WorldWideScience

Sample records for cardiovascular engineering modelization

  1. Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truskey, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering offers the promise of biologically based repair of injured and damaged blood vessels, valves, and cardiac tissue. Major advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering over the past few years involve improved methods to promote the establishment and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), scaffolds from decellularized tissue that may produce more highly differentiated tissues and advance clinical translation, improved methods to promote vascularization, and novel in vitro microphysiological systems to model normal and diseased tissue function. iPSC technology holds great promise, but robust methods are needed to further promote differentiation. Differentiation can be further enhanced with chemical, electrical, or mechanical stimuli. PMID:27303643

  2. Cardiovascular system simulation in biomedical engineering education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, V. C.

    1972-01-01

    Use of complex cardiovascular system models, in conjunction with a large hybrid computer, in biomedical engineering courses. A cardiovascular blood pressure-flow model, driving a compartment model for the study of dye transport, was set up on the computer for use as a laboratory exercise by students who did not have the computer experience or skill to be able to easily set up such a simulation involving some 27 differential equations running at 'real time' rate. The students were given detailed instructions regarding the model, and were then able to study effects such as those due to septal and valve defects upon the pressure, flow, and dye dilution curves. The success of this experiment in the use of involved models in engineering courses was such that it seems that this type of laboratory exercise might be considered for use in physiology courses as an adjunct to animal experiments.

  3. Cardiovascular modeling and diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.; Hashem, S.; Kouzes, R.T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, a novel approach to modeling and diagnosing the cardiovascular system is introduced. A model exhibits a subset of the dynamics of the cardiovascular behavior of an individual by using a recurrent artificial neural network. Potentially, a model will be incorporated into a cardiovascular diagnostic system. This approach is unique in that each cardiovascular model is developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled variables and the variables of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis. This approach also exploits sensor fusion to optimize the utilization of biomedical sensors. The advantage of sensor fusion has been demonstrated in applications including control and diagnostics of mechanical and chemical processes.

  4. A CRISPR Path to Engineering New Genetic Mouse Models for Cardiovascular Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miano, Joseph M; Zhu, Qiuyu Martin; Lowenstein, Charles J

    2016-06-01

    Previous efforts to target the mouse genome for the addition, subtraction, or substitution of biologically informative sequences required complex vector design and a series of arduous steps only a handful of laboratories could master. The facile and inexpensive clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) method has now superseded traditional means of genome modification such that virtually any laboratory can quickly assemble reagents for developing new mouse models for cardiovascular research. Here, we briefly review the history of CRISPR in prokaryotes, highlighting major discoveries leading to its formulation for genome modification in the animal kingdom. Core components of CRISPR technology are reviewed and updated. Practical pointers for 2-component and 3-component CRISPR editing are summarized with many applications in mice including frameshift mutations, deletion of enhancers and noncoding genes, nucleotide substitution of protein-coding and gene regulatory sequences, incorporation of loxP sites for conditional gene inactivation, and epitope tag integration. Genotyping strategies are presented and topics of genetic mosaicism and inadvertent targeting discussed. Finally, clinical applications and ethical considerations are addressed as the biomedical community eagerly embraces this astonishing innovation in genome editing to tackle previously intractable questions. PMID:27102963

  5. Drug releasing systems in cardiovascular tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Spadaccio, Cristiano; Chello, Massimo; Trombetta, Marcella; Rainer, Alberto; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Genovese, Jorge A

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Heart disease and atherosclerosis are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The lack of suitable autologous grafts has produced a need for artificial grafts; however, current artificial grafts carry significant limitations, including thrombosis, infection, limited durability and the inability to grow. Tissue engineering of blood vessels, cardiovascular structures and whole organs is a promising approach for creating replacement tissues to repair congenital defects ...

  6. Modelling cardiovascular disease prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Alimadad, Azadeh

    2012-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cardiovascular disease (CVD), which sits under the chronic disease umbrella, is the number one cause of death globally. Over time, we have witnessed different trends that have influenced the prevalence of CVD. One of the ways of decreasing CVD and its social costs and global fatalities is through influencing preventable CVD risk factors. Though many risk factors such as age and gender are not preventable, there are several effective behaviours...

  7. Computational fluid dynamics modelling in cardiovascular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul D; Narracott, Andrew; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Hsiao, Sarah; Lungu, Angela; Evans, Paul; Bressloff, Neil W; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption and translation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling within cardiovascular medicine. CFD, a specialist area of mathematics and a branch of fluid mechanics, is used routinely in a diverse range of safety-critical engineering systems, which increasingly is being applied to the cardiovascular system. By facilitating rapid, economical, low-risk prototyping, CFD modelling has already revolutionised research and development of devices such as stents, valve prostheses, and ventricular assist devices. Combined with cardiovascular imaging, CFD simulation enables detailed characterisation of complex physiological pressure and flow fields and the computation of metrics which cannot be directly measured, for example, wall shear stress. CFD models are now being translated into clinical tools for physicians to use across the spectrum of coronary, valvular, congenital, myocardial and peripheral vascular diseases. CFD modelling is apposite for minimally-invasive patient assessment. Patient-specific (incorporating data unique to the individual) and multi-scale (combining models of different length- and time-scales) modelling enables individualised risk prediction and virtual treatment planning. This represents a significant departure from traditional dependence upon registry-based, population-averaged data. Model integration is progressively moving towards 'digital patient' or 'virtual physiological human' representations. When combined with population-scale numerical models, these models have the potential to reduce the cost, time and risk associated with clinical trials. The adoption of CFD modelling signals a new era in cardiovascular medicine. While potentially highly beneficial, a number of academic and commercial groups are addressing the associated methodological, regulatory, education- and service-related challenges. PMID:26512019

  8. Straining mode-dependent collagen remodeling in engineered cardiovascular tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubbens, M.P.; Mol, A.; Marion, M.H. van; Hanemaaijer, R.; Bank, R.A.; Baaijens, F.P.T.; Bouten, C.V.C.

    2009-01-01

    Similar to native cardiovascular tissues, the mechanical properties of engineered cardiovascular constructs depend on the composition and quality of the extracellular matrix, which is a net result of matrix remodeling processes within the tissue. To improve tissue remodeling, and hence tissue mechan

  9. Comprehensive cardiovascular modeling: cardiovascular and respiratory systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Gianfranco; Lazzari, Claudio,; Di Molfetta, Arianna; Fresiello, Libera

    2010-01-01

    This chapter illustrates the concept of comprehensive modeling applied to circulatory system. After giving some general indications, some details on comprehensive circulatory models are given. The description of artero-ventricular (A-V) and venous-atrial (V-A) interactions defines the general relationships between heart chambers and the circulatory network. In the last part of the chapter different ventricular, atrial and coronary circulation models are discussed. After that the general princ...

  10. Matriarchal model for cardiovascular prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, R A; Taylor, E L; Knehans, A; Cleaver, V

    1994-02-01

    Family patterns of cardiovascular risk behavior are well documented. Significant correlation exists between spouse-spouse, parent-child, and sibling-sibling for cholesterol, high- and low-density lipoprotein, diet, physical activity, and smoking. Family/environmental influences are important in how/if risk and/or preventive behavior is learned. The family matriarch commonly functions as gatekeeper, controlling eating behavior, access to health care, and other patterns. She often acts as menu planner, shopper, and preparer of meals for all family members. She provides information and verbal reinforcement about food and is a powerful model concerning dietary practices. In fact, the mother, as head of household in most single-parent families, may be the only adult model for many children. Because relevance and credibility are the most important characteristics of a behavioral model, parents (especially mothers) are strong models for observational learning by children. Risk factor information and risk reduction activities adopted by the matriarch can be generalized to the entire family if she learns the skills to act as a change agent. Initiation of this process of education and training the matriarch lies with primary care providers for women (Ob-Gyns see most women). By teaching risk reduction to the matriarch as a component of primary care, physician interaction can have a rippling effect. PMID:8164913

  11. Modelos experimentales de enfermedad cardiovascular Experimental models of cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gil Hernández

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo describe los modelos experimentales de utilidad clínica en el estudio de las enfermedades cardiovasculares y hace énfasis en los modelos usados para determinar los mecanismos fisiopatológicos de la aterosclerosis, así como para evaluar los efectos de productos nutricionales y farmacológicos sobre el desarrollo de este proceso inflamatorio complejo común a muchas enfermedades cardiovasculares. Se revisan los modelos animales en los que se puede inducir aterosclerosis por cambios en la composición de la dieta y los modelos animales en los que la alteración de uno o más genes (animales knock-out y knock-in, o la incorporación de genes foráneos de otras especies, da lugar a la aparición de hiperlipidemia con riesgo asociado de aparición de enfermedad cardiovascular temprana. Por otra parte, se consideran algunas de las líneas celulares más utilizadas en el estudio de los mecanismos moleculares de la aterogénesis y de evaluación de sustancias con interés nutricional o farmacológico.The present work describes clinically useful experimental models for the study of cardiovascular disease and emphasites the models used to determine the pathophysiologic mechanisms of atherosclerosis, as well as to evaluate the effects of nutritional and pharmacological products on the development of this complex inflammatory process present in many cardiovascular diseases. Animal models in which ahterosclerosis may be induced by dietary changes are reviewed, as well as those in which modification in one or more genes (knock-out and knock-in animals, or the incorporation of foreign genes from other species lead to early cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, some of the cell lines most frequently used in studying molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis and assessment of substances with nutritional or pharmacological interest are considered.

  12. Translational In Vivo Models for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliegner, Daniela; Gerdes, Christoph; Meding, Jörg; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are still the first leading cause of death and morbidity in developed countries. Experimental cardiology research and preclinical drug development in cardiology call for appropriate and especially clinically relevant in vitro and in vivo studies. The use of animal models has contributed to expand our knowledge and our understanding of the underlying mechanisms and accordingly provided new approaches focused on the improvement of diagnostic and treatment strategies of various cardiac pathologies.Numerous animal models in different species as well as in small and large animals have been developed to address cardiovascular complications, including heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, and thrombotic diseases. However, a perfect model of heart failure or other indications that reproduces every aspect of the natural disease does not exist. The complexity and heterogeneity of cardiac diseases plus the influence of genetic and environmental factors limit to mirror a particular disease with a single experimental model.Thus, drug development in the field of cardiology is not only very challenging but also inspiring; therefore animal models should be selected that reflect as best as possible the disease being investigated. Given the wide range of animal models, reflecting critical features of the human pathophysiology available nowadays increases the likelihood of the translation to the patients. Furthermore, this knowledge and the increase of the predictive value of preclinical models help us to find more efficient and reliable solutions as well as better and innovative treatment strategies for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26552402

  13. Model Systems for Cardiovascular Regenerative Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Garbern, Jessica C.; Mummery, Christine L.; Lee, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    There is an urgent clinical need to develop new therapeutic approaches to treat heart failure, but the biology of cardiovascular regeneration is complex. Model systems are required to advance our understanding of biological mechanisms of cardiac regeneration as well as to test therapeutic approaches to regenerate tissue and restore cardiac function following injury. An ideal model system should be inexpensive, easily manipulated, easily reproducible, physiologically representative of human di...

  14. Molecular Modeling Approach to Cardiovascular Disease Targetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Sekhar Akula,

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease, including stroke, is the leading cause of illness and death in the India. A number of studies have shown that inflammation of blood vessels is one of the major factors that increase the incidence of heart diseases, including arteriosclerosis (clogging of the arteries, stroke and myocardial infraction or heart attack. Studies have associated obesity and other components of metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular risk factors, with lowgradeinflammation. Furthermore, some findings suggest that drugs commonly prescribed to the lower cholesterol also reduce this inflammation, suggesting an additional beneficial effect of the stains. The recent development of angiotensin 11 (Ang11 receptor antagonists has enabled to improve significantly the tolerability profile of thisgroup of drugs while maintaining a high clinical efficacy. ACE2 is expressed predominantly in the endothelium and in renal tubular epithelium, and it thus may be an import new cardiovascular target. In the present study we modeled the structure of ACE and designed an inhibitor through using ARGUS lab and the validation of the Drug molecule is done basing on QSAR properties and Cache for this protein through CADD.

  15. Low oxygen concentrations impair tissue development in tissue-engineered cardiovascular constructs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlimmeren, M.A.A. van; Driessen-Mol, A.; Oomens, C.W.J.; Broek, M. van den; Stoop, R.; Bouten, C.V.C.; Baaijens, F.P.T.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering has shown considerable progress, but in vitro tissue conditioning to stimulate the development of a functional extracellular matrix still needs improvement. We investigated the environmental factor oxygen concentration for its potential to increase the amount of col

  16. Modeling of Cardiovascular Response to Weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, M. Keith

    1999-01-01

    pressure and, to a limited extent, in extravascular and pedcardial hydrostatic pressure were investigated. A complete hydraulic model of the cardiovascular system was built and flown aboard the NASA KC-135 and a computer model was developed and tested in simulated microgravity. Results obtained with these models have confirmed that a simple lack of hydrostatic pressure within an artificial ventricle causes a decrease in stroke volume. When combined with the acute increase in ventricular pressure associated with the elimination of hydrostatic pressure within the vasculature and the resultant cephalad fluid shift with the models in the upright position, however, stroke volume increased in the models. Imposition of a decreased pedcardial pressure in the computer model and in a simplified hydraulic model increased stroke volume. Physiologic regional fluid shifting was also demonstrated by the models. The unifying parameter characterizing of cardiac response was diastolic ventricular transmural pressure (DVDELTAP) The elimination of intraventricular hydrostatic pressure in O-G decreased DVDELTAP stroke volume, while the elimination of intravascular hydrostatic pressure increased DVDELTAP and stroke volume in the upright posture, but reduced DVDELTAP and stroke volume in the launch posture. The release of gravity on the chest wall and its associated influence on intrathoracic pressure, simulated by a drop in extraventricular pressure4, increased DVDELTAP ans stroke volume.

  17. Model Driven Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaševic, Dragan; Djuric, Dragan; Devedžic, Vladan

    A relevant initiative from the software engineering community called Model Driven Engineering (MDE) is being developed in parallel with the Semantic Web (Mellor et al. 2003a). The MDE approach to software development suggests that one should first develop a model of the system under study, which is then transformed into the real thing (i.e., an executable software entity). The most important research initiative in this area is the Model Driven Architecture (MDA), which is Model Driven Architecture being developed under the umbrella of the Object Management Group (OMG). This chapter describes the basic concepts of this software engineering effort.

  18. Adaptation and development of software simulation methodologies for cardiovascular engineering: present and future challenges from an end-user perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Zuccarini, V; Narracott, A J; Burriesci, G; Zervides, C; Rafiroiu, D; Jones, D; Hose, D R; Lawford, P V

    2009-07-13

    This paper describes the use of diverse software tools in cardiovascular applications. These tools were primarily developed in the field of engineering and the applications presented push the boundaries of the software to address events related to venous and arterial valve closure, exploration of dynamic boundary conditions or the inclusion of multi-scale boundary conditions from protein to organ levels. The future of cardiovascular research and the challenges that modellers and clinicians face from validation to clinical uptake are discussed from an end-user perspective. PMID:19487202

  19. Efficacy of Female Rat Models in Translational Cardiovascular Aging Research

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, K.M.; J. C. Fannin; Gillette, C.; E. R. Blough

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women in the United States. Aging is a primary risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease as well as cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality. Aging is a universal process that all humans undergo; however, research in aging is limited by cost and time constraints. Therefore, most research in aging has been done in primates and rodents; however it is unknown how well the effects of aging in rat models translate into h...

  20. Comparative Analysis of Parametric Engine Model and Engine Map Model

    OpenAIRE

    Zeeshan Ali Memon; Sadiq Ali Shah; Muhammas Saleh Jumani

    2015-01-01

    Two different engine models, parametric engine model and engine map model are employed to analyze the dynamics of an engine during the gear shifting. The models are analyzed under critical transitional manoeuvres to investigate their appropriateness for vehicle longitudinal dynamics. The simulation results for both models have been compared. The results show the engine map model matches well with the parametric model and can be used for the vehicle longitudinal dynamics model. The proposed ap...

  1. Exact Modeling of Cardiovascular System Using Lumped Method

    OpenAIRE

    Ghasemalizadeh, Omid; Mirzaee, Mohammad Reza; Firoozabadi, Bahar; Hassani, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    Electrical analogy (Lumped method) is an easy way to model human cardiovascular system. In this paper Lumped method is used for simulating a complete model. It describes a 36-vessel model and cardiac system of human body with details that could show hydrodynamic parameters of cardiovascular system. Also this paper includes modeling of pulmonary, atrium, left and right ventricles with their equivalent circuits. Exact modeling of right and left ventricles pressure increases the accuracy of our ...

  2. Model Driven Language Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Patrascoiu, Octavian

    2005-01-01

    Modeling is a most important exercise in software engineering and development and one of the current practices is object-oriented (OO) modeling. The Object Management Group (OMG) has defined a standard object-oriented modeling language the Unified Modeling Language (UML). The OMG is not only interested in modeling languages; its primary aim is to enable easy integration of software systems and components using vendor-neutral technologies. This thesis investigates the possibilities for designi...

  3. Numerical model of human cardiovascular system-Korotkoff's sound simulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maršík, František; Převorovská, Světlana; Štembera, Vítězslav

    Graz, Rakousko: Departments of Mathematics and Physiology University of Graz, 2003 - (Kappel, F.; Batzel, J.; Fink, M.; Schneditz, D.). s. 24 [Workshop on Cardiovascular, Respiratory and Metabolic Control Modeling. 11.06.2003-14.06.2003, Graz] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : cardiovascular system * Korotkoff's sound * numerical simulation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  4. A novel approach to modeling and diagnosing the cardiovascular system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, P.E.; Kangas, L.J.; Hashem, S.; Kouzes, R.T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Allen, P.A. [Life Link, Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-07-01

    A novel approach to modeling and diagnosing the cardiovascular system is introduced. A model exhibits a subset of the dynamics of the cardiovascular behavior of an individual by using a recurrent artificial neural network. Potentially, a model will be incorporated into a cardiovascular diagnostic system. This approach is unique in that each cardiovascular model is developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled variables and the variables of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis. This approach also exploits sensor fusion to optimize the utilization of biomedical sensors. The advantage of sensor fusion has been demonstrated in applications including control and diagnostics of mechanical and chemical processes.

  5. Principles of models based engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolin, R.M.; Hefele, J.

    1996-11-01

    This report describes a Models Based Engineering (MBE) philosophy and implementation strategy that has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Center for Advanced Engineering Technology. A major theme in this discussion is that models based engineering is an information management technology enabling the development of information driven engineering. Unlike other information management technologies, models based engineering encompasses the breadth of engineering information, from design intent through product definition to consumer application.

  6. Trends in Cardiovascular Engineering: Organizing the Human Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Tulloch, Nathaniel L.; Charles E. Murry

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of heart growth through the interaction of cell types, matrix molecules, and mechanical cues is poorly understood, yet is necessary for the heart to reach its proper size and function. Using mechanical load and vascular cell co-culture in combination with a tissue engineering approach, we have recently been able to generate organized human myocardium in vitro and to modulate cardiomyocyte alignment, proliferation, and hypertrophy within the engineered tissue construct; further,...

  7. Modeling in Chemical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaap van Brakel

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Models underlying the use of similarity considerations, dimensionless numbers, and dimensional analysis in chemical engineering are discussed. Special attention is given to the many levels at which models and ceteris paribus conditions play a role and to the modeling of initial and boundary conditions. It is shown that both the laws or dimensionless number correlations and the systems to which they apply are models. More generally, no matter which model or description one picks out, what is being modeled is itself a model of something else. Instead of saying that the artifact S models the given B, it is therefore better to say that S and B jointly make up B and S.

  8. Comparative analysis of parametric engine model and engine map model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different engine models, parametric engine model and engine map model are employed to analyze the dynamics of an engine during the gear shifting. The models are analyzed under critical transitional manoeuvres to investigate their appropriateness for vehicle longitudinal dynamics. The simulation results for both models have been compared. The results show the engine map model matches well with the parametric model and can be used for the vehicle longitudinal dynamics model. The proposed approach can be useful for the selection of the appropriate vehicle for the given application. (author)

  9. Exact Modeling of Cardiovascular System Using Lumped Method

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemalizadeh, Omid; Firoozabadi, Bahar; Hassani, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    Electrical analogy (Lumped method) is an easy way to model human cardiovascular system. In this paper Lumped method is used for simulating a complete model. It describes a 36-vessel model and cardiac system of human body with details that could show hydrodynamic parameters of cardiovascular system. Also this paper includes modeling of pulmonary, atrium, left and right ventricles with their equivalent circuits. Exact modeling of right and left ventricles pressure increases the accuracy of our simulation. In this paper we show that a calculated pressure for aorta from our complex circuit is near to measured pressure by using advanced medical instruments.

  10. Engine Modelling for Control Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert

    1997-01-01

    In earlier work published by the author and co-authors, a dynamic engine model called a Mean Value Engine Model (MVEM) was developed. This model is physically based and is intended mainly for control applications. In its newer form, it is easy to fit to many different engines and requires little ...

  11. Cardiovascular tissue engineering and regeneration based on adipose tissue-derived stem/stromal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Parvizi, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the pre-clinical field is rapidly progressing in search of new therapeutic modalities that replace or complement current medication to treat cardiovascular disease. Among these are the single or combined use of stem cells, biomaterials and instructive factors, which together form the triad of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Stem cell therapy is a promising approach for repair, remodeling and even regenerate tissue of otherwise irreparable damage, such as after myocard...

  12. V-Model Role Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Radu CONSTANTINESCU

    2009-01-01

    The paper focuses on role engineering which is an important topic in the development of access control system, particularly when considering Role Based Access Control – RBAC models. Despite the wide use of RBAC in various applications, the role engineering process is not a standardized approach. The paper aims to define a methodology and a process model for role engineering

  13. Experimental Models of Renal Disease and the Cardiovascular System

    OpenAIRE

    Grossman, Rebecca C.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death among patients with end stage renal failure. Animal models have played a crucial role in teasing apart the complex pathological processes involved. This review discusses the principles of using animal models, the history of their use in the study of renal hypertension, the controversies arising from experimental models of non-hypertensive uraemic cardiomyopathy and the lessons learned from these models, and highlights important areas of futur...

  14. Role and applications of circulatory models in cardiovascular pathophysiology.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Gianfranco; Kozarski, Maciej; Lazzari, Claudio,; Gorczynska, Krystyna; Palko, Jakub K.; K Zielinski; Di Molfetta, Arianna; Darowski, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Circulatory models are relevant for research, education and prosthetic devices/components testing. Independently of its structure that can be numerical, physical or hybrid, the models can be used in different areas of cardiovascular pathophysiology. However, the models are often used to reproduce specific circulatory conditions instead of being used as "systemic" tools. That is to say, the models are used to evaluate the global effects of external disturbances such as pathologies, therapies, ...

  15. Clinical and pathological manifestations of cardiovascular disease in rat models: the influence of acute ozone exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper shows that rat models of cardiovascular diseases have differential degrees of underlying pathologies at a young age. Rodent models of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and metabolic disorders are used for examining susceptibility variations to environmental exposures. How...

  16. Mathematical modelling of the cardiovascular system

    OpenAIRE

    Quarteroni, Alfio

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we will address the problem of developing mathematical models for the numerical simulation of the human circulatory system. In particular, we will focus our attention on the problem of haemodynamics in large human arteries.

  17. Cardiovascular response to dynamic aerobic exercise: a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magosso, E; Ursino, M

    2002-11-01

    An original mathematical model of the cardiovascular response to dynamic exercise is presented. It includes the pulsating heart, the pulmonary and systemic circulation, a separate description of the vascular bed in active tissues, the local metabolic vasodilation in these tissues and the mechanical effects of muscular contractions on venous return. Moreover, the model provides a description of the ventilatory response to exercise and various neural regulatory mechanisms working on cardiovascular parameters. These mechanisms embrace the so-called central command, the arterial baroreflex and the lung inflation reflex. All parameters in the model have been given in accordance with physiological data from the literature. In this work, the model has been used to simulate the steady-state value of the main cardiorespiratory quantities at different levels of aerobic exercise and the temporal pattern in the transient phase from rest to moderate exercise. Results suggest that, with suitable parameter values the model is able accurately to simulate the cardiorespiratory response in the overall range of aerobic exercise. This response is characterised by a moderate hypertension (10-30%) and by a conspicuous increase in systemic conductance (80-130%), heart rate (64-150%) and cardiac output (100-200%). The transient pattern exhibits three distinct phases (lasting approximately 5s, 15s and 2 min), that reflect the temporal heterogeneity of the mechanisms involved. The model may be useful to improve understanding of exercise physiology and as an educational tool to analyse the complexity of cardiovascular and respiratory regulation. PMID:12507317

  18. Gas Turbine Engine Behavioral Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Richard T; DeCarlo, Raymond A.; Pekarek, Steve; Doktorcik, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops and validates a power flow behavioral model of a gas tur- bine engine with a gas generator and free power turbine. “Simple” mathematical expressions to describe the engine’s power flow are derived from an understand- ing of basic thermodynamic and mechanical interactions taking place within the engine. The engine behavioral model presented is suitable for developing a supervisory level controller of an electrical power system that contains the en- gine connected to a gener...

  19. Global dynamical model of the cardiovascular system

    CERN Document Server

    Kholodov, A S; Kholodov, Y A; Nadolsky, A A; Shushlebin, A N

    2007-01-01

    Blood system functions are very diverse and important for most processes in human organism. One of its primary functions is matter transport among different parts of the organism including tissue supplying with oxygen, carbon dioxide excretion, drug propagation etc. Forecasting of these processes under normal conditions and in the presence of different pathologies like atherosclerosis, loss of blood, anatomical abnormalities, pathological changing in chemical transformations and others is significant issue for many physiologists. In this connection should be pointed out that global processes are of special interest as they include feedbacks and interdependences among different regions of the organism. Thus the main goal of this work is to develop the model allowing to describe effectively blood flow in the whole organism. As we interested in global processes the models of the four vascular trees (arterial and venous parts of systemic and pulmonary circulation) must be closed with heart and peripheral circulat...

  20. Cardiovascular Changes in Animal Models of Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre M. Lehnen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome has been defined as a group of risk factors that directly contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance seems to have a fundamental role in the genesis of this syndrome. Over the past years to the present day, basic and translational research has used small animal models to explore the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome and to develop novel therapies that might slow the progression of this prevalent condition. In this paper we discuss the animal models used for the study of metabolic syndrome, with particular focus on cardiovascular changes, since they are the main cause of death associated with the condition in humans.

  1. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Inherited Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenjian; Lan, Feng; Zhang, Hongjia

    2014-10-16

    Cardiovascular cells derived from patient specific induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) harbor gene mutations associated with the pathogenesis of inherited cardiac diseases and congenital heart diseases (CHD). Numerous reports have demonstrated the utilization of human induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (hiPSC) to model cardiac diseases as a means of investigating their underlying mechanisms. So far, they have been shown to investigate the molecular mechanisms of many cardiac disorders, such as long-QT syndrome (LQT), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), LEOPARD syndrome (LS), arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM), Friedreich ataxia (FRDA), Barth syndrome (BTHS), hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), Marfan syndrome (MFS) and other CHD. This article summarizes the growing body of research related to modeling various cardiac diseases using hiPSCs. Moreover, by reviewing the methods used in previous studies, we propose multiple novel applications of hiPSCs to investigate comprehensive cardiovascular disorders and facilitate drug discovery. PMID:25322695

  2. Model-based Software Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindler, Ekkart

    2010-01-01

    The vision of model-based software engineering is to make models the main focus of software development and to automatically generate software from these models. Part of that idea works already today. But, there are still difficulties when it comes to behaviour. Actually, there is no lack in models...

  3. Computational Modeling in Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges in tissue engineering is the translation of biological knowledge on complex cell and tissue behavior into a predictive and robust engineering process. Mastering this complexity is an essential step towards clinical applications of tissue engineering. This volume discusses computational modeling tools that allow studying the biological complexity in a more quantitative way. More specifically, computational tools can help in:  (i) quantifying and optimizing the tissue engineering product, e.g. by adapting scaffold design to optimize micro-environmental signals or by adapting selection criteria to improve homogeneity of the selected cell population; (ii) quantifying and optimizing the tissue engineering process, e.g. by adapting bioreactor design to improve quality and quantity of the final product; and (iii) assessing the influence of the in vivo environment on the behavior of the tissue engineering product, e.g. by investigating vascular ingrowth. The book presents examples of each...

  4. Patient-specific modeling of human cardiovascular system elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossovich, Leonid Yu.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Polienko, Asel V.; Chelnokova, Natalia O.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.; Murylev, Vladimir V.

    2016-03-01

    Object of study: The research is aimed at development of personalized medical treatment. Algorithm was developed for patient-specific surgical interventions of the cardiovascular system pathologies. Methods: Geometrical models of the biological objects and initial and boundary conditions were realized by medical diagnostic data of the specific patient. Mechanical and histomorphological parameters were obtained with the help mechanical experiments on universal testing machine. Computer modeling of the studied processes was conducted with the help of the finite element method. Results: Results of the numerical simulation allowed evaluating the physiological processes in the studied object in normal state, in presence of different pathologies and after different types of surgical procedures.

  5. Common swine models of cardiovascular disease for research and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisóstomo, Verónica; Sun, Fei; Maynar, Manuel; Báez-Díaz, Claudia; Blanco, Virginia; Garcia-Lindo, Monica; Usón-Gargallo, Jesús; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco Miguel

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major health concern and therefore an important topic in biomedical research. Large animal models allow researchers to assess the safety and efficacy of new cardiovascular procedures in systems that resemble human anatomy; additionally, they can be used to emulate scenarios for training purposes. Among the many biomedical models that are described in published literature, it is important that researchers understand and select those that are best suited to achieve the aims of their research, that facilitate the humane care and management of their research animals and that best promote the high ethical standards required of animal research. In this resource the authors describe some common swine models that can be easily incorporated into regular practices of research and training at biomedical institutions. These models use both native and altered vascular anatomy of swine to carry out research protocols, such as testing biological reactions to implanted materials, surgically creating aneurysms using autologous tissue and inducing myocardial infarction through closed-chest procedures. Such models can also be used for training, where native and altered vascular anatomy allow medical professionals to learn and practice challenging techniques in anatomy that closely simulates human systems. PMID:26814353

  6. A mock circulation model for cardiovascular device evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to develop an integrated mock circulation system that functions in a physiological manner for testing cardiovascular devices under well-controlled circumstances. In contrast to previously reported mock loops, the model includes a systemic, pulmonary, and coronary circulation, an elaborate heart contraction model, and a realistic heart rate control model. The behavior of the presented system was tested in response to changes in left ventricular contractile states, loading conditions, and heart rate. For validation purposes, generated hemodynamic parameters and responses were compared to literature. The model was implemented in a servo-motor driven mock loop, together with a relatively simple lead-lag controller. The pressure and flow signals measured closely mimicked human pressure under both physiological and pathological conditions. In addition, the system's response to changes in preload, afterload, and heart rate indicate a proper implementation of the incorporated feedback mechanisms (frequency and cardiac function control). Therefore, the presented mock circulation allows for generic in vitro testing of cardiovascular devices under well-controlled circumstances. (paper)

  7. Pulse Detonation Engine Modeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2001-01-01

    Pulse Detonation Engine Technology is currently being investigated at Glenn for both airbreathing and rocket propulsion applications. The potential for both mechanical simplicity and high efficiency due to the inherent near-constant-volume combustion process, may make Pulse Detonation Engines (PDE's) well suited for a number of mission profiles. Assessment of PDE cycles requires a simulation capability that is both fast and accurate. It should capture the essential physics of the system, yet run at speeds that allow parametric analysis. A quasi-one-dimensional, computational-fluid-dynamics-based simulation has been developed that may meet these requirements. The Euler equations of mass, momentum, and energy have been used along with a single reactive species transport equation, and submodels to account for dominant loss mechanisms (e.g., viscous losses, heat transfer, and valving) to successfully simulate PDE cycles. A high-resolution numerical integration scheme was chosen to capture the discontinuities associated with detonation, and robust boundary condition procedures were incorporated to accommodate flow reversals that may arise during a given cycle. The accompanying graphs compare experimentally measured and computed performance over a range of operating conditions for a particular PDE. Experimental data were supplied by Fred Schauer and Jeff Stutrud from the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson AFB and by Royce Bradley from Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc. The left graph shows thrust and specific impulse, Isp, as functions of equivalence ratio for a PDE cycle in which the tube is completely filled with a detonable hydrogen/air mixture. The right graph shows thrust and specific impulse as functions of the fraction of the tube that is filled with a stoichiometric mixture of hydrogen and air. For both figures, the operating frequency was 16 Hz. The agreement between measured and computed values is quite good, both in terms of trend and

  8. Engineering Delta Modeling Languages

    OpenAIRE

    Haber, Arne; Hölldobler, Katrin; Kolassa, Carsten; Look, Markus; Müller, Klaus; Rumpe, Bernhard; Schaefer, Ina

    2014-01-01

    Delta modeling is a modular, yet flexible approach to capture spatial and temporal variability by explicitly representing the differences between system variants or versions. The conceptual idea of delta modeling is language-independent. But, in order to apply delta modeling for a concrete language, so far, a delta language had to be manually developed on top of the base language leading to a large variety of heterogeneous language concepts. In this paper, we present a process that allows der...

  9. Modeling of Engineering Student Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Faridatul Azna Ahmad Shahabudin; Zalina Mohd Ali; Nur Riza Mohd Suradi; Norkisme Zainal Abidin; Norbayani Basri; Zainol Mustafa; Mohd Rashid Ab Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: The purpose of this study is first; to identify the antecedents to student satisfaction and the relationship between student satisfaction and promotion. Second; to develop a suitable student satisfaction model considering the antecedents of student satisfaction with student satisfaction and promotion for students of engineering in universities in Malaysia. A total of 500 engineering students from University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), University Putra Malaysia (UPM), Univers...

  10. Requirements Engineering Reference Model (REM)

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Geisberger; Manfred Broy Technische Universitaet Muenchen Brian Berenbach; Juergen Kazmeier; Daniel Paulish; Arnold Rudorfer Siemens Corporate Research Princeton

    2016-01-01

    Der folgende technische Bericht beschreibt das Requirements Engineering Reference Model (REM). Die Zielsetzung von REM ist:(1) Die Definition eines Referenzmodells für das Requirements Engineering (RE) mittels Festlegung der Kernmenge von zu entwickelnden RE Artefakten (Arbeitsprodukten im RE) einer Systementwicklung und ihren Abhängigkeiten - das RE Artefaktmodell, und(2) Die Einführung und Anpassung von produkt- und projekt-spezifischen RE Prozessen auf Basis des RE Artefaktmodells.REM ist ...

  11. Conceptual Models for Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, D. G.; Efthimiadis, E. N.

    Search engines have entered popular culture. They touch people in diverse private and public settings and thus heighten the importance of such important social matters as information privacy and control, censorship, and equitable access. To fully benefit from search engines and to participate in debate about their merits, people necessarily appeal to their understandings for how they function. In this chapter we examine the conceptual understandings that people have of search engines by performing a content analysis on the sketches that 200 undergraduate and graduate students drew when asked to draw a sketch of how a search engine works. Analysis of the sketches reveals a diverse range of conceptual approaches, metaphors, representations, and misconceptions. On the whole, the conceptual models articulated by these students are simplistic. However, students with higher levels of academic achievement sketched more complete models. This research calls attention to the importance of improving students' technical knowledge of how search engines work so they can be better equipped to develop and advocate policies for how search engines should be embedded in, and restricted from, various private and public information settings.

  12. Modeling of Engineering Student Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faridatul Azna Ahmad Shahabudin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The purpose of this study is first; to identify the antecedents to student satisfaction and the relationship between student satisfaction and promotion. Second; to develop a suitable student satisfaction model considering the antecedents of student satisfaction with student satisfaction and promotion for students of engineering in universities in Malaysia. A total of 500 engineering students from University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM, University Putra Malaysia (UPM, University Islam Antarabangsa Malaysia (UIAM, University Malaya (UM and University Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN were involved as respondents in this research. Approach: To examine these relationships, a model from past study on student satisfaction of Applied Sciences students in Austria was referred. Based on this model, a suitable model measuring student satisfaction of engineering students in Malaysia is constructed. Structural equation modeling is used as its capability in testing the combination of relationship between service performance, university performance, relationship, university standing, student satisfaction and promotion in higher education simultaneously. Results: Suitable model which is able to explain the factors linked to student satisfaction in engineering education is established. Conclusion: This study finds that the antecedent factors have a direct effect on student satisfaction and also student satisfaction has a significant effect on promotion.

  13. Mathematical modelling of flow distribution in the human cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sud, V. K.; Srinivasan, R. S.; Charles, J. B.; Bungo, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed model of the entire human cardiovascular system which aims to study the changes in flow distribution caused by external stimuli, changes in internal parameters, or other factors. The arterial-venous network is represented by 325 interconnected elastic segments. The mathematical description of each segment is based on equations of hydrodynamics and those of stress/strain relationships in elastic materials. Appropriate input functions provide for the pumping of blood by the heart through the system. The analysis employs the finite-element technique which can accommodate any prescribed boundary conditions. Values of model parameters are from available data on physical and rheological properties of blood and blood vessels. As a representative example, simulation results on changes in flow distribution with changes in the elastic properties of blood vessels are discussed. They indicate that the errors in the calculated overall flow rates are not significant even in the extreme case of arteries and veins behaving as rigid tubes.

  14. Stirling Engine Dynamic System Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakis, Christopher G.

    2004-01-01

    The Thermo-Mechanical systems branch at the Glenn Research Center focuses a large amount time on Stirling engines. These engines will be used on missions where solar power is inefficient, especially in deep space. I work with Tim Regan and Ed Lewandowski who are currently developing and validating a mathematical model for the Stirling engines. This model incorporates all aspects of the system including, mechanical, electrical and thermodynamic components. Modeling is done through Simplorer, a program capable of running simulations of the model. Once created and then proven to be accurate, a model is used for developing new ideas for engine design. My largest specific project involves varying key parameters in the model and quantifying the results. This can all be done relatively trouble-free with the help of Simplorer. Once the model is complete, Simplorer will do all the necessary calculations. The more complicated part of this project is determining which parameters to vary. Finding key parameters depends on the potential for a value to be independently altered in the design. For example, a change in one dimension may lead to a proportional change to the rest of the model, and no real progress is made. Also, the ability for a changed value to have a substantial impact on the outputs of the system is important. Results will be condensed into graphs and tables with the purpose of better communication and understanding of the data. With the changing of these parameters, a more optimal design can be created without having to purchase or build any models. Also, hours and hours of results can be simulated in minutes. In the long run, using mathematical models can save time and money. Along with this project, I have many other smaller assignments throughout the summer. My main goal is to assist in the processes of model development, validation and testing.

  15. Mean Value Engine Modelling of an SI Engine with EGR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Føns, Michael; Müller, Martin; Chevalier, Alain;

    1999-01-01

    Recirculation (EGR). The purpose of this paper is to present a modified MVEM which includes EGR in a physical way. It has been tested using newly developed, very fast manifold pressure, manifold temperature, port and EGR mass flow sensors. Reasonable agreement has been obtained on an experimental engine......Mean Value Engine Models (MVEMs) are simplified, dynamic engine models what are physically based. Such models are useful for control studies, for engine control system analysis and for model based engine control systems. Very few published MVEMs have included the effects of Exhaust Gas...

  16. An Otto Engine Dynamic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Ion Tiberiu Petrescu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Otto engine dynamics are similar in almost all common internal combustion engines. We can speak so about dynamics of engines: Lenoir, Otto, and Diesel. The dynamic presented model is simple and original. The first thing necessary in the calculation of Otto engine dynamics, is to determine the inertial mass reduced at the piston. One uses then the Lagrange equation. Kinetic energy conservation shows angular speed variation (from the shaft with inertial masses. One uses and elastic constant of the crank shaft, k. Calculations should be made for an engine with a single cylinder. Finally it makes a dynamic analysis of the mechanism with discussion and conclusions. The ratio between the crank length r and the length of the connecting-rod l is noted with landa. When landa increases the mechanism dynamics is deteriorating. For a proper operation is necessary the reduction of the ratio landa, especially if we want to increase the engine speed. We can reduce the acceleration values by reducing the dimensions r and l.

  17. Engineered Swine Models of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Adrienne L; Carlson, Daniel F.; Largaespada, David A; Hackett, Perry B; Fahrenkrug, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the technology to engineer genetically modified swine has seen many advancements, and because their physiology is remarkably similar to that of humans, swine models of cancer may be extremely valuable for preclinical safety studies as well as toxicity testing of pharmaceuticals prior to the start of human clinical trials. Hence, the benefits of using swine as a large animal model in cancer research and the potential applications and future opportunities of utilizing pigs...

  18. Optimizing Cardiovascular Benefits of Exercise: A Review of Rodent Models

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Brittany; Moriguchi, Takeshi; Sumpio, Bauer

    2013-01-01

    Although research unanimously maintains that exercise can ward off cardiovascular disease (CVD), the optimal type, duration, intensity, and combination of forms are yet not clear. In our review of existing rodent-based studies on exercise and cardiovascular health, we attempt to find the optimal forms, intensities, and durations of exercise. Using Scopus and Medline, a literature review of English language comparative journal studies of cardiovascular benefits and exercise was performed. This...

  19. Depression and cardiovascular disease: the end of simple models

    OpenAIRE

    de Jonge, Peter; Roest, Annelieke M.

    2012-01-01

    In this editorial, we propose that the association between depression and cardiovascular disease may be conceptualised as a continuous, bidirectional process that originates in youth. The paper by Aberg and colleagues in this issue adds to this literature showing that low cardiovascular fitness at adolescence increases the risk of future depression.

  20. Non-destructive analysis of extracellular matrix development in cardiovascular tissue-engineered constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuemen, M; Nguyen, D V A; Raffius, J; Flanagan, T C; Dietrich, M; Frese, J; Schmitz-Rode, T; Jockenhoevel, S

    2013-05-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, there is an increasing demand for non-destructive methods to quantify the synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) components such as collagens, elastin or sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) in vitro as a quality control before clinical use. In this study, procollagen I carboxyterminal peptide (PICP), procollagen III aminoterminal peptide (PIIINP), tropoelastin and sGAGs are investigated for their potential use as non-destructive markers in culture medium of statically cultivated cell-seeded fibrin gels. Measurement of PICP as marker for type I collagen synthesis, and PIIINP as marker of type III collagen turnover, correlated well with the hydroxyproline content of the fibrin gels, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.98 and 0.97, respectively. The measurement of tropoelastin as marker of elastin synthesis correlated with the amount of elastin retained in fibrin gels with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.99. sGAGs were retained in fibrin gels, but were not detectable in culture medium at any time of measurement. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the potential of PICP and tropoelastin as non-destructive culture medium markers for collagen and elastin synthesis. To our knowledge, this is the first study in cardiovascular tissue engineering investigating the whole of here proposed biomarkers of ECM synthesis to monitor the maturation process of developing tissue non-invasively, but for comprehensive assessment of ECM development, these biomarkers need to be investigated in further studies, employing dynamic cultivation conditions and more complex tissue constructs. PMID:23307024

  1. Generation and Assessment of Functional Biomaterial Scaffolds for Applications in Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinderer, Svenja; Brauchle, Eva; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2015-11-18

    Current clinically applicable tissue and organ replacement therapies are limited in the field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine. The available options do not regenerate damaged tissues and organs, and, in the majority of the cases, show insufficient restoration of tissue function. To date, anticoagulant drug-free heart valve replacements or growing valves for pediatric patients, hemocompatible and thrombus-free vascular substitutes that are smaller than 6 mm, and stem cell-recruiting delivery systems that induce myocardial regeneration are still only visions of researchers and medical professionals worldwide and far from being the standard of clinical treatment. The design of functional off-the-shelf biomaterials as well as automatable and up-scalable biomaterial processing methods are the focus of current research endeavors and of great interest for fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here, various approaches that aim to overcome the current limitations are reviewed, focusing on biomaterials design and generation methods for myocardium, heart valves, and blood vessels. Furthermore, novel contact- and marker-free biomaterial and extracellular matrix assessment methods are highlighted. PMID:25778713

  2. Engineered Swine Models of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Adrienne L; Carlson, Daniel F; Largaespada, David A; Hackett, Perry B; Fahrenkrug, Scott C

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the technology to engineer genetically modified swine has seen many advancements, and because their physiology is remarkably similar to that of humans, swine models of cancer may be extremely valuable for preclinical safety studies as well as toxicity testing of pharmaceuticals prior to the start of human clinical trials. Hence, the benefits of using swine as a large animal model in cancer research and the potential applications and future opportunities of utilizing pigs in cancer modeling are immense. In this review, we discuss how pigs have been and can be used as a biomedical models for cancer research, with an emphasis on current technologies. We have focused on applications of precision genetics that can provide models that mimic human cancer predisposition syndromes. In particular, we describe the advantages of targeted gene-editing using custom endonucleases, specifically TALENs and CRISPRs, and transposon systems, to make novel pig models of cancer with broad preclinical applications. PMID:27242889

  3. Engineered Swine Models of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Adrienne L.; Carlson, Daniel F.; Largaespada, David A.; Hackett, Perry B.; Fahrenkrug, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the technology to engineer genetically modified swine has seen many advancements, and because their physiology is remarkably similar to that of humans, swine models of cancer may be extremely valuable for preclinical safety studies as well as toxicity testing of pharmaceuticals prior to the start of human clinical trials. Hence, the benefits of using swine as a large animal model in cancer research and the potential applications and future opportunities of utilizing pigs in cancer modeling are immense. In this review, we discuss how pigs have been and can be used as a biomedical models for cancer research, with an emphasis on current technologies. We have focused on applications of precision genetics that can provide models that mimic human cancer predisposition syndromes. In particular, we describe the advantages of targeted gene-editing using custom endonucleases, specifically TALENs and CRISPRs, and transposon systems, to make novel pig models of cancer with broad preclinical applications.

  4. Engineered Swine Models of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne L. Watson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, the technology to engineer genetically modified swine has seen many advancements, and because their physiology is remarkably similar to that of humans, swine models of cancer may be extremely valuable for preclinical safety studies as well as toxicity testing of pharmaceuticals prior to the start of human clinical trials. Hence, the benefits of using swine as a large animal model in cancer research and the potential applications and future opportunities of utilizing pigs in cancer modeling are immense. In this review, we discuss how pigs have been and can be used as a biomedical models for cancer research, with an emphasis on current technologies. We have focused on applications of precision genetics that can provide models that mimic human cancer predisposition syndromes. In particular, we describe the advantages of targeted gene-editing using custom endonucleases, specifically TALENs and CRISPRs, and transposon systems, to make novel pig models of cancer with broad preclinical applications.

