kuukasjärvi, T; Toivonen, T; Saaristo, R; Dastidar, P

    2008-01-01

    Five combinations of image-processing algorithms were applied to dynamic infrared (IR) images of six breast cancer patients preoperatively to establish optimal enhancement of cancer tissue before frequency analysis. mid-wave photovoltaic (PV) IR cameras with 320x254 and 640x512 pixels were used. The signal-to-noise ratio and the specificity for breast cancer were evaluated with the image-processing combinations from the image series of each patient. Before image processing and frequency analysis the effect of patient movement was minimized with a stabilization program developed and tested in the study by stabilizing image slices using surface markers set as measurement points on the skin of the imaged breast. A mathematical equation for superiority value was developed for comparison of the key ratios of the image-processing combinations. The ability of each combination to locate the mammography finding of breast cancer in each patient was compared. Our results show that data collected with a 640x512-pixel mid-wave PV camera applying image-processing methods optimizing signal-to-noise ratio, morphological image processing and linear image restoration before frequency analysis possess the greatest superiority value, showing the cancer area most clearly also in the match centre of the mammography estimation. PMID:18666012

  15. Interpretation of medical images by model guided analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress in the development of digital pictorial information systems stimulates a growing interest in the use of image analysis techniques in medicine. Especially when precise quantitative information is required the use of fast and reproducable computer analysis may be more appropriate than relying on visual judgement only. Such quantitative information can be valuable, for instance, in diagnostics or in irradiation therapy planning. As medical images are mostly recorded in a prescribed way, human anatomy guarantees a common image structure for each particular type of exam. In this thesis it is investigated how to make use of this a priori knowledge to guide image analysis. For that purpose models are developed which are suited to capture common image structure. The first part of this study is devoted to an analysis of nuclear medicine images of myocardial perfusion. In ch. 2 a model of these images is designed in order to represent characteristic image properties. It is shown that for these relatively simple images a compact symbolic description can be achieved, without significant loss of diagnostically importance of several image properties. Possibilities for automatic interpretation of more complex images is investigated in the following chapters. The central topic is segmentation of organs. Two methods are proposed and tested on a set of abdominal X-ray CT scans. Ch. 3 describes a serial approach based on a semantic network and the use of search areas. Relational constraints are used to guide the image processing and to classify detected image segments. In teh ch.'s 4 and 5 a more general parallel approach is utilized, based on a markov random field image model. A stochastic model used to represent prior knowledge about the spatial arrangement of organs is implemented as an external field. (author). 66 refs.; 27 figs.; 6 tabs

  16. An application of image processing techniques in computed tomography image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McEvoy, Fintan

    2007-01-01

    An estimate of the thickness of subcutaneous adipose tissue at differing positions around the body was required in a study examining body composition. To eliminate human error associated with the manual placement of markers for measurements and to facilitate the collection of data from a large...... number of animals and image slices, automation of the process was desirable. The open-source and free image analysis program ImageJ was used. A macro procedure was created that provided the required functionality. The macro performs a number of basic image processing procedures. These include an initial...... process designed to remove the scanning table from the image and to center the animal in the image. This is followed by placement of a vertical line segment from the mid point of the upper border of the image to the image center. Measurements are made between automatically detected outer and inner...

  17. IMAGE ANALYSIS BASED ON EDGE DETECTION TECHNIQUES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纳瑟; 刘重庆

    2002-01-01

    A method that incorporates edge detection technique, Markov Random field (MRF), watershed segmentation and merging techniques was presented for performing image segmentation and edge detection tasks. It first applies edge detection technique to obtain a Difference In Strength (DIS) map. An initial segmented result is obtained based on K-means clustering technique and the minimum distance. Then the region process is modeled by MRF to obtain an image that contains different intensity regions. The gradient values are calculated and then the watershed technique is used. DIS calculation is used for each pixel to define all the edges (weak or strong) in the image. The DIS map is obtained. This help as priority knowledge to know the possibility of the region segmentation by the next step (MRF), which gives an image that has all the edges and regions information. In MRF model,gray level l, at pixel location i, in an image X, depends on the gray levels of neighboring pixels. The segmentation results are improved by using watershed algorithm. After all pixels of the segmented regions are processed, a map of primitive region with edges is generated. The edge map is obtained using a merge process based on averaged intensity mean values. A common edge detectors that work on (MRF) segmented image are used and the results are compared. The segmentation and edge detection result is one closed boundary per actual region in the image.

