WorldWideScience

Sample records for cardiovascular disease prevention

  1. Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. Nijhuis (Rogier)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWhereas secondary prevention of cardiovascular events through risk factor modification in patients with known coronary and carotid artery disease is recognised as cost-effective, CVD prevention by drug therapy in asymptomatic individuals has shown only modest benefits and to be relativel

  2. Modelling cardiovascular disease prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Alimadad, Azadeh

    2012-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cardiovascular disease (CVD), which sits under the chronic disease umbrella, is the number one cause of death globally. Over time, we have witnessed different trends that have influenced the prevalence of CVD. One of the ways of decreasing CVD and its social costs and global fatalities is through influencing preventable CVD risk factors. Though many risk factors such as age and gender are not preventable, there are several effective behaviours...

  3. Preventing aggressive prostate cancer with proven cardiovascular disease preventive methods

    OpenAIRE

    Moyad, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been the number one cause of death in the U.S. for 114 of the last 115 years. Risk factors for prostate cancer have primarily mirrored risk proven risk factors for CVD, especially aggressive disease. Obesity, dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance, metabolic syndrome, unhealthy dietary habits or caloric excess, lack of physical activity, and inflammation are just some of these shared risk factors. The evidence also suggests proven CVD preventive measures are identi...

  4. Cardiovascular disease: primary prevention, disease modulation and regenerative therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, Sherif

    2012-10-01

    Cardiovascular primary prevention and regeneration programs are the contemporary frontiers in functional metabolic vascular medicine. This novel science perspective harnesses our inherent ability to modulate the interface between specialized gene receptors and bioavailable nutrients in what is labeled as the nutrient-gene interaction. By mimicking a natural process through the conveyance of highly absorbable receptor specific nutrients, it is feasible to accelerate cell repair and optimize mitochondrial function, thereby achieving cardiovascular cure. We performed a comprehensive review of PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Review databases for articles relating to cardiovascular regenerative medicine, nutrigenomics and primary prevention, with the aim of harmonizing their roles within contemporary clinical practice. We searched in particular for large-scale randomized controlled trials on contemporary cardiovascular pharmacotherapies and their specific adverse effects on metabolic pathways which feature prominently in cardiovascular regenerative programs, such as nitric oxide and glucose metabolism. Scientific research on \\'cardiovascular-free\\' centenarians delineated that low sugar and low insulin are consistent findings. As we age, our insulin level increases. Those who can decelerate the rapidity of this process are prompting their cardiovascular rejuvenation. It is beginning to dawn on some clinicians that contemporary treatments are not only failing to impact on our most prevalent diseases, but they may be causing more damage than good. Primary prevention programs are crucial elements for a better outcome. Cardiovascular primary prevention and regeneration programs have enhanced clinical efficacy and quality of life and complement our conventional endovascular practice.

  5. New approaches to the implementation of cardiovascular disease prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Jørstad, H.T.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the biggest contemporary health problems worldwide. To aid preventive measures, risk calculators have been developed to estimate the risk of dying of cardiovascular disease within 10 years, for use in healthy individuals. Decisions to initiate preventive measures are based on this risk (primary prevention). The Netherlands and most European countries use SCORE for this purpose. In this thesis, we show that using SCORE leads to a serious underestimation of the ...

  6. South American Guidelines for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    AH Herdy; F López-Jiménez; CP Terzic; Milani, M.; R Stein; T Carvalho; S. Serra; CG Araujo; PC Zeballos; CV Anchique; G Burdiat; González, K.; González, G.; R. Fernández; C Santibáñez

    2014-01-01

    In this document, the Inter-American Committee of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, together with the South American Society of Cardiology, aimed to formulate strategies, measures, and actions for cardiovascular disease prevention and rehabilitation (CVDPR). In the context of the implementation of a regional and national health policy in Latin American countries, the goal is to promote cardiovascular health and thereby decrease morbidity and mortality. The study group on Cardiopul...

  7. Nutritional Recommendations for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakov Henkin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lifestyle factors, including nutrition, play an important role in the etiology of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD. This position paper, written by collaboration between the Israel Heart Association and the Israel Dietetic Association, summarizes the current, preferably latest, literature on the association of nutrition and CVD with emphasis on the level of evidence and practical recommendations. The nutritional information is divided into three main sections: dietary patterns, individual food items, and nutritional supplements. The dietary patterns reviewed include low carbohydrate diet, low-fat diet, Mediterranean diet, and the DASH diet. Foods reviewed in the second section include: whole grains and dietary fiber, vegetables and fruits, nuts, soy, dairy products, alcoholic drinks, coffee and caffeine, tea, chocolate, garlic, and eggs. Supplements reviewed in the third section include salt and sodium, omega-3 and fish oil, phytosterols, antioxidants, vitamin D, magnesium, homocysteine-reducing agents, and coenzyme Q10.

  8. Preparing nurses for leadership roles in cardiovascular disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanuza, Dorothy M; Davidson, Patricia M; Dunbar, Sandra B; Hughes, Suzanne; De Geest, Sabina

    2011-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a critical global health issue, and cardiovascular nurses play a vital role in decreasing the global burden and contributing to improving outcomes in individuals and communities. Cardiovascular nurses require the knowledge, skills, and resources that will enable them to function as leaders in CVD. This article addresses the education, training, and strategies that are needed to prepare nurses for leadership roles in preventing and managing CVD. Building on the World Health Organization core competencies for 21st-century health care workers, the specific competencies of cardiovascular nurses working in prevention are outlined. These can be further strengthened by investing in the development of cultural, system change and leadership competencies. Mentorship is proposed as a powerful strategy for promoting the cardiovascular nursing role and equipping individual nurses to contribute meaningfully to health system reform and community engagement in CVD risk reduction. PMID:21762853

  9. Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease with hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierbeck, L

    2015-01-01

    Many peri- and postmenopausal women suffer from a reduced quality of life due to menopausal symptoms and preventable diseases. The importance of cardiovascular disease in women must be emphasized, as it is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in women. It is well known that female hormones...... contribute to the later onset of cardiovascular disease in women. The effect of estrogens has for decades been understood from observational studies of postmenopausal women treated with hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Later, treatment with HRT was disregarded due to the fear of side......-effects and an ambiguity of the cardiovascular advantages. Accumulating knowledge from the large number of trials and studies has elucidated the cause for the disparity in results. In this paper, the beneficial effects of HRT, with emphasis on cardiovascular disease are explained, and the relative and absolute risks...

  10. Diet and Physical Activity for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanier, Jeffrey B; Bury, David C; Richardson, Sean W

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States. One-third of these deaths may be preventable through healthy lifestyle choices including diet and physical activity. The Mediterranean diet is associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality, whereas the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan is associated with a reduced risk of coronary artery disease. Substituting dietary saturated fat with polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes, although exogenous supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids does not improve cardiovascular outcomes. There is an association between increased sodium intake and cardiovascular risk, but reducing dietary sodium has not consistently shown a reduction in cardiovascular risk. Physical activity recommendations for adults are at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity per week, 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity per week, or an equivalent combination. Increases in physical activity by any level are associated with reduced cardiovascular risk. Introducing muscle-strengthening activities at least twice per week in previously inactive adults is associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes. Inactive adults without known CVD can gradually increase activity to a moderate-intensity level without consulting a physician. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends behavioral counseling to promote healthy diet and physical activity in adults at high risk of CVD. Evidence of benefit for counseling patients at average risk is less established. PMID:27281836

  11. Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Arden R; O'Neill, Deirdre E; Graham, Michelle M

    2016-09-01

    Primary prevention of cardiovascular events in older adults is challenging because of a general paucity of evidence for safe and efficacious therapy. Furthermore, there is no validated cardiovascular risk assessment tool for older adults (≥75 years of age), yet most are intermediate-to high-risk. Assessment of cardiovascular risk should include a discussion of the potential benefits and risks of therapy, and allow for incorporation of the patients' values and preferences, functionality and/or frailty, comorbidities, and concomitant medications (eg, polypharmacy, drug-drug interactions, adherence). The best available evidence for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events in older adults is for statin therapy and blood pressure control. Statin therapy reduces the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke, although close monitoring for adverse events is warranted. Evidence does not support an association between statin therapy and either cognitive impairment or cancer. Rates of adverse effects, such as myopathy and diabetes, do not appear to be increased in elderly patients. Blood pressure control is also paramount to prevent cardiovascular events and mortality in elderly patients, although the target is debatable and should be individualized to the patient. Conversely, the benefit of antiplatelet therapy in primary prevention does not appear to outweigh the risk, and should not be recommended. Other interventions shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in elderly patients include smoking cessation, physical activity, and maintaining a normal body weight. PMID:27113770

  12. A six question screen to facilitate primary cardiovascular disease prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.V. van der Hoeven (Niels V.); M.A.J. Niessen (Maurice); E.S.G. Stroes (Erik S.G.); A. Burdorf (Alex); R.A. Kraaijenhagen (Roderik); B.-J.H. Born (Bert-Jan H.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: European guidelines on primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) recommend the SCORE risk charts for determining CVD risk, which include blood pressure and serum cholesterol as risk parameters. To facilitate cost-effective large-scale screening, we aimed to construct

  13. Aspirin overutilization for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    VanWormer JJ; Miller AW; Rezkalla SH

    2014-01-01

    Jeffrey J VanWormer,1 Aaron W Miller,2 Shereif H Rezkalla3 1Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Population Health, 2Biomedical Informatics Research Center, Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, WI, USA; 3Department of Cardiology, Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, WI, USA Background: Aspirin is commonly used for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the US. Previous research has observed significant levels of inappropriate aspirin use for primary CVD prevention i...

  14. South American Guidelines for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Herdy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this document, the Inter-American Committee of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, together with the South American Society of Cardiology, aimed to formulate strategies, measures, and actions for cardiovascular disease prevention and rehabilitation (CVDPR. In the context of the implementation of a regional and national health policy in Latin American countries, the goal is to promote cardiovascular health and thereby decrease morbidity and mortality. The study group on Cardiopulmonary and Metabolic Rehabilitation from the Department of Exercise, Ergometry, and Cardiovascular Rehabilitation of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology has created a committee of experts to review the Portuguese version of the guideline and adapt it to the national reality. The mission of this document is to help health professionals to adopt effective measures of CVDPR in the routine clinical practice. The publication of this document and its broad implementation will contribute to the goal of the World Health Organization (WHO, which is the reduction of worldwide cardiovascular mortality by 25% until 2025. The study group's priorities are the following: • Emphasize the important role of CVDPR as an instrument of secondary prevention with significant impact on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality; • Join efforts for the knowledge on CVDPR, its dissemination, and adoption in most cardiovascular centers and institutes in South America, prioritizing the adoption of cardiovascular prevention methods that are comprehensive, practical, simple and which have a good cost/benefit ratio; • Improve the education of health professionals and patients with education programs on the importance of CVDPR services, which are directly targeted at the health system, clinical staff, patients, and community leaders, with the aim of decreasing the barriers to CVDPR implementation.

  15. Evidence For and Against Dietary Recommendations to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dildy, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based dietary guidelines for the prevention of cardiovascular disease have changed significantly over the past 9 years. Now less emphasis is placed on total dietary fat and cholesterol restriction and more emphasis on restricting saturated fat. The public outcry to stop demonizing saturated fats has been around for some time. We are now hearing more agreement from medical researchers and clinicians alike, as they become aware of evidence that some saturated fatty acids are not harmfu...