  5. The Future of Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering in Cardiovascular Disease: The New Era of Biological Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Heydarkhan-Hagvall, Sepideh; Nsair, Ali; Beygui, Ramin E.; Shemin, Richard J

    2010-01-01

    The use of living cells as a therapeutic option presents several challenges including identification of a suitable source, development of adequate derivation, maintenance and differentiation methods, and very importantly proof of safety and efficacy. One of the major issues for cardiovascular tissue engineering is determining the ideal cell type for use in regenerative therapies.Many clinical trials have used bone marrow derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNC) (Schächinger V 2006). These clinical ...

  6. Engineering graphic modelling a workbook for design engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Tjalve, E; Frackmann Schmidt, F

    2013-01-01

    Engineering Graphic Modelling: A Practical Guide to Drawing and Design covers how engineering drawing relates to the design activity. The book describes modeled properties, such as the function, structure, form, material, dimension, and surface, as well as the coordinates, symbols, and types of projection of the drawing code. The text provides drawing techniques, such as freehand sketching, bold freehand drawing, drawing with a straightedge, a draughting machine or a plotter, and use of templates, and then describes the types of drawing. Graphic designers, design engineers, mechanical engine

  7. Modeling the internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A flexible and computationally economical model of the internal combustion engine was developed for use on large digital computer systems. It is based on a system of ordinary differential equations for cylinder-averaged properties. The computer program is capable of multicycle calculations, with some parameters varying from cycle to cycle, and has restart capabilities. It can accommodate a broad spectrum of reactants, permits changes in physical properties, and offers a wide selection of alternative modeling functions without any reprogramming. It readily adapts to the amount of information available in a particular case because the model is in fact a hierarchy of five models. The models range from a simple model requiring only thermodynamic properties to a complex model demanding full combustion kinetics, transport properties, and poppet valve flow characteristics. Among its many features the model includes heat transfer, valve timing, supercharging, motoring, finite burning rates, cycle-to-cycle variations in air-fuel ratio, humid air, residual and recirculated exhaust gas, and full combustion kinetics.

  8. A Unified Bond Graph Modeling Approach for the Ejection Phase of the Cardiovascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUBNA MOIN

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the unified Bond Graph model of the left ventricle ejection phase is presented, simulated and validated. The integro-differential and ordinary differential equations obtained from the bond graph models are simulated using ODE45 (Ordinary Differential Equation Solver on MATLAB and Simulink. The results, thus, obtained are compared with CVS (Cardiovascular System physiological data present in Simbiosys (a software for simulating biological systems and also with the CVS Wiggers diagram of heart cycle. As the cardiac activity is a multi domain process that includes mechanical, hydraulic, chemical and electrical events; therefore, for modeling such systems a unified modeling approach is needed. In this paper the unified Bond Graph model of the left ventricle ejection phase is proposed. The Bond Graph conventionalism approach is a graphical method principally powerful to portray multi-energy systems, as it is formulated on the portrayal of power exchanges. The model takes into account a simplified description of the left ventricle which is close to the medical investigation promoting the apperception and the dialogue between engineers and physiologists.

  9. Animal Models for Vascular Tissue-Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Swartz, Daniel D.; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2013-01-01

    Due to rise in cardiovascular disease throughout the world, there is increasing demand for small diameter blood vessels as replacement grafts. The present review focuses on the animal models that have been used to test small-diameter TEVs with emphasis on the attributes of each model. Small animal models are used to test short-term patency and address mechanistic hypotheses; and large, pre-clinical animal models are employed to test long-term patency, remodeling and function in an environment...

  10. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and dysregulated iron homeostatis in rat models of cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) is considered a risk factor for the exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms ofvariation in susceptibility. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and altere...

  11. Price Model of the Stirling Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Gadré, Isabelle; Maiorana, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    The Stirling engine has very high potential, but there are still some challenges to overcome before it can be commercialised. The engines competitive advantages are that it runs on an external heat source that can be renewable, and it has high efficiency. One of the challenges to overcome is to identify parameters of why the Stirling engine technology presently is very expensive. This project, which was conducted at KTH, creates a new technology price model for the Stirling engine with the ai...

  12. Applying Software Engineering Principles to Process Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Henry, Joel

    1992-01-01

    Process models are constructed using specific modeling methods or techniques. These techniques impart certain characteristics to the models they produce. Application of the software engineering principles of information hiding, top-down functional decomposition and stepwise refinement to process modeling imparts many desirable characteristics to the process models produced. This paper describes an approach to process modeling which applies these software engineering principles to control flow...

  13. Neuropathological changes in mouse models of cardiovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Bink, D.I.

    2016-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment and dementia are common disorders in the elderly. As the life span of the population in the Western world is increasing, the prevalence of cognitive disorders and the social and economic burden that coincide with that will increase. Recent data indicate that cardiovascular diseases are largely associated with an increased risk of dementia. The presence of atherosclerosis, heart failure, hypertension and small vessel disease are all associated with neuropathological c...

  14. Modelling of the cardiovascular and respiratory system interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Převorovská, Světlana; Maršík, František

    Plzeň: Západočeská Universita, Plzeň, 2004 - (Horák, M.), s. 1-1 [Biomechanics of man.. Plzeň (CZ), 16.11.2004-19.11.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/03/1073; GA ČR GA106/03/0958 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : cardiovascular system * respiratory system * numerical simulation Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  15. Model-Based Systems Engineering in Concurrent Engineering Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Curtis; Infeld, Samatha; Bracken, Jennifer Medlin; McGuire, Melissa; McQuirk, Christina; Kisdi, Aron; Murphy, Jonathan; Cole, Bjorn; Zarifian, Pezhman

    2015-01-01

    Concurrent Engineering Centers (CECs) are specialized facilities with a goal of generating and maturing engineering designs by enabling rapid design iterations. This is accomplished by co-locating a team of experts (either physically or virtually) in a room with a narrow design goal and a limited timeline of a week or less. The systems engineer uses a model of the system to capture the relevant interfaces and manage the overall architecture. A single model that integrates other design information and modeling allows the entire team to visualize the concurrent activity and identify conflicts more efficiently, potentially resulting in a systems model that will continue to be used throughout the project lifecycle. Performing systems engineering using such a system model is the definition of model-based systems engineering (MBSE); therefore, CECs evolving their approach to incorporate advances in MBSE are more successful in reducing time and cost needed to meet study goals. This paper surveys space mission CECs that are in the middle of this evolution, and the authors share their experiences in order to promote discussion within the community.

  16. Cardiovascular disease risk models and longitudinal changes in cognition: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L Harrison

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease and its risk factors have consistently been associated with poor cognitive function and incident dementia. Whether cardiovascular disease prediction models, developed to predict an individual's risk of future cardiovascular disease or stroke, are also informative for predicting risk of cognitive decline and dementia is not known.The objective of this systematic review was to compare cohort studies examining the association between cardiovascular disease risk models and longitudinal changes in cognitive function or risk of incident cognitive impairment or dementia.Medline, PsychINFO, and Embase were searched from inception to March 28, 2014. From 3,413 records initially screened, 21 were included.The association between numerous different cardiovascular disease risk models and cognitive outcomes has been tested, including Framingham and non-Framingham risk models. Five studies examined dementia as an outcome; fourteen studies examined cognitive decline or incident cognitive impairment as an outcome; and two studies examined both dementia and cognitive changes as outcomes. In all studies, higher cardiovascular disease risk scores were associated with cognitive changes or risk of dementia. Only four studies reported model prognostic performance indices, such as Area Under the Curve (AUC, for predicting incident dementia or cognitive impairment and these studies all examined non-Framingham Risk models (AUC range: 0.74 to 0.78.Cardiovascular risk prediction models are associated with cognitive changes over time and risk of dementia. Such models are easily obtainable in clinical and research settings and may be useful for identifying individuals at high risk of future cognitive decline and dementia.

  17. A Transformation Model of Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Camelia L.; Fortenberry, Norman L.

    2007-01-01

    A transformation model of engineering education at the undergraduate level is constructed to define the human and technical resources that contribute to the production of a university-trained engineer. The theory of technical systems is applied in the development of the model to transform a graduating pre-university pupil into a university-trained…

  18. Modelling of the cardiovascular and respiratory system interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Převorovská, Světlana; Maršík, František

    Plzeň, ČR: Západočeská Universita, Plzeň, 2004 - (Horák, M.). s. 84 ISBN 80-7043-315-9. [Biomechanics of Man 2004. 16.11.2004-19.11.2004, hotel Horizont, Šumava] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/03/1073; GA ČR GA106/03/0958 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : cardiovascular system * respiratory system * numerical simulation Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  19. Generation and Assessment of Functional Biomaterial Scaffolds for Applications in Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Hinderer, Svenja; Brauchle, Eva; Schenke‐Layland, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Current clinically applicable tissue and organ replacement therapies are limited in the field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine. The available options do not regenerate damaged tissues and organs, and, in the majority of the cases, show insufficient restoration of tissue function. To date, anticoagulant drug‐free heart valve replacements or growing valves for pediatric patients, hemocompatible and thrombus‐free vascular substitutes that are smaller than 6 mm, and stem cell‐recruiting de...

  20. Time Domain Modelling of a Reciprocating Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Stone, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a time domain systems approach to the modelling of a reciprocating engine. The engine model includes the varying inertia effects resulting from the motion of the piston and con-rod. The cylinder pressure measured under operating conditions is used to force the model and the resulting motion compared with the measured response. The results obtained indicate that the model is very good.

  1. Mean Value Modelling of Turbocharged SI Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Martin; Hendricks, Elbert; Sorenson, Spencer C.

    The development of a computer simulation to predict the performance of a turbocharged spark ignition engine during transient operation. New models have been developed for the turbocharged and the intercooling system. An adiabatic model for the intake manifold is presented.......The development of a computer simulation to predict the performance of a turbocharged spark ignition engine during transient operation. New models have been developed for the turbocharged and the intercooling system. An adiabatic model for the intake manifold is presented....

  2. Mean Value Modelling of Turbocharged SI Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Martin; Hendricks, Elbert; Sorenson, Spencer C.

    1998-01-01

    The development of a computer simulation to predict the performance of a turbocharged spark ignition engine during transient operation. New models have been developed for the turbocharged and the intercooling system. An adiabatic model for the intake manifold is presented.......The development of a computer simulation to predict the performance of a turbocharged spark ignition engine during transient operation. New models have been developed for the turbocharged and the intercooling system. An adiabatic model for the intake manifold is presented....

  3. Adaptive life simulator: A novel approach to modeling the cardiovascular system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.; Hashem, S. [and others

    1995-06-01

    In this paper, an adaptive life simulator (ALS) is introduced. The ALS models a subset of the dynamics of the cardiovascular behavior of an individual by using a recurrent artificial neural network. These models are developed for use in applications that require simulations of cardiovascular systems, such as medical mannequins, and in medical diagnostic systems. This approach is unique in that each cardiovascular model is developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled variables and the actual variables of an individual can subsequently be used for diagnosis. This approach also exploits sensor fusion applied to biomedical sensors. Sensor fusion optimizes the utilization of the sensors. The advantage of sensor fusion has been demonstrated in applications including control and diagnostics of mechanical and chemical processes.

  4. Laser docking sensor engineering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekome, Kent; Barr, Joseph M.

    1991-01-01

    NASA JSC has been involved in the development of Laser sensors for the past ten years in order to support future rendezvous and docking missions, both manned and unmanned. Although many candidate technologies have been breadboarded and evaluated, no sensor hardware designed specifically for rendezvous and docking applications has been demonstrated on-orbit. It has become apparent that representative sensors need to be flown and demonstrated as soon as possible, with minimal cost, to provide the capability of the technology in meeting NASA's future AR&C applications. Technology and commercial component reliability have progressed to where it is now feasible to fly hardware as a detailed test objective minimizing the overall cost and development time. This presentation will discuss the ongoing effort to convert an existing in-house developed breadboard to an engineering model configuration suitable for flight. The modifications include improving the ranger resolution and stability with an in-house design, replacing the rack mounted galvanometric scanner drivers with STD-bus cards, replacing the system controlling personal computer with a microcontroller, and repackaging the subsystems as appropriate. The sensor will use the performance parameters defined in previous JSC requirements working groups as design goals and be built to withstand the space environment where fiscally feasible. Testing of the in-house ranger design is expected to be completed in October. The results will be included in the presentation. Preliminary testing of the ranging circuitry indicates a range resolution of 4mm is possible. The sensor will be mounted in the payload bay on a shelf bracket and have command, control, and display capabilities using the payload general support computer via an RS422 data line.

  5. Parametric Model of an Aerospike Rocket Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    A suite of computer codes was assembled to simulate the performance of an aerospike engine and to generate the engine input for the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories. First an engine simulator module was developed that predicts the aerospike engine performance for a given mixture ratio, power level, thrust vectoring level, and altitude. This module was then used to rapidly generate the aerospike engine performance tables for axial thrust, normal thrust, pitching moment, and specific thrust. Parametric engine geometry was defined for use with the engine simulator module. The parametric model was also integrated into the iSIGHTI multidisciplinary framework so that alternate designs could be determined. The computer codes were used to support in-house conceptual studies of reusable launch vehicle designs.

  6. Mathematical model of the Amazon Stirling engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal Medina, Juan Ricardo [Universidad Autonoma de Occidente (Colombia)], e-mail: jrvidal@uao.edu.co; Cobasa, Vladimir Melian; Silva, Electo [Universidade Federal de Itajuba, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: vlad@unifei.edu.br

    2010-07-01

    The Excellency Group in Thermoelectric and Distributed Generation (NEST, for its acronym in Portuguese) at the Federal University of Itajuba, has designed a Stirling engine prototype to provide electricity to isolated regions of Brazil. The engine was designed to operate with residual biomass from timber process. This paper presents mathematical models of heat exchangers (hot, cold and regenerator) integrated into second order adiabatic models. The general model takes into account the pressure drop losses, hysteresis and internal losses. The results of power output, engine efficiency, optimal velocity of the exhaust gases and the influence of dead volume in engine efficiency are presented in this paper. The objective of this modeling is to propose improvements to the manufactured engine design. (author)

  7. Emotional stress and cardiovascular complications in animal models: a review of the influence of stress type.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos C. Crestani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Emotional stress has been recognized as a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The impact of stress on physiological and psychological processes is determined by characteristics of the stress stimulus. For example, distinct responses are induced by acute versus chronic aversive stimuli. Additionally, the magnitude of stress responses has been reported to be inversely related to the degree of predictability of the aversive stimulus. Therefore, the purpose of the present review was to discuss experimental research in animal models describing the influence of stressor stimulus characteristics, such as chronicity and predictability, in cardiovascular dysfunctions induced by emotional stress. Regarding chronicity, the importance of cardiovascular and autonomic adjustments during acute stress sessions and cardiovascular consequences of frequent stress response activation during repeated exposure to aversive threats (i.e., chronic stress is discussed. Evidence of the cardiovascular and autonomic changes induced by chronic stressors involving daily exposure to the same stressor (predictable versus different stressors (unpredictable is reviewed and discussed in terms of the impact of predictability in cardiovascular dysfunctions induced by stress.

  8. Emotional Stress and Cardiovascular Complications in Animal Models: A Review of the Influence of Stress Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestani, Carlos C.

    2016-01-01

    Emotional stress has been recognized as a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The impact of stress on physiological and psychological processes is determined by characteristics of the stress stimulus. For example, distinct responses are induced by acute vs. chronic aversive stimuli. Additionally, the magnitude of stress responses has been reported to be inversely related to the degree of predictability of the aversive stimulus. Therefore, the purpose of the present review was to discuss experimental research in animal models describing the influence of stressor stimulus characteristics, such as chronicity and predictability, in cardiovascular dysfunctions induced by emotional stress. Regarding chronicity, the importance of cardiovascular and autonomic adjustments during acute stress sessions and cardiovascular consequences of frequent stress response activation during repeated exposure to aversive threats (i.e., chronic stress) is discussed. Evidence of the cardiovascular and autonomic changes induced by chronic stressors involving daily exposure to the same stressor (predictable) vs. different stressors (unpredictable) is reviewed and discussed in terms of the impact of predictability in cardiovascular dysfunctions induced by stress.

  9. Survey of Engineering Models for Systems Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Reeves, Gregory T.; Hrischuk, Curtis E.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the field of systems biology has emerged from a confluence of an increase both in molecular biotechnology and in computing storage and power. As a discipline, systems biology shares many characteristics with engineering. However, before the benefits of engineering-based modeling formalisms and analysis tools can be applied to systems biology, the engineering discipline(s) most related to systems biology must be identified. In this paper, we identify the cell as an embedded co...

  10. A cardiovascular system model for lower-body negative pressure response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, B. A., Jr.; Giese, R. P.

    1971-01-01

    Mathematical models used to study complex physiological control systems are discussed. Efforts were made to modify a model of the cardiovascular system for use in studying lower body negative pressure. A computer program was written which allows orderly, straightforward expansion to include exercise, metabolism (thermal stress), respiration, and other body functions.

  11. Issues in Planning Domain Model Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    McCluskey, T.L.; Vaquero, Tiago; Vallati, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The paper raises some issues relating to the engineering of domain models for automated planning. It studies the idea of a domain model as a formal specification of a domain, and considers properties of that specification. It proposes some definitions, which the planning and, more generally, the artificial intelligence community needs to consider, in order to properly deal with engineering issues in domain model creation.

  12. Simulation Model Driven Engineering for Manufacturing Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Hibino, Hironori; Inukai, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Yukishige

    2010-01-01

    In our research, the simulation model driven engineering for manufacturing cell (SMDE-MC) is proposed. The purposes of SMDE-MC are to support the manufacturing engineering processes based on the simulation model and to extend the range of control applications and simulation applications using the PC based control. SMDE-MC provides the simulation model which controls and monitors the manufacturing cell directly using PC based control in the manufacturing system execution phase. Then when the s...

  13. A Model-Driven Engineering Framework for Constrained Model Search

    OpenAIRE

    Kleiner, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    This document describes a formalization, a solver-independant methodology and implementation alternatives for realizing constrained model search in a model-driven engineering framework. The proposed approach combines model-driven engineering tools ((meta)model transformations, models to text, text to models) and constraint programming techniques. Based on previous research, motivations to model search are first introduced together with objectives and background context. A theory of model sear...

  14. Analytical model of the pulse tube engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pulse tube engine represents the thermodynamic inversion of the pulse tube refrigerator used in cryogenic cooling applications. It has a high potential to be used as a prime mover for the conversion of low grade waste heat into mechanical or electrical energy. This paper describes an analytical analysis of the pulse tube engine based on a zero-dimensional model. During compression and expansion, the engine components are considered as isothermal with characteristic temperatures. At the piston's dead centers, a thermal relaxation model is used to switch between these temperatures. Analytical relations for the pV–work developed by the pulse tube engine and its efficiency are derived. The irreversible nature of the pulse tube engine is studied by calculating the entropy production in the components. Furthermore, the thermodynamic cycle is investigated analytically under variation of design features and operating conditions. The results are compared to prior numerical studies. The minimal temperature ratio above which the engine provides a work output is derived analytically and compared to experimental observations. Fundamental characteristics and application limitations of the pulse tube engine are disclosed. An upper limit for the efficiency of the pulse tube engine is derived theoretically and confirmed experimentally as well as through numerically calculations. - Highlights: • An analytical expression for the pV-work of the pulse tube engine is derived. • The irreversible nature of the pulse tube engine is shown mathematically. • The temperature ratio above which the engine operates is calculated and measured. • An upper limit for the pulse tube engine's efficiency is derived

  15. Driving forces behind the increasing cardiovascular treatment intensity.A dynamic epidemiologic model of trends in Danish cardiovascular drug utilization.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Andersen, Morten

    . Objectives: To investigate the driving forces behind the increasing treatment prevalence of cardiovascular drugs, in particular statins, by means of a dynamic epidemiologic drug utilization model. Methods: Material: All Danish residents older than 20 years by January 1, 1996 (4.0 million inhabitants), were...... followed with respect to out-of-hospital redemptions of cardiovascular prescription drugs in the period 1996-2005. The impact of population ageing on cardiovascular treatment intensity was investigated by comparing crude and age/gender standardised intensities. Epidemiologic model: We developed a three......-state (untreated, treated, dead) semi-Markov model to analyse the dynamics of drug use. Transitions were from untreated to treated (incidence), the reverse (discontinuation), and from either untreated or treated to dead. Stratified by sex and age categories, prevalence trends of "growth driving" drug categories...

  16. Driving forces behind the increasing cardiovascular treatment intensity.A dynamic epidemiologic model of trends in Danish cardiovascular drug utilization.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Andersen, Morten

    . Objectives: To investigate the driving forces behind the increasing treatment prevalence of cardiovascular drugs, in particular statins, by means of a dynamic epidemiologic drug utilization model. Methods: Material: All Danish residents older than 20 years by January 1, 1996 (4.0 million inhabitants), were...... followed with respect to out-of-hospital redemptions of cardiovascular prescription drugs in the period 1996-2005. The impact of population ageing on cardiovascular treatment intensity was investigated by comparing crude and age/gender standardised intensities. Epidemiologic model: We developed a three......-state (untreated, treated, dead) semi-Markov model to analyse the dynamics of drug use. Transitions were from untreated to treated (incidence), the reverse (discontinuation), and from either untreated or treated to dead. Stratified by sex and age categories, prevalence trends of "growth driving" drug categories...

  17. Distributed simulation a model driven engineering approach

    CERN Document Server

    Topçu, Okan; Oğuztüzün, Halit; Yilmaz, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Backed by substantive case studies, the novel approach to software engineering for distributed simulation outlined in this text demonstrates the potent synergies between model-driven techniques, simulation, intelligent agents, and computer systems development.

  18. Numerical methods and modelling for engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides a step-by-step approach to numerical methods in engineering modelling. The authors provide a consistent treatment of the topic, from the ground up, to reinforce for students that numerical methods are a set of mathematical modelling tools which allow engineers to represent real-world systems and compute features of these systems with a predictable error rate. Each method presented addresses a specific type of problem, namely root-finding, optimization, integral, derivative, initial value problem, or boundary value problem, and each one encompasses a set of algorithms to solve the problem given some information and to a known error bound. The authors demonstrate that after developing a proper model and understanding of the engineering situation they are working on, engineers can break down a model into a set of specific mathematical problems, and then implement the appropriate numerical methods to solve these problems. Uses a “building-block” approach, starting with simpler mathemati...

  19. Universal Engineering Model for Cooling Towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Arif

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a universal engineering model, which can be used to formulates both counter-flow and cross-flow cooling towers. By using fundamental laws of mass and energy balance, the effectiveness of heat exchange is approximated by a second order polynomial equation. Gauss -Newton and Levenberg-Marquardt methods are then used to determine the coefficients from manufactures data. Compared with the existing models, the new model has two main advantages: (1 As the engineering model is derived from engineering perspective, it involves fewer input variables and has better description of the cooling tower operation; (2 There is no iterative computation required, this feature is very important for online optimization of cooling tower performance. Although the model is simple, the results are very accurate. Application examples are given to compare the proposed model with commonly used models.

  20. Nordic Workshop on Model Driven Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Staron, Miroslaw; Kuzniarz, Ludwik

    2007-01-01

    Modeling is an integral part of software engineering. Models are built to both specify details for construction of software systems and to document software designs. The models are constructed using various methods and tools, such as the popular Unified Modeling Language, or emerging Domain Specific Modeling Languages. Modeling is intended to shrink the gap between the problem domain and the solution space by raising the levels of abstraction in software development and increasing the degree ...

  1. Control of Stirling engine. Simplified, compressible model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, P. I.; Sokołowski, J.; Żochowski, A.

    2016-06-01

    A one-dimensional free boundary problem on a motion of a heavy piston in a tube filled with viscous gas is considered. The system of governing equations and boundary conditions is derived. The obtained system of differential equations can be regarded as a mathematical model of an exterior combustion engine. The existence of a weak solution to this model is proved. The problem of maximization of the total work of the engine is considered.

  2. Model-driven Engineering for Requirements Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Baudry, Benoit; Nebut, Clementine; Le Traon,Yves

    2007-01-01

    Requirements engineering (RE) encompasses a set of activities for eliciting, modelling, agreeing, communicating and validating requirements that precisely define the problem domain for a software system. Several tools and methods exist to perform each of these activities, but they mainly remain separate, making it difficult to capture the global consistency of large requirement documents. In this paper we introduce model-driven engineering (MDE) as a possible technical solution to integrate the...

  3. A simple model of search engine pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Eliaz, Kfir; Spiegler, Ran

    2009-01-01

    We present a simple model of how a monopolistic search engine optimally determines the average quality of firms in its search pool. In our model, there is a continuum of consumers, who use the search engine’s pool, and there is a continuum of firms, whose entry to the pool is restricted by a price set by the search engine. We show that a monopolistic search engine may have an incentive to set a relatively low price that encouarges low-relevance advertisers to enter the searc...

  4. Learning to Model in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainsburg, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Policymakers and education scholars recommend incorporating mathematical modeling into mathematics education. Limited implementation of modeling instruction in schools, however, has constrained research on how students learn to model, leaving unresolved debates about whether modeling should be reified and explicitly taught as a competence, whether…

  5. A New Method for Cardiovascular Disease Clinical Diagnosis Based on Artificial Neural Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis. In order to improve the accuracy of Clinical Diagnosis for Cardiovascular Disease, ANN(Artificial Neural Network is introduced in this paper. 200 cases of cardiovascular disease which have similar symptom and different diagnosis are sampled from our database. BP Network model in Matlab environment is created for these cases. Simulation results show that the Diagnosis after training is much better than that with the doctor’ diagnosis opinion. It can be concluded that this new method is of important value for realistic scale in clinical.

  6. Role Models and the Psychological Characteristics That Buffer Low-Socioeconomic-Status Youth from Cardiovascular Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Edith; Lee, William K.; Cavey, Lisa; Ho, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Little is understood about why some youth from low-socioeconomic-status (SES) environments exhibit good health despite adversity. This study tested whether role models and "shift-and-persist" approaches (reframing stressors more benignly while persisting with future optimism) protect low-SES youth from cardiovascular risk. A total of 163…

  7. Development of patient specific cardiovascular models predicting dynamics in response to orthostatic stress challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological realistic models of the controlled cardiovascular system are constructed and validated against clinical data. Special attention is paid to the control of blood pressure, cerebral blood flow velocity, and heart rate during postural challenges, including sit-to-stand and head-up tilt....

  8. A Simple HCCI Engine Model for Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killingsworth, N; Aceves, S; Flowers, D; Krstic, M

    2006-06-29

    The homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine is an attractive technology because of its high efficiency and low emissions. However, HCCI lacks a direct combustion trigger making control of combustion timing challenging, especially during transients. To aid in HCCI engine control we present a simple model of the HCCI combustion process valid over a range of intake pressures, intake temperatures, equivalence ratios, and engine speeds. The model provides an estimate of the combustion timing on a cycle-by-cycle basis. An ignition threshold, which is a function of the in-cylinder motored temperature and pressure is used to predict start of combustion. This model allows the synthesis of nonlinear control laws, which can be utilized for control of an HCCI engine during transients.

  9. A Large-Scale, Energetic Model of Cardiovascular Homeostasis Predicts Dynamics of Arterial Pressure in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Roytvarf, Alexander; Shusterman, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    The energetic balance of forces in the cardiovascular system is vital to the stability of blood flow to all physiological systems in mammals. Yet, a large-scale, theoretical model, summarizing the energetic balance of major forces in a single, mathematically closed system has not been described. Although a number of computer simulations have been successfully performed with the use of analog models, the analysis of energetic balance of forces in such models is obscured by a big number of inte...

  10. Combustion modeling in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental assumptions of the Blizard and Keck combustion model for internal combustion engines are examined and a generalization of that model is derived. The most significant feature of the model is that it permits the occurrence of unburned hydrocarbons in the thermodynamic-kinetic modeling of exhaust gases. The general formulas are evaluated in two specific cases that are likely to be significant in the applications of the model.

  11. Human modeling in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Review on progress of research and development on human modeling methods is made from the viewpoint of its importance on total man-machine system reliability surrounding nuclear power plant operation. Basic notions on three different approaches of human modeling (behavioristics, cognitives and sociologistics) are firstly introduced, followed by the explanation of fundamental scheme to understand human cognitives at man-machine interface and the mechanisms of human error and its classification. Then, general methodologies on human cognitive model by AI are explained with the brief summary of various R and D activities now prevailing in the human modeling communities around the world. A new method of dealing with group human reliability is also introduced which is based on sociologistic mathematical model. Lastly, problems on human model validation are discussed, followed by the introduction of new experimental method to estimate human cognitive state by psycho-physiological measurement, which is a new methodology plausible for human model validation. (author)

  12. Modeling and Simulation of Hydraulic Engine Mounts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Shanzhong; Marshall McNea

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic engine mounts are widely used in automotive powertrains for vibration isolation.A lumped mechanical parameter model is a traditional approach to model and simulate such mounts.This paper presents a dynamical model of a passive hydraulic engine mount with a double-chamber,an inertia track,a decoupler,and a plunger.The model is developed based on analogy between electrical systems and mechanical-hydraulic systems.The model is established to capture both low and high frequency dynatmic behaviors of the hydraulic mount.The model will be further used to find the approximate pulse responses of the mounts in terms of the force transmission and top chamber pressure.The close form solution from the simplifiod linear model may provide some insight into the highly nonlinear behavior of the mounts.Based on the model,computer simulation has been carried out to study dynamic performance of the hydraulic mount.

  13. Sequential use of human-derived medium supplements favours cardiovascular tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Riem Vis, PW; Sluijter, JPG; Soekhradj - Soechit, RS Sarita; Herwerden, van, LA; Kluin, J; Bouten, CVC Carlijn

    2012-01-01

    Abstract For clinical application of tissue engineering strategies, the use of animal-derived serum in culture medium is not recommended, because it can evoke immune responses in patients. We previously observed that human platelet-lysate (PL) is favourable for cell expansion, but generates weaker tissue as compared to culture in foetal bovine serum (FBS). We investigated if human serum (HS) is a better human supplement to increase tissue strength. Cells were isolated from venous grafts of 10...

  14. Mathematical modeling a chemical engineer's perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherford, Aris

    1999-01-01

    Mathematical modeling is the art and craft of building a system of equations that is both sufficiently complex to do justice to physical reality and sufficiently simple to give real insight into the situation. Mathematical Modeling: A Chemical Engineer's Perspective provides an elementary introduction to the craft by one of the century's most distinguished practitioners.Though the book is written from a chemical engineering viewpoint, the principles and pitfalls are common to all mathematical modeling of physical systems. Seventeen of the author's frequently cited papers are reprinted to illus

  15. Engineering Abstractions in Model Checking and Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achenbach, Michael; Ostermann, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Abstractions are used in model checking to tackle problems like state space explosion or modeling of IO. The application of these abstractions in real software development processes, however, lacks engineering support. This is one reason why model checking is not widely used in practice yet and...... testing is still state of the art in falsification. We show how user-defined abstractions can be integrated into a Java PathFinder setting with tools like AspectJ or Javassist and discuss implications of remaining weaknesses of these tools. We believe that a principled engineering approach to designing...

  16. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Afford New Opportunities in Inherited Cardiovascular Disease Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Bayzigitov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental studies of molecular and cellular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease pathogenesis are required to create more effective and safer methods of their therapy. The studies can be carried out only when model systems that fully recapitulate pathological phenotype seen in patients are used. Application of laboratory animals for cardiovascular disease modeling is limited because of physiological differences with humans. Since discovery of induced pluripotency generating induced pluripotent stem cells has become a breakthrough technology in human disease modeling. In this review, we discuss a progress that has been made in modeling inherited arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies, studying molecular mechanisms of the diseases, and searching for and testing drug compounds using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

  17. Modeling Cardiovascular Hemodynamics Using the Lattice Boltzmann Method on Massively Parallel Supercomputers

    OpenAIRE

    Randles, Amanda Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Accurate and reliable modeling of cardiovascular hemodynamics has the potential to improve understanding of the localization and progression of heart diseases, which are currently the most common cause of death in Western countries. However, building a detailed, realistic model of human blood flow is a formidable mathematical and computational challenge. The simulation must combine the motion of the fluid, the intricate geometry of the blood vessels, continual changes in flow and pressure d...

  18. Cardiovascular Surgery Residency Program: Training Coronary Anastomosis Using the Arroyo Simulator and UNIFESP Models

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Angel Maluf; Walter José Gomes; Ademir Massarico Bras; Thiago Cavalcante Vila Nova de Araújo; André Lupp Mota; Caio Cesar Cardoso; Rafael Viana dos S. Coutinho

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: Engage the UNIFESP Cardiovascular Surgery residents in coronary anastomosis, assess their skills and certify results, using the Arroyo Anastomosis Simulator and UNIFESP surgical models. METHODS: First to 6th year residents attended a weekly program of technical training in coronary anastomosis, using 4 simulation models: 1. Arroyo simulator; 2. Dummy with a plastic heart; 3. Dummy with a bovine heart; and 4. Dummy with a beating pig heart. The assessment test was compr...

  19. Animal Models in Cardiovascular Research: Hypertension and Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Xin-Fang Leong; Chun-Yi Ng; Kamsiah Jaarin

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and atherosclerosis are among the most common causes of mortality in both developed and developing countries. Experimental animal models of hypertension and atherosclerosis have become a valuable tool for providing information on etiology, pathophysiology, and complications of the disease and on the efficacy and mechanism of action of various drugs and compounds used in treatment. An animal model has been developed to study hypertension and atherosclerosis for several reasons. Co...

  20. Software Engineering Tools for Scientific Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Marc; Saboo, Pallabi; Sonsini, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Software tools were constructed to address issues the NASA Fortran development community faces, and they were tested on real models currently in use at NASA. These proof-of-concept tools address the High-End Computing Program and the Modeling, Analysis, and Prediction Program. Two examples are the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric model in Cell Fortran on the Cell Broadband Engine, and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) coupled atmosphere- ocean model called ModelE, written in fixed format Fortran.

  1. Model engineering in a modular PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of PSA (Probabilistic Safety Analysis) for complex industrial systems, often PSA models in the form of fault and event trees are developed to model the risk of unwanted situations (hazards). While the recent decades, PSA models have gained high acceptance and have been developed massively. This lead to an increase in model sizes and complexity. Today, PSA models are often difficult to understand and maintain. This manuscript presents the concept of a modular PSA. A modular PSA tries to cope with the increased complexity by the techniques of modularization and instantiation. Modularization targets to treat a model by smaller pieces (the 'modules') to regain control over models. Instantiation aims to configure a generic model to different contexts. Both try to reduce model complexity. A modular PSA proposes new functionality to manage PSA models. Current model management is rather limited and not efficient. This manuscript shows new methods to manage the evolutions (versions) and deviations (variants) of PSA models in a modular PSA. The concepts of version and variant management are presented in this thesis. In this context, a model comparison and fusion of PSA models is precised. Model comparison provides important feedback to model engineers and model fusion kind of combines the work from different model engineers (concurrent model engineering). Apart from model management, methods to understand the content of PSA models are presented. The methods focus to highlight the dependencies between modules rather than their contents. Dependencies are automatically derived from a model structure. They express relations between model objects (for example a fault tree may have dependencies to basic events). To visualize those dependencies (for example in form of a model cartography) can constitute a crucial aid to model engineers for understanding complex interrelations in PSA models. Within the scope of this thesis, a software named 'Andromeda' has been

  2. A Novel Platform for Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Toxicological Characterization of Inhaled Engineered Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Diaz, Edgar; Long, Mark S.; Godleski, John; Brain, Joseph; Sotiris E. Pratsinis; Demokritou, Philip

    2012-01-01

    A novel method is presented which is suitable for assessing in-vivo the link between the physico-chemical properties of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and their biological outcomes. The ability of the technique to generate a variety of industry-relevant, property-controlled ENM exposure atmospheres for inhalation studies was systematically investigated. The primary particle size for Fe2O3, SiO2, Ag and Ag/SiO2 was controlled from 4 to 25 nm, while the corresponding agglomerate mobility diame...

  3. A systematic review on the application of cardiovascular risk prediction models in pharmacoeconomics, with a focus on primary prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevanovic, Jelena; Postma, Maarten J.; Pechlivanoglou, Petros

    2012-01-01

    Background: Long-term trials on the effectiveness of pharmacological treatment for primary cardiovascular disease prevention are scant. For that reason risk prediction models are used as a tool to project changes in cardiovascular disease incidence due to changes in risk factor levels observed in sh

  4. Chain modeling for life cycle systems engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, J.J. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shapiro, V. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Spatial Automation Lab.

    1997-12-01

    Throughout Sandia`s history, products have been represented by drawings. Solid modeling systems have recently replaced drawings as the preferred means for representing product geometry. These systems are used for product visualization, engineering analysis and manufacturing planning. Unfortunately, solid modeling technology is inadequate for life cycle systems engineering, which requires maintenance of technical history, efficient management of geometric and non-geometric data, and explicit representation of engineering and manufacturing characteristics. Such information is not part of the mathematical foundation of solid modeling. The current state-of-the-art in life cycle engineering is comprised of painstakingly created special purpose tools, which often are incompatible. New research on {open_quotes}chain modeling{close_quotes} provides a method of chaining the functionality of a part to the geometric representation. Chain modeling extends classical solid modeling to include physical, manufacturing, and procedural information required for life cycle engineering. In addition, chain modeling promises to provide the missing theoretical basis for Sandia`s parent/child product realization paradigm. In chain modeling, artifacts and systems are characterized in terms of their combinatorial properties: cell complexes, chains, and their operators. This approach is firmly rooted in algebraic topology and is a natural extension of current technology. The potential benefits of this approach include explicit hierarchical and combinatorial representation of physics, geometry, functionality, test, and legacy data in a common computational framework that supports a rational decision process and partial design automation. Chain modeling will have a significant impact on design preservation, system identification, parameterization, system reliability, and design simplification.

  5. Engineering Abstractions in Model Checking and Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Achenbach, Michael; Ostermann, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Abstractions are used in model checking to tackle problems like state space explosion or modeling of IO. The application of these abstractions in real software development processes, however, lacks engineering support. This is one reason why model checking is not widely used in practice yet and testing is still state of the art in falsification. We show how user-defined abstractions can be integrated into a Java PathFinder setting with tools like AspectJ or Javassist and discuss implicati...

  6. Software-Engineering Process Simulation Model (SEPS)

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, C. Y.; Abdel-Hamid, T.; Sherif, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    This article describes tlie Software-Engineering Process Simulation (SEPS) model developed at JPL. SEPS is a dynamic simulation model of the software project-development process. It uses the feedback principles of system dynamics to simulate the dynamic interactions among various software life-cycle development activities and management decision-making processes. The model is designed to be a planning tool to examine trade-offs of cost, schedule, and functionality, and to test ...

  7. Genetically engineered mouse models of pituitary tumors

    OpenAIRE

    DavidACano; AlfonsoSoto-Moreno

    2014-01-01

    Animal models constitute valuable tools for investigating the pathogenesis of cancer as well as for preclinical testing of novel therapeutics approaches. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of pituitary tumor formation remain poorly understood, particularly in sporadic adenomas, thus making it a challenge to model pituitary tumors in mice. Nevertheless, genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of pituitary tumors have provided important insight into pituitary tumor biology. In this paper, w...

  8. Model-based requirements engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Holt, Jon

    2012-01-01

    This book provides a hands-on introduction to model-based requirementsengineering and management by describing a set of views that form the basisfor the approach. These views take into account each individual requirement interms of its description, but then also provide each requirement with meaning byputting it into the correct 'context'. A requirement that has been put into a contextis known as a 'use case' and may be based upon either stakeholders or levelsof hierarchy in a system. Each use case must then be analysed and validated bydefining a combination of scenarios and formal mathematica

  9. Engine modeling and control modeling and electronic management of internal combustion engines

    CERN Document Server

    Isermann, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    The increasing demands for internal combustion engines with regard to fuel consumption, emissions and driveability lead to more actuators, sensors and complex control functions. A systematic implementation of the electronic control systems requires mathematical models from basic design through simulation to calibration. The book treats physically-based as well as models based experimentally on test benches for gasoline (spark ignition) and diesel (compression ignition) engines and uses them for the design of the different control functions. The main topics are: - Development steps for engine control - Stationary and dynamic experimental modeling - Physical models of intake, combustion, mechanical system, turbocharger, exhaust, cooling, lubrication, drive train - Engine control structures, hardware, software, actuators, sensors, fuel supply, injection system, camshaft - Engine control methods, static and dynamic feedforward and feedback control, calibration and optimization, HiL, RCP, control software developm...

  10. Engineering design models for SNUPPS project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standardization of design for five nuclear units (SNUPPS) has provided an economic justification for a very extensive modeling effort. The use of engineering design models has been fully integrated into the design process of the SNUPPS Standard Power Block. The models serve as primary engineering tools for the location and design of large and small piping, HVAC duct work, electrical trays, conduit, instrumentation, hangers, and embeds. The models are also used for review and optimization of the physical design of the Standard Power Block and provide early identification of operational problems and interferences. Similar interferences encountered during construction of previous nuclear power plants have added millions of dollars in cost. Reviews of the model by client, management and operations personnel provide them with a clear understanding of systems and plant layout including provision for access, inservice inspection and maintenance

  11. Numerical modeling in materials science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Rappaz, Michel; Deville, Michel

    2003-01-01

    This book introduces the concepts and methodologies related to the modelling of the complex phenomena occurring in materials processing. After a short reminder of conservation laws and constitutive relationships, the authors introduce the main numerical methods: finite differences, finite volumes and finite elements. These techniques are developed in three main chapters of the book that tackle more specific problems: phase transformation, solid mechanics and fluid flow. The two last chapters treat inverse methods to obtain the boundary conditions or the material properties and stochastic methods for microstructural simulation. This book is intended for undergraduate and graduate students in materials science and engineering, mechanical engineering and physics and for engineering professionals or researchers who want to get acquainted with numerical simulation to model and compute materials processing.

  12. Rocket engine diagnostics using qualitative modeling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Michael; Maul, William; Meyer, Claudia; Sovie, Amy

    1992-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Lewis Research Center are presently developing qualitative modeling techniques for automated rocket engine diagnostics. A qualitative model of a turbopump interpropellant seal system has been created. The qualitative model describes the effects of seal failures on the system steady-state behavior. This model is able to diagnose the failure of particular seals in the system based on anomalous temperature and pressure values. The anomalous values input to the qualitative model are generated using numerical simulations. Diagnostic test cases include both single and multiple seal failures.

  13. Model tuning in engineering: uncovering the logic

    OpenAIRE

    Steele, Katie; Werndl, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    In engineering, as in other scientific fields, researchers seek to confirm their models with real-world data. It is common practice to assess models in terms of the distance between the model outputs and the corresponding experimental observations. An important question that arises is whether the model should then be ‘tuned’, in the sense of estimating the values of free parameters to get a better fit with the data, and furthermore whether the tuned model can be confirmed with the same data u...

  14. Bayesian network modeling: A case study of an epidemiologic system analysis of cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster-Parra, P; Tauler, P; Bennasar-Veny, M; Ligęza, A; López-González, A A; Aguiló, A

    2016-04-01

    An extensive, in-depth study of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) seems to be of crucial importance in the research of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in order to prevent (or reduce) the chance of developing or dying from CVD. The main focus of data analysis is on the use of models able to discover and understand the relationships between different CVRF. In this paper a report on applying Bayesian network (BN) modeling to discover the relationships among thirteen relevant epidemiological features of heart age domain in order to analyze cardiovascular lost years (CVLY), cardiovascular risk score (CVRS), and metabolic syndrome (MetS) is presented. Furthermore, the induced BN was used to make inference taking into account three reasoning patterns: causal reasoning, evidential reasoning, and intercausal reasoning. Application of BN tools has led to discovery of several direct and indirect relationships between different CVRF. The BN analysis showed several interesting results, among them: CVLY was highly influenced by smoking being the group of men the one with highest risk in CVLY; MetS was highly influence by physical activity (PA) being again the group of men the one with highest risk in MetS, and smoking did not show any influence. BNs produce an intuitive, transparent, graphical representation of the relationships between different CVRF. The ability of BNs to predict new scenarios when hypothetical information is introduced makes BN modeling an Artificial Intelligence (AI) tool of special interest in epidemiological studies. As CVD is multifactorial the use of BNs seems to be an adequate modeling tool. PMID:26777431

  15. Ethical Issues in Engineering Models : Personal Reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, Jack P.C.

    2010-01-01

    I start this contribution with an overview of my personal involvement—as an Operations Research consultant—in several engineering case-studies that may raise ethical questions; these case studies employ simulation models. Next, I present an overview of the recent literature on ethical issues in mode

  16. Cardiovascular Surgery Residency Program: Training Coronary Anastomosis Using the Arroyo Simulator and UNIFESP Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Maluf

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: Engage the UNIFESP Cardiovascular Surgery residents in coronary anastomosis, assess their skills and certify results, using the Arroyo Anastomosis Simulator and UNIFESP surgical models. METHODS: First to 6th year residents attended a weekly program of technical training in coronary anastomosis, using 4 simulation models: 1. Arroyo simulator; 2. Dummy with a plastic heart; 3. Dummy with a bovine heart; and 4. Dummy with a beating pig heart. The assessment test was comprised of 10 items, using a scale from 1 to 5 points in each of them, creating a global score of 50 points maximum. RESULTS: The technical performance of the candidate showed improvement in all items, especially manual skill and technical progress, critical sense of the work performed, confidence in the procedure and reduction of the time needed to perform the anastomosis after 12 weeks practice. In response to the multiplicity of factors that currently influence the cardiovascular surgeon training, there have been combined efforts to reform the practices of surgical medical training. CONCLUSION: 1 - The four models of simulators offer a considerable contribution to the field of cardiovascular surgery, improving the skill and dexterity of the surgeon in training. 2 - Residents have shown interest in training and cooperate in the development of innovative procedures for surgical medical training in the art.

  17. Fluctuations in a coupled-oscillator model of the cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Jorge A.; Suárez-Vargas, Jose J.; Stefanovska, Aneta; McClintock, Peter V. E.

    2007-06-01

    We present a model of the cardiovascular system (CVS) based on a system of coupled oscillators. Using this approach we can describe several complex physiological phenomena that can have a range of applications. For instance, heart rate variability (HRV), can have a new deterministic explanation. The intrinsic dynamics of the HRV is controlled by deterministic couplings between the physiological oscillators in our model and without the need to introduce external noise as is commonly done. This new result provides potential applications not only for physiological systems but also for the design of very precise electronic generators where the frequency stability is crucial. Another important phenomenon is that of oscillation death. We show that in our CVS model the mechanism leading to the quenching of the oscillations can be controlled, not only by the coupling parameter, but by a more general scheme. In fact, we propose that a change in the relative current state of the cardiovascular oscillators can lead to a cease of the oscillations without actually changing the strength of the coupling among them. We performed real experiments using electronic oscillators and show them to match the theoretical and numerical predictions. We discuss the relevance of the studied phenomena to real cardiovascular systems regimes, including the explanation of certain pathologies, and the possible applications in medical practice.