  18. Multivariate image analysis for quality inspection in fish feed production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungqvist, Martin Georg

    focused on here are: pellet size, type and concentration level of astaxanthin in pellet coating, as well as astaxanthin type detected in salmonid fish. Methods used are three different devices for multi- and hyper-spectral imaging, together with shape analysis and multi-variate statistical analysis. The...... results of the work demonstrate a high potential of image analysis and spectral imaging for assessing the product quality of fish feed pellets, astaxanthin and fish meat. We show how image analysis can be used to inspect the pellet size, and how spectral imaging can be used to inspect the surface quality...... origin, or synthesised chemically. Common for both types is that they are relatively expensive in comparison to the other feed ingredients. This thesis investigates multi-variate data collection for visual inspection and optimisation of industrial production in the fish feed industry. Quality parameters...

  19. An image analysis system for near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence lymph imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingdan; Zhou, Shaohua Kevin; Xiang, Xiaoyan; Rasmussen, John C.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2011-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of lymphatic function is crucial for understanding the lymphatic system and diagnosing the associated diseases. Recently, a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging system is developed for real-time imaging lymphatic propulsion by intradermal injection of microdose of a NIR fluorophore distal to the lymphatics of interest. However, the previous analysis software3, 4 is underdeveloped, requiring extensive time and effort to analyze a NIR image sequence. In this paper, we develop a number of image processing techniques to automate the data analysis workflow, including an object tracking algorithm to stabilize the subject and remove the motion artifacts, an image representation named flow map to characterize lymphatic flow more reliably, and an automatic algorithm to compute lymph velocity and frequency of propulsion. By integrating all these techniques to a system, the analysis workflow significantly reduces the amount of required user interaction and improves the reliability of the measurement.

  20. Analysis of Factors Affecting Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) Image Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image reconstruction for positron emission mammography (PEM) with the breast positioned between two parallel, planar detectors is usually performed by backprojection to image planes. Three important factors affecting PEM image reconstruction by backprojection are investigated: (1) image uniformity (flood) corrections, (2) image sampling (pixel size) and (3) count allocation methods. An analytic expression for uniformity correction is developed that incorporates factors for spatial-dependent detector sensitivity and geometric effects from acceptance angle limits on coincidence events. There is good agreement between experimental floods from a PEM system with a pixellated detector and numerical simulations. The analytic uniformity corrections are successfully applied to image reconstruction of compressed breast phantoms and reduce the necessity for flood scans at different image planes. Experimental and simulated compressed breast phantom studies show that lesion contrast is improved when the image pixel size is half of, rather than equal to, the detector pixel size, though this occurs at the expense of some additional image noise. In PEM reconstruction counts usually are allocated to the pixel in the image plane intersected by the line of response (LOR) between the centers of the detection pixels. An alternate count allocation method is investigated that distributes counts to image pixels in proportion to the area of the tube of response (TOR) connecting the detection pixels that they overlay in the image plane. This TOR method eliminates some image artifacts that occur with the LOR method and increases tumor signal-to-noise ratios at the expense of a slight decrease in tumor contrast. Analysis of image uniformity, image sampling and count allocation methods in PEM image reconstruction points to ways of improving image formation. Further work is required to optimize image reconstruction parameters for particular detection or quantitation tasks

  1. Multiscale analysis of subwavelength imaging with metal-dielectric multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotyński, Rafał; Stefaniuk, Tomasz

    2010-04-15

    Imaging with a layered superlens is a spatial filtering operation characterized by the point spread function (PSF). We show that in the same optical system the image of a narrow subwavelength Gaussian incident field may be surprisingly dissimilar to the PSF, and the width of the PSF is not a straightforward measure of the resolution. The FWHM or standard deviation of the PSF gives ambiguous information about the actual resolution, and imaging of objects smaller than the FWHM of the PSF is possible. A multiscale analysis of imaging gives good insight into the peculiar scale-dependent properties of subwavelength imaging. PMID:20410943

  2. Adaptive Local Image Registration: Analysis on Filter Size

    OpenAIRE

    Vishnukumar S; M.Wilscy

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive Local Image Registration is a Local Image Registration based on an Adaptive Filtering frame work. A filter of appropriate size convolves with reference image and gives the pixel values corresponding to the distorted image and the filter is updated in each stage of the convolution. When the filter converges to the system model, it provides the registered image. The filter size plays an important role in this method. The analysis on the filter size is done using Peak Signal-to-Noise Ra...