  16. Is it worth offering cardiovascular disease prevention to the elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohlke, Helmut

    2013-02-01

    The question whether prevention in the elderly or in the old is still worthwhile arises frequently in clinical practice. The life expectancy (LE) of elderly persons is often underestimated and ranges for a 65-year-old European person from 17 to 23 years and for an 80-year-old from 8 and 11 years. In the elderly patients with cardiovascular disease, preventive measures are of great benefit. Smoking cessation results in substantial gains in LE and is more effective than most other interventions. Lipid lowering with statins is cost effective and the intensity of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering correlates with the risk reduction of cardiac events and stroke without increasing the risk of cancer. A quality-adjusted life year costs US $ 18,800, less than the costs of a nursing home for 1 year. Exercise training decreases cardiovascular events and improves quality of life. The benefits of the Mediterranean diet are based on a small randomized trial, which is supplemented by a large observational database. A reduction in all-cause, cardiovascular disease, and cancer mortality is highly likely. Blood pressure lowering reduces stroke and all-cause mortality above the age of 80; however, the target blood pressure should be around 150/80 mmHg or slightly lower. Annual vaccination against influenza is one of the most cost-effective methods to prolong life and should not be forgotten in patients with cardiovascular disease above the age of 65. Thus a number of options are available to add quality-adjusted life years in the elderly by adhering to the general guidelines for cardiovascular prevention. PMID:22089892

  17. Prevention of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney diseases in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    van Nielen, M; Assendelft, P.; Drenthen, T; Hombergh, P. van den; Dis, I. van; Schellevis, F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To study the attitudes and working methods of general practitioners (GPs) in primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney diseases. Methods: A questionnaire with questions about primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney diseases in general practice was sent to a representative sample of 1100 Dutch GPs. The data were analyzed using frequency tables, chi-square and ANOVA. Results: 330 GPs completed and ret...

  18. Vitamin, Mineral, and Multivitamin Supplements for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Vitamin, Mineral, and Multivitamin Supplements for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task ...

  19. Diet, nutrition and the prevention of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddy, K.S.; Katan, M.B.

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are growing contributors to global disease burdens, with epidemics of CVD advancing across many regions of the world which are experiencing a rapid health transition. Diet and nutrition have been extensively investigated as risk factors for major cardiovascular diseases

  20. The North Karelia lessons for prevention of cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina Laatikainen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: As a result of the high cardiovascular disease (CVD rates in Finland in late 1960’s, which became a source of national concern, a major community based programme for CVD prevention called the North Karelia project was established. Aim: The aim of the project was to carry out a programme of comprehensive community based interventions to reduce coronary heart disease (CHD mortality and morbidity.

    Methods: Using lifestyle modification methods and strategies for environmental change the programme aimed to reduce three main risk factors: smoking, elevated blood cholesterol and blood pressure. Several intervention settings and strategies in the community were used.

    Results: Since the 1970’s the CHD mortality in North Karelia has declined by more than 80%. Major reductions have been seen across the main three cardiovascular risk factors. Among both men and women, total serum cholesterol levels within the population declined by almost 20% and systolic blood pressure by about 10%. Smoking among men decreased from 52% to 33%, while among women a slight increase in smoking prevalence was recorded.

    Conclusions: The North Karelia project has shown that a comprehensive, determined, theory-based community program can have a meaningful and positive effect on risk factors and lifestyles. Furthermore, these changes are associated with favorable changes in chronic disease rates and the health of the population.

  1. Aspirin overutilization for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VanWormer JJ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey J VanWormer,1 Aaron W Miller,2 Shereif H Rezkalla3 1Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Population Health, 2Biomedical Informatics Research Center, Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, WI, USA; 3Department of Cardiology, Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, WI, USA Background: Aspirin is commonly used for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD in the US. Previous research has observed significant levels of inappropriate aspirin use for primary CVD prevention in some European populations, but the degree to which aspirin is overutilized in the US remains unknown. This study examined the association between regular aspirin use and demographic/clinical factors in a population-based sample of adults without a clinical indication for aspirin for primary prevention.Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was performed using 2010–2012 data from individuals aged 30–79 years in the Marshfield Epidemiologic Study Area (WI, USA. Regular aspirin users included those who took aspirin at least every other day.Results: There were 16,922 individuals who were not clinically indicated for aspirin therapy for primary CVD prevention. Of these, 19% were regular aspirin users. In the final adjusted model, participants who were older, male, lived in northern Wisconsin, had more frequent medical visits, and had greater body mass index had significantly higher odds of regular aspirin use (P<0.001 for all. Race/ethnicity, health insurance, smoking, blood pressure, and lipid levels had negligible influence on aspirin use. A sensitivity analysis found a significant interaction between age and number of medical visits, indicating progressively more aspirin use in older age groups who visited their provider frequently.Conclusion: There was evidence of aspirin overutilization in this US population without CVD. Older age and more frequent provider visits were the strongest predictors of inappropriate aspirin use. Obesity was the only significant

  2. Meditation as primary intervention strategy in prevention of cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadneshwar Khobragade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart diseases especially Hypertension, Coronary Artery Diseases (CAD and stroke are the leading causes of death all over the world. Hostility, anxiety, depression and increased reactivity to mental stress have been strongly associated with hypertension and CAD. Mental stress or anxiety causes increased sympathetic activation and poor vagus nerve control over heart. Imbalance between sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system leads to vasospasm and has been associated with Hypertension, Coronary Artery Disease and Myocardial Infarction. Psychosocial stress has also been found to be responsible for imbalance in autonomic nervous system, causing sympathetic dominance over parasympathetic leading to acute coronary events. Meditation is a process of self-contemplation and purification of mind. Practitioner of meditation brings about desirable changes in their behaviour and lifestyle. During Meditation sympathetic activity is reduced and there is parasympathetic dominance over sympathetic. During meditation and after meditation person feels calm, quiet and relaxed. Meditation causes decrease in metabolic rate. The blood pressure may come to normal or falls, pulse rate comes to normal or low, vascular spasm if any, is reduced and myocardial perfusion increase. Thus meditation helps in preventing hypertension, coronary artery disease and other cardiac events. This may be beneficial before a person gets coronary event and post-myocardial infarction. In view of the beneficial effects of meditation, it may be introduced as primary intervention strategy in preventing Cardio-vascular Diseases. We did this review study to find out: (1 Can meditation bring about desirable changes in human mind and body in post-intervention group compared to control group? (2 Its effectiveness in prevention of heart diseases like hypertension, coronary events and post-MI complications. This review included all randomised controlled trials on patients above 18 years, both

  3. Economic cost of primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngalesoni, Frida; Ruhago, George; Norheim, Ole F; Robberstad, Bjarne

    2015-09-01

    Tanzania is facing a double burden of disease, with non-communicable diseases being an increasingly important contributor. Evidence-based preventive measures are important to limit the growing financial burden. This article aims to estimate the cost of providing medical primary prevention interventions for cardiovascular disease (CVD) among at-risk patients, reflecting actual resource use and if the World Health Organization (WHO)'s CVD medical preventive guidelines are implemented in Tanzania. In addition, we estimate and explore the cost to patients of receiving these services. Cost data were collected in four health facilities located in both urban and rural settings. Providers' costs were identified and measured using ingredients approach to costing and resource valuation followed the opportunity cost method. Unit costs were estimated using activity-based and step-down costing methodologies. The patient costs were obtained through a structured questionnaire. The unit cost of providing CVD medical primary prevention services ranged from US$30-41 to US$52-71 per patient per year at the health centre and hospital levels, respectively. Employing the WHO's absolute risk approach guidelines will substantially increase these costs. The annual patient cost of receiving these services as currently practised was estimated to be US$118 and US$127 for urban and rural patients, respectively. Providers' costs were estimated from two main viewpoints: 'what is', that is the current practice, and 'what if', reflecting a WHO guidelines scenario. The higher cost of implementing the WHO guidelines suggests the need for further evaluation of whether these added costs are reasonable relative to the added benefits. We also found considerably higher patient costs, implying that distributive and equity implications of access to care require more consideration. Facility location surfaced as the main explanatory variable for both direct and indirect patient costs in the regression

  4. Mobile Phone Interventions for the Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Linda G; Beatty, Alexis; Stafford, Zoey; Whooley, Mary A

    2016-01-01

    Mobile health in the form of text messaging and mobile applications provides an innovative and effective approach to promote prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, the magnitude of these effects is unclear. Through a comprehensive search of databases from 2002-2016, we conducted a quantitative systematic review. The selected studies were critically evaluated to extract and summarize pertinent characteristics and outcomes. A large majority of studies (22 of 28, 79%) demonstrated text messaging, mobile applications, and telemonitoring via mobile phones were effective in improving outcomes. Some key factors associated with successful interventions included personalized messages with tailored advice, greater engagement (2-way text messaging, higher frequency of messages), and use of multiple modalities. Overall, text messaging appears more effective than smartphone-based interventions. Incorporating principles of behavioral activation will help promote and sustain healthy lifestyle behaviors in patients with CVD that result in improved clinical outcomes. PMID:27001245

  5. Microalgae for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, Maria Filomena de Jesus; de Morais, Alcina Maria Miranda Bernardo

    2015-03-15

    This review focuses on and discusses the primary phytochemicals present in microalgal biomass - carotenoids, phenolic compounds, antioxidant vitamins, sterols, and polyunsaturated fatty acids - and also on the exopolysaccharides, which are produced by some types of microalgae and may play a significant role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and strokes. We have listed several preclinical trials and clinical studies supporting the health benefits that most of these compounds may provide. Microalgae are very easy to grow and are not vulnerable to contaminants when grown under controlled conditions. Proper handling and growth conditions may improve the production of phytochemicals. Therefore, they may represent an excellent source of nutraceuticals and food supplements once their safety as a food supplement has been confirmed. PMID:25277945

  6. Combination pharmacotherapy to prevent cardiovascular disease: present status and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Salim; Attaran, Amir; Bosch, Jackie; Joseph, Philip; Lonn, Eva; McCready, Tara; Mente, Andrew; Nieuwlaat, Robby; Pais, Prem; Rodgers, Anthony; Schwalm, J-D; Smith, Richard; Teo, Koon; Xavier, Denis

    2014-02-01

    Combination pills containing aspirin, multiple blood pressure (BP) lowering drugs, and a statin have demonstrated safety, substantial risk factor reductions, and improved medication adherence in the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The individual medications in combination pills are already recommended for use together in secondary CVD prevention. Therefore, current information on their pharmacokinetics, impact on the risk factors, and tolerability should be sufficient to persuade regulators and clinicians to use fixed-dose combination pills in high-risk individuals, such as in secondary prevention. Long-term use of these medicines, in a polypill or otherwise, is expected to reduce CVD risk by at least 50-60% in such groups. This risk reduction needs confirmation in prospective randomized trials for populations for whom concomitant use of the medications is not currently recommended (e.g. primary prevention). Given their additive benefits, the combined estimated relative risk reduction (RRR) in CVD from both lifestyle modification and a combination pill is expected to be 70-80%. The first of several barriers to the widespread use of combination therapy in CVD prevention is physician reluctance to use combination pills. This reluctance may originate from the belief that lifestyle modification should take precedence, and that medications should be introduced one drug at a time, instead of regarding combination pills and lifestyle modification as complementary and additive. Second, widespread availability of combination pills is also impeded by the reluctance of large pharmaceutical companies to invest in development of novel co-formulations of generic (or 'mature') drugs. A business model based on 'mass approaches' to drug production, packaging, marketing, and distribution could make the combination pill available at an affordable price, while at the same time providing a viable profit for the manufacturers. A third barrier is regulatory approval for novel

  7. Childhood obesity and cardiovascular disease: links and prevention strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeau, Kristen J.; Maahs, David M; Daniels, Stephen R.; Eckel, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of pediatric obesity have dramatically increased since the late 1980s, raising concerns about a subsequent increase in cardiovascular outcomes. Strong evidence, particularly from autopsy studies, supports the concept that precursors of adult cardiovascular disease (CVD) begin in childhood, and that pediatric obesity has an important influence on overall CVD risk. Lifestyle patterns also begin early and impact CVD risk. In addition, obesity and other CVD risk factor...