  18. Comparison of primary care models in the prevention of cardiovascular disease - a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogg William

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care providers play an important role in preventing and managing cardiovascular disease. This study compared the quality of preventive cardiovascular care delivery amongst different primary care models. Methods This is a secondary analysis of a larger randomized control trial, known as the Improved Delivery of Cardiovascular Care (IDOCC through Outreach Facilitation. Using baseline data collected through IDOCC, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 82 primary care practices from three delivery models in Eastern Ontario, Canada: 43 fee-for-service, 27 blended-capitation and 12 community health centres with salary-based physicians. Medical chart audits from 4,808 patients with or at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease were used to examine each practice's adherence to ten evidence-based processes of care for diabetes, chronic kidney disease, dyslipidemia, hypertension, weight management, and smoking cessation care. Generalized estimating equation models adjusting for age, sex, rurality, number of cardiovascular-related comorbidities, and year of data collection were used to compare guideline adherence amongst the three models. Results The percentage of patients with diabetes that received two hemoglobin A1c tests during the study year was significantly higher in community health centres (69% than in fee-for-service (45% practices (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR = 2.4 [95% CI 1.4-4.2], p = 0.001. Blended capitation practices had a significantly higher percentage of patients who had their waistlines monitored than in fee-for-service practices (19% vs. 5%, AOR = 3.7 [1.8-7.8], p = 0.0006, and who were recommended a smoking cessation drug when compared to community health centres (33% vs. 16%, AOR = 2.4 [1.3-4.6], p = 0.007. Overall, quality of diabetes care was higher in community health centres, while smoking cessation care and weight management was higher in the blended-capitation models. Fee-for-service practices

  19. Mechanics, Models and Methods in Civil Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Maceri, Franco

    2012-01-01

    „Mechanics, Models and Methods in Civil Engineering” collects leading papers dealing with actual Civil Engineering problems. The approach is in the line of the Italian-French school and therefore deeply couples mechanics and mathematics creating new predictive theories, enhancing clarity in understanding, and improving effectiveness in applications. The authors of the contributions collected here belong to the Lagrange Laboratory, an European Research Network active since many years. This book will be of a major interest for the reader aware of modern Civil Engineering.

  20. Mathematical modeling and validation in physiology applications to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bachar, Mostafa; Kappel, Franz

    2013-01-01

    This volume synthesizes theoretical and practical aspects of both the mathematical and life science viewpoints needed for modeling of the cardiovascular-respiratory system specifically and physiological systems generally.  Theoretical points include model design, model complexity and validation in the light of available data, as well as control theory approaches to feedback delay and Kalman filter applications to parameter identification. State of the art approaches using parameter sensitivity are discussed for enhancing model identifiability through joint analysis of model structure and data. Practical examples illustrate model development at various levels of complexity based on given physiological information. The sensitivity-based approaches for examining model identifiability are illustrated by means of specific modeling  examples. The themes presented address the current problem of patient-specific model adaptation in the clinical setting, where data is typically limited.

  1. Developing engineering processes through integrated modelling of product and process

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Jeppe Bjerrum; Hvam, Lars

    2012-01-01

    This article aims at developing an operational tool for integrated modelling of product assortments and engineering processes in companies making customer specific products. Integrating a product model in the design of engineering processes will provide a deeper understanding of the engineering activities as well as insight into how product features affect the engineering processes. The article suggests possible ways of integrating models of products with models of engineering processes. The ...

  2. Mutation-based Model Synthesis in Model Driven Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Sagar; Baudry, Benoit

    2006-01-01

    With the increasing use of models for software development and the emergence of model-driven engineering, it has become important to build accurate and precise models that present certain characteristics. Model transformation testing is a domain that requires generating a large number of models that satisfy coverage properties (cover the code of the transformation or the structure of the metamodel). However, manually building a set of models to test a transformation is a tedious task and havi...

  3. Engineering design of systems models and methods

    CERN Document Server

    Buede, Dennis M

    2009-01-01

    The ideal introduction to the engineering design of systems-now in a new edition. The Engineering Design of Systems, Second Edition compiles a wealth of information from diverse sources to provide a unique, one-stop reference to current methods for systems engineering. It takes a model-based approach to key systems engineering design activities and introduces methods and models used in the real world. Features new to this edition include: * The addition of Systems Modeling Language (SysML) to several of the chapters, as well as the introduction of new terminology * Additional material on partitioning functions and components * More descriptive material on usage scenarios based on literature from use case development * Updated homework assignments * The software product CORE (from Vitech Corporation) is used to generate the traditional SE figures and the software product MagicDraw UML with SysML plugins (from No Magic, Inc.) is used for the SysML figures This book is designed to be an introductory reference ...

  4. Building Test Cases through Model Driven Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Helaine; Lopes, Denivaldo; Abdelouahab, Zair; Hammoudi, Slimane; Claro, Daniela Barreiro

    Recently, Model Driven Engineering (MDE) has been proposed to face the complexity in the development, maintenance and evolution of large and distributed software systems. Model Driven Architecture (MDA) is an example of MDE. In this context, model transformations enable a large reuse of software systems through the transformation of a Platform Independent Model into a Platform Specific Model. Although source code can be generated from models, defects can be injected during the modeling or transformation process. In order to delivery software systems without defects that cause errors and fails, the source code must be submitted to test. In this paper, we present an approach that takes care of test in the whole software life cycle, i.e. it starts in the modeling level and finishes in the test of source code of software systems. We provide an example to illustrate our approach.

  5. Modeling an efficient Brownian heat engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfaw, Mesfin

    2008-09-01

    We discuss the effect of subdividing the ratchet potential on the performance of a tiny Brownian heat engine that is modeled as a Brownian particle hopping in a viscous medium in a sawtooth potential (with or without load) assisted by alternately placed hot and cold heat baths along its path. We show that the velocity, the efficiency and the coefficient of performance of the refrigerator maximize when the sawtooth potential is subdivided into series of smaller connected barrier series. When the engine operates quasistatically, we analytically show that the efficiency of the engine can not approach the Carnot efficiency and, the coefficient of performance of the refrigerator is always less than the Carnot refrigerator due to the irreversible heat flow via the kinetic energy.

  6. Model based systems engineering for astronomical projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karban, R.; Andolfato, L.; Bristow, P.; Chiozzi, G.; Esselborn, M.; Schilling, M.; Schmid, C.; Sommer, H.; Zamparelli, M.

    2014-08-01

    Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) is an emerging field of systems engineering for which the System Modeling Language (SysML) is a key enabler for descriptive, prescriptive and predictive models. This paper surveys some of the capabilities, expectations and peculiarities of tools-assisted MBSE experienced in real-life astronomical projects. The examples range in depth and scope across a wide spectrum of applications (for example documentation, requirements, analysis, trade studies) and purposes (addressing a particular development need, or accompanying a project throughout many - if not all - its lifecycle phases, fostering reuse and minimizing ambiguity). From the beginnings of the Active Phasing Experiment, through VLT instrumentation, VLTI infrastructure, Telescope Control System for the E-ELT, until Wavefront Control for the E-ELT, we show how stepwise refinements of tools, processes and methods have provided tangible benefits to customary system engineering activities like requirement flow-down, design trade studies, interfaces definition, and validation, by means of a variety of approaches (like Model Checking, Simulation, Model Transformation) and methodologies (like OOSEM, State Analysis)

  7. The Little Engines That Could: Modeling the Performance of World Wide Web Search Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Bradlow, Eric T; David C. Schmittlein

    2000-01-01

    This research examines the ability of six popular Web search engines, individually and collectively, to locate Web pages containing common marketing/management phrases. We propose and validate a model for search engine performance that is able to represent key patterns of coverage and overlap among the engines. The model enables us to estimate the typical additional benefit of using multiple search engines, depending on the particular set of engines being considered. It also provides an estim...

  8. Genetically engineered mouse models of pituitary tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DavidACano

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Animal models constitute valuable tools for investigating the pathogenesis of cancer as well as for preclinical testing of novel therapeutics approaches. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of pituitary tumor formation remain poorly understood, particularly in sporadic adenomas, thus making it a challenge to model pituitary tumors in mice. Nevertheless, genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs of pituitary tumors have provided important insight into pituitary tumor biology. In this paper, we review various GEMMs of pituitary tumors, highlighting their contributions and limitations, and discuss opportunities for research in the field.

  9. Software-Engineering Process Simulation (SEPS) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. Y.; Abdel-Hamid, T.; Sherif, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    The Software Engineering Process Simulation (SEPS) model is described which was developed at JPL. SEPS is a dynamic simulation model of the software project development process. It uses the feedback principles of system dynamics to simulate the dynamic interactions among various software life cycle development activities and management decision making processes. The model is designed to be a planning tool to examine tradeoffs of cost, schedule, and functionality, and to test the implications of different managerial policies on a project's outcome. Furthermore, SEPS will enable software managers to gain a better understanding of the dynamics of software project development and perform postmodern assessments.

  10. 3D Modeling Engine Representation Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Prescott; Ramprasad Sampath; Curtis Smith; Timothy Yang

    2014-09-01

    Computers have been used for 3D modeling and simulation, but only recently have computational resources been able to give realistic results in a reasonable time frame for large complex models. This summary report addressed the methods, techniques, and resources used to develop a 3D modeling engine to represent risk analysis simulation for advanced small modular reactor structures and components. The simulations done for this evaluation were focused on external events, specifically tsunami floods, for a hypothetical nuclear power facility on a coastline.

  11. Multi-scale Modeling of the Cardiovascular System: Disease Development, Progression, and Clinical Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanhang; Barocas, Victor H; Berceli, Scott A; Clancy, Colleen E; Eckmann, David M; Garbey, Marc; Kassab, Ghassan S; Lochner, Donna R; McCulloch, Andrew D; Tran-Son-Tay, Roger; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2016-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of death in the western world. With the current development of clinical diagnostics to more accurately measure the extent and specifics of CVDs, a laudable goal is a better understanding of the structure-function relation in the cardiovascular system. Much of this fundamental understanding comes from the development and study of models that integrate biology, medicine, imaging, and biomechanics. Information from these models provides guidance for developing diagnostics, and implementation of these diagnostics to the clinical setting, in turn, provides data for refining the models. In this review, we introduce multi-scale and multi-physical models for understanding disease development, progression, and designing clinical interventions. We begin with multi-scale models of cardiac electrophysiology and mechanics for diagnosis, clinical decision support, personalized and precision medicine in cardiology with examples in arrhythmia and heart failure. We then introduce computational models of vasculature mechanics and associated mechanical forces for understanding vascular disease progression, designing clinical interventions, and elucidating mechanisms that underlie diverse vascular conditions. We conclude with a discussion of barriers that must be overcome to provide enhanced insights, predictions, and decisions in pre-clinical and clinical applications. PMID:27138523

  12. High-Dose Menaquinone-7 Supplementation Reduces Cardiovascular Calcification in a Murine Model of Extraosseous Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Scheiber

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular calcification is prevalent in the aging population and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and diabetes mellitus, giving rise to substantial morbidity and mortality. Vitamin K-dependent matrix Gla-protein (MGP is an important inhibitor of calcification. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of high-dose menaquinone-7 (MK-7 supplementation (100 µg/g diet on the development of extraosseous calcification in a murine model. Calcification was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy combined with high phosphate diet in rats. Sham operated animals served as controls. Animals received high or low MK-7 diets for 12 weeks. We assessed vital parameters, serum chemistry, creatinine clearance, and cardiac function. CKD provoked increased aortic (1.3 fold; p < 0.05 and myocardial (2.4 fold; p < 0.05 calcification in line with increased alkaline phosphatase levels (2.2 fold; p < 0.01. MK-7 supplementation inhibited cardiovascular calcification and decreased aortic alkaline phosphatase tissue concentrations. Furthermore, MK-7 supplementation increased aortic MGP messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA expression (10-fold; p < 0.05. CKD-induced arterial hypertension with secondary myocardial hypertrophy and increased elastic fiber breaking points in the arterial tunica media did not change with MK-7 supplementation. Our results show that high-dose MK-7 supplementation inhibits the development of cardiovascular calcification. The protective effect of MK-7 may be related to the inhibition of secondary mineralization of damaged vascular structures.

  13. Requirements engineering-based conceptual modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Insfrán, E.; O. Pastor; Wieringa, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    The software production process involves a set of phases where a clear relationship and smooth transitions between them should be introduced. In this paper, a requirements engineering-based conceptual modelling approach is introduced as a way to improve the quality of the software production process. The aim of this approach is to provide a set of techniques and methods to capture software requirements and to provide a way to move from requirements to a conceptual schema in a traceable way. T...

  14. Damage Propagation Modeling for Aircraft Engine Prognostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai; Simon, Don; Eklund, Neil

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes how damage propagation can be modeled within the modules of aircraft gas turbine engines. To that end, response surfaces of all sensors are generated via a thermo-dynamical simulation model for the engine as a function of variations of flow and efficiency of the modules of interest. An exponential rate of change for flow and efficiency loss was imposed for each data set, starting at a randomly chosen initial deterioration set point. The rate of change of the flow and efficiency denotes an otherwise unspecified fault with increasingly worsening effect. The rates of change of the faults were constrained to an upper threshold but were otherwise chosen randomly. Damage propagation was allowed to continue until a failure criterion was reached. A health index was defined as the minimum of several superimposed operational margins at any given time instant and the failure criterion is reached when health index reaches zero. Output of the model was the time series (cycles) of sensed measurements typically available from aircraft gas turbine engines. The data generated were used as challenge data for the Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) data competition at PHM 08.

  15. Developing engineering processes through integrated modelling of product and process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jeppe Bjerrum; Hvam, Lars

    2012-01-01

    This article aims at developing an operational tool for integrated modelling of product assortments and engineering processes in companies making customer specific products. Integrating a product model in the design of engineering processes will provide a deeper understanding of the engineering...... activities as well as insight into how product features affect the engineering processes. The article suggests possible ways of integrating models of products with models of engineering processes. The models have been tested and further developed in an action research study carried out in collaboration with...... a major international engineering company....

  16. Requirements Engineering Model: Role Based Goal Oriented Model

    OpenAIRE

    Sandfreni; Surendro Ir. Kridanto

    2016-01-01

    Requirements engineering approach through intentional perspective is one of the arguments that appear in the field of requirement engineering. That approach can explain the characteristics of the behavior of an actor. The usage Goal Based Workflow and KAOS method in iStar modeling might help the system analyst to gain knowledge about the internal process inside each of actor sequentially, such that the whole sequential activity to achieve the goal are exposed clearly in those actor’s internal...

  17. Improved engineering models for turbulent wall flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Zhen-Su; Chen, Xi; Zou, Hong-Yue; Hussain, Fazle

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new approach, called structural ensemble dynamics (SED), involving new concepts to describe the mean quantities in wall-bounded flows, and its application to improving the existing engineering turbulence models, as well as its physical interpretation. First, a revised k - ω model for pipe flows is obtained, which accurately predicts, for the first time, both mean velocity and (streamwise) kinetic energy for a wide range of the Reynolds number (Re), validated by Princeton experimental data. In particular, a multiplicative factor is introduced in the dissipation term to model an anomaly in the energy cascade in a meso-layer, predicting the outer peak of agreeing with data. Secondly, a new one-equation model is obtained for compressible turbulent boundary layers (CTBL), building on a multi-layer formula of the stress length function and a generalized temperature-velocity relation. The former refines the multi-layer description - viscous sublayer, buffer layer, logarithmic layer and a newly defined bulk zone - while the latter characterizes a parabolic relation between the mean velocity and temperature. DNS data show our predictions to have a 99% accuracy for several Mach numbers Ma = 2.25, 4.5, improving, up to 10%, a previous similar one-equation model (Baldwin & Lomax, 1978). Our results promise notable improvements in engineering models.

  18. Generomak: Fusion physics, engineering and costing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A generic fusion physics, engineering and economics model (Generomak) was developed as a means of performing consistent analysis of the economic viability of alternative magnetic fusion reactors. The original Generomak model developed at Oak Ridge by Sheffield was expanded for the analyses of the Senior Committee on Environmental Safety and Economics of Magnetic Fusion Energy (ESECOM). This report describes the Generomak code as used by ESECOM. The input data used for each of the ten ESECOM fusion plants and the Generomak code output for each case is given. 14 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs

  19. Cardiovascular Risk Assessment with Vascular Function, Carotid Atherosclerosis and the UKPDS Risk Engine in Korean Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon Sik Seon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPatients with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Few studies have evaluated the cardiovascular disease (CVD risk simultaneously using the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS risk engine and non-invasive vascular tests in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.MethodsParticipants (n=380; aged 20 to 81 years with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes were free of clinical evidence of CVD. The 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke risks were calculated for each patient using the UKPDS risk engine. Carotid intima media thickness (CIMT, flow mediated dilation (FMD, pulse wave velocity (PWV and augmentation index (AI were measured. The correlations between the UKPDS risk engine and the non-invasive vascular tests were assessed using partial correlation analysis, after adjusting for age, and multiple regression analysis.ResultsThe mean 10-year CHD and 10-year stroke risks were 14.92±11.53% and 4.03±3.95%, respectively. The 10-year CHD risk correlated with CIMT (P<0.001, FMD (P=0.017, and PWV (P=0.35 after adjusting for age. The 10-year stroke risk correlated only with the mean CIMT (P<0.001 after adjusting for age. FMD correlated with age (P<0.01 and systolic blood pressure (P=0.09. CIMT correlated with age (P<0.01, HbA1c (P=0.05, and gender (P<0.01.ConclusionThe CVD risk is increased at the onset of type 2 diabetes. CIMT, FMD, and PWV along with the UKPDS risk engine should be considered to evaluate cardiovascular disease risk in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

  20. Engineering model for ultrafast laser microprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audouard, E.; Mottay, E.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast laser micro-machining relies on complex laser-matter interaction processes, leading to a virtually athermal laser ablation. The development of industrial ultrafast laser applications benefits from a better understanding of these processes. To this end, a number of sophisticated scientific models have been developed, providing valuable insights in the physics of the interaction. Yet, from an engineering point of view, they are often difficult to use, and require a number of adjustable parameters. We present a simple engineering model for ultrafast laser processing, applied in various real life applications: percussion drilling, line engraving, and non normal incidence trepanning. The model requires only two global parameters. Analytical results are derived for single pulse percussion drilling or simple pass engraving. Simple assumptions allow to predict the effect of non normal incident beams to obtain key parameters for trepanning drilling. The model is compared to experimental data on stainless steel with a wide range of laser characteristics (time duration, repetition rate, pulse energy) and machining conditions (sample or beam speed). Ablation depth and volume ablation rate are modeled for pulse durations from 100 fs to 1 ps. Trepanning time of 5.4 s with a conicity of 0.15° is obtained for a hole of 900 μm depth and 100 μm diameter.

  1. Matrix models, geometric engineering and elliptic genera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compute the prepotential of N = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories in four dimensions obtained by toroidal compactifications of gauge theories from 6 dimensions, as a function of Kaehler and complex moduli of T2. We use three different methods to obtain this: matrix models, geometric engineering and instanton calculus. Matrix model approach involves summing up planar diagrams of an associated gauge theory on T2. Geometric engineering involves considering F-theory on elliptic threefolds, and using topological vertex to sum up worldsheet instantons. Instanton calculus involves computation of elliptic genera of instanton moduli spaces on R4. We study the compactifications of N = 2* theory in detail and establish equivalence of all these three approaches in this case. As a byproduct we geometrically engineer theories with massive adjoint fields. As one application, we show that the moduli space of mass deformed M5-branes wrapped on T2 combines the Kaehler and complex moduli of T2 and the mass parameter into the period matrix of a genus 2 curve

  2. Developing Project Duration Models in Software Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pierre Bourque; Serge Oligny; Alain Abran; Bertrand Fournier

    2007-01-01

    Based on the empirical analysis of data contained in the International Software Benchmarking Standards Group(ISBSG) repository, this paper presents software engineering project duration models based on project effort. Duration models are built for the entire dataset and for subsets of projects developed for personal computer, mid-range and mainframeplatforms. Duration models are also constructed for projects requiring fewer than 400 person-hours of effort and for projectsre quiring more than 400 person-hours of effort. The usefulness of adding the maximum number of assigned resources as asecond independent variable to explain duration is also analyzed. The opportunity to build duration models directly fromproject functional size in function points is investigated as well.

  3. 76 FR 56637 - Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines Model IO-720-A1B Reciprocating Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska... Model IO-720-A1B Reciprocating Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final... model IO-720-A1B Lycoming Engines reciprocating engines. This AD requires a crankshaft inspection...

  4. Patient specific identification of the cardiac driver function in a cardiovascular system model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hann, C E; Revie, J; Stevenson, D; Heldmann, S; Desaive, T; Froissart, C B; Lambermont, B; Ghuysen, A; Kolh, P; Shaw, G M; Chase, J G

    2011-02-01

    The cardiac muscle activation or driver function, is a major determinant of cardiovascular dynamics, and is often approximated by the ratio of the left ventricle pressure to the left ventricle volume. In an intensive care unit, the left ventricle pressure is usually never measured, and the left ventricle volume is only measured occasionally by echocardiography, so is not available real-time. This paper develops a method for identifying the driver function based on correlates with geometrical features in the aortic pressure waveform. The method is included in an overall cardiovascular modelling approach, and is clinically validated on a porcine model of pulmonary embolism. For validation a comparison is done between the optimized parameters for a baseline model, which uses the direct measurements of the left ventricle pressure and volume, and the optimized parameters from the approximated driver function. The parameters do not significantly change between the two approaches thus showing that the patient specific approach to identifying the driver function is valid, and has potential clinically. PMID:20621383

  5. A biofilm model for engineering design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, I; Bye, C M; Chapman, K; Dold, P L; Fairlamb, P M; Jones, R M

    2007-01-01

    A biofilm model is presented for process engineering purposes--wastewater treatment plant design, upgrade and optimisation. The model belongs in the 1D dynamic layered biofilm model category, with modifications that allow it to be used with one parameter set for a large range of process situations. The biofilm model is integrated with a general activated sludge/anaerobic digestion model combined with a chemical equilibrium, precipitation and pH module. This allows the model to simulate the complex interactions that occur in the aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic layers of the biofilm. The model has been tested and is shown to match a variety of design guidelines, as well as experimental results from batch testing and full-scale plant operation. Both moving bed bioreactors (MBBR) and integrated fixed film activated sludge (IFAS) systems were simulated using the same model and parameter set. A new steady-state solver generates fast solutions and allows interactive design work with the complex model. PMID:17547002

  6. Biomass Reburning - Modeling/Engineering Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter M. Maly; Vitali V. Lissianski; Vladimir M. Zamansky

    1998-04-30

    This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. The second reporting period (January 1- March 31) included kinetic modeling of the reburning process while firing natural gas and biomass. Modeling was done with a kinetic mechanism that combined reactions relevant to reburning from GRI-Mech 2.11 with SNCR reactions. Experimental data obtained in a 1 MMBtu/h Boiler Simulator Facility (BSF) for reburning with natural gas and biomass were modeled using the ODF kinetic code. System was treated as a series of four one-dimensional reactors. Modeling of natural gas reburning qualitatively agrees with experimental data for a wide range of initial conditions. Modeling of furniture waste reburning does not qualitatively match experimental data due to a number of model simplifications. Future work will concentrate on improving the basic reburning model to give quantitative agreement with experiments and on search for better representation of biomass composition in kinetic modeling. Experimental data on biomass reburning are included in Appendix 3. These data were obtained during the reporting period in the scope of a coordinated program funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

  7. Tools for model-based security engineering: models vs. code

    OpenAIRE

    Jürjens, Jan; Yu, Yijun

    2007-01-01

    We present tools to support model-based security engineering on both the model and the code level. In the approach supported by these tools, one firstly specifies the security-critical part of the system (e.g. a crypto protocol) using the UML security extension UMLsec. The models are automatically verified for security properties using automated theorem provers. These are implemented within a framework that supports implementing verification routines, based on XMI output of the diagrams from ...

  8. Modeling the effect of engine assembly mass on engine friction and vehicle fuel economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Feng; Stodolsky, Frank

    An analytical model is developed to estimate the impact of reducing engine assembly mass (the term engine assembly refers to the moving components of the engine system, including crankshafts, valve train, pistons, and connecting rods) on engine friction and vehicle fuel economy. The relative changes in frictional mean effective pressure and fuel economy are proportional to the relative change in assembly mass. These changes increase rapidly as engine speed increases. Based on the model, a 25% reduction in engine assembly mass results in a 2% fuel economy improvement for a typical mid-size passenger car over the EPA Urban and Highway Driving Cycles.

  9. Engineering approach to modeling of piled systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Available methods of analysis of piled systems subjected to dynamic excitation invade areas of mathematics usually beyond the reach of a practising engineer. A simple technique that avoids that conflict is proposed, at least for preliminary studies, and its application, compared with other methods, is shown to be satisfactory. A corrective factor for parameters currently used to represent transmitting boundaries is derived for a finite strip that models an infinite layer. The influence of internal damping on the dynamic stiffness of the layer and on radiation damping is analysed. (Author)

  10. Cardiovascular Disease Modeling Using Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Tanaka

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs has opened up a new scientific frontier in medicine. This technology has made it possible to obtain pluripotent stem cells from individuals with genetic disorders. Because iPSCs carry the identical genetic anomalies related to those disorders, iPSCs are an ideal platform for medical research. The pathophysiological cellular phenotypes of genetically heritable heart diseases such as arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies, have been modeled on cell culture dishes using disease-specific iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes. These model systems can potentially provide new insights into disease mechanisms and drug discoveries. This review focuses on recent progress in cardiovascular disease modeling using iPSCs, and discusses problems and future perspectives concerning their use.

  11. Cardiovascular Dysfunction Following Burn Injury: What We Have Learned from Rat and Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley N. Guillory

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe burn profoundly affects organs both proximal and distal to the actual burn site. Cardiovascular dysfunction is a well-documented phenomenon that increases morbidity and mortality following a massive thermal trauma. Beginning immediately post-burn, during the ebb phase, cardiac function is severely depressed. By 48 h post-injury, cardiac function rebounds and the post-burn myocardium becomes tachycardic and hyperinflammatory. While current clinical trials are investigating a variety of drugs targeted at reducing aspects of the post-burn hypermetabolic response such as heart rate and cardiac work, there is still a paucity of knowledge regarding the underlying mechanisms that induce cardiac dysfunction in the severely burned. There are many animal models of burn injury, from rodents, to sheep or swine, but the majority of burn related cardiovascular investigations have occurred in rat and mouse models. This literature review consolidates the data supporting the prevalent role that β-adrenergic receptors play in mediating post-burn cardiac dysfunction and the idea that pharmacological modulation of this receptor family is a viable therapeutic target for resolving burn-induced cardiac deficits.

  12. Cardiovascular Dysfunction Following Burn Injury: What We Have Learned from Rat and Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillory, Ashley N.; Clayton, Robert P.; Herndon, David N.; Finnerty, Celeste C.

    2016-01-01

    Severe burn profoundly affects organs both proximal and distal to the actual burn site. Cardiovascular dysfunction is a well-documented phenomenon that increases morbidity and mortality following a massive thermal trauma. Beginning immediately post-burn, during the ebb phase, cardiac function is severely depressed. By 48 h post-injury, cardiac function rebounds and the post-burn myocardium becomes tachycardic and hyperinflammatory. While current clinical trials are investigating a variety of drugs targeted at reducing aspects of the post-burn hypermetabolic response such as heart rate and cardiac work, there is still a paucity of knowledge regarding the underlying mechanisms that induce cardiac dysfunction in the severely burned. There are many animal models of burn injury, from rodents, to sheep or swine, but the majority of burn related cardiovascular investigations have occurred in rat and mouse models. This literature review consolidates the data supporting the prevalent role that β-adrenergic receptors play in mediating post-burn cardiac dysfunction and the idea that pharmacological modulation of this receptor family is a viable therapeutic target for resolving burn-induced cardiac deficits. PMID:26729111

  13. Genetically engineered livestock for biomedical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Christopher S

    2016-06-01

    To commemorate Transgenic Animal Research Conference X, this review summarizes the recent progress in developing genetically engineered livestock species as biomedical models. The first of these conferences was held in 1997, which turned out to be a watershed year for the field, with two significant events occurring. One was the publication of the first transgenic livestock animal disease model, a pig with retinitis pigmentosa. Before that, the use of livestock species in biomedical research had been limited to wild-type animals or disease models that had been induced or were naturally occurring. The second event was the report of Dolly, a cloned sheep produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. Cloning subsequently became an essential part of the process for most of the models developed in the last 18 years and is stilled used prominently today. This review is intended to highlight the biomedical modeling achievements that followed those key events, many of which were first reported at one of the previous nine Transgenic Animal Research Conferences. Also discussed are the practical challenges of utilizing livestock disease models now that the technical hurdles of model development have been largely overcome. PMID:26820410

  14. A computable cellular stress network model for non-diseased pulmonary and cardiovascular tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drubin David

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Humans and other organisms are equipped with a set of responses that can prevent damage from exposure to a multitude of endogenous and environmental stressors. If these stress responses are overwhelmed, this can result in pathogenesis of diseases, which is reflected by an increased development of, e.g., pulmonary and cardiac diseases in humans exposed to chronic levels of environmental stress, including inhaled cigarette smoke (CS. Systems biology data sets (e.g., transcriptomics, phosphoproteomics, metabolomics could enable comprehensive investigation of the biological impact of these stressors. However, detailed mechanistic networks are needed to determine which specific pathways are activated in response to different stressors and to drive the qualitative and eventually quantitative assessment of these data. A current limiting step in this process is the availability of detailed mechanistic networks that can be used as an analytical substrate. Results We have built a detailed network model that captures the biology underlying the physiological cellular response to endogenous and exogenous stressors in non-diseased mammalian pulmonary and cardiovascular cells. The contents of the network model reflect several diverse areas of signaling, including oxidative stress, hypoxia, shear stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and xenobiotic stress, that are elicited in response to common pulmonary and cardiovascular stressors. We then tested the ability of the network model to identify the mechanisms that are activated in response to CS, a broad inducer of cellular stress. Using transcriptomic data from the lungs of mice exposed to CS, the network model identified a robust increase in the oxidative stress response, largely mediated by the anti-oxidant NRF2 pathways, consistent with previous reports on the impact of CS exposure in the mammalian lung. Conclusions The results presented here describe the construction of a cellular stress

  15. CFD modelling of Stirling engines with complex design topologies

    OpenAIRE

    Alexakis, Thanos

    2013-01-01

    This research is in the field of CFD modelling of heat engines, particularly the advanced CFD methodologies for the performance characterization of solar Stirling Engines with complex geometrical topologies. The research aims to investigate whether these methods can provide a more inclusive picture of the engine performance and how this information can be used for the design improvement of Stirling engines and the investigation of more complex engine topologies.

  16. Loss terms in free-piston Stirling engine models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lloyd B.

    1992-01-01

    Various models for free piston Stirling engines are reviewed. Initial models were developed primarily for design purposes and to predict operating parameters, especially efficiency. More recently, however, such models have been used to predict engine stability. Free piston Stirling engines have no kinematic constraints and stability may not only be sensitive to the load, but also to various nonlinear loss and spring constraints. The present understanding is reviewed of various loss mechanisms for free piston Stirling engines and how they have been incorporated into engine models is discussed.

  17. ZMOTTO- MODELING THE INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1994-01-01

    The ZMOTTO program was developed to model mathematically a spark-ignited internal combustion engine. ZMOTTO is a large, general purpose program whose calculations can be established at five levels of sophistication. These five models range from an ideal cycle requiring only thermodynamic properties, to a very complex representation demanding full combustion kinetics, transport properties, and poppet valve flow characteristics. ZMOTTO is a flexible and computationally economical program based on a system of ordinary differential equations for cylinder-averaged properties. The calculations assume that heat transfer is expressed in terms of a heat transfer coefficient and that the cylinder average of kinetic plus potential energies remains constant. During combustion, the pressures of burned and unburned gases are assumed equal and their heat transfer areas are assumed proportional to their respective mass fractions. Even the simplest ZMOTTO model provides for residual gas effects, spark advance, exhaust gas recirculation, supercharging, and throttling. In the more complex models, 1) finite rate chemistry replaces equilibrium chemistry in descriptions of both the flame and the burned gases, 2) poppet valve formulas represent fluid flow instead of a zero pressure drop flow, and 3) flame propagation is modeled by mass burning equations instead of as an instantaneous process. Input to ZMOTTO is determined by the model chosen. Thermodynamic data is required for all models. Transport properties and chemical kinetics data are required only as the model complexity grows. Other input includes engine geometry, working fluid composition, operating characteristics, and intake/exhaust data. ZMOTTO accommodates a broad spectrum of reactants. The program will calculate many Otto cycle performance parameters for a number of consecutive cycles (a cycle being an interval of 720 crankangle degrees). A typical case will have a number of initial ideal cycles and progress through levels

  18. D Modelling and Rapid Prototyping for Cardiovascular Surgical Planning - Two Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocerino, E.; Remondino, F.; Uccheddu, F.; Gallo, M.; Gerosa, G.

    2016-06-01

    In the last years, cardiovascular diagnosis, surgical planning and intervention have taken advantages from 3D modelling and rapid prototyping techniques. The starting data for the whole process is represented by medical imagery, in particular, but not exclusively, computed tomography (CT) or multi-slice CT (MCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). On the medical imagery, regions of interest, i.e. heart chambers, valves, aorta, coronary vessels, etc., are segmented and converted into 3D models, which can be finally converted in physical replicas through 3D printing procedure. In this work, an overview on modern approaches for automatic and semiautomatic segmentation of medical imagery for 3D surface model generation is provided. The issue of accuracy check of surface models is also addressed, together with the critical aspects of converting digital models into physical replicas through 3D printing techniques. A patient-specific 3D modelling and printing procedure (Figure 1), for surgical planning in case of complex heart diseases was developed. The procedure was applied to two case studies, for which MCT scans of the chest are available. In the article, a detailed description on the implemented patient-specific modelling procedure is provided, along with a general discussion on the potentiality and future developments of personalized 3D modelling and printing for surgical planning and surgeons practice.

  19. Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) cleanroom process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Scott; Basili, Victor; Godfrey, Sally; Mcgarry, Frank; Pajerski, Rose; Waligora, Sharon

    1991-01-01

    The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) cleanroom process model is described. The term 'cleanroom' originates in the integrated circuit (IC) production process, where IC's are assembled in dust free 'clean rooms' to prevent the destructive effects of dust. When applying the clean room methodology to the development of software systems, the primary focus is on software defect prevention rather than defect removal. The model is based on data and analysis from previous cleanroom efforts within the SEL and is tailored to serve as a guideline in applying the methodology to future production software efforts. The phases that are part of the process model life cycle from the delivery of requirements to the start of acceptance testing are described. For each defined phase, a set of specific activities is discussed, and the appropriate data flow is described. Pertinent managerial issues, key similarities and differences between the SEL's cleanroom process model and the standard development approach used on SEL projects, and significant lessons learned from prior cleanroom projects are presented. It is intended that the process model described here will be further tailored as additional SEL cleanroom projects are analyzed.

  20. Model driven product line engineering : core asset and process implications

    OpenAIRE

    Azanza Sesé, Maider

    2012-01-01

    Reuse is at the heart of major improvements in productivity and quality in Software Engineering. Both Model Driven Engineering (MDE) and Software Product Line Engineering (SPLE) are software development paradigms that promote reuse. Specifically, they promote systematic reuse and a departure from craftsmanship towards an industrialization of the software development process. MDE and SPLE have established their benefits separately. Their combination, here called Model Driven Product Line Engin...

  1. Contribution for Modelling and failure prediction in Marine Diesel Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Moussa-Nahim, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a simulator model of a marine diesel engine based on physical, semi-physical, mathematical and thermodynamic equations, allowing fast predictive simulations. The whole engine system is divided into several functional blocs: cooling, lubrication, air, injection, combustion and emissions. The sub-models and dynamic characteristics of individual blocs are established according to engine working principles equations and experimental data collected from a marine diesel engine te...

  2. Modeling cardiovascular hemodynamics using the lattice Boltzmann method on massively parallel supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randles, Amanda Elizabeth

    Accurate and reliable modeling of cardiovascular hemodynamics has the potential to improve understanding of the localization and progression of heart diseases, which are currently the most common cause of death in Western countries. However, building a detailed, realistic model of human blood flow is a formidable mathematical and computational challenge. The simulation must combine the motion of the fluid, the intricate geometry of the blood vessels, continual changes in flow and pressure driven by the heartbeat, and the behavior of suspended bodies such as red blood cells. Such simulations can provide insight into factors like endothelial shear stress that act as triggers for the complex biomechanical events that can lead to atherosclerotic pathologies. Currently, it is not possible to measure endothelial shear stress in vivo, making these simulations a crucial component to understanding and potentially predicting the progression of cardiovascular disease. In this thesis, an approach for efficiently modeling the fluid movement coupled to the cell dynamics in real-patient geometries while accounting for the additional force from the expansion and contraction of the heart will be presented and examined. First, a novel method to couple a mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann fluid model to the microscopic molecular dynamics model of cell movement is elucidated. A treatment of red blood cells as extended structures, a method to handle highly irregular geometries through topology driven graph partitioning, and an efficient molecular dynamics load balancing scheme are introduced. These result in a large-scale simulation of the cardiovascular system, with a realistic description of the complex human arterial geometry, from centimeters down to the spatial resolution of red-blood cells. The computational methods developed to enable scaling of the application to 294,912 processors are discussed, thus empowering the simulation of a full heartbeat. Second, further extensions to enable

  3. Combining Model-Driven Engineering and Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Brunelière, Hugo; Cabot, Jordi; Jouault, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    Service-orientation and model-driven engineering are two of the most dominant software engineering paradigms nowadays. This position paper explores the synergies between them and show how they can benefit from each other. In particular, the paper introduces the notion of Modeling as a Service (MaaS) as a way to provide modeling and model-driven engineering services from the cloud.

  4. Effect of gliclazide on cardiovascular risk factors involved in split-dose streptozotocin induced neonatal rat model: a chronic study

    OpenAIRE

    I. Mohammed Salman; Md. Naseeruddin Inamdar

    2012-01-01

    Background: The present study aimed at evaluating the effect of gliclazide on cardiovascular risk factors involved in type 2 diabetes mellitus using n-STZ rat model on a long term basis. Methods: The diabetic model was developed using a split dose of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg) intraperitoneally on 2nd and 3rd postnatal days. The diabetic rats were treated orally with gliclazide suspension at the dose of 10 mg/kg for 90 days. Cardiovascular risk factors such as systolic blood pressure, heart ra...

  5. Assessment of radiation dose in nuclear cardiovascular imaging using realistic computational models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Nuclear cardiology plays an important role in clinical assessment and has enormous impact on the management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Pediatric patients at different age groups are exposed to a spectrum of radiation dose levels and associated cancer risks different from those of adults in diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures. Therefore, comprehensive radiation dosimetry evaluations for commonly used myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and viability radiotracers in target population (children and adults) at different age groups are highly desired. Methods: Using Monte Carlo calculations and biological effects of ionizing radiation VII model, we calculate the S-values for a number of radionuclides (Tl-201, Tc-99m, I-123, C-11, N-13, O-15, F-18, and Rb-82) and estimate the absorbed dose and effective dose for 12 MPI radiotracers in computational models including the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-yr-old, and adult male and female computational phantoms. Results: For most organs, 201Tl produces the highest absorbed dose whereas 82Rb and 15O-water produce the lowest absorbed dose. For the newborn baby and adult patient, the effective dose of 82Rb is 48% and 77% lower than that of 99mTc-tetrofosmin (rest), respectively. Conclusions: 82Rb results in lower effective dose in adults compared to 99mTc-labeled tracers. However, this advantage is less apparent in children. The produced dosimetric databases for various radiotracers used in cardiovascular imaging, using new generation of computational models, can be used for risk-benefit assessment of a spectrum of patient population in clinical nuclear cardiology practice

  6. Assessment of radiation dose in nuclear cardiovascular imaging using realistic computational models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Tianwu [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva 4 CH-1211 (Switzerland); Lee, Choonsik [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20852 (United States); Bolch, Wesley E. [Departments of Nuclear and Radiological and Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Zaidi, Habib, E-mail: habib.zaidi@hcuge.ch [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva 4 CH-1211 (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva University, Geneva CH-1205 (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Nuclear cardiology plays an important role in clinical assessment and has enormous impact on the management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Pediatric patients at different age groups are exposed to a spectrum of radiation dose levels and associated cancer risks different from those of adults in diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures. Therefore, comprehensive radiation dosimetry evaluations for commonly used myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and viability radiotracers in target population (children and adults) at different age groups are highly desired. Methods: Using Monte Carlo calculations and biological effects of ionizing radiation VII model, we calculate the S-values for a number of radionuclides (Tl-201, Tc-99m, I-123, C-11, N-13, O-15, F-18, and Rb-82) and estimate the absorbed dose and effective dose for 12 MPI radiotracers in computational models including the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-yr-old, and adult male and female computational phantoms. Results: For most organs, {sup 201}Tl produces the highest absorbed dose whereas {sup 82}Rb and {sup 15}O-water produce the lowest absorbed dose. For the newborn baby and adult patient, the effective dose of {sup 82}Rb is 48% and 77% lower than that of {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin (rest), respectively. Conclusions: {sup 82}Rb results in lower effective dose in adults compared to {sup 99m}Tc-labeled tracers. However, this advantage is less apparent in children. The produced dosimetric databases for various radiotracers used in cardiovascular imaging, using new generation of computational models, can be used for risk-benefit assessment of a spectrum of patient population in clinical nuclear cardiology practice.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Hybrid Electrical Engineering Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lobaty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A large class of systems that have found application in various industries and households, electrified transportation facilities and energy sector has been classified as electrical engineering systems. Their characteristic feature is a combination of continuous and discontinuous modes of operation, which is reflected in the appearance of a relatively new term “hybrid systems”. A wide class of hybrid systems is pulsed DC converters operating in a pulse width modulation, which are non-linear systems with variable structure. Using various methods for linearization it is possible to obtain linear mathematical models that rather accurately simulate behavior of such systems. However, the presence in the mathematical models of exponential nonlinearities creates considerable difficulties in the implementation of digital hardware. The solution can be found while using an approximation of exponential functions by polynomials of the first order, that, however, violates the rigor accordance of the analytical model with characteristics of a real object. There are two practical approaches to synthesize algorithms for control of hybrid systems. The first approach is based on the representation of the whole system by a discrete model which is described by difference equations that makes it possible to synthesize discrete algorithms. The second approach is based on description of the system by differential equations. The equations describe synthesis of continuous algorithms and their further implementation in a digital computer included in the control loop system. The paper considers modeling of a hybrid electrical engineering system using differential equations. Neglecting the pulse duration, it has been proposed to describe behavior of vector components in phase coordinates of the hybrid system by stochastic differential equations containing generally non-linear differentiable random functions. A stochastic vector-matrix equation describing dynamics of the

  8. Engineered Models of Confined Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Colin D; Hung, Wei-Chien; Wirtz, Denis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-07-11

    Cells in the body are physically confined by neighboring cells, tissues, and the extracellular matrix. Although physical confinement modulates intracellular signaling and the underlying mechanisms of cell migration, it is difficult to study in vivo. Furthermore, traditional two-dimensional cell migration assays do not recapitulate the complex topographies found in the body. Therefore, a number of experimental in vitro models that confine and impose forces on cells in well-defined microenvironments have been engineered. We describe the design and use of microfluidic microchannel devices, grooved substrates, micropatterned lines, vertical confinement devices, patterned hydrogels, and micropipette aspiration assays for studying cell responses to confinement. Use of these devices has enabled the delineation of changes in cytoskeletal reorganization, cell-substrate adhesions, intracellular signaling, nuclear shape, and gene expression that result from physical confinement. These assays and the physiologically relevant signaling pathways that have been elucidated are beginning to have a translational and clinical impact. PMID:27420571

  9. Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

    2011-08-08

    The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan

  10. Modeling high-order synchronization epochs and transitions in the cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Álvarez, David; Bahraminasab, Alireza; Stefanovska, Aneta; McClintock, Peter V. E.

    2007-12-01

    We study a system consisting of two coupled phase oscillators in the presence of noise. This system is used as a model for the cardiorespiratory interaction in wakefulness and anaesthesia. We show that longrange correlated noise produces transitions between epochs with different n:m synchronisation ratios, as observed in the cardiovascular system. Also, we see that, the smaller the noise (specially the one acting on the slower oscillator), the bigger the synchronisation time, exactly as happens in anaesthesia compared with wakefulness. The dependence of the synchronisation time on the couplings, in the presence of noise, is studied; such dependence is softened by low-frequency noise. We show that the coupling from the slow oscillator to the fast one (respiration to heart) plays a more important role in synchronisation. Finally, we see that the isolines with same synchronisation time seem to be a linear combination of the two couplings.

  11. Controversies in Cardiovascular Research: Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes – boutique science or valuable arrhythmia model?

    OpenAIRE

    Knollmann, Björn C.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the series on Controversies in Cardiovascular Research, the article reviews the strengths and limitations of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CM) as models of cardiac arrhythmias. Specifically, the article attempts to answer the following questions: Which clinical arrhythmias can be modeled by iPSC-CM? How well can iPSC-CM model adult ventricular myocytes? What are the strengths and limitations of published iPSC-CM arrhythmia models? What new mechanistic i...

  12. Sharing and reusing cardiovascular anatomical models over the Web: a step towards the implementation of the virtual physiological human project

    OpenAIRE

    Gianni D.; Mckeever S.; Yu T; Britten R.; Delingette H.; Frangi A.; Hunter P.; Smith N

    2010-01-01

    Sharing and reusing anatomical models over the Web offers a significant opportunity to progress the investigation of cardiovascular diseases. However, the current sharing methodology suffers from the limitations of static model delivery (i.e. embedding static links to the models within Web pages) and of a disaggregated view of the model metadata produced by publications and cardiac simulations in isolation. In the context of euHeart-- a research project targeting the description and representa...

  13. Enhanced Engine Performance During Emergency Operation Using a Model-Based Engine Control Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Connolly, Joseph W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and application of model-based engine control (MBEC) for use during emergency operation of the aircraft. The MBEC methodology is applied to the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (CMAPSS40k) and features an optimal tuner Kalman Filter (OTKF) to estimate unmeasured engine parameters, which can then be used for control. During an emergency scenario, normally-conservative engine operating limits may be relaxed to increase the performance of the engine and overall survivability of the aircraft; this comes at the cost of additional risk of an engine failure. The MBEC architecture offers the advantage of estimating key engine parameters that are not directly measureable. Estimating the unknown parameters allows for tighter control over these parameters, and on the level of risk the engine will operate at. This will allow the engine to achieve better performance than possible when operating to more conservative limits on a related, measurable parameter.

