WorldWideScience

Sample records for cardiovascular heart protection

  1. Protect your heart: a culture-specific multimedia cardiovascular health education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amy; Clayman, Marla L; Glass, Sara; Kandula, Namratha R

    2015-04-01

    South Asians, the second fastest growing racial/ethnic minority in the United States, have high rates of coronary heart disease. Few coronary heart disease prevention efforts target this population. The authors developed and tested a culture-specific, multimedia coronary heart disease prevention education program in English and Hindi for South Asians. Participants were recruited from community organizations in Chicago, Illinois, between June and October of 2011. Bilingual interviewers used questionnaires to assess participants' knowledge and perceptions before and after the patient education program. The change from pretest score to posttest score was calculated using a paired t test. Linear regression was used to determine the association between posttest scores and education and language. Participants' (N = 112) average age was 41 years, 67% had more than a high school education, and 50% spoke Hindi. Participants' mean pretest score was 15 (SD = 4). After the patient education program, posttest scores increased significantly among all participants (posttest score = 24, SD = 4), including those with limited English proficiency. Lower education was associated with a lower posttest score (β = -2.2, 95% CI [-0.68, -3.83]) in adjusted regression. A culture-specific, multimedia patient education program significantly improved knowledge and perceptions about coronary heart disease prevention among South Asian immigrants. Culturally salient multimedia education may be an effective and engaging way to deliver health information to diverse patient populations.

  2. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazacu, A.; Ciubotaru, A.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of congenital heart disease can be attributed to major improvements in diagnosis and treatment. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the clinical management strategy of patients with congenital heart disease. The development of new cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques allows comprehensive assessment of complex cardiac anatomy and function and provides information about the long-term residual post-operative lesions and complications of surgery. It overcomes many of the limitations of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. This review evaluates the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging modality in the management of subject with congenital heart disease (CHD). (authors)

  3. Diabetes, Dyslipidemia, and Heart Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Diabetes, Dyslipidemia, and Heart Protection What is dyslipidemia? Cholesterol and triglycerides, known as lipids, are fatty substances that the body normally produces. Dyslipidemia means that lipid levels ...

  4. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Diseases Resources Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... important step in staying healthy. If you have cardiovascular disease, talk with your doctor about getting your vaccinations ...

  5. Cardiovascular Reactivity and Heart Rate Variability in Panic Disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santiago, Helen T

    1999-01-01

    .... Because previous studies of cardiovascular reactivity and heart rate variability have been inconclusive, these factors were re-examined in panickers and controls during physiological challenge...

  6. Distal protection in cardiovascular medicine: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Onn Akbar; Bhindi, Ravinay; McMahon, Aisling C; Brieger, David; Kritharides, Leonard; Lowe, Harry C

    2006-08-01

    Iatrogenic and spontaneous downstream microembolization of atheromatous material is increasingly recognized as a source of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Devising ways of reducing this distal embolization using a variety of mechanical means--distal protection--is currently under intense and diverse investigation. This review therefore summarizes the present status of distal protection. It examines the problem of distal embolization, describes the available distal protection devices, reviews those areas of cardiovascular medicine where distal protection devices are being investigated, and discusses potential future developments.

  7. Tea and coronary heart disease : protection through estrogenlike activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geleijnse, J.M.; Witteman, J.C.; Launer, L.J.; Lamberts, S.J.; Pols, H.A.

    2000-01-01

    Tea drinking appears to be protective against coronary heart disease in a number of epidemiologic studies. It has been suggested that tea flavonols with antioxidative activity, including quercetin, kaempferol, and myricetin,1 could account for the favorable effect on cardiovascular health. In the

  8. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the charcoal heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grill Howard

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a case of malignant melanoma metastasis to the heart presenting as complete heart block. The highlight of the case is to demonstrate that silent cardiac metastasis is not uncommon and CMR has the potential to characterize these cardiac metastases and should be used routinely as a screening tool for those cancers with a high chance of cardiac involvement.

  9. Isolated heart models: cardiovascular system studies and technological advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnickova, Veronika; Novakova, Marie; Provaznik, Ivo

    2015-07-01

    Isolated heart model is a relevant tool for cardiovascular system studies. It represents a highly reproducible model for studying broad spectrum of biochemical, physiological, morphological, and pharmaceutical parameters, including analysis of intrinsic heart mechanics, metabolism, and coronary vascular response. Results obtained in this model are under no influence of other organ systems, plasma concentration of hormones or ions and influence of autonomic nervous system. The review describes various isolated heart models, the modes of heart perfusion, and advantages and limitations of various experimental setups. It reports the improvements of perfusion setup according to Langendorff introduced by the authors.

  10. The year 2012 in the European Heart Journal-Cardiovascular Imaging. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plein, Sven; Knuuti, Juhani; Edvardsen, Thor; Saraste, Antti; Piérard, Luc A; Maurer, Gerald; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2013-07-01

    The part II of the best of the European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging in 2012 specifically focuses on studies of valvular heart diseases, heart failure, cardiomyopathies, and congenital heart diseases.

  11. Taking Aspirin to Protect Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toolkit No. 23 Taking Aspirin to Protect Your Heart What can taking aspirin do for me? If you are at high risk for or if you have heart disease, taking a low dose aspirin every day may help. Aspirin can also help ...

  12. Protect Your Heart in the Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aortic Aneurysm More Protect Your Heart in the Heat Updated:Jul 5,2017 Whatever brings you outside — ... might need to take special precautions in the heat, according to Gerald Fletcher, M.D., professor of ...

  13. Simplifying cardiovascular risk estimation using resting heart rate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooney, Marie Therese

    2010-09-01

    Elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is a known, independent cardiovascular (CV) risk factor, but is not included in risk estimation systems, including Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE). We aimed to derive risk estimation systems including RHR as an extra variable and assess the value of this addition.

  14. Myocardial protection in heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzer, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    One of the unmet clinical needs in heart surgery is the prevention of myocardial stunning and necrosis that occurs as a result of ischemia-reperfusion. Myocardial stunning, a frequent consequence after heart surgery, is characterized by a requirement for postoperative inotropic support despite a technically satisfactory heart operation. In high-risk patients with marginal cardiac reserve, stunning is a major cause of prolonged critical care and may be associated with as much as a 5-fold increase in mortality. In contrast, the frequency of myocardial necrosis (myocardial infarction [MI]) after cardiac surgery is less appreciated and its consequences are much more subtle. The consequences may not be apparent for months to years. While we now have a much better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying myocardial stunning and MI, we still have no effective way to prevent these complications, nor a consistently effective means to engage the well-studied endogenous mechanisms of cardioprotection. The failure to develop clinically effective interventions is multifactorial and can be attributed to reliance on findings obtained from subcellular and cellular studies, to drawing conclusions from preclinical large animal studies that have been conducted in a disease-free state, and to accepting less than robust surrogate markers of injury in phase II clinical trials. These factors also explain the disappointing failure to identify effective adjuvant therapy in the setting of percutaneous coronary revascularization for acute MI (AMI) and reperfusion injury. These issues have contributed to the disappointing outcomes of large and costly phase III trials, resulting in a lack of enthusiasm on the part of the pharmaceutical industry to engage in further drug development for this indication. The purpose of this review is to (1) define the scope of the clinical problem; (2) summarize the outcomes of selected phases II and III clinical trials; and (3) identify the gap that

  15. Protect Your Heart: Check Food Labels to Make Heart-Healthy Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Protein 15g Total Amounts To make heart-healthy food choices, look at the totals and cut back on • ... Toolkit No. 8: Protect Your Heart: Make Smart Food Choices • Toolkit No. 9: Protect Your Heart: Choose Fats ...

  16. The Role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterzan, Mark A; Rider, Oliver J; Anderson, Lisa J

    2016-11-01

    Cardiovascular imaging is key for the assessment of patients with heart failure. Today, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging plays an established role in the assessment of patients with suspected and confirmed heart failure syndromes, in particular identifying aetiology. Its role in informing prognosis and guiding decisions around therapy are evolving. Key strengths include its accuracy; reproducibility; unrestricted field of view; lack of radiation; multiple abilities to characterise myocardial tissue, thrombus and scar; as well as unparalleled assessment of left and right ventricular volumes. T2* has an established role in the assessment and follow-up of iron overload cardiomyopathy and a role for T1 in specific therapies for cardiac amyloid and Anderson-Fabry disease is emerging.

  17. Protect Your Heart: Choose Healthy Fats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peanut butter and peanut oil Polyunsaturated fat: Polyunsaturated fat, another type of unsaturated fat, protects your heart. Sources of ... paste • safflower oil • walnuts • salad dressings Omega-3 fats: This type of fat helps prevent clogging of the arteries. ...

  18. Rhizoma coptidis: A potential cardiovascular protective agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Li Tan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both the developed and developing world. Rhizoma coptidis (RC, known as Huang Lian in China, is the dried rhizome of medicinal plants from the family Ranunculaceae, such as Coptis chinensis Franch, C. deltoidea C.Y. Cheng et Hsiao, and C. teeta Wall which has been used by Chinese medicinal physicians for more than 2000 years. In China, RC is a common component in traditional medicines used to treat CVD associated problems including obesity, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia and disorders of lipid metabolism. In recent years, numerous scientific studies have sought to investigate the biological properties of RC to provide scientific evidence for its traditional medical uses. RC has been found to exert significant beneficial effects on major risk factors for CVDs including anti-atherosclerotic effect, protection from myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, lipid-lowering effect, anti-obesity effect and anti-hepatic steatosis effect. These properties have been attributed to the presence of bioactive compounds contained in RC such as berberine, coptisine, palmatine, epiberberine, jatrorrhizine and magnoflorine; all of which have been demonstrated to have cardioprotective effects on the various parameters contributing to the occurrence of CVD through a variety of pathways. The evidence available in the published literature indicates that RC is a herb with tremendous potential to reduce the risks of CVDs, and this review aims to summarize the cardioprotective properties of RC with reference to the published literature which overall indicates that RC is a herb with remarkable potential to reduce the risks of CVDs.

  19. The year 2012 in the European Heart Journal-Cardiovascular Imaging: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsen, Thor; Plein, Sven; Saraste, Antti; Knuuti, Juhani; Maurer, Gerald; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2013-06-01

    The new multi-modality cardiovascular imaging journal, European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging, was started in 2012. During its first year, the new Journal has published an impressive collection of cardiovascular studies utilizing all cardiovascular imaging modalities. We will summarize the most important studies from its first year in two articles. The present 'Part I' of the review will focus on studies in myocardial function, myocardial ischaemia, and emerging techniques in cardiovascular imaging.

  20. Dietary proanthocyanidins: Occurrence, dietary intake, bioavailability, and protection against cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S. E.; Frederiksen, H.; Krogholm, Kirstine Suszkiewicz

    2005-01-01

    The French have one of the lowest incidences of coronary heart disease in the Western world despite a diet with a relatively high fat content. This phenomenon that has puzzled researchers worldwide for more than a decade is known as the 'French paradox' and has been linked to the high consumption......, the occurrence, the daily intake from foods, the bioavailability and metabolism, and the evidence for a protective effect against cardiovascular diseases....

  1. The American Heart Association Ideal Cardiovascular Health and Incident Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Among Blacks: The Jackson Heart Study

    OpenAIRE

    Effoe, Valery S.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Echouffo‐Tcheugui, Justin B.; Chen, Haiying; Joseph, Joshua J.; Norwood, Arnita F.; Bertoni, Alain G.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The concept of ideal cardiovascular health (CVH), defined by the American Heart Association primarily for coronary heart disease and stroke prevention, may apply to diabetes mellitus prevention among blacks. Methods and Results: Our sample included 2668 adults in the Jackson Heart Study with complete baseline data on 6 of 7 American Heart Association CVH metrics (body mass index, healthy diet, smoking, total cholesterol, blood pressure, and physical activity). Incident diabetes me...

  2. Reducing cardiovascular risk : protecting the kidney

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobre, Daniela; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J.; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2009-01-01

    Progressive decline of renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD), measured by a reduced glomerular filtration rate or albuminuria, is linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), most

  3. Organ protection possibilities in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Pérez-Barquero, M; Morales-Rull, J L

    2016-04-01

    Unlike chronic heart failure (HF), the treatment for acute HF has not changed over the last decade. The drugs employed have shown their ability to control symptoms but have not achieved organ protection or managed to reduce medium to long-term morbidity and mortality. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute HF suggest that treatment should be directed not only towards correcting the haemodynamic disorders and achieving symptomatic relief but also towards preventing organ damage, thereby counteracting myocardial remodelling and cardiac and extracardiac disorders. Compounds that exert vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory action in the acute phase of HF and can stop cell death, thereby boosting repair mechanisms, could have an essential role in organ protection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  4. The year 2013 in the European Heart Journal--Cardiovascular Imaging. Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsen, Thor; Plein, Sven; Saraste, Antti; Pierard, Luc A; Knuuti, Juhani; Maurer, Gerald; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2014-07-01

    The new multimodality cardiovascular imaging journal, European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging, was created in 2012. Here, we summarize the most important studies from the journal's second year in two articles. Part I of the review will focus on studies in myocardial function, myocardial ischaemia, and emerging techniques in cardiovascular imaging, and Part II will focus on valvular heart diseases, heart failure, cardiomyopathies, and congenital heart diseases. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The year 2014 in the European Heart Journal – Cardiovascular Imaging. Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsen, Thor; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara; Saraste, Antti; Pierard, Luc A; Knuuti, Juhani; Maurer, Gerald; Habib, Gilbert; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2015-07-01

    The new multimodality cardiovascular imaging journal, European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging, was created in 2012. It has already gained an impressive impact factor of 3.669 during its first 2 years. In two articles, we will summarize the most important studies from the journal's third year. Part I of the review will focus on studies in myocardial function, myocardial ischaemia, and emerging techniques in cardiovascular imaging, and Part II will focus on valvular heart diseases, heart failure, cardiomyopathies, and congenital heart diseases. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The year 2013 in the European Heart Journal--Cardiovascular Imaging: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plein, Sven; Edvardsen, Thor; Pierard, Luc A; Saraste, Antti; Knuuti, Juhani; Maurer, Gerald; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2014-08-01

    The new multi-modality cardiovascular imaging journal, European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging, was created in 2012. Here we summarize the most important studies from the journal's second year in two articles. Part I of the review has summarized studies in myocardial function, myocardial ischaemia, and emerging techniques in cardiovascular imaging. Part II is focussed on valvular heart diseases, heart failure, cardiomyopathies, and congenital heart diseases. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. [Soya isoflavones and evidences on cardiovascular protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Cañete, Natalia; Durán Agüero, Samuel

    2014-06-01

    Soya isoflavones represent a group of non-nutritive, bioactive compounds, of non-steroidal phenolic nature that are present in soy bean and derived foods. They share with other compounds the capacity of binding to estrogenic receptors from different cells and tissues so that they may act as phytoestrogens. The current interest in these compounds comes from the knowledge that in Asian populations with high levels of their consumption the prevalence of cancer and cardiovascular disease is lower, as compared to the Western countries populations. This cardiovascular benefit would be the result not only of the modulation of plasma lipids, which is a widely studied mechanism. This paper reviews the published evidence about the beneficial effects of soya isoflavones and the different mechanisms of action that would benefit cardiovascular health and that surpass the mechanisms traditionally approached such as the modulation of plasma lipids, and that implicate the regulation of cellular and enzymatic functions in situations such as inflammation, thrombosis, and atherosclerotic progression. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  8. Valvular heart disease: what does cardiovascular MRI add?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masci, Pier G.; Dymarkowski, Steven; Bogaert, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Although ischemic heart disease remains the leading cause of cardiac-related morbidity and mortality in the industrialized countries, a growing number of mainly elderly patients will experience a problem of valvular heart disease (VHD), often requiring surgical intervention at some stage. Doppler-echocardiography is the most popular imaging modality used in the evaluation of this disease entity. It encompasses, however, some non-negligible constraints which may hamper the quality and thus the interpretation of the exam. Cardiac catheterization has been considered for a long time the reference technique in this field, however, this technique is invasive and considered far from optimal. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is already considered an established diagnostic method for studying ventricular dimensions, function and mass. With improvement of MRI soft- and hardware, the assessment of cardiac valve function has also turned out to be fast, accurate and reproducible. This review focuses on the usefulness of MRI in the diagnosis and management of VHD, pointing out its added value in comparison with more conventional diagnostic means. (orig.)

  9. Valvular heart disease: what does cardiovascular MRI add?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masci, Pier G.; Dymarkowski, Steven; Bogaert, Jan [Gasthuisberg University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2008-02-15

    Although ischemic heart disease remains the leading cause of cardiac-related morbidity and mortality in the industrialized countries, a growing number of mainly elderly patients will experience a problem of valvular heart disease (VHD), often requiring surgical intervention at some stage. Doppler-echocardiography is the most popular imaging modality used in the evaluation of this disease entity. It encompasses, however, some non-negligible constraints which may hamper the quality and thus the interpretation of the exam. Cardiac catheterization has been considered for a long time the reference technique in this field, however, this technique is invasive and considered far from optimal. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is already considered an established diagnostic method for studying ventricular dimensions, function and mass. With improvement of MRI soft- and hardware, the assessment of cardiac valve function has also turned out to be fast, accurate and reproducible. This review focuses on the usefulness of MRI in the diagnosis and management of VHD, pointing out its added value in comparison with more conventional diagnostic means. (orig.)

  10. Cardiovascular metabolic syndrome: mediators involved in the pathophysiology from obesity to coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Cornelis J; Quax, Paul H A; Jukema, J Wouter

    2012-02-01

    Patients with obesity and diabetes mellitus are at increased risk for cardiovascular events and have a higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This worse prognosis is partly explained by the late recognition of coronary heart disease in these patients, due to the absence of symptoms. Early identification of coronary heart disease is vital, to initiate preventive medical therapy and improve prognosis. At present, with the use of cardiovascular risk models, the identification of coronary heart disease in these patients remains inadequate. To this end, biomarkers should improve the early identification of patients at increased cardiovascular risk. The first part of this review describes the pathophysiologic pathway from obesity to coronary heart disease. The second part evaluates several mediators from this pathophysiologic pathway for their applicability as biomarkers for the identification of coronary heart disease.

  11. Heart failure as an endpoint in heart failure and non-heart failure cardiovascular clinical trials: the need for a consensus definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zannad, F.; Stough, W.G.; Pitt, B.

    2008-01-01

    Specific criteria have been established to define the occurrence of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke in cardiovascular clinical trials, but there is not a consistent definition for heart failure. Heart failure events appear to occur at a rate that is similar to stroke and MI in trials...... of hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, and coronary heart disease, yet a consistent approach to defining heart failure events has not yet been realized. The wide range of definitions used in clinical trials makes it difficult to interpret new data in the context of existing literature. This inconsistency has...... led to challenges in determining the incidence of heart failure in cardiovascular studies and the effects of interventions on these endpoints. This paper examines issues related to defining heart failure events in cardiovascular clinical trials and presents a definition to formally address this issue...

  12. The year 2014 in the European Heart Journal--Cardiovascular Imaging: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Bernhard L; Edvardsen, Thor; Pierard, Luc A; Saraste, Antti; Knuuti, Juhani; Maurer, Gerald; Habib, Gilbert; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2015-11-01

    The European Heart Journal-Cardiovascular Imaging, created in 2012, has become a reference for publishing multimodality cardiovascular imaging scientific and review papers. The impressive 2014 impact factor of 4.105 confirms the important position of our journal. In this part, we summarize the most important studies from the journal's third year, with specific emphasis on cardiomyopathies, congenital heart diseases, valvular heart diseases, and heart failure. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging of hypoplastic left heart syndrome in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, Jonathan R.; Hernandez, Ramiro J.; Dorfman, Adam L.; Attili, Anil K.; Agarwal, Prachi P.; Mueller, Gisela C.; Bell, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) plays an important complementary role to echocardiography and conventional angiography in the evaluation of hypoplastic left heart syndrome. This imaging modality is particularly useful for assessing cardiovascular postsurgical changes, extracardiac vascular anatomy, ventricular and valvular function, and a variety of complications. The purpose of this article is to provide a contemporary review of the role of CMR in the management of untreated and surgically palliated hypoplastic left heart syndrome in children. (orig.)

  14. Prevalence of non-cardiovascular findings on CT angiography in children with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Archana [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); St. Christopher' s Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hellinger, Jeffrey C. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); New York Cardiovascular Institute at Lenox Hill Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Servaes, Sabah; Keller, Marc S. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Schwartz, Mathew C. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Levine Children' s Hospital, Sanger Heart and Vascular Institute, Charlotte, NC (United States); Epelman, Monica [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nemours Children' s Health System/Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging/Radiology, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2017-03-15

    CT angiography is gaining broader acceptance in the evaluation of children with known or suspected congenital heart disease. These studies include non-cardiovascular structures such as the mediastinum, lung parenchyma and upper abdominal organs. It is important to inspect all these structures for potential abnormalities that might be clinically important and, in some cases, may impact care plans. To determine the prevalence of non-cardiovascular findings in CT angiography of children with congenital heart disease. During 28 months, 300 consecutive children (170 males; mean age: 7.1 years, age range: 6 h-26 years), referred from a tertiary pediatric cardiology center, underwent clinically indicated CT angiography to evaluate known or suspected congenital heart disease. Slightly more than half (n = 169) of the patients were postoperative or post-intervention. Examinations were retrospectively reviewed, and non-cardiovascular findings were recorded and tabulated by organ system, congenital heart disease and operative procedure in conjunction with outcomes from medical charts. Non-cardiovascular findings were identified in 83% (n = 250 / 300) of the studies for a total of 857 findings. In 221 patients (n = 73.7% of 300) a total of 813 non-cardiovascular findings were clinically significant, while in 9.7% (n = 29 / 300) of patients, 5.1% (n = 44 / 857) of the findings were nonsignificant. In 38.3% (n = 115 / 300) of patients with significant non-cardiovascular pathology, the findings were unexpected and directly impacted patient care plans. Commonly involved organs with non-cardiovascular findings were the lungs with 280 non-cardiovascular findings in 176 / 300 (58.7%) of patients, the airway with 139 non-cardiovascular findings in 103 / 300 (34.3%) of patients and the liver with 108 non-cardiovascular findings in 72 / 300 (24.0%) of patients. Syndromic associations were noted in 22% (n = 66 / 300) of the patients. Non-cardiovascular findings are common in children with

  15. Prevalence of non-cardiovascular findings on CT angiography in children with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Archana; Hellinger, Jeffrey C.; Servaes, Sabah; Keller, Marc S.; Schwartz, Mathew C.; Epelman, Monica

    2017-01-01

    CT angiography is gaining broader acceptance in the evaluation of children with known or suspected congenital heart disease. These studies include non-cardiovascular structures such as the mediastinum, lung parenchyma and upper abdominal organs. It is important to inspect all these structures for potential abnormalities that might be clinically important and, in some cases, may impact care plans. To determine the prevalence of non-cardiovascular findings in CT angiography of children with congenital heart disease. During 28 months, 300 consecutive children (170 males; mean age: 7.1 years, age range: 6 h-26 years), referred from a tertiary pediatric cardiology center, underwent clinically indicated CT angiography to evaluate known or suspected congenital heart disease. Slightly more than half (n = 169) of the patients were postoperative or post-intervention. Examinations were retrospectively reviewed, and non-cardiovascular findings were recorded and tabulated by organ system, congenital heart disease and operative procedure in conjunction with outcomes from medical charts. Non-cardiovascular findings were identified in 83% (n = 250 / 300) of the studies for a total of 857 findings. In 221 patients (n = 73.7% of 300) a total of 813 non-cardiovascular findings were clinically significant, while in 9.7% (n = 29 / 300) of patients, 5.1% (n = 44 / 857) of the findings were nonsignificant. In 38.3% (n = 115 / 300) of patients with significant non-cardiovascular pathology, the findings were unexpected and directly impacted patient care plans. Commonly involved organs with non-cardiovascular findings were the lungs with 280 non-cardiovascular findings in 176 / 300 (58.7%) of patients, the airway with 139 non-cardiovascular findings in 103 / 300 (34.3%) of patients and the liver with 108 non-cardiovascular findings in 72 / 300 (24.0%) of patients. Syndromic associations were noted in 22% (n = 66 / 300) of the patients. Non-cardiovascular findings are common in children with

  16. Heart Rate and Initial Presentation of Cardiovascular Diseases (Caliber)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Coronary Heart Disease NOS; Unheralded Coronary Death; Intracerebral Haemorrhage; Heart Failure; Ischemic Stroke; Myocardial Infarction; Stroke; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Stable Angina Pectoris; Subarachnoid Haemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Unstable Angina; Cardiac Arrest, Sudden Cardiac Death

  17. Cardiovascular mechanisms of SSRI drugs and their benefits and risks in ischemic heart disease and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Kumar, Chethan B; Surya, Sandarsh

    2013-05-01

    Depression and heart disease are commonly comorbid. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly used to treat depression. In March 2011, we carried out a 15-year search of PubMed for preclinical and clinical publications related to SSRIs and ischemic heart disease (IHD) or congestive heart failure (CHF). We identify and discuss a number of mechanisms by which SSRIs may influence cardiovascular functioning and health outcomes in patients with heart disease; many of the mechanisms that we present have received little attention in previous reviews. We examine studies with positive, neutral, and negative outcomes in IHD and CHF patients treated with SSRIs. SSRIs influence cardiovascular functioning and health through several different mechanisms; for example, they inhibit serotonin-mediated and collagen-mediated platelet aggregation, reduce inflammatory mediator levels, and improve endothelial function. SSRIs improve indices of ventricular functioning in IHD and heart failure without adversely affecting electrocardiographic parameters. SSRIs may also be involved in favorable or unfavorable drug interactions with medications that influence cardiovascular functions. The clinical evidence suggests that, in general, SSRIs are safe in patients with IHD and may, in fact, exert a cardioprotective effect. The clinical data are less clear in patients with heart failure, and the evidence for benefits with SSRIs is weak.

  18. Cardiovascular Health in African Americans: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnethon, Mercedes R; Pu, Jia; Howard, George; Albert, Michelle A; Anderson, Cheryl A M; Bertoni, Alain G; Mujahid, Mahasin S; Palaniappan, Latha; Taylor, Herman A; Willis, Monte; Yancy, Clyde W

    2017-11-21

    Population-wide reductions in cardiovascular disease incidence and mortality have not been shared equally by African Americans. The burden of cardiovascular disease in the African American community remains high and is a primary cause of disparities in life expectancy between African Americans and whites. The objectives of the present scientific statement are to describe cardiovascular health in African Americans and to highlight unique considerations for disease prevention and management. The primary sources of information were identified with PubMed/Medline and online sources from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The higher prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors (eg, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, and atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk) underlies the relatively earlier age of onset of cardiovascular diseases among African Americans. Hypertension in particular is highly prevalent among African Americans and contributes directly to the notable disparities in stroke, heart failure, and peripheral artery disease among African Americans. Despite the availability of effective pharmacotherapies and indications for some tailored pharmacotherapies for African Americans (eg, heart failure medications), disease management is less effective among African Americans, yielding higher mortality. Explanations for these persistent disparities in cardiovascular disease are multifactorial and span from the individual level to the social environment. The strategies needed to promote equity in the cardiovascular health of African Americans require input from a broad set of stakeholders, including clinicians and researchers from across multiple disciplines. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Chemokines and Heart Disease: A Network Connecting Cardiovascular Biology to Immune and Autonomic Nervous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusi, Veronica; Ghidoni, Alice; Ravera, Alice; De Ferrari, Gaetano M.; Calvillo, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Among the chemokines discovered to date, nineteen are presently considered to be relevant in heart disease and are involved in all stages of cardiovascular response to injury. Chemokines are interesting as biomarkers to predict risk of cardiovascular events in apparently healthy people and as possible therapeutic targets. Moreover, they could have a role as mediators of crosstalk between immune and cardiovascular system, since they seem to act as a “working-network” in deep linkage with the autonomic nervous system. In this paper we will describe the single chemokines more involved in heart diseases; then we will present a comprehensive perspective of them as a complex network connecting the cardiovascular system to both the immune and the autonomic nervous systems. Finally, some recent evidences indicating chemokines as a possible new tool to predict cardiovascular risk will be described. PMID:27242392

  20. [Broader indication for treatment with statins; the 'heart protection study'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalenhoef, A.F.H.; Stuyt, P.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    The introduction of statins has been a breakthrough in the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia. Statins are safe and effective in reducing the risk of coronary heart disease in the general population. The 'Heart protection study' has provided evidence for the benefit of statin treatment in much

  1. [Omentin: Role in insulin resistance, inflammation and cardiovascular protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Díaz, Adrián; Arana-Martínez, Julio C; Carbó, Roxana; Espinosa-Cervantes, Román; Sánchez-Muñoz, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    The omentin is an adipokine, which role is due to the capacity of regulate metabolic (insulin sensitivity) and anti-inflammatory activities, thus conferring vascular protection during obesity and diabetes mellitus type 2. By this, it is important to know the mechanisms by which omentin confers cardiovascular protection, with the purpose of establish omentin a possible therapeutic target or molecule on this scenario. Copyright © 2015 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  2. Heme oxygenase-1 expression protects the heart from acute injury caused by inducible Cre recombinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Travis D; Bolisetty, Subhashini; DeAlmeida, Angela C; Litovsky, Silvio H; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F

    2013-08-01

    The protective effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cardiovascular disease has been previously demonstrated using transgenic animal models in which HO-1 is constitutively overexpressed in the heart. However, the temporal requirements for protection by HO-1 induction relative to injury have not been investigated, but are essential to employ HO-1 as a therapeutic strategy in human cardiovascular disease states. Therefore, we generated mice with cardiac-specific, tamoxifen (TAM)-inducible overexpression of a human HO-1 (hHO-1) transgene (myosin heavy chain (MHC)-HO-1 mice) by breeding mice with cardiac-specific expression of a TAM-inducible Cre recombinase (MHC-Cre mice), with mice containing an hHO-1 transgene preceded by a floxed-stop signal. MHC-HO-1 mice overexpress HO-1 mRNA and the enzymatically active protein following TAM administration (40 mg/kg body weight on 2 consecutive days). In MHC-Cre controls, TAM administration leads to severe, acute cardiac toxicity, cardiomyocyte necrosis, and 80% mortality by day 3. This cardiac toxicity is accompanied by a significant increase in inflammatory cells in the heart that are predominantly neutrophils. In MHC-HO-1 mice, HO-1 overexpression ameliorates the depression of cardiac function and high mortality rate observed in MHC-Cre mice following TAM administration and attenuates cardiomyocyte necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These results highlight that HO-1 induction is sufficient to prevent the depression of cardiac function observed in mice with TAM-inducible Cre recombinase expression by protecting the heart from necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These findings are important because MHC-Cre mice are widely used in cardiovascular research despite the limitations imposed by Cre-induced cardiac toxicity, and also because inflammation is an important pathological component of many human cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Heart rate control with adrenergic blockade: Clinical outcomes in cardiovascular medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Feldman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available David Feldman1, Terry S Elton2, Doron M Menachemi3, Randy K Wexler41Heart Failure/Transplant and VAD Programs, Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA; 2Division of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA; 3Heart Failure Services, Edith Wolfson Medical Center, The Heart Institute, Sakler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Holon, Israel; 4Department of Clinical Family Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USAAbstract: The sympathetic nervous system is involved in regulating various cardiovascular parameters including heart rate (HR and HR variability. Aberrant sympathetic nervous system expression may result in elevated HR or decreased HR variability, and both are independent risk factors for development of cardiovascular disease, including heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. Epidemiologic studies have established that impaired HR control is linked to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. One successful way of decreasing HR and cardiovascular mortality has been by utilizing β-blockers, because their ability to alter cell signaling at the receptor level has been shown to mitigate the pathogenic effects of sympathetic nervous system hyperactivation. Numerous clinical studies have demonstrated that β-blocker-mediated HR control improvements are associated with decreased mortality in postinfarct and heart failure patients. Although improved HR control benefits have yet to be established in hypertension, both traditional and vasodilating β-blockers exert positive HR control effects in this patient population. However, differences exist between traditional and vasodilating β-blockers; the latter reduce peripheral vascular resistance and exert neutral or positive effects on important metabolic parameters. Clinical evidence suggests that attainment of HR control is an important treatment objective for patients with cardiovascular

  4. Hydroxytyrosol and its complex forms (secoiridoids) modulate aorta and heart proteome in healthy rats: Potential cardio-protective effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Úrsula; Rubió, Laura; López de Las Hazas, Maria-Carmen; Herrero, Pol; Nadal, Pedro; Canela, Núria; Pedret, Anna; Motilva, Maria-José; Solà, Rosa

    2016-10-01

    Hydroxytyrosol (HT) is the major phenolic compound in virgin olive oil (VOO) in both free and complex forms (secoiridoids; SEC). Proteomics of cardiovascular tissues such as aorta or heart represents a promising tool to uncover the mechanisms of action of phenolic compounds in healthy animals. Twelve female Wistar rats were separated into three groups: a standard diet and two diets supplemented in phenolic compounds (HT and SEC) adjusted to 5 mg/kg/day during 21 days. Proteomic analyses of aorta and heart tissues were performed by nano-LC and MS. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was used to generate interaction networks. HT or SEC modulated aorta and heart proteome compared to the standard diet. The top-scored networks were related to Cardiovascular System. HT and SEC downregulated proteins related to proliferation and migration of endothelial cells and occlusion of blood vessels in aorta and proteins related to heart failure in heart tissue. SEC showed higher fold change values compared to HT, attributed to higher concentration of HT detected in heart tissue. Changes at proteomic level in cardiovascular tissues may partially account for the underlying mechanisms of VOO phenols cardiovascular protection being the SEC effects higher than free HT. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Fundamental Cardiovascular Research: Returns on Societal Investment: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joseph A; Ardehali, Reza; Clarke, Kimberli Taylor; Del Zoppo, Gregory J; Eckhardt, Lee L; Griendling, Kathy K; Libby, Peter; Roden, Dan M; Sadek, Hesham A; Seidman, Christine E; Vaughan, Douglas E

    2017-07-21

    Recent decades have witnessed robust successes in conquering the acutely lethal manifestations of heart and vascular diseases. Many patients who previously would have died now survive. Lifesaving successes like these provide a tremendous and easily recognized benefit to individuals and society. Although cardiovascular mortality has declined, the devastating impact of chronic heart disease and comorbidities on quality of life and healthcare resources continues unabated. Future strides, extending those made in recent decades, will require continued research into mechanisms underlying disease prevention, pathogenesis, progression, and therapeutic intervention. However, severe financial constraints currently jeopardize these efforts. To chart a path for the future, this report analyzes the challenges and opportunities we face in continuing the battle against cardiovascular disease and highlights the return on societal investment afforded by fundamental cardiovascular research. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Preexisting Cardiovascular Risk and Subsequent Heart Failure Among Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salz, Talya; Zabor, Emily C; de Nully Brown, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The use of anthracycline chemotherapy is associated with heart failure (HF) among survivors of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We aimed to understand the contribution of preexisting cardiovascular risk factors to HF risk among NHL survivors. Methods Using Danish registries, we identified adults...... diagnosis, 39% had ≥ 1 cardiovascular risk factor; 92% of survivors were treated with anthracycline-containing regimens. In multivariable analysis, intrinsic heart disease diagnosed before lymphoma was associated with increased risk of HF (HR, 2.71; 95% CI, 1.15 to 6.36), whereas preexisting vascular...

  7. Prognostic utility of novel biomarkers of cardiovascular stress: the Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Thomas J; Wollert, Kai C; Larson, Martin G; Coglianese, Erin; McCabe, Elizabeth L; Cheng, Susan; Ho, Jennifer E; Fradley, Michael G; Ghorbani, Anahita; Xanthakis, Vanessa; Kempf, Tibor; Benjamin, Emelia J; Levy, Daniel; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Januzzi, James L

    2012-09-25

    Biomarkers for predicting cardiovascular events in community-based populations have not consistently added information to standard risk factors. A limitation of many previously studied biomarkers is their lack of cardiovascular specificity. To determine the prognostic value of 3 novel biomarkers induced by cardiovascular stress, we measured soluble ST2, growth differentiation factor-15, and high-sensitivity troponin I in 3428 participants (mean age, 59 years; 53% women) in the Framingham Heart Study. We performed multivariable-adjusted proportional hazards models to assess the individual and combined ability of the biomarkers to predict adverse outcomes. We also constructed a "multimarker" score composed of the 3 biomarkers in addition to B-type natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. During a mean follow-up of 11.3 years, there were 488 deaths, 336 major cardiovascular events, 162 heart failure events, and 142 coronary events. In multivariable-adjusted models, the 3 new biomarkers were associated with each end point (Pstatistic (P=0.005 or lower) and net reclassification improvement (P=0.001 or lower). Multiple biomarkers of cardiovascular stress are detectable in ambulatory individuals and add prognostic value to standard risk factors for predicting death, overall cardiovascular events, and heart failure.

  8. Cardiovascular cast model fabrication and casting effectiveness evaluation in fetus with severe congenital heart disease or normal heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Hai-yan; Xie, Ming-xing; He, Lin; Han, Wei; Hong, Liu; Peng, Yuan; Hu, Yun-fei; Song, Ben-cai; Wang, Jing; Wang, Bin; Deng, Cheng

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the application and effectiveness of vascular corrosion technique in preparing fetal cardiovascular cast models, 10 normal fetal heart specimens with other congenital disease (control group) and 18 specimens with severe congenital heart disease (case group) from induced abortions were enrolled in this study from March 2013 to June 2015 in our hospital. Cast models were prepared by injecting casting material into vascular lumen to demonstrate real geometries of fetal cardiovascular system. Casting effectiveness was analyzed in terms of local anatomic structures and different anatomical levels (including overall level, atrioventricular and great vascular system, left-sided and right-sided heart), as well as different trimesters of pregnancy. In our study, all specimens were successfully casted. Casting effectiveness analysis of local anatomic structures showed a mean score from 1.90±1.45 to 3.60±0.52, without significant differences between case and control groups in most local anatomic structures except left ventricle, which had a higher score in control group (P=0.027). Inter-group comparison of casting effectiveness in different anatomical levels showed no significant differences between the two groups. Intra-group comparison also revealed undifferentiated casting effectiveness between atrioventricular and great vascular system, or left-sided and right-sided heart in corresponding group. Third-trimester group had a significantly higher perfusion score in great vascular system than second-trimester group (P=0.046), while the other anatomical levels displayed no such difference. Vascular corrosion technique can be successfully used in fabrication of fetal cardiovascular cast model. It is also a reliable method to demonstrate three-dimensional anatomy of severe congenital heart disease and normal heart in fetus.

  9. [Organ-protection therapy. A new therapeutic approach for acute heart failure?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivite, David; Formiga, Francesc; Corbella, Xavier

    2014-03-01

    Unlike the prolonged benefit produced by the treatment of chronic heart failure, newer drugs tested for the treatment of acute heart failure in the last decade have failed to provide evidence of clinical benefit beyond some improvement in symptom relief. In particular, no drug has shown the ability to reduce the higher medium- and long-term risk of morbidity and mortality in these patients after an episode of decompensation. Current understanding of the pathophysiology of acute heart failure and its consequences has led to the hypothesis that, beyond symptom control, effective therapies for this syndrome should target not only the hemodynamic changes of the initial phase of the syndrome but should also "protect" the organism from the activation of neurohumoral and inflammatory pathways triggered by the decompensation episode, which persist in time and confer a risk of deleterious effects in several organs and tissues. Serelaxin, a new drug related to the peptidic endogenous hormones of the relaxin family, has recently been shown to provide multiple beneficial effects in terms of "organ protection" - not only in the cardiovascular and renal systems - from these acute heart failure-related deleterious changes. This drug has already been tested in acute heart failure patients with encouraging results in terms of medium-term clinical benefit, rendering serelaxin as a serious candidate for first-line, prognosis-modifying therapy in this syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. A Multiscale Closed-Loop Cardiovascular Model, with Applications to Heart Pacing and Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, Daniel; Eldredge, Jeff; Chong, Kwitae; Benharash, Peyman; Dutson, Erik

    2017-11-01

    A computational tool is developed for simulating the dynamic response of the human cardiovascular system to various stressors and injuries. The tool couples zero-dimensional models of the heart, pulmonary vasculature, and peripheral vasculature to one-dimensional models of the major systemic arteries. To simulate autonomic response, this multiscale circulatory model is integrated with a feedback model of the baroreflex, allowing control of heart rate, cardiac contractility, and peripheral impedance. The performance of the tool is demonstrated in two scenarios: increasing heart rate by stimulating the sympathetic nervous system, and an acute 10 percent hemorrhage from the left femoral artery.

  11. Cardiovascular Risk and the American Dream: Life Course Observations From the BHS (Bogalusa Heart Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Benjamin D; Harville, Emily W; Mills, Katherine T; Tang, Wan; Chen, Wei; Bazzano, Lydia A

    2018-02-06

    Economic literature shows that a child's future earnings are predictably influenced by parental income, providing an index of "socioeconomic mobility," or the ability of a person to move towards a higher socioeconomic status from childhood to adulthood. We adapted this economic paradigm to examine cardiovascular risk mobility (CRM), or whether there is life course mobility in relative cardiovascular risk. Participants from the BHS (Bogalusa Heart Study) with 1 childhood and 1 adult visit from 1973 to 2016 (n=7624) were considered. We defined population-level CRM as the rank-rank slope (β) from the regression of adult cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk percentile ranking onto childhood CVD risk percentile ranking (β=0 represents complete mobility; β=1 represents no mobility). After defining and measuring relative CRM, we assessed its correlation with absolute cardiovascular health using the American Heart Association's Ideal Cardiovascular Health metrics. Overall, there was substantial mobility, with black participants having marginally better CRM than whites (β black =0.10 [95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.15]; β white =0.18 [95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.22]; P =0.01). Having high relative CVD risk at an earlier age significantly reduced CRM (β age×slope =-0.02; 95% confidence interval, -0.03 to -0.01; P American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  12. Predictors for major cardiovascular outcomes in stable ischaemic heart disease (PREMAC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Per; Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Hilden, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the predictors for major cardiovascular outcomes in stable ischaemic Heart disease (PREMAC) study is exploratory and hypothesis generating. We want to identify biochemical quantities which—conditionally on the values of available standard demographic, anamnestic, and biochemical data...

  13. Chocolate protects a heart and vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Chudzińska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A healthy diet plays a key role in the prevention and management of cardiovascular diseases. Atherosclerosis and its complications are nowadays one of the leading causes of death in the western population. Among numerous factors known for slowing down the progression of the disease is the consumption of vegetables, fruits and chocolate rich in multiring compounds called polyphenols. Chocolate is a source of catechins, epicatechins and procyanidins. Recently, several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of dark chocolate in management of hypertension  by hypotensive effect associated with vasorelaxation mediated most likely by the stimulation of nitric oxide production in the vascular wall. Cocoa and its derivatives have also strong antioxidative properties resulting in enhancement of the  total antioxidant potential and inhibition of lipid peroxidation. It was also demonstrated that cocoa polyphenols have a favourable antithrombotic effect connected with the inhibition of platelet activation. Chocolate may diminish insulin resistance and inhibit inflammatory process. Cocoa improves also psychical well being. This pleiotropic activity of cocoa results in slowing down the progression and limiting the complications of atherosclerosis in regular chocolate consumers.

  14. Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease and Heart Failure in Type 2 Diabetes – Mechanisms, Management, and Clinical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low Wang, Cecilia C.; Hess, Connie N.; Hiatt, William R.; Goldfine, Allison B.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the principal cause of death and disability among patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes exacerbates mechanisms underlying atherosclerosis and heart failure. Unfortunately, these mechanisms are not adequately modulated by therapeutic strategies focusing solely on optimal glycemic control with currently available drugs or approaches. In the setting of multi-factorial risk reduction with statins and other lipid lowering agents, anti-hypertensive therapies, and anti-hyperglycemic treatment strategies, cardiovascular complication rates are falling, yet remain higher for patients with diabetes than for those without. This review considers the mechanisms, history, controversies, new pharmacologic agents, and recent evidence for current guidelines for cardiovascular management in the patient with diabetes mellitus to support evidence-based care in the patient with diabetes and heart disease outside of the acute care setting. PMID:27297342

  15. Meditation and Cardiovascular Risk Reduction: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Glenn N; Lange, Richard A; Bairey-Merz, C Noel; Davidson, Richard J; Jamerson, Kenneth; Mehta, Puja K; Michos, Erin D; Norris, Keith; Ray, Indranill Basu; Saban, Karen L; Shah, Tina; Stein, Richard; Smith, Sidney C

    2017-09-28

    Despite numerous advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Novel and inexpensive interventions that can contribute to the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease are of interest. Numerous studies have reported on the benefits of meditation. Meditation instruction and practice is widely accessible and inexpensive and may thus be a potential attractive cost-effective adjunct to more traditional medical therapies. Accordingly, this American Heart Association scientific statement systematically reviewed the data on the potential benefits of meditation on cardiovascular risk. Neurophysiological and neuroanatomical studies demonstrate that meditation can have long-standing effects on the brain, which provide some biological plausibility for beneficial consequences on the physiological basal state and on cardiovascular risk. Studies of the effects of meditation on cardiovascular risk have included those investigating physiological response to stress, smoking cessation, blood pressure reduction, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome, endothelial function, inducible myocardial ischemia, and primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Overall, studies of meditation suggest a possible benefit on cardiovascular risk, although the overall quality and, in some cases, quantity of study data are modest. Given the low costs and low risks of this intervention, meditation may be considered as an adjunct to guideline-directed cardiovascular risk reduction by those interested in this lifestyle modification, with the understanding that the benefits of such intervention remain to be better established. Further research on meditation and cardiovascular risk is warranted. Such studies, to the degree possible, should utilize randomized study design, be adequately powered to meet the primary study outcome, strive to achieve low drop-out rates, include long

  16. Abnormal ankle brachial indices may predict cardiovascular disease among diabetic patients without known heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Jeffrey J; Hopkins, Christie B; Hall, Patrick Ax

    2005-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the primary cause of diabetes-associated morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have failed to provide accurate, inexpensive, screening techniques to detect cardiovascular disease in diabetics. Ankle brachial indices (ABI) testing may be an effective screening technique for diabetics. The aim of this 100-subject clinical study was to determine cardiovascular disease prevalence, via perfusion stress testing, in diabetic patients having abnormal ABI (<0.90) and without known heart disease who were referred to the South Carolina Heart Center, Columbia, SC for nuclear perfusion stress testing. Study data were analyzed using frequency and descriptive statistics and 2-sample T-testing. Mean subject age was 62+/-11 years, ABI 0.76+/-13, and ejection fraction 60+/-12%. Perfusion stress testing detected 49 abnormal electrocardiograms, 36 subjects with coronary ischemia, 20 with diminished left ventricular function, and 26 subjects having significant thinning of the myocardium. There were 71 subjects who tested positive for at least one form of cardiovascular disease. The sole predictive variable reaching significance for the presence of cardiovascular disease was an ABI score <0.90 (p< or =0.0001). Cardiovascular disease may be predicted among diabetic patients via ABI scores and confirmed by nuclear perfusion testing.

  17. 'THE UNVEILED HEART' a teaching program in cardiovascular nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itti, Roland; Merabet, Yasmina; Roca, Ramona; Bontemps, Laurence; Itti, Emmanuel

    2004-01-01

    The functional investigation of cardiac diseases using nuclear techniques involves several variables, such as myocardial perfusion, cellular viability or mechanical contraction. The combined, topographical and quantitative assessment of these variables can characterize the functional state of the heart in terms of normal myocardium, ischemia, hibernation or necrosis. The teaching program, 'The Unveiled Heart', has been designed in order to help nuclear physicians or cardiologists approaching these concepts and their implications for diagnosis of coronary artery disease, optimization of therapeutic strategies and prognosis evaluation. Anatomical correlations with coronary angiographic results obtained during balloon occlusion at the time of coronary angioplasty demonstrate the complementary role of imaging techniques and highlight the patient to patient variability of risk areas. A sectorial model derived from a polar projection of the myocardium presents for each sector the probability of involvement of a given coronary artery

  18. Automatic Heart Sound Analysis for Cardiovascular Disease Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Ciências e Tecnologias da Informação, apresentada ao Departamento de Engenharia Informática da Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade de Coimbra Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the most deadly diseases worldwide leaving behind diabetes and cancer. Being connected to ageing population above 65 years is prone to CVDs; hence a new trend of healthcare is emerging focusing on preventive health care in order to reduce the number of hospital visits and to en...

  19. The Relevance of Dietary Polyphenols in Cardiovascular Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Ana G; Fernandez, Maria L

    2017-01-01

    The chemical structure of polyphenols consisting of aromatic rings, capable of quenching free radicals, makes them ideal candidates to protect against oxidation. Polyphenols are present in a variety of foods including grapes, berries, dark chocolate, coffee and tea to mention a few. A number of studies have shown that dietary polyphenols exert a protective effect against hypertension, dyslipidemias, inflammation, endothelial function and atherosclerosis, conditions associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Studies indicate that by decreasing cholesterol absorption, polyphenols alter hepatic cholesterol homeostasis resulting in decreases in plasma lipids and reduction in atherogenic lipoproteins thus having a protective effect against atherosclerosis; polyphenols have also been shown to decrease the activity of enzymes involved in the renin-angiotensinaldosterone system and improve blood pressure. Further, they have been recognized to increase nitric oxide production and to improve endothelial function. In this review we will present some of the evidence derived from epidemiological studies, clinical interventions as well as animal and cell studies supporting the cardioprotective effects of dietary polyphenols. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Left Ventricular Wall Stress-Mass-Heart Rate Product and Cardiovascular Events in Treated Hypertensive Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devereux, Richard B; Bang, Casper N; Roman, Mary J

    2015-01-01

    -varying covariate in Cox models assessing predictors of the LIFE primary composite end point (cardiovascular death, MI, or stroke), its individual components, and all-cause mortality. At baseline, the triple product in both treatment groups was, compared with normal adults, elevated in 70% of patients. During...... more, greater heart rate reduction with atenolol resulted in larger reduction of the triple product. Lower triple product during antihypertensive treatment was strongly, independently associated with lower rates of the LIFE primary composite end point, cardiovascular death, and MI, but not stroke.......In the Losartan Intervention for End Point Reduction in Hypertension (LIFE) study, 4.8 years' losartan- versus atenolol-based antihypertensive treatment reduced left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiovascular end points, including cardiovascular death and stroke. However, there was no difference...

  1. Renal protection in cardiovascular surgery [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Di Tomasso

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is one of the most relevant complications after major surgery and is a predictor of mortality. In Western countries, patients at risk of developing AKI are mainly those undergoing cardiovascular surgical procedures. In this category of patients, AKI depends on a multifactorial etiology, including low ejection fraction, use of contrast media, hemodynamic instability, cardiopulmonary bypass, and bleeding. Despite a growing body of literature, the treatment of renal failure remains mainly supportive (e.g. hemodynamic stability, fluid management, and avoidance of further damage; therefore, the management of patients at risk of AKI should aim at prevention of renal damage. Thus, the present narrative review analyzes the pathophysiology underlying AKI (specifically in high-risk patients, the preoperative risk factors that predispose to renal damage, early biomarkers related to AKI, and the strategies employed for perioperative renal protection. The most recent scientific evidence has been considered, and whenever conflicting data were encountered possible suggestions are provided.

  2. Getting to the Heart of Cardiovascular Risk Assessment in Astronauts for Exploration Class Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgart, S. R.; Shavers, M. R.; Chappell, L.; Milder, C. M.; Huff, J. L.; Semones, E. J.; Simonsen, L. C.; Patel, Z. S.

    2017-01-01

    Since the beginning of manned spaceflight, NASA has recognized the potential risk of cardiovascular decrements due to stressors in the space environment. Of particular concern is the effect of space radiation on cardiovascular disease since astronauts will be exposed to higher levels of galactic cosmic rays outside the Earth's protective magnetosphere. To date, only a few studies have examined the effects of heavy ion radiation on cardiovascular disease, and at lower, space-relevant doses, the association between radiation exposure and cardiovascular pathology is more varied and unclear. Furthermore, other spaceflight conditions such as microgravity, circadian shifts, and confinement stress pose unique challenges in estimating the health risks that can be attributed to exposure to ionizing radiations. In this work, we review age, cause of mortality, and radiation exposure amongst early NASA astronauts in selection groups and discuss the limitations of assessing such a cohort when attempting to characterize the risk of space flight, including stressors such as space radiation and microgravity exposure, on cardiovascular health. METHODS: NASA astronauts in selection groups 1-7 were chosen and the comparison population was white men of the same birth cohort as drawn from data from the CDC Wonder Database and CDC National Center for Health Statistics Life Tables. Cause of death information was obtained from the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health program and deceased astronauts were classified based on ICD-10 codes: ischemic heart disease (IHD), stroke, cancer, acute occupational events, non-NASA accidents, and other/unknown. Expected years of life left and expected age at death were calculated for the cohort. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: There were 32 deaths in this early astronaut population, 12 of which were due to accidents or acute occupational events that impacted lifespan considerably. The average age at death from these causes is 30 years lower than the

  3. Reducing personal exposure to particulate air pollution improves cardiovascular health in patients with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langrish, Jeremy P; Li, Xi; Wang, Shengfeng; Lee, Matthew M Y; Barnes, Gareth D; Miller, Mark R; Cassee, Flemming R; Boon, Nicholas A; Donaldson, Ken; Li, Jing; Li, Liming; Mills, Nicholas L; Newby, David E; Jiang, Lixin

    2012-03-01

    Air pollution exposure increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and is a major global public health concern. We investigated the benefits of reducing personal exposure to urban air pollution in patients with coronary heart disease. In an open randomized crossover trial, 98 patients with coronary heart disease walked on a predefined route in central Beijing, China, under different conditions: once while using a highly efficient face mask, and once while not using the mask. Symptoms, exercise, personal air pollution exposure, blood pressure, heart rate, and 12-lead electrocardiography were monitored throughout the 24-hr study period. Ambient air pollutants were dominated by fine and ultrafine particulate matter (PM) that was present at high levels [74 μg/m³ for PM(2.5) (PM with aerodynamic diamater reduced maximal ST segment depression (-142 vs. -156 μV, p = 0.046) over the 24-hr period. When the face mask was used during the prescribed walk, mean arterial pressure was lower (93 ± 10 vs. 96 ± 10 mmHg, p = 0.025) and heart rate variability increased (high-frequency power: 54 vs. 40 msec², p = 0.005; high-frequency normalized power: 23.5 vs. 20.5 msec, p = 0.001; root mean square successive differences: 16.7 vs. 14.8 msec, p = 0.007). However, mask use did not appear to influence heart rate or energy expenditure. Reducing personal exposure to air pollution using a highly efficient face mask appeared to reduce symptoms and improve a range of cardiovascular health measures in patients with coronary heart disease. Such interventions to reduce personal exposure to PM air pollution have the potential to reduce the incidence of cardiovascular events in this highly susceptible population.

  4. Prognostic value of heart valve calcifications for cardiovascular events in a lung cancer screening population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemink, Martin J; Takx, Richard A P; Išgum, Ivana; de Koning, Harry J; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Mali, Willem P Th M; Budde, Ricardo P J; Leiner, Tim; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; de Jong, Pim A

    2015-08-01

    To assess the prognostic value of aortic valve and mitral valve/annulus calcifications for cardiovascular events in heavily smoking men without a history of cardiovascular disease. Heavily smoking men without a cardiovascular disease history who underwent non-contrast-enhanced low-radiation-dose chest CT for lung cancer screening were included. Non-imaging predictors (age, smoking status and pack-years) were collected and imaging-predictors (calcium volume of the coronary arteries, aorta, aortic valve and mitral valve/annulus) were obtained. The outcome was the occurrence of cardiovascular events. Multivariable Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to calculate hazard-ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Subsequently, concordance-statistics were calculated. In total 3111 individuals were included, of whom 186 (6.0%) developed a cardiovascular event during a follow-up of 2.9 (Q1-Q3, 2.7-3.3) years. If aortic (n = 657) or mitral (n = 85) annulus/valve calcifications were present, cardiovascular event incidence increased to 9.0% (n = 59) or 12.9% (n = 11), respectively. HRs of aortic and mitral valve/annulus calcium volume for cardiovascular events were 1.46 (95% CI, 1.09-1.84) and 2.74 (95% CI, 0.92-4.56) per 500 mm(3). The c-statistic of a basic model including age, pack-years, current smoking status, coronary and aorta calcium volume was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.63-0.72), which did not change after adding heart valve calcium volume. Aortic valve calcifications are predictors of future cardiovascular events. However, there was no added prognostic value beyond age, number of pack-years, current smoking status, coronary and aorta calcium volume for short term cardiovascular events.

  5. Non Hodgkin lymphoma metastasis to the heart detected by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Florange; Morales, Marisela; Pedreanez, Norma; Pabon, Luz; Carrillo, Milton

    2009-01-01

    Primary and secondary heart tumors are relatively rare occurrences but usually imply significant treatment decisions. The differential diagnosis among these tumors and other masses can sometimes be difficult and require the use of different imaging modalities to establish a confident verdict. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance CMR imaging is a very useful tool in these cases by allowing for the application of different strategies to better delineate masses, heart structures and adjacent tissues. In this case description, we present a woman with shortness of breath and a paracardiac mass showing how CMR can be applied. (author)

  6. Defining Quality in Cardiovascular Imaging: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Leslee J; Blankstein, Ron; Jacobs, Jill E; Leipsic, Jonathon A; Kwong, Raymond Y; Taqueti, Viviany R; Beanlands, Rob S B; Mieres, Jennifer H; Flamm, Scott D; Gerber, Thomas C; Spertus, John; Di Carli, Marcelo F

    2017-12-01

    The aims of the current statement are to refine the definition of quality in cardiovascular imaging and to propose novel methodological approaches to inform the demonstration of quality in imaging in future clinical trials and registries. We propose defining quality in cardiovascular imaging using an analytical framework put forth by the Institute of Medicine whereby quality was defined as testing being safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, equitable, and efficient. The implications of each of these components of quality health care are as essential for cardiovascular imaging as they are for other areas within health care. Our proposed statement may serve as the foundation for integrating these quality indicators into establishing designations of quality laboratory practices and developing standards for value-based payment reform for imaging services. We also include recommendations for future clinical research to fulfill quality aims within cardiovascular imaging, including clinical hypotheses of improving patient outcomes, the importance of health status as an end point, and deferred testing options. Future research should evolve to define novel methods optimized for the role of cardiovascular imaging for detecting disease and guiding treatment and to demonstrate the role of cardiovascular imaging in facilitating healthcare quality. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Canagliflozin and Heart Failure in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Results From the CANVAS Program (Canagliflozin Cardiovascular Assessment Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rådholm, Karin; Figtree, Gemma; Perkovic, Vlado; Solomon, Scott D; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; de Zeeuw, Dick; Fulcher, Greg; Barrett, Terrance D; Shaw, Wayne; Desai, Mehul; Matthews, David R; Neal, Bruce

    2018-03-11

    BACKGROUND : Canagliflozin is a sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor that reduces the risk of cardiovascular events. We report the effects on heart failure and cardiovascular death overall, in those with and without a baseline history of heart failure, and in other participant subgroups. METHODS : The CANVAS Program (Canagliflozin Cardiovascular Assessment Study) enrolled 10 142 participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high cardiovascular risk. Participants were randomly assigned to canagliflozin or placebo and followed for a mean of 188 weeks. The primary end point for these analyses was adjudicated cardiovascular death or hospitalized heart failure. RESULTS : Participants with a history of heart failure at baseline (14.4%) were more frequently women, white, and hypertensive and had a history of prior cardiovascular disease (all P failure was reduced in those treated with canagliflozin compared with placebo (16.3 versus 20.8 per 1000 patient-years; hazard ratio [HR], 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67-0.91), as was fatal or hospitalized heart failure (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.55-0.89) and hospitalized heart failure alone (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.52-0.87). The benefit on cardiovascular death or hospitalized heart failure may be greater in patients with a prior history of heart failure (HR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.46-0.80) compared with those without heart failure at baseline (HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.72-1.06; P interaction =0.021). The effects of canagliflozin compared with placebo on other cardiovascular outcomes and key safety outcomes were similar in participants with and without heart failure at baseline (all interaction P values >0.130), except for a possibly reduced absolute rate of events attributable to osmotic diuresis among those with a prior history of heart failure ( P =0.03). CONCLUSIONS : In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease, canagliflozin reduced the risk of cardiovascular death or hospitalized heart

  8. Muscle strength in youth and cardiovascular risk in young adulthood (the European Youth Heart Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Anders; Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Møller, Niels Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whether muscle strength in youth is related to cardiovascular risk later in life independent of cardiorespiratory fitness is unclear. METHODS: We examined the independent association of isometric muscle strength in youth with cardiovascular risk factors in young adulthood using data...... -1.03 to -0.20) in young adulthood in multivariable-adjusted analyses including fitness. Associations to triglyceride, diastolic BP and the cardiovascular risk factor score remained with additional adjustment for waist circumference or BMI. Each 1 SD difference in isometric muscle strength in youth...... from the Danish European Youth Heart Study; a population-based prospective cohort study among boys and girls (n=332) followed for up to 12 years. In youth maximal voluntary contractions during isometric back extension and abdominal flexion were determined using a strain-gauge dynamometer...

  9. Added Sugars and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Children: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Miriam B; Kaar, Jill L; Welsh, Jean A; Van Horn, Linda V; Feig, Daniel I; Anderson, Cheryl A M; Patel, Mahesh J; Cruz Munos, Jessica; Krebs, Nancy F; Xanthakos, Stavra A; Johnson, Rachel K

    2017-05-09

    Poor lifestyle behaviors are leading causes of preventable diseases globally. Added sugars contribute to a diet that is energy dense but nutrient poor and increase risk of developing obesity, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, obesity-related cancers, and dental caries. For this American Heart Association scientific statement, the writing group reviewed and graded the current scientific evidence for studies examining the cardiovascular health effects of added sugars on children. The available literature was subdivided into 5 broad subareas: effects on blood pressure, lipids, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and obesity. Associations between added sugars and increased cardiovascular disease risk factors among US children are present at levels far below current consumption levels. Strong evidence supports the association of added sugars with increased cardiovascular disease risk in children through increased energy intake, increased adiposity, and dyslipidemia. The committee found that it is reasonable to recommend that children consume ≤25 g (100 cal or ≈6 teaspoons) of added sugars per day and to avoid added sugars for children added sugars most likely can be safely consumed in low amounts as part of a healthy diet, few children achieve such levels, making this an important public health target. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Sulforaphane Protects against Cardiovascular Disease via Nrf2 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD causes an unparalleled proportion of the global burden of disease and will remain the main cause of mortality for the near future. Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathophysiology of cardiac disorders. Several studies have highlighted the cardinal role played by the overproduction of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species in the pathogenesis of ischemic myocardial damage and consequent cardiac dysfunction. Isothiocyanates (ITC are sulfur-containing compounds that are broadly distributed among cruciferous vegetables. Sulforaphane (SFN is an ITC shown to possess anticancer activities by both in vivo and epidemiological studies. Recent data have indicated that the beneficial effects of SFN in CVD are due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. SFN activates NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, a basic leucine zipper transcription factor that serves as a defense mechanism against oxidative stress and electrophilic toxicants by inducing more than a hundred cytoprotective proteins, including antioxidants and phase II detoxifying enzymes. This review will summarize the evidence from clinical studies and animal experiments relating to the potential mechanisms by which SFN modulates Nrf2 activation and protects against CVD.

  11. Characteristics, aetiological spectrum and management of valvular heart disease in a Tunisian cardiovascular centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triki, Faten; Jdidi, Jihen; Abid, Dorra; Tabbabi, Nada; Charfeddine, Selma; Ben Kahla, Sahar; Hentati, Mourad; Abid, Leila; Kammoun, Samir

    Valvular heart diseases occur frequently in Tunisia, but no precise statistics are available. To analyse the characteristics of patients with abnormal valvular structure and function, and to identify the aetiological spectrum, treatment and outcomes of valvular heart disease in a single cardiovascular centre in Tunisia. This retrospective study included patients with abnormal valvular structure and function, who were screened by transthoracic echocardiography at a single cardiology department between January 2010 and December 2013. Data on baseline characteristics, potential aetiology, treatment strategies and discharge outcomes were collected from medical records. There were 959 patients with a significant valvular heart disease (mean age 53±17years; female/male ratio 0.57). Valvular heart disease was native in 77% of patients. Mitral stenosis was the most frequent lesion (44.1%), followed by multiple valve disease (22.3%). Rheumatic origin (66.6%) was the most frequent aetiology, followed by degenerative (17.2%) or ischaemic (8.1%) causes, endocarditis (1.4%) and congenital (0.9%) causes. Native valve disease was severe in 589 patients (61.4%). Percutaneous mitral balloon valvuloplasty was performed in 36.9% of patients with mitral stenosis. Among patients with severe valvular heart disease, surgical treatment was indicated for 446 (75.7%) patients. Only 161 (36.1%) patients were finally operated. Postoperative mortality was 13.6% for all valvular heart diseases. This retrospective study has shown that the main cause of valvular heart disease in Tunisia is rheumatic fever. Mitral stenosis and multiple valve disease are the most frequent valvular heart diseases in Tunisia. Percutaneous mitral balloon valvuloplasty and prosthetic valve replacement are the preferred treatment methods for valvular heart disease. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of carcinoid heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandmann, H.; Pakkal, M. [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Steeds, R. [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)], E-mail: rick.steeds@uhb.nhs.uk

    2009-08-15

    Carcinoid disease arises from a low-grade neuroendocrine tumour derived from serotonin-producing enterochromaffin cells. It is the most common tumour affecting the small bowel. The majority of patients who progress to carcinoid syndrome develop cardiac disease selectively involving the right side of the heart, whereas left heart disease is unusual. The most common cause of death is dilatation and dysfunction of the right ventricle. Right ventricular dysfunction is largely secondary to pathological endocardial fibrosis of the tricuspid and pulmonary valves, presenting with regurgitation and stenosis. Average survival falls to only 11 months with the onset of symptoms, but recent evidence suggests that survival can be improved by early surgery in selected individuals. This article reviews the particular role that cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has in the management of carcinoid heart disease.

  13. Is there any difference between Vitamin D deficiency among heart failure and Non-heart failure elderly with cardiovascular disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Taraghi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is common among the elderly with and without heart failure (HF. This study was designed to identify the degree of vitamin D deficiency among HF and Non- HF elderly with cardiovascular disease. In this study, fifty hospitalized elderly patients with HF (26 women and 24 men, age range 60-90 years and fifty elderly without HF were randomly selected. The level of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D was measured using the Eliza method. There were no significantly difference between two groups regarding to the mean age, living location, life style parameters, mean years of disease involvement and disease severity, cardiovascular risk factors and co-morbidities, except for renal problems(P=0/039, hemoglobin levels(P=0/044, and creatinine levels (P=0/048. In both groups, the majority of patients, were moderately vitamin D deficient and there was no significantly difference between two groups. Considering the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among HF and Non-HF elderly with cardiovascular disease, its monitoring and correcting seems essential.