  8. Chocolate and Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Xin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Consumption of chocolate has been often hypothesized to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD due to chocolate's high levels of stearic acid and antioxidant flavonoids. However, debate still lingers regarding the true long term beneficial cardiovascular effects of chocolate overall. Methods We reviewed English-language MEDLINE publications from 1966 through January 2005 for experimental, observational, and clinical studies of relations between cocoa, cacao, chocolate, stearic acid, flavonoids (including flavonols, flavanols, catechins, epicatechins, and procynadins and the risk of cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease (CHD, stroke. A total of 136 publications were selected based on relevance, and quality of design and methods. An updated meta-analysis of flavonoid intake and CHD mortality was also conducted. Results The body of short-term randomized feeding trials suggests cocoa and chocolate may exert beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk via effects on lowering blood pressure, anti-inflammation, anti-platelet function, higher HDL, decreased LDL oxidation. Additionally, a large body of trials of stearic acid suggests it is indeed cholesterol-neutral. However, epidemiologic studies of serum and dietary stearic acid are inconclusive due to many methodologic limitations. Meanwhile, the large body of prospective studies of flavonoids suggests the flavonoid content of chocolate may reduce risk of cardiovascular mortality. Our updated meta-analysis indicates that intake of flavonoids may lower risk of CHD mortality, RR = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.71–0.92 comparing highest and lowest tertiles. Conclusion Multiple lines of evidence from laboratory experiments and randomized trials suggest stearic acid may be neutral, while flavonoids are likely protective against CHD mortality. The highest priority now is to conduct larger randomized trials to definitively investigate the impact of chocolate consumption on long

  9. Mobile Monitoring and Reasoning Methods to Prevent Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego López-de-Ipiña

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available With the recent technological advances, it is possible to monitor vital signs using Bluetooth-enabled biometric mobile devices such as smartphones, tablets or electric wristbands. In this manuscript, we present a system to estimate the risk of cardiovascular diseases in Ambient Assisted Living environments. Cardiovascular disease risk is obtained from the monitoring of the blood pressure by means of mobile devices in combination with other clinical factors, and applying reasoning techniques based on the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation Project charts. We have developed an end-to-end software application for patients and physicians and a rule-based reasoning engine. We have also proposed a conceptual module to integrate recommendations to patients in their daily activities based on information proactively inferred through reasoning techniques and context-awareness. To evaluate the platform, we carried out usability experiments and performance benchmarks.

  10. Low-Dose Aspirin for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ae Jin; Lim, Hye Jin; Ro, Han; Ko, Kwang-Pil; Han, Song Yi; Chang, Jae Hyun; Lee, Hyun Hee; Chung, Wookyung; Jung, Ji Yong

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Previous trials have investigated the effects of low-dose aspirin on CVD prevention in patients with diabetes; however, patients with CKD were not examined. The role of aspirin in diabetics is controversial, and the available literature is contradictory. Therefore, we studied whether low-dose aspirin would be beneficial for patients with CKD, a group that is at high risk for CVD...

  11. Formalized Interconnected Guidelines on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Those for Management of Diabetes, Dyslipidemia and Hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peleška, Jan; Anger, Z.; Buchtela, David; Tomečková, Marie; Veselý, Arnošt; Zvárová, Jana

    24 Suppl. 4, - (2006), s. 172-172. ISSN 0263-6352. [European Meeting on Hypertension /16./. 12.06.2006-15.06.2006, Madrid] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : computer presentation * interconnected medical guidelines * cardiovascular prevention Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Disease s incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  12. Formalized 2003 European Guidelines on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and for Management of Hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peleška, Jan; Anger, Z.; Buchtela, David; Tomečková, Marie; Veselý, Arnošt; Zvárová, Jana

    Manchester : European Society of Hypertension, 2005. s. 46. [Central-European Meeting on Hypertension /3./. 13.10.2005-16.10.2005, Sopron] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : formalized medical guidelines * guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention and for management of hypertension Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Disease s incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  13. [Physical activity in basic and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieszczańska, Małgorzata; Kałka, Dariusz; Pilecki, Witold; Adamus, Jerzy

    2009-06-01

    On account of the frequency of appearing and character of atherosclerosis cardiac vascular disease, one of the most crucial elements of effective fight against it is preparation of complex preventive programs including as vast number of population as possible. Consequently, Benjamin and Smitch suggested attaching the notion of basic prevention to the standard division into primary and secondary one. The basic prevention, carrying out in the general population, should concern genetic predisposition, psychosocial factors, keeping up proper body weight, healthy eating and physical activity. Especially high hopes are connected with high efficiency, simplicity and low money-consumption of preventive activities associated with physical activity modification, which has a crucial influence on reducing negative impact of atherosclerosis hazard. The results of numerous scientific research, carried out in many countries and on various, large groups, proved undoubtedly that at the healthy adult people of both sex the systematic physical activity of moderate intensification plays an essential part in preventing CVD and decreasing the death risk because of that reason as well. Moreover, systematic physical exercises show many other health-oriented actions, thanks to which they have an influence on decreasing premature and total death rate. The risk of incidence of civilization-related diseases such as diabetes type II, hypertension, obesity, osteoporosis, tumors (of large intestine, breast, prostatic gland) and depression has decreased significantly. Unequivocally positive influence has been proved at many observations dedicated to health recreational physical activity and physical activity connected with professional work based on aerobe effort. The positive effects have been also observed at children population and senior population which is more and more numerous and the most at risk. The beneficial action of physical activity is connected with direct effect on organism

  14. The Role of Healthy Lifestyle in the Primordial Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claas, Steven A; Arnett, Donna K

    2016-06-01

    Whereas primary prevention seeks to forestall development of disease in individuals with elevated risk, primordial prevention seeks to preempt the development of risk factors. Health behaviors-characterized as "lifestyle" factors-are key interventional targets in primordial prevention of cardiovascular disease. Appropriate dietary intake, including limiting salt and saturated fat consumption, can reduce the risk of developing hypertension and dyslipidemias. Regular physical activity is associated with lower blood pressure and healthier lipid profiles. Diet and exercise are critical to maintaining weight conducive to cardiovascular health. Behavioral factors such as stress management, sleep duration, portion control, and meal timing may play a role in weight management and offer additional routes of intervention. Any smoking elevates cardiovascular risk. Although lifestyle modification programs can be instrumental in reaching public health goals, maintaining cardiovascular health should not be a matter solely of willpower. Ideally, structural and social forces should make healthy lifestyles the default option. PMID:27142061

  15. Which patients should receive aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease? An economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annemans, L.; Lamotte, M.; Kubin, M.; Evers, T.; Verheugt, F. W. A.

    2006-01-01

    Low-dose aspirin is a standard care for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Its use in primary prevention is less widely accepted, however, despite recent meta-analyses and US and European guidelines supporting its use in individuals at increased CVD risk. The aim of this study was

  16. Is the high-risk strategy to prevent cardiovascular disease equitable?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallach Kildemoes, Helle; Diderichsen, Finn; Krasnik, Allan;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Statins are increasingly prescribed to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in asymptomatic individuals. Yet, it is unknown whether those at higher CVD risk - i.e. individuals in lower socio-economic position (SEP) - are adequately reached by this high-risk strategy. Aim......: To examine whether the Danish implementation of the strategy to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) by initiating statin (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor) therapy in high-risk individuals is equitable across socioeconomic groups. METHODS: Design: Cohort study. Setting and participants: Applying individual...

  17. Preventing cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes: use of aspirin for primary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Dhaval; Ahmed, Haitham M; Michos, Erin D

    2015-03-01

    Diabetics are at high risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) and are considered a coronary heart disease risk equivalent. The utility of aspirin in primary prevention of ASCVD in diabetic patients has been widely studied and is still debated. Overall, the current evidence suggests a modest benefit for reduction in ASCVD events with the greatest benefit among those with higher baseline risk, but at the cost of increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Diabetic patients at higher risk (with 10-year ASCVD risk >10 %) are generally recommended for aspirin therapy if bleeding risk is felt to be low. A patient-provider discussion is recommended before prescribing aspirin therapy. Novel markers such as coronary artery calcium scores and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein may help refine ASCVD risk prediction and guide utility for aspirin therapy. This article will review the literature for the most up-to-date studies evaluating aspirin therapy for primary prevention of ASCVD in patients with diabetes. PMID:25676828

  18. Fruits and vegetables in the prevention of cancer and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Veer, van 't, P.; Jansen, M.C.F.; Klerk, M.; Kok, F. J.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: We quantified the public health benefit of fruits and vegetables on the prevention of cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD), using currently available human data. Design: We reviewed over 250 observational studies on cancer and CVD. Relative risks (RRs) for high versus low intake of fruits and vegetables were obtained. The preventable proportion of chronic diseases, i.e. the per cent of cases attributable to low consumption of fruits and vegetables, was estimated using three scen...

  19. The Tsim Tsoum Approaches for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Singh

    2010-01-01

    proinflammatory status of blood vessels, cardiomyocytes, liver cells and neurones; (a and (b are phenotype-related and depend on genetic, environmental and developmental factors. As such, they appear as universal markers for holistic health and these may be important in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and cancer, which is the main consideration of Tsim Tsoum concept.

  20. Role of n-3 series polyunsaturated fatty acids in cardiovascular disease prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee AH

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Andy H Lee1, Naoko Hiramatsu21School of Public Health, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; 2Laboratory of Nutritional Science, School of Human Science and Environment, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Hyogo, JapanAbstract: Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Its prevention through a healthy lifestyle and appropriate diet is important. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA therapy has shown promise in both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. This commentary discusses the nutritional role of n-3 PUFA, including its metabolism and physiological role, comparison with n-6 series PUFA, as well as complications due to deficiency. Clinical use of n-3 PUFA for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease, recommended intake, and potential adverse effects will also be examined. The available scientific evidence suggests that its supplementation and clinical use ranging from 0.4 to 1 g/day can provide tangible benefits. However, further studies are required to determine optimal dosing and the relative ratio of docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid that provides maximal cardioprotection and treatment of cardiovascular disease.Keywords: alpha-linolenic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, cardiovascular disease, fish oil, polyunsaturated fatty acids

  1. Which interventions offer best value for money in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Cobiac

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite many decades of declining mortality rates in the Western world, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. In this research we evaluate the optimal mix of lifestyle, pharmaceutical and population-wide interventions for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a discrete time Markov model we simulate the ischaemic heart disease and stroke outcomes and cost impacts of intervention over the lifetime of all Australian men and women, aged 35 to 84 years, who have never experienced a heart disease or stroke event. Best value for money is achieved by mandating moderate limits on salt in the manufacture of bread, margarine and cereal. A combination of diuretic, calcium channel blocker, ACE inhibitor and low-cost statin, for everyone with at least 5% five-year risk of cardiovascular disease, is also cost-effective, but lifestyle interventions aiming to change risky dietary and exercise behaviours are extremely poor value for money and have little population health benefit. CONCLUSIONS: There is huge potential for improving efficiency in cardiovascular disease prevention in Australia. A tougher approach from Government to mandating limits on salt in processed foods and reducing excessive statin prices, and a shift away from lifestyle counselling to more efficient absolute risk-based prescription of preventive drugs, could cut health care costs while improving population health.