  3. Medical image analysis of 3D CT images based on extensions of Haralick texture features

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesař, Ludvík; Shimizu, A.; Smutek, D.; Kobatake, H.; Nawano, S.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 6 (2008), s. 513-520. ISSN 0895-6111 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET101050403; GA MŠk 1M0572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : image segmentation * Gaussian mixture model * 3D image analysis Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.192, year: 2008 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2008/AS/tesar-medical image analysis of 3d ct image s based on extensions of haralick texture features.pdf

  4. Methods for processing and analysis functional and anatomical brain images: computerized tomography, emission tomography and nuclear resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various methods for brain image processing and analysis are presented and compared. The following topics are developed: the physical basis of brain image comparison (nature and formation of signals intrinsic performance of the methods image characteristics); mathematical methods for image processing and analysis (filtering, functional parameter extraction, morphological analysis, robotics and artificial intelligence); methods for anatomical localization (neuro-anatomy atlas, proportional stereotaxic atlas, numerized atlas); methodology of cerebral image superposition (normalization, retiming); image networks

  5. Digital image processing and analysis human and computer vision applications with CVIPtools

    CERN Document Server

    Umbaugh, Scott E

    2010-01-01

    Section I Introduction to Digital Image Processing and AnalysisDigital Image Processing and AnalysisOverviewImage Analysis and Computer VisionImage Processing and Human VisionKey PointsExercisesReferencesFurther ReadingComputer Imaging SystemsImaging Systems OverviewImage Formation and SensingCVIPtools SoftwareImage RepresentationKey PointsExercisesSupplementary ExercisesReferencesFurther ReadingSection II Digital Image Analysis and Computer VisionIntroduction to Digital Image AnalysisIntroductionPreprocessingBinary Image AnalysisKey PointsExercisesSupplementary ExercisesReferencesFurther Read

  6. Genetic analysis of the cardiac methylome at single nucleotide resolution in a model of human cardiovascular disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle D Johnson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic marks such as cytosine methylation are important determinants of cellular and whole-body phenotypes. However, the extent of, and reasons for inter-individual differences in cytosine methylation, and their association with phenotypic variation are poorly characterised. Here we present the first genome-wide study of cytosine methylation at single-nucleotide resolution in an animal model of human disease. We used whole-genome bisulfite sequencing in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR, a model of cardiovascular disease, and the Brown Norway (BN control strain, to define the genetic architecture of cytosine methylation in the mammalian heart and to test for association between methylation and pathophysiological phenotypes. Analysis of 10.6 million CpG dinucleotides identified 77,088 CpGs that were differentially methylated between the strains. In F1 hybrids we found 38,152 CpGs showing allele-specific methylation and 145 regions with parent-of-origin effects on methylation. Cis-linkage explained almost 60% of inter-strain variation in methylation at a subset of loci tested for linkage in a panel of recombinant inbred (RI strains. Methylation analysis in isolated cardiomyocytes showed that in the majority of cases methylation differences in cardiomyocytes and non-cardiomyocytes were strain-dependent, confirming a strong genetic component for cytosine methylation. We observed preferential nucleotide usage associated with increased and decreased methylation that is remarkably conserved across species, suggesting a common mechanism for germline control of inter-individual variation in CpG methylation. In the RI strain panel, we found significant correlation of CpG methylation and levels of serum chromogranin B (CgB, a proposed biomarker of heart failure, which is evidence for a link between germline DNA sequence variation, CpG methylation differences and pathophysiological phenotypes in the SHR strain. Together, these results will

  7. Introducing PLIA: Planetary Laboratory for Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, J.; Hueso, R.; Barrado, N.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2005-08-01

    We present a graphical software tool developed under IDL software to navigate, process and analyze planetary images. The software has a complete Graphical User Interface and is cross-platform. It can also run under the IDL Virtual Machine without the need to own an IDL license. The set of tools included allow image navigation (orientation, centring and automatic limb determination), dynamical and photometric atmospheric measurements (winds and cloud albedos), cylindrical and polar projections, as well as image treatment under several procedures. Being written in IDL, it is modular and easy to modify and grow for adding new capabilities. We show several examples of the software capabilities with Galileo-Venus observations: Image navigation, photometrical corrections, wind profiles obtained by cloud tracking, cylindrical projections and cloud photometric measurements. Acknowledgements: This work has been funded by Spanish MCYT PNAYA2003-03216, fondos FEDER and Grupos UPV 15946/2004. R. Hueso acknowledges a post-doc fellowship from Gobierno Vasco.