  14. The American Heart Association Ideal Cardiovascular Health and Incident Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Among Blacks: The Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effoe, Valery S; Carnethon, Mercedes R; Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B; Chen, Haiying; Joseph, Joshua J; Norwood, Arnita F; Bertoni, Alain G

    2017-06-21

    The concept of ideal cardiovascular health (CVH), defined by the American Heart Association primarily for coronary heart disease and stroke prevention, may apply to diabetes mellitus prevention among blacks. Our sample included 2668 adults in the Jackson Heart Study with complete baseline data on 6 of 7 American Heart Association CVH metrics (body mass index, healthy diet, smoking, total cholesterol, blood pressure, and physical activity). Incident diabetes mellitus was defined as fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dL, physician diagnosis, use of diabetes mellitus drugs, or glycosylated hemoglobin ≥6.5%. A summary CVH score from 0 to 6, based on presence/absence of ideal CVH metrics, was derived for each participant. Cox regression was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios. Mean age was 55 years (65% women) with 492 incident diabetes mellitus events over 7.6 years (24.6 cases/1000 person-years). Three quarters of participants had only 1 or 2 ideal CVH metrics; no participant had all 6. After adjustment for demographic factors (age, sex, education, and income) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, each additional ideal CVH metric was associated with a 17% diabetes mellitus risk reduction (hazard ratio, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.74-0.93). The association was attenuated with further adjustment for homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (hazard ratio, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.79-1.00). Compared with participants with 1 or no ideal CVH metric, diabetes mellitus risk was 15% and 37% lower in those with 2 and ≥3 ideal CVH metrics, respectively. The AHA concept of ideal CVH is applicable to diabetes mellitus prevention among blacks. These associations were largely explained by insulin resistance. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  15. Aldosterone Does Not Predict Cardiovascular Events Following Acute Coronary Syndrome in Patients Initially Without Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Reynaria; Gunzburger, Elise; Ballantyne, Christie M; Barter, Philip J; Kallend, David; Leiter, Lawrence A; Leitersdorf, Eran; Nicholls, Stephen J; Shah, Prediman K; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Olsson, Anders G; McMurray, John J V; Kittelson, John; Schwartz, Gregory G

    2017-01-10

    Aldosterone may have adverse effects in the myocardium and vasculature. Treatment with an aldosterone antagonist reduces cardiovascular risk in patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated by heart failure (HF) and left ventricular systolic dysfunction. However, most patients with acute coronary syndrome do not have advanced HF. Among such patients, it is unknown whether aldosterone predicts cardiovascular risk. To address this question, we examined data from the dal-OUTCOMES trial that compared the cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitor dalcetrapib with placebo, beginning 4 to 12 weeks after an index acute coronary syndrome. Patients with New York Heart Association class II (with LVEF coronary heart disease death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for unstable angina, or resuscitated cardiac arrest. Hospitalization for HF was a secondary endpoint. Over a median follow-up of 37 months, the primary outcome occurred in 366 patients (9.0%), and hospitalization for HF occurred in 72 patients (1.8%). There was no association between aldosterone and either the time to first occurrence of a primary outcome (hazard ratio for doubling of aldosterone 0.92, 95% confidence interval 0.78-1.09, P=0.34) or hospitalization for HF (hazard ratio 1.38, 95% CI 0.96-1.99, P=0.08) in Cox regression models adjusted for covariates. In patients with recent acute coronary syndrome but without advanced HF, aldosterone does not predict major cardiovascular events. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00658515. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  16. Comparison of QRS Duration and Associated Cardiovascular Events in American Indian Men Versus Women (The Strong Heart Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Jason F; Rhoades, Dorothy A; Noonan, Carolyn; Best, Lyle G; Okin, Peter M; Devereux, Richard B; Umans, Jason G

    2017-06-01

    Electrocardiographic QRS duration at rest is associated with sudden cardiac death and death from coronary heart disease in the general population. However, its relation to cardiovascular events in American Indians, a population with persistently high cardiovascular disease mortality, is unknown. The relation of QRS duration to incident cardiovascular disease during 17.2 years of follow-up was assessed in 1,851 male and female Strong Heart Study participants aged 45 to 74 years without known cardiovascular disease at baseline. Cox regression with robust standard error estimates was used to determine the association between quintiles of QRS duration and incident cardiovascular disease in gender-stratified analyses, adjusted for age, systolic blood pressure, hypertension, antihypertensive medication use, body mass index, current smoking, diabetes, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and albuminuria. In women only, QRS duration in the highest quintile (≥105 ms) conferred significantly higher risk of cardiovascular disease than QRS duration in the lowest quintile (64 to 84 ms) (hazard ratio 1.6, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.4) likely because of higher risks of coronary heart disease (hazard ratio 1.8, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.1) and myocardial infarction (hazard ratio 2.1, 95% CI 1.0 to 4.7). Furthermore, when added to the Strong Heart Study Coronary Heart Disease Risk Calculator, QRS duration significantly improved prediction of future coronary heart disease events in women (Net Reclassification Index 0.17, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.47). In conclusion, QRS duration is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease in women in the Strong Heart Study cohort and may have value in estimating risk in populations with similar risk profiles and a high lifetime incidence of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Adverse cardiovascular effects of drugs in patients with heart failure: Pharmaco-epidemioiogicai studies on ibopamine and NSAIDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Feenstra

    2000-01-01

    textabstractHeart failure is one of the most common cardiovascular disorders in westem countries. Because (congestive) heart failure is a chronic, incapacitating disease with a poor prognosis and a substantial public health impact, the attention paid to this disorder in research and both scientific

  18. Big heart data: advancing health informatics through data sharing in cardiovascular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suinesiaputra, Avan; Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Cowan, Brett R; Young, Alistair A

    2015-07-01

    The burden of heart disease is rapidly worsening due to the increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes. Data sharing and open database resources for heart health informatics are important for advancing our understanding of cardiovascular function, disease progression and therapeutics. Data sharing enables valuable information, often obtained at considerable expense and effort, to be reused beyond the specific objectives of the original study. Many government funding agencies and journal publishers are requiring data reuse, and are providing mechanisms for data curation and archival. Tools and infrastructure are available to archive anonymous data from a wide range of studies, from descriptive epidemiological data to gigabytes of imaging data. Meta-analyses can be performed to combine raw data from disparate studies to obtain unique comparisons or to enhance statistical power. Open benchmark datasets are invaluable for validating data analysis algorithms and objectively comparing results. This review provides a rationale for increased data sharing and surveys recent progress in the cardiovascular domain. We also highlight the potential of recent large cardiovascular epidemiological studies enabling collaborative efforts to facilitate data sharing, algorithms benchmarking, disease modeling and statistical atlases.

  19. HEART: an automated beat-to-beat cardiovascular analysis package using Matlab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, M J Mark J; Perreault, Bill; Ewert, D L Daniel L; Koenig, S C Steven C

    2004-07-01

    A computer program is described for beat-to-beat analysis of cardiovascular parameters from high-fidelity pressure and flow waveforms. The Hemodynamic Estimation and Analysis Research Tool (HEART) is a post-processing analysis software package developed in Matlab that enables scientists and clinicians to document, load, view, calibrate, and analyze experimental data that have been digitally saved in ascii or binary format. Analysis routines include traditional hemodynamic parameter estimates as well as more sophisticated analyses such as lumped arterial model parameter estimation and vascular impedance frequency spectra. Cardiovascular parameter values of all analyzed beats can be viewed and statistically analyzed. An attractive feature of the HEART program is the ability to analyze data with visual quality assurance throughout the process, thus establishing a framework toward which Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) compliance can be obtained. Additionally, the development of HEART on the Matlab platform provides users with the flexibility to adapt or create study specific analysis files according to their specific needs. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Small molecule screening platform for assessment of cardiovascular toxicity on adult zebrafish heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitambi Satish

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular toxicity is a major limiting factor in drug development and requires multiple cost-effective models to perform toxicological evaluation. Zebrafish is an excellent model for many developmental, toxicological and regenerative studies. Using approaches like morpholino knockdown and electrocardiogram, researchers have demonstrated physiological and functional similarities between zebrafish heart and human heart. The close resemblance of the genetic cascade governing heart development in zebrafish to that of humans has propelled the zebrafish system as a cost-effective model to conduct various genetic and pharmacological screens on developing embryos and larvae. The current report describes a methodology for rapid isolation of adult zebrafish heart, maintenance ex vivo, and a setup to perform quick small molecule throughput screening, including an in-house implemented analysis script. Results Adult zebrafish were anesthetized and after rapid decapitation the hearts were isolated. The short time required for isolation of hearts allows dissection of multiple fishes, thereby obtaining a large sample size. The simple protocol for ex vivo culture allowed maintaining the beating heart for several days. The in-house developed script and spectral analyses allowed the readouts to be presented either in time domain or in frequency domain. Taken together, the current report offers an efficient platform for performing cardiac drug testing and pharmacological screens. Conclusion The new methodology presents a fast, cost-effective, sensitive and reliable method for performing small molecule screening. The variety of readouts that can be obtained along with the in-house developed analyses script offers a powerful setup for performing cardiac toxicity evaluation by researchers from both academics and industry.

  1. Evaluation of HeartSmarts, a Faith-Based Cardiovascular Health Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tettey, Naa-Solo; Duran, Pedro A; Andersen, Holly S; Boutin-Foster, Carla

    2017-02-01

    In order to effectively address cardiovascular disease among African Americans, evidence-based health information must be disseminated within a context aligned with the values and beliefs of the population. Faith-based organizations play a critical role in meeting the religious and spiritual needs of many African Americans. Additionally, faith-based organizations can be effective in health promotion. A manual was created by incorporating biblical scriptures relating to health messages drawn from existing health manuals oriented toward African Americans. Lay health educators active in their churches participated in a 12-week training to learn the basics of cardiovascular disease and methods for delivering the program to their congregations' members. After the completion of the training, these lay health educators recruited participants from their respective churches and administered their own 12-week HeartSmarts program. Measurements of participants' systolic and diastolic blood pressure (mmHg), height (in.), weight (lbs.), and waist circumference (in.) were taken, and cardiovascular disease knowledge assessments (based on 20 open-ended questions) were administered at the start and end of the 12-week programs. Fourteen predominantly African American churches in NYC participated. Of the 221 participants, 199 completed the program. There were significant reductions in pretest and posttest total participant averages for systolic BP (4.48 mmHg, p health assessment scores had an average increase of 12.74 correct responses (p health messages and reducing cardiovascular risk among African Americans.

  2. Prostate brachytherapy seed migration to the heart seen on cardiovascular computed tomographic angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Sachdeva, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy consists of placing radioactive sources into or adjacent to tumors, to deliver conformal radiation treatment. The technique is used for treatment of primary malignancies and for salvage in recurrent disease. Permanent prostate brachytherapy seeds are small metal implants containing radioactive sources of I-125, Pd-103, or Cs-131 encased in a titanium shell. They can embolize through the venous system to the lungs or heart and subsequently be detected by cardiovascular computed tomography. Cardiovascular imagers should be aware of the appearance of migrated seeds, as their presence in the chest is generally benign, so that unnecessary worry and testing are avoided. We report a case of a patient who underwent brachytherapy for prostate cancer and developed a therapeutic seeds embolus to the right ventricle.

  3. Cardiovascular Health and Incident Hypertension in Blacks: JHS (The Jackson Heart Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, John N; Abdalla, Marwah; Tanner, Rikki M; Diaz, Keith M; Bromfield, Samantha G; Tajeu, Gabriel S; Correa, Adolfo; Sims, Mario; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Bress, Adam P; Spruill, Tanya M; Shimbo, Daichi; Muntner, Paul

    2017-08-01

    Several modifiable health behaviors and health factors that comprise the Life's Simple 7-a cardiovascular health metric-have been associated with hypertension risk. We determined the association between cardiovascular health and incident hypertension in JHS (the Jackson Heart Study)-a cohort of blacks. We analyzed participants without hypertension or cardiovascular disease at baseline (2000-2004) who attended ≥1 follow-up visit in 2005 to 2008 or 2009 to 2012 (n=1878). Body mass index, physical activity, diet, cigarette smoking, blood pressure (BP), total cholesterol, and fasting glucose were assessed at baseline and categorized as ideal, intermediate, or poor using the American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7 definitions. Incident hypertension was defined at the first visit wherein a participant had systolic BP ≥140 mm Hg, diastolic BP ≥90 mm Hg, or self-reported taking antihypertensive medication. The percentage of participants with ≤1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 ideal Life's Simple 7 components was 6.5%, 22.4%, 34.4%, 25.2%, 10.0%, and 1.4%, respectively. No participants had 7 ideal components. During follow-up (median, 8.0 years), 944 (50.3%) participants developed hypertension, including 81.3% with ≤1 and 11.1% with 6 ideal components. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for incident hypertension comparing participants with 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 versus ≤1 ideal component were 0.80 (0.61-1.03), 0.58 (0.45-0.74), 0.30 (0.23-0.40), 0.26 (0.18-0.37), and 0.10 (0.03-0.31), respectively ( P trend hypertension risk. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Maximal heart rate does not limit cardiovascular capacity in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, G D W; Svendsen, J H; Damsgaard, R

    2014-01-01

    In humans, maximal aerobic power (VO2 max ) is associated with a plateau in cardiac output (Q), but the mechanisms regulating the interplay between maximal heart rate (HRmax) and stroke volume (SV) are unclear. To evaluate the effect of tachycardia and elevations in HRmax on cardiovascular function...... and capacity during maximal exercise in healthy humans, 12 young male cyclists performed incremental cycling and one-legged knee-extensor exercise (KEE) to exhaustion with and without right atrial pacing to increase HR. During control cycling, Q and leg blood flow increased up to 85% of maximal workload (WLmax...... and RAP (P healthy...

  5. Protective Effects of Flavonoid Pomiferin on Heart Ischemia-Reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Nečas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present 15-day study was to evaluate the cardioprotective potential of flavonoid pomiferin isolated from the infructences of Maclura pomifera, Moraceae, against ischemia-reperfusion induced injury in rat hearts as a model of antioxidant-based composite therapy. Studies were performed with isolated, modifi ed Langendorff-perfused rat hearts and ischemia of heart was initiated by stopping the coronary flow for 30 min, followed by 60 min of reperfusion (14 ml min-1. Wistar rats were divided into three groups. The treated group received pomiferin (5 mg/kg/day in 0.5% Avicel; the placebo group received only 0.5% Avicel; the intact group was left without any applications. Biochemical indicators of oxidative damage, lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde, antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, total antioxidant activity in serum and myocardium has been evaluated. We also examined the effect of pomiferin on cardiac function (left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, left ventricular pressure, peak positive +dP/dt (rate of pressure development after ischemia and reperfusion. Our results demonstrate that pomiferin attenuates the myocardial dysfunction provoked by ischemiareperfusion. This was confirmed by the increase in both the antioxidant enzyme values and the total antioxidant activity. The cardio-protection provided by pomiferin treatment results from the suppression of oxidative stress and correlates with the improved ventricular function.

  6. Cardiovascular Activity of Labdane Diterpenes from Andrographis paniculata in Isolated Rat Hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalijah Awang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dichloromethane (DCM extract of Andrographis paniculata Nees was tested for cardiovascular activity. The extract significantly reduced coronary perfusion pressure by up to 24.5±3.0 mm Hg at a 3 mg dose and also reduced heart rate by up to 49.5±11.4 beats/minute at this dose. Five labdane diterpenes, 14-deoxy-12-hydroxyandrographolide (1, 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide (2, 14-deoxyandrographolide (3, andrographolide (4, and neoandrographolide (5, were isolated from the aerial parts of this medicinal plant. Bioassay-guided studies using animal model showed that compounds, (2 and (3 were responsible for the coronary vasodilatation. This study also showed that andrographolide (4, the major labdane diterpene in this plant, has minimal effects on the heart.

  7. Cardiovascular Activity of Labdane Diterpenes from Andrographis paniculata in Isolated Rat Hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awang, Khalijah; Abdullah, Nor Hayati; Hadi, A. Hamid A.; Su Fong, Yew

    2012-01-01

    The dichloromethane (DCM) extract of Andrographis paniculata Nees was tested for cardiovascular activity. The extract significantly reduced coronary perfusion pressure by up to 24.5 ± 3.0 mm Hg at a 3 mg dose and also reduced heart rate by up to 49.5 ± 11.4 beats/minute at this dose. Five labdane diterpenes, 14-deoxy-12-hydroxyandrographolide (1), 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide (2), 14-deoxyandrographolide (3), andrographolide (4), and neoandrographolide (5), were isolated from the aerial parts of this medicinal plant. Bioassay-guided studies using animal model showed that compounds, (2) and (3) were responsible for the coronary vasodilatation. This study also showed that andrographolide (4), the major labdane diterpene in this plant, has minimal effects on the heart. PMID:22536026

  8. Cardiovascular Diseases in HIV-infected Subjects (HIV-HEART Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    Detection of Frequency, Severity and Progression of Cardiovascular Diseases in Patients With HIV-infection.; Effect on Cardiovascular Risk and Life Quality by Age, Gender, Classic Cardiovascular Risk Factors,; HIV-specific Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Cardiovascular Medication, Antiretroviral Medication

  9. The HEART score is useful to predict cardiovascular risks and reduces unnecessary cardiac imaging in low-risk patients with acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Siping; Huang, Bo; Zou, Yunliang; Guo, Jianbin; Liu, Ziyong; Pi, Dangyu; Qiu, Yunhong; Xiao, Chun

    2018-06-01

    The present study was to investigate whether the HEART score can be used to evaluate cardiovascular risks and reduce unnecessary cardiac imaging in China.Acute coronary syndrome patients with the thrombosis in myocardial infarction risk score risk HEART score group and 2 patients (1.5%) in the high risk HEART score group had cardiovascular events. The sensitivity of HEART score to predict cardiovascular events was 100% and the specificity was 46.7%. The potential unnecessary cardiac testing was 46.3%. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that per one category increase of the HEART score was associated with nearly 1.3-fold risk of cardiovascular events.In the low-risk acute chest pain patients, the HEART score is useful to physicians in evaluating the risk of cardiovascular events within the first 30 days. In addition, the HEART score is also useful in reducing the unnecessary cardiac imaging.

  10. Trends and disparities in coronary heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases in the United States: findings of the national conference on cardiovascular disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R; Cutler, J; Desvigne-Nickens, P; Fortmann, S P; Friedman, L; Havlik, R; Hogelin, G; Marler, J; McGovern, P; Morosco, G; Mosca, L; Pearson, T; Stamler, J; Stryer, D; Thom, T

    2000-12-19

    A workshop was held September 27 through 29, 1999, to address issues relating to national trends in mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular diseases; the apparent slowing of declines in mortality from cardiovascular diseases; levels and trends in risk factors for cardiovascular diseases; disparities in cardiovascular diseases by race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and geography; trends in cardiovascular disease preventive and treatment services; and strategies for efforts to reduce cardiovascular diseases overall and to reduce disparities among subpopulations. The conference concluded that coronary heart disease mortality is still declining in the United States as a whole, although perhaps at a slower rate than in the 1980s; that stroke mortality rates have declined little, if at all, since 1990; and that there are striking differences in cardiovascular death rates by race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and geography. Trends in risk factors are consistent with a slowing of the decline in mortality; there has been little recent progress in risk factors such as smoking, physical inactivity, and hypertension control. There are increasing levels of obesity and type 2 diabetes, with major differences among subpopulations. There is considerable activity in population-wide prevention, primary prevention for higher risk people, and secondary prevention, but wide disparities exist among groups on the basis of socioeconomic status and geography, pointing to major gaps in efforts to use available, proven approaches to control cardiovascular diseases. Recommendations for strategies to attain the year 2010 health objectives were made.

  11. Angiotensin Receptor Blockers: Cardiovascular Protection in the Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash C Deedwania

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well recognised that the metabolic syndrome, a constellation of risk factors including obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia, is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular complications and the development of Type 2 diabetes. Consequently, timely identification and management of all components of the metabolic syndrome is warranted. In particular, guidelines have emphasised the importance of targeting elevated blood pressure (BP and dyslipidaemia as a method of reducing global cardiovascular risk.Findings from the Valsartan Antihypertensive Long-term Use Evaluation (VALUE trial show that the angiotensin receptor blocker, valsartan, reduces cardiovascular events and the development of Type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. This profile is being further explored in the ongoing Nateglinide And Valsartan in Impaired Glucose Tolerance Outcomes Research (NAVIGATOR trial.Given the potential advantages to patients and physicians of tackling more than one of the components of the metabolic syndrome, antihypertensive agents such as valsartan would appear to be an important addition to the management of vulnerable patients at high risk of cardiovascular events.

  12. Notch1 Mediates Preconditioning Protection Induced by GPER in Normotensive and Hypertensive Female Rat Hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmine Rocca

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER is an estrogen receptor expressed in the cardiovascular system. G1, a selective GPER ligand, exerts cardiovascular effects through activation of the PI3K-Akt pathway and Notch signaling in normotensive animals. Here, we investigated whether the G1/GPER interaction is involved in the limitation of infarct size, and improvement of post-ischemic contractile function in female spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR hearts. In this model, we also studied Notch signaling and key components of survival pathway, namely PI3K-Akt, nitric oxide synthase (NOS and mitochondrial K+-ATP (MitoKATP channels. Rat hearts isolated from female SHR underwent 30 min of global, normothermic ischemia and 120 min of reperfusion. G1 (10 nM alone or specific inhibitors of GPER, PI3K/NOS and MitoKATP channels co-infused with G1, just before I/R, were studied. The involvement of Notch1 was studied by Western blotting. Infarct size and left ventricular pressure were measured. To confirm endothelial-independent G1-induced protection by Notch signaling, H9c2 cells were studied with specific inhibitor, N-[N-(3,5 difluorophenacetyl-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT, 5 μM, of this signaling. Using DAPT, we confirmed the involvement of G1/Notch signaling in limiting infarct size in heart of normotensive animals. In the hypertensive model, G1-induced reduction in infarct size and improvement of cardiac function were prevented by the inhibition of GPER, PI3K/NOS, and MitoKATP channels. The involvement of Notch was confirmed by western blot in the hypertensive model and by the specific inhibitor in the normotensive model and cardiac cell line. Our results suggest that GPERs play a pivotal role in mediating preconditioning cardioprotection in normotensive and hypertensive conditions. The G1-induced protection involves Notch1 and is able to activate the survival pathway in the presence of comorbidity. Several pathological conditions

  13. Stress-associated cardiovascular reaction masks heart rate dependence on physical load in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev-Andrievskiy, A A; Popova, A S; Borovik, A S; Dolgov, O N; Tsvirkun, D V; Custaud, M; Vinogradova, O L

    2014-06-10

    When tested on the treadmill mice do not display a graded increase of heart rate (HR), but rather a sharp shift of cardiovascular indices to high levels at the onset of locomotion. We hypothesized that under test conditions cardiovascular reaction to physical load in mice is masked with stress-associated HR increase. To test this hypothesis we monitored mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate in C57BL/6 mice after exposure to stressful stimuli, during spontaneous locomotion in the open-field test, treadmill running or running in a wheel installed in the home cage. Mice were treated with β1-adrenoblocker atenolol (2mg/kg ip, A), cholinolytic ipratropium bromide (2mg/kg ip, I), combination of blockers (A+I), anxiolytic diazepam (5mg/kg ip, D) or saline (control trials, SAL). MAP and HR in mice increased sharply after handling, despite 3weeks of habituation to the procedure. Under stressful conditions of open field test cardiovascular parameters in mice were elevated and did not depend on movement speed. HR values did not differ in I and SAL groups and were reduced with A or A+I. HR was lower at rest in D pretreated mice. In the treadmill test HR increase over speeds of 6, 12 and 18m/min was roughly 1/7-1/10 of HR increase observed after placing the mice on the treadmill. HR could not be increased with cholinolytic (I), but was reduced after sympatholytic (A) or A+I treatment. Anxiolytic (D) reduced heart rate at lower speeds of movement and its overall effect was to unmask the dependency of HR on running speed. During voluntary running in non-stressful conditions of the home cage HR in mice linearly increased with increasing running speeds. We conclude that in test situations cardiovascular reactions in mice are governed predominantly by stress-associated sympathetic activation, rendering efforts to evaluate HR and MAP reactions to workload unreliable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. School burnout and heart rate variability: risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension in young adult females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Ross W; Seibert, Gregory S; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Marcos A; Fincham, Frank D

    2018-05-01

    Emerging research documents the relationship between school burnout and some indicators of increased cardiovascular risk. Indicators of cardiovascular functioning assessed via ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate variability (HRV) have not been thoroughly explored in this research domain. Therefore, the current study examined relationships between school burnout and indicators of cardiac functioning via 24 h ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and electrocardiogram monitoring in a sample of young adult female undergraduates (N = 88). Two hypotheses were tested: (1) that independent of related negative affective symptomology (depression and anxiety), increased school burnout would be related to greater systolic and diastolic BP, higher low frequency (LF) HRV and lower very low frequency (VLF) HRV, and (2) that lower VLF would be related to greater school burnout independently of LF HRV. Hierarchical multiple regression analyzes showed that school burnout was significantly related to elevated ambulatory BP (systolic and diastolic) and HRV markers of increased cardiac sympathovagal tone. These findings support the hypotheses and suggest that school burnout might be implicated in the development of pre-hypertension or early cardiovascular disease. Study limitations and the need for future longitudinal research are discussed.

  15. The women's heart health programme: a pilot trial of sex-specific cardiovascular management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Ting Ting; Chan, Siew Pang; Wai, Shin Hnin; Ang, Zhou; Kyu, Kyu; Lee, Kim Yee; Ching, Anne; Comer, Sarah; Tan, Naomi Qiu Pin; Thong, Elizabeth Grace Hui En; Nang, Tracy; Dutta, Mohan; Lam, Carolyn S P

    2018-04-16

    There is increasing knowledge of sex-specific differences in cardiovascular disease and recognition of sex disparities in management. In our study, we investigated whether a cardiovascular programme tailored to the specific needs of women could lead to improved outcomes. We randomised 100 female patients to receive cardiology follow-up with the conventional sex-neutral cardiac programme (control), or the sex-tailored Women's Heart Health Programme (intervention). The intervention group was managed by an all-women multidisciplinary team and received culture-centred health intervention workshops, designed through in-depth interviews with the participants. The primary outcome was cardiovascular risk factor improvement at 1 year. Secondary outcomes include cardiovascular event rates, quality of life scores, and self-reported improvement in knowledge, attitudes, intentions and practices. Generalised structural equation model analysis was used to determine if the intervention group had better outcomes at alpha level 0.1. The mean age was 67.3 ± 12.7 years, with an ethnic distribution of 70% Chinese, 18% Malays, and 12% Indians. The majority of these patients had no formal or primary level of education (63%), and were mostly unemployed (78%). Patients in intervention group had better control of diabetes mellitus (lower HbA1c of 0.63% [CI 0.21-1.04], p = 0.015) and lower body-mass-index (0.74 kg/m 2 [CI 0.02-1.46], p = 0.092) at 1 year, but there was no significant difference in blood pressure or lipid control. Overall, there was a trend towards better risk factor control, 31.6% of intervention group versus 26.5% of control group achieved improvement in at least 1 CV risk factor control to target range. There was no significant difference in incidence of cardiovascular events, quality of life, or domains in knowledge, attitudes, intention and practices. This pilot study is the first of its kind evaluating a new model of care for women with heart disease

  16. Profile of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease, Normal and Impaired Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    І.V. Cherniavska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of research was to conduct the comparative analysis of the profile of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD and normal either impaired carbohydrate metabolism. Materials and methods. One hundred and forty two patients were observed. In order to estimate the rate of different forms of CHD depending on the state of carbohydrate metabolism such groups were formed: the first group consisted of 83 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM, the second group involved 34 patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT, the third group consisted of 25 patients with normal carbohydrate metabolism. The ischemic changes of myocardium were detected by ambulatory ECG monitoring with the obligatory achievement of submaximal heart rate during the research. Results. Silent myocardial ischemia was educed in 19 (22.9 % patients with type 2 DM, in 3 (8.8 % persons with IGT and in 2 (8.0 % patients with normal carbohydrate metabolism. Smoking, burdened heredity, violation in the haemostatic system more often occurred in the group of patients with type 2 DM and silent myocardial ischemia in comparison with the patients with type 2 DM without CHD. The profile of general population cardiovascular risk factors in patients with CHD and type 2 DM belongs to the most unfavorable. At the same time for patients with early violations of carbohydrate metabolism and normal carbohydrate metabolism such profile statistically does not differentiate meaningfully. Conclusions. Patients with type 2 DM and silent myocardial ischemia as compared to patients with type 2 DM without CHD have more expressed violations of indexes of general population cardiovascular risk factors for certain.

  17. Alopecia and its association with coronary heart disease and cardiovascular risk factors: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieu, Nelson; Eslick, Guy D

    2014-10-20

    Alopecia has been associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease as well as the following risk factors for cardiovascular disease: hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension. We performed a meta-analysis to quantitatively determine the level of risk of coronary heart disease and risk factors in individuals with alopecia. A systematic literature search was conducted using several databases. We calculated pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals using a random effects model. In total, 31 studies comprising 29,254 participants with alopecia were eligible for the meta-analysis and showed that alopecia is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (OR 1.22, 95% CI: 1.07-1.39), hyperinsulinaemia (OR 1.97, 95% CI: 1.20-3.21), insulin resistance (OR 4.88, 95% CI: 2.05-11.64), and metabolic syndrome (OR 4.49, 95% CI: 2.36-8.53). Individuals with alopecia were also shown to be more likely compared to those without alopecia to have higher serum cholesterol levels (OR 1.60, 95% CI: 1.17-2.21), higher serum triglyceride levels (OR 2.07, 95% CI: 1.32-3.25), higher systolic blood pressures (OR 1.73, 95% CI: 1.29-2.33), and higher diastolic blood pressures (OR 1.59, 95% CI: 1.16-2.18). Alopecia is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, and there appears to be a dose-response relationship with degree of baldness whereby the greater the severity of alopecia, the greater the risk of coronary heart disease. Alopecia is also associated with an increased risk of hypertension, hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and having elevated serum total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Validity of coronary heart diseases and heart failure based on hospital discharge and mortality data in the Netherlands using the cardiovascular registry Maastricht cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merry, A.H.; Boer, J.M.; Schouten, L.J.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Verschuren, W.M.; Gorgels, A.P.; Brandt, van den P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Incidence rates of cardiovascular diseases are often estimated by linkage to hospital discharge and mortality registries. The validity depends on the quality of the registries and the linkage. Therefore, we validated incidence rates of coronary heart disease (CHD), acute myocardial infarction,

  19. Million Hearts 2022: Understanding the Links between Environmental Pollutant Exposure and Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Events - Justus-Warren Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    The webinar was requested by the Justus-Warren Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Task Force. From their website, “The task force was established in 1995 in North Carolina to provide statewide leadership for the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. Meetings are...

  20. Modificación de conocimientos en cardiópatas sobre rehabilitación cardiovascular Modification to knowledge of cardiovascular rehabilitation in heart disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arelis Guerra Santana

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Se desarrolló una intervención educativa para modificar conocimientos sobre rehabilitación cardiovascular, dada la alta prevalencia de pacientes con enfermedades del corazón: angina de pecho, infarto del miocardio agudo y cardiopatía hipertensiva. El estudio se efectuó en el Policlínico de Especialidades "Saturnino Lora" de Santiago de Cuba desde enero hasta junio de 2010 e incluyó a 20 trabajadores con alguna de las mencionadas cardiopatías. A los efectos se evaluaron las siguientes variables: concepto de rehabilitación cardiovascular, factores de riesgo, afecciones cardiovasculares más frecuentes, influencia del ejercicio físico y tratamiento. La estrategia didáctica aplicada logró modificar positivamente los conocimientos sobre el tema, lo cual fue comprobado 8 semanas después de realizado ese tipo de capacitación sobre una materia de salud tan importante.An educational intervention was performed to modify the knowledge of cardiovascular rehabilitation because of high prevalence of patients with heart diseases: angina pectoris, acute myocardial infarction and hypertensive heart disease. The study was carried out at "Saturnino Lora" Polyclinic of Specialties in Santiago de Cuba from January to June 2010 and included 20 workers with some of the above heart diseases. With this purpose the following variables were evaluated: concept of cardiovascular rehabilitation, risk factors, more frequent cardiovascular diseases, and influence of the physical exercise and treatment. The teaching strategy was able to positively modify the knowledge of the topic, which was checked 8 weeks after having completed this training on a very important health subject.

  1. The protective role of low-concentration alcohol in high-fructose induced adverse cardiovascular events in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoqi; Pan, Bo; Wang, Ying; Liu, Lingjuan; Huang, Xupei; Tian, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a worldwide public health issue. As fructose consumption is dramatically increasing, it has been demonstrated that a fructose-rich intake would increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. In addition, emerging evidences suggest that low concentration alcohol intake may exert a protective effect on cardiovascular system. This study aimed to investigate whether low-concentration alcohol consumption would prevent the adverse effects on cardiovascular events induced by high fructose in mice. From the results of hematoxylin-eosin staining, echocardiography, heart weight/body weight ratio and the expression of hypertrophic marker ANP, we found high-fructose result in myocardial hypertrophy and the low-concentration alcohol consumption would prevent the cardiomyocyte hypertrophy from happening. In addition, we observed low-concentration alcohol consumption could inhibit mitochondria swollen induced by high-fructose. The elevated levels of glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol in high-fructose group were reduced by low concentration alcohol. Low expression levels of SIRT1 and PPAR-γ induced by high-fructose were significantly elevated when fed with low-concentration alcohol. The histone lysine 9 acetylation (acH3K9) level was decreased in PPAR-γ promoter in high-fructose group but elevated when intake with low concentration alcohol. The binding levels of histone deacetylase SIRT1 were increased in the same region in high-fructose group, while the low concentration alcohol can prevent the increased binding levels. Overall, our study indicates that low-concentration alcohol consumption could inhibit high-fructose related myocardial hypertrophy, cardiac mitochondria damaged and disorders of glucose-lipid metabolism. Furthermore, these findings also provide new insights into histone acetylation-deacetylation mechanisms of low-concentration alcohol treatment that may contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease induced by high

  2. Bad marriage, broken heart? Age and gender differences in the link between marital quality and cardiovascular risks among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Waite, Linda

    2014-12-01

    Working from a life course perspective, we develop hypotheses about age and gender differences in the link between marital quality and cardiovascular risk and test them using data from the first two waves of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. The analytic sample includes 459 married women and 739 married men (aged 57-85 in the first wave) who were interviewed in both waves. We apply Heckman-type corrections for selection bias due to mortality and marriage. Cardiovascular risk is measured as hypertension, rapid heart rate, C-reactive protein, and general cardiovascular events. Results suggest that changes in marital quality and cardiovascular risk are more closely related for older married people than for their younger counterparts and that the link between marital quality and cardiovascular risk is more pronounced among women than among men at older ages. These findings fit with the gendered life course perspective and cumulative disadvantage framework. © American Sociological Association 2014.

  3. The systolic blood pressure difference between arms and cardiovascular disease in the Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Ido; Gona, Philimon; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Jaff, Michael R; Murabito, Joanne M

    2014-03-01

    An increased interarm systolic blood pressure difference is an easily determined physical examination finding. The relationship between interarm systolic blood pressure difference and risk of future cardiovascular disease is uncertain. We described the prevalence and risk factor correlates of interarm systolic blood pressure difference in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) original and offspring cohorts and examined the association between interarm systolic blood pressure difference and incident cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. An increased interarm systolic blood pressure difference was defined as ≥ 10 mm Hg using the average of initial and repeat blood pressure measurements obtained in both arms. Participants were followed through 2010 for incident cardiovascular disease events. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were performed to investigate the effect of interarm systolic blood pressure difference on incident cardiovascular disease. We examined 3390 (56.3% female) participants aged 40 years and older, free of cardiovascular disease at baseline, mean age of 61.1 years, who attended a FHS examination between 1991 and 1994 (original cohort) and from 1995 to 1998 (offspring cohort). The mean absolute interarm systolic blood pressure difference was 4.6 mm Hg (range 0-78). Increased interarm systolic blood pressure difference was present in 317 (9.4%) participants. The median follow-up time was 13.3 years, during which time 598 participants (17.6%) experienced a first cardiovascular event, including 83 (26.2%) participants with interarm systolic blood pressure difference ≥ 10 mm Hg. Compared with those with normal interarm systolic blood pressure difference, participants with an elevated interarm systolic blood pressure difference were older (63.0 years vs 60.9 years), had a greater prevalence of diabetes mellitus (13.3% vs 7.5%,), higher systolic blood pressure (136.3 mm Hg vs 129.3 mm Hg), and a higher total cholesterol

  4. Cardiovascular genomics, personalized medicine, and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: part I: the beginning of an era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Christopher J; Nabel, Elizabeth G

    2008-10-01

    The inaugural issue of Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics arrives at a remarkable time in the history of genetic research and cardiovascular medicine. Despite tremendous progress in knowledge gained, cardiovascular disease(CVD) remains the leading cause of death in the United States,1 and it has overcome infectious diseases as the leading cause of death worldwide.2 In addition, rates of CVD remain higher in black and Hispanic populations in the United States.1 The recent Strategic Plan of the National Heart, Lung,and Blood Institute (NHLBI) emphasizes research areas to fill the significant knowledge gaps needed to improve the diagnosis,treatment, and control of known risk factors and clinically apparent disease. Simultaneously, the NHLBI Strategic Plan recognizes a tremendous opportunity that is available for use of genetic and genomic research to generate new knowledge that might reduce the morbidity and mortality from CVD in US populations.3 Public availability of vast amounts of detailed sequence information about the human genome, completed sequence data on dozens of other animal genomes, and private sector development of high-throughput genetic technologies has transformed in a few short years the conduct of cardiovascular genetics and genomics research from a primary focus on mendelian disorders to a current emphasis on genome-wide association studies (GWAS; Figure1). In this review, we describe the rationale for the current emphasis on large-scale genomic studies, summarize the evolving approaches and progress to date, and identify immediate-term research needs. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the NHLBI are supporting a portfolio of large-scale genetic and genomic programs in diverse US populations with the longer-term objective of translating knowledge into the prediction, prevention, and preemption of CVD, as well as lung, sleep, and blood disorders. Underlying this portfolio is a strong commitment to make available participant-level data and

  5. Non Hodgkin lymphoma metastasis to the heart detected by cardiovascular magnetic resonance; Metastasis cardiaca secundaria al linfoma de Hodgkin detectada por la resonancia magnetica cardiovascular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Florange; Morales, Marisela; Pedreanez, Norma [Hospital Cardiologico Infantil Latinoamericano Dr Gilberto Rodriguez Ochoa, Carcacas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Pabon, Luz; Carrillo, Milton [Universidad Central de Venezuela (UCV/HUC), Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Instituto de Hematoncologia. Hospital Universitario; Fernandes, Juliano Lara [Universidade de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    Primary and secondary heart tumors are relatively rare occurrences but usually imply significant treatment decisions. The differential diagnosis among these tumors and other masses can sometimes be difficult and require the use of different imaging modalities to establish a confident verdict. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance CMR imaging is a very useful tool in these cases by allowing for the application of different strategies to better delineate masses, heart structures and adjacent tissues. In this case description, we present a woman with shortness of breath and a paracardiac mass showing how CMR can be applied. (author)

  6. Reappraisal of role of angiotensin receptor blockers in cardiovascular protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram CV

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available C Venkata S RamTexas Blood Pressure Institute, Clinical Research Institute of Dallas Nephrology Associates; and Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX, USAAbstract: Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs have shown cardioprotective and renoprotective properties. These agents are recommended as first-line therapy for the treatment of hypertension and the reduction of cardiovascular risk. Early studies pointed to the cardioprotective and renoprotective effects of ARBs in high-risk patients. The ONgoing Telmisartan Alone and in combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET established the clinical equivalence of the cardioprotective and renoprotective effects of telmisartan and ramipril, but did not find an added benefit of the combination over ramipril alone. Similar findings were observed in the Telmisartan Randomized AssessmeNt Study in aCE INtolerant subjects with cardiovascular Disease (TRANSCEND trial conducted in ACEI-intolerant patients. In ONTARGET, telmisartan had a better tolerability profile with similar renoprotective properties compared with ramipril, suggesting a potential clinical benefit over ramipril. The recently completed Olmesartan Reducing Incidence of Endstage Renal Disease in Diabetic Nephropathy Trial (ORIENT and Olmesartan and Calcium Antagonists Randomized (OSCAR studies will further define the role of ARBs in cardioprotection and renoprotection for high-risk patients.Keywords: angiotensin receptor blockers, hypertension, outcomes, clinical trials

  7. The Healthy Heart Race: A Short-Duration, Hands-on Activity in Cardiovascular Physiology for Museums and Science Festivals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, Thomas A.; Limson, Melvin; Byse, Miranda; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2011-01-01

    The "Healthy Heart Race" activity provides a hands-on demonstration of cardiovascular function suitable for lay audiences. It was field tested during the United States of America Science and Engineering Festival held in Washington, DC, in October 2010. The basic equipment for the activity consisted of lengths of plastic tubing, a hand…

  8. Diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular clinical characteristics of Spanish women with stable ischaemic heart disease: Data from the SIRENA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez, José M; Masmiquel, Luis; Ripoll, Tomás; Barrios, Vivencio; Anguita, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between diabetes and the cardiovascular clinical characteristics of Spanish women with stable ischaemic heart disease was studied in a nationwide cross-sectional study. Diabetes was related to a higher burden of risk factors, comorbidity, multivessel disease and coronary surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Healthy heart: Results of a community education program on cardiovascular health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madridejos Mora, Rosa; Majem Fabres, Lourdes; Puig Acebal, Helena; Sanz Latorre, Inma; Llobet Traveset, Eva; Arce Casas, Mar; Ruiz Morilla, Dolors; Mercadal Dalmau, Angel; Pañart Sánchez, Dani

    2014-11-01

    To improve the knowledge of the population about heart-healthy habits through a training program supplemented by a web site and community activities. A controlled clinical trial with intervention done through participation in the Cardiovascular Health Training Classroom (CHTC) LOCATION: A town of 80,000 inhabitants. both sexes, aged 55 to 70 years, with at least one cardiovascular risk factor (CVRF). The intervention group (IG) consisted of patients who participated in the CHTC. Intervention was carried out through a 20-hour presential group course in which a support web site was offered and complementary activities were organized. Classes were taught by three Primary Care nurses. The primary endpoint was knowledge of CVRF. The secondary variables were age, sex, CVRF, lifestyle, visits to health centers, pharmaceutical use adherence, and satisfaction with the program. Data from patients in the first 10 courses (n=150) were evaluated. A statistically significant improvement was observed in overall knowledge of CVRF in the IG (87.3% to 100%) compared with control group (GC) (84.5% to 92.7%), pcardiovascular health knowledge and promoting some healthy habits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Nordic walking for cardiovascular prevention in patients with ischaemic heart disease or metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehí, Cristina; Falces, Carles; Sarlat, Miquel Àngel; Gonzalo, Ana; Andrea, Rut; Sitges, Marta

    2016-12-16

    The incidence of atherosclerotic diseases has increased in Europe due in part to the population's sedentary lifestyle. Physical activity is useful for cardiovascular prevention. Nordic walking (NW) mobilizes a great number of muscular groups and is very popular in northern Europe. There is no data available on its impact in the healthcare system of the Mediterranean area. We propose the implementation of a NW program to promote physical activity and control cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF), as well as to improve quality of life and the adherence to medical treatment in patients with a chronic ischemic heart disease or metabolic syndrome. We selected patients with uncontrolled CVRFs. These patients performed 2 weekly sessions of NW over the course of one year. Baseline data extracted from the patients' medical history, quality of life questionnaires and on adherence to treatment was compared with the results obtained at the end of the program. A reduction in the rate of CVRFs from 4.78 to 3 was observed, with an evident trend towards the improvement of the patients' quality of life and a better adherence to the treatment. The implementation of a NW program is feasible in the public healthcare system and can aid in the management of CVRFs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. ABCC-NIH adult health study, Hiroshima 1958-1960. Cardiovascular project report Number 6, heart size norm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Shoichi, Russell, W.J.; Yano, Katsuhiko

    1962-05-01

    Utilizing the information obtained from the detailed clinical examinations of subjects seen at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission, standard heart size determinations in the Hiroshima population are provided. A formula has been devised to express the normal transverse cardiac diameter, obtained from the routine posteroanterior chest roentgenogram, in relation to weight, height, and age. The analysis was made for each sex separately. Values computed by using this formula are regarded as standard heart size. Deviations from the standard are interpreted as individual variability in the normal group, with a standard deviation of 9 mm. When this standard was applied to abnormal subjects, a high correlation between the relative heart size and the blood pressure or the presence of overt heart disease was evident. For this reason, the relative heart size for this standard should prove useful, together with other related factors, in the diagnosis and investigation of cardiovascular disease. A nomograph has been devised for practical use. 12 references, 7 figures, 4 tables.

  12. Genetic and environmental contributions to cardiovascular disease risk in American Indians: the strong heart family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Kari E; Howard, Barbara V; Welty, Thomas K; Best, Lyle G; Lee, Elisa T; Yeh, J L; Fabsitz, Richard R; Roman, Mary J; MacCluer, Jean W

    2003-02-15

    The aims of the Strong Heart Family Study are to clarify the genetic determinants of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in American Indians and to map and identify genes for CVD susceptibility. The authors describe the design of the Strong Heart Family Study (conducted between 1998 and 1999) and evaluate the heritabilities of CVD risk factors in American Indians from this study. In the first phase of the study, approximately 950 individuals, aged 18 years or more, in 32 extended families, were examined. The examination consisted of a personal interview, physical examination, laboratory tests, and an ultrasound examination of the carotid arteries. The phenotypes measured during the physical examination included anthropometry, lipoproteins, blood pressure, glycemic status, and clotting factors. Heritabilities for CVD risk factor phenotypes were estimated using a variance component approach and the program SOLAR. After accounting for the effects of covariates, the authors detected significant heritabilities for many CVD risk factor phenotypes (e.g., high density lipoprotein cholesterol (heritability = 0.50) and diastolic blood pressure (heritability = 0.34)). These results suggest that heredity explains a substantial proportion of the variability of CVD risk factors and that these heritabilities are large enough to warrant a search for major risk factor genes.

  13. Gut Microbiome Associates With Lifetime Cardiovascular Disease Risk Profile Among Bogalusa Heart Study Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Tanika N; Bazzano, Lydia A; Ajami, Nadim J; He, Hua; Zhao, Jinying; Petrosino, Joseph F; Correa, Adolfo; He, Jiang

    2016-09-30

    Few studies have systematically assessed the influence of gut microbiota on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. To examine the association between gut microbiota and lifetime CVD risk profile among 55 Bogalusa Heart Study participants with the highest and 57 with the lowest lifetime burdens of CVD risk factors. 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing was conducted on microbial DNA extracted from stool samples of the Bogalusa Heart Study participants. α Diversity, including measures of richness and evenness, and individual genera were tested for associations with lifetime CVD risk profile. Multivariable regression techniques were used to adjust for age, sex, and race (model 1), along with body mass index (model 2) and both body mass index and diet (model 3). In model 1, odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for each SD increase in richness, measured by the number of observed operational taxonomic units, Chao 1 index, and abundance-based coverage estimator, were 0.62 (0.39-0.99), 0.61 (0.38-0.98), and 0.63 (0.39-0.99), respectively. Associations were consistent in models 2 and 3. Four genera were enriched among those with high versus low CVD risk profile in all models. Model 1 P values were 2.12×10(-3), 7.95×10(-5), 4.39×10(-4), and 1.51×10(-4) for Prevotella 2, Prevotella 7, Tyzzerella, and Tyzzerella 4, respectively. Two genera were depleted among those with high versus low CVD risk profile in all models. Model 1 P values were 2.96×10(-6) and 1.82×10(-4) for Alloprevotella and Catenibacterium, respectively. The current study identified associations of overall microbial richness and 6 microbial genera with lifetime CVD risk. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Heart and Cardiovascular Involvement in Patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IVA (Morquio-A Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Kampmann

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS IVA is a rare lysosomal storage disorder with multiple skeletal and non-skeletal abnormalities requiring multiple surgical interventions. It is well known that patients with MPS IVA suffer from tachycardia, but cardiac and hemodynamic alterations have not been reported to date. We investigated the cardiovascular and hemodynamic alterations in patients with MPS IVA and developed a possible patho-mechanism for cardiovascular deterioration during anesthesia.In this observational study, serial cardiac examinations were performed in 54 patients with MPS IVA who were followed at the Children's Hospital of the Mainz Medical University (Mainz, Germany between 1991 and 2014 (follow-up 1-24 years; median 5.8 years. Results were compared with data from a large central European cohort of more than 2000 healthy infants and children.None of the patients had arterial hypertension, but 4% had evidence of increased pulmonary artery pressure. Patients developed aortic root extension up to 6.9 standard deviations above normal. Left-sided valve leaflet thickening occurred in 26 patients (five with valve disease. Patients had lower left ventricular dimensions (z: -1.02±0.1, lower stroke volumes (z: -2.3±0.17, lower left ventricular mass (z: -1.5±0.21, but higher wall thickness (z: +0.8±0.16, and higher work index (z: +2.5±0.2 compared to healthy control subjects. Cardiac output was preserved by an increase in heart rate of 21%. Sixty % of patients showed impaired diastolic filling; heart rate (99.0±1.8 vs. 92.0±2.1 bpm, age (18.0±1.8 vs. 14.2±1 years, and cardiothoracic ratio (61.6±3.6% vs. 55±4.2% of these patients were higher compared to those with normal filling.The results of this study suggest an age-progressive disproportion of the intra-thoracic organs of patients with MPS IVA, which is accompanied by aortic root extension and thickened left ventricles, with reduced stroke volumes, impaired diastolic filling patterns, and

  15. Heart failure outcomes with empagliflozin in patients with type 2 diabetes at high cardiovascular risk: results of the EMPA-REG OUTCOME® trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitchett, David; Zinman, Bernard; Wanner, Christoph; Lachin, John M.; Hantel, Stefan; Salsali, Afshin; Johansen, Odd Erik; Woerle, Hans J.; Broedl, Uli C.; Inzucchi, Silvio E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims We previously reported that in the EMPA-REG OUTCOME® trial, empagliflozin added to standard of care reduced the risk of 3-point major adverse cardiovascular events, cardiovascular and all-cause death, and hospitalization for heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk. We have now further investigated heart failure outcomes in all patients and in subgroups, including patients with or without baseline heart failure. Methods and results Patients were randomized to receive empagliflozin 10 mg, empagliflozin 25 mg, or placebo. Seven thousand and twenty patients were treated; 706 (10.1%) had heart failure at baseline. Heart failure hospitalization or cardiovascular death occurred in a significantly lower percentage of patients treated with empagliflozin [265/4687 patients (5.7%)] than with placebo [198/2333 patients (8.5%)] [hazard ratio, HR: 0.66 (95% confidence interval: 0.55–0.79); P heart failure hospitalization or cardiovascular death of 35 over 3 years. Consistent effects of empagliflozin were observed across subgroups defined by baseline characteristics, including patients with vs. without heart failure, and across categories of medications to treat diabetes and/or heart failure. Empagliflozin improved other heart failure outcomes, including hospitalization for or death from heart failure [2.8 vs. 4.5%; HR: 0.61 (0.47–0.79); P heart failure at baseline in both treatment groups, but were no more common with empagliflozin than with placebo. Conclusion In patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk, empagliflozin reduced heart failure hospitalization and cardiovascular death, with a consistent benefit in patients with and without baseline heart failure. PMID:26819227

  16. Preventing Heart Attacks and Strokes: Increasing Awareness of the Adverse Cardiovascular Health Impacts of Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary: Chronic cardiovascular disease imposes a significant health and economic burden on individuals and communities. Despite decades of improvement in cardiovascular mortality, cardiovascular disease and stroke remain the leading cause of death in the U.S. and disparities i...

  17. Current status of cardiovascular surgery in Japan 2013 and 2014: A report based on the Japan Cardiovascular Surgery Database. 2: Congenital heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Yasutaka; Hirahara, Norimichi; Murakami, Arata; Motomura, Noboru; Miyata, Hiroaki; Takamoto, Shinichi

    2018-01-01

    We analyzed the mortality and morbidity of congenital heart surgery in Japan using the Japan Cardiovascular Surgery Database (JCVSD). Data regarding congenital heart surgery performed between January 2013 and December 2014 were obtained from JCVSD. The 20 most frequent procedures were selected and the mortality rates and major morbidities were analyzed. The mortality rates of atrial septal defect repair and ventricular septal defect repair were less than 1%, and the mortality rates of tetralogy of Fallot repair, complete atrioventricular septal defect repair, bidirectional Glenn, and total cavopulmonary connection were less than 2%. The mortality rates of the Norwood procedure and total anomalous pulmonary venous connection repair were more than 10%. The rates of unplanned reoperation, pacemaker implantation, chylothorax, deep sternal infection, phrenic nerve injury, and neurological deficit were shown for each procedure. Using JCVSD, the national data for congenital heart surgery, including postoperative complications, were analyzed. Further improvements of the database and feedback for clinical practice are required.

  18. Reply to: Mounting evidence indicates that escalating doses of allopurinol are unnecessary for cardiovascular protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Brian W; Michaud, Kaleb; Bergman, Debra A; Mikuls, Ted R

    2018-05-08

    We thank Dr. Bredemeier for his comments regarding our manuscript on allopurinol dose escalation and mortality. He raises important evidence to consider in support of an interesting hypothesis that dose escalation may be unnecessary for allopurinol's cardiovascular (CV) protection and may actually be related to adverse CV outcomes. While we agree that evidence exists suggesting that low doses of allopurinol may be sufficient for CV protection, we believe that the studies cited highlight a number of areas where knowledge gaps remain which preclude any definitive conclusions about the effect of dose escalation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Protective effects of panax notoginseng saponins on cardiovascular diseases: a comprehensive overview of experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Xiong, Xingjiang; Wang, Heran; Wang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS) are one of the most important compounds derived from roots of the herb Panax notoginseng which are traditionally used as a hemostatic medicine to control internal and external bleeding in China for thousands of years. To date, at least twenty saponins were identified and some of them including notoginsenoside R1, ginsenoside Rb1, and ginsenoside Rg1 were researched frequently in the area of cardiovascular protection. However, the protective effects of PNS on cardiovascular diseases based on experimental studies and its underlying mechanisms have not been reviewed systematically. This paper reviewed the pharmacology of PNS and its monomers Rb1, Rg1, and R1 in the treatment for cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Protective Effects of Panax Notoginseng Saponins on Cardiovascular Diseases: A Comprehensive Overview of Experimental Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochen Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS are one of the most important compounds derived from roots of the herb Panax notoginseng which are traditionally used as a hemostatic medicine to control internal and external bleeding in China for thousands of years. To date, at least twenty saponins were identified and some of them including notoginsenoside R1, ginsenoside Rb1, and ginsenoside Rg1 were researched frequently in the area of cardiovascular protection. However, the protective effects of PNS on cardiovascular diseases based on experimental studies and its underlying mechanisms have not been reviewed systematically. This paper reviewed the pharmacology of PNS and its monomers Rb1, Rg1, and R1 in the treatment for cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Bilirubin and beyond : A review of lipid status in Gilbert's syndrome and its relevance to cardiovascular disease protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulmer, A. C.; Verkade, H. J.; Wagner, K. -H.

    Gilbert's syndrome (GS) is characterized by a benign, mildly elevated bilirubin concentration in the blood. Recent reports show clear protection from cardiovascular disease in this population. Protection of lipids, proteins and other macromolecules from oxidation by bilirubin represents the most

  2. Moderation of dietary sodium potentiates the renal and cardiovascular protective effects of angiotensin receptor blockers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; Holtkamp, Frank A; Parving, Hans-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Dietary sodium restriction has been shown to enhance the short-term response of blood pressure and albuminuria to angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Whether this also enhances the long-term renal and cardiovascular protective effects of ARBs is unknown. Here we conducted a post-hoc analysis of...

  3. Physical Activity and Heart Rate Variability in Older Adults: The Cardiovascular Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Miranda, Luisa; Sattelmair, Jacob; Chaves, Paulo; Duncan, Glen; Siscovick, David S; Stein, Phyllis K; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac mortality and electrophysiologic dysfunction both increase with age. Heart rate variability (HRV) provides indices of autonomic function and electrophysiology that are associated with cardiac risk. How habitual physical activity (PA) among older adults prospectively relates to HRV, including nonlinear indices of erratic sinus patterns, is not established. We hypothesized that increasing levels of both total leisure-time activity and walking would be prospectively associated with more favorable time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear HRV measures in older adults. Methods and Results We evaluated serial longitudinal measures of both PA and 24-hour Holter HRV over 5 years among 985 older US adults in the community-based Cardiovascular Health Study. After multivariable adjustment, greater total leisure-time activity, walking distance, and walking pace were each prospectively associated with specific, more favorable HRV indices, including higher 24-hour standard-deviation-of-all-normal-to-normal-intervals (SDNN, p-trend=0.009, 0.02, 0.06, respectively) and ultra-low-frequency-power (p-trend=0.02, 0.008, 0.16, respectively). Greater walking pace was also associated with higher short-term-fractal-scaling-exponent (p-trend=0.003) and lower Poincare ratio (p-trend=0.02), markers of less erratic sinus patterns. Conclusions Greater total leisure-time activity, as well as walking alone, were prospectively associated with more favorable and specific indices of autonomic function in older adults, including several suggestive of more normal circadian fluctuations and less erratic sinoatrial firing. Our results suggest potential mechanisms that might contribute to lower cardiovascular mortality with habitual PA later in life. PMID:24799513

  4. Prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors in migrants participating in the PEP family heart study, Nuremberg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerda-Maria Haas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in adults and their children from the 3 major groups of migrants participating in the PEP Family Heart Study [11] and to compare the cardio-metabolic risk profiles between migrants and German participants. Methods: In this community-based cross-sectional study, anthropometric data, blood pressure and lipid profiles of migrants (480 children, 363 adults from Turkey (TUR, Eastern Europe (EEU and German immigrants from the former Soviet Union (GFSU were compared with age and gender adjusted German (GER resi-dents (3253 children, 2491 adults. Results: The profile of risk factors differed considerably regarding specificity and frequency. The prevalence of ≥3 risk factors was as follows: in GFSU men 62%, women 36%, boys 19% and girls 17%; in TUR men 57%, women 30%, 15% boys and 6% girls; in GER men 48%, women 19%, boys 4% and girls 6%; for EEU men 38%, women 25% and 0% in children. No risk factor was present in GFSU men 13%, women 25%, boys 38% and girls 42%; TUR men 13%, women 28%, boys 27% and girls 22 %; GER men16%, women 45%, boys 46% and girls 41%; EEU men 17%, women 42 %, boys 29% and girls 27%. About 50% of the adults from Turkey and Eastern Europe were current smokers and one third of women and half of men from these two countries were over-weight. Conclusions: The implementation of primary care measures for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in migrants is necessary, and it should consider the ethnic differences and the heterogene-ous risk profiles.

  5. Cardiovascular risk indicators and perceived race/ethnic discrimination in the Dallas Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Michelle A; Ravenell, Joseph; Glynn, Robert J; Khera, Amit; Halevy, Nitsan; de Lemos, James A

    2008-12-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the association between race/ethnic (r/e) discrimination and subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although r/e discrimination is a chronic stressor that might have negative health effects, cardiovascular data related to experiences with discrimination among different r/e groups in the United States remain sparse. Using data from the Dallas Heart Study, we assessed the association between perceived r/e discrimination and traditional CVD risk factors, C-reactive protein (CRP), aortic plaque area and wall thickness, and coronary calcium (CAC) score among black, white, and Hispanic participants. Prevalent CAC was defined as a CAC score > or =10 Agatston units; CRP elevation was defined as > or =3 mg/L. Participants were asked, "Have you ever been discriminated against due to your race/ethnicity? (responses: yes, no, or don't know)". Blacks reported r/e discrimination more frequently than whites or Hispanics (P discrimination were more likely to be college graduates, to have a family history of myocardial infarction, and to be more physically active than blacks who did not report r/e discrimination (each P discrimination had a higher prevalence of smoking (P discrimination and aortic wall thickness, aortic plaque area, prevalent CAC, or elevated CRP in any of the r/e groups. Among blacks, stratification by gender and education did not change the observed relationship between perceived r/e discrimination and CAC or CRP. Although perceived r/e discrimination is associated with certain health characteristics that may result in negative health outcomes, in general, we found no association of r/e discrimination with either subclinical atherosclerosis as determined by CAC score, aortic wall thickness and aortic plaque area, or inflammation as assessed by elevated CRP levels.

  6. Genomic approach to therapeutic target validation identifies a glucose-lowering GLP1R variant protective for coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert A.; Freitag, Daniel F.; Li, Li; Chu, Audrey Y.; Surendran, Praveen; Young, Robin; Grarup, Niels; Stancáková, Alena; Chen, Yuning; V.Varga, Tibor; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Luan, Jian'an; Zhao, Jing Hua; Willems, Sara M.; Wessel, Jennifer; Wang, Shuai; Maruthur, Nisa; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Pirie, Ailith; van der Lee, Sven J.; Gillson, Christopher; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Amouyel, Philippe; Arriola, Larraitz; Arveiler, Dominique; Aviles-Olmos, Iciar; Balkau, Beverley; Barricarte, Aurelio; Barroso, Inês; Garcia, Sara Benlloch; Bis, Joshua C.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boehnke, Michael; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Bowden, Sarah; Caldas, Carlos; Caslake, Muriel; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Cruchaga, Carlos; Czajkowski, Jacek; den Hoed, Marcel; Dunn, Janet A.; Earl, Helena M.; Ehret, Georg B.; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrieres, Jean; Foltynie, Thomas; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gianfagna, Francesco; Gonzalez, Carlos; Grioni, Sara; Hiller, Louise; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kee, Frank; Kerrison, Nicola D.; Key, Timothy J.; Kontto, Jukka; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Chunyu; Marenne, Gaëlle; Mohlke, Karen L.; Morris, Andrew P.; Muir, Kenneth; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Munroe, Patricia B.; Navarro, Carmen; Nielsen, Sune F.; Nilsson, Peter M.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Packard, Chris J.; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Peloso, Gina M.; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Poole, Christopher J.; Quirós, J. Ramón; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Salomaa, Veikko; Sánchez, María-José; Sattar, Naveed; Sharp, Stephen J.; Sims, Rebecca; Slimani, Nadia; Smith, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Trompet, Stella; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Walker, Mark; Walter, Klaudia; Abraham, Jean E.; Amundadottir, Laufey T.; Aponte, Jennifer L.; Butterworth, Adam S.; Dupuis, Josée; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Franks, Paul W.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Hansen, Torben; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Jørgensen, Torben; Kooner, Jaspal; Laakso, Markku; Langenberg, Claudia; McCarthy, Mark I.; Pankow, James S.; Pedersen, Oluf; Riboli, Elio; Rotter, Jerome I.; Saleheen, Danish; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schunkert, Heribert; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Deloukas, Panos; Danesh, John; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Meigs, James B.; Ehm, Margaret G.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Waterworth, Dawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory authorities have indicated that new drugs to treat type 2 diabetes (T2D) should not be associated with an unacceptable increase in cardiovascular risk. Human genetics may be able to inform development of antidiabetic therapies by predicting cardiovascular and other health endpoints. We therefore investigated the association of variants in 6 genes that encode drug targets for obesity or T2D with a range of metabolic traits in up to 11,806 individuals by targeted exome sequencing, and follow-up in 39,979 individuals by targeted genotyping, with additional in silico follow up in consortia. We used these data to first compare associations of variants in genes encoding drug targets with the effects of pharmacological manipulation of those targets in clinical trials. We then tested the association those variants with disease outcomes, including coronary heart disease, to predict cardiovascular safety of these agents. A low-frequency missense variant (Ala316Thr;rs10305492) in the gene encoding glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1R), the target of GLP1R agonists, was associated with lower fasting glucose and lower T2D risk, consistent with GLP1R agonist therapies. The minor allele was also associated with protection against heart disease, thus providing evidence that GLP1R agonists are not likely to be associated with an unacceptable increase in cardiovascular risk. Our results provide an encouraging signal that these agents may be associated with benefit, a question currently being addressed in randomised controlled trials. Genetic variants associated with metabolic traits and multiple disease outcomes can be used to validate therapeutic targets at an early stage in the drug development process. PMID:27252175

  7. Cardiovascular and metabolic effects of 48-h glucagon-like peptide-1 infusion in compensated chronic patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halbirk, Mads; Nørrelund, Helene; Møller, Niels

    2010-01-01

    effects of 48-h GLP-1 infusions in patients with congestive HF. In a randomized, double-blind crossover design, 20 patients without diabetes and with HF with ischemic heart disease, EF of 30 +/- 2%, New York Heart Association II and III (n = 14 and 6) received 48-h GLP-1 (0.7 pmol.kg(-1).min(-1......)) and placebo infusion. At 0 and 48 h, LVEF, diastolic function, tissue Doppler regional myocardial function, exercise testing, noninvasive cardiac output, and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured. Blood pressure, heart rate, and metabolic parameters were recorded. Fifteen patients completed...... patients. GLP-1 infusion increased circulating insulin levels and reduced plasma glucose concentration but had no major cardiovascular effects in patients without diabetes but with compensated HF. The impact of minor increases in heart rate and diastolic blood pressure during GLP-1 infusion requires...

  8. Protective effect of thymoquinone improves cardiovascular function, and attenuates oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis by mediating the PI3K/Akt pathway in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Hong-Yang; Jiang, Yi-Nong; Li, Nan

    2016-03-01

    Thymoquinone is the main active monomer extracted from black cumin and has anti‑inflammatory, antioxidant and anti‑apoptotic functions. However, the protective effects of thymoquinone on cardiovascular function in diabetes remain to be fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms underling the beneficial effects of thymoquinone on the cardiovascular function in streptozotocin‑induced diabetes mellitus (DM) rats. Supplement thymoquinone may recover the insulin levels and body weight, inhibit blood glucose levels and reduce the heart rate in DM‑induced rats. The results indicated that the heart, liver and lung to body weight ratios, in addition to the blood pressure levels, were similar for each experimental group. Treatment with thymoquinone significantly reduced oxidative stress damage, inhibited the increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein expression and suppressed the elevation of cyclooxygenase‑2 levels in DM‑induced rats. In addition, thymoquinone significantly suppressed the promotion of tumor necrosis factor‑α and interleukin‑6 levels in the DM‑induced rats. Furthermore, administration of thymoquinone significantly reduced caspase‑3 activity and the promotion of phosphorylated‑protein kinase B (Akt) protein expression levels in DM‑induced rats. These results suggest that the protective effect of thymoquinone improves cardiovascular function and attenuates oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis by mediating the phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase/Akt pathway in DM‑induced rats.

  9. Sex and family history of cardiovascular disease influence heart rate variability during stress among healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Charles F; Stoney, Catherine M; Thayer, Julian F; Williams, DeWayne; Bodine, Andrew

    2018-07-01

    Studies of sex differences in heart rate variability (HRV) typically have not accounted for the influence of family history (FH) of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study evaluated sex differences in HRV response to speech stress among men and women (age range 30-49 years) with and without a documented FH of CVD. Participants were 77 adults (mean age = 39.8 ± 6.2 years; range: 30-49 years; 52% female) with positive FH (FH+, n = 32) and negative FH (FH-, n = 45) of CVD, verified with relatives of participants. Cardiac activity for all participants was recorded via electrocardiogram during a standardized speech stress task with three phases: 5-minute rest, 5-minute speech, and 5-minute recovery. Outcomes included time domain and frequency domain indicators of HRV and heart rate (HR) at rest and during stress. Data were analyzed with repeated measures analysis of variance, with sex and FH as between subject variables and time/phase as a within subject variable. Women exhibited higher HR than did men and greater HR reactivity in response to the speech stress. However, women also exhibited greater HRV in both the time and frequency domains. FH+ women generally exhibited elevated HRV, despite the elevated risk of CVD associated with FH+. Although women participants exhibited higher HR at rest and during stress, women (both FH+ and FH-) also exhibited elevated HRV reactivity, reflecting greater autonomic control. Thus, enhanced autonomic function observed in prior studies of HRV among women is also evident among FH+ women during a standardized stress task. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Matters of the heart: cardiovascular disease in U.S. women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Kevin A; Stevens, Tracy L

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in United States women and accounts for approximately 500,000 deaths annually. Over half of cardiovascular disease-related deaths in women result from coronary artery disease including acute coronary syndromes. This paper reviews gender specific issues in women as they relate to current cardiovascular disease epidemiology, trends in cardiovascular disease epidemiology, coronary artery disease detection, risk factor modification, and prevention of cardiovascular disease-related events.

  11. Association between Carotid Intima Media Thickness and Heart Rate Variability in Adults at Increased Cardiovascular Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu C. Baltatu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atherosclerotic carotid intima-media thickness (IMT may be associated with alterations in the sensitivity of carotid baroreceptors. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between carotid IMT and the autonomic modulation of heart rate variability (HRV.Methods: A total of 101 subjects were enrolled in this prospective observational study. The carotid IMT was determined by duplex ultrasonography. The cardiac autonomic function was determined through HRV measures during the Deep Breathing Test. Linear regression models, adjusted for demographics, comorbidities, body mass index, waist-hip-ratio, and left ventricular ejection fraction were used to evaluate the association between HRV parameters and carotid IMT.Results: Participants had a mean age of 60.4 ± 13.4 years and an estimated 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD risk score (using the Pooled Cohort Equations of 16.4 ± 17. The mean carotid media thickness was highest (0.90 ± 0.19 mm in the first quartile of the standard deviation of all RR intervals (SDNN (19.7 ± 5.1 ms and progressively declined in each subsequent quartile to 0.82 ± 0.21 mm, 0.81 ± 0.16 mm, and 0.68 ± 0.19 in quartiles 2 (36.5 ± 5.9 ms, 3 (57.7 ± 6.2 ms and 4 (100.9 ± 22.2 ms, respectively. In multivariable adjusted models, there was a statistical significant association between SDNN and carotid IMT (OR −0.002; 95%CI −0.003 to −0.001, p = 0.005. The same significant association was found between carotid IMT and other measures of HRV, including coefficient of variation of RR intervals (CV and dispersion of points along the line of identity (SD2.Conclusions: In a cohort of individuals at increased cardiovascular risk, carotid IMT as a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis was associated with alterations of HRV indicating an impaired cardiac autonomic control, independently of other cardiovascular risk factors.