  2. Theoretical rationale of community intervention for the prevention and control of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, D R

    1994-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability in the developed world, accounting for slightly more than 40% of all mortality. Along with the resultant disability of those who survive with the disease it costs the health care system in Canada approximately $17 billion on an annual basis. The known risk factors for cardiovascular disease are widespread within the population; in Canada, approximately 70% of individuals have one or more of the major risk factors. Research over the past 25 years has disclosed that a significant proportion of the cause of heart disease and its risk factors are rooted in the unhealthy habits of average living in conjunction with unfavorable physical, economic and psychosocial environments. The primary prevention of cardiovascular disease has focused on individual risk factor change combined with approaches to community organization in an effort to produce a more conducive environment for behavior change to be carried out. First-generation community programs for cardiovascular disease prevention, as illustrated by the North Karelia Project, Stanford Five City Project and others in the United States, have relied heavily on social learning theory as advanced by Bandura, from Stanford University. Second-generation prevention programs, such as the Nova Scotia Heart Health Program, have relied on these theories as well as theories of participation and community development in the prevention of major noncommunicable diseases. This paper gives an overview of the theoretical basis of community intervention programs for cardiovascular disease. Included will be a discussion of some of the various theoretical approaches used in Canada and the United States and elsewhere over the past 25 years. PMID:7919078

  3. The future of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease prevention: polyhype or polyhope?: tales from the polyera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franco, O.; Karnik, K.; Bonneux, L.G.A.

    2007-01-01

    Recently society has been witnessing the rise of a new era in the prevention and treatment of the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease: the Polyera. This new era started when a promising concept – the Polypill – was introduced by Wald et al. in 2003. The Polypill is a theoretical combinatio

  4. Self-Efficacy and Perceived Control in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carpi Ballester, Amparo; Gonzalez Navarro, Pilar; Zurriaga Llorens, Rosario; Marzo Campos, Juan Carlos; Buunk, Abraham P.

    2010-01-01

    From the Theory of Planed Behaviour (TPB), the aim of this study is to analyse the effect of self-efficacy and perceived control on intention and preventive behaviors of cardiovascular disease. To this end, 359 participants were evaluated in an empirical study. Data were analysed using the statistic

  5. Fruits and vegetables in the prevention of cancer and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, van 't P.; Jansen, M.C.F.; Klerk, M.; Kok, F.J.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: We quantified the public health benefit of fruits and vegetables on the prevention of cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD), using currently available human data. Design: We reviewed over 250 observational studies on cancer and CVD. Relative risks (RRs) for high versus low intake of fru

  6. Primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases in primary care: prove principles and persistent practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheltens, T.

    2009-01-01

    Prevention of cardiovascular diseases in clinical practice includes identification of persons at high risk, assessing the well known risk factors, proper estimation and optimal communication of CVD risk and appropriate allocation of therapies, all with the aim to ultimately improve outcomes for pati

  7. Which people should take aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozano R

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Lozano,1 Maria-Esther Franco21Pharmacy Department, 2Haematology Department, Hospital Real de Nuestra Señora de Gracia, Zaragoza, SpainDear editorA single trial, ISIS-2,1 in 1988, demonstrated the utility of daily aspirin in the setting of acute myocardial infarction, reducing the risk of vascular death by 23%. In addition, aspirin has also proven effective in the setting of acute ischemic stroke.2 Thus, for a subset of the general population, aspirin may help to prevent heart attacks and strokes. In fact, at low doses, in the range of 75 to 100 mg per day, aspirin prevents the progression of existing cardiovascular disease (CVD, including coronary heart disease, stroke and peripheral arterial disease, and reduces the frequency of cardiovascular events in patients with history of CVD,3,4 referred to as secondary prevention.Although the benefits of aspirin for secondary prevention of CVD are well known, its use in primary prevention of CVD, defined as prevention of the first occurrence of CVD for all patients without clinical CVD, including those with diabetes mellitus and those without clinical evidence of atherosclerotic disease who are at higher CVD risk, is less clear and controversial results have been obtained. In fact, the results of several studies using aspirin for primary prevention of CVD have generally shown more modest reductions of major vascular events compared with secondary prevention (12% vs 23%.3,5

  8. Israel's prevention programs and screening policies for cardiovascular disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Epstein, L

    1984-01-01

    For all four broad ethnic groups in Israel, mortality rates declined over the last decade for both ischemic heart disease (IHD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD), the first and third most important causes of death in the country. The four broad ethnic groups consist of persons born in Israel, Asia, North Africa, and Europe. Mortality data also indicate a low male to female ratio in mortality from IHD, a definite female predominance in mortality from CVD, and high mortality rates for IHD and C...

  9. [Cardiovascular disease prevention and health promotion in the French speaking community of Belgium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppieters, Y; Béduwé, C; Collignon, J L; Hubens, V; Levêque, A

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the first cause of mortality in Belgium and are a priority for the Five-year program of health promotion in the French speaking Community. It is declined in operational programs by priority thematics, including the heart health. With this framework, it appeared necessary to operationalize cardiovascular priorities. A process of systemic and participative planning was set up in order to seek operational strategies and actions, and to cover the whole population and actors concerned with these health problems. The various cardiovascular risk factors, which potentiate one another, are approached together and in a global way. Upstream to the risk factors, social health determinants play an important role in cardiovascular diseases and others diseases like cancers. Tracking cardiovascular risk factors among people 30 to 75 years is also proposed. It makes it possible to identify people at risk and to put forward individual and adapted measures. The plan integrates actions of health promotion (acting on the health determinants and factors which influence them) as well as actions aiming at improving tracking and the accompaniment of the patients in secondary and tertiary prevention. Actions on health determinants and the factors influencing them present moreover the advantage of being often common to many chronic diseases. PMID:20687443

  10. Antioxidant Vitamins and Their Use in Preventing Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Levy

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis remains one of the leading causes of death in Western populations. Subsequent to the discovery that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, vitamins C and E, along with other antioxidants, were studied as potential therapies for the disease. However, while in vitro and in vivo studies showed promising antiatherogenic effects for vitamins C and E, clinical trials in which patients were given high doses of vitamin E or C showed no benefit and even possible harm. This review will attempt to summarize the known mechanistic data regarding the biochemical effects of vitamins C and E and their relevance to atherosclerosis, and offer an explanation for the failure of clinical trials to show that supplementation with these vitamins provides any benefit when given indiscriminately. We provide one example of how pharmacogenomics may be used to identify a sub-population which may indeed benefit from antioxidant supplementation.

  11. Low-dose aspirin for prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ae Jin Kim

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a major risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Previous trials have investigated the effects of low-dose aspirin on CVD prevention in patients with diabetes; however, patients with CKD were not examined. The role of aspirin in diabetics is controversial, and the available literature is contradictory. Therefore, we studied whether low-dose aspirin would be beneficial for patients with CKD, a group that is at high risk for CVD.From a total of 25340 patients with CKD, 1884 recipients of low-dose aspirin (100 mg/day were paired 1∶1 with non-recipients for analysis using propensity score matching. The primary endpoint was the development of atherosclerotic CVD, including coronary arterial disease, stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. Secondary endpoints included death from any cause, bleeding events, doubling of serum creatinine, and renal death.The incidence of a primary endpoint of any atherosclerotic CVD was significantly higher in the aspirin users than in the non-users (P<0.001. Secondary endpoints, including all-cause mortality and composite bleeding events, were not significantly different between the aspirin users and the non-users. However, the doubling of serum creatinine levels (P = 0.001 and renal death (P = 0.042 were significantly associated with the use of aspirin.These results suggest that the use of low-dose aspirin in patients with CKD may have harmful consequences related to the development of CVD and renal progression.

  12. Views on primary prevention of cardiovascular disease - an interview study with Swedish GPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahlström Rolf

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General practitioners (GPs have gradually become more involved in the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD, both through more frequent prescribing of pharmaceuticals and by giving advice regarding lifestyle factors. Most general practitioners are now faced with decisions about pharmaceutical or non-pharmaceutical treatment for primary prevention every day. The aim of this study was to explore, structure and describe the views on primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in clinical practice among Swedish GPs. Methods Individual interviews were conducted with 21 GPs in southern Sweden. The interview transcripts were analysed using a qualitative approach, inspired by phenomenography. Results Two main categories of description emerged during the analysis. One was the degree of reliance on research data regarding the predictability of real risk and the opportunities for primary prevention of CVD. The other was the allocation of responsibility between the patient and the doctor. The GPs showed different views, from being convinced of an actual and predictable risk for the individual to strongly doubting it; from relying firmly on protection from disease by pharmaceutical treatment to strongly questioning its effectiveness in individual cases; and from reliance on prevention of disease by non-pharmaceutical interventions to a total lack of reliance on such measures. Conclusions The GPs' different views, regarding the rationale for and practical management of primary prevention of CVD, can be interpreted as a reflection of the complexity of patient counselling in primary prevention in clinical practice. The findings have implications for development and implementation of standard treatment guidelines, regarding long-time primary preventive treatment.

  13. DIETA Y PREVENCIÓN SECUNDARIA DE LA ENFERMEDAD CARDIOVASCULAR Diet and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Ángel Arango

    2011-01-01

    mortalidad en pacientes con angina y favorecen la recurrencia de arritmias ventriculares (B-III.Background. There is abundant evidence regarding the effects of diet as a strategy for managing cardiovascular risk factors in primary prevention, covering all types of situations and complications including a whole range of studies from cases and controls, retrospective cohorts, prospective studies to controlled random clinical trial. Objectives. Establishing evidence from recent studies and revised and updated clinical practice guidelines about secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease by dietary management. Materials and methods. Databases were electronically searched using the words «secondary prevention» and connectors «heart» and «cardiovascular risk.» Only studies whose main objective had been the reduction of new cardiovascular events were accepted. Results. A Mediterranean-type diet was shown to be associated with lower overall mortality rates, particularly due to cardiac causes. A cholesterol-reducing diet lowered the recurrent heart-attack rate and appearance of angina, as well as recurrent heart-attacks associated with omega 3 fatty acid 18 consumption (recommendations and level of evidence: B-IIa. A fish fat oil rich diet increased the risk of death and sudden death from cardiac causes in subjects suffering from angina and favored the recurrence of ventricular arrhythmias (B-III. Omega-3 fatty acids from fish and vegetables did not reduce greater cardiovascular events in patients with suitable antihypertensive, antithrombotic and dyslipidaemia (BIII pharmacological therapy. Conclusions. Mediterranean-type diets and those reducing cholesterol rich in omega-3 fatty acids probably have a favourable effect on preventing secondary cardiovascular disease (B-IIa. Such effect disappears when associated with pharmacological treatment of cardiovascular risk factors (B-III. Omega-3 fatty acids probably increase mortality in patients suffering from angina and favour

  14. Prevention and Control of Cardiovascular Disease in the Rapidly Changing Economy of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yangfeng; Benjamin, Emelia J; MacMahon, Stephen