  8. On Texture and Geometry in Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, David Karl John

    2009-01-01

    Images are composed of geometric structure and texture. Large scale structures are considered to be the geometric structure, while small scale details are considered to be the texture. In this dissertation, we will argue that the most important difference between geometric structure and texture is...... not the scale - instead, it is the requirement on representation or reconstruction. Geometric structure must be reconstructed exactly and can be represented sparsely. Texture does not need to be reconstructed exactly, a random sample from the distribution being sufficient. Furthermore, texture can not...... be represented sparsely. In image inpainting, the image content is missing in a region and should be reconstructed using information from the rest of the image. The main challenges in inpainting are: prolonging and connecting geometric structure and reproducing the variation found in texture. The...

  9. Exploiting multi-context analysis in semantic image classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yong-hong; HUANG Tie-jun; GAO Wen

    2005-01-01

    As the popularity of digital images is rapidly increasing on the Internet, research on technologies for semantic image classification has become an important research topic. However, the well-known content-based image classification methods do not overcome the so-called semantic gap problem in which low-level visual features cannot represent the high-level semantic content of images. Image classification using visual and textual information often performs poorly since the extracted textual features are often too limited to accurately represent the images. In this paper, we propose a semantic image classification approach using multi-context analysis. For a given image, we model the relevant textual information as its multi-modal context, and regard the related images connected by hyperlinks as its link context. Two kinds of context analysis models, i.e., cross-modal correlation analysis and link-based correlation model, are used to capture the correlation among different modals of features and the topical dependency among images induced by the link structure. We propose a new collective classification model called relational support vector classifier (RSVC) based on the well-known Support Vector Machines (SVMs) and the link-based correlation model. Experiments showed that the proposed approach significantly improved classification accuracy over that of SVM classifiers using visual and/or textual features.

  10. Data driven analysis of faces from images

    OpenAIRE

    Scherbaum, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    This thesis proposes three new data-driven approaches to detect, analyze, or modify faces in images. All presented contributions are inspired by the use of prior knowledge and they derive information about facial appearances from pre-collected databases of images or 3D face models. First, we contribute an approach that extends a widely-used monocular face detector by an additional classifier that evaluates disparity maps of a passive stereo camera. The algorithm runs in real-time and signific...

  11. A Path Analysis of a Randomized "Promotora de Salud" Cardiovascular Disease-Prevention Trial among At-Risk Hispanic Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Hendrik Dirk; Balcazar, Hector G.; Castro, Felipe; Schulz, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed effectiveness of an educational community intervention taught by "promotoras de salud" in reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among Hispanics using a structural equation modeling (SEM) approach. Model development was guided by a social ecological framework proposing CVD risk reduction through improvement of protective…

  12. Localised manifold learning for cardiac image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Kanwal K.; Price, Anthony N.; Hajnal, Jo V.; Rueckert, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Manifold learning is increasingly being used to discover the underlying structure of medical image data. Traditional approaches operate on whole images with a single measure of similarity used to compare entire images. In this way, information on the locality of differences is lost and smaller trends may be masked by dominant global differences. In this paper, we propose the use of multiple local manifolds to analyse regions of images without any prior knowledge of which regions are important. Localised manifolds are created by partitioning images into regular subsections with a manifold constructed for each patch. We propose a framework for incorporating information from the neighbours of each patch to calculate a coherent embedding. This generates a simultaneous dimensionality reduction of all patches and results in the creation of embeddings which are spatially-varying. Additionally, a hierarchical method is presented to enable a multi-scale embedding solution. We use this to extract spatially-varying respiratory and cardiac motions from cardiac MRI. Although there is a complex interplay between these motions, we show how they can be separated on a regional basis. We demonstrate the utility of the localised joint embedding over a global embedding of whole images and over embedding individual patches independently.