  14. Enhanced Engine Performance During Emergency Operation Using a Model-Based Engine Control Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Connolly, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and application of model-based engine control (MBEC) for use during emergency operation of the aircraft. The MBEC methodology is applied to the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40,000 (CMAPSS40,000) and features an optimal tuner Kalman Filter (OTKF) to estimate unmeasured engine parameters, which can then be used for control. During an emergency scenario, normally-conservative engine operating limits may be relaxed to increase the performance of the engine and overall survivability of the aircraft; this comes at the cost of additional risk of an engine failure. The MBEC architecture offers the advantage of estimating key engine parameters that are not directly measureable. Estimating the unknown parameters allows for tighter control over these parameters, and on the level of risk the engine will operate at. This will allow the engine to achieve better performance than possible when operating to more conservative limits on a related, measurable parameter.

  15. Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM) v.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matney, Mark; Krisko, Paula; Xu, Yu-Lin; Horstman, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    A model of the manmade orbital debris environment is required by spacecraft designers, mission planners, and others in order to understand and mitigate the effects of the environment on their spacecraft or systems. A manmade environment is dynamic, and can be altered significantly by intent (e.g., the Chinese anti-satellite weapon test of January 2007) or accident (e.g., the collision of Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 spacecraft in February 2009). Engineering models are used to portray the manmade debris environment in Earth orbit. The availability of new sensor and in situ data, the re-analysis of older data, and the development of new analytical and statistical techniques has enabled the construction of this more comprehensive and sophisticated model. The primary output of this model is the flux [#debris/area/time] as a function of debris size and year. ORDEM may be operated in spacecraft mode or telescope mode. In the former case, an analyst defines an orbit for a spacecraft and "flies" the spacecraft through the orbital debris environment. In the latter case, an analyst defines a ground-based sensor (telescope or radar) in terms of latitude, azimuth, and elevation, and the model provides the number of orbital debris traversing the sensor's field of view. An upgraded graphical user interface (GUI) is integrated with the software. This upgraded GUI uses project-oriented organization and provides the user with graphical representations of numerous output data products. These range from the conventional flux as a function of debris size for chosen analysis orbits (or views), for example, to the more complex color-contoured two-dimensional (2D) directional flux diagrams in local spacecraft elevation and azimuth.

  16. Civil engineering: EDF needs for concrete modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concrete structures which are encountered at EDF, like all civil engineering structures, age. In order to adapt the maintenance conditions of these structures, particularly to extend their service life, and also to prepare constructions of future structures, tools for predicting the behaviour of these structures in their environment should be available. For EDF the technical risks are high and consequently very appropriate R and D actions are required. In this context the Direction des Etudes et Recherches (DER) has developed a methodology for analysing concrete structure behaviour modelling. This approach has several aims: - making a distinction between the problems which refer to the existing models and those which require R and D; - displaying disciplinary links between different problems encountered on EDF structures (non-linear mechanical, chemical - hydraulic - mechanical coupling, etc); - listing of the existing tools and positioning the DER 'Aster' finite element code among them. This document is a state of the art of scientific knowledge intended to shed light on the fields in which one should be involved when there is, on one part a strong requirement on the side of structure operators, and on the other one, the present tools do not allow this requirement to be satisfactorily met. The analysis has been done on 12 scientific subjects: 1) Hydration of concrete at early ages: exothermicity, hardening, autogenous shrinkage; 2) Drying and drying shrinkage; 3) Alkali-silica reaction and bulky stage formation; 4) Long term deterioration by leaching; 5) Ionic diffusion and associated attacks: the chlorides case; 6) Permeability / tightness of concrete; 7) Concretes -nonlinear behaviour and cracking (I): contribution of the plasticity models; 8) Concretes - nonlinear behaviour and cracking (II): contribution of the damage models; 9) Concretes - nonlinear behaviour and cracking (III): the contribution of the probabilistic analysis model; 10) Delayed behaviour of

  17. Survey of Traceability Approaches in Model-Driven Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Galvao Lourenco da Silva, I.; Göknil, A.

    2007-01-01

    Models have been used in various engineering fields to help managing complexity and represent information in different abstraction levels, according to specific notations and stakeholder's viewpoints. Model-Driven Engineering (MDE) gives the basic principles for the use of models as primary artefacts throughout the software development phases and presents characteristics that simplify the engineering of software in various domains, such as Enterprise Computing Systems. Hence, for its successf...

  18. Applying Megamodelling to Model-Driven Performance Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Fritzsche, Mathias; Brunelière, Hugo; Vanhooff, Bert; Berbers, Yolande; Jouault, Frédéric; Gilani, Wasif

    2009-01-01

    Model Driven Engineering (MDE) has to deal with an increasing number of interrelated modelling artefacts. The Model Driven Performance Engineering (MDPE) process is one concrete illustration of such a situation. This process applies MDE within the context of performance engineering in order to support domain experts, who generally lack the necessary performance expertise. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of megamodelling to manage the numerous artefacts involved in MDPE. Megamodelling en...

  19. Future Modeling Needs in Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Brian; Talley, Doug; Mueller, Donn; Tew, Dave; Guidos, Mike; Seymour, Dave

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a performance model rocket engine design that takes advantage of pulse detonation to generate thrust. The contents include: 1) Introduction to the Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine (PDRE); 2) PDRE modeling issues and options; 3) Discussion of the PDRE Performance Workshop held at Marshall Space Flight Center; and 4) Identify needs involving an open performance model for Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  20. Thermodynamic modeling of micro heat engines for power generation

    OpenAIRE

    Khu, Khu; Jiang, Liudi; Markvart, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The need for compact, high power-density power sources has led to significant research interest in micro heat engines. However, there is a lack of suitable thermodynamic models which can be used to evaluate the power performance of micro heat engines by taking into consideration the effect of leakage and finite heat input. This work is the first to develop such a thermodynamic model to predict the upper limit of performance of micro heat engines. The model allows investigation of the effects ...

  1. Integrating Surface Modeling into the Engineering Design Graphics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Nathan W.

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested there is a knowledge base that surrounds the use of 3D modeling within the engineering design process and correspondingly within engineering design graphics education. While solid modeling receives a great deal of attention and discussion relative to curriculum efforts, and rightly so, surface modeling is an equally viable 3D…

  2. An Overview of NASA's Orbital Debris Engineering Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of Orbital debris engineering models. They are mathematical tools to assess orbital debris flux. It briefly reviews the history of the orbital debris engineering models, and reviews the new features in the current model (i.e., ORDEM2010).

  3. Modeling and simulation concepts in engineering education : virtual tools

    OpenAIRE

    Sevgi, Levent

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews fundamental concepts of modeling and simulation in computational sciences, such as a model, analytical- and numerical-based modeling, simulation, validation, verification, etc., in relation to the virtual labs widely-offered as parts of engineering education. Virtual tools that can be used in electromagnetic engineering are also introduced.

  4. Modeling and Simulation Concepts in Engineering Education: Virtual Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Levent SEVGİ

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews fundamental concepts of modeling and simulation in computational sciences, such as a model, analytical- and numerical-based modeling, simulation, validation, verification, etc., in relation to the virtual labs widely-offered as parts of engineering education. Virtual tools that can be used in electromagnetic engineering are also introduced.

  5. The research on HRM model of geosciences engineering perambulation enterprise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Firstly,this paper defines the definition of geosciences engineering perambulation enterprise,which belongs to the knowledgeable enterprise;then,it summarizes the general HRM model presented by other researchers,based on those models,this paper builds a new HRM model of geosciences engineering perambulation enterprise.

  6. Survey of Traceability Approaches in Model-Driven Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galvao Lourenco da Silva, I.; Göknil, A.

    2007-01-01

    Models have been used in various engineering fields to help managing complexity and represent information in different abstraction levels, according to specific notations and stakeholder's viewpoints. Model-Driven Engineering (MDE) gives the basic principles for the use of models as primary artefact

  7. Mean Value Modelling of an SI Engine with EGR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Føns, Michael; Muller, Martin; Chevalier, Alain;

    1999-01-01

    ). The purpose of this paper is to present a modified MVEM which includes EGR in a physical way. It has been tested using newly developed, ver fast manifold pressure, manifold temperature, port and EGR mass flow sensores. Reasonable agreement has been obtained on an experimental engine, mounted on a......Mean Value Engine Models (MVEMs) are simplified, dynamic engine models which are physically based. Such models are useful for control studies, for engine control system analysis and for model based control systems. Very few published MVEMs have included the effects of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR...

  8. Applied data analysis and modeling for energy engineers and scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, T Agami

    2011-01-01

    ""Applied Data Analysis and Modeling for Energy Engineers and Scientists"" discusses mathematical models, data analysis, and decision analysis in modeling. The approach taken in this volume focuses on the modeling and analysis of thermal systems in an engineering environment, while also covering a number of other critical areas. Other material covered includes the tools that researchers and engineering professionals will need in order to explore different analysis methods, use critical assessment skills and reach sound engineering conclusions. The book also covers process and system design and

  9. Compact and Accurate Turbocharger Modelling for Engine Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorenson, Spencer C; Hendricks, Elbert; Magnússon, Sigurjón;

    2005-01-01

    With the current trend towards engine downsizing, the use of turbochargers to obtain extra engine power has become common. A great díffuculty in the use of turbochargers is in the modelling of the compressor map. In general this is done by inserting the compressor map directly into the engine ECU...... turbocharges with radial compressors for either Spark Ignition (SI) or diesel engines...

  10. Reduction of NADPH-oxidase activity ameliorates the cardiovascular phenotype in a mouse model of Williams-Beuren Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Campuzano

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark feature of Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS is a generalized arteriopathy due to elastin deficiency, presenting as stenoses of medium and large arteries and leading to hypertension and other cardiovascular complications. Deletion of a functional NCF1 gene copy has been shown to protect a proportion of WBS patients against hypertension, likely through reduced NADPH-oxidase (NOX-mediated oxidative stress. DD mice, carrying a 0.67 Mb heterozygous deletion including the Eln gene, presented with a generalized arteriopathy, hypertension, and cardiac hypertrophy, associated with elevated angiotensin II (angII, oxidative stress parameters, and Ncf1 expression. Genetic (by crossing with Ncf1 mutant and/or pharmacological (with ang II type 1 receptor blocker, losartan, or NOX inhibitor apocynin reduction of NOX activity controlled hormonal and biochemical parameters in DD mice, resulting in normalized blood pressure and improved cardiovascular histology. We provide strong evidence for implication of the redox system in the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular disease in a mouse model of WBS. The phenotype of these mice can be ameliorated by either genetic or pharmacological intervention reducing NOX activity, likely through reduced angII-mediated oxidative stress. Therefore, anti-NOX therapy merits evaluation to prevent the potentially serious cardiovascular complications of WBS, as well as in other cardiovascular disorders mediated by similar pathogenic mechanism.

  11. Modeling pollution formation in diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Modeling combustion under conditions that prevail in Diesel engine presents a great challenge. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has invested Laboratory Directed Research and Development Funds to accelerate progress in this area. Research has been concerned with building a chemical mechanism to interface with a high fidelity fluid code to describe aspects of Diesel combustion. The complexity of these models requires implementation on massively parallel machines. The author will describe his efforts concerned with building such a complex mechanism. He begins with C and CO{sub 2} chemistry and adds sequentially higher hydrocarbon chemistry, aromatic production chemistry, soot chemistry, and chemistry describing NO{sub x} production. The metrics against which this chemistry is evaluated are flame velocities, induction times, ignition delay times, flammability limits, flame structure measurements, and light scattering. He assembles a set of elementary reactions, kinetic rate coefficients, and thermochemistry. He modifies existing Sandia codes to be able to investigate the behavior of the mechanism in well-stirred reactors, plug flow reactors, and one-dimensional flames. The modified combustion code with a chemical mechanism at the appropriate level of complexity is then interfaced with the high fidelity fluids code. The fluids code is distinguished by its ability to solve the requisite partial differential equations with adaptively refined grids necessary to describe the strong variation in spatial scales in combustion.

  12. Multi-scale modeling of the human cardiovascular system with applications to aortic valvular and arterial stenoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fuyou; Takagi, Shu; Himeno, Ryutaro; Liu, Hao

    2009-07-01

    A computational model of the entire cardiovascular system is established based on multi-scale modeling, where the arterial tree is described by a one-dimensional model coupled with a lumped parameter description of the remainder. The resultant multi-scale model forms a closed loop, thus placing arterial wave propagation into a global hemodynamic environment. The model is applied to study the global hemodynamic influences of aortic valvular and arterial stenoses located in various regions. Obtained results show that the global hemodynamic influences of the stenoses depend strongly on their locations in the arterial system, particularly, the characteristics of hemodynamic changes induced by the aortic valvular and aortic stenoses are pronounced, which imply the possibility of noninvasively detecting the presence of the stenoses from peripheral pressure pulses. The variations in aortic pressure/flow pulses with the stenoses play testimony to the significance of modeling the entire cardiovascular system in the study of arterial diseases. PMID:19198911

  13. SUBCHRONIC PULMONARY PATHOLOGY, IRON-OVERLOAD AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL ACTIVITY AFTER LIBBY AMPHIBOLE EXPOSURE IN RAT MODELS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Surface-available iron (Fe) is proposed to contribute to asbestos-induced toxicity through the production of reactive oxygen species.Objective: Our goal was to evaluate the hypothesis that rat models of cardiovascular disease with coexistent Fe overload would be incre...

  14. A Model for Sustainable Humanitarian Engineering Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Evan Thomas; Bernard Amadei; Robyn Sandekian

    2009-01-01

    The engineering profession should embrace a new mission statement—to contribute to the building of a more sustainable, stable, and equitable world. Recently, engineering students and professionals in the United States have shown strong interest in directly addressing the needs of developing communities worldwide. That interest has taken the form of short-and medium-term international trips through Engineers Without Borders—USA and similar organizations. There are also several instances wh...

  15. Model Based HCCI Engine Combustion Control

    OpenAIRE

    Lundström, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    An Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition engine is a hybrid between a Diesel and an Otto Engine. It has good fuel efficiency, close to a Diesel engine and also very low emissions of NOX and nearly no particulate soot. Other emissions are higher but can be after treated by a catalyst. The engine has not yet been fully developed so far and lacks among others a good automatic control of the combustion angle which should be held in a small window to achieve the best performance. The objective in...

  16. Cardiovascular disease risk score prediction models for women and its applicability to Asians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goh LGH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Louise GH Goh,1 Satvinder S Dhaliwal,1 Timothy A Welborn,2 Peter L Thompson,2–4 Bruce R Maycock,1 Deborah A Kerr,1 Andy H Lee,1 Dean Bertolatti,1 Karin M Clark,1 Rakhshanda Naheed,1 Ranil Coorey,1 Phillip R Della5 1School of Public Health, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; 2Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Perth, WA, Australia; 3School of Population Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia; 4Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research, Perth, WA, Australia; 5School of Nursing and Midwifery, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia Purpose: Although elevated cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors are associated with a higher risk of developing heart conditions across all ethnic groups, variations exist between groups in the distribution and association of risk factors, and also risk levels. This study assessed the 10-year predicted risk in a multiethnic cohort of women and compared the differences in risk between Asian and Caucasian women. Methods: Information on demographics, medical conditions and treatment, smoking behavior, dietary behavior, and exercise patterns were collected. Physical measurements were also taken. The 10-year risk was calculated using the Framingham model, SCORE (Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation risk chart for low risk and high risk regions, the general CVD, and simplified general CVD risk score models in 4,354 females aged 20–69 years with no heart disease, diabetes, or stroke at baseline from the third Australian Risk Factor Prevalence Study. Country of birth was used as a surrogate for ethnicity. Nonparametric statistics were used to compare risk levels between ethnic groups. Results: Asian women generally had lower risk of CVD when compared to Caucasian women. The 10-year predicted risk was, however, similar between Asian and Australian women, for some models. These findings were

  17. Validation of subject-specific cardiovascular system models from porcine measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revie, James A; Stevenson, David J; Chase, J Geoffrey; Hann, Christopher E; Lambermont, Bernard C; Ghuysen, Alexandre; Kolh, Philippe; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Heldmann, Stefan; Desaive, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    A previously validated mathematical model of the cardiovascular system (CVS) is made subject-specific using an iterative, proportional gain-based identification method. Prior works utilised a complete set of experimentally measured data that is not clinically typical or applicable. In this paper, parameters are identified using proportional gain-based control and a minimal, clinically available set of measurements. The new method makes use of several intermediary steps through identification of smaller compartmental models of CVS to reduce the number of parameters identified simultaneously and increase the convergence stability of the method. This new, clinically relevant, minimal measurement approach is validated using a porcine model of acute pulmonary embolism (APE). Trials were performed on five pigs, each inserted with three autologous blood clots of decreasing size over a period of four to five hours. All experiments were reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of the Medical Faculty at the University of Liege, Belgium. Continuous aortic and pulmonary artery pressures (P(ao), P(pa)) were measured along with left and right ventricle pressure and volume waveforms. Subject-specific CVS models were identified from global end diastolic volume (GEDV), stroke volume (SV), P(ao), and P(pa) measurements, with the mean volumes and maximum pressures of the left and right ventricles used to verify the accuracy of the fitted models. The inputs (GEDV, SV, P(ao), P(pa)) used in the identification process were matched by the CVS model to errors <0.5%. Prediction of the mean ventricular volumes and maximum ventricular pressures not used to fit the model compared experimental measurements to median absolute errors of 4.3% and 4.4%, which are equivalent to the measurement errors of currently used monitoring devices in the ICU (∼5-10%). These results validate the potential for implementing this approach in the intensive care unit. PMID:22126892

  18. Modeling of hybrid vehicle fuel economy and fuel engine efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei

    "Near-CV" (i.e., near-conventional vehicle) hybrid vehicles, with an internal combustion engine, and a supplementary storage with low-weight, low-energy but high-power capacity, are analyzed. This design avoids the shortcoming of the "near-EV" and the "dual-mode" hybrid vehicles that need a large energy storage system (in terms of energy capacity and weight). The small storage is used to optimize engine energy management and can provide power when needed. The energy advantage of the "near-CV" design is to reduce reliance on the engine at low power, to enable regenerative braking, and to provide good performance with a small engine. The fuel consumption of internal combustion engines, which might be applied to hybrid vehicles, is analyzed by building simple analytical models that reflect the engines' energy loss characteristics. Both diesel and gasoline engines are modeled. The simple analytical models describe engine fuel consumption at any speed and load point by describing the engine's indicated efficiency and friction. The engine's indicated efficiency and heat loss are described in terms of several easy-to-obtain engine parameters, e.g., compression ratio, displacement, bore and stroke. Engine friction is described in terms of parameters obtained by fitting available fuel measurements on several diesel and spark-ignition engines. The engine models developed are shown to conform closely to experimental fuel consumption and motored friction data. A model of the energy use of "near-CV" hybrid vehicles with different storage mechanism is created, based on simple algebraic description of the components. With powertrain downsizing and hybridization, a "near-CV" hybrid vehicle can obtain a factor of approximately two in overall fuel efficiency (mpg) improvement, without considering reductions in the vehicle load.

  19. The Department of the Navy Systems Engineering Career Competency Model

    OpenAIRE

    Whitcomb, Clifford; Delgado, Jessica; Khan, Rabia; Alexander, Juli; White, Corina; Grambow, Dana; Walter, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Disclaimer: The views represented in this report are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy position of the Navy, the Department of Defense, or the federal government. The Naval Postgraduate School is developing a competency model for the profession of systems engineering. There is currently no professional engineering occupational code (08XX) for systems engineers, so there is no verified competency model source to use for human resource functions related t...

  20. A Reactive Object Model for Concurrent Engineering Design

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Toan

    1995-01-01

    A reactive object model is defined to control the design process of evolving objects in concurrent engineering environments. The goal is to support engineers in controlling the result of their design decisions, using a software automaton as a plug-in addition to computer-aided design platforms that support concurrent engineering. The automaton implements a reactive design specification for composite objects with multiple representations, that includes a model for their design process. The syn...

  1. Artificial neural network based modelling of internal combustion engine performance

    OpenAIRE

    Boruah, Dibakor; Thakur, Pintu Kumar; Baruah, Dipal

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to quantify the applicability of artificial neural network as a black-box model for internal combustion engine performance. In consequence, an artificial neural network (ANN) based model for a four cylinder, four stroke internal combustion diesel engine has been developed on the basis of specific input and output factors, which have been taken from experimental readings for different load and engine speed circumstances. The input parameters that have been used to create...

  2. Neural Modeling and Control of Diesel Engine with Pollution Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Ouladsine, Mustapha; Dovifaaz, Xavier; 10.1007/s10846-005-3806-y

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a neural approach for modelling and control of a turbocharged Diesel engine. A neural model, whose structure is mainly based on some physical equations describing the engine behaviour, is built for the rotation speed and the exhaust gas opacity. The model is composed of three interconnected neural submodels, each of them constituting a nonlinear multi-input single-output error model. The structural identi?cation and the parameter estimation from data gathered on a real engine are described. The neural direct model is then used to determine a neural controller of the engine, in a specialized training scheme minimising a multivariable criterion. Simulations show the effect of the pollution constraint weighting on a trajectory tracking of the engine speed. Neural networks, which are ?exible and parsimonious nonlinear black-box models, with universal approximation capabilities, can accurately describe or control complex nonlinear systems, with little a priori theoretical knowledge. The present...

  3. A concise wall temperature model for DI Diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torregrosa, A.; Olmeda, P.; Degraeuwe, B. [CMT-Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain); Reyes, M. [Centro de Mecanica de Fluidos y Aplicaciones, Universidad Simon Bolivar (Venezuela)

    2006-08-15

    A concise resistor model for wall temperature prediction in diesel engines with piston cooling is presented here. The model uses the instantaneous in-cylinder pressure and some usually measured operational parameters to predict the temperature of the structural elements of the engine. The resistor model was adjusted by means of temperature measurements in the cylinder head, the liner and the piston. For each model parameter, an expression as a function of the engine geometry, operational parameters and material properties was derived to make the model applicable to other similar engines. The model predicts well the cylinder head, liner and piston temperature and is sensitive to variations of operational parameters such as the start of injection, coolant and oil temperature and engine speed and load. (author)

  4. Stochastic Programming Models for Engineering Design Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Popela, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to introduce various stochastic programs and related deterministic reformulations that are suitable for engineering design problems. Firstly, several application areas of engineering design are introduced and cited. Then, motivation ideas and basic concepts are presented. Later, various types of reformulations are introduced for decision problems involving uncertainty. In addition, short notes on comparison of optimal solutions are included.

  5. Human factors engineering program review model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is performing nuclear power plant design certification reviews based on a design process plan that describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification and an acceptable implemented design. There are two principal reasons for this approach. First, the initial design certification applications submitted for staff review did not include detailed design information. Second, since human performance literature and industry experiences have shown that many significant human factors issues arise early in the design process, review of the design process activities and results is important to the evaluation of an overall design. However, current regulations and guidance documents do not address the criteria for design process review. Therefore, the HFE Program Review Model (HFE PRM) was developed as a basis for performing design certification reviews that include design process evaluations as well as review of the final design. A central tenet of the HFE PRM is that the HFE aspects of the plant should be developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The HFE PRM consists of ten component elements. Each element in divided into four sections: Background, Objective, Applicant Submittals, and Review Criteria. This report describes the development of the HFE PRM and gives a detailed description of each HFE review element

  6. Human factors engineering program review model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is performing nuclear power plant design certification reviews based on a design process plan that describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification and an acceptable implemented design. There are two principal reasons for this approach. First, the initial design certification applications submitted for staff review did not include detailed design information. Second, since human performance literature and industry experiences have shown that many significant human factors issues arise early in the design process, review of the design process activities and results is important to the evaluation of an overall design. However, current regulations and guidance documents do not address the criteria for design process review. Therefore, the HFE Program Review Model (HFE PRM) was developed as a basis for performing design certification reviews that include design process evaluations as well as review of the final design. A central tenet of the HFE PRM is that the HFE aspects of the plant should be developed, designed, and evaluated on the basis of a structured top-down system analysis using accepted HFE principles. The HFE PRM consists of ten component elements. Each element in divided into four sections: Background, Objective, Applicant Submittals, and Review Criteria. This report describes the development of the HFE PRM and gives a detailed description of each HFE review element.

  7. Modelling and Inverse-Modelling: Experiences with O.D.E. Linear Systems in Engineering Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Luaces, Victor

    2009-01-01

    In engineering careers courses, differential equations are widely used to solve problems concerned with modelling. In particular, ordinary differential equations (O.D.E.) linear systems appear regularly in Chemical Engineering, Food Technology Engineering and Environmental Engineering courses, due to the usefulness in modelling chemical kinetics,…

  8. Modelling and Simulation of Gas Engines Using Aspen HYSYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Ekwonu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper gas engine model was developed in Aspen HYSYS V7.3 and validated with Waukesha 16V275GL+ gas engine. Fuel flexibility, fuel types and part load performance of the gas engine were investigated. The design variability revealed that the gas engine can operate on poor fuel with low lower heating value (LHV such as landfill gas, sewage gas and biogas with biogas offering potential integration with bottoming cycles when compared to natural gas. The result of the gas engine simulation gave an efficiency 40.7% and power output of 3592kW.

  9. Modeling Virtual Meetings within Software Engineering Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Aiman Turani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It is a common scenario to see project’s stakeholders, such as managers, team leaders, and developers carrying out their meeting in the online environment without a suitable preparation and facilitation For instance, stakeholders engaging in negotiation sessions trying to communicate system requirements in the virtual environment might face requirements misunderstanding which in turn might cause a whole project to fail. Usually a meeting agenda and design is implicit in the facilitator’s head. Conducting such meetings without obvious structure would potentially lead to various problems such as no one seemed to be in charge? Or there was no clear reason to meet or no agenda etc. In this paper, we are presenting a general framework to model group-based activities and meetings within software engineering field in a simplified and formal manner. Traditionally, managers submit their web-based group meeting information in a form of text-based instructions [1]. Then a group facilitator or chairperson will lead the group throughout the meeting to achieve the desired objectives. These types of meeting are relatively easy to manage in face-to-face environment where web based meeting in the other hand, is more challenging to facilitate and manage. Therefore, more and more specialized tools are immerging to manage and facilitate such meetings. For instance, Adobe Connect [2] is tool for facilitating web-based meetings. These tools usually allow facilitators to organize and prepare the meeting floor by inserting specific collaboration components such as chat, whiteboard, voting, etc. Then during the meeting the facilitator guides participants using the video or text component. This usually leads to undesirable outputs due to the lack of a clear structure or agenda in addition to the virtual distance that weakens the communication. In this paper a two level of modeling views are proposed, the static view and the dynamic view. The static view mainly

  10. The use of mathematical models in teaching wastewater treatment engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgenroth, Eberhard Friedrich; Arvin, Erik; Vanrolleghem, P.

    2002-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of wastewater treatment processes has become increasingly popular in recent years. To prepare students for their future careers, environmental engineering education should provide students with sufficient background and experiences to understand and apply mathematical models...... efficiently and responsibly. Approaches for introducing mathematical modeling into courses on wastewater treatment engineering are discussed depending on the learning objectives, level of the course and the time available.......Mathematical modeling of wastewater treatment processes has become increasingly popular in recent years. To prepare students for their future careers, environmental engineering education should provide students with sufficient background and experiences to understand and apply mathematical models...

  11. Targeted versus universal prevention. a resource allocation model to prioritize cardiovascular prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoogenveen Rudolf T

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus brings an increased risk for cardiovascular complications and patients profit from prevention. This prevention also suits the general population. The question arises what is a better strategy: target the general population or diabetes patients. Methods A mathematical programming model was developed to calculate optimal allocations for the Dutch population of the following interventions: smoking cessation support, diet and exercise to reduce overweight, statins, and medication to reduce blood pressure. Outcomes were total lifetime health care costs and QALYs. Budget sizes were varied and the division of resources between the general population and diabetes patients was assessed. Results Full implementation of all interventions resulted in a gain of 560,000 QALY at a cost of €640 per capita, about €12,900 per QALY on average. The large majority of these QALY gains could be obtained at incremental costs below €20,000 per QALY. Low or high budgets (below €9 or above €100 per capita were predominantly spent in the general population. Moderate budgets were mostly spent in diabetes patients. Conclusions Major health gains can be realized efficiently by offering prevention to both the general and the diabetic population. However, a priori setting a specific distribution of resources is suboptimal. Resource allocation models allow accounting for capacity constraints and program size in addition to efficiency.

  12. A reduced-dimensional model for near-wall transport in cardiovascular flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Kirk B; Shadden, Shawn C

    2016-06-01

    Near-wall mass transport plays an important role in many cardiovascular processes, including the initiation of atherosclerosis, endothelial cell vasoregulation, and thrombogenesis. These problems are characterized by large Péclet and Schmidt numbers as well as a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, all of which impose computational difficulties. In this work, we develop an analytical relationship between the flow field and near-wall mass transport for high-Schmidt-number flows. This allows for the development of a wall-shear-stress-driven transport equation that lies on a codimension-one vessel-wall surface, significantly reducing computational cost in solving the transport problem. Separate versions of this equation are developed for the reaction-rate-limited and transport-limited cases, and numerical results in an idealized abdominal aortic aneurysm are compared to those obtained by solving the full transport equations over the entire domain. The reaction-rate-limited model matches the expected results well. The transport-limited model is accurate in the developed flow regions, but overpredicts wall flux at entry regions and reattachment points in the flow. PMID:26298313

  13. Engineering teacher training models and experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Tirados, R. M.

    2009-04-01

    Education Area, we renewed the programme, content and methodology, teaching the course under the name of "Initial Teacher Training Course within the framework of the European Higher Education Area". Continuous Training means learning throughout one's life as an Engineering teacher. They are actions designed to update and improve teaching staff, and are systematically offered on the current issues of: Teaching Strategies, training for research, training for personal development, classroom innovations, etc. They are activities aimed at conceptual change, changing the way of teaching and bringing teaching staff up-to-date. At the same time, the Institution is at the disposal of all teaching staff as a meeting point to discuss issues in common, attend conferences, department meetings, etc. In this Congress we present a justification of both training models and their design together with some results obtained on: training needs, participation, how it is developing and to what extent students are profiting from it.

  14. Cardiac arrhythmogenesis in urban air pollution: Optical mapping in a tissue-engineered model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, Harold H.

    Recent epidemiological evidence has implicated particulate matter air pollution in cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that inflammatory mediators released from lung macrophages after exposure to particulate matter predisposes the heart to disturbances in rhythm. Using a rational design approach, a fluorescent optical mapping system was devised to image spatiotemporal patterns of excitation in a tissue engineered model of cardiac tissue. Algorithms for automated data analysis and characterization of rhythm stability were developed, implemented, and verified. Baseline evaluation of spatiotemporal instability patterns in normal cardiac tissue was performed for comparison to an in-vitro model of particulate matter air pollution exposure. Exposure to particulate-matter activated alveolar macrophage conditioned media resulted in paradoxical functional changes more consistent with improved growth. These findings might be indicative of a "stress" response to particulate-matter induced pulmonary inflammation, or may be specific to the animal model (neonatal rat) employed. In the pursuit of elucidating the proposed pathway, we have also furthered our understanding of fundamental behaviors of arrhythmias in general and established a model where further testing might ultimately reveal the mechanism for urban air pollution associated cardiovascular morbidity.

  15. Modelling of Electrokinetic Processes in Civil and Environmental Engineering Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.;

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical model for the electrokinetic phenomena is described. Numerical simulations of different applications of electrokinetic techniques to the fields of civil and environmental engineering are included, showing the versatility and consistency of the model. The electrokinetics phenomena c...

  16. Mathematical multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system including mitral valve dynamics. Application to ischemic mitral insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonen Marie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Valve dysfunction is a common cardiovascular pathology. Despite significant clinical research, there is little formal study of how valve dysfunction affects overall circulatory dynamics. Validated models would offer the ability to better understand these dynamics and thus optimize diagnosis, as well as surgical and other interventions. Methods A cardiovascular and circulatory system (CVS model has already been validated in silico, and in several animal model studies. It accounts for valve dynamics using Heaviside functions to simulate a physiologically accurate "open on pressure, close on flow" law. However, it does not consider real-time valve opening dynamics and therefore does not fully capture valve dysfunction, particularly where the dysfunction involves partial closure. This research describes an updated version of this previous closed-loop CVS model that includes the progressive opening of the mitral valve, and is defined over the full cardiac cycle. Results Simulations of the cardiovascular system with healthy mitral valve are performed, and, the global hemodynamic behaviour is studied compared with previously validated results. The error between resulting pressure-volume (PV loops of already validated CVS model and the new CVS model that includes the progressive opening of the mitral valve is assessed and remains within typical measurement error and variability. Simulations of ischemic mitral insufficiency are also performed. Pressure-Volume loops, transmitral flow evolution and mitral valve aperture area evolution follow reported measurements in shape, amplitude and trends. Conclusions The resulting cardiovascular system model including mitral valve dynamics provides a foundation for clinical validation and the study of valvular dysfunction in vivo. The overall models and results could readily be generalised to other cardiac valves.

  17. Mean Value SI Engine Model for Control Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert; Sorenson, Spencer C

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematically simple nonlinear three state (three differential equation) dynamic model of an SI engine which has the same steady state accuracy as a typical dynamometer measurement of the engine over its entire speed/load operating range (± 2.0%). The model's accuracy for l....... The model can easily be run on a Personal Computer (PC) using a ordinary differential equation (ODE) integrating routine or package. This makes the model is useful for control system design and evaluation....

  18. An algebraic approach to modeling in software engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our work couples the formalism of universal algebras with the engineering techniques of mathematical modeling to develop a new approach to the software engineering process. Our purpose in using this combination is twofold. First, abstract data types and their specification using universal algebras can be considered a common point between the practical requirements of software engineering and the formal specification of software systems. Second, mathematical modeling principles provide us with a means for effectively analyzing real-world systems. We first use modeling techniques to analyze a system and then represent the analysis using universal algebras. The rest of the software engineering process exploits properties of universal algebras that preserve the structure of our original model. This paper describes our software engineering process and our experience using it on both research and commercial systems. We need a new approach because current software engineering practices often deliver software that is difficult to develop and maintain. Formal software engineering approaches use universal algebras to describe ''computer science'' objects like abstract data types, but in practice software errors are often caused because ''real-world'' objects are improperly modeled. There is a large semantic gap between the customer's objects and abstract data types. In contrast, mathematical modeling uses engineering techniques to construct valid models for real-world systems, but these models are often implemented in an ad hoc manner. A combination of the best features of both approaches would enable software engineering to formally specify and develop software systems that better model real systems. Software engineering, like mathematical modeling, should concern itself first and foremost with understanding a real system and its behavior under given circumstances, and then with expressing this knowledge in an executable form

  19. Using a human cardiovascular-respiratory model to characterize cardiac tamponade and pulsus paradoxus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Tony S

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac tamponade is a condition whereby fluid accumulation in the pericardial sac surrounding the heart causes elevation and equilibration of pericardial and cardiac chamber pressures, reduced cardiac output, changes in hemodynamics, partial chamber collapse, pulsus paradoxus, and arterio-venous acid-base disparity. Our large-scale model of the human cardiovascular-respiratory system (H-CRS is employed to study mechanisms underlying cardiac tamponade and pulsus paradoxus. The model integrates hemodynamics, whole-body gas exchange, and autonomic nervous system control to simulate pressure, volume, and blood flow. Methods We integrate a new pericardial model into our previously developed H-CRS model based on a fit to patient pressure data. Virtual experiments are designed to simulate pericardial effusion and study mechanisms of pulsus paradoxus, focusing particularly on the role of the interventricular septum. Model differential equations programmed in C are solved using a 5th-order Runge-Kutta numerical integration scheme. MATLAB is employed for waveform analysis. Results The H-CRS model simulates hemodynamic and respiratory changes associated with tamponade clinically. Our model predicts effects of effusion-generated pericardial constraint on chamber and septal mechanics, such as altered right atrial filling, delayed leftward septal motion, and prolonged left ventricular pre-ejection period, causing atrioventricular interaction and ventricular desynchronization. We demonstrate pericardial constraint to markedly accentuate normal ventricular interactions associated with respiratory effort, which we show to be the distinct mechanisms of pulsus paradoxus, namely, series and parallel ventricular interaction. Series ventricular interaction represents respiratory variation in right ventricular stroke volume carried over to the left ventricle via the pulmonary vasculature, whereas parallel interaction (via the septum and

  20. Mean Value Modelling of a Turbocharged SI Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Martin; Hendricks, Elbert; Sorenson, Spencer C.

    1998-01-01

    the cycle-by-cycle behavior. In principle such models are also physically based,are very compact in a mathematical sense but nevertheless can have reasonable prediction accuracy. Presently no MVEMs have been constructed for intercooled turbocharged SI engines because their complexity confounds the...... simple physical understanding and description of such engines. This paper presents a newly constructed MVEM for a turbocharged SI engine which contains the details of the compressor and turbine characteristics in a compact way. The model has been tested against the responses of an experimental engine and...

  1. ROLE OF MOFETTE THERAPY IN CARDIOVASCULAR REHABILITATION – THE COVASNA MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Suceveanu, Mihaela; SUCEVEANU Paul; Pop, Dana; SITAR TAUT Adela; Zdrenghea, Dumitru; Hâncu, Nicolae

    2015-01-01

    The mofettes used for therapeutic purposes in Romania, in the Hospital of Rehabilitation in Cardiovascular Diseases Covasna, are unique in the world. Here, carbon dioxide in the form of carbogaseous baths and particularly, mofettes plays an important role not only in primary prevention, but also in secondary prevention and the rehabilitation of cardiovascular diseases. Aim. The aim of this study is to evidence the role of mofette therapy as part of residential rehabilitation programs carri...

  2. Thermal model of the Eurodish Solar Stirling Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Granados, F. J.; Silva Perez, M. a.; Ruiz-Hernandez, V.

    2006-07-01

    One parabolic dish Stirling engine system has been in operation at the Engineering School of Seville since March 2004. This system is one of the several Country Reference Units of the EnviroDish project, and is based on the Eurodish system. The system has achieved a maximum thermal efficiency (solar to electricity) close to 20% during operation. The analysis of the different parameters suggests a high potential for improvement. A thermal model of the main components of the engine package (cavity, receiver and Stirling engine) can help to evaluate possible modifications of the system and identify the most promising ones. The development of such thermal model and its comparison with experimental data gathered during this period, are reported in this work. Model results exhibit good qualitative agreement with the available measurements. However, the validation of the model will require measuring more parameters at the cavity, receiver and engine. (Author)

  3. Dietary Maillard reaction products and their fermented products reduce cardiovascular risk in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, N S; Park, M R; Lee, K W; Kim, S H; Kim, Y

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the effects of Maillard reaction products (MRP) and MRP fermented by lactic acid bacteria on antioxidants and their enhancement of cardiovascular health in ICR mouse and rat models. In previous in vitro studies, the selected lactic acid bacteria were shown to significantly affect the activity of MRP. The expression of genes (e.g., superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase) related to antioxidant activity was upregulated by Maillard-reacted sodium caseinate (cMRP), and cMRP fermented by Lactobacillus fermentum H9 (F-cMRP) synergistically increased the expression of catalase and superoxide dismutase when compared with the high-cholesterol-diet group. Bleeding time, the assay for determination of antithrombotic activity, was significantly prolonged by Maillard-reacted whey protein concentration (wMRP) and wMRP fermented by Lactobacillus gasseri H10 (F-wMRP), similar to the bleeding time of the aspirin group (positive control). In addition, the acute pulmonary thromboembolism-induced mice overcame severe body paralysis or death in both the wMRP and the F-wMRP groups. In the serum-level experiment, cMRP and F-cMRP significantly reduced the serum total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and triglycerides but had only a slight effect on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The levels of aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase also declined in the cMRP and F-cMRP intake groups compared with the high-cholesterol-diet group. In particular, F-cMRP showed the highest reducing effects on triglycerides, aspartate transaminase, and alanine transaminase. Moreover, the expression of cholesterol-related genes in the F-cMRP group demonstrated greater effects than for the cMRP group in the level of cholesterol 7 α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), and low-density lipoprotein receptors compared with the high-cholesterol-diet group. The protective role of cMRP and F-cMRP in the high

  4. A model of cardiovascular disease giving a plausible mechanism for the effect of fractionated low-dose ionizing radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P Little

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the main cause of coronary heart disease and stroke, the two major causes of death in developed society. There is emerging evidence of excess risk of cardiovascular disease at low radiation doses in various occupationally exposed groups receiving small daily radiation doses. Assuming that they are causal, the mechanisms for effects of chronic fractionated radiation exposures on cardiovascular disease are unclear. We outline a spatial reaction-diffusion model for atherosclerosis and perform stability analysis, based wherever possible on human data. We show that a predicted consequence of multiple small radiation doses is to cause mean chemo-attractant (MCP-1 concentration to increase linearly with cumulative dose. The main driver for the increase in MCP-1 is monocyte death, and consequent reduction in MCP-1 degradation. The radiation-induced risks predicted by the model are quantitatively consistent with those observed in a number of occupationally-exposed groups. The changes in equilibrium MCP-1 concentrations with low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration are also consistent with experimental and epidemiologic data. This proposed mechanism would be experimentally testable. If true, it also has substantive implications for radiological protection, which at present does not take cardiovascular disease into account. The Japanese A-bomb survivor data implies that cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality contribute similarly to radiogenic risk. The major uncertainty in assessing the low-dose risk of cardiovascular disease is the shape of the dose response relationship, which is unclear in the Japanese data. The analysis of the present paper suggests that linear extrapolation would be appropriate for this endpoint.

  5. ROLE OF META-MODEL IN ENGINEERING DATA WAREHOUSE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENGuo-hua; HUANGZhi-qiu; WANGChuan-dong

    2004-01-01

    Engineering data are separately organized and their schemas are increasingly complex and variable. Engineering data management systems are needed to be able to manage the unified data and to be both customizable and extensible. The design of the systems is heavily dependent on the flexibility and self-description of the data model. The characteristics of engineering data and their management facts are analyzed. Then engineering data warehouse (EDW) architecture and multi-layer metamodels are presented. Also an approach to manage anduse engineering data by a meta object is proposed. Finally, an application flight test EDW system (FTEDWS) is described and meta-objects to manage engineering data in the data warehouse are used. It shows that adopting a meta-modeling approach provides a support for interchangeability and a sufficiently flexible environment in which the system evolution and the reusability can be handled.

  6. Chronic Non-Communicable Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Disease in sub-Saharan Africa: An Academic Model for Countering the Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Gerald S.; Kimaiyo, Sylvester; Carter, E. Jane; Binanay, Cynthia; Corey, G. Ralph; Einterz, Robert M.; Tierney, William M.; Velazquez, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Non-communicable diseases are rapidly overtaking infectious, perinatal, nutritional and maternal diseases as the major causes of worldwide death and disability. It is estimated that within the next 10-15 years, the increasing burden of chronic diseases and the ageing of the population will expose the world to an unprecedented burden of chronic diseases. Preventing the potential ramifications of a worldwide epidemic of chronic non-communicable diseases in a sustainable manner requires coordinated, collaborative efforts. Herein we present our collaboration's strategic plan to understand, treat and prevent chronic cardiovascular and pulmonary disease in Western Kenya which builds on a two decade partnership between academic universities in North America and Kenya; the Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH). We emphasize the importance of training Kenyan clinician-investigators who will ultimately lead efforts in cardiovascular and pulmonary disease care, education and research. This penultimate aim will be achieved by our five main goals. Our goals include creating an administrative core capable of managing operations, develop clinical and clinical research training curricula, enhancing existing technology infrastructure and implementing relevant research programs. Leveraging a strong international academic partnership with respective expertise in cardiovascular medicine, pulmonary medicine and medical informatics we have undertaken to understand and counter cardiovascular and pulmonary disease in Kenya by addressing patient care, teaching and clinical research. PMID:21570512

  7. Predictive modeling and reducing cyclic variability in autoignition engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellstrom, Erik; Stefanopoulou, Anna; Jiang, Li; Larimore, Jacob

    2016-08-30

    Methods and systems are provided for controlling a vehicle engine to reduce cycle-to-cycle combustion variation. A predictive model is applied to predict cycle-to-cycle combustion behavior of an engine based on observed engine performance variables. Conditions are identified, based on the predicted cycle-to-cycle combustion behavior, that indicate high cycle-to-cycle combustion variation. Corrective measures are then applied to prevent the predicted high cycle-to-cycle combustion variation.

  8. Underwater striling engine design with modified one-dimensional model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Daijin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stirling engines are regarded as an efficient and promising power system for underwater devices. Currently, many researches on one-dimensional model is used to evaluate thermodynamic performance of Stirling engine, but in which there are still some aspects which cannot be modeled with proper mathematical models such as mechanical loss or auxiliary power. In this paper, a four-cylinder double-acting Stirling engine for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs is discussed. And a one-dimensional model incorporated with empirical equations of mechanical loss and auxiliary power obtained from experiments is derived while referring to the Stirling engine computer model of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA. The P-40 Stirling engine with sufficient testing results from NASA is utilized to validate the accuracy of this one-dimensional model. It shows that the maximum error of output power of theoretical analysis results is less than 18% over testing results, and the maximum error of input power is no more than 9%. Finally, a Stirling engine for UUVs is designed with Schmidt analysis method and the modified one-dimensional model, and the results indicate this designed engine is capable of showing desired output power.

  9. Underwater striling engine design with modified one-dimensional model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daijin; Qin, Kan; Luo, Kai

    2015-09-01

    Stirling engines are regarded as an efficient and promising power system for underwater devices. Currently, many researches on one-dimensional model is used to evaluate thermodynamic performance of Stirling engine, but in which there are still some aspects which cannot be modeled with proper mathematical models such as mechanical loss or auxiliary power. In this paper, a four-cylinder double-acting Stirling engine for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) is discussed. And a one-dimensional model incorporated with empirical equations of mechanical loss and auxiliary power obtained from experiments is derived while referring to the Stirling engine computer model of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The P-40 Stirling engine with sufficient testing results from NASA is utilized to validate the accuracy of this one-dimensional model. It shows that the maximum error of output power of theoretical analysis results is less than 18% over testing results, and the maximum error of input power is no more than 9%. Finally, a Stirling engine for UUVs is designed with Schmidt analysis method and the modified one-dimensional model, and the results indicate this designed engine is capable of showing desired output power.

  10. MULTIBODY DYNAMIC ANALYSIS AND SIMULATION OF ENGINE MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. S.C. Jaiswal; Rahul Singh

    2011-01-01

    An assembly model for the internal combustion engine model has been proposed. The basis for the model is a study of earlier designs. The proposed design will run at a different speed, so the designers want to analyse the components, and in particular the stress in the connecting-rod, at the new speed. The designer's question is: at what speed can the engine be run without the stress in the connecting rodexceeding the permissible stress for the material?