  12. Resting, night-time, and 24 h heart rate as markers of cardiovascular risk in middle-aged and elderly men and women with no apparent heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Christine D; Olsen, Rasmus H; Pedersen, Lene R

    2013-01-01

    AimsIncreased heart rate (HR) is a predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality. We tested which measure of HR had the strongest prognostic value in a population with no apparent heart disease.Methods and resultsSix hundred and fifty-three men and women between the age of 55 and 75...... adjusted model, only night-time HR remained in the model, hazard ratio = 1.17 (1.05-1.30), P = 0.005.ConclusionIn middle-aged subjects with no apparent heart disease, all measures of increased HR were associated with increased mortality and CV risk. However, night-time HR was the only parameter...

  13. Clinical and Echocardiographic Characteristics and Cardiovascular Outcomes According to Diabetes Status in Patients With Heart Failure and Preserved Ejection Fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren L; Mogensen, Ulrik M; Jhund, Pardeep S

    2017-01-01

    in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction) according to history of diabetes mellitus. Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios for cardiovascular outcomes adjusted for known predictors, including age, sex, natriuretic peptides, and comorbidity. Echocardiographic data were available...... versus 29 kg/m2), worse Minnesota Living With Heart Failure score (48 versus 40), higher median N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide concentration (403 versus 320 pg/mL; all Pdifference in left ventricular ejection fraction. Patients with diabetes...

  14. ELABELA-APJ axis protects from pressure overload heart failure and angiotensin II-induced cardiac damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Teruki; Sato, Chitose; Kadowaki, Ayumi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Ho, Lena; Ishida, Junji; Yamaguchi, Tomokazu; Kimura, Akinori; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Penninger, Josef M; Reversade, Bruno; Ito, Hiroshi; Imai, Yumiko; Kuba, Keiji

    2017-06-01

    Elabela/Toddler/Apela (ELA) has been identified as a novel endogenous peptide ligand for APJ/Apelin receptor/Aplnr. ELA plays a crucial role in early cardiac development of zebrafish as well as in maintenance of self-renewal of human embryonic stem cells. Apelin was the first identified APJ ligand, and exerts positive inotropic heart effects and regulates the renin-angiotensin system. The aim of this study was to investigate the biological effects of ELA in the cardiovascular system. Continuous infusion of ELA peptide significantly suppressed pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and impaired contractility in mice. ELA treatment reduced mRNA expression levels of genes associated with heart failure and fibrosis. The cardioprotective effects of ELA were diminished in APJ knockout mice, indicating that APJ is the key receptor for ELA in the adult heart. Mechanistically, ELA downregulated angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) expression in the stressed hearts, whereas it showed little effects on angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) expression, which are distinct from the effects of Apelin. FoxM1 transcription factor, which induces ACE expression in the stressed hearts, was downregulated by ELA but not by Apelin. ELA antagonized angiotensin II-induced hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and fibrosis in mice. The ELA-APJ axis protects from pressure overload-induced heart failure possibly via suppression of ACE expression and pathogenic angiotensin II signalling. The different effects of ELA and Apelin on the expression of ACE and ACE2 implicate fine-tuned mechanisms for a ligand-induced APJ activation and downstream signalling. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Tobacco Use and Cardiovascular Disease among American Indians: The Strong Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas K. Welty

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco use among American Indians has a long and complicated history ranging from its utilization in spiritual ceremonies to its importance as an economic factor for survival. Despite this cultural tradition and long history, there are few studies of the health effects of tobacco in this population. The Strong Heart Study is a prospective observational study of cardiovascular disease (CVD in 13 American Indian tribes in Arizona, Oklahoma, and North and South Dakota with 4,549 participants. Baseline examinations were followed by two examinations at regular intervals and 16 years of morbidity and mortality follow-up. Hazard ratios (HRs for non-fatal CVD for current smokers vs. non-smokers after adjusting for other risk factors were significant in women (HR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.54 to 2.45 and men (HR = 1.59, 95% CI 1.16 to 2.18. Hazard ratios for fatal CVD for current smokers vs. non-smokers after adjusting for other risk factors were significant in women (HR = 1.64, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.58, but not in men. Individuals who smoked and who were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, hypertension or renal insufficiency were more likely to quit smoking than those without these conditions. On average, American Indians smoke fewer cigarettes per day than other racial/ethnic groups; nevertheless, the ill effects of habitual tobacco use are evident in this population.

  16. Does Your Heart Forecast help practitioner understanding and confidence with cardiovascular disease risk communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Sue; Kerr, Andrew; Broadbent, Elizabeth; MacKenzie, Craig; Cole, Karl; McLachlan, Andy

    2011-03-01

    Explaining what cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk means and engaging in shared decision-making regarding risk factor modification is challenging. An electronic CVD risk visualisation tool containing multiple risk communication strategies (Your Heart Forecast) was designed in 2009. To assess whether this tool facilitated explaining CVD risk to primary care patients. Health professionals who accessed a Primary Health Organisation website or who attended educational peer groups over a three-month period were invited to complete questionnaires before and after viewing a four-minute video about the tool. Respondents were asked to make an informed guess of the CVD risk of a 35-year-old patient (actual CVD risk 5%) and rate the following sentence as being true or false: 'If there were 100 people like Mr Andrews, five would go on to have a cardiac event in the next five years.' They also were asked to rank their understanding of CVD risk and confidence in explaining the concept to patients. Fifty health professionals (37 GPs, 12 practice nurses, one other) completed before and after questionnaires. Respondents' CVD risk estimates pre-video ranged from confidence in explaining risk reduced in range and shifted towards greater efficacy. Whether this tool facilitates discussions of CVD risk with patients and improves patient understanding and lifestyle behaviour needs to be evaluated in a randomised trial.

  17. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess myocardial fibrosis in valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesnikar, Tomaz; Delgado, Victoria; Bax, Jeroen J

    2018-01-01

    The left ventricular (LV) remodeling process associated with significant valvular heart disease (VHD) is characterized by an increase of myocardial interstitial space with deposition of collagen and loss of myofibers. These changes occur before LV systolic function deteriorates or the patient develops symptoms. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) permits assessment of reactive fibrosis, with the use of T1 mapping techniques, and replacement fibrosis, with the use of late gadolinium contrast enhancement. In addition, functional consequences of these structural changes can be evaluated with myocardial tagging and feature tracking CMR, which assess the active deformation (strain) of the LV myocardium. Several studies have demonstrated that CMR techniques may be more sensitive than the conventional measures (LV ejection fraction or LV dimensions) to detect these structural and functional changes in patients with severe left-sided VHD and have shown that myocardial fibrosis may not be reversible after valve surgery. More important, the presence of myocardial fibrosis has been associated with lesser improvement in clinical symptoms and recovery of LV systolic function. Whether assessment of myocardial fibrosis may better select the patients with severe left-sided VHD who may benefit from surgery in terms of LV function and clinical symptoms improvement needs to be demonstrated in prospective studies. The present review article summarizes the current status of CMR techniques to assess myocardial fibrosis and appraises the current evidence on the use of these techniques for risk stratification of patients with severe aortic stenosis or regurgitation and mitral regurgitation.

  18. Calcium intake and 28-year cardiovascular and coronary heart disease mortality in Dutch civil servants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Vijver, L P; van der Waal, M A; Weterings, K G; Dekker, J M; Schouten, E G; Kok, F J

    1992-02-01

    Data obtained from a general health examination in 1953-1954 of 2605 middle-aged Dutch civil servants were analysed to investigate the relation between dietary calcium and cardiovascular (CVD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality. Calcium intake was assessed at baseline by a 1-week food frequency recall. Multivariate adjusted odds ratios (OR) were calculated using the highest quintile of calcium intake as the reference. No statistically significant associations were observed for low calcium intake in 15 and 28 years of follow-up in both men and women. For men, multivariate adjusted OR for the lowest quintile of calcium intake were 1.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.8-1.9) and 0.9 (95% CI: 0.6-1.6) for 28-year CVD and CHD mortality, respectively. For women, corresponding OR were 1.1 (95% CI: 0.6-2.0) and 1.1 (95% CI: 0.5-2.5). Although an inverse association between calcium intake and CVD and CHD mortality, possibly mediated by blood pressure, might be hypothesized, no clear association was observed. Because dietary patterns in the 1950s were quite stable, and major calcium sources were addressed, misclassification of calcium intake may not be fully responsible for this finding.

  19. Geographical variation in cardiovascular incidence: results from the British Women's Heart and Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Shah

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD in women shows regional variations not explained by common risk factors. Analysis of CVD incidence will provide insight into whether there is further divergence between regions with increasing age. Methods Seven-year follow-up data on 2685 women aged 59-80 (mean 69 at baseline from 23 towns in the UK were available from the British Women's Heart and Health Study. Time to fatal or non-fatal CVD was analyzed using Cox regression with adjustment for risk factors, using multiple imputation for missing values. Results Compared to South England, CVD incidence is similar in North England (HR 1.05 (95% CI 0.84, 1.31 and Scotland (0.93 (0.68, 1.27, but lower in Midlands/Wales (0.85 (0.64, 1.12. Event severity influenced regional variation, with South England showing lower fatal incident CVD than other regions, but higher non-fatal incident CVD. Kaplan-Meier plots suggested that regional divergence in CVD occurred before baseline (before mean baseline age of 69. Conclusions In women, regional differences in CVD early in adult life do not further diverge in later life. This may be due to regional differences in early detection, survivorship of women entering the study, or event severity. Targeting health care resources for CVD by geographic variation may not be appropriate for older age-groups.

  20. Subjective social status and psychosocial and metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study

    OpenAIRE

    Subramanyam, Malavika A.; Diez-Roux, Ana V.; Hickson, DeMarc A.; Sarpong, Daniel F.; Sims, Mario; Taylor, Herman A.; Williams, David R.; Wyatt, Sharon B

    2012-01-01

    Subjective social status has been shown to be inversely associated with multiple cardiovascular risk factors, independent of objective social status. However, few studies have examined this association among African Americans and the results have been mixed. Additionally, the influence of discrimination on this relationship has not been explored. Using baseline data (2000–2004) from the Jackson Heart Study, an African American cohort from the U.S. South (N = 5301), we quantified the associati...

  1. The South Asian heart lifestyle intervention (SAHELI) study to improve cardiovascular risk factors in a community setting: Design and methods

    OpenAIRE

    Kandula, Namratha R.; Patel, Yasin; Dave, Swapna; Seguil, Paola; Kumar, Santosh; Baker, David W.; Spring, Bonnie; Siddique, Juned

    2013-01-01

    Disseminating and implementing evidence-based, cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention lifestyle interventions in community settings and in ethnic minority populations is a challenge. We describe the design and methods for the South Asian heart lifestyle intervention (SAHELI) study, a pilot study designed to determine the feasibility and initial efficacy of a culturally-targeted, community-based lifestyle intervention to improve physical activity and diet behaviors among medically underserved...

  2. Cardiovascular disease, risk factors and heart rate variability in the elderly general population: Design and objectives of the CARdiovascular disease, Living and Ageing in Halle (CARLA Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuss Oliver

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing burden of cardiovascular diseases (CVD in the ageing population of industrialized nations requires an intensive search for means of reducing this epidemic. In order to improve prevention, detection, therapy and prognosis of cardiovascular diseases on the population level in Eastern Germany, it is necessary to examine reasons for the East-West gradient of CVD morbidity and mortality, potential causal mechanisms and prognostic factors in the elderly. Psychosocial and nutritional factors have previously been discussed as possible causes for the unexplained part of the East-West gradient. A reduced heart rate variability appears to be associated with cardiovascular disease as well as with psychosocial and other cardiovascular risk factors and decreases with age. Nevertheless, there is a lack of population-based data to examine the role of heart rate variability and its interaction with psychosocial and nutritional factors regarding the effect on cardiovascular disease in the ageing population. There also is a paucity of epidemiological data describing the health situation in Eastern Germany. Therefore, we conduct a population-based study to examine the distribution of CVD, heart rate variability and CVD risk factors and their associations in an elderly East German population. This paper describes the design and objectives of the CARLA Study. Methods/design For this study, a random sample of 45–80 year-old inhabitants of the city of Halle (Saale in Eastern Germany was drawn from the population registry. By the end of the baseline examination (2002–2005, 1750 study participants will have been examined. A multi-step recruitment strategy aims at achieving a 70 % response rate. Detailed information is collected on own and family medical history, socioeconomic, psychosocial, behavioural and biomedical factors. Medical examinations include anthropometric measures, blood pressure of arm and ankle, a 10-second and a 20

  3. The knowledge of cardiovascular risk factors in elementary school students in Bushehr Port The Persian Gulf Healthy Heart Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Sanaei Dashty

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular diseases are among the first leading causes of death in the world, whose main risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, obesity, hypertension and smoking are somehow closely related to childhood. The process of atherosclerosis may begin developing during childhood. Methods: In order to evaluate the knowledge of elementary school students of Bushehr Port regarding heart function and risk factors of cardiovascular diseases, 1128 students educating in 3rd and 4th grades were randomly selected and assessed with a 30-item questionnaire including four sections heart anatomy, smoking, exercise and nutrition. The minimum score was considered zero, the maximum 30 and the passing score was to gain 51% of the maximum score (or 15.30 out of 30. Results: The mean of total score was 13.1 5. The mean-score of the 3rd grade students was higher than the mean of the score in the 4th grade ones (P<0.05. There was no significant difference between total mean-score of girls and boys. The mean of the anatomy section score was higher in girls and those of the three other sections were higher in boys. Only 36% of students gained the passing score and 64% of them failed to pass the examination. Conclusion: The level of knowledge of cardiovascular risk factors is low in elementary school students in Bushehr Port. We suggest preparing attractive teaching booklets regarding healthy heart, to be taught routinely in schools, beside other health issues.

  4. 2010 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society Training Standards and Maintenance of Competency in Adult Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Martin S; Guerra, Peter G; Krahn, Andrew D

    2011-01-01

    The last guidelines on training for adult cardiac electrophysiology (EP) were published by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society in 1996. Since then, substantial changes in the knowledge and practice of EP have mandated a review of the previous guidelines by the Canadian Heart Rhythm Society, an affiliate of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Novel tools and techniques also now allow electrophysiologists to map and ablate increasingly complex arrhythmias previously managed with pharmacologic or device therapy. Furthermore, no formal attempt had previously been made to standardize EP training across the country. The 2010 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society Training Standards and Maintenance of Competency in Adult Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology represent a consensus arrived at by panel members from both societies, as well as EP program directors across Canada and other select contributors. In describing program requirements, the technical and cognitive skills that must be acquired to meet training standards, as well as the minimum number of procedures needed in order to acquire these skills, the new guidelines provide EP program directors and committee members with a template to develop an appropriate curriculum for EP training for cardiology fellows here in Canada. Copyright © 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The effects of infographics and several quantitative versus qualitative formats for cardiovascular disease risk, including heart age, on people's risk understanding.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Olga C; Vonk, Suzanne I; Van den Haak, Maaike J; van Hooijdonk, Charlotte M J; Timmermans, Danielle R M

    2018-01-01

    To study how comprehension of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is influenced by: (1) infographics about qualitative risk information, with/without risk numbers; (2) which qualitative risk dimension is emphasized; (3) heart age vs. traditional risk format.

  6. Cardiovascular Ultrasound of Neonatal Long Evans Rats Exposed Prenatally to Trichloroacetic Acid: Effects on Heart Rate, Ejection Fraction, and Cardiac Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    This abstract describes the use of a relatively new technology, cardiovascular ultrasound (echocardiography) for evaluating developmental toxicity affecting heart development. The abstract describes the effects of two known cardiac teratogens, trichloroacetic acid and dimethadio...

  7. Neonatal rat hearts cannot be protected by ischemic postconditioning

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doul, J.; Charvátová, Z.; Ošťádalová, Ivana; Kohutiar, M.; Maxová, H.; Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 6 (2015), s. 789-794 ISSN 0862-8408 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : neonatal rats * ischemic postconditioning * tolerance to ischemia * contractile function * lactate dehydrogenase Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2015

  8. Prognostic value of heart valve calcifications for cardiovascular events in a lung cancer screening population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, Martin J.; Takx, Richard A. P.; Isgum, I; de Koning, Harry J.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Budde, Ricardo P. J.; Leiner, Tim; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; de Jong, Pim A.

    To assess the prognostic value of aortic valve and mitral valve/annulus calcifications for cardiovascular events in heavily smoking men without a history of cardiovascular disease. Heavily smoking men without a cardiovascular disease history who underwent non-contrast-enhanced low-radiation-dose

  9. Prognostic value of heart valve calcifications for cardiovascular events in a lung cancer screening population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Willemink (Martin J.); R.A.P. Takx (Richard A.); I. Isgum (Ivana); H.J. de Koning (Harry); M. Oudkerk (Matthijs); W.P. Mali (Willem); R.P.J. Budde (Ricardo); I. Leiner (Tim); R. Vliegenthart (Rozemarijn); P.A. de Jong (Pim)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractTo assess the prognostic value of aortic valve and mitral valve/annulus calcifications for cardiovascular events in heavily smoking men without a history of cardiovascular disease. Heavily smoking men without a cardiovascular disease history who underwent non-contrast-enhanced

  10. Cardiovascular effects of MnDPDP and MnCl2 in dogs with acute ischaemic heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, J.O.G.; Pedersen, H.K.; Sager, G.; Refsum, H.; Nycomed Imaging AS, Oslo

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the cardiovascular effects of MnDPDP in a model of acute heart failure in the dog, and to compare these effects with those of MnCl 2 . Material and Methods: The study involved slow i.v. infusion of either 10, 60 and 300 μmol/kg of MnDPDP, or 1, 6 and 30 μmol/kg MnCl 2 , in increasing doses to groups of 5 dogs. Acute ischaemic heart failure was first induced by injection of polystyrene microspheres (50±10 μm) into the left coronary artery until a stable left ventricular end-diastolic pressure of approximately 20 mm Hg was achieved. The following test parameters were measured: Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure; the first derivatives of maximum rate of left ventricular contraction and relaxation; mean aortic pressure; pulmonary artery pressure; right atrial pressure; cardiac ouput; heart rate; QT-time; PQ-time; QRS-width; and plasma catecholamines. Results: Slow infusion of MnDPDP at doses up to and including 12 times the clinical dose was well tolerated in dogs without further depression of cardiovascular function during acute ischaemic heart failure. At 300 μmol/kg, i.e. 60 times the human dose, only minor haemodynamic and electrophysiological effects were seen, and these were similar to those seen after administration of 30 μmol/kg MnCl 2 . (orig./AJ)

  11. Cardiovascular effects of MnDPDP and MnCl{sub 2} in dogs with acute ischaemic heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, J.O.G. [Trondheim Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering]|[Nycomed Imaging AS, Oslo (Norway). Research and Development; Mortensen, E. [Dept. of Physiology, Inst. of Medical Biology, Univ. of Tromsoe (Norway); Pedersen, H.K. [Dept. of Radiology, The National Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Sager, G. [Dept. of Pharmacology, Inst. of Medical Biology, Univ. of Tromsoe (Norway); Refsum, H. [Inst. for Experimental Medical Research, Ullevaal Hospital, Oslo Univ. (Norway)]|[Nycomed Imaging AS, Oslo (Norway). Research and Development

    1997-07-01

    Purpose: To examine the cardiovascular effects of MnDPDP in a model of acute heart failure in the dog, and to compare these effects with those of MnCl{sub 2}. Material and Methods: The study involved slow i.v. infusion of either 10, 60 and 300 {mu}mol/kg of MnDPDP, or 1, 6 and 30 {mu}mol/kg MnCl{sub 2}, in increasing doses to groups of 5 dogs. Acute ischaemic heart failure was first induced by injection of polystyrene microspheres (50{+-}10 {mu}m) into the left coronary artery until a stable left ventricular end-diastolic pressure of approximately 20 mm Hg was achieved. The following test parameters were measured: Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure; the first derivatives of maximum rate of left ventricular contraction and relaxation; mean aortic pressure; pulmonary artery pressure; right atrial pressure; cardiac ouput; heart rate; QT-time; PQ-time; QRS-width; and plasma catecholamines. Results: Slow infusion of MnDPDP at doses up to and including 12 times the clinical dose was well tolerated in dogs without further depression of cardiovascular function during acute ischaemic heart failure. At 300 {mu}mol/kg, i.e. 60 times the human dose, only minor haemodynamic and electrophysiological effects were seen, and these were similar to those seen after administration of 30 {mu}mol/kg MnCl{sub 2}. (orig./AJ).

  12. Emotional stress and heart rate variability measures associated with cardiovascular risk in relocated Katrina survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Phebe; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Jeon-Slaughter, Haekyung; Khan, Qaiser; Garton, Theresa

    2012-01-01

    To explore the effects of hurricane exposure and forced relocation on the mind and body, we compared psychiatric diagnoses and symptoms with heart rate variability (HRV) for 34 relocated Katrina survivors and 34 demographically matched controls. All participants were healthy and free of psychiatric and cardiovascular medications. We measured symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale 1) and depression (Beck Depression Inventory), Axis I psychiatric diagnoses (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV), psychosocial disability (Sheehan Disability Scale), and power spectral analysis HRV reactivity to trauma reminders. Katrina-related PTSD occurred in 38% of survivors and 12% of controls. Survivors reported higher levels of PTSD and depression symptoms, within diagnostic ranges, and greater psychosocial disability than controls. Survivors had higher resting heart rate (80.82 [standard deviation = 13.60] versus 74.85 [10.67], p = .05), lower parasympathetic (high-frequency [HF] normalized unit) baseline HRV activity (40.14 [23.81] versus 50.67 [19.93], p = .04) and less reactivity with trauma cues (-2.63 [20.70] versus -11.96 [15.84], p = .04), and higher baseline sympathovagal activity (low frequency/HF ratio) (2.84 [3.08] versus 1.35 [1.08], p = .04) than controls. Survivors with depression (n = 12) and with depression and PTSD combined (n = 7), but not those with PTSD (n = 13), had flattened parasympathetic responsiveness to trauma cues. HRV indices correlated with depressive (low frequency/HF, p = .01; HF normalized unit, p = .046) but not PTSD symptoms (p values > .05). Results showed this multilayer trauma's impact on emotional health and HRV-based measures of autonomic nervous system dysregulation. Specifically, dysregulation of depressed survivors' HRV in response to trauma reminders supports more autonomic involvement in traumatic loss/depression than in PTSD. Diagnostic criteria for PTSD include physiologic reactivity

  13. [Cardiovascular disease prevention in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus according to the recent statement from the American Heart Association/American Diabetes Association].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avogaro, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    There is a clear epidemiologic association between glycemic control and cardiovascular disease. There is strong evidence of a microvascular benefit by lowering glycated hemoglobin diabetic patients, to control all major cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. These risk factors, easily measurable, account for 90% of acute myocardial infarction. In this review, the update on prevention of cardiovascular disease in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus from the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association is discussed and commented.

  14. Prevalence of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Migrants Participating in the PEP Family Heart Study, Nuremberg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerda-Maria Haas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of cardiovascularrisk factors in adults and their children from the 3 majorgroups of migrants participating in the PEP Family Heart Study 11 andto compare the cardio-metabolic risk profiles between migrants andGerman participants.Methods: In this community-based cross-sectional study, anthropometricdata, blood pressure and lipid profiles of migrants (480 children,363 adults from Turkey (TUR, Eastern Europe (EEU and Germanimmigrants from the former Soviet Union (GFSU were comparedwith age- and gender adjusted German (GER residents (3253 children,2491 adults.Results: The profile of risk factors differed considerably regardingspecificity and frequency. The prevalence of ≥3 risk factors was asfollows: in GFSU men 62%, women 36%, boys 19% and girls 17%; inTUR men 57%, women 30%, 15% boys and 6% girls; in GER men48%, women 19%, boys 4% and girls 6%; for EEU men 38%, women25% and 0% in children. No risk factor was present in GFSU men13%, women 25%, boys 38% and girls 42%; TUR men 13%, women28%, boys 27% and girls 22 %; GER men16%, women 45%, boys 46%and girls 41%; EEU men 17%, women 42 %, boys 29% and girls 27%.About 50% of the adults from Turkey and Eastern Europe were currentsmokers and one third of women and half of men from these twocountries were overweight.Conclusions: The implementation of primary care measures for theprevention of cardiovascular disease in migrants is necessary, and itshould consider the ethnic differences and the heterogeneous risk profiles

  15. Proteomic-based detection of a protein cluster dysregulated during cardiovascular development identifies biomarkers of congenital heart defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali K Nath

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular development is vital for embryonic survival and growth. Early gestation embryo loss or malformation has been linked to yolk sac vasculopathy and congenital heart defects (CHDs. However, the molecular pathways that underlie these structural defects in humans remain largely unknown hindering the development of molecular-based diagnostic tools and novel therapies.Murine embryos were exposed to high glucose, a condition known to induce cardiovascular defects in both animal models and humans. We further employed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify proteins differentially expressed in embryos with defects from those with normal cardiovascular development. The proteins detected by mass spectrometry (WNT16, ST14, Pcsk1, Jumonji, Morca2a, TRPC5, and others were validated by Western blotting and immunoflorescent staining of the yolk sac and heart. The proteins within the proteomic dataset clustered to adhesion/migration, differentiation, transport, and insulin signaling pathways. A functional role for several proteins (WNT16, ADAM15 and NOGO-A/B was demonstrated in an ex vivo model of heart development. Additionally, a successful application of a cluster of protein biomarkers (WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1 as a prenatal screen for CHDs was confirmed in a study of human amniotic fluid (AF samples from women carrying normal fetuses and those with CHDs.The novel finding that WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1 protein levels increase in fetuses with CHDs suggests that these proteins may play a role in the etiology of human CHDs. The information gained through this bed-side to bench translational approach contributes to a more complete understanding of the protein pathways dysregulated during cardiovascular development and provides novel avenues for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, beneficial to fetuses at risk for CHDs.

  16. Cardiovascular side effects of cancer therapies: a position statement from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschenhagen, Thomas; Force, Thomas; Ewer, Michael S; de Keulenaer, Gilles W; Suter, Thomas M; Anker, Stefan D; Avkiran, Metin; de Azambuja, Evandro; Balligand, Jean-Luc; Brutsaert, Dirk L; Condorelli, Gianluigi; Hansen, Arne; Heymans, Stephane; Hill, Joseph A; Hirsch, Emilio; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Janssens, Stefan; de Jong, Steven; Neubauer, Gitte; Pieske, Burkert; Ponikowski, Piotr; Pirmohamed, Munir; Rauchhaus, Mathias; Sawyer, Douglas; Sugden, Peter H; Wojta, Johann; Zannad, Faiez; Shah, Ajay M

    2011-01-01

    The reductions in mortality and morbidity being achieved among cancer patients with current therapies represent a major achievement. However, given their mechanisms of action, many anti-cancer agents may have significant potential for cardiovascular side effects, including the induction of heart failure. The magnitude of this problem remains unclear and is not readily apparent from current clinical trials of emerging targeted agents, which generally under-represent older patients and those with significant co-morbidities. The risk of adverse events may also increase when novel agents, which frequently modulate survival pathways, are used in combination with each other or with other conventional cytotoxic chemotherapeutics. The extent to which survival and growth pathways in the tumour cell (which we seek to inhibit) coincide with those in cardiovascular cells (which we seek to preserve) is an open question but one that will become ever more important with the development of new cancer therapies that target intracellular signalling pathways. It remains unclear whether potential cardiovascular problems can be predicted from analyses of such basic signalling mechanisms and what pre-clinical evaluation should be undertaken. The screening of patients, optimization of therapeutic schemes, monitoring of cardiovascular function during treatment, and the management of cardiovascular side effects are likely to become increasingly important in cancer patients. This paper summarizes the deliberations of a cross-disciplinary workshop organized by the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology (held in Brussels in May 2009), which brought together clinicians working in cardiology and oncology and those involved in basic, translational, and pharmaceutical science.

  17. Infectious agents and inflammation in donated hearts and dilated cardiomyopathies related to cardiovascular diseases, Chagas' heart disease, primary and secondary dilated cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangini, Sandrigo; Higuchi, Maria de Lourdes; Kawakami, Joyce Tiyeko; Reis, Marcia Martins; Ikegami, Renata Nishiyama; Palomino, Suely Aparecida Pinheiro; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Fiorelli, Alfredo Inácio; Marcondes-Braga, Fabiana Goulart; Bacal, Fernando; Ferreira, Sílvia Moreira Ayub; Issa, Victor Sarli; Souza, Germano Emílio Conceição; Chizzola, Paulo Roberto; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2015-01-15

    Clinical and experimental conflicting data have questioned the relationship between infectious agents, inflammation and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of infectious agents and inflammation in endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) specimens from patients with idiopathic DCM, explanted hearts from different etiologies, including Chagas' disease, compared to donated hearts. From 2008 to 2011, myocardial samples from 29 heart donors and 55 patients with DCMs from different etiologies were studied (32 idiopathic, 9 chagasic, 6 ischemic and 8 other specific etiologies). Inflammation was investigated by immunohistochemistry and infectious agents by immunohistochemistry, molecular biology, in situ hybridization and electron microscopy. There were no differences regarding the presence of macrophages, expression of HLA class II and ICAM-I in donors and DCM. Inflammation in Chagas' disease was predominant. By immunohistochemistry, in donors, there was a higher expression of antigens of enterovirus and Borrelia, hepatitis B and C in DCMs. By molecular biology, in all groups, the positivity was elevated to microorganisms, including co-infections, with a higher positivity to adenovirus and HHV6 in donors towards DCMs. This study was the first to demonstrate the presence of virus in the heart tissue of chagasic DCM. The presence of inflammation and infectious agents is frequent in donated hearts, in the myocardium of patients with idiopathic DCM, myocardial dysfunction related to cardiovascular diseases, and primary and secondary cardiomyopathies, including Chagas' disease. The role of co-infection in Chagas' heart disease physiopathology deserves to be investigated in future studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Control of major cardiovascular risk factors of ischemic heart disease in secondary prevention in Aragón: COCINA study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucalon Arenal, J M; Buisac Ramón, C; Marin Ibáñez, A; Castan Ruiz, S; Blay Cortes, M G; Barrasa Villar, J I

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease remains a leading cause of death in Spain. According to the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) and European national societies, secondary prevention for these patients consists of control of major cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) and suitable lifestyle habits. To determine the degree of control of CVRF in the Aragonese population in secondary prevention. Cross-sectional study of a sample of 705 patients of Aragon who had suffered a cardiac event, selected opportunistically in consultations of family physicians participating in the 3 provinces of Aragon. The study was conducted in the second half of 2012. To measure the degree of control of different FRVC and lifestyle habits in this population. Anthropometric, different cardiovascular risk factors, treatment and lifestyle. 58% of men and 52% of women met criteria for monitoring of measured variables. The best result was obtained with smoking cessation and the worst with BMI. Hypertension, Dyslipidemia and Diabetes Mellitus achieve poor control results. The results show that the degree of control of CVRF is still low, especially in variables such as dyslipidemia and Diabetes Mellitus. Only 16.5% of control patients met criteria given the pharmacologically-modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2015 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Prognostic value of heart valve calcifications for cardiovascular events in a lung cancer screening population

    OpenAIRE

    Willemink, Martin J.; Takx, Richard A. P.; I?gum, Ivana; de Koning, Harry J.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Budde, Ricardo P. J.; Leiner, Tim; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; de Jong, Pim A.

    2015-01-01

    textabstractTo assess the prognostic value of aortic valve and mitral valve/annulus calcifications for cardiovascular events in heavily smoking men without a history of cardiovascular disease. Heavily smoking men without a cardiovascular disease history who underwent non-contrast-enhanced low-radiation-dose chest CT for lung cancer screening were included. Non-imaging predictors (age, smoking status and pack-years) were collected and imaging-predictors (calcium volume of the coronary arteries...

  20. Ivabradine in acute coronary syndromes: Protection beyond heart rate lowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccoli, Giampaolo; Borovac, Josip Anđelo; Vetrugno, Vincenzo; Camici, Paolo G; Crea, Filippo

    2017-06-01

    Ivabradine is a heart rate reducing agent that exhibits anti-ischemic effects through the inhibition of funny electrical current in the sinus node resulting in heart rate reduction, thus enabling longer diastolic perfusion time, and reduced myocardial oxygen consumption without detrimental changes in arterial blood pressure, coronary vasomotion, and ventricular contractility. The current guideline-based clinical use of Ivabradine is reserved for patients with stable angina pectoris who cannot tolerate or whose symptoms are inadequately controlled with beta blockers. In patients with chronic heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, Ivabradine has demonstrated beneficial effects in improving clinical outcomes when added to conventional therapy. However, the role of Ivabradine in acute coronary syndromes has not been established. Based on the results from some relevant preclinical studies and a limited amount of clinical data that were reported recently, the role of Ivabradine in acute ischemic events warrants further investigation. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the available literature on the potential role of Ivabradine in the clinical context of acute coronary syndromes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Update: Systemic Diseases and the Cardiovascular System (II). The endocrine system and the heart: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Soo S; Pearce, Elizabeth N

    2011-03-01

    Normal endocrine function is essential for cardiovascular health. Disorders of the endocrine system, consisting of hormone hyperfunction and hypofunction, have multiple effects on the cardiovascular system. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of disorders of the pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, and adrenal glands, with respect to the impact of endocrine dysfunction on the cardiovascular system. We also review the cardiovascular benefits of restoring normal endocrine function. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. A Novel α-Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Analogue Protects Against End-Organ Damage in Experimental Hypertension, Cardiac Hypertrophy and Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aubdool, Aisah A; Thakore, Pratish; Argunhan, Fulye

    2017-01-01

    cardiovascular disease in two distinct murine models of hypertension and heart failure in vivoMethods -The ability of the αAnalogue to act selectively via the CGRP pathway was shown in skin using a CGRP receptor antagonist. The effect of the αAnalogue on Angiotensin II (AngII)-induced hypertension......, Western blot and histology. Results -The AngII-induced hypertension was attenuated by co-treatment with the αAnalogue (50nmol/kg/day, s.c., at a dose selected for lack of long term hypotensive effects at baseline). The αAnalogue protected against vascular, renal and cardiac dysfunction, characterised...... failure. It preserved heart function, assessed by echocardiography, whilst protecting against adverse cardiac remodelling and apoptosis. Moreover, treatment with the αAnalogue was well-tolerated with neither signs of desensitisation nor behavioural changes. Conclusions -These findings, in two distinct...

  3. Resting Heart Rate Is Not a Good Predictor of a Clustered Cardiovascular Risk Score in Adolescents: The HELENA Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto César Ferreira de Moraes

    Full Text Available Resting heart rate (RHR reflects sympathetic nerve activity a significant association between RHR and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality has been reported in some epidemiologic studies.To analyze the predictive power and accuracy of RHR as a screening measure for individual and clustered cardiovascular risk in adolescents. The study comprised 769 European adolescents (376 boys participating in the HELENA cross-sectional study (2006-2008 were included in this study. Measurements on systolic blood pressure, HOMA index, triglycerides, TC/HDL-c, VO2máx and the sum of four skinfolds were obtained, and a clustered cardiovascular disease (CVD risk index was computed. The receiver operating characteristics curve was applied to calculate the power and accuracy of RHR to predict individual and clustered CVD risk factors.RHR showed low accuracy for screening CVD risk factors in both sexes (range 38.5%-54.4% in boys and 45.5%-54.3% in girls. Low specificity's (15.6%-19.7% in boys; 18.1%-20.0% in girls were also found. Nevertheless, the sensitivities were moderate-to-high (61.4%-89.1% in boys; 72.9%-90.3% in girls.RHR is a poor predictor of individual CVD risk factors and of clustered CVD and the estimates based on RHR are not accurate. The use of RHR as an indicator of CVD risk in adolescents may produce a biased screening of cardiovascular health in both sexes.

  4. Gastric Bypass Surgery Produces a Durable Reduction in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Reduces the Long-Term Risks of Congestive Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benotti, Peter N; Wood, G Craig; Carey, David J; Mehra, Vishal C; Mirshahi, Tooraj; Lent, Michelle R; Petrick, Anthony T; Still, Christopher; Gerhard, Glenn S; Hirsch, Annemarie G

    2017-05-23

    Obesity and its association with reduced life expectancy are well established, with cardiovascular disease as one of the major causes of fatality. Metabolic surgery is a powerful intervention for severe obesity, resulting in improvement in comorbid diseases and in cardiovascular risk factors. This study investigates the relationship between metabolic surgery and long-term cardiovascular events. A cohort of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) patients was tightly matched by age, body mass index, sex, Framingham Risk Score, smoking history, use of antihypertension medication, diabetes mellitus status, and calendar year with a concurrent cohort of nonoperated control patients. The primary study end points of major cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke, and congestive heart failure) were evaluated using Cox regression. Secondary end points of longitudinal cardiovascular risk factors were evaluated using repeated-measures regression. The RYGB and matched controls (N=1724 in each cohort) were followed for up to 12 years after surgery (overall median of 6.3 years). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a statistically significant reduction in incident major composite cardiovascular events ( P =0.017) and congestive heart failure (0.0077) for the RYGB cohort. Adjusted Cox regression models confirmed the reductions in severe composite cardiovascular events in the RYGB cohort (hazard ratio=0.58, 95% CI=0.42-0.82). Improvements of cardiovascular risk factors (eg, 10-year cardiovascular risk score, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, systolic blood pressure, and diabetes mellitus) were observed within the RYGB cohort after surgery. Gastric bypass is associated with a reduced risk of major cardiovascular events and the development of congestive heart failure. © 2017 The Authors and Geisinger Clinic. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  5. Impact of the Heart WATCH Program on Patients at Risk of Developing Metabolic Syndrome, Prediabetes or Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Fink

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Metabolic syndrome is a set of metabolic risk factors associated with increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. We retrospectively evaluated the effectiveness of a lifestyle modification program (Heart WATCH geared toward reducing development of chronic disease in women deemed at risk for metabolic syndrome, prediabetes and/or cardiovascular disease. Methods: Our institution’s Heart WATCH program consists of screening sessions with a multidisciplinary team (physician/nurse, nutritionist and psychologist, a minimum of three visits with a nurse practitioner and weekly follow-up phone calls for a 14-week period. Sociodemographic variables were obtained at initial visit. Biometric testing indices and self-reported clinical and behavioral health measures were recorded pre- and postintervention, and compared using paired t-tests or McNemar’s test as appropriate. Results: Heart WATCH enrolled 242 women from November 2006 to April 2014, and 193 (80% completed all phases of the 14-week lifestyle intervention. Postintervention, participants demonstrated improved health status in all areas and improved significantly in the following areas: diet/nutrition (P=0.014, exercise (P<0.001, stress (P<0.0001, quality of life (P=0.003, weight (P<0.0001, waist circumference (P=0.01 and total cholesterol (P=0.019. Clinically meaningful improvements were realized by participants who moved to a healthier classification in a number of vital signs and blood panel indices. Conclusions: These findings suggest the “elevated risk profile” for women with components of metabolic syndrome can be reversed through a lifestyle program focused on reducing risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease and prediabetes. Future research is needed to determine mechanisms of risk reduction as well as optimal patient-centered and culturally appropriate approaches to weight management.

  6. Remote Lifestyle Counseling Influences Cardiovascular Health Outcomes in Youth with Overweight or Obesity and Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano-Diaz, Luis; Rombeek, Meghan; De Jesus, Stefanie; Welisch, Eva; Prapavessis, Harry; Dempsey, Adam A; Fraser, Douglas; Miller, Michael R; Norozi, Kambiz

    2017-01-01

    Children with overweight/obesity and congenital heart disease (CHD) are at increased cardiovascular risk. A lifestyle intervention may help reduce these risks. We sought to determine the feasibility of a smartphone-based lifestyle intervention to improve cardiovascular health outcomes in children with overweight/obesity and CHD. We examined the effect of bi-weekly nutrition and fitness counseling delivered via smartphone over 12 months. Thirty-four youth, previously diagnosed with CHD and with overweight or obesity, participated in the intervention. They were divided into two groups depending on whether the heart disease required surgical correction (operated, n  = 19) or not (non-operated, n  = 15). Anthropometry, body composition cardiorespiratory exercise capacity, and cardio-metabolic risk factors were assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Statistically significant decreases in waist circumference (WC), body mass index z -score, WC z -score, and waist to height ratio z -score were observed at 6 and 12 months in the operated group. A significant linear increase in lean body mass was observed in both groups. The study also had a high retention rate and a low attrition rate. The observed changes in anthropometry were positive with significant improvement to some cardiovascular and metabolic risk indicators. However, this was only observed in the operated group suggesting that other factors, such as perception of condition and self-efficacy, may influence lifestyle behaviors. The results from this pilot study clearly demonstrate the feasibility to perform a larger controlled study on remote lifestyle intervention in children with congenital heart defects and overweight or obesity.

  7. Remote Lifestyle Counseling Influences Cardiovascular Health Outcomes in Youth with Overweight or Obesity and Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Altamirano-Diaz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundChildren with overweight/obesity and congenital heart disease (CHD are at increased cardiovascular risk. A lifestyle intervention may help reduce these risks. We sought to determine the feasibility of a smartphone-based lifestyle intervention to improve cardiovascular health outcomes in children with overweight/obesity and CHD.MethodsWe examined the effect of bi-weekly nutrition and fitness counseling delivered via smartphone over 12 months. Thirty-four youth, previously diagnosed with CHD and with overweight or obesity, participated in the intervention. They were divided into two groups depending on whether the heart disease required surgical correction (operated, n = 19 or not (non-operated, n = 15. Anthropometry, body composition cardiorespiratory exercise capacity, and cardio-metabolic risk factors were assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months.ResultsStatistically significant decreases in waist circumference (WC, body mass index z-score, WC z-score, and waist to height ratio z-score were observed at 6 and 12 months in the operated group. A significant linear increase in lean body mass was observed in both groups. The study also had a high retention rate and a low attrition rate.ConclusionThe observed changes in anthropometry were positive with significant improvement to some cardiovascular and metabolic risk indicators. However, this was only observed in the operated group suggesting that other factors, such as perception of condition and self-efficacy, may influence lifestyle behaviors. The results from this pilot study clearly demonstrate the feasibility to perform a larger controlled study on remote lifestyle intervention in children with congenital heart defects and overweight or obesity.

  8. Bcl-2–associated athanogene 3 protects the heart from ischemia/reperfusion injury

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Feifei; Myers, Valerie D.; Knezevic, Tijana; Wang, JuFang; Gao, Erhe; Madesh, Muniswamy; Tahrir, Farzaneh G.; Gupta, Manish K.; Gordon, Jennifer; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Ramsey, Frederick V.; Tilley, Douglas G.; Khalili, Kamel; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Feldman, Arthur M.

    2016-01-01

    Bcl-2–associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) is an evolutionarily conserved protein expressed at high levels in the heart and the vasculature and in many cancers. While altered BAG3 expression has been associated with cardiac dysfunction, its role in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is unknown. To test the hypothesis that BAG3 protects the heart from reperfusion injury, in vivo cardiac function was measured in hearts infected with either recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 9–expressing (rAAV9-expre...

  9. Evaluation of three cardiovascular nuclear medicine procedures for the study of ischemic heart disease in the aged

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iio, M.; Nakai, K.; Murata, H.

    1979-01-01

    Three recent developments of cardiovascular nuclear medicine procedures were evaluated for the study of ischemic heart diseases in the aged. Regional analysis and global analysis was possible by the gated pool method and Tl-201 scanning. The temporal imaging method, even though limited to global function, was proven to be suitable for the dynamic analysis of the ejection fraction at rest and at stress. Therefore combination of these three procedures made it possible to analyse both regional and global functions of the left ventricle of the patient with IHD without any load on the patient and even under physiological conditions. (Auth.)

  10. Effect of enhanced external counterpulsation therapy on myeloperoxidase in lowering cardiovascular events of patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starry H. Rampengan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic heart failure (CHF is a slowly progressive disease with high morbidity and mortality; therefore, the management using pharmacological treatments frequently fails to improve outcome. Enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP, a non-invasive treatment, may serve as alternative treatment for heart failure. This study was aimed to evaluate the influence of EECP on myeloperoxidase (MPO as inflammatory marker as well as cardiac events outcome.Methods: This was an open randomized controlled clinical trial on 66 CHF patients visiting several cardiovascular clinics in Manado between January-December 2012. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups, i.e. the group who receive EECP therapy and those who did not receive EECP therapy with 33 patients in each group. Myeloperoxidase (MPO as inflammatory marker was examined at baseline and after 6 months of observation. Cardiovascular events were observed as well after 6 months of observation. Unpaired t-test was use to analyze the difference of MPO between the two groups, and chi-square followed by calculation of relative risk were used for estimation of cardiovascular event outcomes.Results: MPO measurement at baseline and after 6 months in EECP group were 643.16 ± 239.40 pM and 422.31 ± 156.26 pM, respectively (p < 0.001. Whereas in non EECP group, the MPO values were 584.69 ± 281.40 pM and 517.64 ± 189.68 pM, repectively (p = 0.792. MPO reduction was observed in all patients of EECP group and in 13 patients (48% of non-EECP group (p < 0.001. Cardiovascular events were observed in 7 (21.21% and 15 (45.45% of patients in EECP and non-EECP groups, respectively (p = 0.037.Conclusion: EECP therapy significantly decreased the level of MPO as inflammatory marker and this decrease was correlated with the reduction of cardiovascular events in CHF patients. (Med J Indones. 2013;22:152-60. doi: 10.13181/mji.v22i3.584Keywords: CHF, cardiovascular events, EECP, myeloperoxidase

  11. Sample Entropy and Traditional Measures of Heart Rate Dynamics Reveal Different Modes of Cardiovascular Control During Low Intensity Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Weippert

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear parameters of heart rate variability (HRV have proven their prognostic value in clinical settings, but their physiological background is not very well established. We assessed the effects of low intensity isometric (ISO and dynamic (DYN exercise of the lower limbs on heart rate matched intensity on traditional and entropy measures of HRV. Due to changes of afferent feedback under DYN and ISO a distinct autonomic response, mirrored by HRV measures, was hypothesized. Five-minute inter-beat interval measurements of 43 healthy males (26.0 ± 3.1 years were performed during rest, DYN and ISO in a randomized order. Blood pressures and rate pressure product were higher during ISO vs. DYN (p < 0.001. HRV indicators SDNN as well as low and high frequency power were significantly higher during ISO (p < 0.001 for all measures. Compared to DYN, sample entropy (SampEn was lower during ISO (p < 0.001. Concluding, contraction mode itself is a significant modulator of the autonomic cardiovascular response to exercise. Compared to DYN, ISO evokes a stronger blood pressure response and an enhanced interplay between both autonomic branches. Non-linear HRV measures indicate a more regular behavior under ISO. Results support the view of the reciprocal antagonism being only one of many modes of autonomic heart rate control. Under different conditions; the identical “end product” heart rate might be achieved by other modes such as sympathovagal co-activation as well.

  12. Transgenic overexpression of adenine nucleotide translocase 1 protects ischemic hearts against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpe, Inga; Savvatis, Konstantinos; Westermann, Dirk; Tschöpe, Carsten; Rauch, Ursula; Landmesser, Ulf; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Dörner, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Ischemia impairs the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), which transports ADP and ATP across the inner mitochondrial membrane. We investigated whether ANT1 overexpression has protective effects on ischemic hearts. Myocardial infarction was induced in wild-type (WT) and heart-specific ANT1-transgenic (ANT1-TG) rats, and hypoxia was set in isolated cardiomyocytes. ANT1 overexpression reduced the myocardial infarct area and increased the survival rate of infarcted rats. Reduced ANT1 expression and increased 4-hydroxynonenal modification of ANT paralleled to impaired ANT function in infarcted WT hearts. ANT1 overexpression improved ANT expression and function. This was accompanied by reduced mitochondrial cytochrome C release and caspase-3 activation. ANT1-TG hearts suffered less from oxidative stress, as shown by lower protein carbonylation and 4-hydroxynonenal modification of ANT. ANT1 overexpression also increased cell survival of hypoxic cardiomyocytes and attenuated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. This was linked to higher stability of mitochondrial membrane potential and lower activity of ROS detoxifying catalase. ANT1-TG cardiomyocytes also showed higher resistance against H2O2 treatment, which was independent of catalase activity. In conclusion, ANT1 overexpression compensates impaired ANT activity under oxygen-restricted conditions. It reduces ROS production and oxidative stress, stabilizes mitochondrial integrity, and increases survival, making ANT1 a component in ROS management and heart protection during ischemia. ANT1 overexpression reduces infarct size and increases survival after infarction. ANT1 overexpression compensates restricted ANT expression and function in infarcted hearts. Increased ANT1 expression enhances mitochondrial integrity. ANT1-overexpressing hearts reduce oxidative stress by decreasing ROS generation. ANT1 is a component in ROS management and heart protection.

  13. Construction of an odds model of coronary heart disease using published information: the Cardiovascular Health Improvement Model (CHIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potts Henry WW

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need for a new cardiovascular disease model that includes a wider range of relevant risk factors, in particular lifestyle factors, to aid targeting of interventions and improve population models of the impact of cardiovascular disease and preventive strategies. The model needs to be applicable to a wider population including different ethnic groups, different countries and to those with and without cardiovascular disease. This paper describes the construction of the Cardiovascular Health Improvement Model that aims to meet these requirements. Method An odds model is used. Information was taken from 2003 mortality statistics for England and Wales, the Health Survey for England 2003 and published data on relative risk in those with and without CVD and mean blood pressure values in hypertensives. The odds ratios used were taken from the INTERHEART study. Results A worked example is given calculating the 10-year coronary heart disease risk for a 57 year-old non-diabetic male with no personal or family history of cardiovascular disease, who smokes 30 cigarettes a day and has a systolic blood pressure of 137 mmHg, a total cholesterol (TC of 6.2 mmol/l, a high density lipoprotein (HDL of 1.3 mol/l, and a body mass index of 21. He neither drinks regularly nor exercises. He can give no reliable information about his mental health or fruit and vegetable intake. His 10-year risk of CHD death is 2.47%. Conclusion This paper demonstrates a method for developing a CHD risk model. Further improvements could be made to the model with additional information. The method is applicable to other causes of death.

  14. Cardiovascular Risk Factors and 10-year Risk for Coronary Heart Disease in Korean Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunjoo Boo, RN, PhD

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: Modifiable cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent in Korean women, and the combination of risk factors is common. Development and implementation of multifaceted nursing interventions are required to confront the current epidemic rise of CHD in Korean women.

  15. Neuroimaging, cardiovascular physiology, and functional outcomes in infants with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, Nathalie H. P.; Kelly, Christopher J; Counsell, Serena J.; Benders, Manon J. N. L.

    This review integrates data on brain dysmaturation and acquired brain injury using fetal and neonatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including the contribution of cardiovascular physiology to differences in brain development, and the relationship between brain abnormalities and subsequent

  16. CAN HIGHER WAGES PROTECT YOUR HEART? REGIONAL EVIDENCE FROM ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian INCALTARAU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a bilateral influence between health and economic development. On the one hand, population health influences economic performance, both at micro and macro levels. On the other, being reflected in higher wellbeing, economic performance also influences health of population. Therefore, according to the materialist view, health status is dependent on the standard of living, whereas low living standards can increase the probability of morbidity and mortality by feeding poverty, poor hygiene and restricting access to health care and education, which is truly important in preventing diseases. Being generally considered to be a representative indicator for the standards of living, we have assessed the impact of wage variations on cardiovascular diseases (CVD mortality, as CVD were proved to be more sensitive to socio-economic conditions, but also generally the main mortality cause in post-communist countries including Romania. Carrying out a panel data analysis over the 1995-2012 period on Romanian NUTSIII regions, the results showed a direct link between wage level and CVD mortality proving that the higher wages reach, the lower mortality is, thus confirming assumed materialist hypothesis.

  17. Parathyroid hormone and vitamin D--markers for cardiovascular and all cause mortality in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierbeck, Louise Lind; Jensen, Torben Slott; Bang, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    To investigate levels of vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) in a population of heart failure (HF) patients, and to evaluate whether vitamin D and PTH are related to prognosis.......To investigate levels of vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) in a population of heart failure (HF) patients, and to evaluate whether vitamin D and PTH are related to prognosis....

  18. The association of incidentally detected heart valve calcification with future cardiovascular events

    OpenAIRE

    Gondrie, Martijn J. A.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Jacobs, Peter C.; Oen, Ay L.; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to investigate the prognostic value of incidental aortic valve calcification (AVC), mitral valve calcification (MVC) and mitral annular calcification (MAC) for cardiovascular events and non-rheumatic valve disease in particular on routine diagnostic chest CT. Methods The study followed a case-cohort design. 10410 patients undergoing chest CT were followed for a median period of 17 months. Patients referred for cardiovascular disease were excluded. A random sample of...

  19. Sirtuin 6 protects the heart from hypoxic damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksin-Matveev, Anna; Kanfi, Yariv; Hochhauser, Edith; Isak, Ahuva; Cohen, Haim Y.; Shainberg, Asher

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) is a protein associated with prolonged life expectancy. We investigated whether life extension is associated with cardioprotection against hypoxia. The proposed study is to develop approaches to reduce hypoxic damage through the use of the sirtuin pathway and to elucidate the mechanism involved. For that purpose we subjected cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice (TG) with over-expression of SIRT6, to hypoxic stress in cell cultures. We hypothesized that cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice subjected to prolonged hypoxia may release survival factors or fewer damage markers to protect them from hypoxic stress compared with wild type (WT) mice. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) released to the medium and propidium iodide (PI) binding, were markedly decreased following hypoxia in TG cardiomyocytes. The protective mechanism of SIRT6 over-expression includes the activation of pAMPKα pathway, the increased protein level of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2), the inhibition of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), the decrease of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the reduction in the protein level of phospho-protein kinase B (pAkt) during hypoxia. Together, all these processes impede the necrosis/apoptosis pathways leading to the improved survival of cardiomyocytes following hypoxia, which might explain life extension. - Highlights: • Sirtuin 6 is a protein associated with prolonged life expectancy. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 protects cardiocytes from hypoxia and oxidative stress. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 activates the pAMPKα pathway and the Bcl2 expression. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 decreases ROS formation and pAkt level during hypoxia. • These pathways protect cardiocytes from hypoxia and might explain lifespan extension

  20. Sirtuin 6 protects the heart from hypoxic damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksin-Matveev, Anna; Kanfi, Yariv [The Mina and Everard Goodman, Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel); Hochhauser, Edith [The Laboratory of the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Rabin Medical Center, Petach Tikva (Israel); Isak, Ahuva; Cohen, Haim Y. [The Mina and Everard Goodman, Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel); Shainberg, Asher, E-mail: asher.shainberg@gmail.com [The Mina and Everard Goodman, Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) is a protein associated with prolonged life expectancy. We investigated whether life extension is associated with cardioprotection against hypoxia. The proposed study is to develop approaches to reduce hypoxic damage through the use of the sirtuin pathway and to elucidate the mechanism involved. For that purpose we subjected cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice (TG) with over-expression of SIRT6, to hypoxic stress in cell cultures. We hypothesized that cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice subjected to prolonged hypoxia may release survival factors or fewer damage markers to protect them from hypoxic stress compared with wild type (WT) mice. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) released to the medium and propidium iodide (PI) binding, were markedly decreased following hypoxia in TG cardiomyocytes. The protective mechanism of SIRT6 over-expression includes the activation of pAMPKα pathway, the increased protein level of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2), the inhibition of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), the decrease of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the reduction in the protein level of phospho-protein kinase B (pAkt) during hypoxia. Together, all these processes impede the necrosis/apoptosis pathways leading to the improved survival of cardiomyocytes following hypoxia, which might explain life extension. - Highlights: • Sirtuin 6 is a protein associated with prolonged life expectancy. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 protects cardiocytes from hypoxia and oxidative stress. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 activates the pAMPKα pathway and the Bcl2 expression. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 decreases ROS formation and pAkt level during hypoxia. • These pathways protect cardiocytes from hypoxia and might explain lifespan extension.

  1. Task demands and the pressures of everyday life: associations between cardiovascular reactivity and work blood pressure and heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steptoe, A; Cropley, M; Joekes, K

    2000-01-01

    Associations between cardiovascular stress reactivity and blood pressure and heart rate recorded in everyday life were hypothesized to depend on the stressfulness of the ambulatory monitoring period relative to standardized tasks and on activity levels at the time of measurement. One hundred two female and 60 male school teachers carried out high- and low-demand tasks under standardized conditions and ambulatory monitoring during the working day. Stress ratings during the day were close to those recorded during the low-demand task. Reactions to the low-demand task were significant predictors of ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate independent of baseline, age, gender, and body mass. Associations were more consistent for ambulatory recordings taken when participants were seated than when they were standing and when the ambulatory monitoring day was considered to be as stressful as usual or more stressful than usual, and not less stressful than usual. Laboratory-field associations of cardiovascular activity depend in part on the congruence of stressfulness and physical activity level in the 2 situations.

  2. Assessing the consequences of gestational diabetes mellitus on offspring's cardiovascular health: MySweetHeart Cohort study protocol, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bernardo, Stefano; Mivelaz, Yvan; Epure, Adina Mihaela; Vial, Yvan; Simeoni, Umberto; Bovet, Pascal; Estoppey Younes, Sandrine; Chiolero, Arnaud; Sekarski, Nicole

    2017-11-14

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a state of glucose intolerance with onset during pregnancy. GDM carries prenatal and perinatal risks as well as long-term risks for the mother and her child. GDM may be involved in the foetal programming of long-term cardiovascular health. However, evidence is sparse and the effect of GDM on cardiovascular health is unknown. To address these issues, we will conduct MySweetHeart Cohort study. The objectives are to assess the effect of GDM on offspring's cardiovascular health early in life by using surrogate markers of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. This is a cohort study of 100 offspring of women with GDM and 100 offspring of women without GDM. At inclusion, a baseline assessment of the mothers will be conducted through means of self-report questionnaires, a researcher-administrated interview, blood pressure and anthropometric measurements, and a maternal blood sampling. Between the 30th and 34th weeks of gestation, a foetal echography will be performed to assess the foetal cardiac structure and function, the fetomaternal circulation and the hepatic volume. At birth, maternal and neonatal characteristics will be assessed. An echocardiography will be performed to assess cardiac structure and function 2-7 days after birth; carotid intima-media thickness will be also measured to assess vascular structure. MySweetHeart Cohort is linked to MySweetHeart Trial (clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02890693), a randomised controlled trial assessing the effect of a multidimensional interdisciplinary lifestyle and psychosocial intervention to improve the cardiometabolic and mental health of women with GDM and their offspring. A long-term follow-up of children is planned. Ethical approval has been obtained through the state Human Research Ethics Committee of the Canton de Vaud (study number 2016-00745). We aim to disseminate the findings through regional, national and international conferences and through peer-reviewed journals

  3. Understanding cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000759.htm Understanding cardiovascular disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... lead to heart attack or stroke. Types of Cardiovascular Disease Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common ...

  4. Estimating Longitudinal Risks and Benefits From Cardiovascular Preventive Therapies Among Medicare Patients: The Million Hearts Longitudinal ASCVD Risk Assessment Tool: A Special Report From the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Huffman, Mark D; Karmali, Kunal N; Sanghavi, Darshak M; Wright, Janet S; Pelser, Colleen; Gulati, Martha; Masoudi, Frederick A; Goff, David C

    2017-03-28

    The Million Hearts Initiative has a goal of preventing 1 million heart attacks and strokes-the leading causes of mortality-through several public health and healthcare strategies by 2017. The American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology support the program. The Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Model was developed by Million Hearts and the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services as a strategy to assess a value-based payment approach toward reduction in 10-year predicted risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) by implementing cardiovascular preventive strategies to manage the "ABCS" (aspirin therapy in appropriate patients, blood pressure control, cholesterol management, and smoking cessation). The purpose of this special report is to describe the development and intended use of the Million Hearts Longitudinal ASCVD Risk Assessment Tool. The Million Hearts Tool reinforces and builds on the "2013 ACC/AHA Guideline on the Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk" by allowing clinicians to estimate baseline and updated 10-year ASCVD risk estimates for primary prevention patients adhering to the appropriate ABCS over time, alone or in combination. The tool provides updated risk estimates based on evidence from high-quality systematic reviews and meta-analyses of the ABCS therapies. This novel approach to personalized estimation of benefits from risk-reducing therapies in primary prevention may help target therapies to those in whom they will provide the greatest benefit, and serves as the basis for a Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services program designed to evaluate the Million Hearts Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Model. Copyright © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc., and the American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of the heart as the critical site of adenosine mediated embryo protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greene Robert W

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our understanding of the mechanisms that protect the developing embryo from intrauterine stress is limited. Recently, adenosine has been demonstrated to play a critical role in protecting the embryo against hypoxia via adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs, which are expressed in the heart, nervous system, and other sites during development. However, the sites of A1AR action that mediate embryo protection are not known. To determine if the heart is a key site of adenosine-mediated embryo protection, A1ARs were selectively deleted in the embryonic heart using a Cre-LoxP system in which the alpha-myosin heavy chain promoter drives Cre-recombinase expression and excision of the A1AR gene from cardiomyocytes. Results With increasing exposure of maternal hypoxia (10% O2 from 48-96 hours beginning at embryonic day (E 8.5, embryo viability decreased in the cardiac-A1AR deleted embryos. 48 hours of hypoxia reduced embryonic viability by 49% in embryos exposed from E10.5-12.5 but no effect on viability was observed in younger embryos exposed to hypoxia from E8.5-10.5. After 72 hours of hypoxia, 57.8% of the cardiac-A1AR deleted embryos were either dead or re-absorbed compared to 13.7% of control littermates and after 96 hours 81.6% of cardiac-A1AR deleted embryos were dead or re-absorbed. After 72 hours of hypoxia, cardiac size was reduced significantly more in the cardiac-A1AR deleted hearts compared to controls. Gene expression analysis revealed clusters of genes that are regulated by both hypoxia and A1AR expression. Conclusions These data identify the embryonic heart as the critical site where adenosine acts to protect the embryo against hypoxia. As such these studies identify a previously unrecognized mechanism of embryo protection.

  6. Clinical characteristics of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems in patients with combination of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Vyshnyvetskyy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work was to assess the respiratory and cardiovascular systems of patients with a combination of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and congestive heart failure (CHF. Materials and methods. The study included 177 patients who had been diagnosed COPD by criteria GOLD. CHF was diagnosed in 77 (43.5 % cases – 29 (16.4 % with reduced systolic function and 48 (27.1 % with preserved systolic function. We analyzed some important parameters characterizing respiratory and cardiovascular systems. We tried to identify statistically significant difference of parameters between patients with COPD and those with COPD and CHF. Moreover, patients with CHF were evaluated as a whole, and separately with reduced and with preserved systolic function. Results. Thus, we observed significant deterioration in general clinical, laboratory, spirometric and echocardiographic parameters depending on the presence and severity of CHF in patients with COPD. In particular, the presence of CHF, especially with impaired systolic function significantly impair indicators such as incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and signs of ischemia on the ECG, NT-proBNP levels, prevalence of concentric, eccentric hypertrophy and concentric LV remodeling and diastolic dysfunction type "relaxation disorder", and incidence of a-wave absence during assessment of motion of the rear pulmonary artery valve wall. Listed changes as well as some of the tendencies that have not reached a certain level of significance, indicate that patients with COPD and concomitant CHF, especially with impaired systolic function, worsens general clinical parameters (breath rate, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, frequency arrhythmias and myocardial ischemia on ECG; laboratory levels of hemoglobin, hematocrit, cholesterol, glomerular filtration rate; spirometric indicators of bronchial obstruction (FEV1, FVC, instant volume expiratory flow rates; echocardiographic indicators suggest the

  7. Heart valve prostheses: who protects our patients, and from what?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, A C

    1977-01-01

    Phenomenal advances in the development of cardiac valve prostheses have taken place in less than two decades. However, the currently prevailing atmosphere of consumer protectionism in existence 20 years ago probably would have made such developments impossible. Recent passage of the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (P.L. 94-295) will not only make future development extremely difficult, but also may force the field of cardiac valve replacement back into the era of the 1950s. Regulations implementing this legislation may be even more disastrous. It is time for someone to protect patients from their so-called protectors.

  8. Potential Cardiovascular and Renal Protective Effects of Vitamin D and Coenzyme Q10 in l-NAME-Induced Hypertensive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamardl, Hanan A; El-Ashmony, Sahar M; Kamel, Hala F; Fatani, Sameer H

    2017-08-01

    Hypertension is one of the primary modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Adequate vitamin D (vit D) levels have been shown to reduce vascular smooth muscle contraction and to increase arterial compliance, which may be beneficial in hypertension. Further, coenzyme Q10 (COQ10) through its action to lower oxidative stress has been reported to have beneficial effects on hypertension and heart failure. This study examined the possible cardiac and renal protective effects of vit D and COQ10 both separately and in combination with an angiotensin II receptor blocker, valsartan (vals) in l-NAME hypertensive rats. Hypertension was induced in rats by l-NAME administration. Following induction of hypertension, the rats were assigned into the following 6 subgroups: an l-NAME alone group and treated groups receiving the following drugs intraperitoneally for 6 weeks; vals, vit D, COQ10 and combination of vals with either vit D or COQ10. A group of normotensive rats were used as negative controls. At the end of the treatment period, blood pressure, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, lipids and serum, cardiac and renal parameters of oxidative stress were measured. Compared to the l-NAME only group, all treatments lowered systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressure, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and creatinine levels as well as TNF-α and malondialdehyde. Further, the agents increased serum, cardiac and renal total antioxidant capacity. Interestingly, the combination of agents had further effects on all the parameters compared to treatment with each single agent. The study suggests that the additive protective effects of vit D and COQ10 when used alone or concurrent with vals treatment in hypertensive rats may be due to their effects as antioxidants, anticytokines and blood pressure conservers. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of noninvasive cardiovascular testing, applied clinical nutrition and nutritional supplements in the prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Mark

    2018-03-01

    Numerous clinical trials suggest that we have reached a limit in our ability to decrease the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) utilizing the traditional diagnostic evaluation, prevention and treatment strategies for the top five cardiovascular risk factors of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, obesity and smoking. About 80% of heart disease (heart attacks, angina, coronary heart disease and congestive heart failure) can be prevented by optimal nutrition, optimal exercise, optimal weight and body composition, mild alcohol intake and avoiding smoking. Statistics show that approximately 50% of patients continue to have CHD or myocardial infarction (MI) despite presently defined 'normal' levels of the five risk factors listed above. This is often referred to as the 'CHD gap'. Novel and more accurate definitions and evaluations of these top five risk factors are required, such as 24 h ambulatory blood pressure (ABM) results, advanced lipid profiles, redefined fasting and 2 h dysglycemia parameters, a focus on visceral obesity and body composition and the effects of adipokines on cardiovascular risk. There are numerous traumatic insults from the environment that damage the cardiovascular system but there are only three finite vascular endothelial responses, which are inflammation, oxidative stress and immune vascular dysfunction. In addition, the concept of translational cardiovascular medicine is mandatory in order to correlate the myriad of CHD risk factors to the presence or absence of functional or structural damage to the vascular system, preclinical and clinical CHD. This can be accomplished by utilizing advanced and updated CV risk scoring systems, new and redefined CV risk factors and biomarkers, micronutrient testing, cardiovascular genetics, nutrigenomics, metabolomics, genetic expression testing and noninvasive cardiovascular testing.