  13. Diagnostic imaging analysis of the impacted mesiodens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research was performed to predict the three dimensional relationship between the impacted mesiodens and the maxillary central incisors and the proximity with the anatomic structures by comparing their panoramic images with the CT images. Among the patients visiting Seoul National University Dental Hospital from April 2003 to July 2007, those with mesiodens were selected (154 mesiodens of 120 patients). The numbers, shapes, orientation and positional relationship of mesiodens with maxillary central incisors were investigated in the panoramic images. The proximity with the anatomical structures and complications were investigated in the CT images as well. The sex ratio (M : F) was 2.28 : 1 and the mean number of mesiodens per one patient was 1.28. Conical shape was 84.4% and inverted orientation was 51.9%. There were more cases of anatomical structures encroachment, especially on the nasal floor and nasopalatine duct, when the mesiodens was not superimposed with the central incisor. There were, however, many cases of the nasopalatine duct encroachment when the mesiodens was superimpoised with the apical 1/3 of central incisor (52.6%). Delayed eruption (55.6%), crown rotation (66.7%) and crown resorption (100%) were observed when the mesiodens was superimposed with the crown of the central incisor. It is possible to predict three dimensional relationship between the impacted mesiodens and the maxillary central incisors in the panoramic images, but more details should be confirmed by the CT images when necessary.

  14. Diagnostic imaging analysis of the impacted mesiodens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Jeong Jun; Choi, Bo Ram; Jeong, Hwan Seok; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul [School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The research was performed to predict the three dimensional relationship between the impacted mesiodens and the maxillary central incisors and the proximity with the anatomic structures by comparing their panoramic images with the CT images. Among the patients visiting Seoul National University Dental Hospital from April 2003 to July 2007, those with mesiodens were selected (154 mesiodens of 120 patients). The numbers, shapes, orientation and positional relationship of mesiodens with maxillary central incisors were investigated in the panoramic images. The proximity with the anatomical structures and complications were investigated in the CT images as well. The sex ratio (M : F) was 2.28 : 1 and the mean number of mesiodens per one patient was 1.28. Conical shape was 84.4% and inverted orientation was 51.9%. There were more cases of anatomical structures encroachment, especially on the nasal floor and nasopalatine duct, when the mesiodens was not superimposed with the central incisor. There were, however, many cases of the nasopalatine duct encroachment when the mesiodens was superimpoised with the apical 1/3 of central incisor (52.6%). Delayed eruption (55.6%), crown rotation (66.7%) and crown resorption (100%) were observed when the mesiodens was superimposed with the crown of the central incisor. It is possible to predict three dimensional relationship between the impacted mesiodens and the maxillary central incisors in the panoramic images, but more details should be confirmed by the CT images when necessary.

  15. Analysis Of Spiht Algorithm For Satellite Image Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Nagamani

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Wavelets offer an elegant technique for representing the levels of details present in an image. When an image is decomposed using wavelets, the high pass component carry less information, and vice-versa. The possibility of elimination of the high pass components gives higher compression ratio in the case of wavelet based image compression. To achieve higher compression ratio, various coding schemes have been used. Some of the well known coding algorithms are EZW (Embedded Zero-tree Wavelet, SPIHT (Set Partitioning in Hierarchical Tree and EBCOT (Embedded Block Coding with Optimal Truncation. SPIHT has been one of the popular schemes used for image compression. In this paper the performance of the SPIHT (Set Partitioning in Hierarchical Trees compression technique for satellite images are studied. The satellite rural and urban images have been used for the present analysis. The standard Lena image is used for the purpose of comparison. For a given compression ratio, the PSNR (peak signal to noise ratio values are computed to evaluate the quality of the reconstructed image. The analysis carried out clearly suggests that the PSNR values increases with the level of decomposition. For the satellite images the PSNR values achievable are less compared to that of Standard Lena Image and the SPIHT Algorithm are better suited for compression of Satellite urban Images.