    2016-06-14

    With one-fifth of the world's total population, China's prevention and control of cardiovascular disease (CVD) may affect the success of worldwide efforts to achieve sustainable CVD reduction. Understanding China's current cardiovascular epidemic requires awareness of the economic development in the past decades. The rapid economic transformations (industrialization, marketization, urbanization, globalization, and informationalization) contributed to the aging demography, unhealthy lifestyles, and environmental changes. The latter have predisposed to increasing cardiovascular risk factors and the CVD pandemic. Rising CVD rates have had a major economic impact, which has challenged the healthcare system and the whole society. With recognition of the importance of health, initial political steps and national actions have been taken to address the CVD epidemic. Looking to the future, we recommend that 4 priorities should be taken: pursue multisectorial government and nongovernment strategies targeting the underlying causes of CVD (the whole-of-government and whole-of-society policy); give priority to prevention; reform the healthcare system to fit the nature of noncommunicable diseases; and conduct research for evidence-based, low-cost, simple, sustainable, and scalable interventions. By pursuing the 4 priorities, the pandemic of CVD and other major noncommunicable diseases in China will be reversed and the global sustainable development goal achieved. PMID:27297347

  15. Potential Role of Polyphenols in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases: Molecular Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormaz, Juan Guillermo; Valls, Nicolas; Sotomayor, Camilo; Turner, Thomas; Rodrigo, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of mortality worldwide. It is widely accepted that oxidative stress plays a key role in their development and progression; hence oxidative damage might be abrogated by antioxidants. Polyphenols are phytochemicals showing extensively studied antioxidant properties in-vivo. Most representative sources of these compounds include fruits, greens, nuts, herbs, cocoa, tea and coffee. Epidemiological evidence suggests an association between the consumption of polyphenol-rich vegetables and the reduction of cardiovascular disease prevalence. This fact could be related to the anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic and vasodilatory effects of polyphenols. Even though these biological effects could be mainly attributed to the antioxidant activity of polyphenols, other pharmacological mechanisms should also be considered. The latter could comprise direct anti-inflammatory effects, modulation of intracellular signaling and gene expression, improvement of nitric oxide homeostasis, as well as platelet antiaggregation. However, it is noticeable that protocols of interventions to evaluate the properties of polyphenols have failed to show the same positive results reported from observational studies. At present, a controversy exists regarding the actual effectiveness of polyphenols in preventing cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, an improvement of the available knowledge about polyphenol pharmacokinetics, together with a better understanding of the mechanisms of action of these compounds, could be of great benefit. Thus, a rational support for the development of interventional designs could provide reliable evidence on the actual role of polyphenols in CVD prevention. PMID:26630919

  16. Implementation of a Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Program among School-Aged Children: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavon Young

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to test students’ knowledge of cardiovascular disease information and to determine if a carefully structured training program administered to high school students would increase their knowledge about cardiovascular disease and risk factors that are preventable. A pilot study was conducted during which fifty high school students from nine counties in the State of Mississippi were measured for their knowledge of hypertension both at baseline and after the completion of an intervention training activity. There were significant gains in knowledge between the pre-test and the post-test that the students completed. The gains in knowledge indicate that elimination of risk factors is possible if all health care and school-based prevention programs are implemented to positively impact changes in eating and physical activity behaviors. Students’ involvement in such activities could translate into significant changes in risk factors at these ages and throughout their lifetime. It is widely accepted that these behavioral changes, if sustained into adulthood, could have the potential to influence cardiovascular risk reduction.

  17. Marine microalgae used as food supplements and their implication in preventing cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimouni Virginie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Marine microalgae are photosynthetic microorganisms producing numerous bioactive molecules of interest for health and disease care such as lipids rich in omega-3 fatty acids -as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5 n-3 and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 n-3- and carotenoids (e.g., β-carotene, fucoxanthin, astaxanthin. It has already been shown that these molecules, individually used, are benefic in the prevention of diseases such as those associated with the cardiovascular risks, but also in some carcinomas. When these molecules are combined, synergistic effects may be observed. Microalgae, as a dietary supplement, can be used to study these synergistic effects in animal models in which dyslipidemia can be induced by a nutrition treatment. Different marine microalgae of interest are studied in this context to determine their potential effect as an alternative source to marine omega-3 rich fish oils, actually widely used for human health. Actually, the pharmaceutical and nutrition industries are developing health research programs involving microalgae, trying to limit the dramatic reduction of fish stocks and the associated pollution in the marine environment. The aim of this review is threefold: (1 to present research on lipids, particularly long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, as components of marine microalgae used as food supplements; (2 to present the health benefits of some microalgae or their extracts, in particular in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and (3 to highlight the role of Odontella aurita, a marine microalga rich in EPA used as food supplement with the aim of preventing cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Slow breathing and cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Chaddha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women worldwide. Much emphasis has been placed on the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. While depression and anxiety increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease also increases the risk of developing anxiety and depression. Thus, promoting optimal mental health may be important for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Like lowering blood pressure, lipids, and body weight, lowering anger and hostility and improving depression and anxiety may also be an important intervention in preventive cardiology. As we strive to further improve cardiovascular outcomes, the next bridge to cross may be one of offering patients nonpharmacologic means for combating daily mental stress and promoting mental health, such as yoga and pranayama. Indeed, the best preventive cardiovascular medicine may be a blend of both Western and Eastern medicine.

  19. Psychosocial Stress and Cardiovascular Disease Part 2: Effectiveness of the Transcendental Meditation Program in Treatment and Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Walton, Kenneth G.; Schneider, Robert H.; Nidich, Sanford I.; Salerno, John W.; Nordstrom, Cheryl K; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2002-01-01

    Psychosocial stress is a nontraditional risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality that may respond to behavioral or psychosocial interventions. To date, studies applying such interventions have reported a wide range of success rates in treatment or prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The authors focus on a natural medicine approach that research indicates reduces both psychosocial and traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease—the Transcendental Meditation (TM) p...

  20. The future of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease prevention: polyhype or polyhope? Tales from the polyera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, O H; Karnik, K; Bonneux, L

    2007-09-01

    Recently society has been witnessing the rise of a new era in the prevention and treatment of the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease: the Polyera. This new era started when a promising concept - the Polypill - was introduced by Wald et al. in 2003. The Polypill is a theoretical combination of six pharmacological compounds (a statin, three different antihypertensives, aspirin, and folic acid) that in combination could reduce cardiovascular disease by more than 80%. Although the Polypill could theoretically be a highly effective intervention, it is not yet available in the market and its effectiveness remains unproven. In the population at large, cheap prizes may come at prohibitive costs. With frail elderly and population prevalences of co-morbidity far higher than in drug trials, rare adverse effects may be frequent. In December 2004, a more natural, safer, and probably tastier alternative to the Polypill - the Polymeal - was introduced. Contrary to the Polypill, the Polymeal combined 6 different foods (fruits and vegetables, almonds, chocolate, wine, fish, and garlic) that taken together in a regular basis could cut cardiovascular disease risk by over 75%. Polyproducts from the polyera in true populations might hide unexpected polyinteractions. In the polyera, polytrials will need to establish benefits, harms, and costs. PMID:17846968

  1. Dyslipidemia Management for Secondary Prevention in Women with Cardiovascular Disease: What Can We Expect From Non-pharmacologic Strategies?

    OpenAIRE

    Whelton, Seamus; Chow, Grant V.; Ashen, Dominique; Blumenthal, Roger S.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women and the treatment of dyslipidemia is a cornerstone of secondary prevention. Pharmacologic therapy with statins can lower LDL-C by 30–50% and reduce the risk of recurrent coronary heart disease in both men and women. While significant reductions in LDL-C can be achieved with statin therapy, diet and lifestyle modification remain an essential part of the treatment regimen for cardiovascular disease. Moreover, a large proportion of th...

  2. The economics of primary prevention of cardiovascular disease – a systematic review of economic evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boluarte Till A

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the quest for public and private resources, prevention continues to face a difficult challenge in obtaining tangible public and political support. This may be partly because the economic evidence in favour of prevention is often said to be largely missing. The overall aim of this paper is to examine whether economic evidence in favour of prevention does exist, and if so, what its main characteristics, weaknesses and strengths are. We concentrate on the evidence regarding primary prevention that targets cardiovascular disease event or risk reduction. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review of journal articles published during the period 1995–2005, based on a comprehensive key-word based search in generic and specialized electronic databases, accompanied by manual searches of expert databases. The search strategy consisted of combinations of freetext and keywords related to economic evaluation, cardiovascular diseases, and primary preventive interventions of risk assessment or modification. Results A total of 195 studies fulfilled all of the relevant inclusion criteria. Overall, a significant amount of relevant economic evidence in favour of prevention does exist, despite important remaining gaps. The majority of studies were cost-effectiveness-analyses, expressing benefits as "life years gained", were conducted in a US or UK setting, assessed clinical prevention, mainly drugs targeted at lowering lipid levels, and referred to subjects aged 35–64 years old with at least one risk factor. Conclusion First, this review has demonstrated the obvious lack of economic evaluations of broader health promotion interventions, when compared to clinical prevention. Second, the clear role for government to engage more actively in the economic evaluation of prevention has become very obvious, namely, to fill the gap left by private industry in terms of the evaluation of broader public health interventions and regarding

  3. Comparison of primary care models in the prevention of cardiovascular disease - a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogg William

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care providers play an important role in preventing and managing cardiovascular disease. This study compared the quality of preventive cardiovascular care delivery amongst different primary care models. Methods This is a secondary analysis of a larger randomized control trial, known as the Improved Delivery of Cardiovascular Care (IDOCC through Outreach Facilitation. Using baseline data collected through IDOCC, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 82 primary care practices from three delivery models in Eastern Ontario, Canada: 43 fee-for-service, 27 blended-capitation and 12 community health centres with salary-based physicians. Medical chart audits from 4,808 patients with or at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease were used to examine each practice's adherence to ten evidence-based processes of care for diabetes, chronic kidney disease, dyslipidemia, hypertension, weight management, and smoking cessation care. Generalized estimating equation models adjusting for age, sex, rurality, number of cardiovascular-related comorbidities, and year of data collection were used to compare guideline adherence amongst the three models. Results The percentage of patients with diabetes that received two hemoglobin A1c tests during the study year was significantly higher in community health centres (69% than in fee-for-service (45% practices (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR = 2.4 [95% CI 1.4-4.2], p = 0.001. Blended capitation practices had a significantly higher percentage of patients who had their waistlines monitored than in fee-for-service practices (19% vs. 5%, AOR = 3.7 [1.8-7.8], p = 0.0006, and who were recommended a smoking cessation drug when compared to community health centres (33% vs. 16%, AOR = 2.4 [1.3-4.6], p = 0.007. Overall, quality of diabetes care was higher in community health centres, while smoking cessation care and weight management was higher in the blended-capitation models. Fee-for-service practices

  4. Infection and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-17

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Atherosclerosis

  5. The roles of community pharmacists in cardiovascular disease prevention and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence in the international literature forpharmacist involvement in the prevention and managementof cardiovascular disease (CVD conditions in primary care.Systematic reviews and meta-analyses have confirmed thesignificant clinical benefits of pharmacist interventions for arange of CVD conditions and risk factors. Evidence generatedin research studies of Australian community pharmacistinvolvement in CVD prevention and management issummarised in this article.Commonwealth funding through the Community PharmacyAgreements has facilitated research to establish the feasibilityand effectiveness of new models of primary care involvingcommunity pharmacists. Australian community pharmacistshave been shown to effect positive clinical, humanistic andeconomic outcomes in patients with CVD conditions.Improvements in blood pressure, lipid levels, medicationadherence and CVD risk have been demonstrated usingdifferent study designs. Satisfaction for GPs, pharmacists andconsumers has also been reported. Perceived ‘turf’encroachment, expertise of the pharmacist, space, time andremuneration are challenges to the implementation of diseasemanagement services involving community pharmacists.