  10. The role of 17-beta estradiol in ischemic preconditioning protection of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, Fawzi A; Hoteit, Lamia J; Joseph, Shaji; Mustafa, Abu Salim; Juggi, Jasbir S

    2012-09-01

    The protective effects of 17-beta estradiol (E2) on cardiac tissue during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury have not yet been fully elucidated. To assess the protective effects of short- and long-term E2 treatments on cardiac tissue exposed to I/R, and to assess the effects of these treatments in combination with ischemic preconditioning (IPC) on cardiac protection from I/R injury. SPRAGUE DAWLEY RATS WERE ASSIGNED TO THE FOLLOWING TREATMENT PROTOCOLS: control (no preconditioning); IPC (isolated hearts were subjected to two cycles of 5 min global ischemia followed by 10 min of reperfusion); E2 preconditioning (E2PC; isolated hearts were subjected to E2 pharmacological perfusion for 15 min); short-term in vivo E2 pretreatment for 3 h; long-term in vivo E2 pretreatment or withdrawal (ovariectomy followed by a six-week treatment with E2 or a placebo); combined IPC and E2PC; combined IPC and short- or long-term E2 pretreatments or withdrawal. All hearts were isolated and stabilized for at least 30 min before being subjected to 40 min of global ischemia followed by 30 min of reperfusion; left ventricular function and vascular hemodynamics were then assessed. IPC, E2PC and short-term E2 pretreatment led to the recovery of left ventricle function and vascular hemodynamics. Long-term E2 and placebo treatments did not result in any protection compared with untreated controls. The combination of E2PC or short-term E2 treatments with IPC did not block the IPC protection or result in any additional protection to the heart. Long-term E2 treatment blocked IPC protection; however, placebo treatment did not. Short-term treatment with E2 protected the heart against I/R injury through a pathway involving the regulation of tumour necrosis factor-alpha. The combination of short-term E2 treatment with IPC did not provide additional protection to the heart. Short-term E2 treatment may be a suitable alternative for classical estrogen replacement therapy.

  11. Farmers Have Hearts: The Prevalence of Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease Among a Subgroup of Irish Livestock Farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, Diana; Richardson, Noel; Osborne, Aoife

    2017-01-01

    Despite international findings that farmers have better health outcomes than other occupation groups, Irish farmers are found to be a high-risk group for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Early detection of CVD through preventive health measurements, such as screening of high-risk groups, can contribute to a reduction of CVD cases. Farmers, however, represent a "challenging" group in terms of engaging in preventive health behaviors. This study examined the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among male Irish livestock farmers who participated in heart screening as part of a workplace health intervention. In this cross-sectional study, data were collected from a convenience sample (N = 310) of farmers. Consent included permission to analyze the heart screening results and to participate in two follow-up questionnaires by phone at Week 1 (n = 224) and Week 12 (n = 172). All data were entered onto the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 22) and both descriptive and inferential statistics were compiled. Almost one in two (46%; n = 140) farmers had high blood pressure (≥140/≥90 mm Hg), and 46% (n = 140) had elevated total cholesterol. One third of farmers were found to be obese (35%; n = 110). The vast majority (83%; n = 255) had at least four risk factors for CVD based on the outcomes of the heart screening. The study findings in relation to obesity and the prevalence of multiple risk factors for CVD are a particular cause of concern and shed considerable light on the current excess burden of CVD among farmers in Ireland.

  12. (S)Partners for Heart Health: a school-based program for enhancing physical activity and nutrition to promote cardiovascular health in 5th grade students

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, Joseph J; Eisenmann, Joey C; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Jager, Kathleen B; Sehnert, Scott T; Yee, Kimbo E; Klavinski, Rita A; Feltz, Deborah L

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The American Heart Association Position Statement on Cardiovascular Health Promotion in Public Schools encourages school-based interventions for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) through risk factor prevention or reduction in children with an emphasis on creating an environment that promotes healthy food choices and physical activity (PA). In an effort to address issues related to CVD risk factors including obesity in Michigan children, a multi-discipl...

  13. Drug Does Not Improve Set of Cardiovascular Outcomes for Diastolic Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 270 sites spread across the United States, Canada, Argentina, Brazil, the Republic of Georgia, and Russia. Trial ... The other method required looked at a person's history of heart failure hospitalization within the last year. ...

  14. [Obesity and heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svačina, Štěpán

    2014-12-01

    Cardiovascular complications of obesity are traditionally considered an important complication of obesity. Obesity itself is probably not direct cause of atherosclerosis or coronary heart disease. This may occur indirectly in metabolic complications of obesity, especially diabetes and metabolic syndrome. However, thrombogenicity potential of obesity contributes to embolism and atherosclerosis development. In cardiology is well-known a phenomenon of obesity paradox when obese patients have better prognosis than thin. This is the case of heart failure and some other cardiovascular diseases. Recently, a new concept has emerged of myokines - hormones from muscle tissue that have extensive protective effects on organism and probably on heart. Whether heart is a source of myokines is uncertain. However, undoubted importance has epicardial and pericardial fatty tissue. The epicardial fatty tissue has mainly protective effects on myocardium. This fatty tissue may produce factors of inflammation affecting the myocardium. Relationship between amount of epicardial fatty tissue and coronary heart disease is rather pathogenic. Currently, it is certain that obesity brings more metabolic and cancer complications than cardiovascular and accurate contribution to pathogenic or protective character of fatty tissue in cardiology requires further research. Nevertheless, the conclusion is that adipose tissue of organism and around the heart may be in some circumstances beneficial.

  15. 10-Year Associations Between Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptors 1 and 2 and Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, Axel C; Ruge, Toralph; Kjøller, Erik

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to assess the associations and predictive powers between the soluble receptors for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (TNFR1 and TNFR2) and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with stable coronary heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: CLARICOR (Effect of Clarithromycin on Mortality...... and Morbidity in Patients With Ischemic Heart Disease) is a randomized clinical trial comparing clarithromycin with placebo in patients with stable coronary heart disease. The primary outcome was a composite of nonfatal acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina pectoris, cerebrovascular disease, and all...... factors improved prediction only modestly (concentrations of circulating TNFR1 and TNFR2 were associated with increased risks of cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with stable coronary heart disease. Yet, the utility of measuring TNFR1 and TNFR2 to improve risk...

  16. Protecting patients with cardiovascular diseases from catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment by health finance reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan; Fan, Yancun; McNeil, Edward

    2015-12-01

    To compare the incidences of catastrophic health expenditure (CHE) and impoverishment, the risk protection offered by two health financial reforms and to explore factors associated with CHE and impoverishment among patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in rural Inner Mongolia, China. Cross-sectional study conducted in 2014 in rural Inner Mongolia, China. Patients with CVDs aged over 18 years residing in the sample areas for at least one year were eligible. The definitions of CHE and impoverishment recommended by WHO were adopted. The protection of CHE and impoverishment was compared between the New Cooperative Medical Scheme (NCMS) alone and NCMS plus National Essential Medicines Scheme (NEMS) using the percentage change of incidences for CHE and impoverishment. Logistic regression was used to explore factors associated with CHE and impoverishment. The incidences of CHE and impoverishment under NCMS plus NEMS were 11.26% and 3.30%, respectively, which were lower than those under NCMS alone. The rates of protection were higher among households with patients with CVDs covered by NCMS plus NEMS (25.68% and 34.65%, respectively). NCMS plus NEMS could protect the poor households more from CHE but not impoverishment. NCMS plus NEMS protected more than one-fourth of households from CHE and more than one-third from impoverishment. NCMS plus NEMS was more effective at protecting households with patients with CVDs from CHE and impoverishment than NCMS alone. An integration of NCMS with NEMS should be expanded. However, further strategies to minimise catastrophic health expenditure after this health finance reform are still needed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Hyperoxic preconditioning fails to confer additional protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in acute diabetic rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourkhalili, Khalil; Hajizadeh, Sohrab; Akbari, Zahra; Dehaj, Mansour Esmaili; Akbarzadeh, Samad; Alizadeh, Alimohammad

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies show that detrimental effects of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury can be attenuated by hyperoxic preconditioning in normal hearts, however, there are few studies about hyperoxia effects in diseased myocardium. The present study was designed to assess the cardioprotective effects of hyperoxia pretreatment (≥ 95 % O2) in acute diabetic rat hearts. Normal and one week acute diabetic rats were either exposed to 60 (H60) and 180 (H180) min of hyperoxia or exposed to normal atmospheric air (21 % O2). Then hearts were isolated immediately and subjected to 30 min of regional ischemia followed by 120 min of reperfusion. Infarct size, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, enzymes release and ischemia induced arrhythmias were determined. Heart of diabetic control rats had less infarct size and decreased LDH and CK-MB release compared to normal hearts. 60 and 180 min of hyperoxia reduced myocardial infarct size and enzymes release in normal hearts. 180 min of hyperoxia also decreased cardiomyocytes apoptosis in normal state. On the other hand, protective values of hyperoxia were not significantly different in diabetic hearts. Moreover, hyperoxia reduced severity of ventricular arrhythmias in normal rat hearts whereas; it did not confer any additional antiarrhythmic protection in diabetic hearts. These findings suggest that diabetic hearts are less susceptible to ischemia-induced arrhythmias and infarction. Hyperoxia greatly protects rat hearts against I/R injury in normal hearts, however, it could not provide added cardioprotective effects in acute phase of diabetes.

  18. Dietary fats and cardiovascular disease: a presidential advisory from the American Heart Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading global cause of death, accounting for 17.3 million deaths per year. Preventive treatment that reduces CVD by even a small percentage can substantially reduce, nationally and globally, the number of people who develop CVD and the costs of caring for them. T...

  19. Cardiovascular metabolic syndrome - an interplay of, obesity, inflammation, diabetes and coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rana, J. S.; Nieuwdorp, M.; Jukema, J. W.; Kastelein, J. J. P.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is currently one of the biggest causes of morbidity and mortality facing humanity. Such a paradigm shift of disease pattern over the last century has only worsened due to the alarming global prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes. In recent years there is increasing focus

  20. The Heart's Content : The Association between Positive Psychological Well-Being and Cardiovascular Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Julia K.; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2012-01-01

    This review investigates the association between positive psychological well-being (PPWB) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). We also consider the mechanisms by which PPWB may be linked with CVD, focusing on the health behaviors (e.g., smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, sleep quality and quantity, and food consumption) and biological…

  1. Associations between aerobic and muscular fitness and cardiovascular disease risk : the northern Ireland young hearts study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, T.; Boreham, Colin A; Murray, Liam J; Twisk, Jos W R

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is not clear what the relative contribution is of specific components of physical fitness (aerobic and muscular) to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. We investigated associations between aerobic fitness (endurance) and muscular fitness (power) and CVD risk factors. METHODS: Data were

  2. Implementation of case management to reduce cardiovascular disease risk in the Stanford and San Mateo Heart to Heart randomized controlled trial: study protocol and baseline characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stafford Randall S

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Case management has emerged as a promising alternative approach to supplement traditional one-on-one sessions between patients and doctors for improving the quality of care in chronic diseases such as coronary heart disease (CHD. However, data are lacking in terms of its efficacy and cost-effectiveness when implemented in ethnic and low-income populations. Methods The Stanford and San Mateo Heart to Heart (HTH project is a randomized controlled clinical trial designed to rigorously evaluate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a multi-risk cardiovascular case management program in low-income, primarily ethnic minority patients served by a local county health care system in California. Randomization occurred at the patient level. The primary outcome measure is the absolute CHD risk over 10 years. Secondary outcome measures include adherence to guidelines on CHD prevention practice. We documented the study design, methodology, and baseline sociodemographic, clinical and lifestyle characteristics of 419 participants. Results We achieved equal distributions of the sociodemographic, biophysical and lifestyle characteristics between the two randomization groups. HTH participants had a mean age of 56 years, 63% were Latinos/Hispanics, 65% female, 61% less educated, and 62% were not employed. Twenty percent of participants reported having a prior cardiovascular event. 10-year CHD risk averaged 18% in men and 13% in women despite a modest low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level and a high on-treatment percentage at baseline. Sixty-three percent of participants were diagnosed with diabetes and an additional 22% had metabolic syndrome. In addition, many participants had depressed high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol levels and elevated values of total cholesterol-to-HDL ratio, triglycerides, triglyceride-to-HDL ratio, and blood pressure. Furthermore, nearly 70% of participants were obese, 45% had a family history of CHD or

  3. Heart health in Lebanon and considerations for addressing the burden of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deek, Hiba; Newton, Phillip; Inglis, Sally; Kabbani, Samer; Noureddine, Samar; Macdonald, Peter S; Davidson, Patricia M

    2015-01-01

    Lebanon is a small country located at the western boundary of the Middle East. Approximately 40% of health care in Lebanon is financed by the public sector. Cardiovascular diseases in Lebanon are scarcely addressed in the literature raising the need for baseline data on these health condition to be better treated. To (1) aggregate and define the burden of cardiovascular disease in Lebanon and (2) describe implications for policy, practice and research to improve health outcomes in Lebanon. An integrative review was conducted of both peer-reviewed papers and unpublished reports. CINAHL, Medline, Google Scholar and Academic Search Complete were searched along with the websites of The World Health Organization, Ministry of Public Health Lebanon and Central Intelligence Agency of Lebanon. No year limit was applied to our search. The search yielded 28 peer-reviewed articles and 15 reports. Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Lebanon and is also the primary cause of hospital admission. A range of social, political, economic and cultural factors explain the burden of cardiovascular diseases, some of these risks are culture specific such as the arghile smoking and the high rates of familial hypercholesterolemia. Workforce shortage produced by high rates of migrating nurses also has an implication on the patients' outcomes. Conclusion: Much of the presented data are sourced from the gray literature; more research, using systematic and prospective data collection methods, are needed to inform health services planning, delivery and evaluation. Primary care needs to be enhanced to produce better outcomes for a population with high profile of cardiovascular risk factors.

  4. Living healthier for longer: Comparative effects of three heart-healthy behaviors on life expectancy with and without cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeters Anna

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-smoking, having a normal weight and increased levels of physical activity are perhaps the three key factors for preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD. However, the relative effects of these factors on healthy longevity have not been well described. We aimed to calculate and compare the effects of non-smoking, normal weight and physical activity in middle-aged populations on life expectancy with and without cardiovascular disease. Methods Using multi-state life tables and data from the Framingham Heart Study (n = 4634 we calculated the effects of three heart healthy behaviours among populations aged 50 years and over on life expectancy with and without cardiovascular disease. For the life table calculations, we used hazard ratios for 3 transitions (No CVD to CVD, no CVD to death, and CVD to death by health behaviour category, and adjusted for age, sex, and potential confounders. Results High levels of physical activity, never smoking (men, and normal weight were each associated with 20-40% lower risks of developing CVD as compared to low physical activity, current smoking and obesity, respectively. Never smoking and high levels of physical activity reduced the risks of dying in those with and without a history of CVD, but normal weight did not. Never-smoking was associated with the largest gains in total life expectancy (4.3 years, men, 4.1 years, women and CVD-free life expectancy (3.8 and 3.4 years, respectively. High levels of physical activity and normal weight were associated with lesser gains in total life expectancy (3.5 years, men and 3.4 years, women, and 1.3 years, men and 1.0 year women, respectively, and slightly lesser gains in CVD-free life expectancy (3.0 years, men and 3.1 years, women, and 3.1 years men and 2.9 years women, respectively. Normal weight was the only behaviour associated with a reduction in the number of years lived with CVD (1.8 years, men and 1.9 years, women. Conclusions Achieving high

  5. Cardiovascular oscillations at the bedside: early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis using heart rate characteristics monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorman, J Randall; Lake, Douglas E; Delos, John B; Flower, Abigail A; Cao, Hanqing; Kovatchev, Boris P; Richman, Joshua S

    2011-01-01

    We have applied principles of statistical signal processing and nonlinear dynamics to analyze heart rate time series from premature newborn infants in order to assist in the early diagnosis of sepsis, a common and potentially deadly bacterial infection of the bloodstream. We began with the observation of reduced variability and transient decelerations in heart rate interval time series for hours up to days prior to clinical signs of illness. We find that measurements of standard deviation, sample asymmetry and sample entropy are highly related to imminent clinical illness. We developed multivariable statistical predictive models, and an interface to display the real-time results to clinicians. Using this approach, we have observed numerous cases in which incipient neonatal sepsis was diagnosed and treated without any clinical illness at all. This review focuses on the mathematical and statistical time series approaches used to detect these abnormal heart rate characteristics and present predictive monitoring information to the clinician

  6. Effectiveness of a Walking Group Intervention to Promote Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Health in Predominantly Non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic Urban Neighborhoods: Findings from the Walk Your Heart to Health Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Amy J.; Israel, Barbara A.; Mentz, Graciela B.; Bernal, Cristina; Caver, Deanna; DeMajo, Ricardo; Diaz, Gregoria; Gamboa, Cindy; Gaines, Causandra; Hoston, Bernadine; Opperman, Alisha; Reyes, Angela G.; Rowe, Zachary; Sand, Sharon L.; Woods, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the "Walk Your Heart to Health" ("WYHH") intervention, one component of the multilevel Community Approaches to Cardiovascular Health: Pathways to Heart Health (CATCH:PATH) intervention designed to promote physical activity and reduce cardiovascular risk…

  7. Trust your gut: galvanizing nutritional interest in intestinal cholesterol metabolism for protection against cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Casey J; Kim, Bohkyung; Lee, Jiyoung

    2013-01-16

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the intestine is a key target organ for overall health and longevity. Complementing these studies is the discovery of the trans-intestinal cholesterol efflux pathway and the emerging role of the intestine in reverse cholesterol transport. The surfacing dynamics of the regulation of cholesterol metabolism in the intestine provides an attractive platform for intestine-specific nutritional intervention strategies to lower blood cholesterol levels for protection against cardiovascular diseases. Notably, there is mounting evidence that stimulation of pathways associated with calorie restriction may have a large effect on the regulation of cholesterol removal by the intestine. However, intestinal energy metabolism, specifically the idiosyncrasies surrounding intestinal responses to energy deprivation, is poorly understood. The goal of this paper is to review recent insights into cholesterol regulation by the intestine and to discuss the potential for positive regulation of intestine-driven cholesterol removal through the nutritional induction of pathways associated with calorie restriction.

  8. Trust Your Gut: Galvanizing Nutritional Interest in Intestinal Cholesterol Metabolism for Protection Against Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoung Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that the intestine is a key target organ for overall health and longevity. Complementing these studies is the discovery of the trans-intestinal cholesterol efflux pathway and the emerging role of the intestine in reverse cholesterol transport. The surfacing dynamics of the regulation of cholesterol metabolism in the intestine provides an attractive platform for intestine-specific nutritional intervention strategies to lower blood cholesterol levels for protection against cardiovascular diseases. Notably, there is mounting evidence that stimulation of pathways associated with calorie restriction may have a large effect on the regulation of cholesterol removal by the intestine. However, intestinal energy metabolism, specifically the idiosyncrasies surrounding intestinal responses to energy deprivation, is poorly understood. The goal of this paper is to review recent insights into cholesterol regulation by the intestine and to discuss the potential for positive regulation of intestine-driven cholesterol removal through the nutritional induction of pathways associated with calorie restriction.

  9. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Cardiovascular Disease Modeling and Precision Medicine: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musunuru, Kiran; Sheikh, Farah; Gupta, Rajat M; Houser, Steven R; Maher, Kevin O; Milan, David J; Terzic, Andre; Wu, Joseph C

    2018-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer an unprece-dented opportunity to study human physiology and disease at the cellular level. They also have the potential to be leveraged in the practice of precision medicine, for example, personalized drug testing. This statement comprehensively describes the provenance of iPSC lines, their use for cardiovascular disease modeling, their use for precision medicine, and strategies through which to promote their wider use for biomedical applications. Human iPSCs exhibit properties that render them uniquely qualified as model systems for studying human diseases: they are of human origin, which means they carry human genomes; they are pluripotent, which means that in principle, they can be differentiated into any of the human body's somatic cell types; and they are stem cells, which means they can be expanded from a single cell into millions or even billions of cell progeny. iPSCs offer the opportunity to study cells that are genetically matched to individual patients, and genome-editing tools allow introduction or correction of genetic variants. Initial progress has been made in using iPSCs to better understand cardiomyopathies, rhythm disorders, valvular and vascular disorders, and metabolic risk factors for ischemic heart disease. This promising work is still in its infancy. Similarly, iPSCs are only just starting to be used to identify the optimal medications to be used in patients from whom the cells were derived. This statement is intended to (1) summarize the state of the science with respect to the use of iPSCs for modeling of cardiovascular traits and disorders and for therapeutic screening; (2) identify opportunities and challenges in the use of iPSCs for disease modeling and precision medicine; and (3) outline strategies that will facilitate the use of iPSCs for biomedical applications. This statement is not intended to address the use of stem cells as regenerative therapy, such as transplantation into the body to

  10. Projected Costs of Informal Caregiving for Cardiovascular Disease: 2015 to 2035: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Sandra B; Khavjou, Olga A; Bakas, Tamilyn; Hunt, Gail; Kirch, Rebecca A; Leib, Alyssa R; Morrison, R Sean; Poehler, Diana C; Roger, Veronique L; Whitsel, Laurie P

    2018-05-08

    In a recent report, the American Heart Association estimated that medical costs and productivity losses of cardiovascular disease (CVD) are expected to grow from $555 billion in 2015 to $1.1 trillion in 2035. Although the burden is significant, the estimate does not include the costs of family, informal, or unpaid caregiving provided to patients with CVD. In this analysis, we estimated projections of costs of informal caregiving attributable to CVD for 2015 to 2035. We used data from the 2014 Health and Retirement Survey to estimate hours of informal caregiving for individuals with CVD by age/sex/race using a zero-inflated binomial model and controlling for sociodemographic factors and health conditions. Costs of informal caregiving were estimated separately for hypertension, coronary heart disease, heart failure, stroke, and other heart disease. We analyzed data from a nationally representative sample of 16 731 noninstitutionalized adults ≥54 years of age. The value of caregiving hours was monetized by the use of home health aide workers' wages. The per-person costs were multiplied by census population counts to estimate nation-level costs and to be consistent with other American Heart Association analyses of burden of CVD, and the costs were projected from 2015 through 2035, assuming that within each age/sex/racial group, CVD prevalence and caregiving hours remain constant. The costs of informal caregiving for patients with CVD were estimated to be $61 billion in 2015 and are projected to increase to $128 billion in 2035. Costs of informal caregiving of patients with stroke constitute more than half of the total costs of CVD informal caregiving ($31 billion in 2015 and $66 billion in 2035). By age, costs are the highest among those 65 to 79 years of age in 2015 but are expected to be surpassed by costs among those ≥80 years of age by 2035. Costs of informal caregiving for patients with CVD represent an additional 11% of medical and productivity costs

  11. Feasibility of Obtaining Measures of Lifestyle From a Smartphone App: The MyHeart Counts Cardiovascular Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Michael V; Shcherbina, Anna; Pavlovic, Aleksandra; Homburger, Julian R; Goldfeder, Rachel L; Waggot, Daryl; Cho, Mildred K; Rosenberger, Mary E; Haskell, William L; Myers, Jonathan; Champagne, Mary Ann; Mignot, Emmanuel; Landray, Martin; Tarassenko, Lionel; Harrington, Robert A; Yeung, Alan C; Ashley, Euan A

    2017-01-01

    Studies have established the importance of physical activity and fitness, yet limited data exist on the associations between objective, real-world physical activity patterns, fitness, sleep, and cardiovascular health. To assess the feasibility of obtaining measures of physical activity, fitness, and sleep from smartphones and to gain insights into activity patterns associated with life satisfaction and self-reported disease. The MyHeart Counts smartphone app was made available in March 2015, and prospective participants downloaded the free app between March and October 2015. In this smartphone-based study of cardiovascular health, participants recorded physical activity, filled out health questionnaires, and completed a 6-minute walk test. The app was available to download within the United States. The feasibility of consent and data collection entirely on a smartphone, the use of machine learning to cluster participants, and the associations between activity patterns, life satisfaction, and self-reported disease. From the launch to the time of the data freeze for this study (March to October 2015), the number of individuals (self-selected) who consented to participate was 48 968, representing all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Their median age was 36 years (interquartile range, 27-50 years), and 82.2% (30 338 male, 6556 female, 10 other, and 3115 unknown) were male. In total, 40 017 (81.7% of those who consented) uploaded data. Among those who consented, 20 345 individuals (41.5%) completed 4 of the 7 days of motion data collection, and 4552 individuals (9.3%) completed all 7 days. Among those who consented, 40 017 (81.7%) filled out some portion of the questionnaires, and 4990 (10.2%) completed the 6-minute walk test, made available only at the end of 7 days. The Heart Age Questionnaire, also available after 7 days, required entering lipid values and age 40 to 79 years (among 17 245 individuals, 43.1% of participants). Consequently, 1334 (2

  12. Merging Electronic Health Record Data and Genomics for Cardiovascular Research: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jennifer L; Ryan, John J; Bray, Bruce E; Brown, Candice; Lanfear, David; Newby, L Kristin; Relling, Mary V; Risch, Neil J; Roden, Dan M; Shaw, Stanley Y; Tcheng, James E; Tenenbaum, Jessica; Wang, Thomas N; Weintraub, William S

    2016-04-01

    The process of scientific discovery is rapidly evolving. The funding climate has influenced a favorable shift in scientific discovery toward the use of existing resources such as the electronic health record. The electronic health record enables long-term outlooks on human health and disease, in conjunction with multidimensional phenotypes that include laboratory data, images, vital signs, and other clinical information. Initial work has confirmed the utility of the electronic health record for understanding mechanisms and patterns of variability in disease susceptibility, disease evolution, and drug responses. The addition of biobanks and genomic data to the information contained in the electronic health record has been demonstrated. The purpose of this statement is to discuss the current challenges in and the potential for merging electronic health record data and genomics for cardiovascular research. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Assessing the impact of the heart of New Ulm Project on cardiovascular disease risk factors: A population-based program to reduce cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebottom, Abbey C; Sillah, Arthur; Vock, David M; Miedema, Michael D; Pereira, Raquel; Benson, Gretchen; Lindberg, Rebecca; Boucher, Jackie L; Knickelbine, Thomas; VanWormer, Jeffrey J

    2018-04-07

    The Heart of New Ulm Project (HONU), is a population-based project designed to reduce modifiable cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in the rural community of New Ulm, MN. HONU interventions address multiple levels of the social-ecological model. The community is served by one health system, enabling the use of electronic health record (EHR) data for surveillance. The purpose of this study was to assess if trends in CVD risk factors and healthcare utilization differed between a cohort of New Ulm residents age 40-79 and matched controls selected from a similar community, using EHR data from baseline (2008-2009) through three follow up time periods (2010-2011, 2012-2013, 2014-2015). Matching, using covariate balance sparse technique, yielded a sample of 4077 New Ulm residents and 4077 controls. We used mixed effects longitudinal models to examine trends over time between the two groups. Blood pressure, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and triglycerides showed better management in New Ulm over time compared to the controls. The proportion of residents in New Ulm with controlled blood pressure increased by 6.2 percentage points compared to an increase of 2 points in controls (p risk scores increased less in New Ulm (5.1) than the comparison community (5.9). The intervention and control community did not differ with regard to inpatient stays, smoking, or glucose. Findings suggest efficacy for the HONU project interventions for some outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Resting heart rate and risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Bang, Casper N; Berg, Ronan M G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An elevated resting heart rate (RHR) may be an early sign of cardiac failure, but its prognostic value during watchful waiting in asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) is largely unknown. METHODS: RHR was determined by annual ECGs in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS)...

  15. Hearts and minds: Coordination of neurocognitive and cardiovascular regulation in children and adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapman, H.A.; Woltering, S.; Lamm, C.; Lewis, M.D.

    2010-01-01

    Emotional reactions involve changes in both cognitive and bodily processes. Therefore, effective emotion regulation may also involve modulation of responses in both of these systems. The present study investigated the relationship between regulation of cognition and regulation of the heart in

  16. The relationship of cardiovascular risk factors and electrocardiographic findings: Isfahan Healthy Heart Program

    OpenAIRE

    Nizal Sarrafzadegan; Masoumeh Sadeghi; Forough Khademi; Mohammad Arash Ramezani; Mohammad Hashemi Jazi

    2012-01-01

       BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Various studies showed relationship between electrocardiographic (ECG) changes at rest and CVD mortality. Present study was performed to find the relation between ECG and CVD risk factors in an Iranian population.    METHODS: This cross-sectional study was performed on 3343 subjects aged ≥ 35 years from three provincial cities of Isfahan, Arak, and Najafabad. Demographic and lifesty...

  17. Fitness, work, and leisure-time physical activity and ischaemic heart disease and all-cause mortality among men with pre-existing cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, Andreas; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Burr, Hermann

    2010-01-01

    Our aim was to study the relative impact of physical fitness, physical demands at work, and physical activity during leisure time on ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and all-cause mortality among employed men with pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD)....

  18. "Soldier's Heart": A Genetic Basis for Elevated Cardiovascular Disease Risk Associated with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Harvey B; Shivakumar, Chittari; Starr, Joshua; Eidelman, Ofer; Jacobowitz, David M; Dalgard, Clifton L; Srivastava, Meera; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    "Soldier's Heart," is an American Civil War term linking post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with increased propensity for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We have hypothesized that there might be a quantifiable genetic basis for this linkage. To test this hypothesis we identified a comprehensive set of candidate risk genes for PTSD, and tested whether any were also independent risk genes for CVD. A functional analysis algorithm was used to identify associated signaling networks. We identified 106 PTSD studies that report one or more polymorphic variants in 87 candidate genes in 83,463 subjects and controls. The top upstream drivers for these PTSD risk genes are predicted to be the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) and Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFA). We find that 37 of the PTSD candidate risk genes are also candidate independent risk genes for CVD. The association between PTSD and CVD is significant by Fisher's Exact Test ( P = 3 × 10 -54 ). We also find 15 PTSD risk genes that are independently associated with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM; also significant by Fisher's Exact Test ( P = 1.8 × 10 -16 ). Our findings offer quantitative evidence for a genetic link between post-traumatic stress and cardiovascular disease, Computationally, the common mechanism for this linkage between PTSD and CVD is innate immunity and NFκB-mediated inflammation.

  19. Transformative Impact of Proteomics on Cardiovascular Health and Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Merry L; Mayr, Manuel; Gomes, Aldrin V; Delles, Christian; Arrell, D Kent; Murphy, Anne M; Lange, Richard A; Costello, Catherine E; Jin, Yu-Fang; Laskowitz, Daniel T; Sam, Flora; Terzic, Andre; Van Eyk, Jennifer; Srinivas, Pothur R

    2015-09-01

    The year 2014 marked the 20th anniversary of the coining of the term proteomics. The purpose of this scientific statement is to summarize advances over this period that have catalyzed our capacity to address the experimental, translational, and clinical implications of proteomics as applied to cardiovascular health and disease and to evaluate the current status of the field. Key successes that have energized the field are delineated; opportunities for proteomics to drive basic science research, facilitate clinical translation, and establish diagnostic and therapeutic healthcare algorithms are discussed; and challenges that remain to be solved before proteomic technologies can be readily translated from scientific discoveries to meaningful advances in cardiovascular care are addressed. Proteomics is the result of disruptive technologies, namely, mass spectrometry and database searching, which drove protein analysis from 1 protein at a time to protein mixture analyses that enable large-scale analysis of proteins and facilitate paradigm shifts in biological concepts that address important clinical questions. Over the past 20 years, the field of proteomics has matured, yet it is still developing rapidly. The scope of this statement will extend beyond the reaches of a typical review article and offer guidance on the use of next-generation proteomics for future scientific discovery in the basic research laboratory and clinical settings. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. The feasibility of exercise videogames for cardiovascular risk reduction among adults: a pilot for "Wii heart fitness".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serber, Eva R; Ciccolo, Joseph; Palmer, Kathy; Cobb, Victoria; Tilkemeier, Peter L; Bock, Beth C

    2016-03-01

    More than 30% of the U.S. population is prehypertensive, and the recommended treatment of lifestyle modification includes increased physical activity. Exercise videogames (EVG) are widely marketed to Americans as a means of increasing fitness. This study aimed to examine EVG among a sample of prehypertensive adults, to determine (1) feasibility and acceptability of EVG for physical activity, and (2) assess changes in (1) estimates of cardiovascular fitness and risk indices, and psychosocial constructs. Participants with prehypertension completed a 12-week program including; 36, 1-hour sessions; supervised EVG program using Nintendo Wii platform and games. Assessments were at baseline and 13 weeks. Paired t-tests were conducted. Fourteen adults (84% female; mean age=53 years; 93% Caucasian; 87% employed) completed the study. The study retention rate was 74% and all participants reported satisfaction and enjoyment in the intervention and using the Wii for exercise. Despite the small sample size, significant improvements were seen in: physical activity minutes (P<0.01), peak heart rate (P=0.02), resting systolic blood pressure (P=0.02), and hip circumference (P=0.03). Significant improvements were also seen in the 36-item short-form survey (SF-36) as for general health (P=0.05), role limitations due to emotional problems (P=0.04), and vitality (P=0.01). Findings support that an EVG program is feasible, acceptable, and promising in promoting benefit to cardiovascular fitness and psychosocial health. These data provide pilot data for the necessary randomized clinical trials to examine efficacy and sustainability of EVG for adult engagement in physical activity for cardiovascular health promotion.

  1. Aortic pulse wave velocity and HeartSCORE: improving cardiovascular risk stratification. a sub-analysis of the EDIVA (Estudo de DIstensibilidade VAscular) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, T; Maldonado, J; Polónia, J; Silva, J A; Morais, J; Rodrigues, T; Marques, M

    2014-04-01

    HeartSCORE is a tool for assessing cardiovascular risk, basing its estimates on the relative weight of conventional cardiovascular risk factors. However, new markers of cardiovascular risk have been identified, such as aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV). The purpose of this study was to evaluate to what extent the incorporation of PWV in HeartSCORE increases its discriminative power of major cardiovascular events (MACE). This study is a sub-analysis of the EDIVA project, which is a prospective cohort, multicenter and observational study involving 2200 individuals of Portuguese nationality (1290 men and 910 women) aged between 18 and 91 years (mean 46.33 ± 13.76 years), with annual measurements of PWV (Complior). Only participants above 35 years old were included in the present re-analysis, resulting in a population of 1709 participants. All MACE - death, cerebrovascular accident, coronary accidents (coronary heart disease), peripheral arterial disease and renal failure - were recorded. During a mean follow-up period of 21.42 ± 10.76 months, there were 47 non-fatal MACE (2.1% of the sample). Cardiovascular risk was estimated in all patients based on the HeartSCORE risk factors. For the analysis, the refitted HeartSCORE and PWV were divided into three risk categories. The event-free survival at 2 years was 98.6%, 98.0% and 96.1%, respectively in the low-, intermediate- and high-risk categories of HeartSCORE (log-rank p factor model. The C statistics improved from 0.69 to 0.78 (adding PWV, p = 0.005). The net reclassification improvement (NRI) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) were also determined, and indicated further evidence of improvements in discrimination of the outcome when including PWV in the risk-factor model (NRI = 0.265; IDI = 0.012). The results clearly illustrate the benefits of integrating PWV in the risk assessment strategies, as advocated by HeartSCORE, insofar as it contributes to a better discriminative capacity of global

  2. Association of β-Blocker Therapy With Risks of Adverse Cardiovascular Events and Deaths in Patients With Ischemic Heart Disease Undergoing Noncardiac Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Mérie, Charlotte; Jørgensen, Mads Wissenberg

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Clinical guidelines have been criticized for encouraging the use of β-blockers in noncardiac surgery despite weak evidence. Relevant clinical trials have been small and have not convincingly demonstrated an effect of β-blockers on hard end points (ie, perioperative myocardial infarction......, ischemic stroke, cardiovascular death, and all-cause death). OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of β-blocker treatment with major cardiovascular adverse events (MACE) and all-cause mortality in patients with ischemic heart disease undergoing noncardiac surgery. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, AND EXPOSURE...... to calculate the 30-day risks of MACE (ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, or cardiovascular death) and all-cause mortality associated with β-blocker therapy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Thirty-day risk of MACE and all-cause mortality. RESULTS: Of 28,263 patients with ischemic heart disease undergoing...

  3. Agonist of inward rectifier K+ channels enhances the protection of ischemic postconditioning in isolated rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Z; Feng, Z; Long, C

    2014-07-01

    Selective inhibition of inward rectifier K + channels could abolish the protection mediated by ischemic preconditioning, but the roles of these channels in ischemic postconditioning have not been well characterized. Our study aims to evaluate the effect of inward rectifier K + channels on the protection induced by ischemic postconditioning. Langendorff-perfused rat hearts (n=8 per group) were split into four groups: postconditioning hearts (IPO group); ischemic postconditioning with BaCl 2 hearts (PB group); ischemic postconditioning with zacopride hearts (PZ group); and without ischemic postconditioning (CON group). After suffering 30 minutes of global ischemia, groups IPO, PB and PZ went through 10 seconds of ischemic postconditioning with three different perfusates: respectively, Krebs-Henseleit buffer (IPO group); 20 μmol/L BaCl 2 (antagonist of the channel, PB group); 1 μmol/L zacopride (agonist of the channel, PZ group). At the end of reperfusion, the myocardial performance was better preserved in the PZ group than the other three groups. The PB group showed no significant differences from the CON group. Our study has shown that the I K1 channel agonist zacopride is associated with the enhancement of ischemic postconditioning. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. The pathophysiological basis of the protective effects of metformin in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziubak, Aleksandra; Wójcicka, Grażyna

    2017-08-24

    Metformin, currently recommended as the drug of first choice in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is one of the few antihiperglycemic drugs to reduce cardiovascular risk. Nonetheless, due to the risk of lactic acidosis during metformin therapy, its usage in patients with diabetes and heart failure (HF) is still a matter of debate. The aim of this review is to present data supporting the possibility of using metformin in the treatment of diabetic patients with concomitant heart failure. In the failing heart, metformin through the mechanism related to AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity, improves free fatty acids (FFA) and glucose metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis, as well as nitric oxide (NO)-NO synthase pathway. Metformin can also inhibit the generation and accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and thereby prevents the development of the adverse structural and functional changes in myocardium.In summary, experimental and clinical data indicate the ability of metformin to prevent the development of the structural and functional changes in myocardium, although further basic research and clinical studies assessing benefits and safety of metformin therapy in patients with HF are required.

  5. Comparing the new European cardiovascular disease prevention guideline with prior American Heart Association guidelines: an editorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ton, Van-Khue; Martin, Seth S; Blumenthal, Roger S; Blaha, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Atherosclerotic heart disease and stroke remain the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention can improve the well-being of a population and possibly cut downstream healthcare spending, and must be the centerpiece of any sustainable health economy model. As lifestyle and CVD risk factors differ among ethnicities, cultures, genders, and age groups, an accurate risk assessment model is the critical first step for guiding appropriate use of testing, lifestyle counseling resources, and preventive medications. Examples of such models include the US Framingham Risk Score and the European SCORE system. The European Society of Cardiology recently published an updated set of guidelines on CVD prevention. This review highlights the similarities and differences between European and US risk assessment models, as well as their respective recommendations on the use of advanced testing for further risk reclassification and the appropriate use of medications. In particular, we focus on head-to-head comparison of the new European guideline with prior American Heart Association statements (2002, 2010, and 2011) covering risk assessment and treatment of asymptomatic adults. Despite minor disagreements on the weight of recommendations in certain areas, such as the use of coronary calcium score and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in risk assessment, CVD prevention experts across the 2 continents agree on 1 thing: prevention works in halting the progression of atherosclerosis and decreasing disease burden over a lifetime. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Can Pediatric Hypertension Criteria Be Simplified? A Prediction Analysis of Subclinical Cardiovascular Outcomes From the Bogalusa Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Bo; Zhang, Tao; Li, Shengxu; Harville, Emily; Bazzano, Lydia; He, Jiang; Chen, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Prehypertension and hypertension in childhood are defined by sex-, age-, and height-specific 90th (or ≥120/80 mm Hg) and 95th percentiles of blood pressure, respectively, by the 2004 Fourth Report. However, these cutoffs are complex and cumbersome for use. This study assessed the performance of a simplified blood pressure definition to predict adult hypertension and subclinical cardiovascular disease. The cohort consisted of 1225 adults (530 men; aged 26.3-47.7 years) from the Bogalusa Heart Study with 27.1-year follow-up since childhood. We used 110/70 and 120/80 mm Hg for children (age, 6-11 years), and 120/80 and 130/85 mm Hg for adolescents (age, 12-17 years) as the simplified definition of childhood prehypertension and hypertension, respectively, to compare with the 2004 Fourth Report (the complex definition). Adult carotid intima-media thickness, pulse wave velocity, and left ventricular mass were measured using digital ultrasound instruments. Compared with normal blood pressure, childhood hypertensives diagnosed by the simplified definition and the complex definition were both at higher risk of adult hypertension with hazard ratio of 3.1 (95% confidence interval, 1.8-5.3) by the simplified definition and 3.2 (2.0-5.0) by the complex definition, high pulse wave velocity with 3.5 (1.7-7.1) and 2.2 (1.2-4.1), high carotid intima-media thickness with 3.1 (1.7-5.6) and 2.0 (1.2-3.6), and left ventricular hypertrophy with 3.4 (1.7-6.8) and 3.0 (1.6-5.6). The results were confirmed by reclassification or receiver operating curve analyses. The simplified childhood blood pressure definition predicts the risk of adult hypertension and subclinical cardiovascular disease equally as the complex definition does, which could be useful for screening hypertensive children to reduce risk of adult cardiovascular disease. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Segmented Symbolic Dynamics for Risk Stratification in Patients with Ischemic Heart Failure, Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Voss, Andreas; Schroeder, Rico; Caminal Magrans, Pere; Vallverdú Ferrer, Montserrat; Brunel, Helena; Cygankiewicz, I.; Vázquez, Rafael; Bayes de Luna, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is recognized as major and escalating public health problem. Approximately 69% of CHF patients suffer from cardiac death within 5 years after the initial diagnosis. Until now, no generally accepted ECG risk predictors in CHF patients are available. The objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of the new developed non-linear method segmented symbolic dynamics (SSD) for risk stratification in patients with ischemic cardiomyop...

  8. Novel protective role of endogenous cardiac myocyte P2X4 receptors in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tiehong; Shen, Jian-bing; Yang, Ronghua; Redden, John; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Grady, James; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Liang, Bruce T

    2014-05-01

    Heart failure (HF), despite continuing progress, remains a leading cause of mortality and morbidity. P2X4 receptors (P2X4R) have emerged as potentially important molecules in regulating cardiac function and as potential targets for HF therapy. Transgenic P2X4R overexpression can protect against HF, but this does not explain the role of native cardiac P2X4R. Our goal is to define the physiological role of endogenous cardiac myocyte P2X4R under basal conditions and during HF induced by myocardial infarction or pressure overload. Mice established with conditional cardiac-specific P2X4R knockout were subjected to left anterior descending coronary artery ligation-induced postinfarct or transverse aorta constriction-induced pressure overload HF. Knockout cardiac myocytes did not show P2X4R by immunoblotting or by any response to the P2X4R-specific allosteric enhancer ivermectin. Knockout hearts showed normal basal cardiac function but depressed contractile performance in postinfarct and pressure overload models of HF by in vivo echocardiography and ex vivo isolated working heart parameters. P2X4R coimmunoprecipitated and colocalized with nitric oxide synthase 3 (eNOS) in wild-type cardiac myocytes. Mice with cardiac-specific P2X4R overexpression had increased S-nitrosylation, cyclic GMP, NO formation, and were protected from postinfarct and pressure overload HF. Inhibitor of eNOS, L-N(5)-(1-iminoethyl)ornithine hydrochloride, blocked the salutary effect of cardiac P2X4R overexpression in postinfarct and pressure overload HF as did eNOS knockout. This study establishes a new protective role for endogenous cardiac myocyte P2X4R in HF and is the first to demonstrate a physical interaction between the myocyte receptor and eNOS, a mediator of HF protection. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Factors of health in the protection against death and cardiovascular disease among adults with subclinical atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    While cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention traditionally emphasizes risk-factor control, recent evidence also supports the promotion of "health-factors" associated with cardiovascular wellness. However, whether such health-factors exist among adults with advanced subclinical atherosclerosis is un...

  10. Multi-constituent cardiovascular pills (MCCP)--challenges and promises of population-based prophylactic drug therapy for prevention of heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Michael J; Naghavi, Morteza

    2007-01-01

    Risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) are highly co-prevalent but poorly identified and treated. The Screening for Heart Attack Prevention and Education (SHAPE) Task Force from the Association for Eradication of Heart Attack (AEHA) has recently proposed a new strategy that recommends screening for subclinical atherosclerosis and implementing aggressive treatment of "vulnerable patients". The Task Force has also envisioned future developments that may shift mass screening strategies to mass prophylactic therapy. The "Polypill" concept, introduced by Wald and Law suggests a combination of statin, low-dose antihypertensives, aspirin and folic acid, in a single pill, taken prophylactically by high risk population can cut CVD event rates by as much as 80%. In this communication, we review the challenges and promises of such a strategy. "Polypill" is but one of an astronomical number of possible multiconstituent pills (MCCP). Attractive as the MCCP concept is, it lacks evidence from randomized controlled trials, and begs numerous questions about the credibility of the concept, the design and synthesis of such complex pills, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, bioequivalence, "class" vs. unique properties, interactions, evidence of clinical efficacy and safety, regulatory approval, post-marketing surveillance, prescription vs. over-the-counter use, responsibility for initiating and monitoring therapy, patient education, counterfeiting and importation, reimbursement, advertisement, patent protection, commercial viability, etc. If these issues are favorably addressed, MCCP stand to dramatically change the manner in which CVD is prevented particularly in developing societies. Notwithstanding, assuming low commercial interests, realizing the promises of MCCP will demand serious attention from national public health policymakers. The clinical and regulatory implications of population-based secondary prevention (which rely on a different evidence base

  11. Population cardiovascular health and urban environments: the Heart Healthy Hoods exploratory study in Madrid, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama Bilal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our aim is to conduct an exploratory study to provide an in-depth characterization of a neighborhood’s social and physical environment in relation to cardiovascular health. A mixed-methods approach was used to better understand the food, alcohol, tobacco and physical activity domains of the urban environment. Methods We conducted this study in an area of 16,000 residents in Madrid (Spain. We obtained cardiovascular health and risk factors data from all residents aged 45 and above using Electronic Health Records from the Madrid Primary Health Care System. We used several quantitative audit tools to assess: the type and location of food outlets and healthy food availability; tobacco and alcohol points of sale; walkability of all streets and use of parks and public spaces. We also conducted 11 qualitative interviews with key informants to help understanding the relationships between urban environment and cardiovascular behaviors. We integrated quantitative and qualitative data following a mixed-methods merging approach. Results Electronic Health Records of the entire population of the area showed similar prevalence of risk factors compared to the rest of Madrid/Spain (prevalence of diabetes: 12 %, hypertension: 34 %, dyslipidemia: 32 %, smoking: 10 %, obesity: 20 %. The food environment was very dense, with many small stores (n = 44 and a large food market with 112 stalls. Residents highlighted the importance of these small stores for buying healthy foods. Alcohol and tobacco environments were also very dense (n = 91 and 64, respectively, dominated by bars and restaurants (n = 53 that also acted as food services. Neighbors emphasized the importance of drinking as a socialization mechanism. Public open spaces were mostly used by seniors that remarked the importance of accessibility to these spaces and the availability of destinations to walk to. Conclusion This experience allowed testing and refining

  12. Normal values for myocardial deformation within the right heart measured by feature-tracking cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boyang; Dardeer, Ahmed M; Moody, William E; Edwards, Nicola C; Hudsmith, Lucy E; Steeds, Richard P

    2018-02-01

    Reproducible and repeatable assessment of right heart function is vital for monitoring congenital and acquired heart disease. There is increasing evidence for the additional value of myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) in determining prognosis. This study aims to determine the reproducibility of deformation analyses in the right heart using cardiovascular magnetic resonance feature tracking (FT-CMR); and to establish normal ranges within an adult population. A cohort of 100 healthy subjects containing 10 males and 10 females from each decade of life between the ages of 20 and 70 without known congenital or acquired cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidaemia or renal, hepatic, haematologic and systemic inflammatory disorders underwent FT-CMR assessment of right ventricular (RV) and right atrial (RA) myocardial strain and strain rate. RV longitudinal strain (Ell) was -21.9±3.24% (FW+S Ell) and -24.2±3.59% (FW-Ell). Peak systolic strain rate (S') was -1.45±0.39s -1 (FW+S) and -1.54±0.41s -1 (FW). Early diastolic strain rate (E') was 1.04±0.26s -1 (FW+S) and 1.04±0.33s -1 (FW). Late diastolic strain rate (A') was 0.94±0.33s -1 (FW+S) and 1.08±0.33s -1 (FW). RA peak strain was -21.1±3.76%. The intra- and inter-observer ICC for RV Ell (FW+S) was 0.92 and 0.80 respectively, while for RA peak strain was 0.92 and 0.89 respectively. Normal values of RV & RA deformation for healthy individuals using FT-CMR are provided with good RV Ell and RA peak strain reproducibility. Strain rate suffered from sub-optimal reproducibility and may not be satisfactory for clinical use. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Acellular therapeutic approach for heart failure: in vitro production of extracellular vesicles from human cardiovascular progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Harane, Nadia; Kervadec, Anaïs; Bellamy, Valérie; Pidial, Laetitia; Neametalla, Hany J; Perier, Marie-Cécile; Lima Correa, Bruna; Thiébault, Léa; Cagnard, Nicolas; Duché, Angéline; Brunaud, Camille; Lemitre, Mathilde; Gauthier, Jeanne; Bourdillon, Alexandra T; Renault, Marc P; Hovhannisyan, Yeranuhi; Paiva, Solenne; Colas, Alexandre R; Agbulut, Onnik; Hagège, Albert; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Menasché, Philippe; Renault, Nisa K E

    2018-05-21

    We have shown that extracellular vesicles (EVs) secreted by embryonic stem cell-derived cardiovascular progenitor cells (Pg) recapitulate the therapeutic effects of their parent cells in a mouse model of chronic heart failure (CHF). Our objectives are to investigate whether EV released by more readily available cell sources are therapeutic, whether their effectiveness is influenced by the differentiation state of the secreting cell, and through which mechanisms they act. The total EV secreted by human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiovascular progenitors (iPSC-Pg) and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CM) were isolated by ultracentrifugation and characterized by Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, western blot, and cryo-electron microscopy. In vitro bioactivity assays were used to evaluate their cellular effects. Cell and EV microRNA (miRNA) content were assessed by miRNA array. Myocardial infarction was induced in 199 nude mice. Three weeks later, mice with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 45% received transcutaneous echo-guided injections of iPSC-CM (1.4 × 106, n = 19), iPSC-Pg (1.4 × 106, n = 17), total EV secreted by 1.4 × 106 iPSC-Pg (n = 19), or phosphate-buffered saline (control, n = 17) into the peri-infarct myocardium. Seven weeks later, hearts were evaluated by echocardiography, histology, and gene expression profiling, blinded to treatment group. In vitro, EV were internalized by target cells, increased cell survival, cell proliferation, and endothelial cell migration in a dose-dependent manner and stimulated tube formation. Extracellular vesicles were rich in miRNAs and most of the 16 highly abundant, evolutionarily conserved miRNAs are associated with tissue-repair pathways. In vivo, EV outperformed cell injections, significantly improving cardiac function through decreased left ventricular volumes (left ventricular end systolic volume: -11%, P < 0.001; left

  14. How insights from cardiovascular developmental biology have impacted the care of infants and children with congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Alvin J.; Saint-Jeannet, Jean-Pierre; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2012-01-01

    To illustrate the impact developmental biology and genetics have already had on the clinical management of the million infants born worldwide each year with CHD, we have chosen three stories which have had particular relevance for pediatric cardiologists, cardiothoracic surgeons, cardiac anesthesiologists, and cardiac nurses. First, we show how Margaret Kirby’s finding of the unexpected contribution of an ectodermal cell population – the cranial neural crest – to the aortic arch arteries and arterial pole of the embryonic avian heart provided a key impetus to the field of cardiovascular patterning. Recognition that a majority of patients affected by the neurocristopathy DiGeorge syndrome have a chromosome 22q11 deletion, have also spurred tremendous efforts to characterize the molecular mechanisms contributing to this pathology, assigning a major role to the transcription factor Tbx1. Second, synthesizing the work of the last two decades by many laboratories on a wide gamut of metazoans (invertebrates, tunicates, agnathans, teleosts, lungfish, amphibians, and amniotes), we review the >20 major modifications and additions to the ancient circulatory arrangement composed solely of a unicameral (one-chambered), contractile myocardial tube and a short proximal aorta. Two changes will be discussed in detail – the interposition of a second cardiac chamber in the circulation and the septation of the cardiac ventricle. By comparing the developmental genetic data of several model organisms, we can better understand the origin of the various components of the multicameral (multi-chambered) heart seen in humans. Third, Martina Brueckner’s discovery that a faulty axonemal dynein was responsible for the phenotype of the iv/iv mouse (the first mammalian model of human heterotaxy) focused attention on the biology of cilia. We discuss how even the care of the complex cardiac and non-cardiac anomalies seen in heterotaxy syndrome, which have long seemed impervious to

  15. Effects of stellate ganglion block on cardiovascular reaction and heart rate variability in elderly patients during anesthesia induction and endotracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-Quan; Jin, Xiao-Ju; Liu, Zhao-Fang; Zhu, Mei-Fang

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the effects of stellate ganglion block (SGB) on cardiovascular response and heart rate (HR) variability in elderly patients during anesthesia induction and endotracheal intubation. A randomized, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled study. University-affiliated teaching hospital. Eighty elderly patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists grades I and II) receiving elective surgery during general anesthesia. Right stellate ganglion injection (SGB) was performed in all patients using 10 mL of 1% lidocaine or normal saline. Systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, HR, and calculated rate pressure product. HR variability at the following time points: conscious status before induction (T0); immediately before intubation (T1); immediately after intubation (T2); and 1, 3, and 5 minutes postintubation (T3, T4, and T5). No significant differences in BP and HR were observed between the 2 groups. Rate pressure product values significantly increased in the control group compared with baseline and SGB group values. Low-frequency power (LF) and LF/high-frequency power (HF) significantly increased, and HF and normalized units of HF significantly decreased in the control group compared with baseline values. LF, normalized units of LF, and LF/HF in the SGB group significantly decreased compared with those of the control group. SGB protects the myocardium and effectively suppresses stress responses during anesthesia induction and tracheal intubation in elderly patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference recommendations on heart failure update 2007: Prevention, management during intercurrent illness or acute decompensation, and use of biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J Malcom O; Howlett, Jonathan G; Dorian, Paul; Ducharme, Anique; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Ignaszewski, Andrew; Isaac, Debra; Jong, Philip; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; McKelvie, Robert S; Moe, Gordon W; Parker, John D; Svendsen, Anna M; Tsuyuki, Ross T; O'Halloran, Kelly; Ross, Heather J; Rao, Vivek; Sequeira, Errol J; White, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Heart failure is common, yet it is difficult to treat. It presents in many different guises and circumstances in which therapy needs to be individualized. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations in January 2006 on the diagnosis and management of heart failure, and the present update builds on those core recommendations. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops during 2006, several topics were identified as priorities because of the challenges they pose to health care professionals. New evidence-based recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence adopted and previously described by the Society. Specific recommendations and practical tips were written for the prevention of heart failure, the management of heart failure during intercurrent illness, the treatment of acute heart failure, and the current and future roles of biomarkers in heart failure care. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: which patients should be identified as being at high risk of developing heart failure and which interventions should be used? What complications can occur in heart failure patients during an intercurrent illness, how should these patients be monitored and which medications may require a dose adjustment or discontinuation? What are the best therapeutic, both drug and nondrug, strategies for patients with acute heart failure? How can new biomarkers help in the treatment of heart failure, and when and how should BNP be measured in heart failure patients? The goals of the present update are to translate best evidence into practice, to apply clinical wisdom where evidence for specific strategies is weaker, and to aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients to result in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada.

  17. Heart Rate and Oxygen Uptake Kinetics in Type 2 Diabetes Patients - A Pilot Study on the Influence of Cardiovascular Medication on Regulatory Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschate, Jessica; Drescher, Uwe; Baum, Klaus; Brinkmann, Christian; Schiffer, Thorsten; Latsch, Joachim; Brixius, Klara; Hoffmann, Uwe

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether there are differences in heart rate and oxygen uptake kinetics in type 2 diabetes patients, considering their cardiovascular medication. It was hypothesized that cardiovascular medication would affect heart rate and oxygen uptake kinetics and that this could be detected using a standardized exercise test. 18 subjects were tested for maximal oxygen uptake. Kinetics were measured in a single test session with standardized, randomized moderate-intensity work rate changes. Time series analysis was used to estimate kinetics. Greater maxima in cross-correlation functions indicate faster kinetics. 6 patients did not take any cardiovascular medication, 6 subjects took peripherally acting medication and 6 patients were treated with centrally acting medication. Maximum oxygen uptake was not significantly different between groups. Significant main effects were identified regarding differences in muscular oxygen uptake kinetics and heart rate kinetics. Muscular oxygen uptake kinetics were significantly faster than heart rate kinetics in the group with no cardiovascular medication (maximum in cross-correlation function of muscular oxygen uptake vs. heart rate; 0.32±0.08 vs. 0.25±0.06; p=0.001) and in the group taking peripherally acting medication (0.34±0.05 vs. 0.28±0.05; p=0.009) but not in the patients taking centrally acting medication (0.28±0.05 vs. 0.30±0.07; n.s.). It can be concluded that regulatory processes for the achievement of a similar maximal oxygen uptake are different between the groups. The used standardized test provided plausible results for heart rate and oxygen uptake kinetics in a single measurement session in this patient group. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. 10-Year Associations Between Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptors 1 and 2 and Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, Axel C.; Ruge, Toralph; Kjøller, Erik

    2018-01-01

    mortality. Patients were followed up for 10 years; discovery sample, those assigned placebo (1204 events in n=1998); and replication sample, those assigned clarithromycin (1220 events in n=1979). We used Cox regression adjusted for C-reactive protein level, established cardiovascular risk factors, kidney.......08-1.24; P0.001 for TNFR2). The associations were similar in the replication sample. The associations with the composite outcome were mainly driven by acute myocardial infarction, cardiovascular mortality, and noncardiovascular mortality. The addition of TNFR1 and TNFR2 to established cardiovascular risk...... factors improved prediction only modestly (TNFR1 and TNFR2 were associated with increased risks of cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with stable coronary heart disease. Yet, the utility of measuring TNFR1 and TNFR2 to improve risk...

  19. Origin of heart rate variability and turbulence: an appraisal of autonomic modulation of cardiovascular function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico eLombardi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of autonomic modulation of sinus node by non-invasive techniques has provided relevant clinical information in patients with several cardiac and non-cardiac diseases and has facilitated the appraisal of neural regulatory mechanisms in normal and diseased subjects. The finding that even during resting conditions the heart period changes on a beat to beat basis and that after a premature ventricular beat there are small variations in RR interval whose measurements may be utilised to evaluate the autonomic modulation of sinus node, has provided unprecedented clinical and pathophysiological information. Heart rate variability (HRV and Heart Rate Turbulence (HRT have been extensively utilised in the clinical setting. To explain the negative predictive value of a reduced HRV it was determined that overall HRV was largely dependent on vagal mechanisms and that a reduction in HRV could reflect an increased sympathetic and a reduced vagal modulation of sinus node; i.e. an autonomic alteration favouring cardiac electrical instability. This initial interpretation was challenged by several findings indicating a greater complexity of the relationship between neural input and sinus node responsiveness as well as the possible interference with non-neural mechanisms.Under controlled conditions, however, the computation of low and high frequency components and of their ratio seems capable of providing adequate information on sympatho-vagal balance in normal subjects as well as in most patients with a preserved left ventricular function, thus providing a unique tool to investigate neural control mechanisms. Analysis on non-linear dynamics of HRV has also been utilised to describe the fractal like characteristic of the variability signal and proven effective to identify patients at risk for sudden cardiac death. A reduction on HRT parameters reflecting reduced baroreflex sensitivity as a likely result of a reduced vagal and of an increased sympathetic

  20. Association of heart-type fatty acid-binding protein with cardiovascular risk factors and all-cause mortality in the general population: the Takahata study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Otaki

    Full Text Available Despite many recent advances in medicine, preventing the development of cardiovascular diseases remains a challenge. Heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP is a marker of ongoing myocardial damage and has been reported to be a useful indicator for future cardiovascular events. However, it remains to be determined whether H-FABP can predict all-cause and cardiovascular deaths in the general population.This longitudinal cohort study included 3,503 subjects who participated in a community-based health checkup with a 7-year follow-up. Serum H-FABP was measured in registered subjects. The results demonstrated that higher H-FABP levels were associated with increasing numbers of cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. There were 158 deaths during the follow-up period, including 50 cardiovascular deaths. Deceased subjects had higher H-FABP levels compared to surviving subjects. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis revealed that H-FABP is an independent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular deaths after adjustments for confounding factors. Subjects were divided into four quartiles according to H-FABP level, and Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that the highest H-FABP quartile was associated with the greatest risks for all-cause and cardiovascular deaths. Net reclassification index and integrated discrimination index were significantly increased by addition of H-FABP to cardiovascular risk factors.H-FABP level was increased in association with greater numbers of cardiovascular risk factors and was an independent risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular deaths. H-FABP could be a useful indicator for the early identification of high-risk subjects in the general population.

  1. Hearts and minds: Coordination of neurocognitive and cardiovascular regulation in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, H A; Woltering, S; Lamm, C; Lewis, M D

    2010-05-01

    Emotional reactions involve changes in both cognitive and bodily processes. Therefore, effective emotion regulation may also involve modulation of responses in both of these systems. The present study investigated the relationship between regulation of cognition and regulation of the heart in children and adolescents, using a go/nogo task in combination with the induction of negative emotions. Behavioral, temperamental and event-related brain potential (ERP) indicators of inhibitory cognitive control were collected, as was a measure of parasympathetic control of the heart (respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA). Independently of age, RSA was correlated with nogo N2 magnitudes during the emotion-induction procedure. RSA during the task was also correlated with N2 latencies and with behavioral accuracy before, during and after the emotion induction. Resting RSA was correlated with individual differences in the capacity for effortful cognitive control, as measured by questionnaire. These results suggest that emotional responses in seemingly distinct neurophysiological systems may be regulated in an integrated fashion throughout the developmental span tested. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the translation of cardiovascular discoveries into therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galis, Zorina S; Black, Jodi B; Skarlatos, Sonia I

    2013-04-26

    The molecular causes of ≈4000 medical conditions have been described, yet only 5% have associated therapies. For decades, the average time for drug development through approval has taken 10 to 20 years. In recent years, the serious challenges that confront the private sector have made it difficult to capitalize on new opportunities presented by advances in genomics and cellular therapies. Current trends are disturbing. Pharmaceutical companies are reducing their investments in research, and biotechnology companies are struggling to obtain venture funds. To support early-stage translation of the discoveries in basic science, the National Institutes of Health and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute have developed new approaches to facilitating the translation of basic discoveries into clinical applications and will continue to develop a variety of programs that create teams of academic investigators and industry partners. The goal of these programs is to maximize the public benefit of investment of taxpayer dollars in biomedical research and to lessen the risk required for industry partners to make substantial investments. This article highlights several examples of National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-initiated translational programs and National Institutes of Health translational resources designed to catalyze and enable the earliest stages of the biomedical product development process. The translation of latest discoveries into therapeutic approaches depends on continued federal funding to enhance the early stages of the product development process and to stimulate and catalyze partnerships between academia, industry, and other sources of capital.

  3. Initial heart rate and cardiovascular outcomes in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaad, Nidal; El-Menyar, Ayman; AlHabib, Khalid F; Shabana, Adel; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Almahmeed, Wael; Al Faleh, Hussam; Hersi, Ahmad; Al Saif, Shukri; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Al Nemer, Khalid; Amin, Haitham; Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2014-06-01

    To assess the impact of on-admission heart rate (HR) in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Data were collected retrospectively from the second Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events. Patients were divided according to their initial HR into: (I: < 60, II: 60-69, III: 70-79, IV: 80-89 and V: ≥ 90 bpm). Patients' characteristics and hospital and one- and 12-month outcomes were analyzed and compared. Among 7939 consecutive ACS patients, groups I to V represented 7%, 13%, 20%, 23.5%, and 37%, respectively. Mean age was higher in groups I and V. Group V were more likely males, diabetic and hypertensive. ST-elevation myocardial infarction was the main presentation in groups I and V. Reperfusion therapies were less likely given to group V. Beta blockers were more frequently prescribed to group III in comparison to groups with higher HR. Groups I and V were associated with worse hospital outcomes. Multivariate analysis showed initial tachycardia as an independent predictor for heart failure (OR 2.2; 95%CI: 1.39-3.32), while bradycardia was independently associated with higher one-month mortality (OR 2.0; 95%CI: 1.04-3.85) CONCLUSION: The majority of ACS patients present with tachycardia. However, low or high HR is a marker of high risk that needs more attention and management.

  4. The relationship of cardiovascular risk factors and electrocardiographic findings: Isfahan Healthy Heart Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizal Sarrafzadegan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Various studies showed relationship between electrocardiographic (ECG changes at rest and CVD mortality. Present study was performed to find the relation between ECG and CVD risk factors in an Iranian population.    METHODS: This cross-sectional study was performed on 3343 subjects aged ≥ 35 years from three provincial cities of Isfahan, Arak, and Najafabad. Demographic and lifestyle information, as well as weight, height, blood pressure, hip and waist circumference measurement was recorded. Laboratory tests including total cholesterol (TC, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides (TG and fasting serum glucose were measured too. Ischemic criteria of ECG included minor and major changes in ST segment, T wave, conductive disorders, blocks and arrhythmias.    RESULTS: Ischemic changes in women were 1.5 times more than men (P < 0.05. Mean age of  the group with ischemic findings was 5 years more than non-Ischemic group. Comparison of lifestyle variables indicated that physical activity in reverse to nutrient index was significantly more in non-ischemic individuals compared to the ischemic individuals. Smoking showed a significant difference between the two groups, too (P < 0.05. Anthropometric variables including body mass index (BMI, hip and waist circumference and diabetic and systolic blood pressure as well as biochemical factors including TC, HDL-C, and LDL-C were significantly higher in Ischemic group (P < 0.05.    CONCLUSION: Considering the ischemic change in individuals with unhealthy life style or with CVD risk factors, these should be considered in evaluation of these patients.         Keywords: Ischemic Changes, Electrocardiography, Cardiovascular Risk Factors.

  5. Cardiovascular Aspects of Space Shuttle Flights: At the Heart of Three Decades of American Spaceflight Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John B.; Platts, S. H.

    2011-01-01

    The advent of the Space Shuttle era elevated cardiovascular deconditioning from a research topic in gravitational physiology to a concern with operational consequences during critical space mission phases. NASA has identified three primary cardiovascular risks associate with short-duration (less than 18 d) spaceflight: orthostatic intolerance; decreased maximal oxygen uptake; and cardiac arrhythmias. Orthostatic hypotension (OH) was observed postflight in Mercury astronauts, studied in Gemini and Apollo astronauts, and tracked as it developed in-flight during Skylab missions. A putative hypotensive episode in the pilot during an early shuttle landing, and well documented postflight hypotension in a quarter of crewmembers, catalyzed NASA's research effort to understand its mechanisms and develop countermeasures. Shuttle investigations documented the onset of OH, tested mechanistic hypotheses, and demonstrated countermeasures both simple and complex. Similarly, decreased aerobic capacity in-flight threatened both extravehicular activity and post-landing emergency egress. In one study, peak oxygen uptake and peak power were significantly decreased following flights. Other studies tested hardware and protocols for aerobic conditioning that undergird both current practice on long-duration International Space Station (ISS) missions and plans for interplanetary expeditions. Finally, several studies suggest that cardiac arrhythmias are of less concern during short-duration spaceflight than during long-duration spaceflight. Duration of the QT interval was unchanged and the frequency of premature atrial and ventricular contractions was actually shown to decrease during extravehicular activity. These investigations on short-duration Shuttle flights have paved the way for research aboard long-duration ISS missions and beyond. Efforts are already underway to study the effects of exploration class missions to asteroids and Mars.