  16. Pattern recognition software and techniques for biological image analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lior Shamir

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of automated image acquisition systems is enabling new types of microscopy experiments that generate large image datasets. However, there is a perceived lack of robust image analysis systems required to process these diverse datasets. Most automated image analysis systems are tailored for specific types of microscopy, contrast methods, probes, and even cell types. This imposes significant constraints on experimental design, limiting their application to the narrow set of imaging methods for which they were designed. One of the approaches to address these limitations is pattern recognition, which was originally developed for remote sensing, and is increasingly being applied to the biology domain. This approach relies on training a computer to recognize patterns in images rather than developing algorithms or tuning parameters for specific image processing tasks. The generality of this approach promises to enable data mining in extensive image repositories, and provide objective and quantitative imaging assays for routine use. Here, we provide a brief overview of the technologies behind pattern recognition and its use in computer vision for biological and biomedical imaging. We list available software tools that can be used by biologists and suggest practical experimental considerations to make the best use of pattern recognition techniques for imaging assays.

  17. Image Harvest: an open-source platform for high-throughput plant image processing and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Avi C; Campbell, Malachy T; Caprez, Adam; Swanson, David R; Walia, Harkamal

    2016-05-01

    High-throughput plant phenotyping is an effective approach to bridge the genotype-to-phenotype gap in crops. Phenomics experiments typically result in large-scale image datasets, which are not amenable for processing on desktop computers, thus creating a bottleneck in the image-analysis pipeline. Here, we present an open-source, flexible image-analysis framework, called Image Harvest (IH), for processing images originating from high-throughput plant phenotyping platforms. Image Harvest is developed to perform parallel processing on computing grids and provides an integrated feature for metadata extraction from large-scale file organization. Moreover, the integration of IH with the Open Science Grid provides academic researchers with the computational resources required for processing large image datasets at no cost. Image Harvest also offers functionalities to extract digital traits from images to interpret plant architecture-related characteristics. To demonstrate the applications of these digital traits, a rice (Oryza sativa) diversity panel was phenotyped and genome-wide association mapping was performed using digital traits that are used to describe different plant ideotypes. Three major quantitative trait loci were identified on rice chromosomes 4 and 6, which co-localize with quantitative trait loci known to regulate agronomically important traits in rice. Image Harvest is an open-source software for high-throughput image processing that requires a minimal learning curve for plant biologists to analyzephenomics datasets. PMID:27141917

  18. Cohort comparison study of cardiac disease and atherosclerotic burden in type 2 diabetic adults using whole body cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Duce, Suzanne L.; Weir-McCall, Jonathan R.; Gandy, Stephen J.; Matthew, Shona Z.; Cassidy, Deirdre B.; McCormick, Lynne; Rauchhaus, Petra; Looker, Helen; Helen M Colhoun; Houston, J. Graeme

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whole body cardiovascular MR (WB CVMR) combines whole body angiography and cardiac MR assessment. It is accepted that there is a high disease burden in patients with diabetes, however the quantification of the whole body atheroma burden in both arterial and cardiac disease has not been previously reported. In this study we compare the quantified atheroma burden in those individuals with and without diabetes by clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) status.METHODS: 158 participants ...

  19. Cohort comparison study of cardiac disease and atherosclerotic burden in type 2 diabetic adults using whole body cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Duce, Suzanne L.; Weir-McCall, Jonathan R.; Gandy, Stephen J.; Matthew, Shona Z.; Cassidy, Deirdre B.; McCormick, Lynne; Rauchhaus, Petra; Looker, Helen; Helen M Colhoun; Houston, J. Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Background Whole body cardiovascular MR (WB CVMR) combines whole body angiography and cardiac MR assessment. It is accepted that there is a high disease burden in patients with diabetes, however the quantification of the whole body atheroma burden in both arterial and cardiac disease has not been previously reported. In this study we compare the quantified atheroma burden in those individuals with and without diabetes by clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) status. Methods 158 participants u...

  20. Usefulness of imaging techniques and novel biomarkers in the prediction of cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic kidney disease in Spain: The NEFRONA project

    OpenAIRE

    Junyent, Mireia; Martínez Alonso, Montserrat; Borràs, Mercè; Betriu i Bars, M. Àngels; Coll,Blai; Craver Hospital, Lourdes; Marco Mayayo, M. Paz; Sarró, Felipe; Valdivielso Revilla, José Manuel; Fernández i Giráldez, Elvira

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Cardiovascular risk assessment in this population is hampered by the failure of traditional risk factors to fully account for the elevated CVD risk, mainly due to the reverse epidemiology effect, and the presence of risk factors specifically related to uraemia. Hereby, we present the protocol of a prospective study aimed to assess the ...