  11. The use of mathematical models in teaching wastewater treatment engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgenroth, Eberhard Friedrich; Arvin, Erik; Vanrolleghem, P.

    2002-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of wastewater treatment processes has become increasingly popular in recent years. To prepare students for their future careers, environmental engineering education should provide students with sufficient background and experiences to understand and apply mathematical models...... efficiently and responsibly. Approaches for introducing mathematical modeling into courses on wastewater treatment engineering are discussed depending on the learning objectives, level of the course and the time available....

  12. Component-specific modeling. [jet engine hot section components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Tipton, M. T.; Weber, G.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for a 3 year program to develop methodology for component-specific modeling of aircraft hot section components (turbine blades, turbine vanes, and burner liners). These accomplishments include: (1) engine thermodynamic and mission models, (2) geometry model generators, (3) remeshing, (4) specialty three-dimensional inelastic structural analysis, (5) computationally efficient solvers, (6) adaptive solution strategies, (7) engine performance parameters/component response variables decomposition and synthesis, (8) integrated software architecture and development, and (9) validation cases for software developed.

  13. Model-driven Engineering Metrics for Real Time Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Monperrus, Martin; Jézéquel, Jean-Marc; Champeau, Joël; Hoeltzener, Brigitte

    2008-01-01

    As with other software development processes, model-driven engineering of real time software systems include quality assurance and measurement. Model-driven engineering (MDE) supports the development of real-time software systems by means of a set of languages, processes, methods and tools. To measure the models, a dedicated measurement software has to be developed, which is costly. In this paper, we propose a framework to concisely define and automatically implement an open-ended family of m...

  14. MULTIBODY DYNAMIC ANALYSIS AND SIMULATION OF ENGINE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. S.C. Jaiswal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available An assembly model for the internal combustion engine model has been proposed. The basis for the model is a study of earlier designs. The proposed design will run at a different speed, so the designers want to analyse the components, and in particular the stress in the connecting-rod, at the new speed. The designer's question is: at what speed can the engine be run without the stress in the connecting rodexceeding the permissible stress for the material?

  15. Computer-based modelling and analysis in engineering geology

    OpenAIRE

    Giles, David

    2014-01-01

    This body of work presents the research and publications undertaken under a general theme of computer-based modelling and analysis in engineering geology. Papers are presented on geotechnical data management, data interchange, Geographical Information Systems, surface modelling, geostatistical methods, risk-based modelling, knowledge-based systems, remote sensing in engineering geology and on the integration of computer applications into applied geoscience teaching. The work highlights my...

  16. Building Information Modeling in engineering teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Niclas; Andersson, Pernille Hammar

    2010-01-01

    technological development of ICT systems and the increased application of ICT in industry significantly influence the management and organisation of construction projects, and consequently, ICT has implications for the education of engineers and the preparation of students for their future professional careers......The application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in construction supports business as well as project processes by providing integrated systems for communication, administration, quantity takeoff, time scheduling, cost estimating, progress control among other things. The rapid...... needed to operate the ICT systems properly. This study takes on the challenge of using ICT in engineering education without diminishing the body of technical disciplinary knowledge and the understanding of the engineering context in which it is taught, practiced, and learned. The objective of the study...

  17. Soluble CD54 induces human endothelial cells ex vivo expansion useful for cardiovascular regeneration and tissue engineering application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M. Malara

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that sCD54 is an essential factor for the in-vitro expansion of HECs without donor and vessel-source variability. Resulting primary cultures can be useful, for tissue engineering in regenerative medicine (e.g. artificial micro tissue generation, coating artificial heart valve etc. and bio-nanotechnology applications.

  18. Semantic modeling and interoperability in product and process engineering a technology for engineering informatics

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, feature-based design and manufacturing has gained some momentum in various engineering domains to represent and reuse semantic patterns with effective applicability. However, the actual scope of feature application is still very limited. Semantic Modeling and Interoperability in Product and Process Engineering provides a systematic solution for the challenging engineering informatics field aiming at the enhancement of sustainable knowledge representation, implementation and reuse in an open and yet practically manageable scale.   This semantic modeling technology supports uniform, multi-facet and multi-level collaborative system engineering with heterogeneous computer-aided tools, such as CADCAM, CAE, and ERP.  This presented unified feature model can be applied to product and process representation, development, implementation and management. Practical case studies and test samples are provided to illustrate applications which can be implemented by the readers in real-world scenarios. �...

  19. A detonation model in spark-ignition engines: preliminary results on engine octane requirement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, M.; Danieli, G.A.; Amelio, M.; Bova, S.; Fragiacomo, N.

    1984-01-01

    A detonation model for spark ignition engines has been developed. Basis for the work is the phenomenological spark ignition engine simulation model (PSIES) recently developed at the University of Calabria coupled to an algorithm for determination of the cold flame induction time, as proposed by Douaud and Eyzat for primary reference fuels. The effect of fuel composition on the thermodynamic properties of the unburned mixture has also been taken into account. Model predictions have been compared to experimental results for a CFR engine, obtaining very good agreement. Finally an octane requirement map for a production engine of which some pressure data in absence of detonation were available, has been computed. More work will however be needed in particular for optimizing the values of the various parameters.

  20. A Plastic Damage Mechanics Model for Engineered Cementitious Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Lars; Stang, Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Kabele, Petr

    This paper discusses the establishment of a plasticity-based damage mechanics model for Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC). The present model differs from existing models by combining a matrix and fiber description in order to describe the behavior of the ECC material. The model provides...

  1. An isolated perfused pig heart model for the development, validation and translation of novel cardiovascular magnetic resonance techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Perera Divaka; Morton Geraint; Hay Gunnar; Neumann Nicole; Ishida Masaki; Southworth Richard; Grünwald Inga; Chiribiri Amedeo; Schuster Andreas; Schaeffter Tobias; Nagel Eike

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Novel cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques and imaging biomarkers are often validated in small animal models or empirically in patients. Direct translation of small animal CMR protocols to humans is rarely possible, while validation in humans is often difficult, slow and occasionally not possible due to ethical considerations. The aim of this study is to overcome these limitations by introducing an MR-compatible, free beating, blood-perfused, isolated pig hea...

  2. Is procrastination a vulnerability factor for hypertension and cardiovascular disease? Testing an extension of the procrastination–health model

    OpenAIRE

    Sirois, F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Personality is an important epidemiological factor for understanding health outcomes. This study investigated the associations of trait procrastination with hypertension and cardiovascular disease (HT/CVD) and maladaptive coping by testing an extension of the procrastination–health model among individuals with and without HT/CVD. Individuals with self-reported HT/CVD (N = 182) and healthy controls (N = 564), from a community sample, completed an online survey including measures of personality...

  3. Modeling Student Success in Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qu

    2013-01-01

    In order for the United States to maintain its global competitiveness, the long-term success of our engineering students in specific courses, programs, and colleges is now, more than ever, an extremely high priority. Numerous studies have focused on factors that impact student success, namely academic performance, retention, and/or graduation.…

  4. Bridge Engineering-Oriented Parametric Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周凌远; 李乔

    2004-01-01

    A new model is proposed to improve the efficiency of structural modeling. In this model, the bridge structural components are expressed with component description, parametric description and geometric description in a software system. This model provides both convenience and flexibility for users in structural modeling process. The object-oriented method is applied in the model implementation. A bridge analysis preprocessor is developed on the basis of this model. It provides an effective way for bridge modeling.

  5. Comparison of free-piston Stirling engine model predictions with RE1000 engine test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Predictions of a free-piston Stirling engine model are compared with RE1000 engine test data taken at NASA-Lewis Research Center. The model validation and the engine testing are being done under a joint interagency agreement between the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and NASA-Lewis. A kinematic code developed at Lewis was upgraded to permit simulation of free-piston engine performance; it was further upgraded and modified at Lewis and is currently being validated. The model predicts engine performance by numerical integration of equations for each control volume in the working space. Piston motions are determined by numerical integration of the force balance on each piston or can be specified as Fourier series. In addition, the model Fourier analyzes the various piston forces to permit the construction of phasor force diagrams. The paper compares predicted and experimental values of power and efficiency and shows phasor force diagrams for the RE1000 engine displacer and piston. Further development plans for the model are also discussed.

  6. A multilevel model for cardiovascular disease prevalence in the US and its application to micro area prevalence estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congdon Peter

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimates of disease prevalence for small areas are increasingly required for the allocation of health funds according to local need. Both individual level and geographic risk factors are likely to be relevant to explaining prevalence variations, and in turn relevant to the procedure for small area prevalence estimation. Prevalence estimates are of particular importance for major chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease. Methods A multilevel prevalence model for cardiovascular outcomes is proposed that incorporates both survey information on patient risk factors and the effects of geographic location. The model is applied to derive micro area prevalence estimates, specifically estimates of cardiovascular disease for Zip Code Tabulation Areas in the USA. The model incorporates prevalence differentials by age, sex, ethnicity and educational attainment from the 2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey. Influences of geographic context are modelled at both county and state level, with the county effects relating to poverty and urbanity. State level influences are modelled using a random effects approach that allows both for spatial correlation and spatial isolates. Results To assess the importance of geographic variables, three types of model are compared: a model with person level variables only; a model with geographic effects that do not interact with person attributes; and a full model, allowing for state level random effects that differ by ethnicity. There is clear evidence that geographic effects improve statistical fit. Conclusion Geographic variations in disease prevalence partly reflect the demographic composition of area populations. However, prevalence variations may also show distinct geographic 'contextual' effects. The present study demonstrates by formal modelling methods that improved explanation is obtained by allowing for distinct geographic effects (for counties and states and for

  7. Effect of gliclazide on cardiovascular risk factors involved in split-dose streptozotocin induced neonatal rat model: a chronic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Mohammed Salman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study aimed at evaluating the effect of gliclazide on cardiovascular risk factors involved in type 2 diabetes mellitus using n-STZ rat model on a long term basis. Methods: The diabetic model was developed using a split dose of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg intraperitoneally on 2nd and 3rd postnatal days. The diabetic rats were treated orally with gliclazide suspension at the dose of 10 mg/kg for 90 days. Cardiovascular risk factors such as systolic blood pressure, heart rate, lipid profile, creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase were evaluated at regular intervals along with fasting blood glucose (FBG and oral glucose tolerance test. Results: Gliclazide did not alter FBG however improved the impaired glucose tolerance. The gliclazide treated rats did not develop hypertension and there was a significant difference (p<0.001 at the end of treatment when compared to the diabetic group which could be due to free radical scavenging property of gliclazide. Gliclazide treatment in n-STZ model was found to be effective in preventing hypertension, creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activity. Also gliclazide was found to have beneficial effects on the impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidaemia, adiposity index and total fat pad weight. Conclusions: To improve and prevent the cardiovascular risk factors involved in Type II diabetic patients, gliclazide could be clinically beneficial. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2012; 1(3.000: 196-201

  8. Engine System Model Development for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karl W.; Simpson, Steven P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to design, analyze, and evaluate conceptual Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) engine systems, an improved NTP design and analysis tool has been developed. The NTP tool utilizes the Rocket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) system tool and many of the routines from the Enabler reactor model found in Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS). Improved non-nuclear component models and an external shield model were added to the tool. With the addition of a nearly complete system reliability model, the tool will provide performance, sizing, and reliability data for NERVA-Derived NTP engine systems. A new detailed reactor model is also being developed and will replace Enabler. The new model will allow more flexibility in reactor geometry and include detailed thermal hydraulics and neutronics models. A description of the reactor, component, and reliability models is provided. Another key feature of the modeling process is the use of comprehensive spreadsheets for each engine case. The spreadsheets include individual worksheets for each subsystem with data, plots, and scaled figures, making the output very useful to each engineering discipline. Sample performance and sizing results with the Enabler reactor model are provided including sensitivities. Before selecting an engine design, all figures of merit must be considered including the overall impacts on the vehicle and mission. Evaluations based on key figures of merit of these results and results with the new reactor model will be performed. The impacts of clustering and external shielding will also be addressed. Over time, the reactor model will be upgraded to design and analyze other NTP concepts with CERMET and carbide fuel cores.

  9. A New Titan Atmospheric Model for Mission Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. H.; Bell, J. M.; Lorenz, R.; Achterberg, R.; Flasar, F. M.

    2012-03-01

    Titan’s polar regions and hydrocarbon lakes are of interest for future exploration. This paper describes a new engineering model of Titan’s atmospheric structure with particular reference to the proposed Titan Mare Explorer mission.

  10. Finite element modeling for materials engineers using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Oluwole, Oluleke

    2011-01-01

    Discusses the finite element method with a particular focus on the requirements of materials engineers Uses the MATLAB® pdetool to develop a code-free way of modelling Contains exercises to help develop the reader's understanding

  11. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports

  12. Monitoring Electronics for Steam Engines Models

    OpenAIRE

    Benda, D.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the project was to design and implement a rotary position senzor for sensing rotational speed of steam engines using integrated circuits from the company Austria Micro Systems. Further, a temperature sensing boilers for heating water vapor using temperature sensors from the company Texas Instruments. All information from the sensors are processed in the ATmega16 microcontroller from the company Atmel. The output data are displayed on a display composed of seven segmented blocks.

  13. A Simplified Model of the Internal Combustion Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Christofer Neff

    2013-01-01

    This project further investigates a model of a simplified internal combustion engine considered by Kranc in 1977. Using Euler’s method for ordinary differential equations, we modeled the interaction between the engine’s flywheel and thermodynamic power cycle. Approximating with sufficiently small time intervals (0.001 seconds over a period of 12 seconds) reproduced Kranc’s results with the engine having an average angular velocity of 72/sec.

  14. Translational Models for Musculoskeletal Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Sah, Robert L.; Ratcliffe, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health–sponsored workshop “Translational Models for Musculoskeletal Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine” was held to describe the utility of various translational models for engineered tissues and regenerative medicine therapies targeting intervertebral disc, cartilage, meniscus, ligament, tendon, muscle, and bone. Participants included leaders in the various topics, as well as National Institutes of Health and Food and Drug Administration. The Food and Dru...

  15. Modeling for Control of a Wobble–Yoke Stirling Engine

    OpenAIRE

    García–Canseco, Eloísa; Scherpen, Jacquelien M. A.; Kuindersma, Marnix

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we derive the dynamic model of a four–cylinder double–acting wobble–yoke Stirling engine. In contrast with the classical thermodynamics methods that dominate the literature of Stirling mechanisms, we present a control system perspective to obtain a useful model for the analysis and synthesis of feedback control laws. The main motivation is the application of this gas engine in a micro–combined heat and power (CHP) generation system.

  16. A Simplified Model of the Internal Combustion Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christofer Neff

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This project further investigates a model of a simplified internal combustion engine considered by Kranc in 1977. Using Euler’s method for ordinary differential equations, we modeled the interaction between the engine’s flywheel and thermodynamic power cycle. Approximating with sufficiently small time intervals (0.001 seconds over a period of 12 seconds reproduced Kranc’s results with the engine having an average angular velocity of 72/sec.

  17. Research on the User Interest Modeling of Personalized Search Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhengwei; XIA Shixiong; NIU Qiang; XIA Zhanguo

    2007-01-01

    At present, how to enable Search Engine to construct user personal interest model initially, master user's personalized information timely and provide personalized services accurately have become the hotspot in the research of Search Engine area.Aiming at the problems of user model's construction and combining techniques of manual customization modeling and automatic analytical modeling, a User Interest Model (UIM) is proposed in the paper. On the basis of it, the corresponding establishment and update algorithms of User Interest Profile (UIP) are presented subsequently. Simulation tests proved that the UIM proposed and corresponding algorithms could enhance the retrieval precision effectively and have superior adaptability.

  18. Model-driven and software product line engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Royer, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Many approaches to creating Software Product Lines have emerged that are based on Model-Driven Engineering. This book introduces both Software Product Lines and Model-Driven Engineering, which have separate success stories in industry, and focuses on the practical combination of them. It describes the challenges and benefits of merging these two software development trends and provides the reader with a novel approach and practical mechanisms to improve software development productivity.The book is aimed at engineers and students who wish to understand and apply software product lines

  19. Reliability study of two engineering models using LU decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents two different methods - LU decomposition and Runge-Kutta - for reliability engineering assessment. These methods are used to calculate the steady-state probabilities and frequencies of two different engineering models. The effect of the different methods is shown on the simple numerical examples by comparing the steady-state probabilities and frequencies of both models. The paper concludes that the LU decomposition method is useful to practicing engineers and students of reliability concepts. Also, the final results for both methods is almost the same

  20. Spent fuel reprocessing system security engineering capability maturity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of nuclear safety, traditional work places extra emphasis on risk assessment related to technical skills, production operations, accident consequences through deterministic or probabilistic analysis, and on the basis of which risk management and control are implemented. However, high quality of product does not necessarily mean good safety quality, which implies a predictable degree of uniformity and dependability suited to the specific security needs. In this paper, we make use of the system security engineering - capability maturity model (SSE-CMM) in the field of spent fuel reprocessing, establish a spent fuel reprocessing systems security engineering capability maturity model (SFR-SSE-CMM). The base practices in the model are collected from the materials of the practice of the nuclear safety engineering, which represent the best security implementation activities, reflect the regular and basic work of the implementation of the security engineering in the spent fuel reprocessing plant, the general practices reveal the management, measurement and institutional characteristics of all process activities. The basic principles that should be followed in the course of implementation of safety engineering activities are indicated from 'what' and 'how' aspects. The model provides a standardized framework and evaluation system for the safety engineering of the spent fuel reprocessing system. As a supplement to traditional methods, this new assessment technique with property of repeatability and predictability with respect to cost, procedure and quality control, can make or improve the activities of security engineering to become a serial of mature, measurable and standard activities. (author)

  1. Structural Model for Jet Engine Configuration Using Knowledge-Based Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Tenllado Cunillera, Albert

    2009-01-01

    The overall goal is to develop a structural model that enables configuration of different jet engine concepts and used as input to the research project where dynamic and stress analysis will be performed. The specific goal is to: use the KBE-module of Siemens PLM NX5 called Knowledge Fusion to implement a simplified turbofan jet engine containing accordin to Figure 1. Although the focus is on the structural (i.e the parts that create the stiffness of the jet engine and mostly are static) part...

  2. Review of aerospace engineering cost modelling: The genetic causal approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, R.; Raghunathan, S.; Price, M.

    2004-11-01

    The primary intention of this paper is to review the current state of the art in engineering cost modelling as applied to aerospace. This is a topic of current interest and in addressing the literature, the presented work also sets out some of the recognised definitions of cost that relate to the engineering domain. The paper does not attempt to address the higher-level financial sector but rather focuses on the costing issues directly relevant to the engineering process, primarily those of design and manufacture. This is of more contemporary interest as there is now a shift towards the analysis of the influence of cost, as defined in more engineering related terms; in an attempt to link into integrated product and process development (IPPD) within a concurrent engineering environment. Consequently, the cost definitions are reviewed in the context of the nature of cost as applicable to the engineering process stages: from bidding through to design, to manufacture, to procurement and ultimately, to operation. The linkage and integration of design and manufacture is addressed in some detail. This leads naturally to the concept of engineers influencing and controlling cost within their own domain rather than trusting this to financers who have little control over the cause of cost. In terms of influence, the engineer creates the potential for cost and in a concurrent environment this requires models that integrate cost into the decision making process.

  3. Engineers' Non-Scientific Models in Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norstrom, Per

    2013-01-01

    Engineers commonly use rules, theories and models that lack scientific justification. Examples include rules of thumb based on experience, but also models based on obsolete science or folk theories. Centrifugal forces, heat and cold as substances, and sucking vacuum all belong to the latter group. These models contradict scientific knowledge, but…

  4. The effectiveness and cost effectiveness of dark chocolate consumption as prevention therapy in people at high risk of cardiovascular disease: best case scenario analysis using a Markov model

    OpenAIRE

    Zomer, Ella; Owen, Alice; Magliano, Dianna J; Liew, Danny; Reid, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To model the long term effectiveness and cost effectiveness of daily dark chocolate consumption in a population with metabolic syndrome at high risk of cardiovascular disease. Design Best case scenario analysis using a Markov model. Setting Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle study. Participants 2013 people with hypertension who met the criteria for metabolic syndrome, with no history of cardiovascular disease and not receiving antihypertensive therapy. Main outcome measures ...

  5. High Intensity Aerobic Exercise Training Improves Deficits of Cardiovascular Autonomic Function in a Rat Model of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with Moderate Hyperglycemia

    OpenAIRE

    Grisé, Kenneth N.; T. Dylan Olver; Matthew W. McDonald; Adwitia Dey; Mao Jiang; James C. Lacefield; J. Kevin Shoemaker; Noble, Earl G.; C. W. James Melling

    2016-01-01

    Indices of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in experimental models of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) are often contrary to clinical data. Here, we investigated whether a relatable insulin-treated model of T1DM would induce deficits in cardiovascular (CV) autonomic function more reflective of clinical results and if exercise training could prevent those deficits. Sixty-four rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control (C), sedentary T1DM (D), control exercise (CX), or T1DM e...

  6. Flipped Classroom Model Improves Graduate Student Performance in Cardiovascular, Respiratory, and Renal Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tune, Johnathan D.; Sturek, Michael; Basile, David P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a traditional lecture-based curriculum versus a modified "flipped classroom" curriculum of cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal physiology delivered to first-year graduate students. Students in both courses were provided the same notes and recorded lectures. Students in the…

  7. Assessment of radiation dose in nuclear cardiovascular imaging using realistic computational models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Tianwu; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E.; Zaidi, Habib

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Nuclear cardiology plays an important role in clinical assessment and has enormous impact on the management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Pediatric patients at different age groups are exposed to a spectrum of radiation dose levels and associated cancer risks different from those

  8. Numerical Model of the Human Cardiovascular System-Korotkoff Sounds Simulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maršík, František; Převorovská, Světlana; Brož, Z.; Štembera, V.

    Vol.4, č. 2 (2004), s. 193-199. ISSN 1432-9077 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/03/1073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : cardiovascular system * Korotkoff sounds * numerical simulation Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  9. Thermodynamics of Paint Related Systems with Engineering Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvig, Thomas; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2001-01-01

    solid surfaces and drying. Many engineering models have been applied over the last decades for solutions with commoditity polymers. In this work the performance of some of these models is investigated for paint-related systems, focusing on those drying by the so-called " lacquer mechanism " (evaporation...... conclude that, despite the uncertainties involved, several models yield reasonably accurate activity coefficients, even at infinite dilution. Thus, engineering models may be useful for solvent selection via semiempirical rules of thumb, which are based on thermodynamic considerations....

  10. A Plastic Damage Mechanics Model for Engineered Cementitious Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Lars; Stang, Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe;

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the establishment of a plasticity-based damage mechanics model for Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC). The present model differs from existing models by combining a matrix and fiber description in order to describe the behavior of the ECC material. The model provides...... information about crack opening and spacing, which makes it possible to assess the condition of a structure in the serviceability state. A simulation of a four point bending beam is performed to demonstrate the capability of the model....

  11. Similarity and Modeling in Science and Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Kuneš, Josef

    2012-01-01

    The present text sets itself in relief to other titles on the subject in that it addresses the means and methodologies versus a narrow specific-task oriented approach. Concepts and their developments which evolved to meet the changing needs of applications are addressed. This approach provides the reader with a general tool-box to apply to their specific needs. Two important tools are presented: dimensional analysis and the similarity analysis methods. The fundamental point of view, enabling one to sort all models, is that of information flux between a model and an original expressed by the similarity and abstraction. Each chapter includes original examples and ap-plications. In this respect, the models can be divided into several groups. The following models are dealt with separately by chapter; mathematical and physical models, physical analogues, deterministic, stochastic, and cybernetic computer models. The mathematical models are divided into asymptotic and phenomenological models. The phenomenological m...

  12. Soluble CD54 induces human endothelial cells ex vivo expansion useful for cardiovascular regeneration and tissue engineering application

    KAUST Repository

    Malara, N.M.

    2015-03-01

    Aim: Consistent expansion of primary human endothelial cells in vitro is critical in the development of engineered tissue. A variety of complex culture media and techniques developed from different basal media have been reported with alternate success. Incongruous results are further confounded by donor-to-donor variability and cellular source of derivation. Our results demonstrate how to overcome these limitations using soluble CD54 (sCD54) as additive to conventional culture medium. Methods and results: Isolated primary fragment of different vessel types was expanded in Ham\\'s F12 DMEM, enriched with growth factors, Fetal Calf Serum and conditioned medium of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) collected at different passages. Cytokine content of culture media was analyzed in order to identify the soluble factors correlating with better proliferation profile. sCD54 was found to induce the in vitro expansion of human endothelial cells (HECs) independently from the vessels source and even in the absence of HUVEC-conditioned medium. The HECs cultivated in the presence of sCD54 (50 ng/ml), resulted positive for the expression of CD146 and negative for CD45, and lower fibroblast contamination. Cells were capable to proliferate with an S phase of 25%, to produce vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF, (10 ng/ml) and to give origin to vessel-like tubule in vitro. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that sCD54 is an essential factor for the in-vitro expansion of HECs without donor and vessel-source variability. Resulting primary cultures can be useful, for tissue engineering in regenerative medicine (e.g. artificial micro tissue generation, coating artificial heart valve etc.) and bio-nanotechnology applications. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Artificial Intelligence Software Engineering (AISE) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Peter A.

    1990-01-01

    The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics has initiated a committee on standards for Artificial Intelligence. Presented are the initial efforts of one of the working groups of that committee. A candidate model is presented for the development life cycle of knowledge based systems (KBSs). The intent is for the model to be used by the aerospace community and eventually be evolved into a standard. The model is rooted in the evolutionary model, borrows from the spiral model, and is embedded in the standard Waterfall model for software development. Its intent is to satisfy the development of both stand-alone and embedded KBSs. The phases of the life cycle are shown and detailed as are the review points that constitute the key milestones throughout the development process. The applicability and strengths of the model are discussed along with areas needing further development and refinement by the aerospace community.

  14. Complete modeling for systems of a marine diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahim, Hassan Moussa; Younes, Rafic; Nohra, Chadi; Ouladsine, Mustapha

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a simulator model of a marine diesel engine based on physical, semi-physical, mathematical and thermodynamic equations, which allows fast predictive simulations. The whole engine system is divided into several functional blocks: cooling, lubrication, air, injection, combustion and emissions. The sub-models and dynamic characteristics of individual blocks are established according to engine working principles equations and experimental data collected from a marine diesel engine test bench for SIMB Company under the reference 6M26SRP1. The overall engine system dynamics is expressed as a set of simultaneous algebraic and differential equations using sub-blocks and S-Functions of Matlab/Simulink. The simulation of this model, implemented on Matlab/Simulink has been validated and can be used to obtain engine performance, pressure, temperature, efficiency, heat release, crank angle, fuel rate, emissions at different sub-blocks. The simulator will be used, in future work, to study the engine performance in faulty conditions, and can be used to assist marine engineers in fault diagnosis and estimation (FDI) as well as designers to predict the behavior of the cooling system, lubrication system, injection system, combustion, emissions, in order to optimize the dimensions of different components. This program is a platform for fault simulator, to investigate the impact on sub-blocks engine's output of changing values for faults parameters such as: faulty fuel injector, leaky cylinder, worn fuel pump, broken piston rings, a dirty turbocharger, dirty air filter, dirty air cooler, air leakage, water leakage, oil leakage and contamination, fouling of heat exchanger, pumps wear, failure of injectors (and many others).

  15. Decision models in engineering and management

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Providing a comprehensive overview of various methods  and applications in decision engineering, this book presents chapters written by a range experts in the field. It presents conceptual aspects of decision support applications in various areas including finance, vendor selection, construction, process management, water management and energy, agribusiness , production scheduling and control, and waste management. In addition to this, a special focus is given to methods of multi-criteria decision analysis. Decision making in organizations is a recurrent theme and is essential for business continuity.  Managers from various fields including public, private, industrial, trading or service sectors are required to make decisions. Consequently managers need the support of these structured methods in order to engage in effective decision making. This book provides a valuable resource for graduate students, professors and researchers of decision analysis, multi-criteria decision analysis and group decision analys...

  16. Model Driven Engineering with Capella and AADL

    OpenAIRE

    Ouni, Bassem; Gaufillet, Pierre; Jenn, Eric; Hugues, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The development of real time embedded equipments is a challenging task that requires the elaboration of multiple models in several domains, notably system, electronics and software, spanning a large spectrum of multiple abstraction levels and viewpoints: structural, behavioral, dependability, etc. These models serve various purposes: specification, design, evaluation or verification and validation. Today, no single modeling language and environment covers all these aspects. While Capella – an...

  17. WDM Systems and Networks Modeling, Simulation, Design and Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Ellinas, Georgios; Roudas, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    WDM Systems and Networks: Modeling, Simulation, Design and Engineering provides readers with the basic skills, concepts, and design techniques used to begin design and engineering of optical communication systems and networks at various layers. The latest semi-analytical system simulation techniques are applied to optical WDM systems and networks, and a review of the various current areas of optical communications is presented. Simulation is mixed with experimental verification and engineering to present the industry as well as state-of-the-art research. This contributed volume is divided into three parts, accommodating different readers interested in various types of networks and applications. The first part of the book presents modeling approaches and simulation tools mainly for the physical layer including transmission effects, devices, subsystems, and systems), whereas the second part features more engineering/design issues for various types of optical systems including ULH, access, and in-building system...

  18. Fusing Quantitative Requirements Analysis with Model-based Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornford, Steven L.; Feather, Martin S.; Heron, Vance A.; Jenkins, J. Steven

    2006-01-01

    A vision is presented for fusing quantitative requirements analysis with model-based systems engineering. This vision draws upon and combines emergent themes in the engineering milieu. "Requirements engineering" provides means to explicitly represent requirements (both functional and non-functional) as constraints and preferences on acceptable solutions, and emphasizes early-lifecycle review, analysis and verification of design and development plans. "Design by shopping" emphasizes revealing the space of options available from which to choose (without presuming that all selection criteria have previously been elicited), and provides means to make understandable the range of choices and their ramifications. "Model-based engineering" emphasizes the goal of utilizing a formal representation of all aspects of system design, from development through operations, and provides powerful tool suites that support the practical application of these principles. A first step prototype towards this vision is described, embodying the key capabilities. Illustrations, implications, further challenges and opportunities are outlined.

  19. Potency of Animal Models in KANSEI Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Shigeru; Hisano, Setsuji; Iwamoto, Yoshiki

    Various species of animals have been used as animal models for neuroscience and provided critical information about the brain functions. Although it seems difficult to elucidate a highly advanced function of the human brain, animal models have potency to clarify the fundamental mechanisms of emotion, decision-making and social behavior. In this review, we will pick up common animal models and point to both the merits and demerits caused by the characteristics. We will also mention that wide-ranging approaches from animal models are advantageous to understand KANSEI as well as mind in humans.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Gasdynamics and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C. I.

    2003-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDB) have generated considerable research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional gas turbines and rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a theoretical thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional engines. However, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to all pulse detonation devices has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance of PDES problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the progress that has been made in comparing the available experimental measurements with analytical and numerical models.

  1. Theory and application of experimental model analysis in earthquake engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncarz, P. D.

    The feasibility and limitations of small-scale model studies in earthquake engineering research and practice is considered with emphasis on dynamic modeling theory, a study of the mechanical properties of model materials, the development of suitable model construction techniques and an evaluation of the accuracy of prototype response prediction through model case studies on components and simple steel and reinforced concrete structures. It is demonstrated that model analysis can be used in many cases to obtain quantitative information on the seismic behavior of complex structures which cannot be analyzed confidently by conventional techniques. Methodologies for model testing and response evaluation are developed in the project and applications of model analysis in seismic response studies on various types of civil engineering structures (buildings, bridges, dams, etc.) are evaluated.

  2. Technology driven industry models: Towards organised chaos in engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Kern, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    New and sustainable concepts for business operations such as the shared values concept result inincreased complexity in value network structures and engineering tasks. The generation of suitable engineering patterns is a collaborative task that combines the perspectives of several organizations and disciplines. An approach that allows chaotic structures and organises arrangements to deal with those complexities enables a self-organizing network to set-up the industrys model.This paper will pr...

  3. Multiscale computer modeling in biomechanics and biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book reviews the state-of-the-art in multiscale computer modeling, in terms of both accomplishments and challenges. The information in the book is particularly useful for biomedical engineers, medical physicists and researchers in systems biology, mathematical biology, micro-biomechanics and biomaterials who are interested in how to bridge between traditional biomedical engineering work at the organ and tissue scales, and the newer arenas of cellular and molecular bioengineering.

  4. Mathematical Model of the Jet Engine Fuel System

    OpenAIRE

    Klimko Marek

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses the design of a simplified mathematical model of the jet (turbo-compressor) engine fuel system. The solution will be based on the regulation law, where the control parameter is a fuel mass flow rate and the regulated parameter is the rotational speed. A differential equation of the jet engine and also differential equations of other fuel system components (fuel pump, throttle valve, pressure regulator) will be described, with respect to advanced predetermined simplifications.

  5. Mathematical Model of the Jet Engine Fuel System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimko Marek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the design of a simplified mathematical model of the jet (turbo-compressor engine fuel system. The solution will be based on the regulation law, where the control parameter is a fuel mass flow rate and the regulated parameter is the rotational speed. A differential equation of the jet engine and also differential equations of other fuel system components (fuel pump, throttle valve, pressure regulator will be described, with respect to advanced predetermined simplifications.

  6. Capability maturity models in engineering companies: case study analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Titov Sergei; Bubnov Gregory; Guseva Maria; Lyalin Alexei; Brikoshina Irina

    2016-01-01

    In the conditions of the current economic downturn engineering companies in Russia and worldwide are searching for new approaches and frameworks to improve their strategic position, increase the efficiency of the internal business processes and enhance the quality of the final products. Capability maturity models are well-known tools used by many foreign engineering companies to assess the productivity of the processes, to elaborate the program of business process improvement and to prioritiz...

  7. Human Engineering Modeling and Performance Lab Study Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    The HEMAP (Human Engineering Modeling and Performance) Lab is a joint effort between the Industrial and Human Engineering group and the KAVE (Kennedy Advanced Visualiations Environment) group. The lab consists of sixteen camera system that is used to capture human motions and operational tasks, through te use of a Velcro suit equipped with sensors, and then simulate these tasks in an ergonomic software package know as Jac, The Jack software is able to identify the potential risk hazards.

  8. Mechanical Modelling and Computational Issues in Civil Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Fremond, M.; MACERI, F

    2005-01-01

    In this edited book various novel approaches to problems of modern civil engineering are demonstrated. Experts associated within the Lagrange Laboratory present recent research results in civil engineering dealing both with modelling and computational aspects. Many modern topics are covered, such as monumental dams, soil mechanics and geotechnics, granular media, contact and friction problems, damage and fracture, new structural materials, and vibration damping -presenting the state of the ar...

  9. Modeling and Engineering Algorithms for Mobile Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blunck, Henrik; Hinrichs, Klaus; Sondern, Joëlle; Vahrenhold, Jan

    In this paper, we present an object-oriented approach to modeling mobile data and algorithms operating on such data. Our model is general enough to capture any kind of continuous motion while at the same time allowing for encompassing algorithms optimized for specific types of motion. Such motion...

  10. Miscibility of polymer blends with engineering models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassilis, Harismiadis; van Bergen, A. R. D.; Goncalves, Ana Saraiva; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Fredenslund, Aage; Dimitrios, Tassios

    1996-01-01

    The miscibility behavior of polymer blends that do not exhibit strong specific interactions is examined. Phase equilibrium calculations are presented with the van der Waals equation of state and three group-contribution models (UNIFAC, Entropic-FV, and GC-Flory). Performance of these models is also...

  11. MODELING OF TURBULENT FLAME VELOCITY FOR SPARK IGNITION ENGINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RASHID ALI,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The present model reported a comprehensive theoretical study on flame velocity in spark ignition engine for iso-octane air mixture. The present model developed is a zero-dimensional thermodynamicmodel. Computer simulations have been performed for the turbulent flame velocity of premixed flame. The comparison has been made between the flame velocity obtained from the present model to thetheoretical and experimental flame velocities that are available in the literature for the wide range of engine operating parameters such as clearance height, density ratio, equivalence ratio, flame radius,engine speed and unburnt mixture temperature. The comparison shows a good agreement between the flame velocity obtained from the present model with the experimental and theoretical flame velocity of Cakir.

  12. Thermodynamic modeling of direct injection methanol fueled engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-cylinder pressure is an important parameter that is used to investigate the combustion process in internal combustion (IC) engines. In this paper, a thermodynamic model of IC engine combustion is presented and examined. A heat release function and an empirical conversion efficiency factor are introduced to solve the model. The pressure traces obtained by solving the thermodynamic model are compared with measured pressure data for a fully instrumented laboratory IC spark ignition (SI) engine. Derived scaling parameters for time to peak pressure, peak pressure, and maximum rate of pressure rise (among others) are developed and compared with the numerical simulations. The models examined here may serve as pedagogic tools and, when suitably refined, as preliminary design tools.

  13. NTP system simulation and detailed nuclear engine modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) & detailed nuclear engine modeling; modeling and engineering simulation of nuclear thermal rocket systems; nuclear thermal rocket simulation system; INSPI-NTVR core axial flow profiles; INSPI-NTRV core axial flow profiles; specific impulse vs. chamber pressure; turbine pressure ratio vs. chamber pressure; NERVA core axial flow profiles; P&W XNR2000 core axial flow profiles; pump pressure rise vs. chamber pressure; streamline of jet-induced flow in cylindrical chamber; flow pattern of a jet-induced flow in a chamber; and radiative heat transfer models.

  14. Human Modeling For Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Donald; Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over that last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft and launch vehicles. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the different types of human modeling used currently and in the past at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) currently, and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs.

  15. Cardiovascular Dysfunction Following Burn Injury: What We Have Learned from Rat and Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Guillory, Ashley N.; Clayton, Robert P.; Herndon, David N; Finnerty, Celeste C.

    2016-01-01

    Severe burn profoundly affects organs both proximal and distal to the actual burn site. Cardiovascular dysfunction is a well-documented phenomenon that increases morbidity and mortality following a massive thermal trauma. Beginning immediately post-burn, during the ebb phase, cardiac function is severely depressed. By 48 h post-injury, cardiac function rebounds and the post-burn myocardium becomes tachycardic and hyperinflammatory. While current clinical trials are investigating a variety of ...

  16. Two-Compartment Pharmacokinetic Models for Chemical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanneganti, Kumud; Simon, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The transport of potassium permanganate between two continuous-stirred vessels was investigated to help chemical and biomedical engineering students understand two-compartment pharmacokinetic models. Concepts of modeling, mass balance, parameter estimation and Laplace transform were applied to the two-unit process. A good agreement was achieved…

  17. Modeling for Control of a Wobble–Yoke Stirling Engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García–Canseco, Eloísa; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Kuindersma, Marnix

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we derive the dynamic model of a four–cylinder double–acting wobble–yoke Stirling engine. In contrast with the classical thermodynamics methods that dominate the literature of Stirling mechanisms, we present a control system perspective to obtain a useful model for the analysis and syn

  18. TWRS systems engineering process and information model report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gneiting, B.C., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-22

    The TWRS System Engineering (SE) process and information flows are described using a process modeling methodology. The results of this activity, and the next phase of developing a normalized data model, will be used in training and implemented in SE information systems and support tools.

  19. A Team Building Model for Software Engineering Courses Term Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Yasar Guneri

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a new model for team building, which enables teachers to build coherent teams rapidly and fairly for the term projects of software engineering courses. Moreover, the model can also be used to build teams for any type of project, if the team member candidates are students, or if they are inexperienced on a certain subject. The…

  20. Strategies for the Curation of CAD Engineering Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula Patel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 Product Lifecycle Management (PLM has become increasingly important in the engineering community over the last decade or so, due to the globalisation of markets and the rising popularity of products provided as services. It demands the efficient capture, representation, organisation, retrieval and reuse of product data over its entire life. Simultaneously, there is now a much greater reliance on CAD models for communicating designs to manufacturers, builders, maintenance crews and regulators, and for definitively expressing designs. Creating the engineering record digitally, however, presents problems not only for its long-term maintenance and accessibility - due in part to the rapid obsolescence of the hardware, software and file formats involved - but also for recording the evolution of designs, artefacts and products. We examine the curation and preservation requirements in PLM and suggest ways of alleviating the problems of sustaining CAD engineering models through the use of lightweight formats, layered annotation and the collection of Representation Information as defined in the Open Archival Information System (OAIS Reference Model.  We describe two tools which have been specifically developed to aid in the curation of CAD engineering models in the context of PLM: Lightweight Models with Multilayered Annotation (LiMMA and a Registry/Repository of Representation Information for Engineering (RRoRIfE.

  1. Modeling Commercial Turbofan Engine Icing Risk With Ice Crystal Ingestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which are ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in

  2. Maturity of Software Modelling and Model Driven Engineering: a Survey in the Italian Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Torchiano, Marco; Tomassetti, Federico Cesare Argentino

    2012-01-01

    Background: The main claimed advantage of Model-driven engineering is improvement in productivity. However, few information is available about its actual adoption during software development and maintenance in the industry. Objective: The main aim of this work is investigating the level of maturity in the adoption of software models and of Model-driven engineering in the Italian industry. The perspective is that of software engineering researchers. Method: First, we conducted an exploratory p...

  3. Engineering large animal models of human disease

    OpenAIRE

    Whitelaw, C. Bruce A.; Timothy P Sheets; Lillico, Simon G; Telugu, Bhanu P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The recent development of gene editing tools and methodology for use in livestock enables the production of new animal disease models. These tools facilitate site‐specific mutation of the genome, allowing animals carrying known human disease mutations to be produced. In this review, we describe the various gene editing tools and how they can be used for a range of large animal models of diseases. This genomic technology is in its infancy but the expectation is that through the use of...

  4. Integrated modelling of near field and engineered barrier system processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Yucca Mountain Integrating Model (YMIM) is an integrated model of the Engineered Barrier System. It has been developed to assist project managers at LLNL in identifying areas where research emphasis should be placed. The model was designed to be highly modular so that a model of an individual process could be easily modified or replaced without interfering with the models of other processes. The modules modelling container failure and the dissolution of nuclides include particularly detailed, temperature dependent models of their corresponding processes

  5. Introducing a model of cardiovascular prevention in Nairobi's slums by integrating a public health and private-sector approach: the SCALE-UP study

    OpenAIRE

    Vijver, Steven; Oti, Samuel; Cohen Tervaert, Thijs; Hankins, Catherine; Kyobutungi, Catherine; Gomez, Gabriela G; Brewster, Lizzy; Agyemang, Charles; Lange, Joep

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of death in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), with annual deaths expected to increase to 2 million by 2030. Currently, most national health systems in SSA are not adequately prepared for this epidemic. This is especially so in slum settlementswhere access to formal healthcare and resources is limited.Objective: To develop and introduce a model of cardiovascular prevention in the slums of Nairobi by integrating public health and private sec...

  6. Complete Modeling for Systems of a Marine Diesel Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hassan Moussa Nahim; Rafic Younes; Chadi Nohra; Mustapha Ouladsine

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a simulator model of a marine diesel engine based on physical, semi-physical, mathematical and thermodynamic equations, which allows fast predictive simulations. The whole engine system is divided into several functional blocks: cooling, lubrication, air, injection, combustion and emissions. The sub-models and dynamic characteristics of individual blocks are established according to engine working principles equations and experimental data collected from a marine diesel engine test bench for SIMB Company under the reference 6M26SRP1. The overall engine system dynamics is expressed as a set of simultaneous algebraic and differential equations using sub-blocks and S-Functions of Matlab/Simulink. The simulation of this model, implemented on Matlab/Simulink has been validated and can be used to obtain engine performance, pressure, temperature, efficiency, heat release, crank angle, fuel rate, emissions at different sub-blocks. The simulator will be used, in future work, to study the engine performance in faulty conditions, and can be used to assist marine engineers in fault diagnosis and estimation (FDI) as well as designers to predict the behavior of the cooling system, lubrication system, injection system, combustion, emissions, in order to optimize the dimensions of different components. This program is a platform for fault simulator, to investigate the impact on sub-blocks engine’s output of changing values for faults parameters such as: faulty fuel injector, leaky cylinder, worn fuel pump, broken piston rings, a dirty turbocharger, dirty air filter, dirty air cooler, air leakage, water leakage, oil leakage and contamination, fouling of heat exchanger, pumps wear, failure of injectors (and many others).

  7. TRC210258, a novel TGR5 agonist, reduces glycemic and dyslipidemic cardiovascular risk in animal models of diabesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zambad SP

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Shitalkumar P Zambad, Davinder Tuli, Anoop Mathur, Sameer A Ghalsasi, Anita R Chaudhary, Shailesh Deshpande, Ramesh C Gupta, Vijay Chauthaiwale, Chaitanya DuttTorrent Research Centre, Torrent Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Gujarat, IndiaBackground: Patients with diabesity have a significantly increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Therefore, therapy addressing the multiple metabolic abnormalities linked with diabesity and leading to further reduction of cardiovascular risk is highly desirable. Activation of the TGR5 receptor holds therapeutic potential for diabesity. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of TRC210258, a novel TGR5 agonist, in clinically relevant animal models of diabesity.Methods: A novel small molecule, TRC210258 (N-(4-chlorophenyl-2-(4-fluoro phenoxy-N-methylimidazo (1, 2-a pyrimidine-3-carboxamide, was synthesized. The in vitro TGR5 receptor activation potential of TRC210258 was assessed by cyclic adinosine monophosphate (cAMP assay and cAMP-responsive element reporter assay using cells overexpressing the human TGR5 receptor. The effect of TRC210258 on glucagon-like peptide-1 release was evaluated in vitro using a human enteroendocrine cell line. The effect of TRC210258 on energy expenditure and glycemic control was evaluated in high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Additionally, the effect of TRC210258 on dyslipidemic parameters was determined in high fat-fed hamsters.Results: TRC210258 demonstrated potent TGR5 agonist activity, with enhanced glucagon-like peptide-1 release and energy expenditure. Treatment with TRC210258 resulted in better glycemic control and improved parameters of dyslipidemia such as plasma triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Treatment with TRC210258 also improved emerging dyslipidemic cardiovascular risk parameters, including remnant cholesterol and triglyceride clearance.Conclusion: This study highlights the potential of TRC

  8. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. Jolley; R. Jarek; P. Mariner

    2004-02-09

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  9. Estimation of some stochastic models used in reliability engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work aims to study the estimation of some stochastic models used in reliability engineering. In reliability engineering continuous probability distributions have been used as models for the lifetime of technical components. We consider here the following distributions: exponential, 2-mixture exponential, conditional exponential, Weibull, lognormal and gamma. Maximum likelihood method is used to estimate distributions from observed data which may be either complete or censored. We consider models based on homogeneous Poisson processes such as gamma-poisson and lognormal-poisson models for analysis of failure intensity. We study also a beta-binomial model for analysis of failure probability. The estimators of the parameters for three models are estimated by the matching moments method and in the case of gamma-poisson and beta-binomial models also by maximum likelihood method. A great deal of mathematical or statistical problems that arise in reliability engineering can be solved by utilizing point processes. Here we consider the statistical analysis of non-homogeneous Poisson processes to describe the failing phenomena of a set of components with a Weibull intensity function. We use the method of maximum likelihood to estimate the parameters of the Weibull model. A common cause failure can seriously reduce the reliability of a system. We consider a binomial failure rate (BFR) model as an application of the marked point processes for modelling common cause failure in a system. The parameters of the binomial failure rate model are estimated with the maximum likelihood method

  10. Mathematical modeling and computational intelligence in engineering applications

    CERN Document Server

    Silva Neto, Antônio José da; Silva, Geraldo Nunes

    2016-01-01

    This book brings together a rich selection of studies in mathematical modeling and computational intelligence, with application in several fields of engineering, like automation, biomedical, chemical, civil, electrical, electronic, geophysical and mechanical engineering, on a multidisciplinary approach. Authors from five countries and 16 different research centers contribute with their expertise in both the fundamentals and real problems applications based upon their strong background on modeling and computational intelligence. The reader will find a wide variety of applications, mathematical and computational tools and original results, all presented with rigorous mathematical procedures. This work is intended for use in graduate courses of engineering, applied mathematics and applied computation where tools as mathematical and computational modeling, numerical methods and computational intelligence are applied to the solution of real problems.