  6. On the heart, the mind, and how inflammation killed the Cartesian dualism. Commentary on the 2015 Named Series: Psychological Risk Factors and Immune System Involvement in Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondelli, Valeria; Pariante, Carmine M

    2015-11-01

    The 2015 Named Series on "Psychological Risk Factors and Immune System Involvement in Cardiovascular Disease" was conceived with the idea of drawing attention to the interdisciplinary work aimed at investigating the relationships between the heart, metabolic system, brain, and mental health. In this commentary, we provide a brief overview of the manuscripts included in this Named Series and highlight how a better understanding of immune regulation will help us to move forward from the current "dualistic" perspective of the heart as separate from the mind to a more comprehensive understanding of the physiological links between cardiovascular and mental disorders. The manuscripts included in this Named Series range across a wide spectrum of topics, from understanding biological mechanisms explaining comorbidity between cardiovascular disease and psychiatric disorders to new insights into the dysregulation of inflammation associated with cardiovascular risk factors. Clearly, inflammation emerges as a cross-cutting theme across all studies. Data presented in this Series contribute to putting an end to an era in which the heart and the mind were considered to be separate entities in which the responses of one system did not affect the other. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mounting evidence indicates that escalating doses of allopurinol are unnecessary for cardiovascular protection: Comment on Coburn et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredemeier, Markus

    2018-05-09

    We read with interest the study by Coburn et al. (1), a methodologically sound propensity-score matched cohort study evaluating the effect of dose escalation of allopurinol on cardiovascular (CV) and overall mortality. The results indicate that increasing doses carry a higher risk of mortality, but the authors comment that failure in achieving doses up to 600 mg may have contributed to the absence of protective effect. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of minocycline on parameters of cardiovascular recovery after cardioplegic arrest in a rabbit Langendorff heart model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Aida; Halling, Michelle; Seidel, Thomas; Dhein, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Pharmacological cardiac organ protection during cardiopulmonary bypass presents an opportunity for improvement. A number of different strategies have been established to minimize ischemia/reperfusion-induced damage to the heart. Among these, cardioplegia with histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution and hypothermia are the most frequently used regimens. The antibiotic minocycline has been used in this context for neuroprotection. The aim of the current study was to evaluate whether the application of minocycline prior to cardioplegia exerts a protective effect on cardiac muscle. For this purpose, this study investigated six rabbit hearts with minocycline treatment (1 μmol/L) and six without in a Langendorff model of 90 min cold cardioplegic arrest using Custodiol followed by a 30 min recovery phase. Histological analysis of cardiac muscle revealed that markers of apoptosis, oxidative and nitrosative stress were significantly lower in the minocycline group, whereas adenosine triphosphate (ATP)- and malondialdehyde (MDA)-levels and O2-consumption were not affected by minocycline. Functionally, recovery of dP/dt (max) and dP/dt (min) was significantly faster in the minocycline group than in control. This leads to the conclusion that adding minocycline to the cardioplegic solution may improve left ventricular recovery after cardioplegic arrest involving reduced pro-apoptotic effects. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Subjective social status and psychosocial and metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanyam, Malavika A; Diez-Roux, Ana V; Hickson, Demarc A; Sarpong, Daniel F; Sims, Mario; Taylor, Herman A; Williams, David R; Wyatt, Sharon B

    2012-04-01

    Subjective social status has been shown to be inversely associated with multiple cardiovascular risk factors, independent of objective social status. However, few studies have examined this association among African Americans and the results have been mixed. Additionally, the influence of discrimination on this relationship has not been explored. Using baseline data (2000-2004) from the Jackson Heart Study, an African American cohort from the U.S. South (N=5301), we quantified the association of subjective social status with selected cardiovascular risk factors: depressive symptoms, perceived stress, waist circumference, insulin resistance and prevalence of diabetes. We contrasted the strength of the associations of these outcomes with subjective versus objective social status and examined whether perceived discrimination confounded or modified these associations. Subjective social status was measured using two 10-rung "ladders," using the U.S. and the community as referent groups. Objective social status was measured using annual family income and years of schooling completed. Gender-specific multivariable linear and logistic regression models were fit to examine associations. Subjective and objective measures were weakly positively correlated. Independent of objective measures, subjective social status was significantly inversely associated with depressive symptoms (men and women) and insulin resistance (women). The associations of subjective social status with the outcomes were modest and generally similar to the objective measures. We did not find evidence that perceived racial discrimination strongly confounded or modified the association of subjective social status with the outcomes. Subjective social status was related to depressive symptoms but not consistently to stress or metabolic risk factors in African Americans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Depression, comorbid anxiety disorders, and heart rate variability in physically healthy, unmedicated patients: implications for cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Andrew H; Quintana, Daniel S; Felmingham, Kim L; Matthews, Slade; Jelinek, Herbert F

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that heart rate variability (HRV) is reduced in major depressive disorder (MDD), although there is debate about whether this effect is caused by medication or the disorder per se. MDD is associated with a two to fourfold increase in the risk of cardiac mortality, and HRV is a robust predictor of cardiac mortality; determining a direct link between HRV and not only MDD, but common comorbid anxiety disorders, will point to psychiatric indicators for cardiovascular risk reduction. To determine in physically healthy, unmedicated patients whether (1) HRV is reduced in MDD relative to controls, and (2) HRV reductions are driven by MDD alone, comorbid generalized anxiety disorder (GAD, characterized by anxious anticipation), or comorbid panic and posttraumatic stress disorders (PD/PTSD, characterized by anxious arousal). A case-control study in 2006 and 2007 on 73 MDD patients, including 24 without anxiety comorbidity, 24 with GAD, and 14 with PD/PTSD. Seventy-three MDD and 94 healthy age- and sex-matched control participants were recruited from the general community. Participants had no history of drug addiction, alcoholism, brain injury, loss of consciousness, stroke, neurological disorder, or serious medical conditions. There were no significant differences between the four groups in age, gender, BMI, or alcohol use. HRV was calculated from electrocardiography under a standardized short-term resting state condition. HRV was reduced in MDD relative to controls, an effect associated with a medium effect size. MDD participants with comorbid generalized anxiety disorder displayed the greatest reductions in HRV relative to controls, an effect associated with a large effect size. Unmedicated, physically healthy MDD patients with and without comorbid anxiety had reduced HRV. Those with comorbid GAD showed the greatest reductions. Implications for cardiovascular risk reduction strategies in otherwise healthy patients with psychiatric illness are discussed.

  11. Clinical holistic medicine: the Dean Ornish program ("opening the heart") in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Merrick, Efrat; Merrick, Joav

    2006-02-02

    Dean Ornish of the Preventive Medicine Research Institute in Sausalito, California has created an intensive holistic treatment for coronary heart patients with improved diet (low fat, whole foods, plant based), exercise, stress management, and social support that has proven to be efficient. In this paper, we analyze the rationale behind his cure in relation to contemporary holistic medical theory. In spite of a complex treatment program, the principles seem to be simple and in accordance with holistic medical theories, like the Antonovsky concept of rehabilitating the sense of coherence and the life mission theory for holistic medicine. We believe there is a need for the allocation of resources for further research into the aspects of holistic health and its methods, where positive and significant results have been proven and reproduced at several sites.

  12. Heart smart: a multifaceted cardiovascular risk reduction program for grade school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, S M; Johnson, C C; Little-Christian, S; Nicklas, T A; Harsha, D; Arbeit, M L; Webber, L S; Berenson, G S

    1990-05-01

    Abstract Heart Smart Program is a health education intervention for grades kindergarten through six which encourages the acquisition and maintenance of health-enhancing behaviors. These include nutritious eating habits; physical fitness and exercise; saying "no" to cigarette smoking, alcohol, and drugs; and control of stress. Social Cognitive Theory is used to derive the necessary training concepts for children with reinforcement of these concepts occurring in six areas: the curriculum, school lunch, staff development, physical activity, environment, and parental support. The necessary training mechanisms provide mastery experiences, knowledge transfer, role modeling, and emotional and physiological feedback. The program incorporates the influence of the social environment on learning and builds support from parents, teachers and school staff.

  13. Cardiovascular radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanAman, M.; Mueller, C.F.

    1985-01-01

    Soon after Roentgen documented the uses of x-rays in 1895, fluoroscopic and film evaluation of the heart began. Even today the chest roentgenogram remains one of the first and most frequently used studies for the evaluation of the normal and abnormal heart and great vessels. This chapter gives an overview of plain film evaluation of the cardiovascular system and follow up with comments on the newer imaging modalities of computed tomography, and digital subtraction angiography, in the cardiovascular disease workup. The authors present an evaluation of plain films of the chest, which remains their most cost effective, available, simple, and reliable initial screening tool in the evaluation of cardiovascular disease

  14. Assessment of Cardiovascular Apoptosis in the Isolated Rat Heart by Magnetic Resonance Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Heinz Hiller

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis, an active process of cell self-destruction, is associated with myocardial ischemia. The redistribution of phosphatidylserine (PS from the inner to the outer leaflet of the cell membrane is an early event in apoptosis. Annexin V, a protein with high specificity and tight binding to PS, was used to identify and localize apoptosis in the ischemic heart. Fluorescein-labeled annexin V has been used routinely for the assessment of apoptosis in vitro. For the detection of apoptosis in vivo, positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography have been shown to be suitable tools. In view of the relatively low spatial resolution of nuclear imaging techniques, we developed a high-resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI method that allows rapid and noninvasive monitoring of apoptosis in intact organs. Instead of employing superparamagnetic iron oxide particles linked to annexin V, a new T1 contrast agent was used. To this effect, annexin V was linked to gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (Gd-DTPA-coated liposomes. The left coronary artery of perfused isolated rat hearts was ligated for 30 min followed by reperfusion. T1 and T2* images were acquired by using an 11.7-T magnet before and after intracoronary injection of Gd-DTP-labeled annexin V to visualize apoptotic cells. A significant increase in signal intensity was visible in those regions containing cardiomyocytes in the early stage of apoptosis. Because labeling of early apoptotic cell death in intact organs by histological and immunohistochemical methods remains challenging, the use of Gd-DTPA-labeled annexin V in MRI is clearly an improvement in rapid targeting of apoptotic cells in the ischemic and reperfused myocardium.

  15. Effects of acarbose on cardiovascular and diabetes outcomes in patients with coronary heart disease and impaired glucose tolerance (ACE): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Rury R; Coleman, Ruth L; Chan, Juliana C N; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Feng, Huimei; Ge, Junbo; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Gray, Richard; Huo, Yong; Lang, Zhihui; McMurray, John J; Rydén, Lars; Schröder, Stefan; Sun, Yihong; Theodorakis, Michael J; Tendera, Michal; Tucker, Lynne; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Wei, Yidong; Yang, Wenying; Wang, Duolao; Hu, Dayi; Pan, Changyu

    2017-11-01

    The effect of the α-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with coronary heart disease and impaired glucose tolerance is unknown. We aimed to assess whether acarbose could reduce the frequency of cardiovascular events in Chinese patients with established coronary heart disease and impaired glucose tolerance, and whether the incidence of type 2 diabetes could be reduced. The Acarbose Cardiovascular Evaluation (ACE) trial was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 4 trial, with patients recruited from 176 hospital outpatient clinics in China. Chinese patients with coronary heart disease and impaired glucose tolerance were randomly assigned (1:1), in blocks by site, by a centralised computer system to receive oral acarbose (50 mg three times a day) or matched placebo, which was added to standardised cardiovascular secondary prevention therapy. All study staff and patients were masked to treatment group allocation. The primary outcome was a five-point composite of cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke, hospital admission for unstable angina, and hospital admission for heart failure, analysed in the intention-to-treat population (all participants randomly assigned to treatment who provided written informed consent). The secondary outcomes were a three-point composite outcome (cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and non-fatal stroke), death from any cause, cardiovascular death, fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction, fatal or non-fatal stroke, hospital admission for unstable angina, hospital admission for heart failure, development of diabetes, and development of impaired renal function. The safety population comprised all patients who received at least one dose of study medication. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00829660, and the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number registry, number ISRCTN91899513. Between March 20, 2009

  16. Thymosin β4: multiple functions in protection, repair and regeneration of the mammalian heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollini, Sveva; Riley, Paul R; Smart, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent improvements in interventional medicine, cardiovascular disease still represents the major cause of morbidity worldwide, with myocardial infarction being the most common cardiac injury. This has sustained the development of several regenerative strategies based on the use of stem cells and tissue engineering approaches in order to achieve cardiac repair and regeneration by enhancing coronary neovascularization, modulating acute inflammation and supporting myocardial regeneration to provide new functional muscle. The actin monomer binding peptide, Thymosin β4 (Tβ4), has recently been described as a powerful regenerative agent with angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and cardioprotective effects on the heart and which specifically acts on its resident cardiac progenitor cells. In this review we will discuss the state of the art regarding the many roles of Tβ4 in preserving and regenerating the mammalian heart, with specific attention to its ability to activate the quiescent adult epicardium and specific subsets of epicardial progenitor cells for repair. The therapeutic potential of Tβ4 for the treatment of cardiac failure is herein evaluated alongside existing, emerging and prospective novel treatments.

  17. Publication Speed, Reporting Metrics, and Citation Impact of Cardiovascular Trials Supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David; Cooper-Arnold, Katharine; Lauer, Michael

    2015-07-31

    We previously demonstrated that cardiovascular (CV) trials funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) were more likely to be published in a timely manner and receive high raw citation counts if they focused on clinical endpoints. We did not examine the metrics of trial reports, and our citation measures were limited by failure to account for topic-related citation behaviors. Of 244 CV trials completed between 2000 and 2011, we identified 184 whose main results were published by August 20, 2014. One investigator who was blinded to rapidity of publication and citation data read each publication and characterized it according to modified Delphi criteria. There were 46 trials (25%) that had Delphi scores of 8 or 9 (of a possible 9); these trials published faster (median time from trial completion to publication, 12.6 [interquartile range {IQR}, 6.7 to 23.3] vs. 21.8 [IQR, 12.1 to 34.9] months; Pcitation impact (median citation percentile for topic and date of publication, with 0 best and 100 worst, 1.92 [IQR, 0.64 to 7.83] vs. 8.41 [IQR, 1.80 to 24.75]; P=0.002). By random forest regression, we found that the 3 most important predictors of normalized citation percentile values were total costs, intention-to-treat analyses (as a modified Delphi quality measure), and focus on clinical (not surrogate) endpoints. NHLBI CV trials were more likely to publish results quickly and yield higher topic-normalized citation impact if they reported results according to well-defined metrics, along with focus on clinical endpoints. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  18. Protection from ischemic heart injury by a vigilant heme oxygenase-1 plasmid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yao Liang; Tang, Yi; Zhang, Y Clare; Qian, Keping; Shen, Leping; Phillips, M Ian

    2004-04-01

    Although human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) could provide a useful approach for cellular protection in the ischemic heart, constitutive overexpression of hHO-1 may lead to unwanted side effects. To avoid this, we designed a hypoxia-regulated hHO-1 gene therapy system that can be switched on and off. This vigilant plasmid system is composed of myosin light chain-2v promoter and a gene switch that is based on an oxygen-dependent degradation domain from the hypoxia inducible factor-1-alpha. The vector can sense ischemia and switch on the hHO-1 gene system, specifically in the heart. In an in vivo experiment, the vigilant hHO-1 plasmid or saline was injected intramyocardially into myocardial infarction mice or sham operation mice. After gene transfer, expression of hHO-1 was only detected in the ischemic heart treated with vigilant hHO-1 plasmids. Masson trichrome staining showed significantly fewer fibrotic areas in vigilant hHO-1 plasmids-treated mice compared with saline control (43.0%+/-4.8% versus 62.5%+/-3.3%, PhHO-1 expression in peri-infarct border areas, concomitant with higher Bcl-2 levels and lower Bax, Bak, and caspase 3 levels in the ischemic myocardium compared with saline control. By use of a cardiac catheter, heart from vigilant hHO-1 plasmids-treated mice showed improved recovery of contractile and diastolic performance after myocardial infarction compared with saline control. This study documents the beneficial regulation and therapeutic potential of vigilant plasmid-mediated hHO-1 gene transfer. This novel gene transfer strategy can provide cardiac-specific protection from future repeated bouts of ischemic injury.

  19. Melatonin Protects the Heart, Lungs and Kidneys from Oxidative Stress under Intermittent Hypobaric Hypoxia in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge G Farías

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine is the main secretory product of the pineal gland in all mammals including humans, but it is also produced in other organs. It has been previously demonstrated to be a powerful organ-protective substance under oxidative stress conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of melatonin in several organs such as heart, lung, kidney, and of the reproductive system, such as testis and epididymis in animals exposed to intermittent hypobaric hypoxia and therefore exposed to oxidative stress and analyzed by lipid peroxidation. Ten-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups for 96 hours during 32 days under: 1 Normobaric conditions, 2 plus physiologic solution, 3 plus melatonin, 4 intermittent hypobaric hypoxia, 5 plus physiologic solution and 6 plus melatonin. The animals were injected with melatonin (10 mg/kg body weight at an interval of 96 hours during 32 days. Results indicated that melatonin decreased lipid peroxidation in heart, kidneys and lung under intermittent hypobaric hypoxia conditions. However, it did not exhibit any protective effect in liver, testis, epididymis and sperm count.

  20. Cognitive function in patients with stable coronary heart disease: Related cerebrovascular and cardiovascular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayda, Mathieu; Gremeaux, Vincent; Bherer, Louis; Juneau, Martin; Drigny, Joffrey; Dupuy, Olivier; Lapierre, Gabriel; Labelle, Véronique; Fortier, Annik; Nigam, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Chronic exercise has been shown to prevent or slow age-related decline in cognitive functions in otherwise healthy, asymptomatic individuals. We sought to assess cognitive function in a stable coronary heart disease (CHD) sample and its relationship to cerebral oxygenation-perfusion, cardiac hemodynamic responses, and [Formula: see text] peak compared to age-matched and young healthy control subjects. Twenty-two young healthy controls (YHC), 20 age-matched old healthy controls (OHC) and 25 patients with stable CHD were recruited. Cognitive function assessment included short term-working memory, perceptual abilities, processing speed, cognitive inhibition and flexibility and long-term verbal memory. Maximal cardiopulmonary function (gas exchange analysis), cardiac hemodynamic (impedance cardiography) and left frontal cerebral oxygenation-perfusion (near-infra red spectroscopy) were measured during and after a maximal incremental ergocycle test. Compared to OHC and CHD, YHC had higher [Formula: see text] peak, maximal cardiac index (CI max), cerebral oxygenation-perfusion (ΔO2 Hb, ΔtHb: exercise and recovery) and cognitive function (for all items) (Pcognitive inhibition and flexibility and long-term verbal memory (Pcognitive function (Pcognitive function (Pcognitive function, a similar cerebral oxygenation/perfusion during exercise but reduced one during recovery vs. their aged-matched healthy counterparts. In the all sample, cognitive functions correlated with [Formula: see text] peak, CI max and cerebral oxygenation-perfusion.

  1. Lifestyle, cardiovascular drugs and risk factors in younger and elder adults: The PEP family heart study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schwandt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to compare cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors, lifestyle habits and pharmacological treatment in two groups of elder adults with 20 years difference in their mean age. Methods: This study comprised 590 women including two groups with mean age of 42.4±5.5 vs. 66.5±4.0 years, and 486 men of two groups with mean age of 44.1±5.6 vs. 63.9±7.0 years. Data on physical examination, fasting blood analyses, 7-day dietary re-cords, physical activity, smoking and actual medication use were recorded. Results: Compared with younger individuals, seniors had a more adverse risk factor profile in terms of abdominal obesity, over-weight, hyperglycemia, hypertension, dyslipoproteinemia without differences in HDL-C. But this is not reflected by lifestyle behav-ior. Less than 2% of the elderly and 17% of the younger adults were current smoker. Furthermore, the pattern of physical activ-ity was different in terms of more continuous sports in seniors contrasting with extremes between no sports and more than twice a week in the younger group. Seniors consumed significantly less carbohydrates including more monosaccharide and less polysaccharides, more alcohol and water. The intake of fat and protein was higher in elder women than in all other groups. One third of seniors took antihypertensive medications and 12% used lipid modifying drugs. Conclusions: Different levels of prevention against CVDs and their risk factors shall be considered for various age groups of population. The findings of this study emphasize on the necessity of preventive measures against smoking and physical inactivity in younger adults and dietary habits in seniors.

  2. Lifestyle, Cardiovascular Drugs and Risk Factors in Younger and Elder Adults: The PEP Family Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schwandt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to compare cardiovascular disease(CVD risk factors, lifestyle habits and pharmacological treatmentin two groups of elder adults with 20 years difference in theirmean age.Methods: This study comprised 590 women including two groupswith mean age of 42.4±5.5 vs. 66.5±4.0 years, and 486 men of twogroups with mean age of 44.1±5.6 vs. 63.9±7.0 years. Data onphysical examination, fasting blood analyses, 7-day dietary records,physical activity, smoking and actual medication use wererecorded.Results: Compared with younger individuals, seniors had a moreadverse risk factor profile in terms of abdominal obesity, overweight,hyperglycemia, hypertension, dyslipoproteinemia withoutdifferences in HDL-C. But this is not reflected by lifestyle behavior.Less than 2% of the elderly and 17% of the younger adultswere current smoker. Furthermore, the pattern of physical activitywas different in terms of more continuous sports in seniorscontrasting with extremes between no sports and more than twicea week in the younger group. Seniors consumed significantly lesscarbohydrates including more monosaccharide and less polysaccharides,more alcohol and water. The intake of fat and proteinwas higher in elder women than in all other groups. One third ofseniors took antihypertensive medications and 12% used lipidmodifying drugs.Conclusions: Different levels of prevention against CVDs andtheir risk factors shall be considered for various age groups ofpopulation. The findings of this study emphasize on the necessityof preventive measures against smoking and physical inactivity inyounger adults and dietary habits in seniors.

  3. Coaching patients On Achieving Cardiovascular Health (COACH): a multicenter randomized trial in patients with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Margarite J; Jelinek, Michael V; Best, James D; Dart, Anthony M; Grigg, Leeanne E; Hare, David L; Ho, Betty P; Newman, Robert W; McNeil, John J

    Disease management programs in which drugs are prescribed by dietitians or nurses have been shown to improve the coronary risk factor profile in patients with coronary heart disease. However, those disease management programs in which drugs are not prescribed by allied health professionals have not improved coronary risk factor status. The objective of the Coaching patients On Achieving Cardiovascular Health (COACH) study was to determine whether dietitians or nurses who did not prescribe medications could coach patients with coronary heart disease to work with their physicians to achieve the target levels for their total cholesterol (TC) and other risk factors. Multicenter randomized controlled trial in which 792 patients from 6 university teaching hospitals underwent a stratified randomization by cardiac diagnosis within each hospital: 398 were assigned to usual care plus The COACH Program and 394 to usual care alone. Patients in The COACH Program group received regular personal coaching via telephone and mailings to achieve the target levels for their particular coronary risk factors. There was one coach per hospital. The primary outcome was the change in TC (DeltaTC) from baseline (in hospital) to 6 months after randomization. Secondary outcomes included measurement of a wide range of physical, nutritional, and psychological factors. The analysis was performed by intention to treat. The COACH Program achieved a significantly greater DeltaTC than usual care alone: the mean DeltaTC was 21 mg/dL (0.54 mmol/L) (95% confidence interval [CI], 16-25 mg/dL [0.42-0.65 mmol/L]) in The COACH Program vs 7 mg/dL (0.18 mmol/L) (95% CI, 3-11 mg/dL [0.07-0.29 mmol/L]) in the usual care group (PCOACH Program group than in the usual care group. Coaching produced substantial improvements in most of the other coronary risk factors and in patient quality of life. Coaching, delivered as The COACH Program, is a highly effective strategy in reducing TC and many other coronary risk

  4. Acute cardiovascular toxicity of sterilizers, PHMG, and PGH: severe inflammation in human cells and heart failure in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Yong; Kim, Hak Hyeon; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2013-06-01

    In 2011, dozens of children and pregnant women in Korea died by exposure to sterilizer for household humidifier, such as Oxy(®) and Cefu(®). Until now, however, it remains unknown how the sterilizer affect the human health to cause the acute deaths. To find its toxicity for organ, we investigated the putative toxicity of the sterilizer in the cardiovascular system. The sterilizers, polyhexamethylene guanidine phosphate (PHMG, Cefu(®)), and oligo-[2-(2-ethoxy)-ethoxyethyl)-guanidinium-chloride (PGH, Oxy(®)) were treated to human lipoproteins, macrophages, and dermal fibroblast cells. The PGH and PHMG at normal dosages caused severe atherogenic process in human macrophages, cytotoxic effect, and aging in human dermal cell. Zebrafish embryos, which were exposed to the sterilizer, showed early death with acute inflammation and attenuated developmental speed. All zebrafish exposed to the working concentration of PHMG (final 0.3 %) and PGH (final 10 mM) died within 70 min and displayed acute increases in serum triacylglycerol level and fatty liver induction. The dead zebrafish showed severe accumulation of fibrous collagen in the bulbous artery of the heart with elevation of reactive oxygen species. In conclusion, the sterilizers showed acute toxic effect in blood circulation system, causing by severe inflammation, atherogenesis, and aging, with embryo toxicity.

  5. DETERMINANTS OF PREVENTIVE BEHAVIOR REGARDING CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES AND RISK FACTORS IN PATIENTS WITH ESSENTIAL HYPERTENSION AND CHRONIC ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Platonov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze potential determinants of preventive behavior (PB in patients with essential hypertension (HT and chronic ischemic heart disease (CIHD, and to establish their significance and hierarchy. Material and methods. Patients with HT (n=285 and CIHD (n=223 were studied. Questioning of all patients was performed to assess the characteristics of their PB. Differentiated multivariate analysis of activity and efficacy of PB determinants was performed in HT and CIHD patients by the method of step-by-step backward logistic regression. Results. Awareness of the cardiovascular diseases (CVD and its prevention (odds ratio [OR] 6.08 as well as high level of general education (OR=2.29 were the most significant determinants of active PB in HT patients. Sufficient social support (OR=3.77, awareness of CVD and its prevention (OR=3.16 were the most significant determinants of active PB in patients with CIHD. Efficacy of PB in patients with HT and CIHD mostly depends on satisfaction of medical service (OR=10.2 and 6.63, respectively, social support (OR=6.25 and 10.5, respectively, adequate awareness of CVD and its prevention (OR, 6.92 and 6.64, respectively. Conclusion. PB activity and efficacy in patients with HT and CIHD depends on many contributing and impeding factors. Disregarding these factors can result in failure in preventive efforts at both individual and population levels.

  6. Statin treatment prevents increased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality associated with clarithromycin in patients with stable coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Gorm B; Hilden, Jørgen; Als-Nielsen, Bodil

    2010-01-01

    In the CLARICOR trial, significantly increased cardiovascular (CV) and all-cause mortality in stable patients with coronary heart disease were observed after a short course of clarithromycin. We report on the impact of statin treatment at entry on the CV and all-cause mortality. The multicenter...... CLARICOR trial randomized patients to oral clarithromycin (500 mg daily; n = 2172) versus matching placebo (daily; n = 2201) for 2 weeks. Patients were followed through public databases. In the 41% patients on statin treatment at entry, no significant effect of clarithromycin was observed on CV (hazard...... ratio [HR], 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38-1.22; P = 0.20) or all-cause mortality (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.71-1.65; P = 0.72) at 2.6-year follow up. In the patients not on statin treatment at entry, clarithromycin was associated with a significant increase in CV (HR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.34-2.67; P = 0...

  7. Nutrition and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Four Age Groups of Female Individuals: The PEP Family Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schwandt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Assessment of nutritional habits and associations with cardio-metabolic risk factors in four age groups of women partici-pating in the Prevention Education Program, Family Heart Study.Methods: Anthropometric variables, systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP, DBP, lipoproteins, glucose and insulin were measured in 141 children, 211 adolescents, 151 women 3 times more common in adolescents. Thirty six percent of junior women were overweight (BMI ≥25 kg/m² and 21% had central adiposity obese. Sixty eight year-old women had a far more adverse risk profile than 35 year-old women. In terms of energy consumption, 14 year-old women had the lowest fat intake and the highest consumption of carbohydrates whereas intake of protein was lowest in 10 year-old girls. Intake of unsaturated fat was lower in youths than in adults amounting to 37 g unsaturated fat respectively 53.4% of total fat consumption. The asso-ciation between energy consumption and overweight was significant and calorie intake was associated with clustering of ≥3 cardiovascular risk factors (OR :4.72; 95% CI 1.22-18.33.Conclusions: The prevalence of CVD risk factors increased continuously from girls and adolescents to junior and senior women. However, dietary intake was different in the four age groups. Caloric intake was associated with overweight and clustering of risk factors in adult women.

  8. Influence of race/ethnicity on cardiovascular risk factors in polycystic ovary syndrome, the Dallas Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Alice Y; Oshiro, June; Ayers, Colby; Auchus, Richard J

    2016-07-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is estimated to affect up to 20% of women. PCOS is associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular (CV) risk factors. We aimed to evaluate the impact of race/ethnicity on the prevalence of CV risk factors and subclinical predictors of CV events. Cross-sectional analysis of data collected by the Dallas Heart Study, an urban, population-based cohort oversampled for blacks. A previously described cohort of women with PCOS and control subjects of the same racial/ethnic group, matched for age and body mass index. Hormonal and clinical measures associated with PCOS and CV risk factors. The study included 117 women with PCOS and 204 controls. Women with PCOS had significant differences across racial/ethnic groups in the prevalence of hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia and impaired fasting glucose (P PCOS than controls after adjusting for race/ethnicity (odds ratio, 1·50 [95% CI, 1·03-2·30]; P = 0·04). However, we did not see an interaction of race/ethnicity that significantly changed CV risk factor prevalence between PCOS and controls. In addition, subclinical measures of CV disease were not different between women with PCOS vs controls, even among hypertensive women. Race/ethnicity affects the prevalence of CV risk factors for women with and without PCOS. However, race/ethnicity does not interact with PCOS to additionally increase CV risk factor prevalence or subclinical CV disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Multimodality Imaging in Valvular Heart Disease: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, John U; Kort, Smadar; Mehran, Roxana; Schoenhagen, Paul; Soman, Prem; Dehmer, Greg J; Doherty, John U; Schoenhagen, Paul; Amin, Zahid; Bashore, Thomas M; Boyle, Andrew; Calnon, Dennis A; Carabello, Blase; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Conte, John; Desai, Milind; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Ferrari, Victor A; Ghoshhajra, Brian; Mehrotra, Praveen; Nazarian, Saman; Reece, T Brett; Tamarappoo, Balaji; Tzou, Wendy S; Wong, John B; Doherty, John U; Dehmer, Gregory J; Bailey, Steven R; Bhave, Nicole M; Brown, Alan S; Daugherty, Stacie L; Dean, Larry S; Desai, Milind Y; Duvernoy, Claire S; Gillam, Linda D; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Lindsay, Bruce D; Manning, Warren J; Mehrotra, Praveen; Patel, Manesh R; Sachdeva, Ritu; Wann, L Samuel; Winchester, David E; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2018-04-01

    This document is 1 of 2 companion appropriate use criteria (AUC) documents developed by the American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This document addresses the evaluation and use of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis and management of valvular heart disease, whereas the second, companion document addresses this topic with regard to structural heart disease. Although there is clinical overlap, the documents addressing valvular and structural heart disease are published separately, albeit with a common structure. The goal of the companion AUC documents is to provide a comprehensive resource for multimodality imaging in the context of valvular and structural heart disease, encompassing multiple imaging modalities. Using standardized methodology, the clinical scenarios (indications) were developed by a diverse writing group to represent patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included common applications and anticipated uses. Where appropriate, the scenarios were developed on the basis of the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines. A separate, independent rating panel scored the 92 clinical scenarios in this document on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that a modality is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Midrange scores of 4 to 6 indicate that a modality may be appropriate for the clinical scenario, and scores of 1 to 3 indicate that a modality is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario. The primary objective of the AUC is to provide a framework for the assessment of these scenarios by practices that will

  10. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Multimodality Imaging in Valvular Heart Disease : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, John U; Kort, Smadar; Mehran, Roxana; Schoenhagen, Paul; Soman, Prem

    2017-12-01

    This document is 1 of 2 companion appropriate use criteria (AUC) documents developed by the American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This document addresses the evaluation and use of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis and management of valvular heart disease, whereas the second, companion document addresses this topic with regard to structural heart disease. Although there is clinical overlap, the documents addressing valvular and structural heart disease are published separately, albeit with a common structure. The goal of the companion AUC documents is to provide a comprehensive resource for multimodality imaging in the context of valvular and structural heart disease, encompassing multiple imaging modalities.Using standardized methodology, the clinical scenarios (indications) were developed by a diverse writing group to represent patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included common applications and anticipated uses. Where appropriate, the scenarios were developed on the basis of the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines.A separate, independent rating panel scored the 92 clinical scenarios in this document on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that a modality is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Midrange scores of 4 to 6 indicate that a modality may be appropriate for the clinical scenario, and scores of 1 to 3 indicate that a modality is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario.The primary objective of the AUC is to provide a framework for the assessment of these scenarios by practices that will

  11. Exploration into Uric and Cardiovascular Disease: Uric Acid Right for heArt Health (URRAH) Project, A Study Protocol for a Retrospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desideri, Giovambattista; Virdis, Agostino; Casiglia, Edoardo; Borghi, Claudio

    2018-02-09

    The relevance of cardiovascular role played by levels of serum uric acid is dramatically growing, especially as cardiovascular risk factor potentially able to exert either a direct deleterious impact or a synergic effect with other cardiovascular risk factors. At the present time, it still remains undefined the threshold level of serum uric acid able to contribute to the cardiovascular risk. Indeed, the available epidemiological case studies are not homogeneous, and some preliminary data suggest that the so-called "cardiovascular threshold limit" may substantially differ from that identified as a cut-off able to trigger the acute gout attack. In such scenario, there is the necessity to clarify and quantify this threshold value, to insert it in the stratification of risk algorithm scores and, in turn, to adopt proper prevention and correction strategies. The clarification of the relationship between circulating levels of uric acid and cardio-nephro-metabolic disorders in a broad sample representative of general population is critical to identify the threshold value of serum uric acid better discriminating the increased risk associated with uric acid. The Uric acid Right for heArt Health (URRAH) project has been designed to define, as primary objective, the level of uricemia above which the independent risk of cardiovascular disease may increase in a significantly manner in a general Italian population.

  12. Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in current and former smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Magnus T; Marott, Jacob L; Jensen, Gorm B

    2010-01-01

    . Current and former smokers had, irrespective of tobacco consumption, greater relative risk of elevated RHR compared to never smokers. The relative risk of all-cause mortality per 10bpm increase in RHR was (95% CI): 1.06 (1.01-1.10) in never smokers, 1.11 (1.07-1.15) in former smokers, 1.13 (1......BACKGROUND: Elevated resting heart rate is associated with mortality in general populations. Smokers may be at particular risk. The association between resting heart rate (RHR), smoking status and cardiovascular and total mortality was investigated in a general population. METHODS: Prospective.......09-1.16) in moderate smokers, and 1.13 (1.10-1.16) in heavy smokers. There was no gender difference. The risk estimates for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality were essentially similar. In univariate analyses, the difference in survival between a RHR in the highest (>80bpm) vs lowest quartile (...

  13. Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in current and former smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Magnus T; Marott, Jacob L; Jensen, Gorm B

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elevated resting heart rate is associated with mortality in general populations. Smokers may be at particular risk. The association between resting heart rate (RHR), smoking status and cardiovascular and total mortality was investigated in a general population. METHODS: Prospective....... Current and former smokers had, irrespective of tobacco consumption, greater relative risk of elevated RHR compared to never smokers. The relative risk of all-cause mortality per 10bpm increase in RHR was (95% CI): 1.06 (1.01-1.10) in never smokers, 1.11 (1.07-1.15) in former smokers, 1.13 (1.......09-1.16) in moderate smokers, and 1.13 (1.10-1.16) in heavy smokers. There was no gender difference. The risk estimates for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality were essentially similar. In univariate analyses, the difference in survival between a RHR in the highest (>80bpm) vs lowest quartile (...

  14. Relationship between Medication Use and Cardiovascular Disease Health Outcomes in the Jackson Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique S. White

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Even though some medications have the potential to slow the progress of atherosclerosis and development of CVD, there are many at-risk individuals who continue to resist the benefits that are available by not following the advice of medical professionals. Non-adherence to prescribed drug regimens is a pervasive medical problem that negatively affects treatment outcomes. Information from standardized interviews of 5301 African Americans participating in the Jackson Heart Study was examined to determine the association between demographic parameters, behavior including adherence to prescribed medical regimens, and health outcomes. Data were also collected at Annual Follow-Up and Surveillance visits. During the two weeks prior to the examination visit, almost 52% of the participants reported taking blood pressure medication, 14% took cholesterol medication, 16% took medication for diabetes, and 19% took blood thinning medication. Of those who did not take the prescribed medications, the reasons given were the following: 47% were in a hurry, too busy, or forgot to take medications; 23% were trying to do without medications; 18% had no money to purchase medications; 19% indicated that the medications made them feel bad; 17% felt that they could not carry out daily functions when taking medications. The African American population can benefit from heightened awareness of the risk factors that are associated with CVD and the benefits of following a prescribed treatment regimen. Unacceptable secondary effects of prescribed medication comprised an important cause of non-compliance. Encouragement of this population to communicate with their healthcare providers to ensure that medication regimens are better tolerated could increase compliance and improve health outcomes.

  15. Cognitive function in patients with stable coronary heart disease: Related cerebrovascular and cardiovascular responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Gayda

    Full Text Available Chronic exercise has been shown to prevent or slow age-related decline in cognitive functions in otherwise healthy, asymptomatic individuals. We sought to assess cognitive function in a stable coronary heart disease (CHD sample and its relationship to cerebral oxygenation-perfusion, cardiac hemodynamic responses, and [Formula: see text] peak compared to age-matched and young healthy control subjects. Twenty-two young healthy controls (YHC, 20 age-matched old healthy controls (OHC and 25 patients with stable CHD were recruited. Cognitive function assessment included short term-working memory, perceptual abilities, processing speed, cognitive inhibition and flexibility and long-term verbal memory. Maximal cardiopulmonary function (gas exchange analysis, cardiac hemodynamic (impedance cardiography and left frontal cerebral oxygenation-perfusion (near-infra red spectroscopy were measured during and after a maximal incremental ergocycle test. Compared to OHC and CHD, YHC had higher [Formula: see text] peak, maximal cardiac index (CI max, cerebral oxygenation-perfusion (ΔO2 Hb, ΔtHb: exercise and recovery and cognitive function (for all items (P<0.05. Compared to OHC, CHD patients had lower [Formula: see text] peak, CI max, cerebral oxygenation-perfusion (during recovery and short term-working memory, processing speed, cognitive inhibition and flexibility and long-term verbal memory (P<0.05. [Formula: see text] peak and CI max were related to exercise cerebral oxygenation-perfusion and cognitive function (P<0.005. Cerebral oxygenation-perfusion (exercise was related to cognitive function (P<0.005. Stable CHD patients have a worse cognitive function, a similar cerebral oxygenation/perfusion during exercise but reduced one during recovery vs. their aged-matched healthy counterparts. In the all sample, cognitive functions correlated with [Formula: see text] peak, CI max and cerebral oxygenation-perfusion.

  16. Acupuncture-like stimulation at auricular point Heart evokes cardiovascular inhibition via activating the cardiac-related neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin Yan; Li, Yan Hua; Liu, Kun; Rong, Pei Jing; Ben, Hui; Li, Liang; Zhu, Bing; Zhang, Shi Ping

    2011-06-23

    Fifty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats used in the present study to investigate the role of baroreceptor sensitive neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) in the regulation of cardiovascular inhibition during acupuncture at the auricular point Heart, single unit recording was made in anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. A neuron was considered to be excited or inhibited by acupuncture stimulation if it displayed 15% more or less spikes s(-1), respectively. NTS neurons were classified into cardiac-related (CR) neurons and non-cardiac-related neurons based on whether their rhythmic discharges were synchronized with the R-waves and responding to sodium nitroprusside (NP; 20 μg/kg, i.v.) administration. Manual acupuncture was applied at the auricular point Heart and somatic acupuncture points ST36 and PC6. Acupuncture at auricular point Heart showed a more significant inhibitory effect on arterial pressure (-22.1±2.4mm Hg; Pheart rate (-12.7±1.7 bpm; PHeart also increased the level of response of CR neurons in the NTS (93.8%±26.0% increase in discharge rate; Pneurons evoked by auricular acupuncture, but had no effect on the same responses evoked by somatic acupuncture. Inactivation of the NTS with local anesthetics also decreased the cardiovascular inhibitory responses evoked by auricular acupuncture. Our results show that acupuncture at the auricular point Heart regulates cardiovascular function by activating baroreceptor sensitive neurons in the NTS in a similar manner as the baroreceptor reflex in cardiovascular inhibition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The protective effects of acute cardiovascular exercise on the interference of procedural memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, J S; Chen, J; Riechman, S; Roig, M; Wright, D L

    2018-04-10

    Numerous studies have reported a positive impact of acute exercise for procedural skill memory. Previous work has revealed this effect, but these findings are confounded by a potential contribution of a night of sleep to the reported exercise-mediated reduction in interference. Thus, it remains unclear if exposure to a brief bout of exercise can provide protection to a newly acquired motor memory. The primary objective of the present study was to examine if a single bout of moderate-intensity cardiovascular exercise after practice of a novel motor sequence reduces the susceptibility to retroactive interference. To address this shortcoming, 17 individuals in a control condition practiced a novel motor sequence that was followed by test after a 6-h wake-filled interval. A separate group of 17 individuals experienced practice with an interfering motor sequence 45 min after practice with the original sequence and were then administered test trials 6 h later. One additional group of 12 participants was exposed to an acute bout of exercise immediately after practice with the original motor sequence but prior to practice with the interfering motor sequence and the subsequent test. In comparison with the control condition, increased response times were revealed during the 6-h test for the individuals that were exposed to interference. The introduction of an acute bout of exercise between the practice of the two motor sequences produced a reduction in interference from practice with the second task at the time of test, however, this effect was not statistically significant. These data reinforce the hypothesis that while there may be a contribution from exercise to post-practice consolidation of procedural skills which is independent of sleep, sleep may interact with exercise to strengthen the effects of the latter on procedural memory.

  18. Protective effects of GLP-1 analogues exendin-4 and GLP-1(9-36) amide against ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, David P; Engstrøm, Thomas; Treiman, Marek

    2007-01-01

    to exert cardiovascular effects in a number of experimental models. Here we tested exendin-4 (Exe-4), a peptide agonist at GLP-1 receptors, and GLP-1(9-36) amide, the primary endogenous metabolite of GLP-1 (both in the concentration range 0.03-3.0 nM), for their protective effects against ischemia......-reperfusion injury (IRI) in an isolated rat heart preparation. When administered, the agents were only present for the first 15 min of a 120 min reperfusion period (postconditioning protocol). Exe-4, but not GLP-1(9-36) amide, showed a strong infarct-limiting action (from 33.2% +/-2.7% to 14.5% +/-2.......2% of the ischemic area, pamide were able to augment left ventricular performance (left ventricular developed pressure and rate-pressure product) during...

  19. Comparison of cardiovascular response to combined static-dynamic effort, postprandial dynamic effort and dynamic effort alone in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, J.; McKillip, J.; Savin, W.; Magder, S.; Kraus, R.; Houston, N.; Goris, M.; Haskell, W.; DeBusk, R.

    1982-01-01

    The cardiovascular responses to combined static-dynamic effort, postprandial dynamic effort and dynamic effort alone were evaluated by upright bicycle ergometry during equilibrium-gated blood pool scintigraphy in 24 men, mean age 59 +/- 8 years, with chronic ischemic heart disease. Combined static-dynamic effort and the postprandial state elicited a peak cardiovascular response similar to that of dynamic effort alone. Heart rate, intraarterial systolic and diastolic pressures, rate-pressure product and ejection fraction were similar for the three test conditions at the onset of ischemia and at peak effort. The prevalence and extent of exercise-induced ischemic left ventricular dysfunction, ST-segment depression, angina pectoris and ventricular ectopic activity were also similar during the three test conditions. Direct and indirect measurements of systolic and diastolic blood pressure were highly correlated. The onset of ischemic ST-segment depression and angina pectoris correlated as strongly with heart rate alone as with the rate-pressure product during all three test conditions. The cardiovascular response to combined static-dynamic effort and to postprandial dynamic effort becomes more similar to that of dynamic effort alone as dynamic effort reaches a symptom limit. If significant ischemic and arrhythmic abnormalities are absent during symptom-limited dynamic exercise testing, they are unlikely to appear during combined static-dynamic or postprandial dynamic effort

  20. Pomegranate Supplementation Protects against Memory Dysfunction after Heart Surgery: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan A. Ropacki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Memory dysfunction is a common complaint following heart surgery and may be related to a diffuse ischemic state induced by microemboli dislodged during the procedure. Ischemia can induce damage by a number of mechanisms, including oxidative stress. Because pomegranates contain a variety of polyphenols with antioxidant and other potentially beneficial effects, we tested whether supplementation with a pomegranate extract before and after heart surgery could protect against postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft and/or valve surgery were given either 2 g of pomegranate extract (in 2 POMx pills or placebo (pills containing no pomegranate ingredients per day from one week before surgery to 6 weeks after surgery. The patients were also administered a battery of neuropsychological tests to assess memory function at 1 week before surgery (baseline, 2 weeks after surgery, and 6 weeks after surgery. The placebo group had significant deficits in postsurgery memory retention, and the pomegranate treatment not only protected against this effect, but also actually improved memory retention performance for up to 6 weeks after surgery as compared to presurgery baseline performance.

  1. Bcl-2–associated athanogene 3 protects the heart from ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Feifei; Myers, Valerie D.; Knezevic, Tijana; Wang, JuFang; Gao, Erhe; Madesh, Muniswamy; Tahrir, Farzaneh G.; Gupta, Manish K.; Gordon, Jennifer; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Tilley, Douglas G.; Khalili, Kamel; Cheung, Joseph Y.

    2016-01-01

    Bcl-2–associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) is an evolutionarily conserved protein expressed at high levels in the heart and the vasculature and in many cancers. While altered BAG3 expression has been associated with cardiac dysfunction, its role in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is unknown. To test the hypothesis that BAG3 protects the heart from reperfusion injury, in vivo cardiac function was measured in hearts infected with either recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 9–expressing (rAAV9-expressing) BAG3 or GFP and subjected to I/R. To elucidate molecular mechanisms by which BAG3 protects against I/R injury, neonatal mouse ventricular cardiomyocytes (NMVCs) in which BAG3 levels were modified by adenovirus expressing (Ad-expressing) BAG3 or siBAG3 were exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R). H/R significantly reduced NMVC BAG3 levels, which were associated with enhanced expression of apoptosis markers, decreased expression of autophagy markers, and reduced autophagy flux. The deleterious effects of H/R on apoptosis and autophagy were recapitulated by knockdown of BAG3 with Ad-siBAG3 and were rescued by Ad-BAG3. In vivo, treatment of mice with rAAV9-BAG3 prior to I/R significantly decreased infarct size and improved left ventricular function when compared with mice receiving rAAV9-GFP and improved markers of autophagy and apoptosis. These findings suggest that BAG3 may provide a therapeutic target in patients undergoing reperfusion after myocardial infarction. PMID:27882354

  2. Hyperleptinemia May Protect From Cardio-Vascular Complications: A Small Georgian Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Zerekidze

    2014-12-01

    CONCLUSION: Leptin might act as a preventive measure for cardiovascular complications only in the presence of sufficient amount of fat mass. Further studies are warranted in order to support these results.

  3. Social media for health promotion: What messages are women receiving about cardiovascular disease risk by the Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Christine A; McGannon, Kerry R; Schinke, Robert J

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the meanings of women's cardiovascular disease constructed within the Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation Facebook page. Posts from Heart and Stroke Foundation and public user comments surrounding the launch of the Heart and Stroke Foundation re-branding were of interest. Ethnographic content analysis was employed to analyse text ( n = 40), images ( n = 32), videos ( n = 6), user comments and replies ( n = 42) from November 2016 to March 2017. Constructions (re)presented on Facebook of 'typical' women at risk and risk reduction were problematic as women most at risk were excluded through the use of consumerist, medicalized identities which also excluded promotion of healthy behaviour changes.

  4. Effect of ghrelin on mortality and cardiovascular outcomes in experimental rat and mice models of heart failure: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahalaqua Nazli Khatib

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF continues to be a challenging condition in terms of prevention and management of the disease. Studies have demonstrated various cardio-protective effects of Ghrelin. The aim of the study is to determine the effect of Ghrelin on mortality and cardiac function in experimental rats/mice models of HF.Data sources: PUBMED, Scopus. We searched the Digital Dissertations and conference proceedings on Web of Science. Search methods: We systematically searched for all controlled trials (upto November 2014 which assessed the effects of Ghrelin (irrespective of dose, form, frequency, duration and route of administration on mortality and cardiac function in rats/ mice models of HF. Ghrelin administration irrespective of dose, form, frequency, duration and route of administration. Data collection and analysis: Two authors independently assessed each abstract for eligibility and extracted data on characteristics of the experimental model used, intervention and outcome measures. We assessed the methodological quality by SYRCLE's risk of bias tool for all studies and the quality of evidence by GRADEpro. We performed meta-analysis using RevMan 5.3.A total of 325 animals (rats and mice were analyzed across seven studies. The meta-analysis revealed that the mortality in Ghrelin group was 31.1% and in control group was 40% (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.46 to 1.47 i.e Ghrelin group had 68 fewer deaths per 1000 (from 216 fewer to 188 more as compared to the control group. The meta-analysis reveals that the heart rate in rats/mice on Ghrelin was higher (MD 13.11, 95% CI 1.14 to 25.08, P=0.66 while the mean arterial blood pressure (MD -1.38, 95% CI -5.16 to 2.41, P=0.48 and left ventricular end diastolic pressure (MD -2.45, 95% CI -4.46 to -0.43, P=0.02 were lower as compared to the those on placebo. There were insignificant changes in cardiac output (SMD 0.28, 95% CI -0.24 to 0.80, P=0.29 and left ventricular end systolic pressure (MD 1.48, 95% CI -3.86 to 6

  5. The impact of lifecourse socioeconomic position on cardiovascular disease events in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebreab, Samson Y; Diez Roux, Ana V; Brenner, Allison B; Hickson, DeMarc A; Sims, Mario; Subramanyam, Malavika; Griswold, Michael E; Wyatt, Sharon B; James, Sherman A

    2015-05-27

    Few studies have examined the impact of lifecourse socioeconomic position (SEP) on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among African Americans. We used data from the Jackson Heart Study (JHS) to examine the associations of multiple measures of lifecourse SEP with CVD events in a large cohort of African Americans. During a median of 7.2-year follow-up, 362 new or recurrent CVD events occurred in a sample of 5301 participants aged 21 to 94. Childhood SEP was assessed by using mother's education, parental home ownership, and childhood amenities. Adult SEP was assessed by using education, income, wealth, and public assistance. Adult SEP was more consistently associated with CVD risk in women than in men: age-adjusted hazard ratios for low versus high income (95% CIs), 2.46 (1.19 to 5.09) in women and 1.50 (0.87 to 2.58) in men, P for interaction=0.1244, and hazard ratio for low versus high wealth, 2.14 (1.39 to 3.29) in women and 1.06 (0.62 to 1.81) in men, P for interaction=0.0224. After simultaneous adjustment for all adult SEP measures, wealth remained a significant predictor of CVD events in women (HR=1.73 [1.04, 2.85] for low versus high). Education and public assistance were less consistently associated with CVD. Adult SEP was a stronger predictor of CVD events in younger than in older participants (HR for high versus low summary adult SEP score 3.28 [1.43, 7.53] for participants ≤50 years, and 1.90 (1.36 to 2.66) for participants >50 years, P for interaction 0.0846). Childhood SEP was not associated with CVD risk in women or men. Adult SEP is an important predictor of CVD events in African American women and in younger African Americans. Childhood SEP was not associated with CVD events in this population. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  6. Prognostic Significance of Creatinine Increases During an Acute Heart Failure Admission in Patients With and Without Residual Congestion: A Post Hoc Analysis of the PROTECT Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metra, Marco; Cotter, Gad; Senger, Stefanie; Edwards, Christopher; Cleland, John G; Ponikowski, Piotr; Cursack, Guillermo C; Milo, Olga; Teerlink, John R; Givertz, Michael M; O'Connor, Christopher M; Dittrich, Howard C; Bloomfield, Daniel M; Voors, Adriaan A; Davison, Beth A

    2018-05-01

    The importance of a serum creatinine increase, traditionally considered worsening renal function (WRF), during admission for acute heart failure has been recently debated, with data suggesting an interaction between congestion and creatinine changes. In post hoc analyses, we analyzed the association of WRF with length of hospital stay, 30-day death or cardiovascular/renal readmission and 90-day mortality in the PROTECT study (Placebo-Controlled Randomized Study of the Selective A1 Adenosine Receptor Antagonist Rolofylline for Patients Hospitalized With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure and Volume Overload to Assess Treatment Effect on Congestion and Renal Function). Daily creatinine changes from baseline were categorized as WRF (an increase of 0.3 mg/dL or more) or not. Daily congestion scores were computed by summing scores for orthopnea, edema, and jugular venous pressure. Of the 2033 total patients randomized, 1537 patients had both available at study day 14. Length of hospital stay was longer and 30-day cardiovascular/renal readmission or death more common in patients with WRF. However, these were driven by significant associations in patients with concomitant congestion at the time of assessment of renal function. The mean difference in length of hospital stay because of WRF was 3.51 (95% confidence interval, 1.29-5.73) more days ( P =0.0019), and the hazard ratio for WRF on 30-day death or heart failure hospitalization was 1.49 (95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.09) times higher ( P =0.0205), in significantly congested than nonsignificantly congested patients. A similar trend was observed with 90-day mortality although not statistically significant. In patients admitted for acute heart failure, WRF defined as a creatinine increase of ≥0.3 mg/dL was associated with longer length of hospital stay, and worse 30- and 90-day outcomes. However, effects were largely driven by patients who had residual congestion at the time of renal function assessment. URL: https

  7. An evaluation of coronary artery lesions of Kawasaki disease and congenital heart disease using rotary three dimensional digital cardiovascular angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Masanori; Ogawa, Shunichi; Kumazaki, Tatsuo; Hirayama, Tsuneo

    1994-01-01

    Congenital heart disease and the coronary artery lesions of children suffering from Kawasaki disease were evaluated by cardiovascular angiography using a newly developed rotary three-dimensional digital angiography method, and the usefulness of the device was examined. This method enable the observation of lesions from 144 directions within a 180 degree range depicting an image from optimal directions. In addition, the radiation exposure during one angiography was about one fifth of that of conventional cineangiography. With regard to the lesions of the coronary artery, identification of the localization of the stenotic lesions were made possible, especially at bifurcations, or the stenotic lesions overlapping with other bifurcations or coronary arteries aneurysms as well as the structure at the ostium of the left and right coronary arteries, which were difficult to identify using conventional coronary artery angiography. For the case of patient ductus arteriosus or major aortopulmonary collateral artery (MAPCA), separation and imaging of the overlap with other blood vessels through the three-dimensional observation became possible. This method is effective for the evaluation of the site, direction and morphology of these arteries. With regard to stenosis of the right ventricular outflow tract, the morphology and the degree of stenosis could be evaluated more accurately than by conventional cineangiography. In addition, the images matched well with the operative findings. This method was also effective for the diagnosis and evaluation of the stenosis at the main pulmonary artery and stenosis of the bifurcation of the right and left pulmonary arteries overlapping with the main trunk of the pulmonary artery. The problem with this method is that it cannot be used for the quantitative evaluation of the cardiac function because it cannot take images from multiple directions at the same time or cannot take temporal images from one direction. (author)

  8. Availability and quality of coronary heart disease family history in primary care medical records: implications for cardiovascular risk assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Dhiman

    Full Text Available The potential to use data on family history of premature disease to assess disease risk is increasingly recognised, particularly in scoring risk for coronary heart disease (CHD. However the quality of family health information in primary care records is unclear.To assess the availability and quality of family history of CHD documented in electronic primary care records.Cross-sectional study.537 UK family practices contributing to The Health Improvement Network database.Data were obtained from patients aged 20 years or more, registered with their current practice between 1(st January 1998 and 31(st December 2008, for at least one year. The availability and quality of recorded CHD family history was assessed using multilevel logistic and ordinal logistic regression respectively.In a cross-section of 1,504,535 patients, 19% had a positive or negative family history of CHD recorded. Multilevel logistic regression showed patients aged 50-59 had higher odds of having their family history recorded compared to those aged 20-29 (OR:1.23 (1.21 to 1.25, however most deprived patients had lower odds compared to those least deprived (OR: 0.86 (0.85 to 0.88. Of the 140,058 patients with a positive family history recorded (9% of total cohort, age of onset was available in 45%; with data specifying both age of onset and relative affected available in only 11% of records. Multilevel ordinal logistic regression confirmed no statistical association between the quality of family history recording and age, gender, deprivation and year of registration.Family history of CHD is documented in a small proportion of primary care records; and where positive family history is documented the details are insufficient to assess familial risk or populate cardiovascular risk assessment tools. Data capture needs to be improved particularly for more disadvantaged patients who may be most likely to benefit from CHD risk assessment.

  9. Association of lung function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7 cardiovascular health metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenjun; Lee, Hwa; Lee, Angela; Kieu, Chi; Wong, Nathan D

    2017-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. There is a strong association between COPD and cardiovascular (CV) disease; however, the relation between COPD and CV health factors is not well defined. We examined the relation between lung function and CV health factors defined by American Heart Association's (AHA) Life's Simple 7 (LS7). We studied 6352 adults aged ≥20 from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2009-2012. Analysis of variance was used to compare mean FEV1% of predicted across levels of each LS7 metric and population attributable risk was calculated based on COPD prevalence. We also conducted linear regression and logistic regression analyses to determine the association between lung function, COPD and LS7 score. Overall 19.9% of subjects were defined as having COPD. Subjects in the highest categories of the LS7 metrics had the highest mean values of FEV1% of predicted (p < 0.0001 except for total cholesterol). Current smoking and hypertension had a population attributed risk of 21.8% and 21.1% of COPD, respectively. Compared to subjects with 0 ideal health factors, the gender and ethnicity-adjusted odds (95% CI) for COPD were 0.45 (0.22-0.93), 0.22 (0.11-0.43) for those with 4 and 5-7 factors, but adjustment for age attenuated this relation. LS7 score is associated with lung function as well as the odds of COPD that is largely explained by age. Studies are needed to show if promotion of CV health will preserve healthy lung function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Early-adulthood cardiovascular disease risk factor profiles among individuals with and without diabetes in the Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preis, Sarah Rosner; Pencina, Michael J; Mann, Devin M; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Savage, Peter J; Fox, Caroline S

    2013-06-01

    Many studies of diabetes have examined risk factors at the time of diabetes diagnosis instead of considering the lifetime burden of adverse risk factor levels. We examined the 30-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor burden that participants have up to the time of diabetes diagnosis. Among participants free of CVD, incident diabetes cases (fasting plasma glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL or treatment) occurring at examinations 2 through 8 (1979-2008) of the Framingham Heart Study Offspring cohort were age- and sex-matched 1:2 to controls. CVD risk factors (hypertension, high LDL cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, high triglycerides, obesity) were measured at the time of diabetes diagnosis and at time points 10, 20, and 30 years prior. Conditional logistic regression was used to compare risk factor levels at each time point between diabetes cases and controls. We identified 525 participants with new-onset diabetes who were matched to 1,049 controls (mean age, 60 years; 40% women). Compared with those without diabetes, individuals who eventually developed diabetes had higher levels of hypertension (odds ratio [OR], 2.2; P = 0.003), high LDL (OR, 1.5; P = 0.04), low HDL (OR, 2.1; P = 0.0001), high triglycerides (OR, 1.7; P = 0.04), and obesity (OR, 3.3; P < 0.0001) at time points 30 years before diabetes diagnosis. After further adjustment for BMI, the ORs for hypertension (OR, 1.9; P = 0.02) and low HDL (OR, 1.7; P = 0.01) remained statistically significant. CVD risk factors are increased up to 30 years before diagnosis of diabetes. These findings highlight the importance of a life course approach to CVD risk factor identification among individuals at risk for diabetes.

  11. Availability and quality of coronary heart disease family history in primary care medical records: implications for cardiovascular risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, Paula; Kai, Joe; Horsfall, Laura; Walters, Kate; Qureshi, Nadeem

    2014-01-01

    The potential to use data on family history of premature disease to assess disease risk is increasingly recognised, particularly in scoring risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). However the quality of family health information in primary care records is unclear. To assess the availability and quality of family history of CHD documented in electronic primary care records. Cross-sectional study. 537 UK family practices contributing to The Health Improvement Network database. Data were obtained from patients aged 20 years or more, registered with their current practice between 1(st) January 1998 and 31(st) December 2008, for at least one year. The availability and quality of recorded CHD family history was assessed using multilevel logistic and ordinal logistic regression respectively. In a cross-section of 1,504,535 patients, 19% had a positive or negative family history of CHD recorded. Multilevel logistic regression showed patients aged 50-59 had higher odds of having their family history recorded compared to those aged 20-29 (OR:1.23 (1.21 to 1.25)), however most deprived patients had lower odds compared to those least deprived (OR: 0.86 (0.85 to 0.88)). Of the 140,058 patients with a positive family history recorded (9% of total cohort), age of onset was available in 45%; with data specifying both age of onset and relative affected available in only 11% of records. Multilevel ordinal logistic regression confirmed no statistical association between the quality of family history recording and age, gender, deprivation and year of registration. Family history of CHD is documented in a small proportion of primary care records; and where positive family history is documented the details are insufficient to assess familial risk or populate cardiovascular risk assessment tools. Data capture needs to be improved particularly for more disadvantaged patients who may be most likely to benefit from CHD risk assessment.

  12. The South Asian Heart Lifestyle Intervention (SAHELI) study to improve cardiovascular risk factors in a community setting: design and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Namratha R; Patel, Yasin; Dave, Swapna; Seguil, Paola; Kumar, Santosh; Baker, David W; Spring, Bonnie; Siddique, Juned

    2013-11-01

    Disseminating and implementing evidence-based, cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention lifestyle interventions in community settings and in ethnic minority populations is a challenge. We describe the design and methods for the South Asian Heart Lifestyle Intervention (SAHELI) study, a pilot study designed to determine the feasibility and initial efficacy of a culturally-targeted, community-based lifestyle intervention to improve physical activity and diet behaviors among medically underserved South Asians (SAs). Participants with at least one CVD risk factor will be randomized to either a lifestyle intervention or a control group. Participants in both groups will be screened in a community setting and receive a primary care referral after randomization. Intervention participants will receive 6weeks of group classes, followed by 12weeks of individual telephone support where they will be encouraged to initiate and maintain a healthy lifestyle goal. Control participants will receive their screening results and monthly mailings on CVD prevention. Primary outcomes will be changes in moderate/vigorous physical activity and saturated fat intake between baseline, 3-, and 6-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes will be changes in weight, clinical risk factors, primary care visits, self-efficacy, and social support. This study will be one of the first to pilot-test a lifestyle intervention for SAs, one of the fastest growing racial/ethnic groups in the U.S. and one with disparate CVD risk. Results of this pilot study will provide preliminary data about the efficacy of a lifestyle intervention on CVD risk in SAs and inform community-engaged CVD prevention efforts in an increasingly diverse U.S. population. © 2013.

  13. Is inequality at the heart of it? Cross-country associations of income inequality with cardiovascular diseases and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daniel; Kawachi, Ichiro; Hoorn, Stephen Vander; Ezzati, Majid

    2008-04-01

    Despite a number of cross-national studies that have examined the associations between income inequality and broad health outcomes such as life expectancy and all-cause mortality, investigations of the cross-country relations between income inequality and cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity, mortality, and risk factors are sparse. We analyzed the cross-national relations between income inequality and age-standardized mean body mass index (BMI), serum total cholesterol, systolic blood pressure (SBP), obesity prevalence, smoking impact ratio (SIR), and age-standardized and age-specific disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and mortality rates from coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke, controlling for multiple country-level factors and specifying 5- to 10-year lag periods. In multivariable analyses primarily limited to industrialized countries, countries in the middle and highest (vs. lowest) tertiles of income inequality had higher absolute age-standardized obesity prevalences in both sexes. Higher income inequality was also related to higher mean SBP in both sexes, and higher SIR in women. In analyses of larger sets of countries with available data, positive associations were observed between higher income inequality and mean BMI, obesity prevalence, and CHD DALYs and mortality rates. Associations with stroke outcomes were inverse, yet became positive with the inclusion of eastern bloc and other countries in recent economic/political transition. China was also identified to be an influential data point, with the positive associations with stroke mortality rates becoming attenuated with its inclusion. Overall, our findings are compatible with harmful effects of income inequality at the national scale on CVD morbidity, mortality, and selected risk factors, particularly BMI/obesity. Future studies should consider income inequality as an independent contributor to variations in CVD burden globally.

  14. The role of physicians in a community-wide program for prevention of cardiovascular disease: the Minnesota Heart Health Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelmark, M B; Leupker, R V; Grimm, R; Kottke, T E; Blackburn, H

    1988-01-01

    The Minnesota Heart Health Program (MHHP) aims to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality by reducing risk factors among the mass of residents in three midwestern communities. A major aspect of the program is the involvement of community physicians because they have high credibility as citizen leaders, especially on health issues. In the MHHP, physicians contributed in a number of ways. The initial contacts with physicians resulted in their providing support and introductions to other community leaders, whose active support was also gained. Physicians sit as members of the central Community Advisory Borads of MHHP and serve on the executive committees of these boards. All MHHP issues related to medical practice are brought before Physicians' Advisory Groups in each community for resolution. Primary care physicians attend MHHP continuing education programs. In a survey of 109 physicians in one of the MHHP communities, 95 percent of respondents believed cigarette smoking to be an important risk factor for CVD, but only 15 percent judged themselves to be effective in dealing with patients who smoked. Forty-one percent of respondents said that elevated blood cholesterol is an important risk factor, but only 20 percent felt effective in treating the condition. Only 18 percent of the physicians in the sample believed that a poor eating pattern plays a substantial role in CVD, and 9 percent felt effective in counseling patients about eating habits. This pattern of results indicates the need not only for continuing education about risk factors for CVD, but also for training to improve patient counseling skills. PMID:3136495

  15. Predictive value of night-time heart rate for cardiovascular events in hypertension. The ABP-International study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatini, Paolo; Reboldi, Gianpaolo; Beilin, Lawrence J; Eguchi, Kazuo; Imai, Yutaka; Kario, Kazuomi; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Pierdomenico, Sante D; Saladini, Francesca; Schwartz, Joseph E; Wing, Lindon; Verdecchia, Paolo

    2013-09-30

    Data from prospective cohort studies regarding the association between ambulatory heart rate (HR) and cardiovascular events (CVE) are conflicting. To investigate whether ambulatory HR predicts CVE in hypertension, we performed 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure and HR monitoring in 7600 hypertensive patients aged 52 ± 16 years from Italy, U.S.A., Japan, and Australia, included in the 'ABP-International' registry. All were untreated at baseline examination. Standardized hazard ratios for ambulatory HRs were computed, stratifying for cohort, and adjusting for age, gender, blood pressure, smoking, diabetes, serum total cholesterol and serum creatinine. During a median follow-up of 5.0 years there were 639 fatal and nonfatal CVE. In a multivariable Cox model, night-time HR predicted fatal combined with nonfatal CVE more closely than 24h HR (p=0.007 and =0.03, respectively). Daytime HR and the night:day HR ratio were not associated with CVE (p=0.07 and =0.18, respectively). The hazard ratio of the fatal combined with nonfatal CVE for a 10-beats/min increment of the night-time HR was 1.13 (95% CI, 1.04-1.22). This relationship remained significant when subjects taking beta-blockers during the follow-up (hazard ratio, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.05-1.25) or subjects who had an event within 5 years after enrollment (hazard ratio, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.05-1.45) were excluded from analysis. At variance with previous data obtained from general populations, ambulatory HR added to the risk stratification for fatal combined with nonfatal CVE in the hypertensive patients from the ABP-International study. Night-time HR was a better predictor of CVE than daytime HR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Permutation entropy analysis of heart rate variability for the assessment of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carricarte Naranjo, Claudia; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Lazaro M; Brown Martínez, Marta; Estévez Báez, Mario; Machado García, Andrés

    2017-07-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is a relevant tool for the diagnosis of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN). To our knowledge, no previous investigation on CAN has assessed the complexity of HRV from an ordinal perspective. Therefore, the aim of this work is to explore the potential of permutation entropy (PE) analysis of HRV complexity for the assessment of CAN. For this purpose, we performed a short-term PE analysis of HRV in healthy subjects and type 1 diabetes mellitus patients, including patients with CAN. Standard HRV indicators were also calculated in the control group. A discriminant analysis was used to select the variables combination with best discriminative power between control and CAN patients groups, as well as for classifying cases. We found that for some specific temporal scales, PE indicators were significantly lower in CAN patients than those calculated for controls. In such cases, there were ordinal patterns with high probabilities of occurrence, while others were hardly found. We posit this behavior occurs due to a decrease of HRV complexity in the diseased system. Discriminant functions based on PE measures or probabilities of occurrence of ordinal patterns provided an average of 75% and 96% classification accuracy. Correlations of PE and HRV measures showed to depend only on temporal scale, regardless of pattern length. PE analysis at some specific temporal scales, seem to provide additional information to that obtained with traditional HRV methods. We concluded that PE analysis of HRV is a promising method for the assessment of CAN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Safe Oral Triiodo-L-Thyronine Therapy Protects from Post-Infarct Cardiac Dysfunction and Arrhythmias without Cardiovascular Adverse Effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswanathan Rajagopalan

    Full Text Available A large body of evidence suggests that thyroid hormones (THs are beneficial for the treatment of cardiovascular disorders. We have shown that 3 days of triiodo-L-thyronine (T3 treatment in myocardial infarction (MI rats increased left ventricular (LV contractility and decreased myocyte apoptosis. However, no clinically translatable protocol is established for T3 treatment of ischemic heart disease. We hypothesized that low-dose oral T3 will offer safe therapeutic benefits in MI.Adult female rats underwent left coronary artery ligation or sham surgeries. T3 (~6 μg/kg/day was available in drinking water ad libitum immediately following MI and continuing for 2 month(s (mo. Compared to vehicle-treated MI, the oral T3-treated MI group at 2 mo had markedly improved anesthetized Magnetic Resonance Imaging-based LV ejection fraction and volumes without significant negative changes in heart rate, serum TH levels or heart weight, indicating safe therapy. Remarkably, T3 decreased the incidence of inducible atrial tachyarrhythmias by 88% and improved remodeling. These were accompanied by restoration of gene expression involving several key pathways including thyroid, ion channels, fibrosis, sympathetic, mitochondria and autophagy.Low-dose oral T3 dramatically improved post-MI cardiac performance, decreased atrial arrhythmias and cardiac remodeling, and reversed many adverse changes in gene expression with no observable negative effects. This study also provides a safe and effective treatment/monitoring protocol that should readily translate to humans.