  6. [Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases in diabetic patients: focus on gender difference and insulin resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, D A; Scheen, A J

    2006-10-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is widely used as antiplatelet therapy for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects appear to be different according to the studied population, with a reduction of coronary events in men and, rather, a diminution of strokes in women. Diabetes mellitus markedly increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases, with an especially elevated relative risk among women. We present a detailed analysis of the literature about the efficacy of aspirin in the primary prevention of cardiovascular complications in the diabetic population. Limited available data suggest a lower protection in the diabetic than in the non-diabetic population. A greater aspirin resistance has been suggested in diabetic patents, which might lead to the use of a higher daily dosage of aspirin in diabetic than in non diabetic patients. Whatsoever, aspirin remains the first antiplatelet agent in the diabetic population in all international guidelines of cardiovascular prevention. PMID:17209500

  7. Risk stratification in cardiovascular disease primary prevention - scoring systems, novel markers, and imaging techniques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zannad, Faiez

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to review and discuss current methods of risk stratification for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention, emerging biomarkers, and imaging techniques, and their relative merits and limitations. This report is based on discussions that took place among experts in the area during a special CardioVascular Clinical Trialists workshop organized by the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Drug Therapy in September 2009. Classical risk factors such as blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels remain the cornerstone of risk estimation in primary prevention but their use as a guide to management is limited by several factors: (i) thresholds for drug treatment vary with the available evidence for cost-effectiveness and benefit-to-risk ratios; (ii) assessment may be imprecise; (iii) residual risk may remain, even with effective control of dyslipidemia and hypertension. Novel measures include C-reactive protein, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) , genetic markers, and markers of subclinical organ damage, for which there are varying levels of evidence. High-resolution ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging to assess carotid atherosclerotic lesions have potential but require further validation, standardization, and proof of clinical usefulness in the general population. In conclusion, classical risk scoring systems are available and inexpensive but have a number of limitations. Novel risk markers and imaging techniques may have a place in drug development and clinical trial design. However, their additional value above and beyond classical risk factors has yet to be determined for risk-guided therapy in CVD prevention.

  8. [The Belgian project for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases: a model of multifactorial prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornitzer, M

    1989-01-01

    Résults are presented from the "belgian heart disease prevention project, part of the WHO european collaborative trial in the multifactorial prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD)". 19.409 men aged 40-59 yr took part; they were employed in thirty factories which formed the allocation units for a randomised controlled trial lasting 5-6 yr. The intervention package consisted largely of health education promoting a cholesterol-lowering diet, smoking cessation, weight control, physical activity, and treatment of arterial hypertension. A programme of information was supplemented by face-to-face counselling at the workplace by two physicians attached to the project. The coronary risk profile was reduced in the intervention group, compared with that in the control group, especially during the first 4 yr, by effects on serum cholesterol, number of cigarettes smoked daily, and arterial blood-pressure. Total mortality was 17.5% lower in the intervention group than in the control group (p = 0.038); coronary mortality was reduced by a non-significant 20.8% whereas CHD incidence (non-fatal myocardial infarction plus fatal myocardial infarction plus sudden deaths) was reduced by 24.5%, (P = 0.031). Non-fatal myocardial infarction (not a major end-point) was similarly reduced by 26.1% (p = 0.030). PMID:2679938

  9. Epigenetics and cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite advances in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD), this group of multifactorial disorders remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide. CVD is associated with multiple genetic and modifiable risk factors; however, known environmental and genetic influences can only...

  10. Cardiovascular disease prevention in low resource settings: lessons from the Heartfile experience in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishtar, Sania

    2003-01-01

    This paper outlines activities of the Heartfile Program in Pakistan (http://heartfile.org). The program focuses on cardiovascular disease prevention and health promotion, and includes several initiatives that encompass building policy, reorienting health services, and developing community interventions that utilize the print and electronic media and outreach at the grass-root level to incorporate social marketing approaches. Initiated by the nonprofit private sector, the program now links with major public sector primary healthcare programs, and is currently spearheading formulation of the National Action Plan on Noncommunicable Disease Prevention and Control in Pakistan. In addition, the program is being refined, validated, and packaged as a replicable model for other developing countries and in low resource settings, utilizing appropriate principles of franchising with inbuilt components sensitive to cultural and social adaptations. A review of the planning process, implementation strategy, and fund-raising experience is presented. Strategies unique to low resource settings, such as the development of cost- and time-efficient strategic alliances and partnerships, have also been highlighted. In addition, specific caveats are identified as being helpful to private sector development of chronic disease prevention programs in resource-constrained settings, and a road map to a sustainable public-private sector partnership is provided. PMID:13677429

  11. Worksite Characteristics and Environmental and Policy Supports for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in New York State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Brissette, PhD

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionWorksite policy and environmental supports that promote physical activity, healthy eating, stress management, and preventive health screenings can contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease and lower employer costs. This study examines the availability of these four categories of supports in a statewide survey of New York State worksites.MethodsIn 2002, we recruited a statewide sample of worksites in New York State with 75 or more employees to participate in a mailed survey assessing worksite policy and environmental supports for wellness and health promotion. The overall response rate was 34.8%. The analysis included data from 832 worksites.ResultsWorksite size was an independent predictor of health promotion supports with small (75–99 employees and medium-small (100–199 employees worksites reporting significantly fewer policy and environmental supports in all four categories than worksites with 300 or more employees. Worksites in which most employees were nonwhite reported fewer supports for physical activity, healthy eating, and stress management than worksites in which most employees were white. A wellness committee or wellness coordinator was associated with more health promotion supports, regardless of the size of the worksite or composition of its workforce.ConclusionWorksites with fewer than 200 employees have an increased need for assistance in establishing environmental and policy supports promoting cardiovascular health. Worksites that have a wellness committee or coordinator are better able to establish and sustain supports with the potential to improve the health of their workers.

  12. Quality of cardiovascular disease care in Ontario, Canada: missed opportunities for prevention - a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liddy Clare

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care plays a key role in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD. We examined primary care practice adherence to recommended care guidelines associated with the prevention and management of CVD for high risk patients. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of cross-sectional baseline data collected from 84 primary care practices participating in a large quality improvement initiative in Eastern Ontario from 2008 to 2010. We collected medical chart data from 4,931 patients who either had, or were at high risk of developing CVD to study adherence rates to recommended guidelines for CVD care and to examine the proportion of patients at target for clinical markers such as blood pressure, lipid levels and hemoglobin A1c. Results Adherence to preventive care recommendations was poor. Less than 10% of high risk patients received a waistline measurement, half of the smokers received cessation advice, and 7.7% were referred to a smoking cessation program. Gaps in care exist for diabetes and kidney disease as 54.9% of patients with diabetes received recommended hemoglobin-A1c screenings, and only 55.8% received an albumin excretion test. Adherence rates to recommended guidelines for coronary artery disease, hypertension, and dyslipidemia were high (>75%; however Conclusions There remain significant opportunities for primary care providers to engage high risk patients in prevention activities such as weight management and smoking cessation. Despite high adherence rates for hypertension, dyslipidemia, and coronary artery disease, a significant proportion of patients failed to meet treatment targets, highlighting the complexity of caring for people with multiple chronic conditions. Trial Registration NCT00574808

  13. Benefit-Risk Assessment of Fish Oil in Preventing Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lands, Bill

    2016-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a preventable disease, which combines two general processes: chronic vascular inflammation and acute thrombosis. Both are amplified with positive feedback signals by n-6 eicosanoids derived from food-based n-6 highly unsaturated fatty acids (n-6 HUFA). This amplification is lessened by competing actions of n-3 HUFA. Death results from fatal interactions of the vascular wall with platelets and clotting proteins. The benefits of fish oil interventions are confounded by complex details in pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, adverse events, timescale factors, topology, financial incentives and people's sense of cause and effect. Two basic aspects of n-3 HUFA that are overlooked in CVD dynamics are saturable, hyperbolic responses of the enzymes continually supplying n-6 HUFA and hard-to-control positive feedback receptor signals by excessive n-6 HUFA-based mediators. Multiple feedback loops in inflammation and thrombosis have diverse mediators, and reducing one mediator that occurs above its rate-limiting levels may not reduce the pathophysiology. Clinicians have developed some successful interventions that decrease CVD deaths in the form of secondary prevention. However, the current high CVD prevalence in the USA remains unchanged, and successful primary prevention of CVD remains uncertain. This review weighs the available evidence to help clinicians, the biomedical community and the public put the use of fish oil supplements into a balanced perspective. PMID:27412006

  14. Cardiovascular disease prevention in Ghana: feasibility of a faith-based organizational approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Karen A Abanilla

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the feasibility of using community health workers (CHWs to implement cardiovascular disease (CVD prevention programmes within faith-based organizations in Accra, Ghana. METHODS: Faith-based organization capacity, human resources, health programme sustainability/barriers and community members' knowledge were evaluated. Data on these aspects were gathered through a mixed method design consisting of in-depth interviews and focus groups with 25 church leaders and health committee members from five churches, and of a survey of 167 adult congregants from two churches. FINDINGS: The delivery of a CVD prevention programme in faith-based organizations by CHWs is feasible. Many faith-based organizations already provide health programmes for congregants and involve non-health professionals in their health-care activities, and most congregants have a basic knowledge of CVD.Yet despite the feasibility of the proposed approach to CVD prevention through faith-based organizations, sociocultural and health-care barriers such as poverty, limited human and economic resources and limited access to health care could hinder programme implementation. CONCLUSION: The barriers to implementation identified in this study need to be considered when defining CVD prevention programme policy and planning.

  15. Mediterranean versus vegetarian diet for cardiovascular disease prevention (the CARDIVEG study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Sofi, Francesco; Dinu, Monica; Pagliai, Giuditta; Cesari, Francesca; Marcucci, Rossella; Casini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Background Nutrition is able to alter the cardiovascular health of the general population. However, the optimal dietary strategy for cardiovascular disease prevention is still far from being defined. Mediterranean and vegetarian diets are those reporting the greatest grade of evidence in the literature, but no experimental studies comparing these two dietary patterns are available. Methods/design This is an open randomized crossover clinical trial including healthy subjects with a low-to-medi...

  16. Metabolic Risk: Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Patient’s Guide The number of people at risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) ... lifestyle therapies because studies suggest it will reduce cardiovascular risk. Medications to lower LDL cholesterol may be added ...