  11. Verification of concurrent engineering software using CSM models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miescicki, J.; Baszun, M.; Daszczuk, W.B. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    An engineering design process may involve software modules that can be executed concurrently. Concurrent modules can be very easily subjects to some synchronization errors. This paper discusses verification process for such engineering software. We present a method for verification that requires several steps. First, the state diagram models are constructed that describe the design iterations and interactions with the designer. Next, the state diagram models are transformed into concurrent state machines (CSM). After that, the CSM models are analyzed in order to verify their correctness. In this phase, the modifications are performed if necessary. In the last phase the code is generated. The tools to support our method can be called new concurrent CASE tools. Using these tools the engineering software can be created that is verified for correctness in respect to concurrent execution.

  12. Semantic Web and Model-Driven Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Parreiras, Fernando S

    2012-01-01

    The next enterprise computing era will rely on the synergy between both technologies: semantic web and model-driven software development (MDSD). The semantic web organizes system knowledge in conceptual domains according to its meaning. It addresses various enterprise computing needs by identifying, abstracting and rationalizing commonalities, and checking for inconsistencies across system specifications. On the other side, model-driven software development is closing the gap among business requirements, designs and executables by using domain-specific languages with custom-built syntax and se

  13. Engineering models and methods for industrial cell control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Hans Jørgen Birk; Alting, Leo

    1997-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the engineering, i.e. the designing and making, of industrial cell control systems. The focus is on automated robot welding cells in the shipbuilding industry. The industrial research project defines models and methods for design and implemen-tation of computer based....... Further, an engineering methodology is defined. The three elements enablers, architecture and methodology constitutes the Cell Control Engineering concept which has been defined and evaluated through the implementation of two cell control systems for robot welding cells in production at ODENSE STEEL...... SHIPYARD.It is concluded that cell control technology provides for increased performance in production systems, and that the Cell Control Engineering concept reduces the effort for providing and operating high quality and high functionality cell control solutions for the industry....

  14. Use of genome-scale microbial models for metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Åkesson, M.; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    Metabolic engineering serves as an integrated approach to design new cell factories by providing rational design procedures and valuable mathematical and experimental tools. Mathematical models have an important role for phenotypic analysis, but can also be used for the design of optimal metabolic...... network structures. The major challenge for metabolic engineering in the post-genomic era is to broaden its design methodologies to incorporate genome-scale biological data. Genome-scale stoichiometric models of microorganisms represent a first step in this direction....

  15. The impact of initial statin treatment decisions on cardiovascular outcomes in clinical care settings: estimates using the Archimedes Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Herick A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Andrew van Herick,1 C Andy Schuetz,1 Peter Alperin,1 Michael Bullano,2 Sanjeev Balu,2 Sanjay Gandhi21Archimedes, Inc, San Francisco, CA, USA; 2AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Wilmington, DE, USAPurpose: Many patients treated for dyslipidemia do not achieve recommended cholesterol goals despite the widespread availability of effective statins. Pharmaceutical claims show a strong tendency for patients to remain on their initially assigned treatment. With computer simulations, the impact of initial statin treatment decisions on medium- and long-term cardiovascular outcomes were examined.Patients and methods: Using the Archimedes Model, three treatment scenarios were simulated. Patients initiated treatment with simvastatin (20, 40, or 80 mg, atorvastatin (10, 20, 40, or 80 mg, or rosuvastatin (10, 20, or 40 mg, and periodically intensified treatment. The simulated population consisted of 50,025 patients, aged 45–70 years, with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol exceeding goal. The proportion of patients initiating each dose was calibrated to United States pharmacy claims. Patients not reaching goal intensified the dose of their current statin or switched to an appropriate dose of rosuvastatin at rates matching pharmacy claims. Biomarkers and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE were tracked for 10 years and several high-risk subpopulations were analyzed. Statin models used biomarker effects from the STELLAR (Statin Therapies for Elevated Lipid Levels Compared Across Doses to Rosuvastatin trial and outcomes data from various trials.Results: Initiating therapy with rosuvastatin reduced MACE more than simvastatin or atorvastatin. The 5- year relative risk of MACE was 0.906 (95% confidence interval: 0.888–0.923; P < 0.001 for initial treatment with atorvastatin rather than simvastatin, 0.831 (0.812–0.850; P < 0.001 for rosuvastatin rather than simvastatin, and 0.918 (0.898–0.938; P < 0.001 for rosuvastatin rather than atorvastatin

  16. Ethical issues in engineering models: An operations researcher's reflections.

    OpenAIRE

    Kleijnen, Jack P.C.

    2011-01-01

    This article starts with an overview of the author’s personal involvement—as an Operations Research consultant—in several engineering case-studies that may raise ethical questions; e.g., case-studies on nuclear waste, water management, sustainable ecology, military tactics, and animal welfare. All these case studies employ computer simulation models. In general, models are meant to solve practical problems, which may have ethical implications for the various stakeholders; namely, the modelers...

  17. Quality management using model-driven engineering: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz-Rube, Iván; Escalona, María José

    2014-01-01

    Quality Management (QM) is one of the critical points of any software development process. In recent years, several proposals have emerged on this issue, mainly with regard to maturity models, quality standards and best practices collections. Besides, Model Driven Engineering (MDE) aims to build software systems through the construction and transformation of models. However, MDE might be used for other different tasks. In this poster, we summarize the main contributions abou...

  18. Miscibility of polymer blends with engineering models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassilis, Harismiadis; van Bergen, A. R. D.; Goncalves, Ana Saraiva;

    1996-01-01

    The miscibility behavior of polymer blends that do not exhibit strong specific interactions is examined. Phase equilibrium calculations are presented with the van der Waals equation of state and three group-contribution models (UNIFAC, Entropic-FV, and GC-Flory). Performance of these models is also...... compared. The van der Waals equation of state was recently shown to accurately correlate and predict vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid equilibria for binary polymer/solvent solutions. In this work, it is demonstrated that it correlates the upper critical solution behavior of polymer blends with excellent......, the upper critical solution temperature can be predicted with an average error of less than 45 degrees C. The van der Waals equation of state can correlate the lower critical solution behavior of polymer blends, using an interaction parameter that is a linear function of temperature. The UNIFAC and...

  19. Longevity risks: modelling and financial engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shaohui

    2008-01-01

    In this dissertation, we investigate various aspects of the systematic mortality risks, in particular, the longevity risks. To describe the precise meaning of random survival probability, we model the systematic mortality risks by generalizing the idea of conditional independence into a dynamical setting. The effects of systematic mortality risks on actuarial science are also analyzed. To evaluate and hedge the longevity risks on capital markets, we build up an arbitrage-free financial mar...

  20. Research on Urban Engineering Applying Location Models

    OpenAIRE

    Cosenza, Carlos Alberto N.; Lima, Fernando Rodrigues; Neves, Cesar das

    2010-01-01

    Location models can also be employed for previewing land use and occupation of urban areas. An analogy could be done considering an occupation typology (habitational buildings, industrial zone, etc.) as a project for an urban site (district, zone, land, etc.). A list of location factors that direct urban development could be selected from spatial, economic and social data records (population, market, education, prices, mobility, health care, etc.). The offer of these location factors could be...

  1. Enhanced Fan Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejsa, Eugene A.; Stone, James R.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work by consultants to Diversitech Inc. for the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to revise the fan noise prediction procedure based on fan noise data obtained in the 9- by 15 Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel at GRC. The purpose of this task is to begin development of an enhanced, analytical, more physics-based, fan noise prediction method applicable to commercial turbofan propulsion systems. The method is to be suitable for programming into a computational model for eventual incorporation into NASA's current aircraft system noise prediction computer codes. The scope of this task is in alignment with the mission of the Propulsion 21 research effort conducted by the coalition of NASA, state government, industry, and academia to develop aeropropulsion technologies. A model for fan noise prediction was developed based on measured noise levels for the R4 rotor with several outlet guide vane variations and three fan exhaust areas. The model predicts the complete fan noise spectrum, including broadband noise, tones, and for supersonic tip speeds, combination tones. Both spectra and directivity are predicted. Good agreement with data was achieved for all fan geometries. Comparisons with data from a second fan, the ADP fan, also showed good agreement.

  2. Multifunctional Collaborative Modeling and Analysis Methods in Engineering Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Jonathan B.; Broduer, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Engineers are challenged to produce better designs in less time and for less cost. Hence, to investigate novel and revolutionary design concepts, accurate, high-fidelity results must be assimilated rapidly into the design, analysis, and simulation process. This assimilation should consider diverse mathematical modeling and multi-discipline interactions necessitated by concepts exploiting advanced materials and structures. Integrated high-fidelity methods with diverse engineering applications provide the enabling technologies to assimilate these high-fidelity, multi-disciplinary results rapidly at an early stage in the design. These integrated methods must be multifunctional, collaborative, and applicable to the general field of engineering science and mechanics. Multifunctional methodologies and analysis procedures are formulated for interfacing diverse subdomain idealizations including multi-fidelity modeling methods and multi-discipline analysis methods. These methods, based on the method of weighted residuals, ensure accurate compatibility of primary and secondary variables across the subdomain interfaces. Methods are developed using diverse mathematical modeling (i.e., finite difference and finite element methods) and multi-fidelity modeling among the subdomains. Several benchmark scalar-field and vector-field problems in engineering science are presented with extensions to multidisciplinary problems. Results for all problems presented are in overall good agreement with the exact analytical solution or the reference numerical solution. Based on the results, the integrated modeling approach using the finite element method for multi-fidelity discretization among the subdomains is identified as most robust. The multiple-method approach is advantageous when interfacing diverse disciplines in which each of the method's strengths are utilized. The multifunctional methodology presented provides an effective mechanism by which domains with diverse idealizations are

  3. Cardiovascular Safety Assessment in Early-Phase Clinical Studies: A Meta-Analytical Comparison of Exposure-Response Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrado, D J; Chen, D; Denney, W S

    2016-06-01

    Exposure-response analysis of QT interval in clinical studies has been proposed as a thorough QT study alternative. Many exposure-response model structures have been proposed for cardiovascular (CV) safety markers, but few studies have compared models across multiple drugs. To recommend preferred drug-effect exposure-response models on vital signs and electrocardiogram (ECG) intervals, an individual-level model-based meta-analysis (39 studies and 1,291 subjects) compared 90 model structures. Models were selected to describe the data and cross-validate studies on the same drug. The most commonly selected baseline model was an unstructured model (estimation of a value at each study nominal time) for all measures but blood pressure. The unstructured model estimated a better cross-validated drug-effect when considering all markers. A linear model was the most commonly selected to characterize drug-effect on all markers. We propose these models as a starting point assisting with CV safety exposure-response assessment in nondedicated small studies with healthy subjects. PMID:27318037

  4. Building a Narrative Based Requirements Engineering Mediation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Nan; Hall, Tracy; Barker, Trevor

    This paper presents a narrative-based Requirements Engineering (RE) mediation model to help RE practitioners to effectively identify, define, and resolve conflicts of interest, goals, and requirements. Within the SPI community, there is a common belief that social, human, and organizational issues significantly impact on the effectiveness of software process improvement in general and the requirements engineering process in particularl. Conflicts among different stakeholders are an important human and social issue that need more research attention in the SPI and RE community. By drawing on the conflict resolution literature and IS literature, we argue that conflict resolution in RE is a mediated process, in which a requirements engineer can act as a mediator among different stakeholders. To address socio-psychological aspects of conflict in RE and SPI, Winslade and Monk (2000)'s narrative mediation model is introduced, justified, and translated into the context of RE.

  5. Analysis of simulated engine sounds using a psychoacoustic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvigneau, Fabian; Liefold, Steffen; Höchstetter, Marius; Verhey, Jesko L.; Gabbert, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the paper is the evaluation and the prediction of the perceived quality of engine sounds, which is predicted in the design process by numerical simulations. Periodic combustion sounds of the operating engine are synthesized with the help of an overall numerical simulation approach before a real prototype exists. The perceived quality of the sound is rated in hearing tests using the method of relative comparison and absolute judgment. Results are transferred into an interval scaled ranking of the stimuli. Based on the data, a psychoacoustic model for sound quality is developed using psychoacoustic parameters. Predictions of this model are used to evaluate the sound quality of several technical design modifications, for example, different engine encapsulations. The results are visualized to allow a simple qualitative analysis of the sound perception. This results in an impartial and objective decision regarding the final design of an acoustic encapsulation with a higher perceived sound quality.

  6. A Review of Modeling Bioelectrochemical Systems: Engineering and Statistical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Luo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bioelectrochemical systems (BES are promising technologies to convert organic compounds in wastewater to electrical energy through a series of complex physical-chemical, biological and electrochemical processes. Representative BES such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs have been studied and advanced for energy recovery. Substantial experimental and modeling efforts have been made for investigating the processes involved in electricity generation toward the improvement of the BES performance for practical applications. However, there are many parameters that will potentially affect these processes, thereby making the optimization of system performance hard to be achieved. Mathematical models, including engineering models and statistical models, are powerful tools to help understand the interactions among the parameters in BES and perform optimization of BES configuration/operation. This review paper aims to introduce and discuss the recent developments of BES modeling from engineering and statistical aspects, including analysis on the model structure, description of application cases and sensitivity analysis of various parameters. It is expected to serves as a compass for integrating the engineering and statistical modeling strategies to improve model accuracy for BES development.

  7. Nano zerovalent iron particles induce pulmonary and cardiovascular toxicity in an in vitro human co-culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhelin; Yang, Lingyan; Chen, Ku-Fan; Chen, Guan-Wen; Peng, Yen-Ping; Chen, Jen-Kun; Suo, Guangli; Yu, Jiantao; Wang, Wen-Cheng; Lin, Chia-Hua

    2016-09-01

    Despite promising environmental applications for nano zerovalent iron (nZVI), concerns remain about the potential accumulation and toxic effects of nZVI particles. Here, we use an alveolar-capillary co-culture model to investigate a possible link between low-level epithelial exposure to nZVI and pulmonary and cardiovascular toxicity. While nZVI was unable to pass through the epithelial barrier into the endothelium, nZVI exposure did cause oxidative and inflammatory responses in both epithelial and endothelial cells. Therefore, toxic effects induced by nZVI are not restricted to epithelial cells but can be transferred into the endothelium. Communication between A549 and EA.hy926 cells is responsible for amplification of nZVI-induced toxic responses. Decreases in transepithelial electrical resistance and zonula occludens proteins after epithelial exposure to nZVI impaired epithelial barrier integrity. Increases in oxidized α1-antitrypsin and oxidized low-density lipoprotein in the co-culture model suggest that nZVI exposure increases the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and atherosclerosis. Therefore, inhalation of nZVI has the potential to induce cardiovascular disease through oxidative and inflammatory mediators produced from the damaged lung epithelium in chronic lung diseases. PMID:26694701

  8. Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.L. Hardin

    2000-07-17

    The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II).

  9. Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II)

  10. Logistics Systems Engineer – Interdisciplinary Competence Model for Modern Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarvo Niine

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Logistics is an interdisciplinary field of study. Modern logisticians need to integrate business management and administration skills with technology design, IT systems and other engineering fields. However, based on research of university curricula and competence standards in logistics, the engineering aspect is not represented to full potential. There are some treatments of logistician competences which relate to engineering, but not a modernized one with wide-spread recognition. This paper aims to explain the situation from the conceptual development point of view and suggests a competence profile for “logistics system engineer”, which introduces the viewpoint of systems engineering into logistics. For that purpose, the paper analyses requirements of various topical competence models and merges the introductory competences of systems engineering into logistics. In current interpretation, logistics systems engineering view integrates networks, technologies and ICT, process and service design and offers broader interdisciplinary approach. Another term suitable for this field would be intelligent logistics. The practical implication of such a competence profile is to utilize it in curriculum development and also present it as an occupational standard. The academic relevance of such concept is to offer a specific way to differentiate education in logistics.

  11. Reinforced chitosan-based heart valve scaffold and utility of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cardiovascular tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanna, Mohammad Zaki

    utility for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. Moreover, we evaluated the effect of various glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on MSCs morphology and proliferation. Lastly, we studied the effect of stiffness of mechanically improved chitosan fibers on MSCs viability, attachment and proliferation. Results showed that MSCs proliferation improved in proportion to fiber stiffness.

  12. Cardiovascular performance with E. coli challenges in a canine model of human sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors investigated cardiovascular dysfunction by injecting lethal and nonlethal bacterial challenges into conscious dogs. E coli bacteria of varying numbers were placed in a peritoneal clot. Cardiovascular function was studied with simultaneous radionuclide scans and thermodilution cardiac outputs. In surviving animals, the number of bacteria in the clot increased as the corresponding systolic cardiac function decreased. Cardiac function was measured by left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and LV function curves. Furthermore, the diastolic volume-pressure relationship of survivors shifted progressively to the right. This increase in LV size was associated with maintenance of measures of cardiac performance at similar levels. Death occurred only in the group with the highest bacterial dose. Compared with survivors receiving the same number of bacterial, nonsurvivors had a decrease in LV size, a leftward shift in LV diastolic volume-pressure relationship, and a decrease in both LVSWI and SVI. Data from survivors suggest that increasing the number of bacteria produces changes in myocardial compliance and contractility. These changes increase LV size (preload), a major determinant of cardiac performance that possibility enhances survival

  13. Cardiovascular performance with E. coli challenges in a canine model of human sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natanson, C.; Danner, R.L.; Fink, M.P.; MacVittie, T.J.; Walker, R.I.; Conklin, J.J.; Parrillo, J.E. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA) Naval Medical Research Institute and Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA) Univ. of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester (USA))

    1988-03-01

    The authors investigated cardiovascular dysfunction by injecting lethal and nonlethal bacterial challenges into conscious dogs. E coli bacteria of varying numbers were placed in a peritoneal clot. Cardiovascular function was studied with simultaneous radionuclide scans and thermodilution cardiac outputs. In surviving animals, the number of bacteria in the clot increased as the corresponding systolic cardiac function decreased. Cardiac function was measured by left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and LV function curves. Furthermore, the diastolic volume-pressure relationship of survivors shifted progressively to the right. This increase in LV size was associated with maintenance of measures of cardiac performance at similar levels. Death occurred only in the group with the highest bacterial dose. Compared with survivors receiving the same number of bacterial, nonsurvivors had a decrease in LV size, a leftward shift in LV diastolic volume-pressure relationship, and a decrease in both LVSWI and SVI. Data from survivors suggest that increasing the number of bacteria produces changes in myocardial compliance and contractility. These changes increase LV size (preload), a major determinant of cardiac performance that possibility enhances survival.

  14. Comparing the cardiovascular therapeutic indices of glycopyrronium and tiotropium in an integrated rat pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and safety model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long acting inhaled muscarinic receptor antagonists, such as tiotropium, are widely used as bronchodilator therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although this class of compounds is generally considered to be safe and well tolerated in COPD patients the cardiovascular safety of tiotropium has recently been questioned. We describe a rat in vivo model that allows the concurrent assessment of muscarinic antagonist potency, bronchodilator efficacy and a potential for side effects, and we use this model to compare tiotropium with NVA237 (glycopyrronium bromide), a recently approved inhaled muscarinic antagonist for COPD. Anaesthetized Brown Norway rats were dosed intratracheally at 1 or 6 h prior to receiving increasing doses of intravenous methacholine. Changes in airway resistance and cardiovascular function were recorded and therapeutic indices were calculated against the ED50 values for the inhibition of methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction. At both time points studied, greater therapeutic indices for hypotension and bradycardia were observed with glycopyrronium (19.5 and 28.5 fold at 1 h; > 200 fold at 6 h) than with tiotropium (1.5 and 4.2 fold at 1 h; 4.6 and 5.5 fold at 6 h). Pharmacokinetic, protein plasma binding and rat muscarinic receptor binding properties for both compounds were determined and used to generate an integrated model of systemic M2 muscarinic receptor occupancy, which predicted significantly higher M2 receptor blockade at ED50 doses with tiotropium than with glycopyrronium. In our preclinical model there was an improved safety profile for glycopyrronium when compared with tiotropium. - Highlights: • We use an in vivo rat model to study CV safety of inhaled muscarinic antagonists. • We integrate protein and receptor binding and PK of tiotropium and glycopyrrolate. • At ED50 doses for bronchoprotection we model systemic M2 receptor occupancy. • Glycopyrrolate demonstrates lower M2 occupancy at bronchoprotective

  15. A comprehensive combustion model for biodiesel-fueled engine simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakora, Jessica L.

    Engine models for alternative fuels are available, but few are comprehensive, well-validated models that include accurate physical property data as well as a detailed description of the fuel chemistry. In this work, a comprehensive biodiesel combustion model was created for use in multi-dimensional engine simulations, specifically the KIVA3v R2 code. The model incorporates realistic physical properties in a vaporization model developed for multi-component fuel sprays and applies an improved mechanism for biodiesel combustion chemistry. A reduced mechanism was generated from the methyl decanoate (MD) and methyl-9-decenoate (MD9D) mechanism developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It was combined with a multi-component mechanism to include n-heptane in the fuel chemistry. The biodiesel chemistry was represented using a combination of MD, MD9D and n-heptane, which varied for a given fuel source. The reduced mechanism, which contained 63 species, accurately predicted ignition delay times of the detailed mechanism over a range of engine-specific operating conditions. Physical property data for the five methyl ester components of biodiesel were added to the KIVA library. Spray simulations were performed to ensure that the models adequately reproduce liquid penetration observed in biodiesel spray experiments. Fuel composition impacted liquid length as expected, with saturated species vaporizing more and penetrating less. Distillation curves were created to ensure the fuel vaporization process was comparable to available data. Engine validation was performed against a low-speed, high-load, conventional combustion experiments and the model was able to predict the performance and NOx formation seen in the experiment. High-speed, low-load, low-temperature combustion conditions were also modeled, and the emissions (HC, CO, NOx) and fuel consumption were well-predicted for a sweep of injection timings. Finally, comparisons were made between the results of biodiesel

  16. Product Lifecycle Management Architecture: A Model Based Systems Engineering Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonan, Nicholas James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report is an analysis of the Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) program. The analysis is centered on a need statement generated by a Nuclear Weapons (NW) customer. The need statement captured in this report creates an opportunity for the PLM to provide a robust service as a solution. Lifecycles for both the NW and PLM are analyzed using Model Based System Engineering (MBSE).

  17. PBL and CDIO: Complementary Models for Engineering Education Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edström, Kristina; Kolmos, Anette

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares two models for reforming engineering education, problem/project-based learning (PBL), and conceive-design-implement-operate (CDIO), identifying and explaining similarities and differences. PBL and CDIO are defined and contrasted in terms of their history, community, definitions, curriculum design, relation to disciplines,…

  18. Learning design: models for computers, for engineers or for teachers?

    OpenAIRE

    Pernin, Jean-Philippe; Lejeune, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Pernin, J.P., Lejeune, A. (2006). Learning design: models for computers, for engineers or for teachers?. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence Conference. March 30th-31st, Sofia, Bulgaria: TENCompetence. Retrieved June 30th, 2006, from http://dspace.learningnetworks.org

  19. Computer Modeling of Carbon Metabolism Enables Biofuel Engineering (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-09-01

    In an effort to reduce the cost of biofuels, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has merged biochemistry with modern computing and mathematics. The result is a model of carbon metabolism that will help researchers understand and engineer the process of photosynthesis for optimal biofuel production.

  20. Model-Driven Instructional Engineering to Generate Adaptable Learning Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Dodero, Juan Manuel; Díez, David

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Dodero, J. M. & Díez, D. (2006). Model-Driven Instructional Engineering to Generate Adaptable Learning Materials. Proceedings of ICALT2006. July, Kerkrade, The Netherlands: IEEE. Retrieved July 30th, 2006, from http://dspace.learningnetworks.org

  1. Quality-aware model-driven service engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Pahl, Claus; Boskovic, Marko; Barrett, Ronan; Hasselbring, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Service engineering and service-oriented architecture as an integration and platform technology is a recent approach to software systems integration. Quality aspects ranging from interoperability to maintainability to performance are of central importance for the integration of heterogeneous, distributed service-based systems. Architecture models can substantially influence quality attributes of the implemented software systems. Besides the benefits of explicit architectures on maintainabi...

  2. Concurrent engineering and product models in seafood companies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsdottir, Stella; Vesterager, Johan; Børresen, Torger

    1998-01-01

    Concurrent Engineering (CE) can provide an improved approach to product development for extending the lines of seafood products. Information technology (IT) support tools based on product models can provide an integrated and simultaneous approach for specifying new recipes. The seafood industry c...

  3. Efficient Proof Engines for Bounded Model Checking of Hybrid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fränzle, Martin; Herde, Christian

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present HySat, a new bounded model checker for linear hybrid systems, incorporating a tight integration of a DPLL-based pseudo-Boolean SAT solver and a linear programming routine as core engine. In contrast to related tools like MathSAT, ICS, or CVC, our tool exploits all of the...

  4. Numerical modeling of hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, N.L.; Amsden, A.A.

    1996-12-31

    The planned use of hydrogen as the energy carrier of the future introduces new challenges and opportunities, especially to the engine design community. Hydrogen is a bio-friendly fuel that can be produced from renewable resources and has no carbon dioxide combustion products; and in a properly designed ICE, almost zero NO{sub x} and hydrocarbon emissions can be achieved. Because of the unique properties of hydrogen combustion - in particular the highly wrinkled nature of the laminar flame front due to the preferential diffusion instability - modeling approaches for hydrocarbon gaseous fuels are not generally applicable to hydrogen combustion. This paper reports on the current progress to develop a engine design capability based on KIVA family of codes for hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited engines in support of the National Hydrogen Program. A turbulent combustion model, based on a modified eddy-turnover model in conjunction with an intake flow valve model, is found to describe well the efficiency and NO{sub x} emissions of this engine satisfy the Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicle (EZEV) standard established by the California Resource Board. 26 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Learning design: models for computers, for engineers or for teachers?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pernin, Jean-Philippe; Lejeune, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Pernin, J.P., Lejeune, A. (2006). Learning design: models for computers, for engineers or for teachers?. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence Conference. March 30th-31st, Sofia, Bulgaria: TENCo

  6. A decision-making model for engineering designers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, S.; Hansen, Claus Thorp

    This paper describes research that combines the generic decision-making model of Hansen, together with design strategies employed by experienced engineering designers. The relationship between the six decision-making sub-activities and the eight design strategies are examined. By combining these...

  7. Interface Management in Concurrent Engineering Facilities for Systems and Service Systems Engineering: A Model-based Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Gianni, Daniele; D'Ambrogio, Andrea; Schaus, Volker; Gerndt, Andreas; Lisi, Marco; De Simone, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent engineering facilities (CEFs) are successfully used in the aeropsace sector to design systems and services that that fulfill the requirements. Model-based systems engineering (MBSE) enables the effective (i.e., unambiguous) communication in the collaborative activities within concurrent engineering and service systems engineering facilities. The advantages obtained by the MBSE approach can be further scaled up by an innovative approach that take into explicit account the representa...

  8. Numerical simulation of the cardiovascular hemodynamics during hemorrhaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Převorovská, Světlana; Maršík, František

    Praha: Ústav termomechaniky AV ČR, 2001 - (Poživilová, A.; Masák, J.), s. 519 KB ISBN 80-85918-64-1. [National conference with intenational participation Engineering mechanics 2001. Svratka (CZ), 14.05.2001-17.05.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GV106/98/K019 Grant ostatní: ÚT AVČR(XC) PP50258 Keywords : cardiovascular system * numerical model * blood loss Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  9. IP Telephony Interconnection Reference Challenges, Models, and Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Boucadair, Mohamed; Neves, Pedro Miguel; Einarsson, Olafur Pall

    2011-01-01

    Addressing the growth of IP telephony service offerings within the corporate and residential realm, IP Telephony Interconnection Reference: Challenges, Models, and Engineering examines the technical and regulatory issues related to IP telephony interconnection at the large scale. It describes business and interconnection models, reviews emerging architectures such as IMS and TISPAN, identifies commonly-encountered issues, and supplies solutions to technical issues. The authors offer a detailed overview of SPEERMINT activity and proposed architecture, the current work undertaken in i3 Forum, an

  10. Using Model Driven Engineering technologies for building authoring applications

    OpenAIRE

    Beaudoux, Olivier; Blouin, Arnaud; Jézéquel, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Building authoring applications is a tedious and complex task that requires a high programming effort. Document technologies, especially XML based ones, can help in reducing such an effort by providing common bases for manipulating documents. Still, the overall task consists mainly of writing the application's source code. Model Driven Engineering (MDE) focuses on generating the source code from an exhaustive model of the application. In this paper, we illustrate that MDE technologies can be ...

  11. HCCI in a CFR engine: experiments and detailed kinetic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Smith, R; Torres, J; Girard, J; Dibble, R

    1999-11-05

    Single cylinder engine experiments and chemical kinetic modeling have been performed to study the effect of variations in fuel, equivalence ratio, and intake charge temperature on the start of combustion and the heat release rate. Neat propane and a fuel blend of 15% dimethyl-ether in methane have been studied. The results demonstrate the role of these parameters on the start of combustion, efficiency, imep, and emissions. Single zone kinetic modeling results show the trends consistent with the experimental results.

  12. A decision-making model for engineering designers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, S.; Hansen, Claus Thorp

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes research that combines the generic decision-making model of Hansen, together with design strategies employed by experienced engineering designers. The relationship between the six decision-making sub-activities and the eight design strategies are examined. By combining these...... two understandings of the design process, a model has been developed, which describes the different types of decision made during the design process together with strategies that aid the designer in making decisions....

  13. Prioritization of engineering support requests and advanced technology projects using decision support and industrial engineering models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavana, Madjid

    1995-01-01

    The evaluation and prioritization of Engineering Support Requests (ESR's) is a particularly difficult task at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) -- Shuttle Project Engineering Office. This difficulty is due to the complexities inherent in the evaluation process and the lack of structured information. The evaluation process must consider a multitude of relevant pieces of information concerning Safety, Supportability, O&M Cost Savings, Process Enhancement, Reliability, and Implementation. Various analytical and normative models developed over the past have helped decision makers at KSC utilize large volumes of information in the evaluation of ESR's. The purpose of this project is to build on the existing methodologies and develop a multiple criteria decision support system that captures the decision maker's beliefs through a series of sequential, rational, and analytical processes. The model utilizes the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), subjective probabilities, the entropy concept, and Maximize Agreement Heuristic (MAH) to enhance the decision maker's intuition in evaluating a set of ESR's.

  14. Sharing Research Models: Using Software Engineering Practices for Facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Stephanie P; Solano, Eric; Cantor, Susanna; Cooley, Philip C; Wagener, Diane K

    2011-03-01

    Increasingly, researchers are turning to computational models to understand the interplay of important variables on systems' behaviors. Although researchers may develop models that meet the needs of their investigation, application limitations-such as nonintuitive user interface features and data input specifications-may limit the sharing of these tools with other research groups. By removing these barriers, other research groups that perform related work can leverage these work products to expedite their own investigations. The use of software engineering practices can enable managed application production and shared research artifacts among multiple research groups by promoting consistent models, reducing redundant effort, encouraging rigorous peer review, and facilitating research collaborations that are supported by a common toolset. This report discusses three established software engineering practices- the iterative software development process, object-oriented methodology, and Unified Modeling Language-and the applicability of these practices to computational model development. Our efforts to modify the MIDAS TranStat application to make it more user-friendly are presented as an example of how computational models that are based on research and developed using software engineering practices can benefit a broader audience of researchers. PMID:21687780

  15. Chronic noncommunicable cardiovascular and pulmonary disease in sub-Saharan Africa: an academic model for countering the epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Gerald S; Kimaiyo, Sylvester; Carter, E Jane; Binanay, Cynthia; Corey, G Ralph; Einterz, Robert M; Tierney, William M; Velazquez, Eric J

    2011-05-01

    Noncommunicable diseases are rapidly overtaking infectious, perinatal, nutritional, and maternal diseases as the major causes of worldwide death and disability. It is estimated that, within the next 10 to 15 years, the increasing burden of chronic diseases and the aging of the population will expose the world to an unprecedented burden of chronic diseases. Preventing the potential ramifications of a worldwide epidemic of chronic noncommunicable diseases in a sustainable manner requires coordinated, collaborative efforts. Herein, we present our collaboration's strategic plan to understand, treat, and prevent chronic cardiovascular and pulmonary disease (CVPD) in western Kenya, which builds on a 2-decade partnership between academic universities in North America and Kenya, the Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare. We emphasize the importance of training Kenyan clinician-investigators who will ultimately lead efforts in CVPD care, education, and research. This penultimate aim will be achieved by our 5 main goals. Our goals include creating an administrative core capable of managing operations, develop clinical and clinical research training curricula, enhancing existing technology infrastructure, and implementing relevant research programs. Leveraging a strong international academic partnership with respective expertise in cardiovascular medicine, pulmonary medicine, and medical informatics, we have undertaken to understand and counter CVPD in Kenya by addressing patient care, teaching, and clinical research. PMID:21570512

  16. The genetic and metabolic determinants of cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetes: recent insights from animal models and clinical investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohen Avramoglu, Rita; Laplante, Marc-André; Le Quang, Khai; Deshaies, Yves; Després, Jean-Pierre; Larose, Eric; Mathieu, Patrick; Poirier, Paul; Pérusse, Louis; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Sweeney, Gary; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Laakso, Markku; Uusitupa, Matti; Marette, André

    2013-10-01

    Cardiovascular complications (CVC) are the most common causes of death in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). However the pathophysiological determinants and molecular mechanisms involved in the progression of CVC in T2D are poorly understood. We have undertaken the challenging task of identifying some of the genetic and clinical determinants of CVC through a unique multidisciplinary approach involving Canadian and Finnish investigators. We are studying novel animal models combining atherosclerosis, diet-induced obesity and T2D to understand the molecular basis of CVC in obesity-linked T2D. We are also conducting clinical studies to identify key determinants of CVC in T2D patients and to determine whether a lifestyle modification program targeting loss of visceral adipose tissue/ectopic fat could be associated with clinical benefits in these patients. Together, we strongly believe that we can fill some gaps in our understanding of the CVC pathogenesis in T2D and identify novel therapeutic targets and hope that this new knowledge may be translated into the design of effective clinical interventions to optimally reduce cardiovascular risk in T2D subjects. PMID:24500564

  17. Development of Systems Engineering Model for Spent Fuel Extraction Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of the Transmutation Research Program (TRP) at University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) is to establish a nuclear engineering test bed that can carry out effective transmutation and advanced reactor research and development effort. The Nevada Center for Advanced Computational Methods (NCACM) at UNLV is currently developing the systems engineering model, TRPSEMPro (Transmutation Research Program System Engineering Model Project, that provides process optimization through the automatic adjustment on input parameters, such as feed compositions, stages, flow rates, etc., based on the extraction efficiency of components and concerned output factors. An object-oriented programming (OOP) is considered. Such systems engineering model consists of task manager, task integration and solution monitor modules. A MS SQL server database is implemented for managing data flow from optimization processing. Task manager coordinates and interacts with other two modules. Task integration module works as a flowsheet constructor that builds task hierarchy, input parameter values and constrains. Task solution monitor component presents both in-progress and final outputs in tabulated and graphical formats. The system can monitor parameter justification outputs from optimization toolbox developed by Mathworks' MatLab commercial software. While initial parameter constraint identifications for using optimization process is tedious and time-consuming, the interface also provides a multiple-run process that executes a design matrix without invoking any optimization module. Experimental reports can be flexibly generated through database query and formatting. (authors)

  18. Gene therapy and stem cell therapy for cardiovascular diseases today: a model for translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Valentin; Sanz, Javier

    2007-02-01

    Clinical trials looking at ways to promote myocardial regeneration have reported that the administered therapies have either neutral effects or modest benefits of questionable impact. These somewhat disappointing results should emphasize the need for translational research, with bidirectional feedback between the basic research laboratory and the clinical arena. Such a translational pathway is illustrated by the quest to find an effective therapy for restenosis, which culminated in the development of sirolimus. At this point a move away from the bedside and a return to the bench seems necessary to better understand the mechanisms of action of progenitor cells and stimulating factors. Without such basic knowledge research might be prematurely discouraged and the opportunity to fully understand the true potential of cardiovascular regenerative therapy might be missed. PMID:17230204

  19. Impact of Diabetes and its pharmacological treatment on cardiovascular function: studies on ischaemia-reperfusion models

    OpenAIRE

    Paiva, Marta Sofia Abreu

    2011-01-01

    As doenças cardiovasculares são a principal causa de morte em todo o mundo, das quais a doença cardíaca isquémica assume um papel principal. Um fornecimento reduzido de oxigénio e nutrientes é deveras deletério para o tecido cardíaco, o qual possui um elevado consumo energético. Após isquémia-reperfusão (IR), a morte celular ocorre de forma extensa. O tecido morto é substituído por tecido fibroso, levando à disfunção e insuficiência cardíacas. Estudos clínicos demonstraram que os diabéticos s...

  20. Cardiovascular comorbidity in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmohamed, Michael T; Heslinga, Maaike; Kitas, George D

    2015-12-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory joint diseases (IJDs) have an increased risk of premature death compared with the general population, mainly because of the risk of cardiovascular disease, which is similar in patients with RA and in those with diabetes mellitus. Pathogenic mechanisms and clinical expression of cardiovascular comorbidities vary greatly between different rheumatic diseases, but atherosclerosis seems to be associated with all IJDs. Traditional risk factors such as age, gender, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, smoking, obesity and diabetes mellitus, together with inflammation, are the main contributors to the increased cardiovascular risk in patients with IJDs. Although cardiovascular risk assessment should be part of routine care in such patients, no disease-specific models are currently available for this purpose. The main pillars of cardiovascular risk reduction are pharmacological and nonpharmacological management of cardiovascular risk factors, as well as tight control of disease activity. PMID:26282082

  1. Comparing the cardiovascular therapeutic indices of glycopyrronium and tiotropium in an integrated rat pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and safety model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifilieff, Alexandre; Ethell, Brian T; Sykes, David A; Watson, Kenny J; Collingwood, Steve; Charlton, Steven J; Kent, Toby C

    2015-08-15

    Long acting inhaled muscarinic receptor antagonists, such as tiotropium, are widely used as bronchodilator therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although this class of compounds is generally considered to be safe and well tolerated in COPD patients the cardiovascular safety of tiotropium has recently been questioned. We describe a rat in vivo model that allows the concurrent assessment of muscarinic antagonist potency, bronchodilator efficacy and a potential for side effects, and we use this model to compare tiotropium with NVA237 (glycopyrronium bromide), a recently approved inhaled muscarinic antagonist for COPD. Anaesthetized Brown Norway rats were dosed intratracheally at 1 or 6h prior to receiving increasing doses of intravenous methacholine. Changes in airway resistance and cardiovascular function were recorded and therapeutic indices were calculated against the ED50 values for the inhibition of methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction. At both time points studied, greater therapeutic indices for hypotension and bradycardia were observed with glycopyrronium (19.5 and 28.5 fold at 1h; >200 fold at 6h) than with tiotropium (1.5 and 4.2 fold at 1h; 4.6 and 5.5 fold at 6h). Pharmacokinetic, protein plasma binding and rat muscarinic receptor binding properties for both compounds were determined and used to generate an integrated model of systemic M2 muscarinic receptor occupancy, which predicted significantly higher M2 receptor blockade at ED50 doses with tiotropium than with glycopyrronium. In our preclinical model there was an improved safety profile for glycopyrronium when compared with tiotropium. PMID:26026369

  2. A Model Driven Engineering Approach Applied to Master Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menet, Ludovic; Lamolle, Myriam

    The federation of data sources and the definition of pivot models are strongly interrelated topics. This paper explores a mediation solution based on XML architecture and the concept of Master Data Management. In this solution, pivot models use the standard XML Schema allowing the definition of complex data structures. The introduction of a MDE approach is a means to make modeling easier. We use UML as an abstract modeling layer. UML is a modeling object language, which is more and more used and recognized as a standard in the software engineering field, which makes it an ideal candidate for the modeling of XML Schema models. In this purpose we introduce features of the UML formalism, through profiles, to facilitate the definition and the exchange of models.

  3. Femur Model Reconstruction Based on Reverse Engineering and Rapid Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tongming; Zhang, Zheng; Ni, Hongjun; Deng, Jiawen; Huang, Mingyu

    Precise reconstruction of 3D models is fundamental and crucial to the researches of human femur. In this paper we present our approach towards tackling this problem. The surface of a human femur was scanned using a hand-held 3D laser scanner. The data obtained, in the form of point cloud, was then processed using the reverse engineering software Geomagic and the CAD/CAM software CimatronE to reconstruct a digital 3D model. The digital model was then used by the rapid prototyping machine to build a physical model of human femur using 3D printing. The geometric characteristics of the obtained physical model matched that of the original femur. The process of "physical object - 3D data - digital 3D model - physical model" presented in this paper provides a foundation of precise modeling for the digital manufacturing, virtual assembly, stress analysis, and simulated surgery of artificial bionic femurs.

  4. Applications of computational modeling in metabolic engineering of yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Lahtvee, Petri-Jaan; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Generally, a microorganism's phenotype can be described by its pattern of metabolic fluxes. Although fluxes cannot be measured directly, inference of fluxes is well established. In biotechnology the aim is often to increase the capacity of specific fluxes. For this, metabolic engineering methods...... preferred flux distribution. These methods point to strategies for altering gene expression; however, fluxes are often controlled by post-transcriptional events. Moreover, GEMs are usually not taking into account metabolic regulation, thermodynamics and enzyme kinetics. To facilitate metabolic engineering......, tools from synthetic biology have emerged, enabling integration and assembly of naturally nonexistent, but well-characterized components into a living organism. To describe these systems kinetic models are often used and to integrate these systems with the standard metabolic engineering approach, it is...

  5. Code Generator Composition for Model-Driven Engineering of Robotics Component & Connector Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ringert, Jan Oliver; Roth, Alexander; Rumpe, Bernhard; Wortmann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Engineering software for robotics applications requires multidomain and application-specific solutions. Model-driven engineering and modeling language integration provide means for developing specialized, yet reusable models of robotics software architectures. Code generators transform these platform independent models into executable code specific to robotic platforms. Generative software engineering for multidomain applications requires not only the integration of modeling languages but als...

  6. Interactive training model of TRIZ for mechanical engineers in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Runhua; Zhang, Huangao

    2014-03-01

    Innovation is a process of taking an original idea and converting it into a business value, in which the engineers face some inventive problems which can be solved hardly by experience. TRIZ, as a new theory for companies in China, provides both conceptual and procedural knowledge for finding and solving inventive problems. Because the government plays a leading role in the diffusion of TRIZ, too many companies from different industries are waiting to be trained, but the quantity of the trainers mastering TRIZ is incompatible with that requirement. In this context, to improve the training effect, an interactive training model of TRIZ for the mechanical engineers in China is developed and the implementation in the form of training classes is carried out. The training process is divided into 6 phases as follows: selecting engineers, training stage-1, finding problems, training stage-2, finding solutions and summing up. The government, TRIZ institutions and companies to join the programs interact during the process. The government initiates and monitors a project in form of a training class of TRIZ and selects companies to join the programs. Each selected companies choose a few engineers to join the class and supervises the training result. The TRIZ institutions design the training courses and carry out training curriculum. With the beginning of the class, an effective communication channel is established by means of interview, discussion face to face, E-mail, QQ and so on. After two years training practices, the results show that innovative abilities of the engineers to join and pass the final examinations increased distinctly, and most of companies joined the training class have taken congnizance of the power of TRIZ for product innovation. This research proposes an interactive training model of TRIZ for mechanical engineers in China to expedite the knowledge diffusion of TRIZ.

  7. Engineering Large Animal Species to Model Human Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    Animal models are an important resource for studying human diseases. Genetically engineered mice are the most commonly used species and have made significant contributions to our understanding of basic biology, disease mechanisms, and drug development. However, they often fail to recreate important aspects of human diseases and thus can have limited utility as translational research tools. Developing disease models in species more similar to humans may provide a better setting in which to study disease pathogenesis and test new treatments. This unit provides an overview of the history of genetically engineered large animals and the techniques that have made their development possible. Factors to consider when planning a large animal model, including choice of species, type of modification and methodology, characterization, production methods, and regulatory compliance, are also covered. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367161

  8. Engineered Polymeric Hydrogels for 3D Tissue Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric biomaterials are widely used in a wide range of biomedical applications due to their unique properties, such as biocompatibility, multi-tunability and easy fabrication. Specifically, polymeric hydrogel materials are extensively utilized as therapeutic implants and therapeutic vehicles for tissue regeneration and drug delivery systems. Recently, hydrogels have been developed as artificial cellular microenvironments because of the structural and physiological similarity to native extracellular matrices. With recent advances in hydrogel materials, many researchers are creating three-dimensional tissue models using engineered hydrogels and various cell sources, which is a promising platform for tissue regeneration, drug discovery, alternatives to animal models and the study of basic cell biology. In this review, we discuss how polymeric hydrogels are used to create engineered tissue constructs. Specifically, we focus on emerging technologies to generate advanced tissue models that precisely recapitulate complex native tissues in vivo.