  18. The relation of digital vascular function to cardiovascular risk factors in African-Americans using digital tonometry: the Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClendon, Eric E; Musani, Solomon K; Samdarshi, Tandaw E; Khaire, Sushant; Stokes, Donny; Hamburg, Naomi M; Sheffy, Koby; Mitchell, Gary F; Taylor, Herman R; Benjamin, Emelia J; Fox, Ervin R

    2017-06-01

    Digital vascular tone and function, as measured by peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT), are associated with cardiovascular risk and events in non-Hispanic whites. There are limited data on relations between PAT and cardiovascular risk in African-Americans. PAT was performed on a subset of Jackson Heart Study participants using a fingertip tonometry device. Resting digital vascular tone was assessed as baseline pulse amplitude. Hyperemic vascular response to 5 minutes of ischemia was expressed as the PAT ratio (hyperemic/baseline amplitude ratio). Peripheral augmentation index (AI), a measure of relative wave reflection, also was estimated. The association of baseline pulse amplitude (PA), PAT ratio, and AI to risk factors was assessed using stepwise multivariable models. The study sample consisted of 837 participants from the Jackson Heart Study (mean age, 54 ± 11 years; 61% women). In stepwise multivariable regression models, baseline pulse amplitude was related to male sex, body mass index, and diastolic blood pressure (BP), accounting for 16% of the total variability of the baseline pulse amplitude. Age, male sex, systolic BP, diastolic BP, antihypertensive medication, and prevalent cardiovascular disease contributed to 11% of the total variability of the PAT ratio. Risk factors (primarily age, sex, and heart rate) explained 47% of the total variability of the AI. We confirmed in our cohort of African-Americans, a significant relation between digital vascular tone and function measured by PAT and multiple traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Further studies are warranted to investigate the utility of these measurements in predicting clinical outcomes in African-Americans. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The role of mitochondria in protection of the heart by preconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halestrap, Andrew P.; Clarke, Samantha J.; Khaliulin, Igor

    2007-01-01

    A prolonged period of ischaemia followed by reperfusion irreversibly damages the heart. Such reperfusion injury (RI) involves opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) under the conditions of calcium overload and oxidative stress that accompany reperfusion. Protection from MPTP opening and hence RI can be mediated by ischaemic preconditioning (IP) where the prolonged ischaemic period is preceded by one or more brief (2–5 min) cycles of ischaemia and reperfusion. Following a brief overview of the molecular characterisation and regulation of the MPTP, the proposed mechanisms by which IP reduces pore opening are reviewed including the potential roles for reactive oxygen species (ROS), protein kinase cascades, and mitochondrial potassium channels. It is proposed that IP-mediated inhibition of MPTP opening at reperfusion does not involve direct phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins, but rather reflects diminished oxidative stress during prolonged ischaemia and reperfusion. This causes less oxidation of critical thiol groups on the MPTP that are known to sensitise pore opening to calcium. The mechanisms by which ROS levels are decreased in the IP hearts during prolonged ischaemia and reperfusion are not known, but appear to require activation of protein kinase Cε, either by receptor-mediated events or through transient increases in ROS during the IP protocol. Other signalling pathways may show cross-talk with this primary mechanism, but we suggest that a role for mitochondrial potassium channels is unlikely. The evidence for their activity in isolated mitochondria and cardiac myocytes is reviewed and the lack of specificity of the pharmacological agents used to implicate them in IP is noted. Some K+ channel openers uncouple mitochondria and others inhibit respiratory chain complexes, and their ability to produce ROS and precondition hearts is mimicked by bona fide uncouplers and respiratory chain inhibitors. IP may also provide continuing

  20. Multicentre, prospective, randomised, open-label, blinded end point trial of the efficacy of allopurinol therapy in improving cardiovascular outcomes in patients with ischaemic heart disease: protocol of the ALL-HEART study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Isla S; Ford, Ian; Walker, Andrew; Hawkey, Chris; Begg, Alan; Avery, Anthony; Taggar, Jaspal; Wei, Li; Struthers, Allan D; MacDonald, Thomas M

    2016-09-08

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is one of the most common causes of death in the UK and treatment of patients with IHD costs the National Health System (NHS) billions of pounds each year. Allopurinol is a xanthine oxidase inhibitor used to prevent gout that also has several positive effects on the cardiovascular system. The ALL-HEART study aims to determine whether allopurinol improves cardiovascular outcomes in patients with IHD. The ALL-HEART study is a multicentre, controlled, prospective, randomised, open-label blinded end point (PROBE) trial of allopurinol (up to 600 mg daily) versus no treatment in a 1:1 ratio, added to usual care, in 5215 patients aged 60 years and over with IHD. Patients are followed up by electronic record linkage and annual questionnaires for an average of 4 years. The primary outcome is the composite of non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke or cardiovascular death. Secondary outcomes include all-cause mortality, quality of life and cost-effectiveness of allopurinol. The study will end when 631 adjudicated primary outcomes have occurred. The study is powered at 80% to detect a 20% reduction in the primary end point for the intervention. Patient recruitment to the ALL-HEART study started in February 2014. The study received ethical approval from the East of Scotland Research Ethics Service (EoSRES) REC 2 (13/ES/0104). The study is event-driven and results are expected after 2019. Results will be reported in peer-reviewed journals and at scientific meetings. Results will also be disseminated to guideline committees, NHS organisations and patient groups. 32017426, pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. SIRT1 Functions as an Important Regulator of Estrogen-Mediated Cardiomyocyte Protection in Angiotensin II-Induced Heart Hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Shen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1 is a member of the sirtuin family, which could activate cell survival machinery and has been shown to be protective in regulation of heart function. Here, we determined the mechanism by which SIRT1 regulates Angiotensin II- (AngII- induced cardiac hypertrophy and injury in vivo and in vitro. Methods. We analyzed SIRT1 expression in the hearts of control and AngII-induced mouse hypertrophy. Female C57BL/6 mice were ovariectomized and pretreated with 17β-estradiol to measure SIRT1 expression. Protein synthesis, cardiomyocyte surface area analysis, qRT-PCR, TUNEL staining, and Western blot were performed on AngII-induced mouse heart hypertrophy samples and cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs to investigate the function of SIRT1. Results. SIRT1 expression was slightly upregulated in AngII-induced mouse heart hypertrophy in vivo and in vitro, accompanied by elevated cardiomyocyte apoptosis. SIRT1 overexpression relieves AngII-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis. 17β-Estradiol was able to protect cardiomyocytes from AngII-induced injury with a profound upregulation of SIRT1 and activation of AMPK. Moreover, estrogen receptor inhibitor ICI 182,780 and SIRT1 inhibitor niacinamide could block SIRT1’s protective effect. Conclusions. These results indicate that SIRT1 functions as an important regulator of estrogen-mediated cardiomyocyte protection during AngII-induced heart hypertrophy and injury.

  2. Protective effects of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide in perioperative period during open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunbin; Li, Yong; Bao, Weiguo; Qiu, Shi

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effects and safety aspects of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide (rhBNP) on cardiac functions of patients undergoing open-heart surgery during perioperative period. In total, 150 patients undergoing open heart surgery in the Second Hospital of Shandong Universty from August 2015 to July 2016 were randomly divided into control group and observation group each with 75 cases. Patients in control group were treated by routine rehabilitation while patients in the observation group were treated by both the routine rehabilitation and rhBNP. All the observations were made before operation, after operation and 7 days after operation. The changes of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) of patients, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), cardiac function [Cardiac output (CO), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PAWP) and central venous pressure (CVP)] of patients were measured. Further, respirator support time, ICU stay time, incidence of complications and vital signs (BP, HR, SaO2) of patients in the two groups were also compared. NT-proBNP levels of all patients improved after operation but it decreased in both groups after 7 days of operation. The decrease of NT-proBNP levels in observation group was significantly higher than that of control group. Whereas, LVEF, CO, PAWP and CVP of patients in both the groups increased after operation but effects were significantly higher in the observation group after 7 days of medication. Respirator support time and ICU stay time of patients in observation group were significantly shorter than those in control group, and the incidence of postoperative complications of patients in the observation group were significantly lower than the control group. Moreover, BP, HR and SaO2 of patients in observation group were significantly elevated in comparison to control group (Popen heart surgery, and is safe as well as reliable.

  3. Prognostic Value of Stress Echocardiography in Patients With Low-Intermediate or High Short-Term (10 Years) Versus Low (Risk of Cardiovascular Disease According to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 Cardiovascular Risk Calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Siu-Sun; Supariwala, Azhar; Yao, Amanda; Dukkipati, Sai Sreenija; Wyne, Jamshad; Chaudhry, Farooq A

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluates the prognostic value of stress echocardiography (Secho) in short-term (10 years) and lifetime atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk-defined groups according to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 cardiovascular risk calculator. The ideal risk assessment and management of patients with low-to-intermediate or high short-term versus low (risk is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of Secho in short-term and lifetime CV risk-defined groups. We evaluated 4,566 patients (60 ± 13 years; 46% men) who underwent Secho (41% treadmill and 59% dobutamine) with low-intermediate short-term (risk divided into low (risk and third group with high short-term risk (≥20%, n = 3,537). Follow-up (3.2 ± 1.5 years) for nonfatal myocardial infarction (n = 102) and cardiac death (n = 140) were obtained. By univariate analysis, age (p risk and also in those with high short-term CV risk group (3.5% vs 1.0% per year, p risk assessment in patients with low-intermediate or high short-term versus low or high lifetime cardiovascular risk. Event rate with normal Secho is low (≤1% per year) but higher in patients with high short-term CV risk by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 cardiovascular risk calculator. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Perioperative erythropoietin protects the CNS against ischemic lesions in patients after open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakič, Nikola; Mrak, Miha; Šušteršič, Miha; Rakovec, Peter; Bunc, Matjaž

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to establish erythropoietin as a protective factor against brain ischemia during open heart surgery. A total of 36 consecutive patients scheduled for revascularization heart surgery were included in the study. Of the patients 18 received 3 intravenous doses of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo, 24,000 IU) and 18 patients received a placebo. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect new brain ischemic lesions was performed. Additionally, S100A, S100B, neuron-specific enolase A and B (NSE-A and B) and the concentration of antibodies against N‑methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) to identify new neurological complications were determined. Patients who received rHuEpo showed no postoperative ischemic changes in the brain on MRI images. In the control group 5 (27.8 %) new ischemic lesions were found. The NMDAR antibody concentration, S100A, S100B and NSE showed no significant differences between the groups for new cerebral ischemia. High levels of lactate before and after external aortic compression (p = 0.022 and p = 0.048, respectively) and duration of operation could predict new ischemic lesions (p = 0.009). The addition of rHuEpo reduced the formation of lesions detectable by MRI in the brain and could be used clinically as neuroprotection in cardiac surgery.

  5. Ischemic preconditioning fails to confer additional protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in the hypothyroid rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourouzis, I; Dimopoulos, A; Saranteas, T; Tsinarakis, N; Livadarou, E; Spanou, D; Kokkinos, A D; Xinaris, C; Pantos, C; Cokkinos, D V

    2009-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence showing that ischemic preconditioning (PC) may lose its cardioprotective effect in the diseased states. The present study investigated whether PC can be effective in hypothyroidism, a clinical condition which is common and often accompanies cardiac diseases such as heart failure and myocardial infarction. Hypothyroidism was induced in rats by 3-week administration of 6n-propyl-2-thiouracil in water (0.05 %). Normal and hypothyroid hearts (HYPO) were perfused in Langendorff mode and subjected to 20 min of zero-flow global ischemia and 45 min of reperfusion. A preconditioning protocol (PC) was also applied prior to ischemia. HYPO hearts had significantly improved post-ischemic recovery of left ventricular developed pressure, end-diastolic pressure and reduced lactate dehydrogenase release. Furthermore, phospho-JNK and p38 MAPK levels after ischemia and reperfusion were 4.0 and 3.0 fold lower in HYPO as compared to normal hearts (Phearts. PC improved the post-ischemic recovery of function and reduced the extent of injury in normal hearts but had no additional effect on the hypothyroid hearts. This response, in the preconditioned normal hearts, resulted in 2.5 and 1.8 fold smaller expression of the phospho-JNK and phospho-p38 MAPK levels at the end of reperfusion, as compared to non-PC hearts (Phearts, no additional reduction in the phosphorylation of these kinases was observed after PC. Hypothyroid hearts appear to be tolerant to ischemia-reperfusion injury. This response may be, at least in part, due to the down-regulation of ischemia-reperfusion induced activation of JNKs and p38 MAPK kinases. PC is not associated with further reduction in the activation of these kinases in the hypothyroid hearts and fails to confer added protection in those hearts.

  6. Cardiovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Kazunori

    1992-01-01

    This paper is aimed to discuss the involvement of delayed radiation effects of A-bomb exposure in cardiovascular diseases. First, the relationship between radiation and cardiovascular diseases is reviewed in the literature. Animal experiments have confirmed the relationship between ionizing radiation and vascular lesions. There are many reports which describe ischemic heart disease, cervical and cerebrovascular diseases, and peripheral disease occurring after radiation therapy. The previous A-bomb survivor cohort studies, i.e., the RERF Life Span Study and Adult Health Study, have dealt with the mortality rate from cardiovascular diseases, the prevalence or incidence of cardiovascular diseases, pathological findings, clinical observation of arteriosclerosis, ECG abnormality, blood pressure abnormality, and cardiac function. The following findings have been suggested: (1) A-bomb exposure is likely to be involved in the mortality rate and incidence of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases; (2) similarly, the involvement of A-bomb exposure is considered in the prevalence of the arch of aorta; (3) ECG abnormality corresponding to ischemic heart disease may reflect the involvement of A-bomb exposure. To confirm the above findings, further studies are required on the basis of more accurate information and the appropriate number of cohort samples. Little evidence has been presented for the correlation between A-bomb exposure and both rheumatic heart disease and congenital heart disease. (N.K.) 88 refs

  7. The anti-cancer components of Ganoderma lucidum possesses cardiovascular protective effect by regulating circular RNA expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Weijiang; Li, Xiangmin; Jiao, Chunwei; Huang, Ren; Yang, Burton B.

    2016-01-01

    To examine the role of oral Ganoderma spore oil in cardiovascular disease, we used transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in mice to model pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy. Our preliminary results demonstrated a potential cardioprotective role for spore oil extracted from Ganoderma. We found that Ganoderma treatment normalized ejection fraction and corrected the fractional shortening generated by TAC. We also found evidence of reduced left ventricular hypertrophy as assessed by left ventricular end diastolic diameter. Analysis of total RNA expression using cardiac tissue samples from these mice corroborated our findings. We found reduced expression of genes associated with heart failure, including a novel circular RNA circ-Foxo3. Thus our data provides evidence for Ganoderma lucidum as a potential cardioprotective agent, warranting further preclinical exploration. PMID:27713910

  8. Short-arm human centrifugation with 0.4g at eye and 0.75g at heart level provides similar cerebrovascular and cardiovascular responses to standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nandu; Bruner, Michelle; Xu, Da; Bareille, Marie-Pierre; Beck, Arnaud; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut; Blaber, Andrew P

    2015-07-01

    Orthostatic intolerance continues to be a problem with astronauts upon return to Earth as a result of cerebral and cardiovascular adaptations to weightlessness. We tested the hypothesis that artificial gravity from a short-arm human centrifuge (SAHC) could provide cerebral and cardiovascular stimuli similar to upright posture and thereby serve as a suitable countermeasure. We compared cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses before, during, and after exposure to hyper-G with that of standing in healthy young participants. The head was positioned such that the middle cerebral artery (MCA) was 0.46 m from the center of rotation. Two levels of hyper-G that provided 1g and 2g at foot level were investigated. Continuous blood pressure, heart rate, calf blood volume, MCA mean blood flow velocity (MFV) and end-tidal CO2 were measured. Blood pressure at the level of the MCA (BP-MCA) and MFV was reduced during stand and at 2g. The relationship between MFV and BP-MCA at 2g was different from supine and similar to standing, while 1g centrifugation was not different from supine. The cardiovascular system was also not different from supine at 1g but was similarly challenged in 2g compared to stand. Our data suggest that short-arm centrifugation 2g at the feet, with the head offset 0.5 m from the center, provides similar cardiovascular and cerebral responses to standing. This supports the hypothesis that passive 2g SAHC exposure at the feet could be used as a countermeasure for in-flight cardiovascular and cerebrovascular deconditioning.

  9. Dietary catechins and their potentially protective role in cardiovascular diseases and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, I.C.W.

    2001-01-01

    Catechins are polyphenolic compounds in plant foods that belong to the family of flavonoids. Due to their strong antioxidant activity and their capacity to influence mammalian enzyme systems, catechins were hypothesized to affect risk of cardiovascular diseases and cancer in humans. After

  10. Evidence for Therapeutic Patient Education Interventions to Promote Cardiovascular Patient Self-Management: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnason, Susan; White-Williams, Connie; Rossi, Laura P; Centeno, Mae; Crabbe, Deborah L; Lee, Kyoung Suk; McCabe, Nancy; Nauser, Julie; Schulz, Paula; Stamp, Kelly; Wood, Kathryn

    2017-06-01

    The burden of cardiovascular disease as a chronic illness increasingly requires patients to assume more responsibility for their self-management. Patient education is believed to be an essential component of cardiovascular care; however, there is limited evidence about specific therapeutic patient education approaches used and the impact on patient self-management outcomes. An integrative review of the literature was conducted to critically analyze published research studies of therapeutic patient education for self-management in selected cardiovascular conditions. There was variability in methodological approaches across settings and disease conditions. The most effective interventions were tailored to individual patient needs, used multiple components to improve self-management outcomes, and often used multidisciplinary approaches. This synthesis of evidence expands the base of knowledge related to the development of patient self-management skills and provides direction for more rigorous research. Recommendations are provided to guide the implementation of therapeutic patient education in clinical practice and the design of comprehensive self-management interventions to improve outcomes for cardiovascular patients. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Cardiovascular and heart failure safety profile of vildagliptin: a meta-analysis of 17 000 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, G; Evans, M; Del Prato, S; Stumvoll, M; Schweizer, A; Lukashevich, V; Shao, Q; Kothny, W

    2015-11-01

    To report the cardiovascular (CV) safety profile and heart failure (HF) risk of vildagliptin from a large pool of studies, including trials in high-risk patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), such as those with congestive HF and/or moderate/severe renal impairment. We conducted a retrospective meta-analysis of prospectively adjudicated CV events. Patient-level data were pooled from 40 double-blind, randomized controlled phase III and IV vildagliptin studies. The primary endpoint was occurrence of major adverse CV events (MACEs; myocardial infarction, stroke and CV death). Assessments of the individual MACE components and HF events (requiring hospitalization or new onset) were secondary endpoints. The risk ratio (RR) of vildagliptin (50 mg once- and twice-daily combined) versus comparators (placebo and all non-vildagliptin treatments) was calculated using the Mantel-Haenszel (M-H) method. Of the 17 446 patients, 9599 received vildagliptin (9251.4 subject-years of exposure) and 7847 received comparators (7317.0 subject-years of exposure). The mean age of the patients was 57 years, body mass index 30.5 kg/m(2) (nearly 50% obese), glycated haemoglobin concentration 8.1% and T2DM duration 5.5 years. A MACE occurred in 83 (0.86%) vildagliptin-treated patients and 85 (1.20%) comparator-treated patients, with an M-H RR of 0.82 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-1.11]. Similar RRs were observed for the individual events. Confirmed HF events were reported in 41 (0.43%) vildagliptin-treated patients and 32 (0.45%) comparator-treated patients, with an M-H RR 1.08 (95% CI 0.68-1.70). This large meta-analysis indicates that vildagliptin is not associated with an increased risk of adjudicated MACEs relative to comparators. Moreover, this analysis did not find a significant increased risk of HF in vildagliptin-treated patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Cardiovascular risk factors and behavior lifestyles of young women: implications from findings of the Bogalusa Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, C E; Nicklas, T A; Myers, L; Johnson, C C; Berenson, G S

    1997-12-01

    The primary purposes of this article are to highlight important issues related to cardiovascular risk factors and behavior life-styles in young women and to examine racial (black-white) differences in risk factors that relate to cardiovascular disease. In childhood, some girls show cardiovascular risk factors of higher blood pressure levels, dyslipidemia, and obesity, all of which continue into young adulthood. Factors that contribute to abnormal risk factors are a high-saturated fat diet, excess energy intake related to inactivity, and cigarette smoking. Trends of obesity are documented; and young white girls are continuing to use tobacco, more so than boys and black girls. Although the onset of clinical cardiovascular disease is delayed in women, the stage is set in childhood for the development of early cardiovascular risk.

  13. Comparative study of short-term cardiovascular autonomic control in cardiac surgery patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting or correction of valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartz, Vladimir A; Kiselev, Anton R; Karavaev, Anatoly S; Vulf, Kristina A; Borovkova, Ekaterina I; Prokhorov, Mikhail D; Petrosyan, Andrey D; Bockeria, Olga L

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Our aim was to perform a comparative study of short-term cardiovascular autonomic control in cardiac surgery patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or surgical correction of valvular heart disease (SCVHD ). Methods: The synchronous 15 minutes records of heart rate variability (HRV) and finger's photoplethysmographic waveform variability (PPGV) were performed in 42 cardiac surgery patients (12 women) aged 61.8 ± 8.6 years (mean ± standard deviation), who underwent CABG, and 36 patients (16 women) aged 54.2 ± 14.9 years, who underwent SCVHD , before surgery and in 5-7 days after surgery. Conventional time and frequency domain measures of HRV and index S of synchronization between the slow oscillations in PPGV and HRV were analyzed. We also calculated personal dynamics of these indices after surgery. Results: We found no differences ( Р > 0.05) in all studied autonomic indices (preoperative and post-surgery) between studied patients' groups, except for the preoperative heart rate, which was higher in patients who underwent SCVHD ( P = 0.013). We have shown a pronounced preoperative and post-surgery variability (magnitude of inter-quartile ranges) of all autonomic indices in studied patients. In the cluster analysis based on cardiovascular autonomic indices (preoperative and post-surgery), we divided all patients into two clusters (38 and 40 subjects) which did not differ in all clinical characteristics (except for the preoperative hematocrit, P = 0.038), index S, and all post-surgery HRV indices. First cluster (38 patients) had higher preoperative values of the HR, TP, HF, and HF%, and lower preoperative values of the LF% and LF/HF. Conclusion: The variability of cardiovascular autonomic indices in on-pump cardiac surgery patients (two characteristic clusters were identified based on preoperative indices) was not associated with their clinical characteristics and features of surgical procedure (including cardioplegia).

  14. Protective Effect of Antenatal Antioxidant on Nicotine-Induced Heart Ischemia-Sensitive Phenotype in Rat Offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DaLiao Xiao

    Full Text Available Fetal nicotine exposure increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease later in life. The present study tested the hypothesis that perinatal nicotine-induced programming of heart ischemia-sensitive phenotype is mediated by enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS in offspring. Nicotine was administered to pregnant rats via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps from day 4 of gestation to day 10 after birth, in the absence or presence of a ROS inhibitor, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC in drinking water. Experiments were conducted in 8 month old age male offspring. Isolated hearts were perfused in a Langendorff preparation. Perinatal nicotine treatment significantly increased ischemia and reperfusion-induced left ventricular injury, and decreased post-ischemic recovery of left ventricular function and coronary flow rate. In addition, nicotine enhanced cardiac ROS production and significantly attenuated protein kinase Cε (PKCε protein abundance in the heart. Although nicotine had no effect on total cardiac glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β protein expression, it significantly increased the phosphorylation of GSK3β at serine 9 residue in the heart. NAC inhibited nicotine-mediated increase in ROS production, recovered PKCε gene expression and abrogated increased phosphorylation of GSK3β. Of importance, NAC blocked perinatal nicotine-induced increase in ischemia and reperfusion injury in the heart. These findings provide novel evidence that increased oxidative stress plays a causal role in perinatal nicotine-induced developmental programming of ischemic sensitive phenotype in the heart, and suggest potential therapeutic targets of anti-oxidative stress in the treatment of ischemic heart disease.

  15. Contribution of cardiac and extra-cardiac disease burden to risk of cardiovascular outcomes varies by ejection fraction in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Emil; Claggett, Brian; Køber, Lars

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Patients with heart failure (HF) often have multiple co-morbidities that contribute to the risk of adverse cardiovascular (CV) and non-CV outcomes. We assessed the relative contribution of cardiac and extra-cardiac disease burden and demographic factors to CV outcomes in HF patients...... Association class, systolic blood pressure, time since HF diagnosis, HF medication use), extra-cardiac (body mass index, creatinine, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, smoker), and demographic (age, gender) categories, and calculated subscores for each patient representing the burden......EF patients (PAR: 76% cardiac disease vs. 58% extra-cardiac disease, P vs. 49% extra-cardiac disease, P

  16. Protective effects of hydroalcoholic extract from rhizomes of Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. on compensated right heart failure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garjani, Alireza; Afrooziyan, Arash; Nazemiyeh, Hossein; Najafi, Moslem; Kharazmkia, Ali; Maleki-Dizaji, Nasrin

    2009-08-05

    The rhizomes of Cynodon dactylon are used for the treatment of heart failure in folk medicine. In the present study, we investigated the effects of hydroalcoholic extract of C. dactylon rhizomes on cardiac contractility in normal hearts and on cardiac functions in right-heart failure in rats. Right-heart failure was induced by intraperitoneal injection of monocrotaline (50 mg/kg). Two weeks later, the animals were treated orally with different doses of the extract for fifteen days. At the end of the experiments cardiac functions and markers of myocardial hypertrophy were measured. The treated rats showed very less signs of fatigue, peripheral cyanosis and dyspnea. The survival rate was high in the extract treated groups (90%). Administration of C. dactylon in monocrotaline-injected rats led to profound improvement in cardiac functions as demonstrated by decreased right ventricular end diastolic pressure (RVEDP) and elevated mean arterial pressure. RVdP/dtmax, and RVdP/dt/P as indices of myocardial contractility were also markedly (p < 0.001; using one way ANOVA) increased by the extract. The extract reduced heart and lung congestion by decreasing tissue wet/dry and wet/body weight ratios (p < 0.01). In the isolated rat hearts, the extract produced a remarkable (P < 0.001) positive inotropic effect concomitant with a parallel decrease in LVEDP. The results of this study indicated that C. dactylon exerted a strong protective effect on right heart failure, in part by positive inotropic action and improving cardiac functions.

  17. "It's Like Backing up Science with Scripture": Lessons Learned from the Implementation of HeartSmarts, a Faith-Based Cardiovascular Disease Health Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tettey, Naa-Solo; Duran, Pedro A; Andersen, Holly S; Washington, Niajee; Boutin-Foster, Carla

    2016-06-01

    African-Americans are disproportionately impacted by cardiovascular disease (CVD). Faith-based institutions provide a non-traditional route for health education targeted at African-Americans. This paper describes HeartSmarts, a faith-based CVD education program. Evidence-based literature was used to develop a curriculum, which was tailored by integrating biblical scripture representing aspects of health behaviors. Eighteen church peer-educators were recruited to participate in a 12-week training. They then disseminated the faith-based curriculum to members of their congregations. There were 199 participants of which 137 provided feedback via open-ended surveys indicating that HeartSmarts was well accepted and effective for disseminating CVD health messages while engaging spirituality.

  18. Hydro-mechanical foundation for blood swirling vortex flows formation in the cardio-vascular system and the problem of artificial heart creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey G. Chefranov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Leonardo da Vinci perhaps was the first who paid attention to the energetic efficiency of existence of vortices emerging near sines of Valsalva and defining normal functioning (opening of aortal valve. However up to now a fundamental problem of defining of mechanisms of mysterious energetic efficiency of functioning of cardio-vascular system (CVS of blood feeding of the organism is still remaining significantly not solved and this is, for example, one of the main restriction for the creation of artificial heart and corresponding valve systems. In the present paper, results witnessing possible important role of the very hydro-mechanical mechanism in the realization of the noted energetic efficiency of CVS due to formation in the CVS of spiral structural organization of the arterial blood flow observed by methods of MRT and color Doppler-measuring in the left ventricular of the heart and in aorta.

  19. Clarithromycin for stable coronary heart disease increases all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and cerebrovascular morbidity over 10years in the CLARICOR randomised, blinded clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Per; Hilden, Jørgen; Hansen, Jørgen Fischer

    2015-01-01

    -cause mortality (hazard ratio (HR): 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00-1.21) and cerebrovascular disease during 10years (HR: 1.19, 95% CI: 1.02-1.38). The increased mortality and morbidity were restricted to patients not on statin at entry (HR: 1.16, 95% CI: 1.04-1.31, and HR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1...... death outside hospital and cerebrovascular morbidity in patients with stable coronary heart disease who were not on statin. The increased cardiovascular mortality was years later compensated, likely through frailty attrition.......BACKGROUND: The CLARICOR trial reported that clarithromycin compared with placebo increased all-cause mortality in patients with stable coronary heart disease. This study investigates the effects of clarithromycin versus placebo during 10years follow up. METHODS: The CLARICOR trial is a randomised...

  20. Cardiovascular risk protection from the Mediterranean diet and olive oil. A transcriptomic update in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrion, S.; Torres, L.; Castañer, O.

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the human studies that explore the benefits of the Mediterranean diet and olive oil, based on gene expression analysis. We summarized consistent human transcriptomic studies on cardiovascular risk, based on TMD and olive oil interventions, with real life doses and conditions. A literature review was carried out leading up to February 2016. The results show that the TMD, specially supplemented with virgin olive oil, produces beneficial changes in the transcriptomic response of relevant genes in cardiovascular risk such as CAT, GPX1 and SIRT2. p65 and MCP-1, IL1B, IL6, CXCL1, INF-γ, ARHGAP15 and IL7R, which are involved in inflammation; and ABCA1, SR-B1, PPARBP, PPARα, PPARγ, PPARδ, CD-36 and COX-1, which play an important role in cholesterol efflux. The available data illustrate a transcriptomic effect on atherosclerosis, inflammation and oxidative stress pathways as well as the mentioned genes. [es

  1. Cardiovascular risk protection from the Mediterranean diet and olive oil. A transcriptomic update in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Carrión

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the human studies that explore the benefits of the Mediterranean diet and olive oil, based on gene expression analysis. We summarized consistent human transcriptomic studies on cardiovascular risk, based on TMD and olive oil interventions, with real life doses and conditions. A literature review was carried out leading up to February 2016. The results show that the TMD, specially supplemented with virgin olive oil, produces beneficial changes in the transcriptomic response of relevant genes in cardiovascular risk such as CAT, GPX1 and SIRT2. p65 and MCP-1, IL1B, IL6, CXCL1, INF-γ, ARHGAP15 and IL7R, which are involved in inflammation; and ABCA1, SR-B1, PPARBP, PPARα, PPARγ, PPARδ, CD-36 and COX-1, which play an important role in cholesterol efflux. The available data illustrate a transcriptomic effect on atherosclerosis, inflammation and oxidative stress pathways as well as the mentioned genes.

  2. Clinical relationship of myocardial sympathetic nervous activity to cardiovascular functions in chronic heart failure. Assessment by myocardial scintigraphy with 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Yukoh; Miura, Masaetsu; Fujiwara, Satomi; Mori, Shunpei; Seiji, Kazumasa; Kimura, Tokihisa

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between cardiac sympathetic nervous activity (SNA) assessed by radioiodinated metaiodobenzylguanidine ( 123 I-MIBG), an analogue of norepinephrine and cardiovascular functions in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Subjects were 17 patients with CHF. A dose of 111 MBq of 123 I-MIBG was administered intravenously, and 5-minute anterior planar images were obtained 15 minutes (early image) and 3 hours (delayed image) after the injection. The heart/mediastinum (H/M) count ratio was defined to quantify cardiac 123 I-MIBG uptake. The washout ratio (WR) of 123 I-MIBG from the heart was calculated as follows: (early counts-delayed counts)/early counts x 100 (%). Echocardiography was performed on all patients within 1 week of 123 I-MIBG scintigraphy to measure stroke volume index (SVI). Blood pressure and heart rate (HR) in the resting state were also recorded to calculate cardiovascular functions including cardiac output, pulse pressure (PP), and mean blood pressure. Significant linear correlations were found between the early H/M ratio of 123 I-MIBG and SVI, and between the delayed H/M ratio of 123 I-MIBG and SVI, respectively. WR of 123 I-MIBG was correlated with HR, and was inversely correlated with SVI and with PP, respectively. It is likely that a decrease in SVI is associated with enhanced cardiac SNA in severe CHF. 123 I-MIBG scintigraphy is effective in assessing the cardiac functional status and SNA in patients with CHF in vivo. Moreover, changes in PP and HR indicate well alteration in SNA. (author)

  3. Cardiovascular Consequences of Childhood Secondhand Tobacco Smoke Exposure: Prevailing Evidence, Burden, and Racial and Socioeconomic Disparities: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuveer, Geetha; White, David A; Hayman, Laura L; Woo, Jessica G; Villafane, Juan; Celermajer, David; Ward, Kenneth D; de Ferranti, Sarah D; Zachariah, Justin

    2016-10-18

    Although public health programs have led to a substantial decrease in the prevalence of tobacco smoking, the adverse health effects of tobacco smoke exposure are by no means a thing of the past. In the United States, 4 of 10 school-aged children and 1 of 3 adolescents are involuntarily exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS), with children of minority ethnic backgrounds and those living in low-socioeconomic-status households being disproportionately affected (68% and 43%, respectively). Children are particularly vulnerable, with little control over home and social environment, and lack the understanding, agency, and ability to avoid SHS exposure on their own volition; they also have physiological or behavioral characteristics that render them especially susceptible to effects of SHS. Side-stream smoke (the smoke emanating from the burning end of the cigarette), a major component of SHS, contains a higher concentration of some toxins than mainstream smoke (inhaled by the smoker directly), making SHS potentially as dangerous as or even more dangerous than direct smoking. Compelling animal and human evidence shows that SHS exposure during childhood is detrimental to arterial function and structure, resulting in premature atherosclerosis and its cardiovascular consequences. Childhood SHS exposure is also related to impaired cardiac autonomic function and changes in heart rate variability. In addition, childhood SHS exposure is associated with clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors such as obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance. Individualized interventions to reduce childhood exposure to SHS are shown to be at least modestly effective, as are broader-based policy initiatives such as community smoking bans and increased taxation. The purpose of this statement is to summarize the available evidence on the cardiovascular health consequences of childhood SHS exposure; this will support ongoing efforts to further reduce and eliminate SHS exposure in this

  4. The effects of infographics and several quantitative versus qualitative formats for cardiovascular disease risk, including heart age, on people's risk understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Olga C; Vonk, Suzanne I; van den Haak, Maaike J; van Hooijdonk, Charlotte M J; Timmermans, Danielle R M

    2018-03-11

    To study how comprehension of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is influenced by: (1) infographics about qualitative risk information, with/without risk numbers; (2) which qualitative risk dimension is emphasized; (3) heart age vs. traditional risk format. For aim 1, a 2 (infographics versus text) x 2 (risk number versus no risk number) between-subjects design was used. For aim 2, three pieces of information were tested within-subjects. Aim 3 used a simple comparison group. Participants (45-65 yrs old) were recruited through an online access panel; low educated people were oversampled. They received hypothetical risk information (20%/61yrs). Primary outcomes: recall, risk appraisals, subjective/objective risk comprehension. behavioral intentions, information evaluations. Infographics of qualitative risk dimensions negatively affected recall, subjective risk comprehension and information evaluations. No effect of type of risk dimension was found on risk perception. Heart age influenced recall, comprehension, evaluations and affective risk appraisals. Infographics of hypothetical CVD risk information had detrimental effects on measures related to risk perception/comprehension, but effects were mainly seen in undereducated participants. Heart age influenced perceptions/comprehension of hypothetical risk in a way that seemed to support understanding. Heart age seems a fruitful risk communication approach in disease risk calculators. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Annexin 1 and Melanocortin Peptide Therapy for Protection Against Ischaemic-Reperfusion Damage in the Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.N.E. Gavins

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality within the western world affecting 2.7 million British people. This review highlights the beneficial effects of naturally occurring hormones and their peptides, in myocardial ischaemic-injury (MI models, a disease pathology in which cytokines and neutrophils play a causal role. Here we discuss two distinct classes of endogenous peptides: the steroid inducible annexin 1 and the melanocortin peptides. Annexin 1 and the melanocortins counteract the most important part of the host inflammatory response, namely, the process of leukocyte extravasation, as well as release of proinflammatory mediators. Their biological effects are mediated via the seven transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors, the fMLP receptor family (or FPR, and the melanocortin receptors, respectively. Pharmacological analysis has demonstrated that the first 24 amino acids of the N-terminus (termed Ac2-26 are the most active region. Both exogenous annexin 1 and its peptides demonstrate cardioprotectiveness and continuing work is required to understand this annexin 1/FPR relationship fully. The melanocortin peptides are derived from a precursor molecule called the POMC protein. These peptides display potent anti-inflammatory effects in human and animal models of disease. In MI, the MC3R has been demonstrated to play an important role in mediating the protective effects of these peptides. The potential anti-inflammatory role for endogenous peptides in cardiac disease is in its infancy. The inhibition of cell migration and release of cytokines and other soluble mediators appears to play an important role in affording protection in ischaemic injury and thus may lead to potential therapeutic targets.

  6. Hypertension, Obesity, Diabetes, and Heart Failure-Free Survival: The Cardiovascular Disease Lifetime Risk Pooling Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faraz S; Ning, Hongyan; Rich, Jonathan D; Yancy, Clyde W; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Wilkins, John T

    2016-12-01

    This study was designed to quantify the relationship between the absence of heart failure risk factors in middle age and incident heart failure, heart failure-free survival, and overall survival. Quantification of years lived free from heart failure in the context of risk factor burden in mid-life may improve risk communication and prevention efforts. We conducted a pooled, individual-level analysis sampling from communities across the United States as part of 4 cohort studies: the Framingham Heart, Framingham Offspring, Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry, and ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities) studies. Participants with and without hypertension (blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg or treatment), obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m 2 ), or diabetes (fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dl or treatment), and combinations of these factors, at index ages of 45 years and 55 years through 95 years. Competing risk-adjusted Cox models, a modified Kaplan-Meier estimator, and Irwin's restricted mean were used to estimate the association between the absence of risk factors at mid-life and incident heart failure, heart failure-free survival, and overall survival. For participants at age 45 years, over 516,537 person-years of follow-up, 1,677 incident heart failure events occurred. Men and women with no risk factors, compared to those with all 3, had 73% to 85% lower risks of incident heart failure. Men and women without hypertension, obesity, or diabetes at age 45 years lived on average 34.7 years and 38.0 years without incident heart failure, and they lived on average an additional 3 years to 15 years longer free of heart failure than those with 1, 2, or 3 risk factors. Similar trends were seen when stratified by race and at index age 55 years. Prevention of hypertension, obesity, and diabetes by ages 45 years and 55 years may substantially prolong heart failure-free survival, decrease heart failure-related morbidity, and reduce the public health impact of

  7. Low birth weight as a predictor of cardiovascular risk factors in childhood and adolescence? The pep family heart study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerda-Maria Haas

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Overall we did not find significant associations between birth weight and nine traditional cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents. However, the 2 nd quintile of birth weight might suggest clustering of risk factors.

  8. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: executive summary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silversides, Candice K.; Marelli, Ariane; Beauchesne, Luc; Dore, Annie; Kiess, Marla; Salehian, Omid; Bradley, Timothy; Colman, Jack; Connelly, Michael; Harris, Louise; Khairy, Paul; Mital, Seema; Niwa, Koichiro; Oechslin, Erwin; Poirier, Nancy; Schwerzmann, Markus; Taylor, Dylan; Vonder Muhll, Isabelle; Baumgartner, Helmut; Benson, Lee; Celermajer, David; Greutmann, Matthias; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Mulder, Barbara; Warnes, Carole; Webb, Gary; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure, and

  9. (SPartners for Heart Health: a school-based program for enhancing physical activity and nutrition to promote cardiovascular health in 5th grade students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehnert Scott T

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The American Heart Association Position Statement on Cardiovascular Health Promotion in Public Schools encourages school-based interventions for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD through risk factor prevention or reduction in children with an emphasis on creating an environment that promotes healthy food choices and physical activity (PA. In an effort to address issues related to CVD risk factors including obesity in Michigan children, a multi-disciplinary team of Michigan State University (MSU faculty, clinicians, and health profession students was formed to "(Spartner" with elementary school physical education (PE teachers and MSU Extension staff to develop and implement a cost-effective, sustainable program aimed at CVD risk factor prevention and management for 5th grade students. This (Spartnership is intended to augment and improve the existing 5th grade PE, health and nutrition curriculum by achieving the following aims: 1 improve the students' knowledge, attitudes and confidence about nutrition, PA and heart health; 2 increase the number of students achieving national recommendations for PA and nutrition; and 3 increase the number of students with a desirable CVD risk factor status based on national pediatric guidelines. Secondary aims include promoting school staff and parental support for heart health to help children achieve their goals and to provide experiential learning and service for MSU health profession students for academic credit. Methods/Design This pilot effectiveness study was approved by the MSU IRB. At the beginning and the end of the school year students undergo a CVD risk factor assessment conducted by MSU medical students and graduate students. Key intervention components include eight lesson plans (conducted bi-monthly designed to promote heart healthy nutrition and PA behaviors conducted by PE teachers with assistance from MSU undergraduate dietetic and kinesiology students

  10. (S)Partners for Heart Health: a school-based program for enhancing physical activity and nutrition to promote cardiovascular health in 5th grade students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Joseph J; Eisenmann, Joey C; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Jager, Kathleen B; Sehnert, Scott T; Yee, Kimbo E; Klavinski, Rita A; Feltz, Deborah L

    2008-12-22

    The American Heart Association Position Statement on Cardiovascular Health Promotion in Public Schools encourages school-based interventions for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) through risk factor prevention or reduction in children with an emphasis on creating an environment that promotes healthy food choices and physical activity (PA). In an effort to address issues related to CVD risk factors including obesity in Michigan children, a multi-disciplinary team of Michigan State University (MSU) faculty, clinicians, and health profession students was formed to "(S)partner" with elementary school physical education (PE) teachers and MSU Extension staff to develop and implement a cost-effective, sustainable program aimed at CVD risk factor prevention and management for 5th grade students. This (S)partnership is intended to augment and improve the existing 5th grade PE, health and nutrition curriculum by achieving the following aims: 1) improve the students' knowledge, attitudes and confidence about nutrition, PA and heart health; 2) increase the number of students achieving national recommendations for PA and nutrition; and 3) increase the number of students with a desirable CVD risk factor status based on national pediatric guidelines. Secondary aims include promoting school staff and parental support for heart health to help children achieve their goals and to provide experiential learning and service for MSU health profession students for academic credit. This pilot effectiveness study was approved by the MSU IRB. At the beginning and the end of the school year students undergo a CVD risk factor assessment conducted by MSU medical students and graduate students. Key intervention components include eight lesson plans (conducted bi-monthly) designed to promote heart healthy nutrition and PA behaviors conducted by PE teachers with assistance from MSU undergraduate dietetic and kinesiology students (Spartners). The final 10 minutes of each lesson

  11. Sex differences in platelet reactivity and cardiovascular and psychological response to mental stress in patients with stable ischemic heart disease: insights from the REMIT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Zainab; Boyle, Stephen; Ersboll, Mads; Vora, Amit N; Zhang, Ye; Becker, Richard C; Williams, Redford; Kuhn, Cynthia; Ortel, Thomas L; Rogers, Joseph G; O'Connor, Christopher M; Velazquez, Eric J; Jiang, Wei

    2014-10-21

    Although emotional stress is associated with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and related clinical events, sex-specific differences in the psychobiological response to mental stress have not been clearly identified. We aimed to study the differential psychological and cardiovascular responses to mental stress between male and female patients with stable IHD. Patients with stable IHD enrolled in the REMIT (Responses of Mental Stress-Induced Myocardial Ischemia to Escitalopram) study underwent psychometric assessments, transthoracic echocardiography, and platelet aggregation studies at baseline and after 3 mental stress tasks. Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI) was defined as the development or worsening of regional wall motion abnormality, reduction of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥8% by transthoracic echocardiography, and/or ischemic ST-segment change on electrocardiogram during 1 or more of the 3 mental stress tasks. In the 310 participants with known IHD (18% women, 82% men), most baseline characteristics were similar between women and men (including heart rate, blood pressure, and LVEF), although women were more likely to be nonwhite, living alone (p mental stress, women had more MSIMI (57% vs. 41%; p mental stress in women and men. Further studies should test the association of sex differences in cardiovascular and platelet reactivity in response to mental stress and long-term outcomes. (Responses of Myocardial Ischemia to Escitalopram Treatment [REMIT]; NCT00574847). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Relative protection from ischaemic heart disease in beta-thalassaemia carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozdar, M.; Ahmed, S.; Anwar, J.

    2010-01-01

    To compare the frequency of beta thalassaemia trait in individuals with Ischaemic Heart Disease (IHD) and a control population without IHD. Study Design: Case control study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Haematology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, from September 2007 to May 2009. Methodology: Using non-probability consecutive sampling, a total of 544 subjects were selected, including 272 IHD patients and an equal number of age and gender matched normal controls. The subjects were tested for the presence of b-thalassaemia trait by performing their blood counts, haemoglobin electrophoresis and Haemoglobin A2 (HbA2) estimation. Proportions were compared using chi-square test. Odds ratio was also calculated. Results: The frequency of b-thalassaemia trait was determined in IHD patients and was compared to the frequency in normal Pakistani population. Six out of the 272 control subjects (2.2%) had b-thalassaemia trait and one of the control subject had Haemoglobin D trait. In contrast, none of the 272 IHD patients had b-thalassaemia trait. The calculated odds ratio was less than 1, which shows a significant negative association of b-thalassaemia trait with IHD. The difference in the frequency of b-thalassaemia trait in the two groups was statistically significant (p=0.033). Conclusion: The results suggest that b-thalassaemia carriers have some protection against IHD, though it is not an absolute cardio protection due to the role of other risk factors in IHD. This beneficial information may be communicated to the concerned individuals in their counselling sessions and as part of general awareness on thalassaemia. (author)

  13. Cardiovascular diseases mortality following cancer during childhood: long term risk, role of chemotherapy and of radiation dose to heart and brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukenova, Markhaba; Guibout, Catherine; Oberlin, Odile; Doyon, Francoise; Moussannif, Abdedaid; Haddy, Nadia; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vathaire, Florent de; Pacquement, Helene; Hawkins, Mike; Winter, Dave

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Background: A multi-centric French-UK cohort study was performed to evaluate the role of treatment in the long-term overall and cause-specific mortality among childhood cancer survivors. Methods: This study cohort included 4,120 patients treated for a solid tumours before the age of 17 between 1942-1986, in 8 centres in France and UK and who survived at least 5 years from diagnosis. Detailed clinical and therapeutic data were extracted for each patients from medical records. For 2868 of the 2868 patients who received radiotherapy, radiation doses were estimated using DOS E G software at 188 anatomical sites, including heart (7 sites) and lungs (10 sites). We obtained the death causes of 95 % of dead patients. Overall and cause-specific mortality standardized ratios (SMR), absolute excess risk (AER) of death were studied using Poisson regression. Results: 603 patients died during the follow-up, i.e. 8.5-fold (95 % CI: 7.7-9.1) more than that expected in the general population. A total of 32 patients died of cardiovascular diseases, i.e. 4.8-fold (95 % CI, 3.3 to 6.7) more than expected, 21 of which were cardiac diseases, i.e. 6.0-fold more (95% CI, 3.8 to 9.0). Overall, patients who had received radiotherapy had a 5.4-fold (95% CI, 1.5 to 32.1) higher risk of mortality due to cardiovascular disease than those who had not. Mortality due to cardiac disease was related to the administration of alkylating agents and / or vinca alkaloids, and to that of anthracyclines. Each additional 100 mg of anthracyclines per m 2 of body surface area increased the mortality rate due to heart diseases by 92% (95% CI, 16% to 318%). Patients who had received between 5 to 14.9 Gy to the heart during radiotherapy had a 14.5-fold (95% CI, 2.0 to 291) higher risk of mortality from cardiac diseases than patients who had not received radiotherapy, this ratio being 32.6 (95% CI, 5.6 to 622) in those who had received more than 15 Gy. Conclusion: Childhood cancer survivors are at high

  14. Lifetime trauma exposure and prospective cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality: findings from the Heart and Soul Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Carolyn M; Neylan, Thomas C; Na, Beeya; Regan, Mathilda; Zhang, Qian; Cohen, Beth E

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of cumulative psychological trauma on health outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to prospectively examine the association between lifetime trauma exposure and recurrent cardiovascular events or all-cause mortality in patients with existing cardiovascular disease. A total of 1021 men and women with cardiovascular disease were recruited in 2000 to 2002 and followed annually. Trauma history and psychiatric comorbidities were assessed at baseline using the Computerized Diagnostic Interview Schedule for DSM-IV. Health behaviors were assessed using standardized questionnaires. Outcome data were collected annually, and all medical records were reviewed by two independent, blinded physician adjudicators. We used Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association between lifetime trauma exposure and the composite outcome of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. During an average of 7.5 years of follow-up, there were 503 cardiovascular events and deaths. Compared with the 251 participants in the lowest trauma exposure quartile, the 256 participants in the highest exposure quartile had a 38% greater risk of adverse outcomes (hazard ratio = 1.38, 95% confidence interval = 1.06-1.81), adjusted for age, sex, race, income, education, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, smoking, physical inactivity, and illicit drug abuse. Cumulative exposure to psychological trauma was associated with an increased risk of recurrent cardiovascular events and mortality, independent of psychiatric comorbidities and health behaviors. These data add to a growing literature showing enduring effects of repeated trauma exposure on health that are independent of trauma-related psychiatric disorders such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder.

  15. Reduced expression of mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins from hibernating hearts relative to ischemic preconditioned hearts in the second window of protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Jesús A; Butterick, Tammy A; Long, Eric K; Ziemba, Elizabeth A; Anderson, Lorraine B; Duffy, Cayla M; Sluiter, Willem; Duncker, Dirk J; Zhang, Jianyi; Chen, Yingjie; Ward, Herbert B; Kelly, Rosemary F; McFalls, Edward O

    2013-07-01

    Although protection against necrosis has been observed in both hibernating (HIB) and ischemic preconditioned hearts in the second window of protection (SWOP), a comparison of the mitochondrial proteome between the two entities has not been previously performed. Anesthetized swine underwent instrumentation with a fixed constrictor around the LAD artery and were followed for 12 weeks (HIB; N=7). A second group of anesthetized swine underwent ischemic preconditioning by inflating a balloon within the LAD artery 10 times for 2 min, each separated by 2 min reperfusion and were sacrificed 24h later (SWOP; N=7). Myocardial blood flow and high-energy nucleotides were obtained in the LAD region and normalized to remote regions. Post-sacrifice, protein content as measured with iTRAQ was compared in isolated mitochondria from the LAD area of a Sham heart. Basal regional blood flow in the LAD region when normalized to the remote region was 0.86±0.04 in HIB and 1.02±0.02 in SWOP tissue (Pregional blood flows in HIB hearts, ATP content in the LAD region, when normalized to the remote region was similar in HIB versus SWOP (1.06±0.06 and 1.02±0.05 respectively; NS) as was the transmural phosphocreatine (PCr) to ATP ratio (2.1±0.2 and 2.2±0.2 respectively; NS). Using iTRAQ, 64 common proteins were identified in HIB and SWOP hearts. Compared with SWOP, the relative abundance of mitochondrial proteins involved with electron transport chain (ETC) were reduced in HIB including NADH dehydrogenase, Cytochrome c reductase and oxidase, ATP synthase, and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase. Within chronically HIB heart tissue with reduced blood flow, the relative abundance of mitochondrial ETC proteins is decreased when compared with SWOP tissue. These data support the concept that HIB heart tissue subjected to chronically reduced blood flow is associated with a down-regulation in the expression of key mitochondrial proteins involved in electron transport. Published by Elsevier

  16. 4D cardiovascular magnetic resonance velocity mapping of alterations of right heart flow patterns and main pulmonary artery hemodynamics in tetralogy of Fallot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background To assess changes in right heart flow and pulmonary artery hemodynamics in patients with repaired Tetralogy of Fallot (rTOF) we used whole heart, four dimensional (4D) velocity mapping (VM) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods CMR studies were performed in 11 subjects with rTOF (5M/6F; 20.1 ± 12.4 years) and 10 normal volunteers (6M/4F; 34.2 ± 13.4 years) on clinical 1.5T and 3.0T MR scanners. 4D VM-CMR was performed using PC VIPR (Phase Contrast Vastly undersampled Isotropic Projection Reconstruction). Interactive streamline and particle trace visualizations of the superior and inferior vena cava (IVC and SVC, respectively), right atrium (RA), right ventricle (RV), and pulmonary artery (PA) were generated and reviewed by three experienced readers. Main PA net flow, retrograde flow, peak flow, time-to-peak flow, peak acceleration, resistance index and mean wall shear stress were quantified. Differences in flow patterns between the two groups were tested using Fisher's exact test. Differences in quantitative parameters were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Results 4D VM-CMR was successfully performed in all volunteers and subjects with TOF. Right heart flow patterns in rTOF subjects were characterized by (a) greater SVC/IVC flow during diastole than systole, (b) increased vortical flow patterns in the RA and in the RV during diastole, and (c) increased helical or vortical flow features in the PA's. Differences in main PA retrograde flow, resistance index, peak flow, time-to-peak flow, peak acceleration and mean wall shear stress were statistically significant. Conclusions Whole heart 4D VM-CMR with PC VIPR enables detection of both normal and abnormal right heart flow patterns, which may allow for comprehensive studies to evaluate interdependencies of post-surgically altered geometries and hemodynamics. PMID:22313680

  17. Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Their Relation to Future Surgery for Valvular Heart Disease or Ascending Aortic Disease: A Case-Referent Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungberg, Johan; Johansson, Bengt; Engström, Karl Gunnar; Albertsson, Elin; Holmer, Paul; Norberg, Margareta; Bergdahl, Ingvar A; Söderberg, Stefan

    2017-05-05

    Risk factors for developing heart valve and ascending aortic disease are based mainly on retrospective data. To elucidate these factors in a prospective manner, we have performed a nested case-referent study using data from large, population-based surveys. A total of 777 patients operated for heart valve disease or disease of the ascending aorta had previously participated in population-based health surveys in Northern Sweden. Median time (interquartile range) from survey to surgery was 10.5 (9.0) years. Primary indications for surgery were aortic stenosis (41%), aortic regurgitation (12%), mitral regurgitation (23%), and dilatation/dissection of the ascending aorta (17%). For each case, referents were allocated, matched for age, sex, and geographical area. In multivariable models, surgery for aortic stenosis was predicted by hypertension, high cholesterol levels, diabetes mellitus, and active smoking. Surgery for aortic regurgitation was associated with a low cholesterol level, whereas a high cholesterol level predicted surgery for mitral regurgitation. Hypertension, blood pressure, and previous smoking predicted surgery for disease of the ascending aorta whereas diabetes mellitus was associated with reduced risk. After exclusion of cases with coronary atherosclerosis, only the inverse associations between cholesterol and aortic regurgitation and between diabetes mellitus and disease of the ascending aorta remained. This is the first truly prospective study of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and their association with valvular heart disease and disease of the ascending aorta. We confirm the strong association between traditional risk factors and aortic stenosis, but only in patients with concomitant coronary artery disease. In isolated valvular heart disease, the impact of traditional risk factors is varying. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  18. Diffuse myocardial fibrosis among healthy pediatric heart transplant recipients: Correlation of histology, cardiovascular magnetic resonance, and clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, Brian; Salgado, Cláudia M; Reyes-Múgica, Miguel; Drant, Stacey E; Miller, Susan A; Kennedy, Mark; Kellman, Peter; Schelbert, Erik B; Wong, Timothy C

    2017-08-01

    Fibrosis is commonly described in heart allografts lost late after transplantation. CMR-derived ECV is a validated measure of DMF in native adult hearts that may predict heart failure and mortality. We explored associations of ECV with histologic myocardial fibrosis and clinical features after pediatric heart transplantation. Twenty-five recipients (7.0±6.3 years at transplant and 10.7±6.5 years post-transplant) were prospectively recruited for CMR and BNP measurement at the time of surveillance biopsy. All had normal ejection fractions and lacked heart failure symptoms. Fibrosis was quantified on biopsy after picrosirius red staining as CVF. ECV was quantified using contemporaneous hematocrit on basal and mid-short-axis slices. ECV was moderately correlated with CVF (r=.47; P=.019). We found no associations of ECV with hemodynamics, ischemic time, time since transplantation, or number of prior biopsies or acute rejections. Compared to healthy non-transplant controls, there was no significant difference in ECV (25.1±3.0 vs 23.7±2.0%, P=.09). Log-transformed BNP was correlated with ECV (recipients: r=.46, P=.02; recipients and controls: r=.45, P=.006). These findings suggest ECV quantifies DMF and relates to biological indicators of cardiac function after pediatric heart transplantation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Stimulating high impact HIV-related cardiovascular research: recommendations from a multidisciplinary NHLBI Working Group on HIV-related heart, lung, and blood disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Monica R; Cook, Nakela; Wong, Renee; Hsue, Priscilla; Ridker, Paul; Currier, Judith; Shurin, Susan

    2015-02-24

    The clinical challenges confronting patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have shifted from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related illnesses to chronic diseases, such as coronary artery disease, chronic lung disease, and chronic anemia. With the growing burden of HIV-related heart, lung, and blood (HLB) disease, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) recognizes it must stimulate and support HIV-related HLB research. Because HIV offers a natural, accelerated model of common pathological processes, such as inflammation, HIV-related HLB research may yield important breakthroughs for all patients with HLB disease. This paper summarizes the cardiovascular recommendations of an NHLBI Working Group, Advancing HIV/AIDS Research in Heart, Lung, and Blood Diseases, charged with identifying scientific priorities in HIV-related HLB disease and developing recommendations to promote multidisciplinary collaboration among HIV and HLB investigators. The working group included multidisciplinary sessions, as well as HLB breakout sessions for discussion of disease-specific issues, with common themes about scientific priorities and strategies to stimulate HLB research emerging in all 3 groups. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    McMurray, John; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure.

  1. A randomized study of coconut oil versus sunflower oil on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with stable coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maniyal Vijayakumar

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: Coconut oil even though rich in saturated fatty acids in comparison to sunflower oil when used as cooking oil media over a period of 2 years did not change the lipid-related cardiovascular risk factors and events in those receiving standard medical care.

  2. Living healthier for longer: Comparative effects of three heart-healthy behaviors on life expectancy with and without cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Nusselder (Wilma); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A. Peeters (Anna); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Non-smoking, having a normal weight and increased levels of physical activity are perhaps the three key factors for preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the relative effects of these factors on healthy longevity have not been well described. We aimed to calculate

  3. Late Gadolinium Enhancement Amount as an Independent Risk Factor for the Incidence of Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Stage C or D Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Myocardial fibrosis (MF is a risk factor for poor prognosis in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE of the myocardium on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR represents MF. We examined whether the LGE amount increases the incidence of adverse cardiovascular events in patients with stage C or D heart failure (HF. Methods Eighty-four consecutive patients with stage C or D HF, either ischemic or non-ischemic, were enrolled. Comprehensive clinical and CMR evaluations were performed. All patients were followed up for a composite endpoint of cardiovascular death, heart transplantation, and cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D.Results LGE was present in 79.7% of the end-stage HF patients. LGE distribution patterns were mid-wall, epi-myocardial, endo-myocardial, and the morphological patterns were patchy, transmural, and diffuse. During the average follow-up of 544 days, 13 (15.5% patients had endpoint events: 7 patients cardiac death, 2 patients heart transplantation, and 4 patients underwent CRT-D implantation. On univariate analysis, LGE quantification on cardiac magnetic resonance, blood urine nitrogen, QRS duration on electrocardiogram, left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD and left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV on CMR had the strongest associations with the composite endpoint events. However, on multivariate analysis for both Model I (after adjusting for age, sex, and body mass index and Model II (after adjusting for age, sex, BMI, renal function, QRS duration and atrial fibrillation on electrocardiogram, the etiology of HF, LVEF, CMR-LVEDD and CMR-LVEDV, LGE amount was a significant risk factor for composite endpoint events (Model I 6SD HR 1.037, 95%CI 1.005-1.071, p=0.022; Model II 6SD HR 1.045, 95%CI 1.001-1.084, p=0.022. Conclusion LGE amount from high-scale threshold on CMR increased the incidence of adverse cardiovascular events for patients in either stage C or D HF.

  4. [Burnout syndrome: a "true" cardiovascular risk factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cursoux, Pauline; Lehucher-Michel, Marie-Pascale; Marchetti, Hélène; Chaumet, Guillaume; Delliaux, Stéphane

    2012-11-01

    The burnout syndrome is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment in individuals professionally involved with others. The burnout syndrome is poorly recognized, particularly in France, as a distinct nosology from adaptation troubles, stress, depression, or anxiety. Several tools quantifying burnout and emotional exhaustion exist, the most spread is the questionnaire called Maslach Burnout Inventory. The burnout syndrome alters cardiovascular function and its neuroregulation by autonomic nervous system and is associated with: increased sympathetic tone to heart and vessels after mental stress, lowered physiological post-stress vagal rebound to heart, and lowered arterial baroreflex sensitivity. Job strain as burnout syndrome seems to be a real independent cardiovascular risk factor. Oppositely, training to manage emotions could increase vagal tone to heart and should be cardio-protective. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Melatonin rescues cardiovascular dysfunction during hypoxic development in the chick embryo

    OpenAIRE

    Itani, Nozomi; Skeffington, Katie L.; Beck, Christian; Niu, Youguo; Giussani, Dino A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is a search for rescue therapy against fetal origins of cardiovascular disease in pregnancy complicated by chronic fetal hypoxia, particularly following clinical diagnosis of fetal growth restriction (FGR). Melatonin protects the placenta in adverse pregnancy; however, whether melatonin protects the fetal heart and vasculature in hypoxic pregnancy independent of effects on the placenta is unknown. Whether melatonin can rescue fetal cardiovascular dysfunction when treatment comm...

  6. Heart and Lungs Protection Technique for Cardiac Surgery with Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Pichugin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardioplegic cardiac arrest with subsequent ischemic-reperfusion injuries can lead to the development of inflammation of the myocardium, leucocyte activation, and release of cardiac enzymes. Flow reduction to the bronchial arteries, causing low-flow lung ischemia, leads to the development of a pulmonary regional inflammatory response. Hypoventilation during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB is responsible for development of microatelectasis, hydrostatic pulmonary edema, poor compliance, and a higher incidence of infection. Based on these facts, prevention methods of these complications were developed. The aim of this study was to evaluate constant coronary perfusion (CCP and the “beating heart” in combination with pulmonary artery perfusion (PAP and “ventilated lungs” technique for heart and lung protection in cardiac surgery with CPB.Methods. After ethical approval and written informed consent, 80 patients undergoing cardiac surgery with normothermic CPB were randomized in three groups. In the first group (22 patients, the crystalloid cardioplegia without lung ventilation/perfusion techniques were used. In the second group (30 patients, the CCP and “beating heart” without lung ventilation/perfusion techniques were used. In the third group (28 patients, the CCP with PAP and lung ventilation techniques were used. Clinical, functional parameters, myocardial damage markers (CK MB level, oxygenation index, and lung compliance were investigated.Results. There were higher rates of spontaneous cardiac recovery and lower doses of inotrops in the second and third groups. Myocardial contractility function was better preserved in the second and third groups. The post-operative levels of CK-MB were lower than in control group.  Three hours after surgery CK-MB levels in the second and third  groups were lower by 38.1% and 33.3%, respectively. Eight hours after surgery, CK-MB levels were lower in the second and third groups by 45.9% and

  7. Cold Weather and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cold Weather and Cardiovascular Disease Updated:Sep 16,2015 Th is winter ... and procedures related to heart disease and stroke. Cardiovascular Conditions • Conditions Home • Arrhythmia and Atrial Fibrillation • Cardiac ...

  8. Hypertension and Cardiovascular Remodelling in Rats Exposed to Continuous Light: Protection by ACE-Inhibition and Melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedor Simko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure of rats to continuous light attenuates melatonin production and results in hypertension development. This study investigated whether hypertension induced by continuous light (24 hours/day exposure induces heart and aorta remodelling and if these alterations are prevented by melatonin or angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor captopril. Four groups of 3-month-old male Wistar rats (10 per group were treated as follows for six weeks: untreated controls, exposed to continuous light, light-exposed, and treated with either captopril (100 mg/kg/day or melatonin (10 mg/kg/day. Exposure to continuous light led to hypertension, left ventricular (LV hypertrophy and fibrosis, and enhancement of the oxidative load in the LV and aorta. Increase in systolic blood pressure by continuous light exposure was prevented completely by captopril and partially by melatonin. Both captopril and melatonin reduced the wall thickness and cross-sectional area of the aorta and reduced the level of oxidative stress. However, only captopril reduced LV hypertrophy development and only melatonin reduced LV hydroxyproline concentration in insoluble and total collagen in rats exposed to continuous light. In conclusion, captopril prevented LV hypertrophy development in the continuous light-induced hypertension model, while only melatonin significantly reduced fibrosis. This antifibrotic action of melatonin may be protective in hypertensive heart disease.

  9. Blood pressure level and relation to other cardiovascular risk factors in male hypertensive patients without clinical evidence of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C T; Sørum, C; Hansen, J F

    2000-01-01

    , duration of hypertension, cholesterol and triglyceride level, smoking status, information of regular exercise, a family history of ischemic heart disease (IHD) and drug treatment, in 220 men treated for arterial hypertension. In the univariate analyses we found a higher systolic blood pressure (SBP......) with older age, higher SBP in smoking patients and lower SBP in patients with regular exercise. In a multivariate model age (p = 0.0004), smoking status (p = 0.01) and regular exercise (p= 0.06) were independently associated with SBP. There was a lower diastolic blood pressure (DBP) with older age, and age...... cardiovascular risk factors--43% was smoking, 21% had a family history of IHD, 77% had a se-cholesterol above 5.5 mmol/l and 48% had a se-triglyceride above 1.6 mmol/l. In a consecutive group of asymptomatic male treated hypertensive patients SBP is independently associated with age and smoking status, and DBP...