  17. Secondary prevention of renal and cardiovascular disease: results of a renal and cardiovascular treatment program in an Australian aboriginal community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Wendy E; Wang, Zhiqiang; Baker, Philip R A; Kelly, Angela M

    2003-07-01

    Australian Aborigines are experiencing an epidemic of renal and cardiovascular disease. In late 1995 we introduced a treatment program into the Tiwi community, which has a three- to fivefold increase in death rates and a recent annual incidence of treated ESRD of 2760 per million. Eligible for treatment were people with hypertension, diabetics with micro or overt albuminuria, and all people with overt albuminuria. Treatment centered around use of perindopril (Coversyl, Servier), with other agents added to reach BP goals; attempts to control glucose and lipid levels; and health education. Thirty percent of the adult population, or 267 people, were enrolled, with a mean follow up of 3.39 yr. Clinical parameters were followed every 6 mo, and rates of terminal endpoints were compared with those of 327 historical controls matched for baseline disease severity, followed in the pretreatment program era. There was a dramatic reduction in BP in the treatment group, which was sustained through 3 yr of treatment. Albuminuria and GFR stabilized or improved. Rates of natural deaths were reduced by an estimated 50% (P = 0.012); renal deaths were reduced by 57% (P = 0.038); and nonrenal deaths by 46% (P = 0.085). Survival benefit was suggested at all levels of overt albuminuria, and regardless of diabetes status, baseline BP, or prior administration of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI). No significant benefit was apparent among people without overt albuminuria, nor among those with GFR less than 60 ml/min. An estimated 13 renal deaths and 10 nonrenal deaths were prevented, with the number-needed-to-treat to avoid one terminal event of only 11.6. Falling deaths and renal failure in the whole community support these estimates. The program was extremely cost-effective. Programs like this should be introduced to all high-risk communities as a matter of urgency. PMID:12819325

  18. Modifying health behavior to prevent cardiovascular diseases: a nationwide survey among German primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sven; Diehl, Katharina; Bock, Christina; Herr, Raphael M; Mayer, Manfred; Görig, Tatiana

    2014-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a major public health concern as they are the leading cause of death in developed countries. Primary care is considered to be the ideal setting for CVD prevention. Therefore, more than 4,000 German primary care physicians (PCPs) were asked about their attitudes towards and their activities regarding the prevention of CVD in the nationwide ÄSP-kardio Study. The focus of the study was on health behavior modification. Two thirds of the participating PCPs stated that they routinely provided brief inventions to assist patients in reducing both their tobacco (72%) and alcohol (61%) consumption, to encourage them to increase their levels of physical activity (72%), and to assist them in adjusting to a more healthy diet (66%), and in achieving a healthy body weight (69%). However, only between 23% (quitting smoking) and 49% (diet modification) of PCPs felt that they had been successful in helping patients modify their lifestyles. Insufficient reimbursement, cultural diversity and a lack of time were reported to be the most problematic barriers to successful intervention in the primary care setting. Despite these obstacles, the majority of German PCPs was engaged in prevention and health behavior intervention to reduce the incidence and progression of CVD. PMID:24739770

  19. Modifying Health Behavior to Prevent Cardiovascular Diseases: A Nationwide Survey among German Primary Care Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Schneider

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases (CVD are a major public health concern as they are the leading cause of death in developed countries. Primary care is considered to be the ideal setting for CVD prevention. Therefore, more than 4,000 German primary care physicians (PCPs were asked about their attitudes towards and their activities regarding the prevention of CVD in the nationwide ÄSP-kardio Study. The focus of the study was on health behavior modification. Two thirds of the participating PCPs stated that they routinely provided brief inventions to assist patients in reducing both their tobacco (72% and alcohol (61% consumption, to encourage them to increase their levels of physical activity (72%, and to assist them in adjusting to a more healthy diet (66%, and in achieving a healthy body weight (69%. However, only between 23% (quitting smoking and 49% (diet modification of PCPs felt that they had been successful in helping patients modify their lifestyles. Insufficient reimbursement, cultural diversity and a lack of time were reported to be the most problematic barriers to successful intervention in the primary care setting. Despite these obstacles, the majority of German PCPs was engaged in prevention and health behavior intervention to reduce the incidence and progression of CVD.

  20. Integrative approaches for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarneri, Mimi; Mercado, Nestor; Suhar, Christopher

    2009-12-01

    In the United States, $2.5 trillion is spent on healthcare annually. Seven chronic diseases account for half of all this expense. Of these 7, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, stroke, and diabetes mellitus are largely preventable. Integrative cardiology programs that focus on risk-factor modification through lifestyle change combined with early detection and advanced lipid management offer a new paradigm to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:19955547

  1. DETERMINANTS OF PREVENTIVE BEHAVIOR REGARDING CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES AND RISK FACTORS IN PATIENTS WITH ESSENTIAL HYPERTENSION AND CHRONIC ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Platonov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze potential determinants of preventive behavior (PB in patients with essential hypertension (HT and chronic ischemic heart disease (CIHD, and to establish their significance and hierarchy. Material and methods. Patients with HT (n=285 and CIHD (n=223 were studied. Questioning of all patients was performed to assess the characteristics of their PB. Differentiated multivariate analysis of activity and efficacy of PB determinants was performed in HT and CIHD patients by the method of step-by-step backward logistic regression. Results. Awareness of the cardiovascular diseases (CVD and its prevention (odds ratio [OR] 6.08 as well as high level of general education (OR=2.29 were the most significant determinants of active PB in HT patients. Sufficient social support (OR=3.77, awareness of CVD and its prevention (OR=3.16 were the most significant determinants of active PB in patients with CIHD. Efficacy of PB in patients with HT and CIHD mostly depends on satisfaction of medical service (OR=10.2 and 6.63, respectively, social support (OR=6.25 and 10.5, respectively, adequate awareness of CVD and its prevention (OR, 6.92 and 6.64, respectively. Conclusion. PB activity and efficacy in patients with HT and CIHD depends on many contributing and impeding factors. Disregarding these factors can result in failure in preventive efforts at both individual and population levels.

  2. Is the high-risk strategy to prevent cardiovascular disease equitable? A pharmacoepidemiological cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallach-Kildemoes Helle

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statins are increasingly prescribed to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD in asymptomatic individuals. Yet, it is unknown whether those at higher CVD risk – i.e. individuals in lower socio-economic position (SEP – are adequately reached by this high-risk strategy. We aimed to examine whether the Danish implementation of the strategy to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD by initiating statin (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor therapy in high-risk individuals is equitable across socioeconomic groups. Methods Design: Cohort study. Setting and participants: Applying individual-level nationwide register information on socio-demographics, dispensed prescription drugs and hospital discharges, all Danish citizens aged 20+ without previous register-markers of CVD, diabetes or statin therapy were followed during 2002–2006 for first occurrence of myocardial infarction (MI and a dispensed statin prescription (N = 3.3 mill. Main outcome measures: Stratified by gender, 5-year age-groups and socioeconomic position (SEP, incidence of MI was applied as a proxy for statin need. Need-standardized statin incidence rates were calculated, applying MI incidence rate ratios (IRR as need-weights to adjust for unequal needs across SEP.Horizontal equity in initiating statin therapy was tested by means of Poisson regression analysis. Applying the need-standardized statin parameters and the lowest SEP-group as reference, a need-standardized statin IRR > 1 translates into horizontal inequity favouring the higher SEP-groups. Results MI incidence decreased with increasing SEP without a parallel trend in incidence of statin therapy. According to the regression analyses, the need-standardized statin incidence increased in men aged 40–64 by 17%, IRR 1.17 (95% CI: 1.14-1.19 with each increase in income quintile. In women the proportion was 23%, IRR 1.23 (1.16-1.29. An analogous pattern was seen applying education as SEP indicator and among subjects

  3. Lycopene and Its Antioxidant Role in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases-A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Lars; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Lowe, Gordon; Böhm, Volker

    2016-08-17

    The present review is based mainly on papers published between 2000 and 2011 and gives information about the properties of the carotenoid lycopene in chemical and biological systems and its possible role in preventing cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The main aim of this report is to highlight its role as an antioxidant, also reported are bioactive properties that may influence the development of foam cells and protection against endothelial cell damage. The paper will also examine recent observations that lycopene may improve blood flow and reduce inflammatory responses. Lycopene possesses antioxidant properties in vitro, and some epidemiological studies have reported protective effects against the progression of CVD. The oxidation of human low density lipoproteins (LDL) is a fundamental mechanism in the initiation of atherosclerosis. A beneficial role of lycopene as antioxidant in the prevention of CVD is suggested but the data are still controversial. Lycopene is believed to be the most potent carotenoid antioxidant in vitro. Tissue culture experiments and animal studies support potential cardioprotective effects for lycopene and other carotenoids in the blood. Most studies showed beneficial effects of lycopene to individuals who are antioxidant-deficient like elderly patients, or humans exposed to higher levels of oxidative stress like smokers, diabetics, hemodialysis patients and acute myocardial infarction patients. By defining the right population and combining antioxidant potentials of lycopene with vitamins and other bioactive plant compounds, the beneficial role of lycopene in CVD can be clarified in future studies. PMID:25675359

  4. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Mar 23,2016 The following statistics speak ... disease. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  5. Modified Treatment Approach Using Cardiovascular Disease Risk Calculator for Primary Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Himanshu; Schiros, Chun G; Denney, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent guidelines for preventing atherosclerotic cardiovascular events are an important advancement. For primary prevention, statins are recommended if the ten-year risk is ≥ 5% (consideration for therapy) or ≥ 7.5% (definitive treatment unless contraindication after discussion). We rationalized that a significant cohort with ten-year risk below the treatment thresholds would predictably surpass them within the recommended 4–6 year window for reassessing the ten-year risk. As a...

  6. The clinical and economic value of lovastatin in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Pradelli

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available HMGCoA-inhibitors (statins lower plasma cholesterol through interference with the rate-limiting enzyme in the endogenous synthesis process. Since their introduction in the early 90’s, the clinical attitude towards cardiovascular (cv risk reduction has evolved from the attention to single risk factors to a more comprehensive global risk evaluation, and thus the indications of statins have broadened from the secondary prevention in hypercholesterolemic patients to include primary prevention in mildly and moderately hypercholesterolemic, or even normocholesterolemic patients, provided their global cv risk is considered high (typically, an estimated major cv event probability greater than 20%. Italian drug utilization data show that a small proportion of patients who could benefit from statins do actually receive them, contributing to the persistence of the clinical and economical burden of cv disease, the leading cause of mortality; since statins have proved effective, and cost-effective, in cv prevention, a more widespread use appears desirable, but requires high investments in pharmaceutical costs. This article defines a clinical profile of lovastatin, a statin with a solid efficacy and safety record only recently introduced into the Italian market despite it has been the first to become clinically available abroad. Among available statin formulations appropriate for target cholesterol reductions up to 30%, which apply to a significant proportion of statin therapy candidates, lovastatin 20 mg is marketed at the lowest price. Although the individual response to the different statins is highly unpredictable, determining a mandatory empirical molecule- and dose-finding strategy on the single patient, from the societal point of view the choice to start with lower cost molecules, among options that on average are equally-effective, may limit initial drug investment and dampen the impact of resource waste secondary to treatment interruptions and

  7. The role of dietary fats for preventing cardiovascular disease. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak-Wegierek, Dorota; Kłosiewicz-Latoszek, Longina; Szostak, Wiktor B; Cybulska, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    At the present, there is a pandemic of chronic non-communicable disease (NCD) affecting most countries of the world. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has identified the main contributing determinants to be cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, malignant cancer and chronic disease of the respiratory system. Unhealthy nutrition, as well as other adverse lifestyle health behaviour are recognised to be part of the prime factors responsible. According to WHO guidelines, a healthy lifestyle should include substituting saturated fatty acids (SFAs) with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) together with eliminating trans-fatty acids from the diet and limiting the intake of refined carbohydrates in conjunction with increasing the consumption of fruit, vegetables, nuts and wholegrain cereal products. Recent studies on the relations between CVD prevention and dietary fats have been however unclear. The present study thus aims to provide a review of current evidence and opinion on the type of dietary fat most appropriate for preventing arteriosclerosis. The adoption of dated recommendations on the need to increase dietary PUFA in both Northern Europe and America has led to n-6 PUFAs being predominant in diets as compared to n-3 PUFAs. This disproportion may have caused mortality to rise, due to CVD, as a result of arteriosclerosis in these countries. In contrast, a traditional Mediterranean diet yields a PUFA n-6/n-3 ratio of 2:1, which is much lower than for the aforementioned northern countries. Some authors however consider that assessing this ratio is irrelevant and that decreasing n-6 PUFA may be harmful. Such differences of opinion leads to confusion in adopting an effective approach for arteriosclerosis management regarding dietary n-6/n-3 ratios. Moreover, recent studies have added much controversy to the notion that the characteristics of SFAs are responsible for arteriosclerosis. These found that replacing dietary SFAs with carbohydrates did not reduce the risk

  8. Aspirin in the prevention of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovens, Marcel Maria Christiaan

    2010-01-01

    In the first of this thesis, results are summarized of a randomised crossover trial on the effects of aspirin on markers of inflammation, coagulation and number of endothelial progenitor cells in type 2 diabetic patients without cardiovascular disease. In the second part, results of two systematic r

  9. Formalized Combined 2003 European Guidelines on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peleška, Jan; Anger, Z.; Buchtela, David; Tomečková, Marie; Veselý, Arnošt; Zvárová, Jana

    23 Suppl. 2, - (2005), s. 196. ISSN 0263-6352. [European Meeting on Hypertension /15./. 17.06.2005-21.06.2005, Milan] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : European medical guidelines * formalization of combined guidelines Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Disease s incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  10. Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals in the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Alissa, Eman M.; Gordon. A. Ferns

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is now the leading cause of death globally and is a growing health concern. Dietary factors are important in the pathogenesis of CVD and may to a large degree determine CVD risk, but have been less extensively investigated. Functional foods are those that are thought to have physiological benefits and/or reduce the risk of chronic disease beyond their basic nutritional functions. The food industry has started to market products labelled as “functional foods.” Alth...