  9. Optimization of Component Based Software Engineering Model Using Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of Component Based Software Engineering (CBSE is to deliver high quality, more reliable and more maintainable software systems in a shorter time and within limited budget by reusing and combining existing quality components. A high quality system can be achieved by using quality components, framework and integration process that plays a significant role. So, techniques and methods used for quality assurance and assessment of a component based system is different from those of the traditional software engineering methodology. In this paper, we are presenting a model for optimizing Chidamber and Kemerer (CK metric values of component-based software. A deep analysis of a series of CK metrics of the software components design patterns is done and metric values are drawn from them. By using unsupervised neural network- Self Organizing Map, we have proposed a model that provides an optimized model for Software Component engineering model based on reusability that depends on CK metric values. Average, standard deviated and optimized values for the CK metric are compared and evaluated to show the optimized reusability of component based model.

  10. Design Model Data Exchange Between Concurrent Engineering Facilities by Means of Model Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Philipp M.; Schaus, Volker; Gerndt, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) is developing the software Virtual Satellite for use in their Concurrent Engineering Facility. Throughout the design process of a spacecraft the software supports engineers to store and manage the data and results of their engineering sessions. The European Cooperation for Space Standardization (ECSS) is promoting a new technical memorandum for model based data exchange across the facilities. In order to enable data exchange from Virtual Satellite's own mo...

  11. Seamless Method- and Model-based Software and Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broy, Manfred

    Today engineering software intensive systems is still more or less handicraft or at most at the level of manufacturing. Many steps are done ad-hoc and not in a fully systematic way. Applied methods, if any, are not scientifically justified, not justified by empirical data and as a result carrying out large software projects still is an adventure. However, there is no reason why the development of software intensive systems cannot be done in the future with the same precision and scientific rigor as in established engineering disciplines. To do that, however, a number of scientific and engineering challenges have to be mastered. The first one aims at a deep understanding of the essentials of carrying out such projects, which includes appropriate models and effective management methods. What is needed is a portfolio of models and methods coming together with a comprehensive support by tools as well as deep insights into the obstacles of developing software intensive systems and a portfolio of established and proven techniques and methods with clear profiles and rules that indicate when which method is ready for application. In the following we argue that there is scientific evidence and enough research results so far to be confident that solid engineering of software intensive systems can be achieved in the future. However, yet quite a number of scientific research problems have to be solved.

  12. Development of a System Engineering Competency Career Model: verification of the model using OPM method.

    OpenAIRE

    Whitcomb, Clifford; White, Corina; Khan, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    Systems Engineering Competency Career Model (SECCM) (FY2015) Technical Report The DOD acquisition workforce is growing rapidly, and the need to align tasks to job positions and competencies with individuals to ensure positions are filled with the ‘best fitting’ candidate is extremely important (Whitcomb, White, Khan 2014). DASN RDT&E has funded NPS on a multi-year project to assist in the development of the Systems Engineering Career Competency Model (SECCM). This model identif...

  13. Generalized Linear Models with Applications in Engineering and the Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Raymond H; Vining, G Geoffrey; Robinson, Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition "The obvious enthusiasm of Myers, Montgomery, and Vining and their reliance on their many examples as a major focus of their pedagogy make Generalized Linear Models a joy to read. Every statistician working in any area of applied science should buy it and experience the excitement of these new approaches to familiar activities."-Technometrics Generalized Linear Models: With Applications in Engineering and the Sciences, Second Edition continues to provide a clear introduction to the theoretical foundations and key applications of generalized linear models (GLMs). Ma

  14. Surrogate Model Development for Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, Krishnasamy [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ra, youngchul [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The fuels used in internal-combustion engines are complex mixtures of a multitude of different types of hydrocarbon species. Attempting numerical simulations of combustion of real fuels with all of the hydrocarbon species included is highly unrealistic. Thus, a surrogate model approach is generally adopted, which involves choosing a few representative hydrocarbon species whose overall behavior mimics the characteristics of the target fuel. The present study proposes surrogate models for the nine fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) that have been developed for studying low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine concepts. The surrogate compositions for the fuels are arrived at by simulating their distillation profiles to within a maximum absolute error of 4% using a discrete multi-component (DMC) fuel model that has been incorporated in the multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, KIVA-ERC-CHEMKIN. The simulated surrogate compositions cover the range and measured concentrations of the various hydrocarbon classes present in the fuels. The fidelity of the surrogate fuel models is judged on the basis of matching their specific gravity, lower heating value, hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratio, cetane number, and cetane index with the measured data for all nine FACE fuels.

  15. BioModel Engineering: Its role in Systems Biology and Synthetic Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, David Roger; Breitling, Rainer; Heiner, Monika

    2009-01-01

    BioModel Engineering takes place at the interface of computing science, mathematics, engineering and biology, and provides a systematic approach for designing, constructing and analyzing computational models of biological systems. Some of its central concepts are inspired by efficient software engineering strategies. BioModel Engineering does not aim at engineering biological systems per se, but rather aims at describing their structure and behavior, in particular at the le...

  16. Cardiovascular modeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension: focus on mechanisms and treatment of right heart failure using the CircAdapt model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumens, Joost; Delhaas, Tammo

    2012-09-15

    In recent years, increased understanding of cardiovascular system dynamics has led to the development of mathematical models of the heart and circulation. Models that enable realistic simulation of ventricular mechanics and interactions under a range of conditions have the potential to provide an ideal method with which to investigate the effects of pulmonary arterial hypertension and its treatment on cardiac mechanics and hemodynamics. Such mathematical models have the potential to contribute to a personalized, patient-specific treatment approach and allow more objective diagnostic decision-making, patient monitoring, and assessment of treatment outcome. This review discusses the development of mathematical models of the heart and circulation, with particular reference to the closed-loop CircAdapt model, and how the model performs under both normal and pathophysiological (pulmonary hypertensive) conditions. PMID:22921031

  17. Formal Model-Driven Engineering: Generating Data and Behavioural Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Wei Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Model-driven engineering is the automatic production of software artefacts from abstract models of structure and functionality. By targeting a specific class of system, it is possible to automate aspects of the development process, using model transformations and code generators that encode domain knowledge and implementation strategies. Using this approach, questions of correctness for a complex, software system may be answered through analysis of abstract models of lower complexity, under the assumption that the transformations and generators employed are themselves correct. This paper shows how formal techniques can be used to establish the correctness of model transformations used in the generation of software components from precise object models. The source language is based upon existing, formal techniques; the target language is the widely-used SQL notation for database programming. Correctness is established by giving comparable, relational semantics to both languages, and checking that the transformations are semantics-preserving.

  18. First experiments results about the engineering model of Rapsodie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with the first series of experiments carried out on the engineering model of Rapsodie and on an associated sodium facility set in a laboratory hall of Cadarache. It conveys more precisely: 1/ - The difficulties encountered during the erection and assembly of the engineering model and a compilation of the results of the first series of experiments and tests carried out on this installation (loading of the subassemblies preheating, thermal chocks...). 2/ - The experiments and tests carried out on the two prototypes control rod drive mechanisms which brought to the choice for the design of the definitive drive mechanism. As a whole, the results proved the validity of the general design principles adopted for Rapsodie. (authors)

  19. Engineering models for catastrophe risk and their application to insurance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Internationally earthquake insurance, like all other insurance (fire, auto), adopted actuarial approach in the past,which is, based on historical loss experience to determine insurance rate. Due to the fact that earthquake is a rare event withsevere consequence, irrational determination of premium rate and lack of understanding scale of potential loss led to manyinsurance companies insolvent after Northridge earthquake in 1994.Along with recent advances in earth science, computer science and engineering, computerized loss estimation methodologiesbased on first principles have been developed to the point that losses from destructive earthquakes can be quantified withreasonable accuracy using scientific modeling techniques.This paper intends to introduce how engineering models can assist to quantify earthquake risk and how insurance industry can usethis information to manage their risk in the United States and abroad.

  20. Computational modeling, optimization and manufacturing simulation of advanced engineering materials

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents recent research work focused in the development of adequate theoretical and numerical formulations to describe the behavior of advanced engineering materials.  Particular emphasis is devoted to applications in the fields of biological tissues, phase changing and porous materials, polymers and to micro/nano scale modeling. Sensitivity analysis, gradient and non-gradient based optimization procedures are involved in many of the chapters, aiming at the solution of constitutive inverse problems and parameter identification. All these relevant topics are exposed by experienced international and inter institutional research teams resulting in a high level compilation. The book is a valuable research reference for scientists, senior undergraduate and graduate students, as well as for engineers acting in the area of computational material modeling.

  1. Engineering models for catastrophe risk and their application to insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Weimin

    2002-06-01

    Internationally earthquake insurance, like all other insurance (fire, auto), adopted actuarial approach in the past, which is, based on historical loss experience to determine insurance rate. Due to the fact that earthquake is a rare event with severe consequence, irrational determination of premium rate and lack of understanding scale of potential loss led to many insurance companies insolvent after Northridge earthquake in 1994. Along with recent advances in earth science, computer science and engineering, computerized loss estimation methodologies based on first principles have been developed to the point that losses from destructive earthquakes can be quantified with reasonable accuracy using scientific modeling techniques. This paper intends to introduce how engineering models can assist to quantify earthquake risk and how insurance industry can use this information to manage their risk in the United States and abroad.

  2. Modeling of Engine and Driveline Related Disturbances on the Wheel Speed in Passanger Cars

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to derive a mathematical model of the engine and driveline in a passenger car, capable of describing the wheel speed disturbances related to the engine and driveline. The thesis is conducted in order to improve the disturbance cancelation algorithm in the indirect tire pressure monitoring system, TPI developed by NIRA Dynamics AB. The model consists of two parts, the model of the engine and the model of the driveline. The engine model uses an analytical cylinder press...

  3. The CCAILM Learning Model: An Instructional Model for Teaching and Learning of Engineering Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faleye, Sunday

    2011-01-01

    This research report presents a new teaching and learning model in engineering classes. The proposed learning model is called the CCAILM (constructionist computer aided instructional learning model). This new model was derived from the constructionist learning theory, the media-affects-learning hypothesis and the multiple representation principle.…

  4. Pharmacogenomics and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Roden, Dan M

    2013-01-01

    Variability in drug responsiveness is a sine qua non of modern therapeutics, and the contribution of genomic variation is increasingly recognized. Investigating the genomic basis for variable responses to cardiovascular therapies has been a model for pharmacogenomics in general and has established...... resulted in changes to the product labels but also have led to development of initial clinical guidelines that consider how to facilitate incorporating genetic information to the bedside. This review summarizes the state of knowledge in cardiovascular pharmacogenomics and considers how variants described...

  5. Reverse engineering for industrial-environment cad models

    OpenAIRE

    Toledo, Rodrigo; Levy, Bruno; Paul, Jean-Claude

    2008-01-01

    Industrial-environment CAD models are commonly represented by triangular meshes, which do not preserve original information about implicit surfaces used during design. The reverse-engineering algorithms presented in this paper focus on reconstructing implicit information, recovering original data. We propose two different approaches, a numerical one and an original topological approach. We explore specificities found in CAD meshes to achieve high effectiveness, reconstructing 90% of informati...

  6. Model-driven performance evaluation for service engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Pahl, Claus; Boskovic, Marko; Hasselbring, Wilhelm

    2007-01-01

    Service engineering and service-oriented architecture as an integration and platform technology is a recent approach to software systems integration. Software quality aspects such as performance are of central importance for the integration of heterogeneous, distributed service-based systems. Empirical performance evaluation is a process of measuring and calculating performance metrics of the implemented software. We present an approach for the empirical, model-based performance evaluat...

  7. Uniform and Model-Driven Engineering of Feedback Control Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Křikava, Filip; Collet, Philippe; Blay-Fornarino, Mireille

    2011-01-01

    Engineering and reusing feedback control systems face challenging issues, such as structuring control loops to allow for fine-grained reasoning about their architecture. We propose a model-driven approach in which all major parts of the feedback control are uniformly designed as first-class adaptive elements. Expected properties of the approach are discussed and illustrated on a real scenario of overload control in a grid middleware.

  8. Mechanical networks model for the truss system in structural engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Kesheng Wang; Øyvind Bjørke

    1990-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how to use a mechanical networks model to analyse a three-dimensional truss system in structural engineering. A three-dimensional numerical example with a complete program written in the APL programming language is presented. The principles and concepts of this method are easily understood, and the formulation and computation of the problem can be carried out systematically and consistently. The main purpose is to develop a uniform, systematic theory and method which c...

  9. DEFINING PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS FOR ENGINEERING A VASCULAR MEDIA MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    U Cheema, E. A. H.; N Tamimi, B. A.; V Mudera, R. A. B.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tissue engineering of a blood vessel structure requires an understanding of the parameters governing the survival of resident vascular smooth muscle cells. We have developed a collagen-based vascular media model to examine the correlation between cell density, O2 requirements and cell viability. METHODS: Collagen type I gels were cast in rectangular wells and were compressed to produce 100μm thin, dense collagen sheets1. These were subsequently spiraled around a mandrel to mimic...

  10. Enzymatic corn wet milling: engineering process and cost model

    OpenAIRE

    McAloon Andrew J; Johnston David B; Ramírez Edna C; Singh Vijay

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Enzymatic corn wet milling (E-milling) is a process derived from conventional wet milling for the recovery and purification of starch and co-products using proteases to eliminate the need for sulfites and decrease the steeping time. In 2006, the total starch production in USA by conventional wet milling equaled 23 billion kilograms, including modified starches and starches used for sweeteners and ethanol production 1. Process engineering and cost models for an E-milling pr...

  11. [Cardiovascular disease in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Bauersachs, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are among the most frequent complications in pregnancies. Among them preexisting heart diseases including congenital heart disease, genetic cardiomyopathies, myocardial infarction and chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathies display a special challenge for the mother and her physicians. Moreover, the incidence of cardiovascular disease induced by or associated with pregnancy, i.e. hypertensive disorders and peripartum cardiomyopathies, has increased over the past decades. In the present overview we explain why pregnancy is a stress model for the maternal heart and summarize the current knowledge on the influence of pregnancy on preexisting cardiomyopathies. We highlight recent advances in research with regard to hypertensive complications in pregnancy and peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). Moreover, we summarize etiologies, risk factors, pathomechanisms, diagnosis, treatment, management and prognosis. Finally, interdisciplinarity between different clinical fields and basic science is a key requirement to avoid longterm damage to the cardiovascular system induced by pregnancy associated impacts and with this improve women's health in general. PMID:26800071

  12. Model Engine Performance Measurement From Force Balance Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeracki, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    A large scale model representative of a low-noise, high bypass ratio turbofan engine was tested for acoustics and performance in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. This test was part of NASA's continuing Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program. The low tip speed fan, nacelle, and an un-powered core passage (with core inlet guide vanes) were simulated. The fan blades and hub are mounted on a rotating thrust and torque balance. The nacelle, bypass duct stators, and core passage are attached to a six component force balance. The two balance forces, when corrected for internal pressure tares, measure the total thrust-minus-drag of the engine simulator. Corrected for scaling and other effects, it is basically the same force that the engine supports would feel, operating at similar conditions. A control volume is shown and discussed, identifying the various force components of the engine simulator thrust and definitions of net thrust. Several wind tunnel runs with nearly the same hardware installed are compared, to identify the repeatability of the measured thrust-minus-drag. Other wind tunnel runs, with hardware changes that affected fan performance, are compared to the baseline configuration, and the thrust and torque effects are shown. Finally, a thrust comparison between the force balance and nozzle gross thrust methods is shown, and both yield very similar results.

  13. Ozone and cardiovascular injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainaldi Giuseppe

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Air pollution is increasingly recognized as an important and modifiable determinant of cardiovascular diseases in urban communities. The potential detrimental effects are both acute and chronic having a strong impact on morbidity and mortality. The acute exposure to pollutants has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, heart failure and life-threatening arrhythmias. The long-terms effects are related to the lifetime risk of death from cardiac causes. The WHO estimates that air pollution is responsible for 3 million premature deaths each year. The evidence supporting these data is very strong nonetheless, epidemiologic and observational data have the main limitation of imprecise measurements. Moreover, the lack of clinical experimental models makes it difficult to demonstrate the individual risk. The other limitation is related to the lack of a clear mechanism explaining the effects of pollution on cardiovascular mortality. In the present review we will explore the epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence of the effects of ozone on cardiovascular diseases. The pathophysiologic consequences of air pollutant exposures have been extensively investigated in pulmonary systems, and it is clear that some of the major components of air pollution (e.g. ozone and particulate matter can initiate and exacerbate lung disease in humans 1. It is possible that pulmonary oxidant stress mediated by particulate matter and/or ozone (O3 exposure can result in downstream perturbations in the cardiovasculature, as the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems are intricately associated, and it is well documented that specific environmental toxins (such as tobacco smoke 2 introduced through the lungs can initiate and/or accelerate cardiovascular disease development. Indeed, several epidemiologic studies have proved that there is an association between PM and O3 and the increased incidence of cardiovascular morbidity

  14. Comparing the cardiovascular therapeutic indices of glycopyrronium and tiotropium in an integrated rat pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and safety model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trifilieff, Alexandre; Ethell, Brian T. [Respiratory Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Wimblehurst Road, Horsham, West Sussex RH12 5AB (United Kingdom); Sykes, David A. [Respiratory Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Wimblehurst Road, Horsham, West Sussex RH12 5AB (United Kingdom); School of Life Sciences, Queen' s Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2UH (United Kingdom); Watson, Kenny J.; Collingwood, Steve [Respiratory Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Wimblehurst Road, Horsham, West Sussex RH12 5AB (United Kingdom); Charlton, Steven J. [Respiratory Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Wimblehurst Road, Horsham, West Sussex RH12 5AB (United Kingdom); School of Life Sciences, Queen' s Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2UH (United Kingdom); Kent, Toby C., E-mail: tobykent@me.com [Respiratory Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Wimblehurst Road, Horsham, West Sussex RH12 5AB (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    Long acting inhaled muscarinic receptor antagonists, such as tiotropium, are widely used as bronchodilator therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although this class of compounds is generally considered to be safe and well tolerated in COPD patients the cardiovascular safety of tiotropium has recently been questioned. We describe a rat in vivo model that allows the concurrent assessment of muscarinic antagonist potency, bronchodilator efficacy and a potential for side effects, and we use this model to compare tiotropium with NVA237 (glycopyrronium bromide), a recently approved inhaled muscarinic antagonist for COPD. Anaesthetized Brown Norway rats were dosed intratracheally at 1 or 6 h prior to receiving increasing doses of intravenous methacholine. Changes in airway resistance and cardiovascular function were recorded and therapeutic indices were calculated against the ED{sub 50} values for the inhibition of methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction. At both time points studied, greater therapeutic indices for hypotension and bradycardia were observed with glycopyrronium (19.5 and 28.5 fold at 1 h; > 200 fold at 6 h) than with tiotropium (1.5 and 4.2 fold at 1 h; 4.6 and 5.5 fold at 6 h). Pharmacokinetic, protein plasma binding and rat muscarinic receptor binding properties for both compounds were determined and used to generate an integrated model of systemic M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor occupancy, which predicted significantly higher M{sub 2} receptor blockade at ED{sub 50} doses with tiotropium than with glycopyrronium. In our preclinical model there was an improved safety profile for glycopyrronium when compared with tiotropium. - Highlights: • We use an in vivo rat model to study CV safety of inhaled muscarinic antagonists. • We integrate protein and receptor binding and PK of tiotropium and glycopyrrolate. • At ED{sub 50} doses for bronchoprotection we model systemic M{sub 2} receptor occupancy. • Glycopyrrolate demonstrates lower M

  15. Design Model Free Switching Gain Scheduling Baseline Controller with Application to Automotive Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Farzin Piltan; Mehdi Akbari; Mojdeh Piran; Mansour Bazregar

    2012-01-01

    Internal combustion (IC) engines are optimized to meet exhaust emission requirements with the best fuel economy. Closed loop combustion control is a key technology that is used to optimize the engine combustion process to achieve this goal. In order to conduct research in the area of closed loop combustion control, a control oriented cycle-to-cycle engine model, containing engine combustion information for each individual engine cycle as a function of engine crank angle, is a necessity. This ...

  16. Model based methods and tools for process systems engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    Process systems engineering (PSE) provides means to solve a wide range of problems in a systematic and efficient manner. This presentation will give a perspective on model based methods and tools needed to solve a wide range of problems in product-process synthesis-design. These methods and tools...... need to be integrated with work-flows and data-flows for specific product-process synthesis-design problems within a computer-aided framework. The framework therefore should be able to manage knowledge-data, models and the associated methods and tools needed by specific synthesis-design work-flows and...... data-flows. In particular, the framework needs to manage models of different types, forms and complexity, together with their associated parameters. The application range of the framework depends very much on the application range of the associated models. Therefore, a modelling tool-box is also a part...

  17. A capillary network model for gas migration in engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas may be generated in a waste repository by a number of mechanisms, including anaerobic corrosion of metals and microbial degradation. Scoping calculations indicate that a free gas phase will probably form. Here attention is focused on two hazards this may pose. First, a gas pressure buildup may damage engineered barriers. Second, migrating gas may displace contaminated pore water. In previous studies, Darcy two-phase flow models have been used to calculate gas pressures and pore water displacement. A two-dimensional capillary network model has been developed and implemented in a numerical code, GARNET. Example calculations of the migration of gas from a point source have been undertaken to demonstrate its functionality and to indicate how phenomena, such as intermittent gas fluxes, may be modelled. Results indicate that the capillary network model reproduces behaviour observed in gas migration through low permeability media, and is a viable alternative to Darcy two-phase flow models

  18. Mechanics and model-based control of advanced engineering systems

    CERN Document Server

    Irschik, Hans; Krommer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mechanics and Model-Based Control of Advanced Engineering Systems collects 32 contributions presented at the International Workshop on Advanced Dynamics and Model Based Control of Structures and Machines, which took place in St. Petersburg, Russia in July 2012. The workshop continued a series of international workshops, which started with a Japan-Austria Joint Workshop on Mechanics and Model Based Control of Smart Materials and Structures and a Russia-Austria Joint Workshop on Advanced Dynamics and Model Based Control of Structures and Machines. In the present volume, 10 full-length papers based on presentations from Russia, 9 from Austria, 8 from Japan, 3 from Italy, one from Germany and one from Taiwan are included, which represent the state of the art in the field of mechanics and model based control, with particular emphasis on the application of advanced structures and machines.

  19. Comparison of Engineering Wake Models with CFD Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Juhl; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Ivanell, S.;

    2014-01-01

    The engineering wake models by Jensen [1] and Frandsen et al. [2] are assessed for different scenarios simulated using Large Eddy Simulation and the Actuator Line method implemented in the Navier-Stokes equations. The scenarios include the far wake behind a single wind turbine, a long row of...... turbines in an atmospheric boundary layer, idealised cases of an infinitely long row of wind turbines and infinite wind farms with three different spacings. Both models include a wake expansion factor, which is calibrated to fit the simulated wake velocities. The analysis highlights physical deficiencies...

  20. Integrated modeling and systems engineering for the Thirty Meter Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, George Z.; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos; MacMynowski, Doug; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Nissly, Carl; Troy, Mitchell; Cho, Myung

    2011-09-01

    Modeling is an integral part of systems engineering. It is utilized in requirement validation, system verification, as well as for supporting design trade studies. Modeling highly complex systems poses particular challenges, including the definition and interpretation of system performance, and the combined evaluation of physical processes spanning a wide range of time frames. Our solution is based on statistical interpretation of system performance and a unique image quality metric developed by TMT. The Stochastic Framework and Point Source Sensitivity allow us to properly estimate and combine the optical effects of various disturbances and telescope imperfections.

  1. Model-Driven Engineering of Machine Executable Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichberg, Michael; Monperrus, Martin; Kloppenburg, Sven; Mezini, Mira

    Implementing static analyses of machine-level executable code is labor intensive and complex. We show how to leverage model-driven engineering to facilitate the design and implementation of programs doing static analyses. Further, we report on important lessons learned on the benefits and drawbacks while using the following technologies: using the Scala programming language as target of code generation, using XML-Schema to express a metamodel, and using XSLT to implement (a) transformations and (b) a lint like tool. Finally, we report on the use of Prolog for writing model transformations.

  2. A Reflective Approach to Model-Driven Web Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clowes, Darren; Kolovos, Dimitris; Holmes, Chris; Rose, Louis; Paige, Richard; Johnson, Julian; Dawson, Ray; Probets, Steve

    A reflective approach to model-driven web engineering is presented, which aims to overcome several of the shortcomings of existing generative approaches. The approach uses the Epsilon platform and Apache Tomcat to render dynamic HTML content using Epsilon Generation Language templates. This enables EMF-based models to be used as data sources without the need to pre-generate any HTML or dynamic script, or duplicate the contents into a database. The paper reports on our experimental results in using this approach for dynamically querying and visualising a very large military standard.

  3. Modelling Gaia CCD pixels with Silvaco 3D engineering software

    CERN Document Server

    Seabroke, G M; Hopkinson, G; Burt, D; Robbins, M; Holland, A

    2010-01-01

    Gaia will only achieve its unprecedented measurement accuracy requirements with detailed calibration and correction for radiation damage. We present our Silvaco 3D engineering software model of the Gaia CCD pixel and two of its applications for Gaia: (1) physically interpreting supplementary buried channel (SBC) capacity measurements (pocket-pumping and first pixel response) in terms of e2v manufacturing doping alignment tolerances; and (2) deriving electron densities within a charge packet as a function of the number of constituent electrons and 3D position within the charge packet as input to microscopic models being developed to simulate radiation damage.

  4. Towards a Security Engineering Process Model for Electronic Business Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Eichler, Jörn

    2012-01-01

    Business process management (BPM) and accompanying systems aim at enabling enterprises to become adaptive. In spite of the dependency of enterprises on secure business processes, BPM languages and techniques provide only little support for security. Several complementary approaches have been proposed for security in the domain of BPM. Nevertheless, support for a systematic procedure for the development of secure electronic business processes is still missing. In this paper, we pinpoint the need for a security engineering process model in the domain of BPM and identify key requirements for such process model.

  5. Modelling Gaia CCD pixels with Silvaco 3D engineering software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabroke, G. M.; Prod'Homme, T.; Hopkinson, G.; Burt, D.; Robbins, M.; Holland, A.

    2011-02-01

    Gaia will only achieve its unprecedented measurement accuracy requirements with detailed calibration and correction for radiation damage. We present our Silvaco 3D engineering software model of the Gaia CCD pixel and two of its applications for Gaia: (1) physically interpreting supplementary buried channel (SBC) capacity measurements (pocket-pumping and first pixel response) in terms of e2v manufacturing doping alignment tolerances; and (2) deriving electron densities within a charge packet as a function of the number of constituent electrons and 3D position within the charge packet as input to microscopic models being developed to simulate radiation damage.

  6. Model-based engineering for medical-device software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Arnab; Jetley, Raoul; Jones, Paul L; Zhang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the benefits of adopting model-based design techniques for engineering medical device software. By using a patient-controlled analgesic (PCA) infusion pump as a candidate medical device, the authors show how using models to capture design information allows for i) fast and efficient construction of executable device prototypes ii) creation of a standard, reusable baseline software architecture for a particular device family, iii) formal verification of the design against safety requirements, and iv) creation of a safety framework that reduces verification costs for future versions of the device software. 1. PMID:21142522

  7. A Novel Closed-Chest Porcine Model of Chronic Ischemic Heart Failure Suitable for Experimental Research in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Biondi-Zoccai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac pathologies are among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in industrialized countries, with myocardial infarction (MI representing one of the major conditions leading to heart failure (HF. Hitherto, the development of consistent, stable, and reproducible models of closed-chest MI in large animals, meeting the clinical realism of a patient with HF subsequent to chronic ischemic necrosis, has not been successful. We hereby report the design and ensuing application of a novel porcine experimental model of closed-chest chronic ischemia suitable for biomedical research, mimicking post-MI HF. We also emphasize the key procedural steps involved in replicating this unprecedented model, from femoral artery and vein catheterization to MI induction by permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery through superselective deployment of platinum-nylon coils, as well as endomyocardial biopsy sampling for histologic analysis and cell harvesting. Our model could indeed represent a valuable contribution and tool for translational research, providing precious insights to understand and overcome the many hurdles concerning, and currently quenching, the preclinical steps mandatory for the clinical translation of new cardiovascular technologies for personalized HF treatments.

  8. Multi-resolution physiological modeling for the analysis of cardiovascular pathologies

    OpenAIRE

    Ojeda Avellaneda, David

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents three main contributions in the context of modeling and simulation of physiological systems. The first one is a formalization of the methodology involved in multi-formalism and multi-resolution modeling. The second one is the presentation and improvement of a modeling and simulation framework integrating a range of tools that help the definition, analysis, usage and sharing of complex mathematical models. The third contribution is the application of this modeling framewor...

  9. Diesel Engine performance improvement in a 1-D engine model using Particle Swarm Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karra, Prashanth

    2015-12-01

    A particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique was implemented to improve the engine development and optimization process to simultaneously reduce emissions and improve the fuel efficiency. The optimization was performed on a 4-stroke 4-cylinder GT-Power based 1-D diesel engine model. To achieve the multi-objective optimization, a merit function was defined which included the parameters to be optimized: Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Nonmethyl hydro carbons (NMHC), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC). EPA Tier 3 emissions standards for non-road diesel engines between 37 and 75 kW of output were chosen as targets for the optimization. The combustion parameters analyzed in this study include: Start of main Injection, Start of Pilot Injection, Pilot fuel quantity, Swirl, and Tumble. The PSO was found to be very effective in quickly arriving at a solution that met the target criteria as defined in the merit function. The optimization took around 40-50 runs to find the most favourable engine operating condition under the constraints specified in the optimization. In a favourable case with a high merit function values, the NOx+NMHC and CO values were reduced to as low as 2.9 and 0.014 g/kWh, respectively. The operating conditions at this point were: 10 ATDC Main SOI, -25 ATDC Pilot SOI, 0.25 mg of pilot fuel, 0.45 Swirl and 0.85 tumble. These results indicate that late main injections preceded by a close, small pilot injection are most favourable conditions at the operating condition tested.

  10. Modeling of a bioethanol combustion engine under different operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Bioethanol/gasoline blends’ fuel effects on engine’s efficiency, CO and NOx emissions. • Fuel consumption and EGR optimizations with respect to estimated engine’s work. • Ignition timing and blends’ effects on engine’s efficiency. • Rich mixture, gasoline/bioethanol blends and EGR effects on engine’s efficiency. - Abstract: A physical model based on a thermodynamic analysis was designed to characterize the combustion reaction parameters. The time-variations of pressure and temperature required for the calculation of specific heat ratio are obtained from the solution of energy conservation equation. The chemical combustion of biofuel is modeled by an overall reaction in two-steps. The rich mixture and EGR were varied to obtain the optimum operating conditions for the engine. The NOx formation is modeled by using an eight-species six-step mechanism. The effect of various formation steps of NOx in combustion is considered via a phenomenological model of combustion speed. This simplified model, which has been validated by the most available published results, is used to characterize and control, in real time, the impact of biofuel on engine performances and NOx emissions as well. It has been demonstrated that a delay of the ignition timing leads to an increase of the gas mixture temperature and cylinder pressure. Furthermore, it has been found that the CO is lower near the stoichiometry. Nevertheless, we notice that lower rich mixture values result in small NOx emission rates

  11. The role of technology and engineering models in transforming healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, Misha; Jimison, Holly Brugge; Wactlar, Howard D; Hayes, Tamara L; Barkis, Will; Skapik, Julia; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The healthcare system is in crisis due to challenges including escalating costs, the inconsistent provision of care, an aging population, and high burden of chronic disease related to health behaviors. Mitigating this crisis will require a major transformation of healthcare to be proactive, preventive, patient-centered, and evidence-based with a focus on improving quality-of-life. Information technology, networking, and biomedical engineering are likely to be essential in making this transformation possible with the help of advances, such as sensor technology, mobile computing, machine learning, etc. This paper has three themes: 1) motivation for a transformation of healthcare; 2) description of how information technology and engineering can support this transformation with the help of computational models; and 3) a technical overview of several research areas that illustrate the need for mathematical modeling approaches, ranging from sparse sampling to behavioral phenotyping and early detection. A key tenet of this paper concerns complementing prior work on patient-specific modeling and simulation by modeling neuropsychological, behavioral, and social phenomena. The resulting models, in combination with frequent or continuous measurements, are likely to be key components of health interventions to enhance health and wellbeing and the provision of healthcare. PMID:23549108

  12. Model-Based Engineering and Manufacturing CAD/CAM Benchmark.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domm, T.C.; Underwood, R.S.

    1999-10-13

    The Benchmark Project was created from a desire to identify best practices and improve the overall efficiency and performance of the Y-12 Plant's systems and personnel supporting the manufacturing mission. The mission of the benchmark team was to search out industry leaders in manufacturing and evaluate their engineering practices and processes to determine direction and focus for Y-12 modernization efforts. The companies visited included several large established companies and a new, small, high-tech machining firm. As a result of this effort, changes are recommended that will enable Y-12 to become a more modern, responsive, cost-effective manufacturing facility capable of supporting the needs of the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) into the 21st century. The benchmark team identified key areas of interest, both focused and general. The focus areas included Human Resources, Information Management, Manufacturing Software Tools, and Standards/Policies and Practices. Areas of general interest included Infrastructure, Computer Platforms and Networking, and Organizational Structure. The results of this benchmark showed that all companies are moving in the direction of model-based engineering and manufacturing. There was evidence that many companies are trying to grasp how to manage current and legacy data. In terms of engineering design software tools, the companies contacted were somewhere between 3-D solid modeling and surfaced wire-frame models. The manufacturing computer tools were varied, with most companies using more than one software product to generate machining data and none currently performing model-based manufacturing (MBM) from a common model. The majority of companies were closer to identifying or using a single computer-aided design (CAD) system than a single computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) system. The Internet was a technology that all companies were looking to either transport information more easily throughout the corporation or as a conduit for

  13. Axisymmetric Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2005-01-01

    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) have generated research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional rocket engines and gas turbines. However, while this theoretical advantage has spurred considerable interest in building PDRE devices, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to the PDRE has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the progress that has been made in comparing the available experimental measurements with analytical and numerical models. In recent work by the author, a quasi-one-dimensional, finite rate chemistry CFD model was utilized to study the gasdynamics and performance characteristics of PDREs over a range of blowdown pressure ratios from 1-1000. Models of this type are computationally inexpensive, and enable first-order parametric studies of the effect of several nozzle and extension geometries on PDRE performance over a wide range of conditions. However, the quasi-one-dimensional approach is limited in that it cannot properly capture the multidimensional blast wave and flow expansion downstream of the PDRE, nor can it resolve nozzle flow separation if present. Moreover, the previous work was limited to single-pulse calculations. In this paper, an axisymmetric finite rate chemistry model is described and utilized to study these issues in greater detail. Example Mach number contour plots showing the multidimensional blast wave and nozzle exhaust plume are shown. The performance results are compared with the quasi-one-dimensional results from the previous paper. Both Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions are calculated in order to determine the effect of viscous

  14. Verification of a computational cardiovascular system model comparing the hemodynamics of a continuous flow to a synchronous valveless pulsatile flow left ventricular assist device

    OpenAIRE

    Gohean, Jeffrey R.; George, Mitchell J.; Pate, Thomas D.; Kurusz, Mark; Longoria, Raul G.; Smalling, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to utilize a computational model to compare a synchronized valveless pulsatile left ventricular assist device to continuous flow left ventricular assist devices at the same level of device flow, and to verify the model with in vivo porcine data. A dynamic system model of the human cardiovascular system was developed to simulate support of a healthy or failing native heart from a continuous flow left ventricular assist device or a synchronous, pulsatile, va...

  15. Modeling and cold start in alcohol-fueled engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markel, A.J.; Bailey, B.K.

    1998-05-01

    Neat alcohol fuels offer several benefits over conventional gasoline in automotive applications. However, their low vapor pressure and high heat of vaporization make it difficult to produce a flammable vapor composition from a neat alcohol fuel during a start under cold ambient conditions. Various methods have been introduced to compensate for this deficiency. In this study, the authors applied computer modeling and simulation to evaluate the potential of four cold-start technologies for engines fueled by near-neat alcohol. The four technologies were a rich combustor device, a partial oxidation reactor, a catalytic reformer, and an enhanced ignition system. The authors ranked the competing technologies by their ability to meet two primary criteria for cold starting an engine at {minus}25 deg C and also by several secondary parameters related to commercialization. Their analysis results suggest that of the four technologies evaluated, the enhanced ignition system is the best option for further development.

  16. Statistical Validation of Engineering and Scientific Models: Background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tutorial is presented discussing the basic issues associated with propagation of uncertainty analysis and statistical validation of engineering and scientific models. The propagation of uncertainty tutorial illustrates the use of the sensitivity method and the Monte Carlo method to evaluate the uncertainty in predictions for linear and nonlinear models. Four example applications are presented; a linear model, a model for the behavior of a damped spring-mass system, a transient thermal conduction model, and a nonlinear transient convective-diffusive model based on Burger's equation. Correlated and uncorrelated model input parameters are considered. The model validation tutorial builds on the material presented in the propagation of uncertainty tutoriaI and uses the damp spring-mass system as the example application. The validation tutorial illustrates several concepts associated with the application of statistical inference to test model predictions against experimental observations. Several validation methods are presented including error band based, multivariate, sum of squares of residuals, and optimization methods. After completion of the tutorial, a survey of statistical model validation literature is presented and recommendations for future work are made

  17. An updated prediction model of the global risk of cardiovascular disease in HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Møller, Nina; Nielsen, Lene Ryom; Smith, Colette;

    2016-01-01

    of the D:A:D models were compared with a recent CVD prediction model from the Framingham study, which was assessed recalibrated to the D:A:D dataset. A total of 1010 CVD events occurred during 186,364.5 person-years. The full D:A:D CVD prediction model included age, gender, systolic blood pressure, smoking...... status, family history of CVD, diabetes, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, CD4 lymphocyte count, cumulative exposure to protease- and nucleoside reverse transcriptase-inhibitors, and current use of abacavir. A reduced model omitted antiretroviral therapies. The D:A:D models statistically...

  18. 75 FR 39803 - Airworthiness Directives; Thielert Aircraft Engines GmbH Model TAE 125-01 Reciprocating Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... Register on April 5, 2010 (75 FR 17084). That NPRM proposed to correct an unsafe condition for the... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or... Engines GmbH Model TAE 125-01 Reciprocating Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA),...

  19. Semantically-Rigorous Systems Engineering Modeling Using Sysml and OWL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, J. Steven; Rouquette, Nicolas F.

    2012-01-01

    The Systems Modeling Language (SysML) has found wide acceptance as a standard graphical notation for the domain of systems engineering. SysML subsets and extends the Unified Modeling Language (UML) to define conventions for expressing structural, behavioral, and analytical elements, and relationships among them. SysML-enabled modeling tools are available from multiple providers, and have been used for diverse projects in military aerospace, scientific exploration, and civil engineering. The Web Ontology Language (OWL) has found wide acceptance as a standard notation for knowledge representation. OWL-enabled modeling tools are available from multiple providers, as well as auxiliary assets such as reasoners and application programming interface libraries, etc. OWL has been applied to diverse projects in a wide array of fields. While the emphasis in SysML is on notation, SysML inherits (from UML) a semantic foundation that provides for limited reasoning and analysis. UML's partial formalization (FUML), however, does not cover the full semantics of SysML, which is a substantial impediment to developing high confidence in the soundness of any conclusions drawn therefrom. OWL, by contrast, was developed from the beginning on formal logical principles, and consequently provides strong support for verification of consistency and satisfiability, extraction of entailments, conjunctive query answering, etc. This emphasis on formal logic is counterbalanced by the absence of any graphical notation conventions in the OWL standards. Consequently, OWL has had only limited adoption in systems engineering. The complementary strengths and weaknesses of SysML and OWL motivate an interest in combining them in such a way that we can benefit from the attractive graphical notation of SysML and the formal reasoning of OWL. This paper describes an approach to achieving that combination.

  20. Subsidence characterization and modeling for engineered facilities in Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, M. L.; Fergason, K. C.; Panda, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    Several engineered facilities located on deep alluvial basins in southern Arizona, including flood retention structures (FRS) and a coal ash disposal facility, have been impacted by up to as much as 1.8 m of differential land subsidence and associated earth fissuring. Compressible basin alluvium depths are as deep as about 300 m, and historic groundwater level declines due to pumping range from 60 to more than 100 m at these facilities. Addressing earth fissure-inducing ground strain has required alluvium modulus characterization to support finite element modeling. The authors have developed Percolation Theory-based methodologies to use effective stress and generalized geo-material types to estimate alluvium modulus as a function of alluvium lithology, depth and groundwater level. Alluvial material modulus behavior may be characterized as high modulus gravel-dominated, low modulus sand-dominated, or very low modulus fines-dominated (silts and clays) alluvium. Applied at specific aquifer stress points, such as significant pumping wells, this parameter characterization and quantification facilitates subsidence magnitude modeling at its' sources. Modeled subsidence is then propagated over time across the basin from the source(s) using a time delay exponential decay function similar to the soil mechanics consolidation coefficient, only applied laterally. This approach has expanded subsidence modeling capabilities on scales of engineered facilities of less than 2 to more than 15 km.

  1. Simulations of the Cardiovascular System Using the Cardiovascular Simulation Toolbox

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz-León, Gabriela; Vílchez-Monge, Marta; Montero-Rodríguez, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    In the present document, six mathematical models of the cardiovascular system are studied and implemented in MATLAB R2013a using an updated version of the Cardiovascular Simulation Toolbox proposed by O. Barnea at the Tel-Aviv University. All the mathematical models are based on electrical lumped-parameter analogies. The results of the simulations are compared with a list of expected hemodynamic parameters and contrasted with laboratory values.

  2. An Integrated Quantitative Assessment Model For Usability Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidar S. Jabbar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Many different quantitative assessment models have been proposed to measure and report the usability of a general software product for various business and design purposes. However, there are several problems coupled with existing models that consequently bias and affect the process and results of the usability assessment. Moreover, they do not aid their usage by analysts who are not experienced in the filed of usability. Therefore, an integrated, accurate, consolidated and simple usability assessment model is required, to provide an entire construct of usability for general software products. In this paper, we proposed an Integrated Quantitative Assessment Model for Usability Engineering (IQAMUE for measuring and reporting usability for general software products. The contribution of the IQAMUE has been done at several points: (1 The investigation into existing models that represents usability factors, either by standard bodies or by well-known researches in the field of usability. As a result, we have proposed an improved comprehensive model, which integrates potential and general usability factors, and measure their related metrics in a standard way (2 We have proposed an adjustable sample size estimation model for usability assessment, which enhances the estimation process, by using historical data to gain an initial idea of the software product, and on present data to predict the complexity of the software product (3 For the applicability purpose of the proposed model, we have conducted an empirical case study for a local e-mail system (Eudora V7 to examine and practice the proposed model.

  3. Methods for model selection in applied science and engineering.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Richard V., Jr.

    2004-10-01

    Mathematical models are developed and used to study the properties of complex systems and/or modify these systems to satisfy some performance requirements in just about every area of applied science and engineering. A particular reason for developing a model, e.g., performance assessment or design, is referred to as the model use. Our objective is the development of a methodology for selecting a model that is sufficiently accurate for an intended use. Information on the system being modeled is, in general, incomplete, so that there may be two or more models consistent with the available information. The collection of these models is called the class of candidate models. Methods are developed for selecting the optimal member from a class of candidate models for the system. The optimal model depends on the available information, the selected class of candidate models, and the model use. Classical methods for model selection, including the method of maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods, as well as a method employing a decision-theoretic approach, are formulated to select the optimal model for numerous applications. There is no requirement that the candidate models be random. Classical methods for model selection ignore model use and require data to be available. Examples are used to show that these methods can be unreliable when data is limited. The decision-theoretic approach to model selection does not have these limitations, and model use is included through an appropriate utility function. This is especially important when modeling high risk systems, where the consequences of using an inappropriate model for the system can be disastrous. The decision-theoretic method for model selection is developed and applied for a series of complex and diverse applications. These include the selection of the: (1) optimal order of the polynomial chaos approximation for non-Gaussian random variables and stationary stochastic processes, (2) optimal pressure load model to be

  4. Coupled dynamic-multidimensional modelling of free-piston engine combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Free-piston engines are under investigation by a number of research groups worldwide, as an alternative to conventional technology in applications such as electric and hydraulic power generation. The piston dynamics of the free-piston engine differ significantly from those of conventional engines, and this may influence in-cylinder gas motion, combustion and emissions formation. Due to the complex interaction between mechanics and thermodynamics, the modelling of free-piston engines is not straight-forward. This paper presents a novel approach to the modelling of free-piston engines through the introduction of solution-dependent mesh motion in an engine CFD code. The particular features of free-piston engines are discussed, and the model for engine dynamics implemented in the CFD code is described. Finally, the coupled solver is demonstrated through the modelling of a spark ignited free-piston engine generator

  5. ISO 9000 and/or Systems Engineering Capability Maturity Model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholston, Sampson E.

    2002-01-01

    For businesses and organizations to remain competitive today they must have processes and systems in place that will allow them to first identify customer needs and then develop products/processes that will meet or exceed the customers needs and expectations. Customer needs, once identified, are normally stated as requirements. Designers can then develop products/processes that will meet these requirements. Several functions, such as quality management and systems engineering management are used to assist product development teams in the development process. Both functions exist in all organizations and both have a similar objective, which is to ensure that developed processes will meet customer requirements. Are efforts in these organizations being duplicated? Are both functions needed by organizations? What are the similarities and differences between the functions listed above? ISO 9000 is an international standard of goods and services. It sets broad requirements for the assurance of quality and for management's involvement. It requires organizations to document the processes and to follow these documented processes. ISO 9000 gives customers assurance that the suppliers have control of the process for product development. Systems engineering can broadly be defined as a discipline that seeks to ensure that all requirements for a system are satisfied throughout the life of the system by preserving their interrelationship. The key activities of systems engineering include requirements analysis, functional analysis/allocation, design synthesis and verification, and system analysis and control. The systems engineering process, when followed properly, will lead to higher quality products, lower cost products, and shorter development cycles. The System Engineering Capability Maturity Model (SE-CMM) will allow companies to measure their system engineering capability and continuously improve those capabilities. ISO 9000 and SE-CMM seem to have a similar objective, which

  6. Human Factors Engineering Review Model for advanced nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Hara, J.; Higgins, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Goodman, C.; Galletti, G.: Eckenrode, R. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD (United States)

    1993-05-01

    One of the major issues to emerge from the initial design reviews under the certification process was that detailed human-systems interface (HSI) design information was not available for staff review. To address the lack of design detail issue. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is performing the design certification reviews based on a design process plan which describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification. Since the review of a design process is unprecedented in the nuclear industry. The criteria for review are not addressed by current regulations or guidance documents and. therefore, had to be developed. Thus, an HFE Program Review Model was developed. This paper will describe the model`s rationale, scope, objectives, development, general characteristics. and application.