  10. Fitness, work, and leisure-time physical activity and ischaemic heart disease and all-cause mortality among men with pre-existing cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, Andreas; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Burr, Hermann

    2010-01-01

    , smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index, diabetes, hypertension, physical work demands, leisure-time physical activity, and social class - showed a substantially reduced risk for IHD mortality among employees who were intermediately fit [VO (2)Max range 25-36; hazard ratio (HR) 0.54, 95% confidence......OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to study the relative impact of physical fitness, physical demands at work, and physical activity during leisure time on ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and all-cause mortality among employed men with pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD). METHOD: We carried out a 30-year...... physical work demands and leisure-time physical activity using a self-reported questionnaire. Results Among 274 men with a history of CVD, 93 men died from IHD. Using male employees with a history of CVD and a low level of fitness as the reference group, our Cox analyses - adjusted for age, blood pressure...

  11. Sleep disordered breathing, insomnia, and health related quality of life -- a comparison between age and gender matched elderly with heart failure or without cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Peter; Arestedt, Kristoffer; Alehagen, Urban; Svanborg, Eva; Dahlström, Ulf; Broström, Anders

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this study are (I) to compare the prevalence of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and insomnia between elderly with heart failure (HF) and age and gender matched elderly without cardiovascular disease (CVD), and (II) to examine the association between HF, SDB and insomnia, as well as their impact on health related quality of life (Hr-QoL). Three hundred and thirty-one elderly (71-87 years) community-living individuals underwent sleep recordings and echocardiography. Questionnaires assessed insomnia and Hr-QoL. Comparisons were made between age and gender matched individuals with HF (n=36) and without CVD (n=36). The HF group had higher mean apnoea-hypopnoea index (17.6 vs. 6.3, pinsomnia or EDS. SDB, DMS and EDS are more common in elderly with HF. SDB is not an obvious cause for sleep complaints or poor Hr-QoL in elderly. Copyright (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. The Role of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species in Cardiovascular Injury and Protective Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danina M. Muntean

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R injury of the heart represents a major health burden mainly associated with acute coronary syndromes. While timely coronary reperfusion has become the established routine therapy in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction, the restoration of blood flow into the previously ischaemic area is always accompanied by myocardial injury. The central mechanism involved in this phenomenon is represented by the excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Besides their harmful role when highly generated during early reperfusion, minimal ROS formation during ischaemia and/or at reperfusion is critical for the redox signaling of cardioprotection. In the past decades, mitochondria have emerged as the major source of ROS as well as a critical target for cardioprotective strategies at reperfusion. Mitochondria dysfunction associated with I/R myocardial injury is further described and ultimately analyzed with respect to its role as source of both deleterious and beneficial ROS. Furthermore, the contribution of ROS in the highly investigated field of conditioning strategies is analyzed. In the end, the vascular sources of mitochondria-derived ROS are briefly reviewed.

  13. Protectant activity of defibrotide in cardioplegia followed by ischemia/reperfusion injury in the isolated rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoni, G; Pompilio, G; Biglioli, P; Alamanni, F; Tartara, P; Rona, P; Porqueddu, M; Berti, F

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that defibrotide, a polydeoxyribonucleotide obtained by depolymerization of DNA from porcine tissues, has important protective effects on myocardial ischemia, which may be associated with a prostacyclin-related mechanism. The purpose of this study was to investigate the direct effects of defibrotide (given in cardioplegia or after ischemia) on a model of rat heart recovery after cardioplegia followed by ischemia/reperfusion injury. Isolated rat hearts, undergoing 5 minutes of warm cardioplegic arrest followed by 20 minutes of global ischemia and 30 minutes of reperfusion, were studied using the modified Langendorff model. The cardioplegia consisted of St. Thomas' Hospital solution augmented with defibrotide (50, 100, and 200 microg/mL) or without defibrotide (controls). Left ventricular mechanical function and the levels of creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha (6-keto-PGF1alpha; the stable metabolite of prostacyclin) were measured during preischemic and reperfusion periods. After global ischemia, hearts receiving defibrotide in the cardioplegic solution (n = 8) manifested in a concentration-dependent fashion lower left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (p defibrotide in the cardioplegic solution also had, in a dose-dependent way, lower levels of creatine-kinase (p defibrotide was given alone to the hearts at the beginning of reperfusion (n = 7), the recovery of postischemic left ventricular function was inferior (p defibrotide was given in cardioplegia. Defibrotide confers to conventional crystalloid cardioplegia a potent concentration-dependent protective effect on the recovery of isolated rat heart undergoing ischemia/reperfusion injury. The low cost and the absence of contraindications (cardiac toxicity and hemodynamic effects) make defibrotide a promising augmentation to cardioplegia.

  14. Update protocols for evaluating nuclear cardiology and management of coronary heart disease. Chilean Society of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massardo, Teresa; Jaimovich, Rodrigo; Canessa, Jose; Castro, Gabriel; Soto, Juan Ramon

    2010-01-01

    Protocols are reviewed nuclear cardiology present, with emphasis on imaging studies Single photon ( S PECT ) myocardial perfusion mainly in assessment of coronary heart disease (EC). The indications and protocols used are detailed as well as the literature review relevant both to clinical use as a quality control and interpretation of studies

  15. Elevated resting heart rate is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease in healthy men and women.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooney, Marie Therese

    2010-04-01

    Elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is known to be associated with reduced survival but inconsistencies remain, including lack of significance in most studies of healthy women, lack of independence from systolic blood pressure (SBP) in some, and the suggestion that RHR is merely functioning as a marker of physical inactivity or other comorbidities. We aimed to clarify these inconsistencies.

  16. Type D personality is associated with low cardiovascular reactivity to acute mental stress in heart failure patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kupper, N.; Denollet, J.; Widdershoven, J.W.M.G.; Kop, W.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The distressed (Type D) personality is associated with adverse coronary heart disease outcomes, but the mechanisms accounting for this association remain to be elucidated. We examined whether myocardial and hemodynamic responses to mental stress are disrupted in Type D patients with

  17. Apolipoprotein E Gene Polymorphism and Its Association with Cardiovascular Heart Disease Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Amani Ashari; Julia Omar; Arif Hashim; Shahrul Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene polymorphism has influence on serum lipids which relates to cardiovascular risk. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency distribution of APOE alleles among Malaysian Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD) and their association with serum lipid profiles. A total of 115 patients were recruited in which 78 patients had Type 2 DM without CAD and 37 patients had Type 2 DM with CAD. The APOE polymorphism wa...

  18. Prevalence of cardiovascular risks factors and 10 year predictions of coronary heart disease in seafarers of Pertamina shipping (Indonesia)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purnawarma, Irwin GNI; Jensen, Olaf Chresten; Canals, ML

    2011-01-01

    independent CHD risk factors were Obesity (BMI >25%, 56%), dislipidemia (TC >200mg/dL and/or TG >150mg/dL, 72.1%), Smoking (43.7%) and Lack of Exercise (43.7%). After adjusting age and comparison to BMI and Cholesterol levels, in older age group seafarers (50-55 yrs old), the risk of a cardiovascular event...

  19. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  20. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007188.htm Heart disease and women To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. People often DO NOT consider heart disease a woman's disease. Yet cardiovascular disease is the ...

  1. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 13,2017 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  2. Heart disease and intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000540.htm Heart disease and intimacy To use the sharing features on ... Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald’s Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  3. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  4. A randomized study of coconut oil versus sunflower oil on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with stable coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Maniyal; Vasudevan, D M; Sundaram, K R; Krishnan, Sajitha; Vaidyanathan, Kannan; Nandakumar, Sandya; Chandrasekhar, Rajiv; Mathew, Navin

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) and its pathological atherosclerotic process are closely related to lipids. Lipids levels are in turn influenced by dietary oils and fats. Saturated fatty acids increase the risk for atherosclerosis by increasing the cholesterol level. This study was conducted to investigate the impact of cooking oil media (coconut oil and sunflower oil) on lipid profile, antioxidant mechanism, and endothelial function in patients with established CAD. In a single center randomized study in India, patients with stable CAD on standard medical care were assigned to receive coconut oil (Group I) or sunflower oil (Group II) as cooking media for 2 years. Anthropometric measurements, serum, lipids, Lipoprotein a, apo B/A-1 ratio, antioxidants, flow-mediated vasodilation, and cardiovascular events were assessed at 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years. Hundred patients in each arm completed 2 years with 98% follow-up. There was no statistically significant difference in the anthropometric, biochemical, vascular function, and in cardiovascular events after 2 years. Coconut oil even though rich in saturated fatty acids in comparison to sunflower oil when used as cooking oil media over a period of 2 years did not change the lipid-related cardiovascular risk factors and events in those receiving standard medical care. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Telomere elongation protects heart and lung tissue cells from fatal damage in rats exposed to severe hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaping; Zhao, Zhen; Zhu, Zhiyong; Li, Pingying; Li, Xiaolin; Xue, Xiaohong; Duo, Jie; Ma, Yingcai

    2018-02-17

    The effects of acute hypoxia at high altitude on the telomere length of the cells in the heart and lung tissues remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate the change in telomere length of rat heart and lung tissue cells in response to acute exposure to severe hypoxia and its role in hypoxia-induced damage to heart and lung tissues. Forty male Wistar rats (6-week old) were randomized into control group (n = 10) and hypoxia group (n = 30). Rats in control group were kept at an altitude of 1500 m, while rats in hypoxia group were exposed to simulated hypoxia with an altitude of 5000 m in a low-pressure oxygen chamber for 1, 3, and 7 days (n = 10). The left ventricular and right middle lobe tissues of each rat were collected for measurement of telomere length and reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, and the mRNA and protein levels of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), hypoxia-inducible factor1α (HIF-1α), and hypoxia-inducible factor1α (HIF-2α). Increased exposure to hypoxia damaged rat heart and lung tissue cells and increased ROS production and telomere length. The mRNA and protein levels of TERT and HIF-1α were significantly higher in rats exposed to hypoxia and increased with prolonged exposure; mRNA and protein levels of HIF-2α increased only in rats exposed to hypoxia for 7 days. TERT was positively correlated with telomere length and the levels of HIF-1α but not HIF-2α. Acute exposure to severe hypoxia causes damage to heart and lung tissues due to the production of ROS but promotes telomere length and adaptive response by upregulating TERT and HIF-1α, which protect heart and lung tissue cells from fatal damage.

  6. Project h[schwa]li?dx[superscript w]/Healthy Hearts across Generations: Development and Evaluation Design of a Tribally Based Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Intervention for American Indian Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Karina L.; LaMarr, June; Levy, Rona L.; Pearson, Cynthia; Maresca, Teresa; Mohammed, Selina A.; Simoni, Jane M.; Evans-Campbell, Teresa; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Fryberg, Sheryl; Jobe, Jared B.

    2012-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) populations are disproportionately at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, and obesity, compared with the general US population. This article describes the h[schwa]li?dx[superscript w]/Healthy Hearts Across Generations project, an AIAN-run, tribally based randomized controlled trial (January…

  7. 2013 AHA/ACC guideline on lifestyle management to reduce cardiovascular risk: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association task force on practice guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goals of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) are to prevent cardiovascular (CV) diseases, improve the management of people who have these diseases through professional education and research, and develop guidelines, standards and policies that promot...

  8. Validation of a model to investigate the effects of modifying cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors on the burden of CVD: the rotterdam ischemic heart disease and stroke computer simulation (RISC) model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kempen, Bob J. H.; Ferket, Bart S.; Hofman, Albert; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Colkesen, Ersen B.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Hunink, M. G. Myriam

    2012-01-01

    Background: We developed a Monte Carlo Markov model designed to investigate the effects of modifying cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors on the burden of CVD. Internal, predictive, and external validity of the model have not yet been established. Methods: The Rotterdam Ischemic Heart Disease

  9. Risk factors of cardiovascular diseases in Bushehr Port on the basis of The WHO MONICA Project The Persian Gulf Healthy Heart Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amiri

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The majority of all deaths attributable to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are in developing countries. There is now a pressing need for developing countries to define and implement preventive interventions for CVDs. We used WHO MONICA Project protocols to measure trends in coronary risk factors in Bushehr Port in the Persian Gulf Healthy Heart Project. Coronary risk factors of 2092 , aged >= 25 years men and women were evaluated in a cross-sectional study. Of the studied population, 97.7% had at least one coronary risk factor, 44.3% of men and 69% of women had at least two coronary risk factors. The high prevalence rates of diabetes mellitus (8.6%, central obesity (59.4%, obesity (26.8%, hypertension (24.5%, smoking (15.7%, physical inactivity (71.1%, hypercholesterolemia (24% and low HDL-cholesterol (61.5% showed that coronary risk factors prevail in Bushehr Port. Therefore, preventive strategies should be implemented immediately to avoid cardiovascular epidemic in the near future.

  10. Passive opium smoking does not have beneficial effect on plasma lipids and cardiovascular indices in hypercholesterolemic rabbits with ischemic and non-ischemic hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafipour, Hamid; Joukar, Siyavash; Malekpour-Afshar, Reza; Mirzaeipour, Fateme; Nasri, Hamid Reza

    2010-02-03

    To scientifically test a traditionally belief of some Asian countries residents that opium may prevent or have ameliorating effects on cardiovascular diseases (CVD) we investigated the effect of passive opium smoking (POS) on plasma lipids and some cardiovascular parameters in hypercholesterolemic rabbits with ischemic and non-ischemic hearts. 40 rabbits were fed for 2 weeks with cholesterol-enriched diet and divided to control (CTL), short-term opium (SO) and long-term opium (LO) groups. SO and LO groups were exposed to POS for 3 days and 4 weeks respectively. ECG, blood pressure (BP) and left ventricular pressure recorded and serum lipid and cardiac troponin I levels were measured. Isoproterenol (ISO) injected for induction of cardiac ischemia and after 4h the above variables were measured along with cardiac histopathology assessment. HDL cholesterol decreased significantly in LO compared to CTL group (35+/-5 vs 53+/-5mg/dl). Groups treated with ISO showed significantly higher increments in troponin I level (POpium exposure caused a trend of increase in blood pressure, LDL cholesterol and ECG disturbances, attenuated ISO induced myonecrosis but augmented tissue congestion and hemorrhage. POS can be considered as a CVD risk factor. Opium does not reduce BP or cholesterol level, as is anticipated by its users. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Connections between nutritional status and proton pump inhibitor therapy in patients scheduled for cardiovascular rehabilitation after treatment for ischaemic and valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boban, Marko; Persic, Viktor; Petricevic, Mate; Biocina, Bojan; Sipic, Tomislav; Pehar-Pejcnovic, Vesna; Balen, Sanja; Zulj, Marinko; Vcev, Aleksandar

    Multiple and yet uncertain connections exist between cardiovascular diseases and the nutritional status of patients, particularly in relation to cardiovascular treatments. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are among the most commonly used group of drugs. To analyse utilisation of PPI in association with nutritional risk of patients scheduled for rehabilitation after treatment for ischaemic and valvular heart disease. Retrospective analyses on a consecutive sample of patients, which included drug utilisation of PPI and nutritional risk screening, using a standardised NRS-2002 tool. The patients (n = 536) were divided into groups based on previous cardiovascular treatments and use of PPI. Nearly half of the patients (244, 46.1%) had PPI in their chronic therapy despite the clinically negligible prevalence of conditions that are their fundamental indications. The odds for using PPI in patients with increased nutritional risk, estimated by logistic regression, were 3.34 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 2.26-4.94), p 3: positive likelihood-ratio (LR) 2.35 (95% CI 2.10-2.60); negative LR 0.46 (95% CI 0.4-0.6); area under the curve (AUC) 0.720; p 6.36% (positive LR 2.22 [95% CI 2.00-2.50]; negative LR 0.41 [95% CI 0.30-0.50]; AUC 0.707; p < 0.001). Utilisation of PPI was found to be of relatively high prevalence and significantly associated with parameters of nutritional risk screening. Furthermore, it was in correlation with the age of patients and the existence of chronic kidney disease, which are well-established predispositions for poor nutritional status. Nutritional risk seems to be additionally negatively challenged by utilisation of PPI due to gastric malabsorption and anaemia.

  12. Assessment of American Heart Association's Ideal Cardiovascular Health Metrics Among Employees of a Large Healthcare Organization: The Baptist Health South Florida Employee Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunmoroti, Oluseye; Younus, Adnan; Rouseff, Maribeth; Spatz, Erica S; Das, Sankalp; Parris, Don; Aneni, Ehimen; Holzwarth, Leah; Guzman, Henry; Tran, Thinh; Roberson, Lara; Ali, Shozab S; Agatston, Arthur; Maziak, Wasim; Feldman, Theodore; Veledar, Emir; Nasir, Khurram

    2015-07-01

    Healthcare organizations and their employees are critical role models for healthy living in their communities. The American Heart Association (AHA) 2020 impact goal provides a national framework that can be used to track the success of employee wellness programs with a focus on improving cardiovascular (CV) health. This study aimed to assess the CV health of the employees of Baptist Health South Florida (BHSF), a large nonprofit healthcare organization. HRAs and wellness examinations can be used to measure the cardiovascular health status of an employee population. The AHA's 7 CV health metrics (diet, physical activity, smoking, body mass index, blood pressure, total cholesterol, and blood glucose) categorized as ideal, intermediate, or poor were estimated among employees of BHSF participating voluntarily in an annual health risk assessment (HRA) and wellness fair. Age and gender differences were analyzed using χ(2) test. The sample consisted of 9364 employees who participated in the 2014 annual HRA and wellness fair (mean age [standard deviation], 43 [12] years, 74% women). Sixty (1%) individuals met the AHA's definition of ideal CV health. Women were more likely than men to meet the ideal criteria for more than 5 CV health metrics. The proportion of participants meeting the ideal criteria for more than 5 CV health metrics decreased with age. A combination of HRAs and wellness examinations can provide useful insights into the cardiovascular health status of an employee population. Future tracking of the CV health metrics will provide critical feedback on the impact of system wide wellness efforts as well as identifying proactive programs to assist in making substantial progress toward the AHA 2020 Impact Goal. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Effects of High-Intensity Interval Training versus Continuous Training on Physical Fitness, Cardiovascular Function and Quality of Life in Heart Failure Patients.

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    Nathalie M M Benda

    Full Text Available Physical fitness is an important prognostic factor in heart failure (HF. To improve fitness, different types of exercise have been explored, with recent focus on high-intensity interval training (HIT. We comprehensively compared effects of HIT versus continuous training (CT in HF patients NYHA II-III on physical fitness, cardiovascular function and structure, and quality of life, and hypothesize that HIT leads to superior improvements compared to CT.Twenty HF patients (male:female 19:1, 64±8 yrs, ejection fraction 38±6% were allocated to 12-weeks of HIT (10*1-minute at 90% maximal workload-alternated by 2.5 minutes at 30% maximal workload or CT (30 minutes at 60-75% of maximal workload. Before and after intervention, we examined physical fitness (incremental cycling test, cardiac function and structure (echocardiography, vascular function and structure (ultrasound and quality of life (SF-36, Minnesota living with HF questionnaire (MLHFQ.Training improved maximal workload, peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak related to the predicted VO2peak, oxygen uptake at the anaerobic threshold, and maximal oxygen pulse (all P<0.05, whilst no differences were present between HIT and CT (N.S.. We found no major changes in resting cardiovascular function and structure. SF-36 physical function score improved after training (P<0.05, whilst SF-36 total score and MLHFQ did not change after training (N.S..Training induced significant improvements in parameters of physical fitness, although no evidence for superiority of HIT over CT was demonstrated. No major effect of training was found on cardiovascular structure and function or quality of life in HF patients NYHA II-III.Nederlands Trial Register NTR3671.

  14. High plasma ghrelin protects from coronary heart disease and Leu72Leu polymorphism of ghrelin gene from cancer in healthy adults during the 19 years follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurila, M; Santaniemi, M; Kesäniemi, Y A; Ukkola, O

    2014-11-01

    The aim of our investigation was to find out if ghrelin concentrations or polymorphisms predict the future risk for cardiovascular diseases and cancer in a population-based cohort initiated in 1991 (491 hypertensive and 513 control subjects). Total mortality and hospital events were followed up for 19 years. Fasting total ghrelin concentrations were determined and Arg51Gln, Leu72Met and -501 A > C polymorphisms identified. Cox regression analysis was performed. The mean value in the control cohort was 674 pg/ml whereas in the hypertensive cohort it was 661 pg/ml. The associations found suggest that in the controls the highest ghrelin quartile protected from CHD (coronary heart disease). The results were significant without or with adjustments for age, sex, smoking, systolic blood pressure and LDL cholesterol, BMI, type 2 diabetes or QUICK index. C/C variant of the promoter associated with the prevention of IHD (ischemic heart disease) in the hypertensive group (pghrelin concentration was related to protection from CHD and Leu72Leu genotype to prevention of cancer in healthy adults during the 19 years follow-up. C/C promoter protects from IHD in the hypertensive subjects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Case management to reduce cardiovascular disease risk in American Indians and Alaska Natives with diabetes: results from the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Healthy Heart Demonstration Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kelly; Jiang, Luohua; Manson, Spero M; Beals, Janette; Henderson, William; Pratte, Katherine; Acton, Kelly J; Roubideaux, Yvette

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) with diabetes in the Special Diabetes Program for Indians Healthy Heart (SDPI-HH) Demonstration Project. Multidisciplinary teams implemented an intensive case management intervention among 30 health care programs serving 138 tribes. The project recruited 3373 participants, with and without current CVD, between 2006 and 2009. We examined data collected at baseline and 1 year later to determine whether improvements occurred in CVD risk factors and in Framingham coronary heart disease (CHD) risk scores, aspirin use, and smoking status. A1c levels decreased an average of 0.2% (P risk scores also decreased significantly. Aspirin therapy increased significantly, and smoking decreased. Participants with more case management visits had significantly greater reductions in LDL cholesterol and A1c values. SDPI-HH successfully translated an intensive case management intervention. Creative retention strategies and an improved understanding of organizational challenges are needed for future Indian health translational efforts.

  16. Cardiovascular Protective Effects of Adjunctive Alternative Medicine (Salvia miltiorrhiza and Pueraria lobata in High-Risk Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Woo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hypertension in association with diabetes (DM, renal impairment (RI, and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH increases the risk of future cardiovascular events. We hypothesize, traditional herbal medicines Danshen and Gegen (D&G have beneficial effects on atherogenesis in these high-risk hypertensive subjects. Subjects and Methods. 90 asymptomatic hypertensive subjects associated with LVH (63.3%, DM (62.2%, or RI (30% were randomized to receive D&G herbal capsules 1 gm/day, 2 gm/day, or identical placebo capsules in double-blind and parallel fashion for 12 months. Brachial flow-mediated dilation (endothelium-dependent dilation, FMD and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT were measured by ultrasound. All data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences in Windows 16.0. Results. Their mean age was 55±8 years, and 74.4% were male. After 12 months of adjunctive therapies and compared with baseline, there were no significant changes in blood pressure, heart rate, hematological, glucose, and creatinine profiles in both placebo and D&G groups. FMD improved significantly during D&G (P=0.0001 and less so after placebo treatment (P=0.001. There was a mild but significant decrease in carotid IMT after D&G (P<0.001 but no significant changes after placebo. A trend of better improvement in FMD after higher versus lower D&G dosages was seen. D&G were well tolerated, with no significant adverse events or blood biochemistry changes. Conclusion. D&G adjunctive treatment was well tolerated and significantly improved atherogenesis in high-risk hypertensive patients, with potential in primary atherosclerosis prevention.

  17. Status of cardiovascular disease and stroke in Hispanics/Latinos in the United States: a science advisory from the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carlos J; Allison, Matthew; Daviglus, Martha L; Isasi, Carmen R; Keller, Colleen; Leira, Enrique C; Palaniappan, Latha; Piña, Ileana L; Ramirez, Sarah M; Rodriguez, Beatriz; Sims, Mario

    2014-08-12

    This American Heart Association (AHA) scientific statement provides a comprehensive overview of current evidence on the burden cardiovascular disease (CVD) among Hispanics in the United States. Hispanics are the largest minority ethnic group in the United States, and their health is vital to the public health of the nation and to achieving the AHA's 2020 goals. This statement describes the CVD epidemiology and related personal beliefs and the social and health issues of US Hispanics, and it identifies potential prevention and treatment opportunities. The intended audience for this statement includes healthcare professionals, researchers, and policy makers. Writing group members were nominated by the AHA's Manuscript Oversight Committee and represent a broad range of expertise in relation to Hispanic individuals and CVD. The writers used a general framework outlined by the committee chair to produce a comprehensive literature review that summarizes existing evidence, indicate gaps in current knowledge, and formulate recommendations. Only English-language studies were reviewed, with PubMed/MEDLINE as our primary resource, as well as the Cochrane Library Reviews, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the US Census data as secondary resources. Inductive methods and descriptive studies that focused on CVD outcomes incidence, prevalence, treatment response, and risks were included. Because of the wide scope of these topics, members of the writing committee were responsible for drafting individual sections selected by the chair of the writing committee, and the group chair assembled the complete statement. The conclusions of this statement are the views of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the AHA. All members of the writing group had the opportunity to comment on the initial drafts and approved the final version of this document. The manuscript underwent extensive AHA internal peer review before consideration and approval by the

  18. A healthy dose of scepticism: four good reasons to think again about protective effects of alcohol on coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikritzhs, Tanya; Fillmore, Kaye; Stockwell, Tim

    2009-07-01

    Alcohol has been implicated in both the popular press and scientific literature as having a protective effect for at least a dozen conditions including coronary heart disease (CHD). Epidemiological evidence for an apparent protective effect of alcohol on CHD is now being challenged on a number of fronts. This paper is a synopsis of those various challenges as they currently stand. The argument that systematic misclassification of ex-drinkers and occasional drinkers to 'abstainer' categories among epidemiological studies might explain apparent protective effects of moderate alcohol consumption on CHD has recently been supported by new meta-analyses and independent research. The influence of uncontrolled or unknown factors on the relationship between alcohol and disease cannot be ruled out. Exclusion of participants on the basis of ill-health severely reduces study sample size and new analyses suggest that doing so might artificially create the appearance of protective effects. The ability of respondents to accurately recall their own alcohol consumption is in serious doubt and very few individuals maintain one single drinking level or style throughout life. The relationship between alcohol and some conditions might be a function of drinking patterns but few studies have addressed the issue. Popular perceptions regarding the strength of evidence for alcohol's protective effect on a growing number of conditions might be misguided. It is time for the wider research, health and medical community to seriously reflect on the quality of current evidence for apparent protective effects of alcohol on human disease.

  19. ISFAHAN HEALTHY HEART PROGRAM:A COMPREHENSIVE INTEGRATED COMMUNITY-BASED PROGRAM FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE PREVENTION AND CONTROL. DESIGN, METHODS AND INITIAL EXPERIENCE 2000-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N MOHAMMADI FARD

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Isfahan Healthy Heart Program (IHHP is a five to six year comprehensive integrated community based program for preventing and controlling of cardiovascular diseases (CVD via reducing CVD risk factors and improvement of cardiovascular healthy behavior in target population. IHHP has been started in 1999 and will be last since 2004. Primary survey was done to collect baseline data from interventional (Isfahan and Najafabad Cities and reference (Arak communities. In a multistage sampling method, we select randomly 5 to 10 percent of households in clusters. Then individuals aged equal or higher than 19 years old were selected for entering to survey. In this way, data from 12600 individuals (6300 in interventional counties and 6300 in reference county was collected and stratified due to their living area (urban vs. rural and different age and sex groups. Cardiovascular risk factors (Hypercholesterolemia, Smoking, Hypertension, Diabetes Mellitus, Obesity were investigated by laboratory tests (Lipid profile, FBS, OGTT, physical exam and standard questionnaires, in all ones. Nutritional habits, socioeconomic states, physical activity profiles and other healthy behaviors regarding to cardiovascular disease were assessed by validated questionnaires via interviewing to all individuals. Twelve leads electrocardiogram was done in all persons older than 35 years old. The prevalence of CVDs and distribution of CVD risk factors were estimated in this phase. In the 2nd phase, based on primary survey findings, we arranged a series of teams (worksite, children, women, health personnel, high risk patients, nutrition for planning and implementation of program through interventional community for a 5-year period. Every team has its own target population and objectives and monitors its process during the study. At intervals (annually, some local and small surveys with a random sampling will be conducted to assess and monitor the program and its potency to cope with

  20. Estrogen and the female heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, A A; Korzick, D H

    2014-05-25

    Estrogen has a plethora of effects in the cardiovascular system. Studies of estrogen and the heart span human clinical trials and basic cell and molecular investigations. Greater understanding of cell and molecular responses to estrogens can provide further insights into the findings of clinical studies. Differences in expression and cellular/intracellular distribution of the two main receptors, estrogen receptor (ER) α and β, are thought to account for the specificity and differences in responses to estrogen. Much remains to be learned in this area, but cellular distribution within the cardiovascular system is becoming clearer. Identification of GPER as a third ER has introduced further complexity to the system. 17β-estradiol (E2), the most potent human estrogen, clearly has protective properties activating a signaling cascade leading to cellular protection and also influencing expression of the protective heat shock proteins (HSP). E2 protects the heart from ischemic injury in basic studies, but the picture is more involved in the whole organism and clinical studies. Here the complexity of E2's widespread effects comes into play and makes interpretation of findings more challenging. Estrogen loss occurs primarily with aging, but few studies have used aged models despite clear evidence of differences between the response to estrogen deficiency in adult and aged animals. Thus more work is needed focusing on the effects of aging vs. estrogen loss on the cardiovascular system. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Protective effect of curcumin on pulmonary and cardiovascular effects induced by repeated exposure to diesel exhaust particles in mice.

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    Abderrahim Nemmar

    Full Text Available Particulate air pollution has been associated with increased risk of cardiopulmonary diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We have previously demonstrated that single dose exposure to diesel exhaust particle (DEP causes lung inflammation and peripheral thrombotic events. Here, we exposed mice with repeated doses of DEP (15 µg/animal every 2(nd day for 6 days (a total of 4 exposures, and measured several cardiopulmonary endpoints 48 h after the end of the treatments. Moreover, the potential protective effect of curcumin (the yellow pigment isolated from turmeric on DEP-induced cardiopulmonary toxicity was assessed. DEP exposure increased macrophage and neutrophil numbers, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF α in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid, and enhanced airway resistance to methacoline measured invasively using Flexivent. DEP also significantly increased plasma C-reactive protein (CRP and TNF α concentrations, systolic blood pressure (SBP as well as the pial arteriolar thrombosis. It also significantly enhanced the plasma D-dimer and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1. Pretreatment with curcumin by oral gavage (45 mg/kg 1 h before exposure to DEP significantly prevented the influx of inflammatory cells and the increase of TNF α in BAL, and the increased airway resistance caused by DEP. Likewise, curcumin prevented the increase of SBP, CRP, TNF α, D-dimer and PAI-1. The thrombosis was partially but significantly mitigated. In conclusion, repeated exposure to DEP induced lung and systemic inflammation characterized by TNFα release, increased SBP, and accelerated coagulation. Our findings indicate that curcumin is a potent anti-inflammatory agent that prevents the release of TNFα and protects against the pulmonary and cardiovascular effects of DEP.

  2. Does high optimism protect against the inter-generational transmission of high BMI? The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serlachius, Anna; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Juonala, Markus; Sabin, Matthew; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli; Elovainio, Marko

    2017-09-01

    The transmission of overweight from one generation to the next is well established, however little is known about what psychosocial factors may protect against this familial risk. The aim of this study was to examine whether optimism plays a role in the intergenerational transmission of obesity. Our sample included 1043 participants from the prospective Cardiovascular Risk in Young FINNS Study. Optimism was measured in early adulthood (2001) when the cohort was aged 24-39years. BMI was measured in 2001 (baseline) and 2012 when they were aged 35-50years. Parental BMI was measured in 1980. Hierarchical linear regression and logistic regression were used to examine the association between optimism and future BMI/obesity, and whether an interaction existed between optimism and parental BMI when predicting BMI/obesity 11years later. High optimism in young adulthood demonstrated a negative relationship with high BMI in mid-adulthood, but only in women (β=-0.127, p=0.001). The optimism×maternal BMI interaction term was a significant predictor of future BMI in women (β=-0.588, p=0.036). The logistic regression results confirmed that high optimism predicted reduced obesity in women (OR=0.68, 95% CI, 0.55-0.86), however the optimism × maternal obesity interaction term was not a significant predictor (OR=0.50, 95% CI, 0.10-2.48). Our findings supported our hypothesis that high optimism mitigated the intergenerational transmission of high BMI, but only in women. These findings also provided evidence that positive psychosocial factors such as optimism are associated with long-term protective effects on BMI in women. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Protection of Ischemic and Reperfused Rat Heart by Aqueous Extract of Urtica Dioica

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    D Shackebaei

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urtica dioica (U.D has widely been used in traditional medicine for its hypotensive and vasodilatory effects. The objective of this study was to clarify the effects of aqueous extract of Urtica dioica on isolated ischemia- reperfused heart.Methods: The heart of male wistar rats were isolated and perfused according to langendorff method. In the control group (n = 13 the hearts were subjected to three steps of stabilization (30 min, normothermic global ischemia (40 min and reperfusion (45 min. In addition, before and after ischemia, the aqueous extract of U.D (200 mg/ml was added to perfusion solution in the test group (n=14. Different cardiac variables including left ventricular pressure, heart rate and coronary flow were measured and rate pressure product was calculated.Results: Results showed that left ventricular pressure (59.11±4.7 and rate pressure product (13680±1136 in 45th minute of reperfusion in the test group were significantly (P=0.0187 and 0.0321 respectively greater than the control group (39.1±6.0, 9480±1480 respectively. These findings indicated decreased cardiac damage following ischemia in the test group, compared with that of control group.Conclusion: Results of the present study showed that the aqueous extract of U.D, increased the tolerance of isolated rat hearts against ischemic damage. This effect can be explained by potent antioxidant activity of the U.D extract, suggesting its clinical use in ischemic heart disease.

  4. Are Changes in Heart Rate Variability During Hypoglycemia Confounded by the Presence of Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy in Patients with Diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cichosz, Simon Lebech; Frystyk, Jan; Tarnow, Lise

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have recently shown how the combination of information from continuous glucose monitor (CGM) and heart rate variability (HRV) measurements can be used to construct an algorithm for prediction of hypoglycemia in both bedbound and active patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Questions...... with CGM and a Holter device while they performed normal daily activities. CAN was diagnosed using two cardiac reflex tests: (1) deep breathing and (2) orthostatic hypotension and end organ symptoms. Early CAN was defined as the presence of one abnormal reflex test and severe CAN was defined as two...

  5. Consecutive Isoproterenol and Adenosine Treatment Confers Marked Protection against Reperfusion Injury in Adult but Not in Immature Heart: A Role for Glycogen

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    Martin Lewis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Consecutive treatment of adult rat heart with isoproterenol and adenosine (Iso/Aden, known to consecutively activate PKA/PKC signaling, is cardioprotective against ischemia and reperfusion (I/R. Whether this is cardioprotective in an immature heart is unknown. Langendorff–perfused hearts from adult and immature (60 and 14 days old male Wistar rats were exposed to 30 min ischemia and 120 min reperfusion, with or without prior perfusion with 5 nM Iso for 3 min followed by 30 μM Aden for 5 min. Changes in hemodynamics (developed pressure and coronary flow and cardiac injury (Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH release and infarct size were measured. Additional hearts were used to measure glycogen content. Iso induced a similar inotropic response in both age groups. Treatment with Iso/Aden resulted in a significant reduction in time to the onset of ischemic contracture in both age groups whilst time to peak contracture was significantly shorter only in immature hearts. Upon reperfusion, the intervention reduced cardiac injury and functional impairment in adults with no protection of immature heart. Immature hearts have significantly less glycogen content compared to adult. This work shows that Iso/Aden perfusion confers protection in an adult heart but not in an immature heart. It is likely that metabolic differences including glycogen content contribute to this difference.

  6. Serum Potassium Levels and Outcome in Acute Heart Failure (Data from the PROTECT and COACH Trials)

    OpenAIRE

    Tromp, Jasper; ter Maaten, Jozine M.; Damman, Kevin; OConnor, Christopher M.; Metra, Marco; Dittrich, Howard C.; Ponikowski, Piot; Teerlink, John R.; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth; Cleland, John G. F.; Givertz, Michael M.; Bloomfield, Daniel M.; van der Wal, Martje H. L.; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2017-01-01

    Serum potassium is routinely measured at admission for acute heart failure (AHF), but information on association with clinical variables and prognosis is limited. Potassium measurements at admission were available in 1,867 patients with AHF in the original cohort of 2,033 patients included in the Patients Hospitalized with acute heart failure and Volume Overload to Assess Treatment Effect on Congestion and Renal FuncTion trial. Patients were grouped according to low potassium (amp;lt;3.5 mEq/...

  7. Adenosine A1 receptor activation increases myocardial protein S-nitrosothiols and elicits protection from ischemia-reperfusion injury in male and female hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Shao

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO plays an important role in cardioprotection, and recent work from our group and others has implicated protein S-nitrosylation (SNO as a critical component of NO-mediated protection in different models, including ischemic pre- and post-conditioning and sex-dependent cardioprotection. However, studies have yet to examine whether protein SNO levels are similarly increased with pharmacologic preconditioning in male and female hearts, and whether an increase in protein SNO levels, which is protective in male hearts, is sufficient to increase baseline protection in female hearts. Therefore, we pharmacologically preconditioned male and female hearts with the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclohexyl adenosine (CHA. CHA administration prior to ischemia significantly improved functional recovery in both male and female hearts compared to baseline in a Langendorff-perfused heart model of ischemia-reperfusion injury (% of preischemic function ± SE: male baseline: 37.5±3.4% vs. male CHA: 55.3±3.2%; female baseline: 61.4±5.7% vs. female CHA: 76.0±6.2%. In a separate set of hearts, we found that CHA increased p-Akt and p-eNOS levels. We also used SNO-resin-assisted capture with LC-MS/MS to identify SNO proteins in male and female hearts, and determined that CHA perfusion induced a modest increase in protein SNO levels in both male (11.4% and female (12.3% hearts compared to baseline. These findings support a potential role for protein SNO in a model of pharmacologic preconditioning, and provide evidence to suggest that a modest increase in protein SNO levels is sufficient to protect both male and female hearts from ischemic injury. In addition, a number of the SNO proteins identified with CHA treatment were also observed with other forms of cardioprotective stimuli in prior studies, further supporting a role for protein SNO in cardioprotection.

  8. Sudden cardiovascular death following myocardial infarction: the importance of left ventricular systolic dysfunction and congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildstrøm, Steen Zabell; Ottesen, Michael M; Rask-Madsen, Christian

    2005-01-01

    of implantable defibrillators. METHODS: Data from consecutive patients with acute MI screened in 1990-92 for the TRAndolapril Cardiac Evaluation (TRACE) study were entered into a registry. A total of 5502 patients were alive 30 days after the MI and were followed for up to 4 years with respect to cause of death....... SCD was defined as cardiovascular death within 1 h of onset of symptoms. An echocardiography was performed 1-6 days after the admission and evaluated centrally using the wall motion index (WMI). RESULTS: Half of the patients had CHF and 17% of the patients had WMI ... to an ejection fraction follow-up 431 patients died from SCD and 606 from non-SCD. The risk ratios for SCD and non-SCD associated with WMI

  9. Low Birth Weight as a Predictor of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Childhood and Adolescence? The PEP Family Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Gerda-Maria; Liepold, Evelyn; Schwandt, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low birth weight is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in later life. Because data in children and adolescents are sparse and controversial, we assessed the association of birth weight with CVD risk factors in German youths. Methods: We categorized 843 urban children and adolescents aged 3-18 years by quintiles of birth weight and measured nine traditional risk factors in terms of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure, total cholesterol (TC), LDL-C, HDL-C, Non HDL-C and triglycerides (TG). SPSS 21 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Mean values and prevalence of nine anthropometric and lipid risk variables were equally distributed over the five birth weight groups. Though risk factors clustered between 3.0 kg and 4.0 kg of birth weight in both genders we found only one significant correlation of birth weight with TG for males and females and another one for HDL-C in males. The strongest clustering of significant regression coefficients occurred in the 2nd birth weight quintile for SBP (ß 0.018), TC (ß -0.050), LDL-C (ß -0.039), non LDL-C (ß -0.049) and log TG (ß -0.001) in males and females. Conclusions: Overall we did not find significant associations between birth weight and nine traditional cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents. However, the 2nd quintile of birth weight might suggest clustering of risk factors. PMID:26900435

  10. Disruption of COX-2 and eNOS does not confer protection from cardiovascular failure in lipopolysaccharide-treated conscious mice and isolated vascular rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, Mette; Madsen, Kirsten; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    (NS 398), disruption of COX-2, endothelium removal, or eNOS deletion (eNOS(-/-)) did not improve vascular reactivity after LPS, while the NO synthase blockers 1400W and N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester prevented loss of tone. COX-2 and eNOS activities are not necessary for LPS-induced decreases...... in blood pressure, heart rate, and vascular reactivity. Inducible NOS activity appears crucial. COX-2 and eNOS are not obvious therapeutic targets for cardiovascular rescue during gram-negative endotoxemic shock....

  11. Caffeine and cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Duncan; Rodricks, Joseph V; Mariano, Gregory F; Chowdhury, Farah

    2017-10-01

    This report evaluates the scientific literature on caffeine with respect to potential cardiovascular outcomes, specifically relative risks of total cardiovascular disease (CVD), coronary heart disease (CHD) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI), effects on arrhythmia, heart failure, sudden cardiac arrest, stroke, blood pressure, hypertension, and other biomarkers of effect, including heart rate, cerebral blood flow, cardiac output, plasma homocysteine levels, serum cholesterol levels, electrocardiogram (EKG) parameters, heart rate variability, endothelial/platelet function and plasma/urine catecholamine levels. Caffeine intake has been associated with a range of reversible and transient physiological effects broadly and cardiovascular effects specifically. This report attempts to understand where the delineations exist in caffeine intake and corresponding cardiovascular effects among various subpopulations. The available literature suggests that cardiovascular effects experienced by caffeine consumers at levels up to 600 mg/day are in most cases mild, transient, and reversible, with no lasting adverse effect. The point at which caffeine intake may cause harm to the cardiovascular system is not readily identifiable in part because data on the effects of daily intakes greater than 600 mg is limited. However, the evidence considered within this review suggests that typical moderate caffeine intake is not associated with increased risks of total cardiovascular disease; arrhythmia; heart failure; blood pressure changes among regular coffee drinkers; or hypertension in baseline populations. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Selenium protects the immature rat heart against ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ošťádalová, Ivana; Vobecký, Miloslav; Chvojková, Zuzana; Miková, D.; Hampl, V.; Wilhelm, J.; Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 300, 1-2 (2007), s. 259-267 ISSN 0300-8177 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : selenium * immature heart * ischemia Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.707, year: 2007

  13. Serum Potassium Levels and Outcome in Acute Heart Failure (Data from the PROTECT and COACH Trials)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, Jasper; ter Maaten, Jozine M.; Damman, Kevin; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Metra, Marco; Dittrich, Howard C.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Teerlink, John R.; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth; Cleland, John G. F.; Givertz, Michael M.; Bloomfield, Daniel M.; van der Wal, Martje H. L.; Jaarsma, Tiny; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Hillege, Hans L.; Voors, Adriaan A.; van der Meer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Serum potassium is routinely measured at admission for acute heart failure (AHF), but information on association with clinical variables and prognosis is limited. Potassium measurements at admission were available in 1,867 patients with AHF in the original cohort of 2,033 patients included in the

  14. Hyperthyroidism and the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuna, Patricia Mejia; Udovcic, Maja; Sharma, Morali D

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormones have a significant impact on cardiac function and structure. Excess thyroid hormone affects cardiovascular hemodynamics, leading to high-output heart failure and, in late stages, dilated cardiomyopathy. In this review, we discuss how hyperthyroidism affects cardiovascular pathophysiology and molecular mechanisms and examine the complications caused by excess thyroid hormone, such as heart failure and atrial fibrillation.

  15. Adenosine 5′-Triphosphate Metabolism in Red Blood Cells as a Potential Biomarker for Post-Exercise Hypotension and a Drug Target for Cardiovascular Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollen K. Yeung

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The importance of adenosine and ATP in regulating many biological functions has long been recognized, especially for their effects on the cardiovascular system, which may be used for management of hypertension and cardiometabolic diseases. In response to ischemia and cardiovascular injury, ATP is broken down to release adenosine. The effect of adenosine is very short lived because it is rapidly taken up by erythrocytes (RBCs, myocardial and endothelial cells, and also rapidly catabolized to oxypurine metabolites. Intracellular adenosine is phosphorylated back to adenine nucleotides via a salvage pathway. Extracellular and intracellular ATP is broken down rapidly to ADP and AMP, and finally to adenosine by 5′-nucleotidase. These metabolic events are known to occur in the myocardium, endothelium as well as in RBCs. Exercise has been shown to increase metabolism of ATP in RBCs, which may be an important mechanism for post-exercise hypotension and cardiovascular protection. The post-exercise effect was greater in hypertensive than in normotensive rats. The review summarizes current evidence in support of ATP metabolism in the RBC as a potential surrogate biomarker for cardiovascular protection and toxicities. It also discusses the opportunities, challenges, and obstacles of exploiting ATP metabolism in RBCs as a target for drug development and precision medicine.

  16. Periodontal status affects C-reactive protein and lipids in patients with stable heart disease from a tertiary care cardiovascular clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Manuela F; Montenegro, Marlon M; Furtado, Mariana V; Polanczyk, Carisi A; Rösing, Cassiano K; Haas, Alex N

    2014-04-01

    There are scarce data on the impact of the periodontal condition in the control of biomarkers in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study is to assess whether periodontal inflammation and tissue breakdown are associated with C-reactive protein (CRP) and lipids in patients with stable heart disease. This cross-sectional study included 93 patients with stable coronary artery disease (57 males; mean age: 63.5 ± 9.8 years) who were in outpatient care for at least 6 months. After applying a structured questionnaire, periodontal examinations were performed by two calibrated periodontists in six sites per tooth at all teeth. Blood samples were collected from patients on the day of periodontal examination to determine levels of CRP, lipids, and glycated hemoglobin. Multiple linear regression models were fitted to evaluate the association among different periodontal and blood parameters controlling for sex, body mass index, glycated hemoglobin, use of oral hypoglycemic drugs, and smoking. Overall, the sample presented high levels of periodontal inflammation and tissue breakdown. Unadjusted mean concentrations of triglycerides (TGs), very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and glucose were significantly higher in individuals with severe periodontitis. When multiple linear regression models were applied, number of teeth with clinical attachment loss ≥6 mm and presence of severe periodontitis were significantly associated with higher CRP concentrations. Bleeding on probing was significantly associated with TGs, total cholesterol, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In this sample of patients with stable CVD, current periodontal inflammation and tissue breakdown are associated with cardiovascular inflammatory markers, such as CRP and lipid profile.

  17. Major Depressive Disorder and Bipolar Disorder Predispose Youth to Accelerated Atherosclerosis and Early Cardiovascular Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Benjamin I; Carnethon, Mercedes R; Matthews, Karen A; McIntyre, Roger S; Miller, Gregory E; Raghuveer, Geetha; Stoney, Catherine M; Wasiak, Hank; McCrindle, Brian W

    2015-09-08

    In the 2011 "Expert Panel on Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents," several medical conditions among youth were identified that predispose to accelerated atherosclerosis and early cardiovascular disease (CVD), and risk stratification and management strategies for youth with these conditions were elaborated. Major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) among youth satisfy the criteria set for, and therefore merit inclusion among, Expert Panel tier II moderate-risk conditions. The combined prevalence of MDD and BD among adolescents in the United States is ≈10%, at least 10 times greater than the prevalence of the existing moderate-risk conditions combined. The high prevalence of MDD and BD underscores the importance of positioning these diseases alongside other pediatric diseases previously identified as moderate risk for CVD. The overall objective of this statement is to increase awareness and recognition of MDD and BD among youth as moderate-risk conditions for early CVD. To achieve this objective, the primary specific aims of this statement are to (1) summarize evidence that MDD and BD are tier II moderate-risk conditions associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and early CVD and (2) position MDD and BD as tier II moderate-risk conditions that require the application of risk stratification and management strategies in accordance with Expert Panel recommendations. In this scientific statement, there is an integration of the various factors that putatively underlie the association of MDD and BD with CVD, including pathophysiological mechanisms, traditional CVD risk factors, behavioral and environmental factors, and psychiatric medications. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Meal Timing and Frequency: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Ard, Jamy; Baskin, Monica L; Chiuve, Stephanie E; Johnson, Heather M; Kris-Etherton, Penny; Varady, Krista

    2017-02-28

    Eating patterns are increasingly varied. Typical breakfast, lunch, and dinner meals are difficult to distinguish because skipping meals and snacking have become more prevalent. Such eating styles can have various effects on cardiometabolic health markers, namely obesity, lipid profile, insulin resistance, and blood pressure. In this statement, we review the cardiometabolic health effects of specific eating patterns: skipping breakfast, intermittent fasting, meal frequency (number of daily eating occasions), and timing of eating occasions. Furthermore, we propose definitions for meals, snacks, and eating occasions for use in research. Finally, data suggest that irregular eating patterns appear less favorable for achieving a healthy cardiometabolic profile. Intentional eating with mindful attention to the timing and frequency of eating occasions could lead to healthier lifestyle and cardiometabolic risk factor management. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Adult family members and their resemblance of coronary heart disease risk factors: The Cardiovascular Disease Study in Finnmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenn, Tormod

    1997-01-01

    Coronary heart disease tends to run in families, and the familial resemblance of major risk factors for the disease was examined among various types of adult family members. Family units were assembled from a total of 4,738 men and women who took part in a cross sectional health survey in four Norwegian municipalities where all inhabitants between 20 and 52 years of age were invited. After adjusting for age and other confounders, correlation coefficients were derived as a measure of the degree of resemblance. Viewed across all types of investigated familial relationships, similarity was found to be stronger for total cholesterol than for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, and also stronger for systolic than for diastolic blood pressure. Between husbands and wives (3,060 subjects), correlations were small (between 0.02 and 0.06), except for 0.11 for total cholesterol. Lipid and blood pressure correlations ranged from 0.13 to 0.27 for parents and their offspring (471 subjects, p < 0.05) and from 0.11 to 0.22 among siblings (2,166 subjects, p < 0.01). Sibling correlations were consistent across age groups. Furthermore, reports from each individual on daily smoking (yes or no) revealed that husbands and wives had similar habits in 63.5% of all marriages as compared with the expected 49.4% had no smoking similarity at all been present. Smoking concordance was also demonstrated among siblings (p < 0.01). The persistent pattern of lipid and blood pressure aggregation among genetically related individuals from 20 to 52 years of age and the much weaker such similarity between husbands and wives, point towards genes or commonly shared environment at early ages as a major reason why coronary heart disease runs in families

  20. 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) of pediatric and neonatal patients: pediatric basic life support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    This publication presents the 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) of the pediatric patient and the 2005 American Academy of Pediatrics/AHA guidelines for CPR and ECC of the neonate. The guidelines are based on the evidence evaluation from the 2005 International Consensus Conference on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations, hosted by the American Heart Association in Dallas, Texas, January 23-30, 2005. The "2005 AHA Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care" contain recommendations designed to improve survival from sudden cardiac arrest and acute life-threatening cardiopulmonary problems. The evidence evaluation process that was the basis for these guidelines was accomplished in collaboration with the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). The ILCOR process is described in more detail in the "International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations." The recommendations in the "2005 AHA Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care" confirm the safety and effectiveness of many approaches, acknowledge that other approaches may not be optimal, and recommend new treatments that have undergone evidence evaluation. These new recommendations do not imply that care involving the use of earlier guidelines is unsafe. In addition, it is important to note that these guidelines will not apply to all rescuers and all victims in all situations. The leader of a resuscitation attempt may need to adapt application of the guidelines to unique circumstances. The following are the major pediatric advanced life support changes in the 2005 guidelines: There is further caution about the use of endotracheal tubes. Laryngeal mask airways are acceptable when used by experienced

  1. Update on Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Light of Recent Evidence: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Caroline S; Golden, Sherita Hill; Anderson, Cheryl; Bray, George A; Burke, Lora E; de Boer, Ian H; Deedwania, Prakash; Eckel, Robert H; Ershow, Abby G; Fradkin, Judith; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Nelson, Robert G; Patel, Mahesh J; Pignone, Michael; Quinn, Laurie; Schauer, Philip R; Selvin, Elizabeth; Vafiadis, Dorothea K

    2015-08-25

    Cardiovascular disease risk factor control as primary prevention in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus has changed substantially in the past few years. The purpose of this scientific statement is to review the current literature and key clinical trials pertaining to blood pressure and blood glucose control, cholesterol management, aspirin therapy, and lifestyle modification. We present a synthesis of the recent literature, new guidelines, and clinical targets, including screening for kidney and subclinical cardiovascular disease for the contemporary management of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Nurse-coordinated multidisciplinary, family-based cardiovascular disease prevention programme (EUROACTION) for patients with coronary heart disease and asymptomatic individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease: a paired, cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, D A; Kotseva, K; Connolly, S; Jennings, C; Mead, A; Jones, J; Holden, A; De Bacquer, D; Collier, T; De Backer, G; Faergeman, O

    2008-06-14

    Our aim was to investigate whether a nurse-coordinated multidisciplinary, family-based preventive cardiology programme could improve standards of preventive care in routine clinical practice. In a matched, cluster-randomised, controlled trial in eight European countries, six pairs of hospitals and six pairs of general practices were assigned to an intervention programme (INT) or usual care (UC) for patients with coronary heart disease or those at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The primary endpoints-measured at 1 year-were family-based lifestyle change; management of blood pressure, lipids, and blood glucose to target concentrations; and prescription of cardioprotective drugs. Analysis was by intention to treat. The trial is registered as ISRCTN 71715857. 1589 and 1499 patients with coronary heart disease in hospitals and 1189 and 1128 at high risk were assigned to INT and UC, respectively. In patients with coronary heart disease who smoked in the month before the event, 136 (58%) in the INT and 154 (47%) in the UC groups did not smoke 1 year afterwards (difference in change 10.4%, 95% CI -0.3 to 21.2, p=0.06). Reduced consumption of saturated fat (196 [55%] vs 168 [40%]; 17.3%, 6.4 to 28.2, p=0.009), and increased consumption of fruit and vegetables (680 [72%] vs 349 [35%]; 37.3%, 18.1 to 56.5, p=0.004), and oily fish (156 [17%] vs 81 [8%]; 8.9%, 0.3 to 17.5, p=0.04) at 1 year were greatest in the INT group. High-risk individuals and partners showed changes only for fruit and vegetables (p=0.005). Blood-pressure target of less than 140/90 mm Hg was attained by both coronary (615 [65%] vs 547 [55%]; 10.4%, 0.6 to 20.2, p=0.04) and high-risk (586 [58%] vs 407 [41%]; 16.9%, 2.0 to 31.8, p=0.03) patients in the INT groups. Achievement of total cholesterol of less than 5 mmol/L did not differ between groups, but in high-risk patients the difference in change from baseline to 1 year was 12.7% (2.4 to 23.0, p=0.02) in favour of INT. In the hospital group

  3. Depression and coronary heart disease: recommendations for screening, referral, and treatment: a science advisory from the American Heart Association Prevention Committee of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing, Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, and Interdisciplinary Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research: endorsed by the American Psychiatric Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtman, Judith H; Bigger, J Thomas; Blumenthal, James A; Frasure-Smith, Nancy; Kaufmann, Peter G; Lespérance, François; Mark, Daniel B; Sheps, David S; Taylor, C Barr; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2008-10-21

    Depression is commonly present in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and is independently associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Screening tests for depressive symptoms should be applied to identify patients who may require further assessment and treatment. This multispecialty consensus document reviews the evidence linking depression with CHD and provides recommendations for healthcare providers for the assessment, referral, and treatment of depression.

  4. MID TERM RESULTS AFTER OPEN HEART SURGERY IN HEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS AWAITING KIDNEY TRANSPLANT: DOES CARDIOVASCULAR SURGICAL INTERVENTION PRIOR TO TRANSPLANTATION PROLONG SURVIVAL?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, C; Sever, K; Demirhan, O; Mansuroglu, D; Kurtoglu, N; Ugurlucan, M; Sevmis, S; Karakayali, H

    2015-12-01

    - group, whereas the length of follow up was significantly higher in the Tp+ group. The use of inotropic agents was significantly higher in the Tp- group. A logistic regression analysis was made to determine the factors affecting mortality. Revision (p=0.013), blood transfusion (p=0.017), ventilation time (p=0.019), and length of stay in the intensive care unit (p=0.009) were found as predictors of mortality. Survival rates at years 1, 2 and 3 were 86.1%, 81%, 77.5% in the Tp- group, and 96.0%, 96.3%, 90.4% in the Tp+ group. Median survival rate was 41.35±2.02 in the Tp- group, and 49.64±1.59 in the Tp+ group which was significantly higher compared to the Tp- group (p=0.048). Chronic renal failure is among the perioperative risk factors for patients undergoing open heart surgery. Transplantation is still an important health issue due to insufficiency of available transplant organs. Patients with chronic renal failure are well known to have higher risks for coronary artery disease. A radical solution of the cardiovascular system problems prior to kidney transplantation seems to have a significant contribution to the post transplant survival.

  5. Rules versus ideas in landscape protection : is a Green Heart attack imminent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korthals Altes, W.K.

    2017-01-01

    Landscape protection in metropolitan areas is an ongoing activity that lies outside the remit of political office-holders. As political agendas change, the importance of landscape protection on strategic planning agendas may also change. This paper raises the question whether this strategic level

  6. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) activates STAT3 to protect against de novo acute heart failure (AHF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Gaurang P; Imamdin, Aqeela; Lecour, Sandrine; Opie, Lionel H

    2018-03-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a burden disease, with high mortality and re-hospitalisations. Using an ex-vivo model of AHF, we have previously reported that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) confers cardioprotection. However, the mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we aimed to examine the role of the cardioprotective signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in S1P mediated improved functional recovery in AHF. Isolated hearts from male Long-Evans rats were subjected to hypotensive AHF for 35 min followed by a recovery phase of 30 min (n ≥ 4/group). S1P (10 nM) was given during either the hypotensive or the recovery phase with/without an inhibitor of STAT3, AG490. Functional parameters were recorded throughout the experiment. Following an AHF insult, S1P, given during the recovery phase, improved the heart rate (HR) compared to the control (175.2 ± 30.7 vs. 71.6 ± 27.4 beats per minute (BPM); p S1P abolished the cardioprotective effect of S1P (42.3 ± 17.1 vs. 148.8 ± 26.4 BPM for S1P; p S1P protects in an ex-vivo rat heart model of AHF by activation of STAT3 and provide further evidence for the usage of S1P as a potential therapy in patients suffering from AHF. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Protective effects of dexrazoxane against acute ischaemia/reperfusion injury of rat hearts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neckář, Jan; Boudíková, Adéla; Mandíková, Petra; Štěrba, M.; Popelová, O.; Mikšík, Ivan; Dabrowská, L.; Mráz, J.; Geršl, V.; Kolář, František

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 9 (2012), s. 1303-1310 ISSN 0008-4212 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAAX01110901; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0416 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : heart * dexrazoxane * ischaemia * reperfusion * infarct size * arrhythmias * cardioprotection * reactive oxygen species Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 1.556, year: 2012

  8. Widening access to cardiovascular healthcare: community screening among ethnic minorities in inner-city Britain – the Healthy Hearts Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey Inessa

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD in Britain is concentrated in inner-city areas such as Sandwell, which is home to a diverse multi-ethnic population. Current guidance for CVD risk screening is not established, nor are there specific details for ethnic minorities. Given the disparity in equitable healthcare for these groups, we developed a 'tailored' and systematic approach to CVD risk screening within communities of the Sandwell locality. The key anticipated outcomes were the numbers of participants from various ethnic backgrounds attending the health screening events and the prevalence of known and undiagnosed CVD risk within ethnic groups. Methods Data was collected during 10 health screening events (September 2005 and July 2006, which included an assessment of raised blood pressure, overweight, hyperlipidaemia, impaired fasting glucose, smoking habit and the 10 year CVD risk score. Specific features of our approach included (i community involvement, (ii a clinician who could deliver immediate attention to adverse findings, and (iii the use of an interpreter. Results A total of 824 people from the Sandwell were included in this study (47% men, mean age 47.7 years from community groups such as the Gujarati Indian, Punjabi Indian, European Caucasian, Yemeni, Pakistani and Bangladeshi. A total of 470 (57% individuals were referred to their General Practitioner with a report of an increased CVD score – undetected high blood pressure in 120 (15%, undetected abnormal blood glucose in 70 (8%, undetected raised total cholesterol in 149 (18%, and CVD risk management review in 131 (16%. Conclusion Using this systematic and targeted approach, there was a clear demand for this service from people of various ethnic backgrounds, of whom, one in two needed review from primary or secondary healthcare. Further work is required to assess the accuracy and clinical benefits of this community health screening approach.

  9. Psoriasis and risk of heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Usman; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Psoriasis is a common inflammatory disease that is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, including myocardial infarction. Heart failure (HF) is independently associated with several cardiovascular risk factors and is a major cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality...

  10. The Relationship between Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure and Cardiovascular Disease and the Potential Modifying Effect of Diet in a Prospective Cohort among American Indians: The Strong Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Rajkumar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available American Indians experience high rates of cardiovascular diseases (CVD. Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS has been linked to CVD, possibly due to pro-inflammatory and oxidative stress pathways. We examined the relationship between self-reported exposure to ETS and fatal and nonfatal CVD incidence using Cox proportional hazards models among 1843 non-smoking American Indians participating in the Strong Heart Study. We also evaluated potential modifying effects of several dietary nutrients high in anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties with ETS exposure on fatal and nonfatal CVD by creating interaction terms between ETS exposure and the dietary variable. Participants exposed to ETS had a higher hazard (hazard ratio: 1.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 1.44 for developing CVD compared to persons not exposed. Interaction analyses suggested stronger effects of ETS on CVD incidence among those consuming diets lower in vitamin E as compared to those consuming higher amounts, particularly on the additive scale. Additional research is recommended to clarify whether public health prevention strategies should simultaneously target reductions in ETS exposures and improvements in diets that may exceed the expected benefits of targeting these risk factors separately.

  11. Resting heart rate associates with one-year risk of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndrome after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao-Li; Wang, Cheng-Long; Wang, Pei-Li; Xu, Hao; Du, Jian-Peng; Zhang, Da-Wu; Gao, Zhu-Ye; Zhang, Lei; Fu, Chang-Geng; Chen, Ke-Ji; Shi, Da-Zhuo

    2016-03-01

    The study was to access the association between resting heart rate (RHR) and one-year risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Patients with ACS after PCI (n = 808) were prospectively followed-up for MACE. RHR was obtained from electrocardiogram. MACE was defined as a composite of cardiac death, nonfatal recurrent myocardial infarction, ischemic-driven revascularization, and ischemic stroke. The association between RHR and one-year risk of MACE was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression model. Compared with patients with RHR >76 bpm, the adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) was 0.51 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0.23-1.14; P = 0.100) for patients with RHR 76 bpm were at higher risk of MACE during one-year follow-up compared with patients with RHR 61-76 bpm. An elevated RHR ≥ 61 bpm was associated with increased risk of one-year MACE in ACS patients. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  12. Effect of Natriuretic Peptide-Guided Therapy on Hospitalization or Cardiovascular Mortality in High-Risk Patients With Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felker, G Michael; Anstrom, Kevin J; Adams, Kirkwood F; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Fiuzat, Mona; Houston-Miller, Nancy; Januzzi, James L; Mark, Daniel B; Piña, Ileana L; Passmore, Gayle; Whellan, David J; Yang, Hongqiu; Cooper, Lawton S; Leifer, Eric S; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; O'Connor, Christopher M

    2017-08-22

    The natriuretic peptides are biochemical markers of heart failure (HF) severity and predictors of adverse outcomes. Smaller studies have evaluated adjusting HF therapy based on natriuretic peptide levels ("guided therapy") with inconsistent results. To determine whether an amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP)-guided treatment strategy improves clinical outcomes vs usual care in high-risk patients with HF and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The Guiding Evidence Based Therapy Using Biomarker Intensified Treatment in Heart Failure (GUIDE-IT) study was a randomized multicenter clinical trial conducted between January 16, 2013, and September 20, 2016, at 45 clinical sites in the United States and Canada. This study planned to randomize 1100 patients with HFrEF (ejection fraction ≤40%), elevated natriuretic peptide levels within the prior 30 days, and a history of a prior HF event (HF hospitalization or equivalent) to either an NT-proBNP-guided strategy or usual care. Patients were randomized to either an NT-proBNP-guided strategy or usual care. Patients randomized to the guided strategy (n = 446) had HF therapy titrated with the goal of achieving a target NT-proBNP of less than 1000 pg/mL. Patients randomized to usual care (n = 448) had HF care in accordance with published guidelines, with emphasis on titration of proven neurohormonal therapies for HF. Serial measurement of NT-proBNP testing was discouraged in the usual care group. The primary end point was the composite of time-to-first HF hospitalization or cardiovascular mortality. Prespecified secondary end points included all-cause mortality, total hospitalizations for HF, days alive and not hospitalized for cardiovascular reasons, the individual components on the primary end point, and adverse events. The data and safety monitoring board recommended stopping the study for futility when 894 (median age, 63 years; 286 [32%] women) of the planned 1100 patients had been enrolled with

  13. Dietary patterns and cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents and young adults: the Northern Ireland Young Hearts Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCourt, Hannah J; Draffin, Claire R; Woodside, Jayne V; Cardwell, Chris R; Young, Ian S; Hunter, Steven J; Murray, Liam J; Boreham, Colin A; Gallagher, Alison M; Neville, Charlotte E; McKinley, Michelle C

    2014-11-28

    Dietary pattern (DP) analysis allows examination of the combined effects of nutrients and foods on the markers of CVD. Very few studies have examined these relationships during adolescence or young adulthood. Traditional CVD risk biomarkers were analysed in 12-15-year-olds (n 487; Young Hearts (YH)1) and again in the same individuals at 20-25 years of age (n 487; YH3). Based on 7 d diet histories, in the present study, DP analysis was performed using a posteriori principal component analysis for the YH3 cohort and the a priori Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) was calculated for both YH1 and YH3 cohorts. In the a posteriori DP analysis, YH3 participants adhering most closely to the 'healthy' DP were found to have lower pulse wave velocity (PWV) and homocysteine concentrations, the 'sweet tooth' DP were found to have increased LDL concentrations, and decreased HDL concentrations, [corrected] the 'drinker/social' DP were found to have lower LDL and homocysteine concentrations, but exhibited a trend towards a higher TAG concentration, and finally the 'Western' DP were found to have elevated homocysteine and HDL concentrations. In the a priori dietary score analysis, YH3 participants adhering most closely to the Mediterranean diet were found to exhibit a trend towards a lower PWV. MDS did not track between YH1 and YH3, and nor was there a longitudinal relationship between the change in the MDS and the change in CVD risk biomarkers. In conclusion, cross-sectional analysis revealed that some associations between DP and CVD risk biomarkers were already evident in the young adult population, namely the association between the healthy DP (and the MDS) and PWV; however, no longitudinal associations were observed between these relatively short time periods.

  14. Blockade of Inflammation and Apoptosis Pathways by siRNA Prolongs Cold Preservation Time and Protects Donor Hearts in a Porcine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Wei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In donor hearts from mini pigs, overtime cold preservation and ischemia-reperfusion injury cause poor graft quality and impaired heart function. Blockage of complement, apoptosis, and inflammation is considered a strategy for attenuating ischemia-reperfusion injury and protecting cardiac function. Minipig donor hearts were perfused and preserved in Celsior solution or transfection reagent containing Celsior solution with scramble siRNA or siRNAs targeting complement 3, caspase-8, caspase-3, and nuclear factor κB-p65 genes at 4°C and subsequently hemo-reperfused ex vivo (38°C or transplanted into recipients. The protective effect of the siRNA solution was evaluated by measuring cell apoptosis, structural alteration, protein markers for tissue damage and oxidative stress, and cardiac function. We found a reduction in cell apoptosis, myocardial damage, and tissue inflammation by reduced biochemistry and markers and protein expression of proinflammatory cytokines and improvement in cardiac function, as shown by the improved hemodynamic indices in 12-hr-preserved siRNA-treated hearts of both ex vivo and orthotopic transplantation models. These findings demonstrate that blockade of inflammation and apoptosis pathways using siRNA can prolong cold preservation time and better protect donor heart function in cardiac transplantation of large animals, which may be beneficial for human heart preservation.

  15. MicroRNA-150 protects the mouse heart from ischaemic injury by regulating cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yaoping; Wang, Yongchao; Park, Kyoung-mi; Hu, Qiuping; Teoh, Jian-peng; Broskova, Zuzana; Ranganathan, Punithavathi; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Li, Jie; Su, Huabo; Tang, Yaoliang; Ramesh, Ganesan; Kim, Il-man

    2015-01-01

    Aims Cardiac injury is accompanied by dynamic changes in the expression of microRNAs (miRs). For example, miR-150 is down-regulated in patients with acute myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, dilated and ischaemic cardiomyopathy as well as in various mouse heart failure (HF) models. Circulating miR-150 has been recently proposed as a better biomarker of HF than traditional clinical markers such as brain natriuretic peptide. We recently showed using the β-arrestin-biased β-blocker, carvedilol that β-arrestin1-biased β1-adrenergic receptor cardioprotective signalling stimulates the processing of miR-150 in the heart. However, the potential role of miR-150 in ischaemic injury and HF is unknown. Methods and results Here, we show that genetic deletion of miR-150 in mice causes abnormalities in cardiac structural and functional remodelling after MI. The cardioprotective roles of miR-150 during ischaemic injury were in part attributed to direct repression of the pro-apoptotic genes egr2 (zinc-binding transcription factor induced by ischaemia) and p2x7r (pro-inflammatory ATP receptor) in cardiomyocytes. Conclusion These findings reveal a pivotal role for miR-150 as a regulator of cardiomyocyte survival during cardiac injury. PMID:25824147

  16. Surgical outcomes in native valve infectious endocarditis: the experience of the Cardiovascular Surgery Department - Cluj-Napoca Heart Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Adrian; Muresan, Ioan; Trifan, Catalin; Pop, Dana; Sacui, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of Duke's criteria and the improvement of imaging methods has lead to an earlier and a more accurate diagnosis of infectious endocarditis (IE). The options for the best therapeutic approach and the timing of surgery are still a matter of debate and require a close colaboration between the cardiologist, the infectionist and the cardiac surgeon. We undertook a retrospective, descriptive study, spanning over a period of five years (from January 1st, 2007 to December 31st, 2012), on 100 patients who underwent surgery for native valve infectious endocarditis in our unit. The patients' age varied between 13 and 77 years (with a mean of 54 years), of which 85 were males (85%). The main microorganisms responsible for IE were: Streptococcus Spp. (21 cases - 21%), Staphylococcus Spp. (15 cases - 15%), and Enterococcus Spp. (9 cases - 9%). The potential source of infection was identified in 26 patients (26%), with most cases being in the dental area (16 cases - 16%). The lesions caused by IE were situated in the left heart in 96 patients (96%), mostly on the aortic valve (50 cases - 50%). In most cases (82%) we found preexisting endocardial lesions which predisposed to the development of IE, most of them being degenerative valvular lesions (38 cases - 38%). We performed the following surgical procedures: surgery on a single valve - aortic valve replacement (40 cases), mitral valve replacement (19 cases), mitral valve repair (1 case), surgery on more than one valve - mitral and aortic valve replacement (20 cases), aortic and tricuspid valve replacement (1 case), aortic valve replacement with a mechanical valve associated with mitral valve repair (5 cases), aortic valve replacement with a biological valve associated with mitral valve repair (2 cases), and mitral valve replacement with a mechanical valve combined with De Vega procedure on the tricuspid valve (1 case). In 5 patients (5%) the bacteriological examination of valve pieces excised during surgery was

  17. Surgical outcomes in native valve infectious endocarditis: the experience of the Cardiovascular Surgery Department – Cluj-Napoca Heart Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOLNAR, ADRIAN; MURESAN, IOAN; TRIFAN, CATALIN; POP, DANA; SACUI, DIANA

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims The introduction of Duke’s criteria and the improvement of imaging methods has lead to an earlier and a more accurate diagnosis of infectious endocarditis (IE). The options for the best therapeutic approach and the timing of surgery are still a matter of debate and require a close colaboration between the cardiologist, the infectionist and the cardiac surgeon. Methods We undertook a retrospective, descriptive study, spanning over a period of five years (from January 1st, 2007 to December 31st, 2012), on 100 patients who underwent surgery for native valve infectious endocarditis in our unit. Results The patients’ age varied between 13 and 77 years (with a mean of 54 years), of which 85 were males (85%). The main microorganisms responsible for IE were: Streptococcus Spp. (21 cases – 21%), Staphylococcus Spp. (15 cases – 15%), and Enterococcus Spp. (9 cases – 9%). The potential source of infection was identified in 26 patients (26%), with most cases being in the dental area (16 cases – 16%). The lesions caused by IE were situated in the left heart in 96 patients (96%), mostly on the aortic valve (50 cases – 50%). In most cases (82%) we found preexisting endocardial lesions which predisposed to the development of IE, most of them being degenerative valvular lesions (38 cases – 38%). We performed the following surgical procedures: surgery on a single valve - aortic valve replacement (40 cases), mitral valve replacement (19 cases), mitral valve repair (1 case), surgery on more than one valve – mitral and aortic valve replacement (20 cases), aortic and tricuspid valve replacement (1 case), aortic valve replacement with a mechanical valve associated with mitral valve repair (5 cases), aortic valve replacement with a biological valve associated with mitral valve repair (2 cases), and mitral valve replacement with a mechanical valve combined with De Vega procedure on the tricuspid valve (1 case). In 5 patients (5%) the bacteriological

  18. Factors influencing the relation between alcohol and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbaek, Morten

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Light-to-moderate alcohol intake is known to have cardioprotective properties in some subsets of the population. This review focuses on factors that modify the relation between alcohol and cardiovascular disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Several large American studies have shown...... to a binge - intake of alcohol have benefits with regard to cardiovascular disease. Prospective studies from the UK, Sweden and Denmark have further suggested that wine drinkers have a lower mortality than beer and spirits drinkers. SUMMARY: The J-shaped relation between alcohol intake and cardiovascular...... that the J-shaped relation is influenced by age and coronary heart disease risk-factor status since only middle-aged and elderly and those already at risk of developing coronary heart disease seem protected by drinking alcohol. It has also been suggested that only those who have a steady - in contrast...

  19. Serum Potassium Levels and Outcome in Acute Heart Failure (Data from the PROTECT and COACH Trials).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, Jasper; Ter Maaten, Jozine M; Damman, Kevin; O'Connor, Christopher M; Metra, Marco; Dittrich, Howard C; Ponikowski, Piotr; Teerlink, John R; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth; Cleland, John G F; Givertz, Michael M; Bloomfield, Daniel M; van der Wal, Martje H L; Jaarsma, Tiny; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Hillege, Hans L; Voors, Adriaan A; van der Meer, Peter

    2017-01-15

    Serum potassium is routinely measured at admission for acute heart failure (AHF), but information on association with clinical variables and prognosis is limited. Potassium measurements at admission were available in 1,867 patients with AHF in the original cohort of 2,033 patients included in the Patients Hospitalized with acute heart failure and Volume Overload to Assess Treatment Effect on Congestion and Renal FuncTion trial. Patients were grouped according to low potassium (5.0 mEq/l) levels. Results were verified in a validation cohort of 1,023 patients. Mean age of patients was 71 ± 11 years, and 66% were men. Low potassium was present in 115 patients (6%), normal potassium in 1,576 (84%), and high potassium in 176 (9%). Potassium levels increased during hospitalization (0.18 ± 0.69 mEq/l). Patients with high potassium more often used angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists before admission, had impaired baseline renal function and a better diuretic response (p = 0.005), independent of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist usage. During 180-day follow-up, a total of 330 patients (18%) died. Potassium levels at admission showed a univariate linear association with mortality (hazard ratio [log] 2.36, 95% confidence interval 1.07 to 5.23; p = 0.034) but not after multivariate adjustment. Changes of potassium levels during hospitalization or potassium levels at discharge were not associated with outcome after multivariate analysis. Results in the validation cohort were similar to the index cohort. In conclusion, high potassium levels at admission are associated with an impaired renal function but a better diuretic response. Changes in potassium levels are common, and overall levels increase during hospitalization. In conclusion, potassium levels at admission or its change during hospitalization are not associated with mortality after multivariate adjustment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc

  20. Gender-specific research for emergency diagnosis and management of ischemic heart disease: proceedings from the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference Cardiovascular Research Workgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Basmah; Nagurney, John T; Anise, Ayodola; DeVon, Holli A; D'Onofrio, Gail; Hess, Erik P; Hollander, Judd E; Legato, Mariane J; McGregor, Alyson J; Scott, Jane; Tewelde, Semhar; Diercks, Deborah B

    2014-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cause of death for both men and women. However, over the years, emergency physicians, cardiologists, and other health care practitioners have observed varying outcomes in men and women with symptomatic CAD. Women in general are 10 to 15 years older than men when they develop CAD, but suffer worse postinfarction outcomes compared to age-matched men. This article was developed by the cardiovascular workgroup at the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference to identify sex- and gender-specific gaps in the key themes and research questions related to emergency cardiac ischemia care. The workgroup had diverse stakeholder representation from emergency medicine, cardiology, critical care, nursing, emergency medical services, patients, and major policy-makers in government, academia, and patient care. We implemented the nominal group technique to identify and prioritize themes and research questions using electronic mail, monthly conference calls, in-person meetings, and Web-based surveys between June 2013 and May 2014. Through three rounds of nomination and refinement, followed by an in-person meeting on May 13, 2014, we achieved consensus on five priority themes and 30 research questions. The overarching themes were as follows: 1) the full spectrum of sex-specific risk as well as presentation of cardiac ischemia may not be captured by our standard definition of CAD and needs to incorporate other forms of ischemic heart disease (IHD); 2) diagnosis is further challenged by sex/gender differences in presentation and variable sensitivity of cardiac biomarkers, imaging, and risk scores; 3) sex-specific pathophysiology of cardiac ischemia extends beyond conventional obstructive CAD to include other causes such as microvascular dysfunction, takotsubo, and coronary artery dissection, better recognized as IHD; 4) treatment and prognosis are influenced by sex-specific variations in biology, as well as patient

  1. Accelerated cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the mouse heart using self-gated parallel imaging strategies does not compromise accuracy of structural and functional measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörries Carola

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-gated dynamic cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR enables non-invasive visualization of the heart and accurate assessment of cardiac function in mouse models of human disease. However, self-gated CMR requires the acquisition of large datasets to ensure accurate and artifact-free reconstruction of cardiac cines and is therefore hampered by long acquisition times putting high demands on the physiological stability of the animal. For this reason, we evaluated the feasibility of accelerating the data collection using the parallel imaging technique SENSE with respect to both anatomical definition and cardiac function quantification. Results Findings obtained from accelerated data sets were compared to fully sampled reference data. Our results revealed only minor differences in image quality of short- and long-axis cardiac cines: small anatomical structures (papillary muscles and the aortic valve and left-ventricular (LV remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI were accurately detected even for 3-fold accelerated data acquisition using a four-element phased array coil. Quantitative analysis of LV cardiac function (end-diastolic volume (EDV, end-systolic volume (ESV, stroke volume (SV, ejection fraction (EF and LV mass in healthy and infarcted animals revealed no substantial deviations from reference (fully sampled data for all investigated acceleration factors with deviations ranging from 2% to 6% in healthy animals and from 2% to 8% in infarcted mice for the highest acceleration factor of 3.0. CNR calculations performed between LV myocardial wall and LV cavity revealed a maximum CNR decrease of 50% for the 3-fold accelerated data acquisition when compared to the fully-sampled acquisition. Conclusions We have demonstrated the feasibility of accelerated self-gated retrospective CMR in mice using the parallel imaging technique SENSE. The proposed method led to considerably reduced acquisition times, while preserving high

  2. Plausible mechanisms explaining the association of periodontitis with cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loos, B.G.; Teeuw, W.J.; Nicu, E.A.; Lynge Petersen, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The association between periodontitis and cardiovascular diseases is now well established. Cardiovascular diseases include atherosclerosis, coronary heart (artery) disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral artery disease. Atherosclerosis is the underlying pathology of cardiovascular diseases.

  3. SIRT1 gene is associated with cardiovascular disease in the Iranian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sirtuins (SIRT) have recently been identified as the pivotal regulators of lifespan and health. SIRT1 has protective effects against cardiovascular disease (CVD) and through its deacetylase activity it regulates numerous essential pathways including regulating blood pressure, reducing atherosclerosis, heart ...

  4. Twelve-Year Follow-Up of American Women’s Awareness of Cardiovascular Disease Risk and Barriers to Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Lori; Mochari-Greenberger, Heidi; Dolor, Rowena J.; Newby, L. Kristin; Robb, Karen J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Awareness of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk has been linked to taking preventive action in women. The purpose of this study was to assess contemporary awareness of CVD risk and barriers to prevention in a nationally representative sample of women and to evaluate trends since 1997 from similar triennial surveys. Methods and Results A standardized survey about awareness of CVD risk was completed in 2009 by 1142 women ≥25 years of age, contacted through random digit dialing oversampled for racial/ethnic minorities, and by 1158 women contacted online. There was a significant increase in the proportion of women aware that CVD is the leading cause of death since 1997 (P for trend=<0.0001). Awareness among telephone participants was greater in 2009 compared with 1997 (54% versus 30%, P<0.0001) but not different from 2006 (57%). In multivariate analysis, African American and Hispanic women were significantly less aware than white women, although the gap has narrowed since 1997. Only 53% of women said they would call 9-1-1 if they thought they were having symptoms of a heart attack. The majority of women cited therapies to prevent CVD that are not evidence-based. Common barriers to prevention were family/caretaking responsibilities (51%) and confusion in the media (42%). Community-level changes women thought would be helpful were access to healthy foods (91%), public recreation facilities (80%), and nutrition information in restaurants (79%). Conclusions Awareness of CVD as the leading cause of death among women has nearly doubled since 1997 but is stabilizing and continues to lag in racial/ethnic minorities. Numerous misperceptions and barriers to prevention persist and women strongly favored environmental approaches to facilitate preventive action. PMID:20147489

  5. Hypertensive heart disease versus hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: multi-parametric cardiovascular magnetic resonance discriminators when end-diastolic wall thickness ≥ 15 mm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Jonathan C.L. [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, NIHR Bristol Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Department, Bristol Heart Institute (United Kingdom); University of Bristol, School of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences (United Kingdom); Rohan, Stephen [University of Bristol, Medical School, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry (United Kingdom); Ghosh Dastidar, Amardeep; Harries, Iwan; Lawton, Christopher B. [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, NIHR Bristol Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Department, Bristol Heart Institute (United Kingdom); Ratcliffe, Laura E.; Burchell, Amy E.; Nightingale, Angus K. [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, CardioNomics Research Group, Clinical Research and Imaging Centre, Bristol Heart Institute (United Kingdom); Hart, Emma C.; Paton, Julian F.R. [University of Bristol, School of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences (United Kingdom); University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, CardioNomics Research Group, Clinical Research and Imaging Centre, Bristol Heart Institute (United Kingdom); Hamilton, Mark C.K. [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Bristol Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom); Manghat, Nathan E. [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, NIHR Bristol Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Department, Bristol Heart Institute (United Kingdom); University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Bristol Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    European guidelines state left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic wall thickness (EDWT) ≥15 mm suggests hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), but distinguishing from hypertensive heart disease (HHD) is challenging. We identify cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) predictors of HHD over HCM when EDWT ≥15 mm. 2481 consecutive clinical CMRs between 2014 and 2015 were reviewed. 464 segments from 29 HCM subjects with EDWT ≥15 mm but without other cardiac abnormality, hypertension or renal impairment were analyzed. 432 segments from 27 HHD subjects with EDWT ≥15 mm but without concomitant cardiac pathology were analyzed. Magnitude and location of maximal EDWT, presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), LV asymmetry (>1.5-fold opposing segment) and systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve (SAM) were measured. Multivariate logistic regression was performed. Significance was defined as p<0.05. HHD and HCM cohorts were age-/gender-matched. HHD had significantly increased indexed LV mass (110±27 g/m{sup 2} vs. 91±31 g/m{sup 2}, p=0.016) but no difference in site or magnitude of maximal EDWT. Mid-wall LGE was significantly more prevalent in HCM. Elevated indexed LVM, mid-wall LGE and absence of SAM were significant multivariate predictors of HHD, but LV asymmetry was not. Increased indexed LV mass, absence of mid-wall LGE and absence of SAM are better CMR discriminators of HHD from HCM than EDWT ≥15 mm. circle Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is often diagnosed with end-diastolic wall thickness ≥15 mm. (orig.)

  6. Hypertensive heart disease versus hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: multi-parametric cardiovascular magnetic resonance discriminators when end-diastolic wall thickness ≥ 15 mm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Jonathan C.L.; Rohan, Stephen; Ghosh Dastidar, Amardeep; Harries, Iwan; Lawton, Christopher B.; Ratcliffe, Laura E.; Burchell, Amy E.; Nightingale, Angus K.; Hart, Emma C.; Paton, Julian F.R.; Hamilton, Mark C.K.; Manghat, Nathan E.

    2017-01-01

    European guidelines state left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic wall thickness (EDWT) ≥15 mm suggests hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), but distinguishing from hypertensive heart disease (HHD) is challenging. We identify cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) predictors of HHD over HCM when EDWT ≥15 mm. 2481 consecutive clinical CMRs between 2014 and 2015 were reviewed. 464 segments from 29 HCM subjects with EDWT ≥15 mm but without other cardiac abnormality, hypertension or renal impairment were analyzed. 432 segments from 27 HHD subjects with EDWT ≥15 mm but without concomitant cardiac pathology were analyzed. Magnitude and location of maximal EDWT, presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), LV asymmetry (>1.5-fold opposing segment) and systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve (SAM) were measured. Multivariate logistic regression was performed. Significance was defined as p<0.05. HHD and HCM cohorts were age-/gender-matched. HHD had significantly increased indexed LV mass (110±27 g/m"2 vs. 91±31 g/m"2, p=0.016) but no difference in site or magnitude of maximal EDWT. Mid-wall LGE was significantly more prevalent in HCM. Elevated indexed LVM, mid-wall LGE and absence of SAM were significant multivariate predictors of HHD, but LV asymmetry was not. Increased indexed LV mass, absence of mid-wall LGE and absence of SAM are better CMR discriminators of HHD from HCM than EDWT ≥15 mm. circle Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is often diagnosed with end-diastolic wall thickness ≥15 mm. (orig.)

  7. Prehypertension and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Children and Adolescents Participating in the Community-Based Prevention Education Program Family Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Gerda-Maria; Bertsch, Thomas; Schwandt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background: Because prehypertension identifies children most at risk for the development of future hypertensive disease, the purpose of this study was, to examine the association of prehypertension with risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a large sample of youths participating in the community-based prevention education program family heart study. Methods: We estimated blood pressure and body mass index (BMI) for age and the lipid profile in terms of total cholesterol (TC), low-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), non-HDL-C, triglycerides (TG) and the LDL-C to HDL-C ratio. Results: Among 10,841 (5,628 males) children and adolescents 1,587 (14.6%) had prehypertension (85th to 95th percentile) youth. The prevalence of dyslipidemia was similar in prehypertensive boys and girls in terms of LDL-C 11.2% versus 11.8%, non HDL-C 11.9% versus 14.3%, TG 2.4% versus 2.7% and for low HDL-C 2.1% versus 2.3%. The prevalence of low HDL-C increased from 2.1% in non-overweight, through 3.9% in overweight to 5.2% in obese youth and of elevated TG from 1.2% via 4.5% to 6.5% respectively. The number of risk factors is affected by BMI. Significant associations between prehypertension and CVD risk factors were observed in boys and girls for overweight/obesity odds ratios (OR 2.0/2.4), for hypertriglyceridemia (OR 1.9/2.0), for high non HDL-C (OR 1.4/1.4) and for elevated LDL-C (OR 1.3/1.1). Conclusions: Prehypertension was significantly associated with overweight, obesity and dyslipidemia in 10,841 children and adolescents. PMID:24791192

  8. Methionine-supplemented diet affects the expression of cardiovascular disease-related genes and increases inflammatory cytokines in mice heart and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aissa, Alexandre Ferro; Amaral, Catia Lira do; Venancio, Vinicius Paula; Machado, Carla da Silva; Hernandes, Lívia Cristina; Santos, Patrick Wellington da Silva; Curi, Rui; Bianchi, Maria de Lourdes Pires; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi

    2017-01-01

    Some important environmental factors that influence the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) include tobacco, excess alcohol, and unhealthy diet. Methionine obtained from the diet participates in the synthesis of DNA, proteins, lipids and affects homocysteine levels, which is associated with the elevated risk for CVD development. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the manner in which dietary methionine might affect cellular mechanisms underlying CVD occurrence. Swiss albino mice were fed either control (0.3% DL-methionine), methionine-supplemented (2% DL-methionine), or a methionine-deprived diet (0% DL-methionine) over a 10-week period. The parameters measured included plasma homocysteine concentrations, oxidative stress by reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio, levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-1ß, TNF-α, and IL-6, as well as expression of genes associated with CVD. The levels of apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5), a regulator of plasma triglycerides, were measured. The methionine-supplemented diet increased oxidative stress by lowering the GSH/GSSG ratio in heart tissues and decreased expression of the genes Apob, Ctgf, Serpinb2, Spp1, Il1b, and Sell, but elevated expression of Thbs4, Tgfb2, Ccr1, and Vegfa. Methionine-deprived diet reduced expression of Col3a1, Cdh5, Fabp3, Bax, and Hbegf and increased expression of Sell, Ccl5, Itga2, Birc3, Msr1, Bcl2a1a, Il1r2, and Selp. Methionine-deprived diet exerted pro-inflammatory consequences as evidenced by elevated levels of cytokines IL-1ß, TNF-α, and IL-6 noted in liver. Methionine-supplemented diet increased hepatic IL-6 and cardiac TNF-α. Both methionine supplementation and deprivation lowered hepatic levels of APOA5. In conclusion, data demonstrated that a methionine-supplemented diet modulated important biological processes associated with high risk of CVD development.

  9. A cross-sectional study of the relationship between job demand-control, effort-reward imbalance and cardiovascular heart disease risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderberg Mia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This cross-sectional study explored relationships between psychosocial work environment, captured by job demand-control (JDC and effort-reward imbalance (ERI, and seven cardiovascular heart disease (CHD risk factors in a general population. Method The sampled consists of randomly-selected men and women from Gothenburg, Sweden and the city’s surrounding metropolitan areas. Associations between psychosocial variables and biomarkers were analysed with multiple linear regression adjusted for age, smoking, education and occupational status. Results The study included 638 men and 668 women aged 24–71. Analysis between JDC and CHD risk factors illustrated that, for men, JDC was associated with impaired scores in several biomarkers, especially among those in high strain jobs. For women, there were no relationships between JDC and biomarkers. In the analysis of links between ERI and CHD risk factors, most associations tested null. The only findings were raised triglycerides and BMI among men in the fourth quartile of the ERI-ratio distribution, and lowered LDL-cholesterol for women. An complementary ERI analysis, combining high/low effort and reward into categories, illustrated lowered triglycerides and elevated HDL-cholesterol values among women reporting high efforts and high rewards, compared to women experiencing low effort and high reward. Conclusions There were some associations between psychosocial stressors and CHD risk factors. The cross-sectional design did not allow conclusions about causality but some results indicated gender differences regarding sensitivity to work stressors and also how the models might capture different psychosocial dimensions.

  10. Insomnia with Objective Short Sleep Duration and Risk of Incident Cardiovascular Disease and All-Cause Mortality: Sleep Heart Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertisch, Suzanne M; Pollock, Benjamin D; Mittleman, Murray A; Buysse, Daniel J; Bazzano, Lydia A; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Redline, Susan

    2018-03-07

    To quantify the association between insomnia/poor sleep with objective short sleep and incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in the general population. We conducted a time-to-event analysis of Sleep Heart Health Study data. Questionnaires and at-home polysomnography were performed between 1994 -1998. Participants were followed for a median 11.4 years (Q1-Q3, 8.8-12.4 years) until death or last contact. The primary exposure was insomnia or poor sleep with short sleep defined as: difficulty falling asleep, difficulty returning to sleep, early morning awakenings, or sleeping pill use, 16-30 nights/month; and total sleep insomnia/poor sleep with short sleep and CVD, as well as all-cause mortality. Among 4,994 participants (mean age 64.0 ± 11.1 years), 14.1% reported insomnia or poor sleep, of which 50.3% slept insomnia/poor sleep with short sleep group compared with the reference group (HR, 1.29, 95% CI, 1.00, 1.66), but neither the insomnia/poor sleep only nor short sleep only groups were associated with higher incident CVD. Insomnia/poor sleep with objective short sleep was not significantly associated with all-cause mortality (HR, 1.07, 95% CI, 0.86, 1.33). Insomnia/poor sleep with PSG-short sleep was associated with higher risk of incident CVD. Future studies should evaluate the impact of interventions to improve insomnia with PSG-short sleep on CVD.

  11. Heart rate reserve predicts cardiovascular death among physically unfit but otherwise healthy middle-aged men: a 35-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeseth, Kristian; Hodnesdal, Christian; Grundvold, Irene; Liestøl, Knut; Gjesdal, Knut; Erikssen, Gunnar; Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Erikssen, Jan E; Bodegard, Johan; Skretteberg, Per Torger

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate reserve (HRR) has been reported to be inversely associated with cardiovascular (CV) disease and death. The impact of physical fitness (PF) on this relationship has not, however, been described in detail. We investigated how different levels of PF influenced the association between HRR and CV death during a 35-year follow-up. HRR and PF were measured in 2014 apparently healthy, middle-aged men during a symptom-limited bicycle exercise test in 1972-75. The men were divided into tertiles (T1-T3) by age-adjusted HRR. Morbidity and mortality data were registered from hospital charts through 2007 and the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Adjusted Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate risks. Incidence of CV death was 528 (26%) during median 30 years of follow-up. Men with the lowest HRR had 41% (HR 1.41 [1.14-1.75]) increased risk of CV death compared with the men with the highest. We found a significant interaction between age-adjusted PF and HRR. After stratifying the men by PF, results were statistically significant only among men with the lowest PF, where the men with lowest HRR had a 70% (HR 1.70 [1.12-2.67]) increased risk of CV death compared with the men with the highest. Low HRR was independently associated with increased risk of CV death in apparently healthy, middle-aged men. The predictive impact of HRR on CV death risk was, however, confined to unfit men. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  12. Prehypertension and cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents participating in the community-based prevention education program family heart study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerda-Maria Haas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Because prehypertension identifies children most at risk for the development of future hypertensive disease, the purpose of this study was, to examine the association of prehypertension with risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD in a large sample of youths participating in the community-based prevention education program family heart study. Methods: We estimated blood pressure and body mass index (BMI for age and the lipid profile in terms of total cholesterol (TC, low-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C, high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C, non-HDL-C, triglycerides (TG and the LDL-C to HDL-C ratio. Results: Among 10,841 (5,628 males children and adolescents 1,587 (14.6% had prehypertension (85 th to 95 th percentile youth. The prevalence of dyslipidemia was similar in prehypertensive boys and girls in terms of LDL-C 11.2% versus 11.8%, non HDL-C 11.9% versus 14.3%, TG 2.4% versus 2.7% and for low HDL-C 2.1% versus 2.3%. The prevalence of low HDL-C increased from 2.1% in non-overweight, through 3.9% in overweight to 5.2% in obese youth and of elevated TG from 1.2% via 4.5% to 6.5% respectively. The number of risk factors is affected by BMI. Significant associations between prehypertension and CVD risk factors were observed in boys and girls for overweight/obesity odds ratios (OR 2.0/2.4, for hypertriglyceridemia (OR 1.9/2.0, for high non HDL-C (OR 1.4/1.4 and for elevated LDL-C (OR 1.3/1.1. Conclusions: Prehypertension was significantly associated with overweight, obesity and dyslipidemia in 10,841 children and adolescents.

  13. Machine learning based analysis of cardiovascular images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterink, JM

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), including coronary artery disease (CAD) and congenital heart disease (CHD) are the global leading cause of death. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow non-invasive imaging of cardiovascular structures. This thesis presents machine

  14. The protective effect of curcumin against sodium fluoride-induced oxidative stress in rat heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabavi S.F.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study the cardioprotective effects of curcumin, a herbal polyphenolic compound, against sodium fluoride (NaF-induced toxicity in rat heart was evaluated. Fifty rats were divided into five experimental groups containing 10 rats each. Group I received standard water and diet and was used as a normal group; groups II and III were pretreated with curcumin intraperitoneally for 7 days prior to NaF intoxication. Group IV was pretreated with vitamin C, a standard antioxidant, intraperitoneally for 7 days prior to NaF intoxication and used as a positive control group. The animals in group V were intoxicated with NaF for the same time and used as a control group. There was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation along with a decrease in superoxide dismutase activity in the homogenates of tissues of the NaF-treated animals. Curcumin pretreatment in animals prior to fluoride intoxication normalized the levels of biochemical parameters measured.

  15. Heart failure in women and men during acute coronary syndrome and long-term cardiovascular mortality (the ABC-3* Study on Heart Disease) (*Adria, Bassano, Conegliano, and Padova Hospitals).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Giuseppe; Cordiano, Rocco; Cavuto, Fiorella; Bagato, Francesco; Pellegrinet, Marco; Cati, Arianna

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the gender-based differences in the association between heart failure (HF) during acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and post-discharge, long-term cardiovascular (CV) mortality. The present study included 557 patients enrolled in three intensive coronary care units and discharged alive. HF during ACS was evaluated by Killip class and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Interaction between gender and HF after 15years of follow up was studied using Cox models including a formal interaction term. Median age was 67 (interquartile range [IQR], 59-75) years, 29% were females, 37% had non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and 32% Killip class>1, and median LVEF was 53% (IQR 46-61). All but five patients were followed up to 15years, representing 5332 person-years. Of these, 40.2% died of CV-related causes. Crude CV mortality rate was higher among women (52.2%) than men (35.3%; Pcoronary reperfusion, the interaction was significant across all models [HR=0.63 (0.42-0.95), P=0.02 in the fully adjusted model]. LVEF showed no significant hazard associated with female gender on univariable analysis [HR=1.4 (0.9-0.2.0), P=0.11] but did so in all adjusted models [HR=1.7 (1.2-2.5), P=0.005 in the fully adjusted model]. Gender is a consistent, independent effect modifier in the association between HF and long-term CV mortality after ACS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment-resistant hypertension and the incidence of cardiovascular disease and end-stage renal disease: results from the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntner, Paul; Davis, Barry R; Cushman, William C; Bangalore, Sripal; Calhoun, David A; Pressel, Sara L; Black, Henry R; Kostis, John B; Probstfield, Jeffrey L; Whelton, Paul K; Rahman, Mahboob

    2014-11-01

    Apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (aTRH) is defined as uncontrolled hypertension despite the use of ≥3 antihypertensive medication classes or controlled hypertension while treated with ≥4 antihypertensive medication classes. Although a high prevalence of aTRH has been reported, few data are available on its association with cardiovascular and renal outcomes. We analyzed data on 14 684 Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) participants to determine the association between aTRH (n=1870) with coronary heart disease, stroke, all-cause mortality, heart failure, peripheral artery disease, and end-stage renal disease. We defined aTRH as blood pressure not at goal (systolic/diastolic blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg) while taking ≥3 classes of antihypertensive medication or taking ≥4 classes of antihypertensive medication with blood pressure at goal during the year 2 ALLHAT study visit (1996-2000). Use of a diuretic was not required to meet the definition of aTRH. Follow-up occurred through 2002. The multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) comparing participants with versus without aTRH were as follows: coronary heart disease (1.44 [1.18-1.76]), stroke (1.57 [1.18-2.08]), all-cause mortality (1.30 [1.11-1.52]), heart failure (1.88 [1.52-2.34]), peripheral artery disease (1.23 [0.85-1.79]), and end-stage renal disease (1.95 [1.11-3.41]). aTRH was also associated with the pooled outcomes of combined coronary heart disease (hazard ratio, 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-1.71) and combined cardiovascular disease (hazard ratio, 1.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-1.64). These results demonstrate that aTRH increases the risk for cardiovascular disease and end-stage renal disease. Studies are needed to identify approaches to prevent aTRH and reduce risk for adverse outcomes among individuals with aTRH. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Protective effect of yerba mate intake on the cardiovascular system: a post hoc analysis study in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Veiga, D T A; Bringhenti, R; Copes, R; Tatsch, E; Moresco, R N; Comim, F V; Premaor, M O

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases is increased in postmenopausal women, which contributes to the burden of illnesses in this period of life. Yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis) is a native bush from Southern South America. Its leaves are rich in phenolic components, which may have antioxidant, vasodilating, hypocholesterolemic, and hypoglycemic proprieties. This post hoc analysis of the case-control study nested in the Obesity and Bone Fracture Cohort evaluated the consumption of yerba mate and the prevalence of hypertension, dyslipidemia, and coronary diseases in postmenopausal women. Ninety-five postmenopausal women were included in this analysis. A questionnaire was applied to evaluate the risk factors and diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases and consumption of yerba mate infusion. Student's t-test and chi-square test were used to assess significant differences between groups. The group that consumed more than 1 L/day of mate infusion had significantly fewer diagnoses of coronary disease, dyslipidemia, and hypertension (P<0.049, P<0.048, and P<0.016, respectively). Furthermore, the serum levels of glucose were lower in the group with a higher consumption of yerba mate infusion (P<0.013). The serum levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides were similar between the groups. This pragmatic study points out the benefits of yerba mate consumption for the cardiovascular and metabolic systems. The ingestion of more than 1 L/day of mate infusion was associated with fewer self-reported cardiovascular diseases and lower serum levels of glucose. Longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate the association between yerba mate infusion and reduction of cardiovascular diseases in postmenopausal women.

  18. Protective Effect of Carvacrol Against Oxidative Stress and Heart Injury in Cyclophosphamide-Induced Cardiotoxicity in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songul Cetik

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Possible protective effects of carvacrol (Car against cyclophosphamide (CP-induced cardiotoxicity was examined in this study. Experimental groups of the rats were randomly divided into 13 groups,each including seven animals: Group 1 (control treated with saline; groups 2, 3, and 4 treated with 50, 100, or 150 mg/kg of CP, respectively; group 5 treated with 0.5 mL olive oil; groups 6 and 7 treated with 5.0 and 10 mg/kg of Car, respectively; groups 8, 9, or 10 treated with respective CP plus 5.0 mg/kg of Car; and groups 11, 12, or 13 treated with respective CP plus 10 mg/kg of Car. Serum alanine transaminase (ALT,aspartat transaminase (AST, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, malondialdehyde (MDA,creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB, total oxidant state (TOS, oxidative stress index (OSI, and levels were high only in the CP groups. There was a dose-dependence on the CP-induced cardiotoxicity. Hemorrhage, inflammatory cell infiltration and the separation of the muscle fibers in the heart tissue supported the biochemical data. With 5.0 and 10 mg/kg Car, there was an important decrease in the CP toxicity and this was related to the oxidative and nitrosative stress in the CP-induced cardiotoxicity. Reduced inflammation and lipid peroxidation in the heart tissue and increase of serum glutathione (GSH and total antioxidant capacity (TAS levels were found when carvacrol was applied. Based on these findings, it could be proposed that Car was a strong candidate in preventing the CP-induced cardiotoxicity but further clinical studies should be done in order to verify its application on humans.

  19. Atlantic salmon endothelial cells from the heart were more susceptible than fibroblasts from the bulbus arteriosus to four RNA viruses but protected from two viruses by dsRNA pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Phuc H; Tong, Winnie W L; Misk, Ehab; Jones, Ginny; Lumsden, John S; Bols, Niels C

    2017-11-01

    Heart diseases caused by viruses are major causes of Atlantic salmon aquaculture loss. Two Atlantic salmon cardiovascular cell lines, an endothelial cell line (ASHe) from the heart and a fibroblast cell line (BAASf) from the bulbus arteriosus, were evaluated for their response to four fish viruses, CSV, IPNV, VHSV IVa and VHSV IVb, and the innate immune agonist, double-stranded RNA mimic poly IC. All four viruses caused cytopathic effects in ASHe and BAASf. However, ASHe was more susceptible to all four viruses than BAASf. When comparing between the viruses, ASHe cells were found to be moderately susceptible to CSV and VHSV IVb, but highly susceptible to IPNV and VHSV IVa induced cell death. All four viruses were capable of propagating in the ASHe cell line, leading to increases in virus titre over time. In BAASf, CSV and IPNV produced more than one log increase in titre from initial infection, but VHSV IVb and IVa did not. When looking at the antiviral response of both cell lines, Mx proteins were induced in ASHe and BAASf by poly IC. All four viruses induced Mx proteins in BAASf, while only CSV and VHSV IVb induced Mx proteins in ASHe. IPNV and VHSV IVa suppressed Mx proteins expression in ASHe. Pretreatment of ASHe with poly IC to allow for Mx proteins accumulation protected the culture from subsequent infections with IPNV and VHSV IVa, resulting in delayed cell death, reduced virus titres and reduced viral proteins expression. These data suggest that endothelial cells potentially can serve as points of infections for viruses in the heart and that two of the four viruses, IPNV and VHSV IVa, have mechanisms to avoid or downregulate antiviral responses in ASHe cells. Furthermore, the high susceptibility of the ASHe cell line to IPNV and VHSV IVa can make it a useful tool for studying antiviral compounds against these viruses and for general detection of fish viruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiovascular Disease in Acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Morali D; Nguyen, Anh V; Brown, Spandana; Robbins, Richard J

    2017-01-01

    In patients with acromegaly, chronic excess of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) leads to the development of acromegalic cardiomyopathy. Its main features are biventricular hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction, and in later stages, systolic dysfunction and congestive heart failure. Surgical and/or pharmacological treatment of acromegaly and control of cardiovascular risk factors help reverse some of these pathophysiologic changes and decrease the high risk of cardiovascular complications.

  1. Myocardium protection of cardiomyopeptide for injection against ischemia-reperfusion injury during open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Min; Zhang Baimin; Zhang Xiuhe; Jiang Yizhong; Li Huijun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the myocardium protection of cardiomyopeptide for injection against ischemia-reperfusion injury during open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods: Thirty patients scheduled for elective cardiac valvular replacement were divided into two groups. In treatment group (n=15), cardiomyopeptide for injection was used during CPB; but in control group (n=15), no cardiomyopeptide for injection was used. Blood samples were drawn from the radial artery at the following time points: before CPB (T0); at release of aortic declamping (T1); 30 min after aortic declamping (T2); 12 h after aortic declamping(T3); 24 h after aortic declamping (T4). The levels of creatine phosphokinase isoenzyme (CK-MB), cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in plasma were measured. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) was used to measure the concentration of tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) in plasma. Ejection fraction (EF) was measured at the 7th day after operation. Results: The levels of CK-MB, cTnI, and TNF-α in plasma in two groups showed no difference before CPB (P>0.05). The levels of CK-MB and TNF-α in two groups were significantly increased 30 min after aortic declamping than release of aortic declamping (P<0.05). The levels of CK-MB and TNF-α in plasma in treatment group were significantly lower than those in control group 30 min, 12 h and 24 h after aortic declamping (P<0.05). The plasma concentrations of cTnI in two groups were significantly increased at release of aortic declamping (P<0.05). The concentrations of cTnI in treatment group were significantly lower than those in control group at T1, T2, T3, T4 (P<0.05). EF in treatment group was significantly higher than that in control group at the 7th day after operation (P<0.05). Conclusion: Cardiomyopeptide for injection can protect myocardium and reduce the acute inflammatory response during CPB and improve heart function after operation. (authors)

  2. Histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution with added ebselen augments myocardial protection in neonatal porcine hearts undergoing ischemia/reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Liu, Jinping; Li, Shoujun; Yan, Fuxia; Xue, Qinghua; Wang, Huiying; Sun, Peng; Long, Cun

    2015-02-01

    Whether modified histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK) solution offers myocardial protection to newborn heart has not been documented. The purpose of this study was to compare myocardial protection using HTK added by ebselen with HTK in a piglet model of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Fifteen piglets were randomly assigned to three groups: the control group (C group, n = 5), HTK solution group (HTK group, n = 5), and HTK added by 10 nM ebselen group (HTK+E group, n = 5). Animals in the two experimental groups were placed on hypothermic CPB, after which the ascending aorta had been clamped for 2 h. The control animals underwent normothermic CPB without cardiac arrest. Myocardial antioxidant activities, myocytes apoptosis and mitochondrial structures, as well as the release of cytochrome c and the expression of Bax, Bcl-2, and HSP72 protein in myocardium were measured. Increased myocardial superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Mn-SOD activities, decreased TUNEL-positive cells, and reduced release of cytochrome c were noted in the HTK+E group compared with those in the HTK group (P = 0.021, P = 0.020, P = 0.045, and P = 0.010, respectively). The Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in the HTK group was significantly higher than that in the C group (P = 0.024). The expression of HSP72 protein and mRNA in the HTK+E group was higher than that in the HTK group (P = 0.039 and P = 0.035, respectively). Mitochondrial score under electron microscope in the HTK+E group was lower than that in the HTK group (P = 0.047). Improved antioxidant defense, reduced myocytes apoptosis, and better preserved mitochondrial structure were observed in the HTK+E group. Ebselen added to HTK provides better myocardioprotection to HTK solution for the neonatal heart. Copyright © 2014 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Protective effect of yerba mate intake on the cardiovascular system: a post hoc analysis study in postmenopausal women

    OpenAIRE

    da Veiga, D.T.A.; Bringhenti, R.; Copes, R.; Tatsch, E.; Moresco, R.N.; Comim, F.V.; Premaor, M.O.

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases is increased in postmenopausal women, which contributes to the burden of illnesses in this period of life. Yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis) is a native bush from Southern South America. Its leaves are rich in phenolic components, which may have antioxidant, vasodilating, hypocholesterolemic, and hypoglycemic proprieties. This post hoc analysis of the case-control study nested in the Obesity and Bone Fracture Cohort evaluated the consumpt...

  4. Pre-historic eating patterns in Latin America and protective effects of plant-based diets on cardiovascular risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio C. Acosta Navarro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we present the contributions to nutrition science from Latin American native peoples and scientists, appreciated from a historic point of view since pre-historic times to the modern age. Additionally, we present epidemiological and clinical studies on the area of plant-based diets and their relation with the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases conducted in recent decades, and we discuss challenges and perspectives regarding aspects of nutrition in the region

  5. Heart failure - palliative care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is available as a pill, liquid, or tablet that dissolves under the tongue. Your provider will ... RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  6. Reinforced chitosan-based heart valve scaffold and utility of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cardiovascular tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanna, Mohammad Zaki

    Recent research has demonstrated a strong correlation between the differentiation profile of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and scaffold stiffness. Chitosan is being widely studied for tissue engineering applications due to its biocompatibility and biodegradability. However, its use in load-bearing applications is limited due to moderate to low mechanical properties. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of a fiber reinforcement method for enhancing the mechanical properties of chitosan scaffolds. Chitosan fibers were fabricated using a solution extrusion and neutralization method and incorporated into porous chitosan scaffolds. The effects of different fiber/scaffold mass ratios, fiber mechanical properties and fiber lengths on scaffold mechanical properties were studied. The results showed that incorporating fibers improved scaffold strength and stiffness in proportion to the fiber/scaffold mass ratio. A fiber-reinforced heart valve leaflet scaffold achieved strength values comparable to the radial values of human pulmonary and aortic valves. Additionally, the effects of shorter fibers (2 mm) were found to be up to 3-fold greater than longer fibers (10 mm). Despite this reduction in fiber mechanical properties caused by heparin crosslinking, the heparin-modified fibers still improved the mechanical properties of the reinforced scaffolds, but to a lesser extent than the unmodified fibers. The results demonstrate that chitosan fiber-reinforcement can be used to generate tissue-matching mechanical properties in porous chitosan scaffolds and that fiber length and mechanical properties are important parameters in defining the degree of mechanical improvement. We further studied various chemical and physical treatments to improve the mechanical properties of chitosan fibers. With combination of chemical and physical treatments, fiber stiffness improved 40fold compared to unmodified fibers. We also isolated ovine bone marrow-derived MSCs and evaluated their

  7. Protective effects of long-term administration of Ziziphus jujuba fruit extract on cardiovascular responses in L-NAME hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebbati, Reza; Bavarsad, Kosar; Rahimi, Maryam; Rakhshandeh, Hasan; Khajavi Rad, Abolfazl; Shafei, Mohammad Naser

    2018-01-01

    Ziziphus jujuba stimulates the release of nitric oxide (NO). Because NO is involved in cardiovascular regulations, in this study the effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Z. jujuba on cardiovascular responses in acute NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) hypertensive rats were evaluated. Rats were divided into 6 group (n=6): 1) saline, 2) L-NAME received (10mg/kg) intravenously, 3) sodium nitroprusside (SNP) (50µg/kg)+L-NAME group received SNP before L-NAME and 4-6) three groups of Z. jujuba (100, 200 and 400mg/kg) that treated for four weeks and on the 28 th day, L-NAME was injected. Femoral artery and vein were cannulated for recording cardiovascular responses and drug injection, respectively. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded continuously. Maximal changes (∆) of SBP, MAP and HR were calculated and compared to control and L-NAME groups. In L-NAME group, maximal ΔSBP (L-NAME: 44.15±4.0 mmHg vs control: 0.71±2.1 mmHg) and ΔMAP (L-NAME: 40.8±4.0 mmHg vs control: 0.57±1.6 mmHg) significantly increased (p0.05). All doses of Z. jujuba attenuated maximal ∆SBP and ∆MAP induced by L-NAME but only the lowest dose (100 mg/kg) had significant effects (ΔSBP: 20.36±5.6 mmHg vs L-NAME: 44.1±4.0 mmHg and ΔMAP: 20.8±4.5 mmHg vs L-NAME: 40.8±3.8 mmHg (pL-NAME group (p>0.05). Because long-term consumption of Z. jujuba extract, especially its lowest dose, attenuated cardiovascular responses induced by L-NAME, we suggest that Z. jujuba has potential beneficial effects in prevention of hypertension induced by NO deficiency.

  8. Hypothesis: Low frequency heart rate variability (LF-HRV) is an input for undisclosed yet biological adaptive control, governing the cardiovascular regulations to assure optimal functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbay, Uri; Bobrovsky, Ben Zion

    2012-02-01

    Cardiovascular regulation is considered today as having three levels: autoregulations, neural regulations and hormonal regulations. We hypothesize that the cardiovascular regulation has an additional (fourth) control level which is outer, hierarchical (adaptive) loop where LF-HRV amplitude serves as a reference input which the neural cardiovascular center detects and responses in order to maintain LF-HRV around some prescribed level. Supporting evidences: LF-HRV absence during artificial cardiac pacing may be associated with "pacemaker syndrome" which had not been sufficiently understood regardless of apparently unimpaired cardiovascular performance. The hypothesis may provide an essential basis for understanding several cardiovascular morbidities and insight toward diagnostic measures and treatments (including but not limited to adding variability to the pulse generator of artificial pacemakers to eliminate "pace maker syndrome"). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Educational inequality in cardiovascular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Grethe; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Mortensen, Laust Hvas

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Educational inequality in diseases in the circulatory system (here termed cardiovascular disease) is well documented but may be confounded by early life factors. The aim of this observational study was to examine whether the associations between education and all cardiovascular diseases...... educational status was associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, ischaemic heart disease and stroke. All associations attenuated in the within-sibship analyses, in particular in the analyses on ischaemic heart disease before age 45 years. For instance, in the cohort analyses, the hazard rate...... factors shared by siblings explained the associations between education and the cardiovascular disease outcomes but to varying degrees. This should be taken into account when planning interventions aimed at reducing educational inequalities in the development of cardiovascular disease, ischaemic heart...

  10. [Thyroid and cardiovascular disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyśko, Dorota; Gajek, Jacek

    2004-05-01

    In this study three problems concerning interactions between thyroid and cardiovascular system are discussed. Cardiac arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, pleural effusion, hyperlipidaemia, arterial hypertension may be consequences of thyroid disorders leading to inappropriate hormone secretion. During such illnesses as heart failure, myocardial infarction and in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery profound changes may occur in thyroid hormone metabolism known as sick euthyroid syndrome. Treatment with amiodarone may lead to changes in thyroid tests results and to development of hypothyroidism or thyrotoxicosis.

  11. Sex differences in cardiovascular function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, František; Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 207, č. 4 (2013), s. 584-587 ISSN 1748-1708 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : heart * vascular * risk factors * sex Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 4.251, year: 2013

  12. Genetic risks for cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zafarmand, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD), which involves the heart, brain, and peripheral circulation, is a major health problem world-wide. The development of atherosclerosis is a complex process, and several established risk factors are involved. Nevertheless, these established risk factors

  13. Ghrelin protects the heart against ischemia/reperfusion injury via inhibition of TLR4/NLRP3 inflammasome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Lin, Ping; Li, Peng; Feng, Li; Ren, Qian; Xie, Xiaofeng; Xu, Jing

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cardioprotective effects of ghrelin against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and the underlying mechanism. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into Sham, I/R and I/R+ghrelin groups. After 30 minutes ischemia, ghrelin (8nmol/kg) was injected intraperitoneally at the time of reperfusion in the I/R+ghrelin group. Then hemodynamic parameters were observed at 24h after reperfusion. Ghrelin exhibited dramatic improvement in cardiac functions, as manifested by increased LVSP and ±dP/dt max and decreased LVDP. At 24h after reperfusion, ghrelin significantly attenuated the myocardial infarction area and apoptosis, accompanied with a decrease in the levels of the myocyte injury marker enzymes. Oxidative stress injury and inflammatory response were also relieved by ghrelin. Western blot showed that the expression of TLR4, NLRP3, and caspase-1 were obviously increased in I/R group, while ghrelin significantly inhibited the I/R-induced TLR4, NLRP3, and caspase-1 expression. Ghrelin could inhibit the increased protein levels of NLRP3, caspase-1, and IL-1β induced by lipopolysacharide in primary cultured cardiomyocytes of neonatal rats. Ghrelin protected the heart against I/R injury by inhibiting oxidative stress and inflammation via TLR4/NLRP3 signaling pathway. Our results might provide new strategy and target for treatment of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular cardiovascular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefers, M.

    2007-01-01

    Although huge and long-lasting research efforts have been spent on the development of new diagnostic techniques investigating cardiovascular diseases, still fundamental challenges exist; the main challenge being the diagnosis of a suspected or known coronary artery disease or its consequences (myocardial infarction, heart failure etc.). Beside morphological techniques, functional imaging modalities are available in clinical diagnostic algorithms, whereas molecular cardiovascular imaging techniques are still under development. This review summarizes clinical-diagnostical challenges of modern cardiovascular medicine as well as the potential of new molecular imaging techniques to face these. (orig.)

  15. [The influence of carbon dioxide baths differing in the total mineralization levels on the functional state of the cardiovascular system of the patients presenting with hypertensive disease associated with coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'vova, N V; Tupitsyna, Iu Iu; Badalov, N G; Krasnikov, V E; Lebedeva, O D

    2013-01-01

    The results of the study on the influence of carbon dioxide baths differing in the total mineralization levels on the clinical course of hypertensive disease associated with coronary heart disease and on various functional systems of the body. The data obtained provide an insight into the role of salt concentrations (10 and 20 g/l) in carbon dioxide bath water (1.2 g/l) applied for the traditional treatment of the patients with hypertensive disease associated with concomitant coronary heart disease and musculoskeletal pathology. Highly mineralized bath water has a greater influence on the functional state of the cardiovascular system by causing a more pronounced decrease in peripheral vascular resistance and hypotensive effect. Baths with a salt concentration of 20 g/l markedly reduced pain and had anti-inflammatory effect in the patients with pathology of support and locomotor organs.

  16. Influenza vaccines for preventing cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Clar

    and reported cardiovascular outcomes among their safety analyses; four trials (n = 1682 focused on prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with established coronary heart disease. These populations were analysed separately. Follow-up continued between 42 days and one year. Five RCTs showed deficits in at least three of the risk of bias criteria assessed. When reported (seven studies, vaccination provided adequate immunogenicity or protection against influenza. Cardiovascular mortality was reported by four secondary prevention trials and was significantly reduced by influenza vaccination overall (risk ratio (RR 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.26 to 0.76; P value 0.003 with no significant heterogeneity between studies, and by three trials reporting cardiovascular mortality as part of their safety analyses when the numbers of events were too small to permit conclusions. In studies of patients with coronary heart disease, composite outcomes of cardiovascular events tended to be decreased with influenza vaccination compared with placebo. Generally no significant difference was found between comparison groups regarding individual outcomes such as myocardial infarction.AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: In patients with cardiovascular disease, influenza vaccination may reduce cardiovascular mortality and combined cardiovascular events. However, studies had some risk of bias, and results were not always consistent, so additional higher-quality evidence is necessary to confirm these findings. Not enough evidence was available to establish whether influenza vaccination has a role to play in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  17. Influenza vaccines for preventing cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clar, Christine; Oseni, Zainab; Flowers, Nadine; Keshtkar-Jahromi, Maryam; Rees, Karen

    2015-05-05

    cardiovascular events in patients with established coronary heart disease. These populations were analysed separately. Follow-up continued between 42 days and one year. Five RCTs showed deficits in at least three of the risk of bias criteria assessed. When reported (seven studies), vaccination provided adequate immunogenicity or protection against influenza. Cardiovascular mortality was reported by four secondary prevention trials and was significantly reduced by influenza vaccination overall (risk ratio (RR) 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.26 to 0.76; P value 0.003) with no significant heterogeneity between studies, and by three trials reporting cardiovascular mortality as part of their safety analyses when the numbers of events were too small to permit conclusions. In studies of patients with coronary heart disease, composite outcomes of cardiovascular events tended to be decreased with influenza vaccination compared with placebo. Generally no significant difference was found between comparison groups regarding individual outcomes such as myocardial infarction. In patients with cardiovascular disease, influenza vaccination may reduce cardiovascular mortality and combined cardiovascular events. However, studies had some risk of bias, and results were not always consistent, so additional higher-quality evidence is necessary to confirm these findings. Not enough evidence was available to establish whether influenza vaccination has a role to play in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  18. A Heart-Healthy Diet: Recent Insights and Practical Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinu, Monica; Pagliai, Giuditta; Sofi, Francesco

    2017-08-24

    The purpose of this study is to review the current evidence on the relationship between diet and heart, giving practical recommendations for cardiovascular prevention. A heart-healthy diet should maximize the consumption of whole grains, vegetables, fruit, and legumes and discourage the consumption of meat and meat products as well as refined and processed foods. Plant-based diets fully meet these criteria, and the evidence supporting the protective effect of these dietary patterns evolved rapidly in recent years. Among plant-based diets, the Mediterranean and vegetarian diets gained the greater interest, having been associated with numerous health benefits such as reduced levels of traditional and novel risk factors and lower risk of cardiovascular disease. These positive effects may be explained by their high content of dietary fiber, complex carbohydrate, vitamins, minerals, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and phytochemicals. Current evidence suggests that both Mediterranean and vegetarian diets are consistently beneficial with respect to cardiovascular disease.

  19. Adding left atrial appendage closure to open heart surgery provides protection from ischemic brain injury six years after surgery independently of atrial fibrillation history: the LAACS randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park-Hansen, Jesper; Holme, Susanne J V; Irmukhamedov, Akhmadjon; Carranza, Christian L; Greve, Anders M; Al-Farra, Gina; Riis, Robert G C; Nilsson, Brian; Clausen, Johan S R; Nørskov, Anne S; Kruuse, Christina R; Rostrup, Egill; Dominguez, Helena

    2018-05-23

    Open heart surgery is associated with high occurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF), subsequently increasing the risk of post-operative ischemic stroke. Concomitant with open heart surgery, a cardiac ablation procedure is commonly performed in patients with known AF, often followed by left atrial appendage closure with surgery (LAACS). However, the protective effect of LAACS on the risk of cerebral ischemia following cardiac surgery remains controversial. We have studied whether LAACS in addition to open heart surgery protects against post-operative ischemic brain injury regardless of a previous AF diagnosis. One hundred eighty-seven patients scheduled for open heart surgery were enrolled in a prospective, open-label clinical trial and randomized to concomitant LAACS vs. standard care. Randomization was stratified by usage of oral anticoagulation (OAC) planned to last at least 3 months after surgery. The primary endpoint was a composite of post-operative symptomatic ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack or imaging findings of silent cerebral ischemic (SCI) lesions. During a mean follow-up of 3.7 years, 14 (16%) primary events occurred among patients receiving standard surgery vs. 5 (5%) in the group randomized to additional LAACS (hazard ratio 0.3; 95% CI: 0.1-0.8, p = 0.02). In per protocol analysis (n = 141), 14 (18%) primary events occurred in the control group vs. 4 (6%) in the LAACS group (hazard ratio 0.3; 95% CI: 0.1-1.0, p = 0.05). In a real-world setting, LAACS in addition to elective open-heart surgery was associated with lower risk of post-operative ischemic brain injury. The protective effect was not conditional on AF/OAC status at baseline. LAACS study, clinicaltrials.gov NCT02378116 , March 4th 2015, retrospectively registered.

  20. Effect of environmental air pollution on cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, S A; Suraya, F

    2015-12-01

    Environmental air pollution has become a leading health concern especially in the developing countries with more urbanization, industrialization and rapidly growing population. Prolonged exposure to air pollution is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of environmental air pollution on progression of cardiovascular problems. In this study, we identified 6880 published articles through a systematic database including ISI-Web of Science, PubMed and EMBASE. The allied literature was searched by using the key words such as environmental pollution, air pollution, particulate matter pollutants PM 2.5 μm-PM 10 μm. Literature in which environmental air pollution and cardiac diseases were discussed was included. Descriptive information was retrieved from the selected literature. Finally, we included 67 publications and remaining studies were excluded. Environmental pollution can cause high blood pressure, arrhythmias, enhanced coagulation, thrombosis, acute arterial vasoconstriction, atherosclerosis, ischemic heart diseases, myocardial infarction and even heart failure. Environmental air pollution is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Environmental pollution exerts its detrimental effects on the heart by developing pulmonary inflammation, systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and prothrombotic changes. Environmental protection officials must take high priority steps to minimize the air pollution to decrease the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Cardiovascular consequences of hormone therapy in postmenopausal women: Messages to clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylikorkala, O; Mikkola, T

    2005-03-01

    Results from the recent randomized clinical trials indicating that hormone therapy (HT) does not provide cardiovascular protection, but potentially harm are in profound disagreement with the sound evidence from numerous observational and experimental studies. While the observational studies have mainly assessed symptomatic recently menopausal women, the randomized trials have studied symptomless elderly postmenopausal women with established coronary heart disease or various risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Therefore, the recent trials have only revealed that HT does not provide secondary cardiovascular benefits. Since primary cardiovascular benefits of HT are rational but not yet proven in clinical trials, new studies are in demand. Until more data from recently menopausal symptomatic women are available, we need to base our decisions on existing evidence and good clinical practice. Although the potential of HT to provide cardiovascular benefits is decreased by advancing age and time since menopause, this should not preclude the use of individualized HT in younger postmenopausal women. (Reprod Med Biol 2005; 4 : 1- 6).

  2. Cardiovascular Physiology of Dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Roger S

    2016-11-01

    Cardiovascular function in dinosaurs can be inferred from fossil evidence with knowledge of how metabolic rate, blood flow rate, blood pressure, and heart size are related to body size in living animals. Skeletal stature and nutrient foramen size in fossil femora provide direct evidence of a high arterial blood pressure, a large four-chambered heart, a high aerobic metabolic rate, and intense locomotion. But was the heart of a huge, long-necked sauropod dinosaur able to pump blood up 9 m to its head? ©2016 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  3. Cardiovascular Ultrasound of Neonatal Long Evans Rats ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This abstract describes the use of a relatively new technology, cardiovascular ultrasound (echocardiography) for evaluating developmental toxicity affecting heart development. The abstract describes the effects of two known cardiac teratogens, trichloroacetic acid and dimethadione, and their effects as determined by echocardiography. This abstract describes the use and development of a relatively new technology, cardiovascular ultrasound (echocardiography) for evaluating developmental toxicity affecting heart development.

  4. Partial and weak oestrogenicity of the red wine constituent resveratrol: consideration of its superagonist activity in MCF-7 cells and its suggested cardiovascular protective effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, J; Tinwell, H; Pennie, W; Brooks, A N; Lefevre, P A; Beresford, N; Sumpter, J P

    1999-01-01

    It was recently reported that the red wine phytoestrogen resveratrol (RES) acts as a superagonist to oestrogen-responsive MCF-7 cells. This activity of RES was speculated to be relevant to the 'French paradox' in which moderate red wine consumption is reported to yield cardiovascular health benefits to humans. We report here that RES binds to oestrogen receptors (ER) isolated from rat uterus with an affinity approximately 5 orders of magnitude lower than does either the reference synthetic oestrogen diethylstilboestrol (DES) or oestradiol (E2). In comparison with E2 or DES, RES is only a weak and partial agonist in a yeast hER-alpha transcription assay and in cos-1 cell assays employing transient transfections of ER-alpha or ER-beta associated with two different ER-response elements. Resveratrol was also concluded to be inactive in immature rat uterotrophic assays conducted using three daily administrations of 0.03-120 mgkg(-1)/day(-1) RES (administered by either oral gavage or subcutaneous injection). These data weaken the suggestion that the oestrogenicity of RES may account for the reported cardiovascular protective effects of red wine consumption, and they raise questions regarding the extent to which oestrogenicity data derived for a chemical using MCF-7 cells (or any other single in vitro assay) can be used to predict the hormonal effects likely to occur in animals or humans.

  5. [Time of adhesion to the Family Health Strategy protects elderly against cardiovascular and cerebrovascular accidents in Florianópolis, 2003 to 2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, André Junqueira; dos Reis, Sandro Sedrez; Paulo, Elizabeth Machado; d'Orsi, Eleonora

    2008-01-01

    The Family Health Strategy (FHS) provides longitudinal follow-up and integrated healthcare. This study evaluated the influence of the time of adhesion to the FHS upon the incidence of cardiovascular and cerebral vascular accidents among the elderly enrolled in the CASSI-Florianópolis. The events were selected because of their high incidence, good notification and association with risk factors the FHS is able to modify. The longer the time of adhesion to the strategy the lower the incidence of these events, demonstrating the effectiveness of the FHS. A historical cohort study was conducted with 674 senior participants (60 or more years), registered between November/2003 and March/2007. The analysis used Student's T test, bivariate and multivariate analysis with logistic regression. The independent risk factors were: age over 80 years, (OR=3,44; CI 95%: 1,8-6,2), diabetes (OR=2,62; CI 95%: 1,4-4,7), hypertension (OR=1,68; CI 95%: 1,0-2,6) and physical inactivity (OR=2,06; CI 95%: 1,2-3,2). The study found no significant association between gender, dislipidemia, obesity, smoking, alcoholism and the studied events. The long time of adhesion to the FHS showed independent protective effect (OR=0,43; CI 95%: 0,2-0,8) after adjustment to earlier covariates, being effective in reducing the incidence of cardiovascular and cerebral vascular accidents among the enrolled population of elderly.

  6. Hypothyroidism and the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udovcic, Maja; Pena, Raul Herrera; Patham, Bhargavi; Tabatabai, Laila; Kansara, Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a commonly encountered clinical condition with variable prevalence. It has profound effects on cardiac function that can impact cardiac contractility, vascular resistance, blood pressure, and heart rhythm. With this review, we aim to describe the effects of hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism on the heart. Additionally, we attempt to briefly describe how hypothyroid treatment affects cardiovascular parameters. PMID:28740582

  7. Hypothyroidism and the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udovcic, Maja; Pena, Raul Herrera; Patham, Bhargavi; Tabatabai, Laila; Kansara, Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a commonly encountered clinical condition with variable prevalence. It has profound effects on cardiac function that can impact cardiac contractility, vascular resistance, blood pressure, and heart rhythm. With this review, we aim to describe the effects of hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism on the heart. Additionally, we attempt to briefly describe how hypothyroid treatment affects cardiovascular parameters.

  8. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor PKI-166 governs cardiovascular protection without beneficial effects on the kidney in hypertensive 5/6 nephrectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulu, Nadir; Mulder, Gemma M; Vavrinec, Peter; Landheer, Sjoerd W; Duman-Dalkilic, Basak; Gurdal, Hakan; Goris, Maaike; Duin, Marry; van Dokkum, Richard P E; Buikema, Hendrik; van Goor, Harry; Henning, Robert H

    2013-06-01

    Transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling by G protein-coupled receptors has been implicated in several cardiovascular (CV) conditions, including hypertension, heart failure, and cardiac and vascular hypertrophy. However, the therapeutic potential of EGFR inhibition in these conditions is currently unknown. The main objective of the present study was to investigate cardiac, vascular, and renal effects of EGFR inhibition by 4-[4-[[(1R)-1-phenylethyl]amino]-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-6-yl]phenol (PKI-166) in the hypertensive chronic kidney disease model. Rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6Nx) and were treated with PKI-166, lisinopril or vehicle from week 6 after disease induction until week 12. Sham animals received either PKI-166 or vehicle. Treatment with PKI-166 did not affect the development of the characteristic renal features in 5/6Nx, including proteinuria, diminished creatinine clearance, and increased glomerulosclerosis, whereas these were attenuated by lisinopril. Despite absence of effects on progressive renal damage, PKI-166 attenuated the progression of hypertension and maintained cardiac function (left ventricle end-diastolic pressure) to a similar extent as lisinopril. Also, PKI-166 attenuated the increase in phosphorylated EGFR in the heart as induced by 5/6Nx. Moreover, PKI-166 and lisinopril restored the impaired contraction of isolated thoracic aortic rings to phenylephrine and angiotensin II and impaired myogenic constriction of small mesenteric arteries in 5/6Nx rats. Blockade of the EGFR displays a CV benefit independent of limiting the progression of renal injury. Our findings extend the evidence on EGFR signaling as a target in CV disorders.

  9. Right Ventricular Volumes and Systolic Function by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and the Impact of Sex, Age, and Obesity in a Longitudinally Followed Cohort Free of Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Disease: The Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppa, Murilo; Arora, Garima; Gona, Philimon; Ashrafi, Arman; Salton, Carol J; Yeon, Susan B; Blease, Susan J; Levy, Daniel; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Manning, Warren J; Chuang, Michael L

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance is uniquely well suited for noninvasive imaging of the right ventricle. We sought to define normal cardiac magnetic resonance reference values and to identify the main determinants of right ventricular (RV) volumes and systolic function using a modern imaging sequence in a community-dwelling, longitudinally followed cohort free of clinical cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. The Framingham Heart Study Offspring cohort has been followed since 1971. We scanned 1794 Offspring cohort members using steady-state free precession cardiac magnetic resonance and identified a reference group of 1336 adults (64±9 years, 576 men) free of prevalent cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. RV trabeculations and papillary muscles were considered cavity volume. Men had greater RV volumes and cardiac output before and after indexation to body size (all Pheart rate account for most of the variability in RV volumes and function in this community-dwelling population. We report sex-specific normative values for RV measurements among principally middle-aged and older adults. RV ejection fraction is greater in women. RV volumes increase with body size, are greater in men, and are smaller in older people. Body surface area seems to be appropriate for indexation of cardiac magnetic resonance-derived RV volumes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Challenges in the management of cardiovascular emergencies in Sub-Saharan Africa: a case report of acute heart failure complicating infective endocarditis in a semi-urban setting in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkoke, Clovis; Teuwafeu, Denis; Nkouonlack, Cyrille; Abanda, Martin; Kouam, Wilfried; Mapina, Alice; Makoge, Christelle; Hamadou, Ba

    2018-04-25

    Infective endocarditis is a deadly disease if not promptly treated with antibiotics either in association with cardiac surgery or not. Cardiac complications are the most common complications seen in infective endocarditis. Heart failure remains the most common cause of mortality and the most common indication for cardiac surgery in patients with infective endocarditis which is increasingly available in resource limited settings. We report a case of native valve infective endocarditis of the aortic valve in a 27-year old female in a semi-urban setting in Cameroon complicated by severe aortic valve regurgitation and heart failure. She presented with a 2 month history of fever and a 2 weeks history of rapidly worsening shortness of breath. Eme