  7. Digital Modeling and Visualization of Hydroelectric Engineering Geoinformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Donghai; ZHONG Denghua; LI Mingchao

    2006-01-01

    To describe the spatial tendency and complex relationship of geological structures, a digital modeling based on geographic information system and the visualization of hydroelectric engineering geology information are presented. The functions of information visual query, spatial cutting,section drawing, and coupled analysis with hydraulic structures are realized. The geologic model can match the attribute data with the shape data of geological structures, and organize the information for spatial query and analysis of the 3D model. With an application in Laxiwa hydroelectric project on the upriver of Huanghe River, the method provides a 3D parallel section view and query results of geoinformation, and 3D section views of geoinformation along axis of spillway tunnel, and along the 5th axis with underground structures, respectively.

  8. Comparison of Engineering Wake Models with CFD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, S. J.; Sørensen, J. N.; Ivanell, S.; Mikkelsen, R. F.

    2014-06-01

    The engineering wake models by Jensen [1] and Frandsen et al. [2] are assessed for different scenarios simulated using Large Eddy Simulation and the Actuator Line method implemented in the Navier-Stokes equations. The scenarios include the far wake behind a single wind turbine, a long row of turbines in an atmospheric boundary layer, idealised cases of an infinitely long row of wind turbines and infinite wind farms with three different spacings. Both models include a wake expansion factor, which is calibrated to fit the simulated wake velocities. The analysis highlights physical deficiencies in the ability of the models to universally predict the wake velocities, as the expansion factor can be fitted for a given case, but with not apparent transition between the cases.

  9. Cardiovascular health promotion for children: a model for a Parish (County)-wide program (implementation and preliminary results).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenson, Gerald S

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) risk factors in childhood result in a lifetime burden on the CV system. The Bogalusa Heart Study, a prevention program for children, addresses behaviors and lifestyles associated with CV risk. This prevention program utilizes the substructure of a Parish (County) that can be a model for other areas. All aspects in educating school children-the classroom, physical activity, cafeteria, teachers, and parents with community involvement-are included. The program requires cooperation of parents, schools, physicians, and political and business personnel. Their collaboration helps implement and sustain the program. Understanding the origin of coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes, and now the obesity epidemic shows the need to develop a framework for improving lifestyles and behaviors beginning in childhood. In addition to nutrition and exercise, the program addresses tobacco, alcohol, and drug use, and societal problems such as dropping out of school, violent behavior, and teenage pregnancy. An initial accomplishment is the entry into all elementary schools, representing approximately 7000 children. Early results show reduction in obesity, increased physical activity, improved decision making, and healthy attitudes. This public health model is inexpensive by utilizing prior research findings and integrating into community resources. Health education of children is an important aspect of preventive cardiology with a need for pediatric and adult cardiologists' involvement. PMID:20021623

  10. An Open Distributed Architecture for Flexible Hybrid Assembly Systems: A Model Driven Engineering Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Thramboulidis, Kleanthis

    2014-01-01

    Assembly systems constitute one of the most important fields in today industry. In this paper we propose an open distributed architecture for the engineering of evolvable flexible hybrid assembly systems. The proposed architecture is based on the model driven development paradigm. Models are used to represent structure and behavior and a domain specific engineering tool is defined to facilitate the assembly system engineer in the engineering process of the assembly system. Specific meta model...

  11. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissley, D. M.

    1997-03-01

    Analytical models for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas tur-bine engines are presented. Electron beam/physical vapor-deposited and plasma-sprayed TBC systems are discussed. An overview of the following TBC spalling mechanisms is presented: (1) metal oxidation at the ceramic/metal interface, (2) ceramic/metal interface stresses caused by radius of curvature and inter-face roughness, (3) material properties and mechanical behavior, (4) component design features, (5) tem-perature gradients, (6) ceramic/metal interface stress singularities at edges and corners, and (7) object impact damage. Analytical models for TBC spalling life are proposed based on observations of TBC spall-ing and plausible failure theories. Spalling was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceed the material strength (at or near the ceramic/metal interface). Knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimen-tal evidence and analytical understanding of TBC failure are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC spalling failure trends.

  12. Engineering models for merging wakes in wind farm optimization applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machefaux, E.; Larsen, G. C.; Murcia Leon, J. P.

    2015-06-01

    The present paper deals with validation of 4 different engineering wake superposition approaches against detailed CFD simulations and covering different turbine interspacing, ambient turbulence intensities and mean wind speeds. The first engineering model is a simple linear superposition of wake deficits as applied in e.g. Fuga. The second approach is the square root of sums of squares approach, which is applied in the widely used PARK program. The third approach, which is presently used with the Dynamic Wake Meandering (DWM) model, assumes that the wake affected downstream flow field to be determined by a superposition of the ambient flow field and the dominating wake among contributions from all upstream turbines at any spatial position and at any time. The last approach developed by G.C. Larsen is a newly developed model based on a parabolic type of approach, which combines wake deficits successively. The study indicates that wake interaction depends strongly on the relative wake deficit magnitude, i.e. the deficit magnitude normalized with respect to the ambient mean wind speed, and that the dominant wake assumption within the DWM framework is the most accurate.

  13. Finite element modeling of engineered thin film/coating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finite element modeling is becoming an increasingly important tool used in the design methodology and in the analysis of engineered functional thin film/coating systems. In contrast with many analytical modeling methods, modem finite element analysis can readily model non-linear static and transient thermo-mechanical behavior of engineered coating systems. Non-linear finite element analysis can be applied to multi-layered coating systems to predict the stresses and deformations generated during the processing of the coating system and under operating conditions. For example thermo-mechanical finite element analysis can be used to determine the composition and layer geometry of a coating system such that the stresses generated under operating conditions are minimized. In this paper we demonstrate the use of non-linear finite element analysis in the following situations: a) the prediction of contact stresses and film surface crack propagation within the coating system developed during the normal indentation of a hard wear-resistant coating on a soft substrate, and b) the determination of stresses generated in a multi-layered non-wetting, wear-resistant and oxidation resistant glass molding coating system during repeated thermal shot cycling. (author)

  14. Simulation-driven design optimization and modeling for microwave engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Koziel, Slawomir; Zhang, Qi-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Computer-aided full-wave electromagnetic (EM) analysis has been used in microwave engineering for the past decade. Initially, its main application area was design verification. Today, EM-simulation-driven optimization and design closure become increasingly important due to the complexity of microwave structures and increasing demands for accuracy. In many situations, theoretical models of microwave structures can only be used to yield the initial designs that need to be further fine-tuned to meet given performance requirements. In addition, EM-based design is a must for a growing number of mic

  15. Human performance models for computer-aided engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkind, Jerome I. (Editor); Card, Stuart K. (Editor); Hochberg, Julian (Editor); Huey, Beverly Messick (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses a topic important to the field of computational human factors: models of human performance and their use in computer-based engineering facilities for the design of complex systems. It focuses on a particular human factors design problem -- the design of cockpit systems for advanced helicopters -- and on a particular aspect of human performance -- vision and related cognitive functions. By focusing in this way, the authors were able to address the selected topics in some depth and develop findings and recommendations that they believe have application to many other aspects of human performance and to other design domains.

  16. Mathematical Modeling and Simulation Introduction for Scientists and Engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Velten, Kai

    2008-01-01

    This concise and clear introduction to the topic requires only basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra—all other concepts and ideas are developed in the course of the book. Lucidly written so as to appeal to undergraduates and practitioners alike, it enables readers to set up simple mathematical models on their own and to interpret their results and those of others critically. To achieve this, many examples have been chosen from various fields, such as biology, ecology, economics, medicine, agricultural, chemical, electrical, mechanical and process engineering, which are subsequently di

  17. Model suicide vector for containment of genetically engineered microorganisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Bej, A K; Perlin, M H; Atlas, R M

    1988-01-01

    A model suicide vector (pBAP19h), designed for the potential containment of genetically engineered microorganisms, was made by constructing a plasmid with the hok gene, which codes for a lethal polypeptide, under the control of the lac promoter. The vector plasmid also codes for carbenicillin resistance. In the absence of carbenicillin, induction of the hok gene in vitro caused elimination of all detectable cells containing the suicide vector; pBAP19h-free cells of the culture survived and gr...

  18. Self-Explanatory User Interfaces by Model-Driven Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    García Frey, Alfonso; Calvary, Gaëlle; Dupuy-Chessa, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Modern User Interfaces (UI) must deal with the increasing complexity of applications as well as new features such as the capacity of UIs to be dynamically adapted to the con- text of use. The complexity does not necessarily imply a better quality. Thus, it becomes necessary to make users un- derstand the UIs. This paper describes an on-going research about Self-Explanatory User Interfaces (SE-UI) by Model- Driven Engineering (MDE). Self-explanation makes refer- ence to the capacity of a UI to...

  19. The state of practice in model-driven engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Whittle, Jon; Hutchinson, John; Rouncefield, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Despite lively debate over the last decade on the benefits or drawbacks of model-driven engineering (MDE), there have been very few industry-wide studies of MDE in practice. We present a new study, covering a broad range of experiences and ways of applying MDE: we surveyed 450 MDE practitioners and carried out in-depth interviews with 22 more. Findings suggest that MDE may be more widespread than commonly believed, but developers rarely use it to generate whole systems; rather, they apply it ...

  20. Dynamic model of Stirling engine crank mechanism with connected electric generator

    OpenAIRE

    Vlach R.; Sikora M

    2009-01-01

    This paper treats of a numerical dynamic model of Stirling engine crank mechanism. The model is included in the complex model of combined heat and power unit. The unit is composed of the Stirling engine and of attached three-phase synchronous generator. This generator should start the Stirling engine in motor mode as well. It is necessary to combine the crank shaft dynamic model and the complete thermal model of Stirling engine for simulations and analyses of engine run. Our aim is to create ...

  1. A novel cardiovascular risk stratification model incorporating ECG and heart rate variability for patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain

    OpenAIRE

    Heldeweg, Micah Liam Arthur; Liu, Nan; Koh, Zhi Xiong; Fook-Chong, Stephanie; Lye, Weng Kit; Harms, Mark; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Background Risk stratification models can be employed at the emergency department (ED) to evaluate patient prognosis and guide choice of treatment. We derived and validated a new cardiovascular risk stratification model comprising vital signs, heart rate variability (HRV) parameters, and demographic and electrocardiogram (ECG) variables. Methods We conducted a single-center, observational cohort study of patients presenting to the ED with chest pain. All patients above 21 years of age and in ...

  2. Bramwell-Hill modeling for local aortic pulse wave velocity estimation: a validation study with velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance and invasive pressure assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Westenberg Jos JM; van Poelgeest Eveline P; Steendijk Paul; Grotenhuis Heynric B; Jukema JW; de Roos Albert

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The Bramwell-Hill model describes the relation between vascular wall stiffness expressed in aortic distensibility and the pulse wave velocity (PWV), which is the propagation speed of the systolic pressure wave through the aorta. The main objective of this study was to test the validity of this model locally in the aorta by using PWV-assessments based on in-plane velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), with invasive pressure measurements serving as the gol...

  3. Increasing pulse wave velocity in a realistic cardiovascular model does not increase pulse pressure with age

    OpenAIRE

    Mohiuddin, Mohammad W.; Rihani, Ryan J.; Laine, Glen A.; Quick, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of the well-documented increase in aortic pulse pressure (PP) with age is disputed. Investigators assuming a classical windkessel model believe that increases in PP arise from decreases in total arterial compliance (Ctot) and increases in total peripheral resistance (Rtot) with age. Investigators assuming a more sophisticated pulse transmission model believe PP rises because increases in pulse wave velocity (cph) make the reflected pressure wave arrive earlier, augmenting systol...

  4. Cardio-vascular safety beyond hERG: in silico modelling of a guinea pig right atrium assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenu, Luca A; Teisman, Ard; De Buck, Stefan S; Sinha, Vikash K; Gilissen, Ron A H J; Nijsen, Marjoleen J M A; Mackie, Claire E; Sanderson, Wendy E

    2009-12-01

    As chemists can easily produce large numbers of new potential drug candidates, there is growing demand for high capacity models that can help in driving the chemistry towards efficacious and safe candidates before progressing towards more complex models. Traditionally, the cardiovascular (CV) safety domain plays an important role in this process, as many preclinical CV biomarkers seem to have high prognostic value for the clinical outcome. Throughout the industry, traditional ion channel binding data are generated to drive the early selection process. Although this assay can generate data at high capacity, it has the disadvantage of producing high numbers of false negatives. Therefore, our company applies the isolated guinea pig right atrium (GPRA) assay early-on in discovery. This functional multi-channel/multi-receptor model seems much more predictive in identifying potential CV liabilities. Unfortunately however, its capacity is limited, and there is no room for full automation. We assessed the correlation between ion channel binding and the GPRA's Rate of Contraction (RC), Contractile Force (CF), and effective refractory frequency (ERF) measures assay using over six thousand different data points. Furthermore, the existing experimental knowledge base was used to develop a set of in silico classification models attempting to mimic the GPRA inhibitory activity. The Naïve Bayesian classifier was used to built several models, using the ion channel binding data or in silico computed properties and structural fingerprints as descriptors. The models were validated on an independent and diverse test set of 200 reference compounds. Performances were assessed on the bases of their overall accuracy, sensitivity and specificity in detecting both active and inactive molecules. Our data show that all in silico models are highly predictive of actual GPRA data, at a level equivalent or superior to the ion channel binding assays. Furthermore, the models were interpreted in

  5. Model-guided bone tissue engineering: from bench to bedside via in silico modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Geris, Liesbet

    2014-01-01

    The creation of man-made living implants is the holy grail of tissue engineering (TE). As basic science advances, one of the major challenges in TE is the translation of the increasing biological knowledge on complex cell and tissue behavior into a predictive and robust engineering process. Mastering this complexity is an essential step towards clinical applications of TE. Computational modeling allows to study the biological complexity in a more integrative and quantitative way. Specifically...

  6. Quasi-One-Dimensional Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2002-01-01

    Pulsed detonation rocket engines (PDREs) have generated considerable research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional rocket engines and gas turbines. However, while this theoretical advantage has spurred a great deal of interest in building PDRE devices, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to the PDRE has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the difficulties in comparing the available experimental measurements with numerical models. In a previous paper by the author, parametric studies of the performance of a single, straight-tube PDRE were reported. A 1-D, unsteady method of characteristics code, employing a constant-gamma assumption behind the detonation front, was developed for that study. Models of this type are computationally inexpensive, and are particularly useful for parametric performance comparisons. For example, a plot showing the specific impulse of various PDRE and steady-state rocket engine (SSRE) configurations as a function of blowdown pressure ratio. The performance curves clearly indicate that a straight-tube PDRE is superior in specific impulse to a SSRE with a sonic nozzle over the entire range of pressure ratios. Note, however, that a straight-tube PDRE in general does not compare favorably to a SSRE fitted with an optimized de Laval supersonic nozzle, particularly at the high pressure ratios typical for boost or in-space rocket applications. However, the calculations also show that if a dynamically optimized, supersonic de Laval nozzle could be could be fitted to a PDRE, then the specific impulse of the device would exceed that of a comparable SSRE

  7. Imitating model of the electronic regulator frequencies of rotation of the automobile diesel engine

    OpenAIRE

    Тырловой, С. И.

    2011-01-01

    The imitating model of an frequency electronic regulator of rotation of high-speed diesel engine an automobile diesel engine with the distributive fuel pump of Bosch company is resulted. Is executed simulation transitive modes of a diesel engine with mechanic and electronic regulators. Deterioration influence plungers steams on dinamic and economic indicators of a diesel engine is analysed. Operational indicators of a diesel engine with mechanic and electronic regulators are compared. The obt...

  8. A master-model approach to whole jet engine analysis and design optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Sandberg, Marcus; Kokkolaras, Michael; Aidanpää, Jan-Olov; Isaksson, Ola; Larsson, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    Novel jet engine concepts and architectures are being explored to reduce mass, fuel consumption, development cost and environmental impact while increasing performance. Although the engine systems development process of the next generation aero engines takes place at the original equipment manufacturer level, component manufacturers need to optimize their components using an integrated engine system design approach. Therefore, they need the capability to model and simulate whole engine behavi...

  9. A Business Maturity Model of Software Product Line Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Faheem; Capretz, Luiz Fernando

    2015-01-01

    In the recent past, software product line engineering has become one of the most promising practices in software industry with the potential to substantially increase the software development productivity. Software product line engineering approach spans the dimensions of business, architecture, software engineering process and organization. The increasing popularity of software product line engineering in the software industry necessitates a process maturity evaluation methodology. According...

  10. Generic Engineering Competencies: A Review and Modelling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male, Sally A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper puts forward the view that engineering educators have a responsibility to prepare graduates for engineering work and careers. The current literature reveals gaps between the competencies required for engineering work and those developed in engineering education. Generic competencies feature in these competency gaps. Literature suggests…

  11. Pulmonary Toxicity and Modifications in Iron Homeostasis Following Libby Amphibole Asbestos Exposure in Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Individuals suffering from cardiovascular disease (CVD) develop iron dysregulation which may influence pulmonary toxicity and injury upon exposure to asbestos. We hypothesized spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) rats woul...

  12. Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease Demonstrate Distinctive Pulmonary Gene Expressions for Vascular Response Genes: Impact of Ozone Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative gene expression profiling of multiple tissues from rat strains with genetic predisposition to diverse cardiovascular diseases (CVD) can help decode the transcriptional program that governs organ-specific functions. We examined expressions of CVD genes in the lungs of ...

  13. Modelo del Costo Basado en la Actividad aplicado a consultas por trazadores de enfermedades cardiovasculares Activity-based cost model applied to tracer cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia A. Marteau

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Hacer un análisis de costos, de la atención médica en consultas externas, mediante la metodología del Costo Basado en la Actividad (ABC, por sus siglas en inglés y en relación con eventos trazadores de enfermedades cardiovasculares de origen isquémico en las instituciones del sector público. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: El estudio se basó en consultas por enfermedades o eventos trazadores (n=290 y no trazadores (n=1 710, de una muestra de 2 000 consultas de primera vez de un hospital zonal general de agudos (San Roque de Gonnet, de la provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina, y se realizó de abril a octubre de 1998. El costo se evaluó con la metodología del ABC. RESULTADOS: El mejoramiento de las actividades de atención en el servicio de Clínica Médica conllevaría un ahorro sustancial en los costos indirectos, equivalente a un porcentaje promedio de 7.11 sobre los productos definidos como consultas por hipertensión arterial (HTA, dislipidemia y diabetes. El ahorro total en el costo unitario por producto que se produciría si se eliminaran las actividades mencionadas, estaría en el orden de 11.78% para el producto HTA, de 13.96% para dislipidemia, de 19.05% para diabetes y de 11.45% para las enfermedades no trazadores. Se asignó o se gastó ineficientemente 66.26% de los costos totales indirectos correspondientes al producto dislipidemia y 61.80% de los correspondientes a diabetes. El costo unitario total de las consultas en el servicio de Clínica Médica, según el método tradicional, es de $22.98, valor que en algunos casos está muy por debajo del costo obtenido a partir del método ABC aplicado en este estudio. CONCLUSIONES: Es necesario trabajar en el rediseño del proceso de atención para evaluar las actividades que no agreguen valor al mismo; éstas únicamente generan molestias y demoras al paciente y provocan ineficiencias en el sistema, dado que se asignan recursos a actividades que no optimizan la gestión y, como

  14. The Apoe(-/-) mouse model: a suitable model to study cardiovascular and respiratory diseases in the context of cigarette smoke exposure and harm reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Sasso, Giuseppe; Schlage, Walter K; Boué, Stéphanie; Veljkovic, Emilija; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe(-/-)) mice display poor lipoprotein clearance with subsequent accumulation of cholesterol ester-enriched particles in the blood, which promote the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Therefore, the Apoe(-/-) mouse model is well established for the study of human atherosclerosis. The systemic proinflammatory status of Apoe(-/-) mice also makes them good candidates for studying chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, characterized by pulmonary inflammation, airway obstruction, and emphysema, and which shares several risk factors with cardiovascular diseases, including smoking. Herein, we review the results from published studies using Apoe(-/-) mice, with a particular focus on work conducted in the context of cigarette smoke inhalation studies. The findings from these studies highlight the suitability of this animal model for researching the effects of cigarette smoking on atherosclerosis and emphysema. PMID:27207171

  15. Vascularization of engineered cartilage constructs in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghartz, Marc; Gehrke, Thomas; Storck, Katharina; Staudenmaier, Rainer; Mandlik, Veronika; Schurr, Christian; Hoang, Nguyen; Hagen, Rudolf; Kleinsasser, Norbert

    2015-02-01

    Tissue engineering of cartilage tissue offers a promising method for reconstructing ear, nose, larynx and trachea defects. However, a lack of sufficient nutrient supply to cartilage constructs limits this procedure. Only a few animal models exist to vascularize the seeded scaffolds. In this study, polycaprolactone (PCL)-based polyurethane scaffolds are seeded with 1 × 10(6) human cartilage cells and implanted in the right hind leg of a nude mouse using an arteriovenous flow-through vessel loop for angiogenesis for the first 3 weeks. Equally seeded scaffolds but without access to a vessel loop served as controls. After 3 weeks, a transposition of the vascularized scaffolds into the groin of the nude mouse was performed. Constructs (verum and controls) were explanted 1 and 6 weeks after transposition. Constructs with implanted vessels were well vascularized. The amount of cells increased in vascularized constructs compared to the controls but at the same time noticeably less extracellular matrix was produced. This mouse model provides critical answers to important questions concerning the vascularization of engineered tissue, which offers a viable option for repairing defects, especially when the desired amount of autologous cartilage or other tissues is not available and the nutritive situation at the implantation site is poor. PMID:25381568

  16. A WEAR MODEL FOR DIESEL ENGINE EXHAUST VALVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    The work summarized here comprises the concluding effort of a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies. It supports the development of a better understanding of advanced diesel engine designs in which enhanced power density, energy efficiency, and emissions control place increasing demands upon the durability of engine materials. Many kinds of metallic alloys are used in engines depending on the operating stresses, temperatures, and chemical environments. Exhaust valves, for example, are subjected to high temperatures and repetitive surface contacts that place demands on durability and frictional characteristics of the materials. Valves must continue to seal the combustion chamber properly for thousands of hours of cyclic engine operation and under varying operating conditions. It was the focus of this effort to understand the wear processes in the valve-seat area and to develop a model for the surface deformation and wear of that important interface. An annotated bibliography is provided to illustrate efforts to understand valve wear and to investigate the factors of engine operation that affect its severity and physical manifestation. The project for which this modeling effort was the final task, involved construction of a high-temperature repetitive impact test system as well as basic tribology studies of the combined processes of mechanical wear plus oxidation at elevated temperatures. Several publications resulted from this work, and are cited in this report. The materials selected for the experimental work were high-performance alloys based on nickel and cobalt. In some cases, engine-tested exhaust valves were made available for wear analysis and to ensure that the modes of surface damage produced in experiments were simulative of service. New, production-grade exhaust valves were also used to prepare test specimens for experimental work along with the other alloy samples. Wear analysis of valves and seats

  17. Engineering complex topological memories from simple Abelian models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, James R.; Lahtinen, Ville; Doucot, Benoit; Pachos, Jiannis K.

    2011-09-01

    In three spatial dimensions, particles are limited to either bosonic or fermionic statistics. Two-dimensional systems, on the other hand, can support anyonic quasiparticles exhibiting richer statistical behaviors. An exciting proposal for quantum computation is to employ anyonic statistics to manipulate information. Since such statistical evolutions depend only on topological characteristics, the resulting computation is intrinsically resilient to errors. The so-called non-Abelian anyons are most promising for quantum computation, but their physical realization may prove to be complex. Abelian anyons, however, are easier to understand theoretically and realize experimentally. Here we show that complex topological memories inspired by non-Abelian anyons can be engineered in Abelian models. We explicitly demonstrate the control procedures for the encoding and manipulation of quantum information in specific lattice models that can be implemented in the laboratory. This bridges the gap between requirements for anyonic quantum computation and the potential of state-of-the-art technology.

  18. Mechanical properties of Composite Engineering Structures by Multivolume Micromechanical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Novotný

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineering structures often consist of elements having the character of a periodically repeated composite structure. A multivolume micromechanical model based on a representative cell division into r1 × r2 × r3 subcells with different elastic material properties has been used in this paper to derive macromechanical characteristics of the composite construction response to applied load and temperature changes. The multivolume method is based on ensuring the equilibrium of the considered volume on an average basis. In the same (average way, the continuity conditions of displacements and tractions at the interfaces between subcells and between neighboring representative elements are imposed, resulting in a homogenization procedure that eliminates the discrete nature of the composite model. The details of the method are shown for the case of a concrete block pavement. A parametric study is presented illustrating the influence of joint thickness, joint filling material properties and the quality of bonding between block and filler elements.

  19. 3D Model Generation From the Engineering Drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaský, Jozef; Eliáš, Michal; Bezák, Pavol; Červeňanská, Zuzana; Izakovič, Ladislav

    2010-01-01

    The contribution deals with the transformation of engineering drawings in a paper form into a 3D computer representation. A 3D computer model can be further processed in CAD/CAM system, it can be modified, archived, and a technical drawing can be then generated from it as well. The transformation process from paper form to the data one is a complex and difficult one, particularly owing to the different types of drawings, forms of displayed objects and encountered errors and deviations from technical standards. The algorithm for 3D model generating from an orthogonal vector input representing a simplified technical drawing of the rotational part is described in this contribution. The algorithm was experimentally implemented as ObjectARX application in the AutoCAD system and the test sample as the representation of the rotational part was used for verificaton.

  20. RAST Model: simulation of tensiotraces to facilitate drophad engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pringuet, Philippe [Bahrain Polytechnic, BP33349, Isa Town, Kingdom of Bahrain (Bahrain); McMillan, N D; Doyle, G [Institute of Technology Carlow, Kilkenny Road, Carlow (Ireland); Smith, S R P [Physics Department, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ (United Kingdom); ONeill, M [Carl Stuart Ltd, Whitestown Business Park, Tallaght, Dublin 24 (Ireland); Riedel, S, E-mail: philippe.pringuet@polytechnic.bh [Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin (Ireland)

    2011-08-17

    Tensiography is a technique that determines the physical and chemical properties of a liquid by illuminating a growing pendant drop from within using a source fibre. Light reflected internally at the surface of the drop is recieved by a collector fibre and is converted into an electric signal called a tensiotrace, which is a graph of reflected light as a function of drop volume. The instrument obtaining this signal is called multianalyser. A numerical model that simulates tensiotraces through a raytracing analysis (RAST - Raytracing Analysis for the Simulation of Tensiotraces) of the multianalyser as been developed to define theoretically how the tensiotrace describes the physical and chemical properties of a liquid. The purpose of this study is to investigate the model as an engineering/design assistant leading to discoveries and improvements to the multianalyser.

  1. Human Factors Engineering Review Model for advanced nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major issues to emerge from the initial design reviews under the certification process was that detailed human-systems interface (HSI) design information was not available for staff review. To address the lack of design detail issue. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is performing the design certification reviews based on a design process plan which describes the human factors engineering (HFE) program elements that are necessary and sufficient to develop an acceptable detailed design specification. Since the review of a design process is unprecedented in the nuclear industry. The criteria for review are not addressed by current regulations or guidance documents and. therefore, had to be developed. Thus, an HFE Program Review Model was developed. This paper will describe the model's rationale, scope, objectives, development, general characteristics. and application

  2. Evaluating model of frozen soil environment change under engineering actions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Qingbai(吴青柏); ZHU; Yuanlin(朱元林); LIU; Yongzhi(刘永智)

    2002-01-01

    The change of frozen soil environment is evaluated by permafrost thermal stability, thermal thaw sensibility and surface landscape stability and the quantitatively evaluating model of frozen soil environment is proposed in this paper. The evaluating model of frozen soil environment is calculated by 28 ground temperature measurements along Qinghai-Xizang Highway. The relationships of thermal thaw sensibility and freezing and thawing processes and seasonally thawing depth, thermal stability and permafrost table temperature, mean annual ground temperature and seasonally thawing depth, and surface landscape stability and freezing and thawing hazards and their forming possibility are analyzed. The results show that thermal stability, thermal thaw sensibility and surface landscape stability can be used to evaluate and predict the change of frozen soil environment under human engineering action.

  3. A content-oriented model for science exhibit engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Recently, science museums have begun to review their educational purposes and redesign their pedagogies. At the most basic level, this entails accounting for the performance of individual exhibits, and indeed, in some cases, research indicates shortcomings in exhibit design: While often successful...... in prompting visitors to carry out intended actions, exhibits do not necessarily promote the intended interpretations of these actions among visitors. Here, the notion of praxeology from didactics research is suggested as a model to remedy this shortcoming. The suggested role of praxeology is twofold......: as a means to operationalize the link between exhibit features and visitor activities; and as a template to transform scientists’ practices in the research context into visitors’ activities in the exhibit context. The resulting model of science exhibit engineering is presented and exemplified, and its...

  4. Is procrastination a vulnerability factor for hypertension and cardiovascular disease? Testing an extension of the procrastination-health model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirois, Fuschia M

    2015-06-01

    Personality is an important epidemiological factor for understanding health outcomes. This study investigated the associations of trait procrastination with hypertension and cardiovascular disease (HT/CVD) and maladaptive coping by testing an extension of the procrastination-health model among individuals with and without HT/CVD. Individuals with self-reported HT/CVD (N = 182) and healthy controls (N = 564), from a community sample, completed an online survey including measures of personality, coping, and health outcomes. Logistic regression analysis controlling for demographic and higher order personality factors found that older age, lower education level and higher procrastination scores were associated with HT/CVD. Moderated mediation analyses with bootstrapping revealed that procrastination was more strongly associated with maladaptive coping behaviours in participants with HT/CVD than the healthy controls, and the indirect effects on stress through maladaptive coping were larger for the HT/CVD sample. Results suggest procrastination is a vulnerability factor for poor adjustment to and management of HT/CVD. PMID:25804373

  5. OPTIMUM PLANNING OF EXPERIMENTS AT MODELING FUEL CONSUMPTION IN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES

    OpenAIRE

    N. Koshevoy; O. Kostenko; V. Siroklyn

    2009-01-01

    The efficiency of optimum experiments planning by cost expenses at studying the processes of fuel consumption internal combustion engines is shown. The mathematical models of these processes in different state of engine working are synthesized.

  6. Modeling and Simulation for Control of Lean-Burn Gas Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Sirum, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis a lean-burn gas engine, produced by Rolls-Royce is studied. The goal is to make an improved simulation model in Simulink for the Bergen B-gas engine by including turbocharger dynamics. And also test and investigate if an MPC controller can improve the engine's behavior compared to the current controller.First the general internal combustion engine is presented. Then a literature study concerning mathematical modeling of engines is conducted. Further, a mean value engine mo...

  7. The determination of third order linear models from a seventh order nonlinear jet engine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Rick J.; Hartley, Tom T.; De Abreu-Garcia, J. Alex

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented that demonstrate how good reduced-order models can be obtained directly by recursive parameter identification using input/output (I/O) data of high-order nonlinear systems. Three different methods of obtaining a third-order linear model from a seventh-order nonlinear turbojet engine model are compared. The first method is to obtain a linear model from the original model and then reduce the linear model by standard reduction techniques such as residualization and balancing. The second method is to identify directly a third-order linear model by recursive least-squares parameter estimation using I/O data of the original model. The third method is to obtain a reduced-order model from the original model and then linearize the reduced model. Frequency responses are used as the performance measure to evaluate the reduced models. The reduced-order models along with their Bode plots are presented for comparison purposes.

  8. Establishing a predictive model for aspirin resistance in elderly Chinese patients with chronic cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian; Hao, Wei-Jun; Gao, Ling-Gen; Chen, Tian-Meng; Liu, Lin; Sun, Yu-Fa; Hu, Guo-Liang; Hu, Yi-Xin; Fan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistance to anti-platelet therapy is detrimental to patients. Our aim was to establish a predictive model for aspirin resistance to identify high-risk patients and to propose appropriate intervention. Methods Elderly patients (n = 1130) with stable chronic coronary heart disease who were taking aspirin (75 mg) for > 2 months were included. Details of their basic characteristics, laboratory test results, and medications were collected. Logistic regression analysis was performed to establish a predictive model for aspirin resistance. Risk score was finally established according to coefficient B and type of variables in logistic regression. The Hosmer–Lemeshow (HL) test and receiver operating characteristic curves were performed to respectively test the calibration and discrimination of the model. Results Seven risk factors were included in our risk score. They were serum creatinine (> 110 μmol/L, score of 1); fasting blood glucose (> 7.0 mmol/L, score of 1); hyperlipidemia (score of 1); number of coronary arteries (2 branches, score of 2; ≥ 3 branches, score of 4); body mass index (20–25 kg/m2, score of 2; > 25 kg/m2, score of 4); percutaneous coronary intervention (score of 2); and smoking (score of 3). The HL test showed P ≥ 0.05 and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve ≥ 0.70. Conclusions We explored and quantified the risk factors for aspirin resistance. Our predictive model showed good calibration and discriminative power and therefore a good foundation for the further study of patients undergoing anti-platelet therapy. PMID:27594876

  9. Increasing pulse wave velocity in a realistic cardiovascular model does not increase pulse pressure with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, Mohammad W; Rihani, Ryan J; Laine, Glen A; Quick, Christopher M

    2012-07-01

    The mechanism of the well-documented increase in aortic pulse pressure (PP) with age is disputed. Investigators assuming a classical windkessel model believe that increases in PP arise from decreases in total arterial compliance (C(tot)) and increases in total peripheral resistance (R(tot)) with age. Investigators assuming a more sophisticated pulse transmission model believe PP rises because increases in pulse wave velocity (c(ph)) make the reflected pressure wave arrive earlier, augmenting systolic pressure. It has recently been shown, however, that increases in c(ph) do not have a commensurate effect on the timing of the reflected wave. We therefore used a validated, large-scale, human arterial system model that includes realistic pulse wave transmission to determine whether increases in c(ph) cause increased PP with age. First, we made the realistic arterial system model age dependent by altering cardiac output (CO), R(tot), C(tot), and c(ph) to mimic the reported changes in these parameters from age 30 to 70. Then, c(ph) was theoretically maintained constant, while C(tot), R(tot), and CO were altered. The predicted increase in PP with age was similar to the observed increase in PP. In a complementary approach, C(tot), R(tot), and CO were theoretically maintained constant, and c(ph) was increased. The predicted increase in PP was negligible. We found that increases in c(ph) have a limited effect on the timing of the reflected wave but cause the system to degenerate into a windkessel. Changes in PP can therefore be attributed to a decrease in C(tot). PMID:22561301

  10. Functional data analytic approach of modeling ECG T-wave shape to measure cardiovascular behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Yingchun; 10.1214/09-AOAS273

    2010-01-01

    The T-wave of an electrocardiogram (ECG) represents the ventricular repolarization that is critical in restoration of the heart muscle to a pre-contractile state prior to the next beat. Alterations in the T-wave reflect various cardiac conditions; and links between abnormal (prolonged) ventricular repolarization and malignant arrhythmias have been documented. Cardiac safety testing prior to approval of any new drug currently relies on two points of the ECG waveform: onset of the Q-wave and termination of the T-wave; and only a few beats are measured. Using functional data analysis, a statistical approach extracts a common shape for each subject (reference curve) from a sequence of beats, and then models the deviation of each curve in the sequence from that reference curve as a four-dimensional vector. The representation can be used to distinguish differences between beats or to model shape changes in a subject's T-wave over time. This model provides physically interpretable parameters characterizing T-wave sh...

  11. [Models for calculating risks as a tool in screening for cardiovascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryndorf, T E; Petersen, H H; Baastrup, A; Bremmelgaard, A; Videbaek, J

    1990-04-16

    In connection with screening for risk factors for ischaemic heart disease in Bispebjerg Hospital, we have assessed three different models for calculation of the risk, employed on our own material. A total of 462 persons participated in the screening and 275 of these were under the age of 65 years. Out of these 275, 92 had plasma cholesterol values over or equal to 7.0 mmol/l and or smoked over 20 gram tobacco daily. On comparison between three models for calculation of the risk: one American, one British and one Swedish, moderate agreement was observed: the correlation coefficients varied between 0.75 and 0.89. The reason for this may be that the models for calculation of the risk are constructed on the basis of statistics already described from epidemiological investigations in which coincidence is demonstrated between selected observable factors and ischaemic heart disease. It is thus possible that the factors which we measure and possibly attempt to influence are not pathogenetic. We consider, therefore, that risk scoring should be employed with caution. As causal connection between ischaemic heart disease and cholesterol and smoking, respectively, have been demonstrated with reasonable certainty, we consider that it is reasonable to screen and intervene for these factors alone. PMID:2330641

  12. Cardiovascular group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  13. Model-Based Engineering and Manufacturing CAD/CAM Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domm, T.D.; Underwood, R.S.

    1999-04-26

    The Benehmark Project was created from a desire to identify best practices and improve the overall efficiency and performance of the Y-12 Plant's systems and personnel supprting the manufacturing mission. The mission of the benchmark team was to search out industry leaders in manufacturing and evaluate lheir engineering practices and processes to determine direction and focus fm Y-12 modmizadon efforts. The companies visited included several large established companies and anew, small, high-tech machining firm. As a result of this efforL changes are recommended that will enable Y-12 to become a more responsive cost-effective manufacturing facility capable of suppordng the needs of the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NW@) and Work Fw Others into the 21' century. The benchmark team identified key areas of interest, both focused and gencml. The focus arm included Human Resources, Information Management, Manufacturing Software Tools, and Standarda/ Policies and Practices. Areas of general interest included Inhstructure, Computer Platforms and Networking, and Organizational Structure. The method for obtaining the desired information in these areas centered on the creation of a benchmark questionnaire. The questionnaire was used throughout each of the visits as the basis for information gathering. The results of this benchmark showed that all companies are moving in the direction of model-based engineering and manufacturing. There was evidence that many companies are trying to grasp how to manage current and legacy data. In terms of engineering design software tools, the companies contacted were using both 3-D solid modeling and surfaced Wire-frame models. The manufacturing computer tools were varie4 with most companies using more than one software product to generate machining data and none currently performing model-based manufacturing (MBM) ftom a common medel. The majority of companies were closer to identifying or using a single computer-aided design (CAD) system

  14. Model-Based Engineering and Manufacturing CAD/CAM Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Benehmark Project was created from a desire to identify best practices and improve the overall efficiency and performance of the Y-12 Plant's systems and personnel supporting the manufacturing mission. The mission of the benchmark team was to search out industry leaders in manufacturing and evaluate their engineering practices and processes to determine direction and focus fm Y-12 modmizadon efforts. The companies visited included several large established companies and anew, small, high-tech machining firm. As a result of this effort changes are recommended that will enable Y-12 to become a more responsive cost-effective manufacturing facility capable of suppording the needs of the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NW at sign) and Work Fw Others into the 21' century. The benchmark team identified key areas of interest, both focused and gencml. The focus arm included Human Resources, Information Management, Manufacturing Software Tools, and Standarda/ Policies and Practices. Areas of general interest included Inhstructure, Computer Platforms and Networking, and Organizational Structure. The method for obtaining the desired information in these areas centered on the creation of a benchmark questionnaire. The questionnaire was used throughout each of the visits as the basis for information gathering. The results of this benchmark showed that all companies are moving in the direction of model-based engineering and manufacturing. There was evidence that many companies are trying to grasp how to manage current and legacy data. In terms of engineering design software tools, the companies contacted were using both 3-D solid modeling and surfaced Wire-frame models. The manufacturing computer tools were varie4 with most companies using more than one software product to generate machining data and none currently performing model-based manufacturing (MBM) ftom a common medel. The majority of companies were closer to identifying or using a single computer-aided design (CAD) system

  15. Modelling of fuel spray and combustion in diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huttunen, M.T.; Kaario, O.T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Fuel spray and air motion characteristics and combustion in direct injection (DI) diesel engines was studied using computational models of the commercial CFD-code FIRE. Physical subprocesses modelled included Lagrangian spray droplet movement and behaviour (atomisation, evaporation and interaction of spray droplets) and combustion of evaporated liquid spray in the gas phase. Fuel vapour combustion rate was described by the model of Magnussen and Hjertager. The standard k,{epsilon}-model was used for turbulence. In order to be able to predict combustion accurately, the fuel spray penetration should be predicted with reasonable accuracy. In this study, the standard drag coefficient had to be reduced in order to match the computed penetration to the measured one. In addition, the constants in the submodel describing droplet breakup also needed to be adjusted for closer agreement with the measurements. The characteristic time scale of fuel consumption rate k/C{sub R} {epsilon} strongly influenced the heat release and in-cylinder pressure. With a value around 2.0 to 5.0 for C{sub R}, the computed in-cylinder pressure during the compression stroke agreed quite well with the measurements. On the other hand, the in-cylinder pressure was underpredicted during the expansion stroke. This is partly due to the fact that hydrocarbon fuel combustion was modelled as a one-step reaction reading to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O and inadequate description of the mixing of reactants and combustion products. (author) 16 refs.

  16. Cardiovascular disease-related parameters and oxidative stress in SHROB rats, a model for metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Molinar-Toribio

    Full Text Available SHROB rats have been suggested as a model for metabolic syndrome (MetS as a situation prior to the onset of CVD or type-2 diabetes, but information on descriptive biochemical parameters for this model is limited. Here, we extensively evaluate parameters related to CVD and oxidative stress (OS in SHROB rats. SHROB rats were monitored for 15 weeks and compared to a control group of Wistar rats. Body weight was recorded weekly. At the end of the study, parameters related to CVD and OS were evaluated in plasma, urine and different organs. SHROB rats presented statistically significant differences from Wistar rats in CVD risk factors: total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, apoA1, apoB100, abdominal fat, insulin, blood pressure, C-reactive protein, ICAM-1 and PAI-1. In adipose tissue, liver and brain, the endogenous antioxidant systems were activated, yet there was no significant oxidative damage to lipids (MDA or proteins (carbonylation. We conclude that SHROB rats present significant alterations in parameters related to inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, thrombotic activity, insulin resistance and OS measured in plasma as well as enhanced redox defence systems in vital organs that will be useful as markers of MetS and CVD for nutrition interventions.

  17. The zebrafish model system in cardiovascular research: A tiny fish with mighty prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kar Lai Poon

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The zebrafish Danio rerio, a tropical freshwater fish, belongs to the family of cyprinidae, which in the last 30 years has developed into a very popular model organism for studies of embryonic development and human diseases. Initially the zebrafish species has been selected on the basis of its small size of approximately 3-5 cm, its transparency during development and its high fertility, qualities first identified by George Stresinger, the founding father of zebrafish research [1]. The ability to house thousands of small fishes and the ease of screening mutations in the translucent embryos made it feasible to perform large-scale forward genetic screens in a vertebrate model organism. The abundance of eggs obtained, approximately 200 eggs per female per week, is ideal for genetic and statistical analysis. The mutagenesis screens performed in the early 1990s have led to the identification of genes important in vertebrate organogenesis in an unbiased fashion [2-3]. Many of the isolated mutants have now been fully characterized and the mutated genes mapped, as the zebrafish genome sequencing completes. The knowledge derived has led to a better understanding of the underlying genetic networks governing vertebrate development. More sophisticated phenotype-based screens have since been developed to screen for mutations in defined biological processes [4].

  18. GEO-ENGINEERING MODELING THROUGH INTERNET INFORMATICS (GEMINI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Lynn Watney; John H. Doveton

    2004-05-13

    GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through Internet Informatics) is a public-domain web application focused on analysis and modeling of petroleum reservoirs and plays (http://www.kgs.ukans.edu/Gemini/index.html). GEMINI creates a virtual project by ''on-the-fly'' assembly and analysis of on-line data either from the Kansas Geological Survey or uploaded from the user. GEMINI's suite of geological and engineering web applications for reservoir analysis include: (1) petrofacies-based core and log modeling using an interactive relational rock catalog and log analysis modules; (2) a well profile module; (3) interactive cross sections to display ''marked'' wireline logs; (4) deterministic gridding and mapping of petrophysical data; (5) calculation and mapping of layer volumetrics; (6) material balance calculations; (7) PVT calculator; (8) DST analyst, (9) automated hydrocarbon association navigator (KHAN) for database mining, and (10) tutorial and help functions. The Kansas Hydrocarbon Association Navigator (KHAN) utilizes petrophysical databases to estimate hydrocarbon pay or other constituent at a play- or field-scale. Databases analyzed and displayed include digital logs, core analysis and photos, DST, and production data. GEMINI accommodates distant collaborations using secure password protection and authorized access. Assembled data, analyses, charts, and maps can readily be moved to other applications. GEMINI's target audience includes small independents and consultants seeking to find, quantitatively characterize, and develop subtle and bypassed pays by leveraging the growing base of digital data resources. Participating companies involved in the testing and evaluation of GEMINI included Anadarko, BP, Conoco-Phillips, Lario, Mull, Murfin, and Pioneer Resources.

  19. Modelling for Control of Exhaust Gas Recirculation on Large Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Mahler; Zander, Claes-Göran; Pedersen, Nicolai; Blanke, Mogens; Vejlgaard-Laursen, Morten

    models. While literature is rich on four-stroke automotive engines, this paper considers two-stroke engines and develops a non-linear dynamic model of the exhaust gas system. Parameters are determined by system identication. The paper uses black-box nonlinear model identication and modelling from rst...

  20. Urotensin II in cardiovascular regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser D Russell

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Fraser D RussellSchool of Health and Sport Sciences, Faculty of Science, Health and Education, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiovascular function is modulated by neuronal transmitters, circulating hormones, and factors that are released locally from tissues. Urotensin II (UII is an 11 amino acid peptide that stimulates its’ obligatory G protein coupled urotensin II receptors (UT to modulate cardiovascular function in humans and in other animal species, and has been implicated in both vasculoprotective and vasculopathic effects. For example, tissue and circulating concentrations of UII have been reported to increase in some studies involving patients with atherosclerosis, heart failure, hypertension, preeclampsia, diabetes, renal disease and liver disease, raising the possibility that the UT receptor system is involved in the development and/or progression of these conditions. Consistent with this hypothesis, administration of UT receptor antagonists to animal models of cardiovascular disease have revealed improvements in cardiovascular remodelling and hemodynamics. However, recent studies have questioned this contributory role of UII in disease, and have instead postulated a protective effect on the cardiovascular system. For example, high concentrations of circulating UII correlated with improved clinical outcomes in patients with renal disease or myocardial infarction. The purpose of this review is to consider the regulation of the cardiovascular system by UII, giving consideration to methodologies for measurement of plasma concentrations, sites of synthesis and triggers for release.Keywords: urotensin II, cardiovascular disease, heart failure, hypertension