  11. Seaweeds as Preventive Agents for Cardiovascular Diseases: From Nutrients to Functional Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana M. Cardoso

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Being naturally enriched in key nutrients and in various health-promoting compounds, seaweeds represent promising candidates for the design of functional foods. Soluble dietary fibers, peptides, phlorotannins, lipids and minerals are macroalgae’s major compounds that can hold potential in high-value food products derived from macroalgae, including those directed to the cardiovascular-health promotion. This manuscript revises available reported data focusing the role of diet supplementation of macroalgae, or extracts enriched in bioactive compounds from macroalgae origin, in targeting modifiable markers of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs, like dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, vascular inflammation, hypertension, hypercoagulability and activation of the sympathetic and renin-angiotensin systems, among others. At last, the review also describes several products that have been formulated with the use of whole macroalgae or extracts, along with their claimed cardiovascular-associated benefits.

  12. A Polypill for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: A feasibility study of the World Health Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunaratne Padma S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The feasibility of conducting a large-scale Polypill clinical trial in developing countries remains unclear. More information is needed regarding the efficacy in reducing the risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD, side effects, improvement in adherence and physician/patient "acceptability" of the Polypill. Methods We conducted an open-label, parallel-group, randomized clinical trial involving three sites in Sri Lanka that enrolled a total of 216 patients without established CVD. The trial compared a Polypill (75 mg aspirin, 20 mg simvastatin, 10 mg lisinopril and 12.5 mg hydrochlorothiazide to Standard Practice. After randomization, patients were followed monthly for three months. Pre-specified primary outcomes included reduction in systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol and estimated 10-year CVD risk. We also evaluated the recruitment process and acceptability of the Polypill by both physicians and patients. Results Patients were recruited in a six-month period as planned. Two hundred three patients (94.0% completed the treatment program and returned for their three-month follow-up visits. No safety concerns were reported. These findings suggest a high rate of patient acceptability, a finding that is bolstered by the majority of patients completing the trial (90% indicating that they would take the Polypill "for life" if proven to be effective in reducing CVD risk. Approximately 86% of the physicians surveyed agreed with and supported use of the Polypill for primary prevention and 93% for secondary prevention of CVD. Both the Polypill and Standard Practice resulted in marked reductions in systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol and 10-year risk of CVD. However, the differences between the treatment groups were not statistically significant. Conclusions We successfully completed a Polypill feasibility trial in Sri Lanka. We were able to document high acceptability of the Polypill to patients and physicians. We

  13. Traditional Dietary Recommendations for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease: Do They Meet the Needs of Our Patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Johannes Scholl

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of patients with CVD have changed: whereas smoking prevalence declines, obesity and metabolic syndrome are on the rise. Unfortunately, the traditional low-fat diet for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) still seems to be the “mainstream knowledge” despite contradicting evidence. But lowering LDL-cholesterol by the wrong diet even may be counterproductive, if sd-LDL is raised and HDL is lowered. New insights into the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and its...

  14. Cardiovascular disease risk prevention: preliminary survey of baseline knowledge, attitude and practices of a Nigerian rural community

    OpenAIRE

    Victor Maduabuchi Oguoma; Ezekiel Uba Nwose; Philip Taderera Bwititi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Knowledge and attitude are significant factors impinging on whether individuals seek healthcare service. This flows on to impact public health knowledge of prevalence of diseases, and in turn, the practice of preventive medicine. As part of the international research collaboration agenda for Prediabetes and Cardiovascular Complications Study, a preliminary survey of one of the Ndokwa communities of Nigeria has been carried out. Aim: This study was to understand the baseline knowle...

  15. Mixed methods evaluation of targeted case finding for cardiovascular disease prevention using a stepped wedged cluster RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall Tom

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A pilot project cardiovascular prevention was implemented in Sandwell (West Midlands, UK. This used electronic primary care records to identify untreated patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease then invited these high risk patients for assessment by a nurse in their own general practice. Those found to be eligible for treatment were offered treatment. During the pilot a higher proportion of high risk patients were started on treatment in the intervention practices than in control practices. Following the apparent success of the prevention project, it was intended to extend the service to all practices across the Sandwell area. However the pilot project was not a robust evaluation. There was a need for an efficient evaluation that would not disrupt the planned rollout of the project. Methods/design Project nurses will sequentially implement targeted cardiovascular case finding in a phased way across all general practices, with the sequence of general practices determined randomly. This is a stepped wedge randomised controlled trial design. The target population is patients aged 35 to 74, without diabetes or cardiovascular disease whose ten-year cardiovascular risk, (determined from data in their electronic records is ≥20%. The primary outcome is the number of high risk patients started on treatment, because these data could be efficiently obtained from electronic primary care records. From this we can determine the effects of the case finding programme on the proportion of high risk patients started on treatment in practices before and after implementation of targeted case finding. Cost-effectiveness will be modelled from the predicted effects of treatments on cardiovascular events and associated health service costs. Alongside the implementation it is intended to interview clinical staff and patients who participated in the programme in order to determine acceptability to patients and clinicians. Practical

  16. Epidemiology of Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease: Translation From Population to Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Meigs, James B.

    2010-01-01

    In the book Epidemiology of Diabetes and Its Vascular Lesions (1978), Kelly West summarized extant knowledge of the distribution and causes of diabetes. The 30 years of epidemiological research that followed have seen remarkable advances in the understanding of obesity as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and diabetes and pre-diabetes as risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Increasingly detailed understanding of these relationships has, unfortunately, been accompanied by an alarming incr...

  17. Effectiveness of programmes as part of primary prevention demonstrated on the example of cardiovascular diseases and the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korczak, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The HTA-report (HTA = Health Technology Assessment deals with the primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus type 2. In 2009 approximately 356,000 people died in Germany due to cardiovascular diseases. According to estimations about 6.3 million people are suffering from diabetes mellitus type 2. The interventions that are subsidized by the public health insurance are mainly focused on sufficient physical activities, healthy nutrition, stress management and the reduction of the consumption of addictive drugs and luxury food. Objectives: Which lifestyle-related measures and/or programmes for primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases and of the metabolic syndrome are effective? To what extent will the health status be improved by these offers? To what extent will existing health resources and skills be strengthened by these offers? Are there any differences regarding the effectiveness among the interventions with respect to different settings or subgroups? Which lifestyle-related interventions and/or programmes for primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases and of the metabolic syndrome are sustainable and cost-effective? Which outcome parameters are in the view of the contributors decisive for the evaluation of the effectiveness? In the view of the contributor are there different values between the outcome parameters? In the view of the payers and other actors are there different values between the outcome parameters? Which ethical and juridical factors have to be considered? Which social and/or socio-economic parameters influence the use of the services and effectiveness? Methods: A systematic literature research is done in 35 databases. For the period 2005 to 2010, reviews, epidemiological and clinical studies as well as economical evaluations which deal with primary prevention programmes regarding cardiovascular diseases or the metabolic syndrome are included. Results: 44 publications meet the

  18. Prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease in Ethiopia: a cost-effectiveness analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tolla, Mieraf Taddesse; Norheim, Ole Frithjof; Memirie, Solomon Tessema; Abdisa, Senbeta Guteta; Ababulgu, Awel; Jerene, Degu; Bertram, Melanie; Strand, Kirsten; Verguet, Stéphane; Johansson, Kjell Arne

    2016-01-01

    Background: The coverage of prevention and treatment strategies for ischemic heart disease and stroke is very low in Ethiopia. In view of Ethiopia’s meager healthcare budget, it is important to identify the most cost-effective interventions for further scale-up. This paper’s objective is to assess cost-effectiveness of prevention and treatment of ischemic heart disease (IHD) and stroke in an Ethiopian setting. Methods: Fifteen single interventions and sixteen intervention packages w...

  19. Cardiovascular Prevention of Cognitive Decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Jacques Monsuez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Midlife cardiovascular risk factors, including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipemia, and an unhealthy lifestyle, have been linked to subsequent incidence, delay of onset, and progression rate of Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia. Conversely, optimal treatment of cardiovascular risk factors prevents and slows down age-related cognitive disorders. The impact of antihypertensive therapy on cognitive outcome in patients with hypertension was assessed in large trials which demonstrated a reduction in progression of MRI white matter hyperintensities, in cognitive decline and in incidence of dementia. Large-scale database correlated statin use and reduction in the incidence of dementia, mainly in patients with documented atherosclerosis, but clinical trials failed to reach similar conclusions. Whether a multitargeted intervention would substantially improve protection, quality of life, and reduce medical cost expenditures in patients with lower risk profile has not been ascertained. This would require appropriately designed trials targeting large populations and focusing on cognitive decline as a primary outcome endpoint.

  20. Multifactorial intervention to prevent cardiovascular disease in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Annemarie Lyng; Christensen, Robin; Persson, Frederik;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cardiovascular morbidity is a major burden in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we compare the effect of a targeted, intensified, multifactorial intervention with that of conventional treatment of modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in pati...... The Danish Health and Medicines Authority. Dissemination will occur through presentations at National and International conferences and publications in international peer-reviewed journals. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02246257....... patients with early RA fulfilling the 2010 American College of Rheumatology European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) criteria. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The study is a prospective, randomised, open label trial with blinded end point assessment and balanced randomisation (1:1) conducted in 10 outpatient...

  1. Cardiovascular disease prevention in rural Nigeria in the context of a community based health insurance scheme: QUality Improvement Cardiovascular care Kwara-I (QUICK-I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alli Shade

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular diseases (CVD are a leading contributor to the burden of disease in low- and middle-income countries. Guidelines for CVD prevention care in low resource settings have been developed but little information is available on strategies to implement this care. A community health insurance program might be used to improve patients' access to care. The operational research project "QUality Improvement Cardiovascular care Kwara - I (QUICK-I" aims to assess the feasibility of CVD prevention care in rural Nigeria, according to international guidelines, in the context of a community based health insurance scheme. Methods/Design Design: prospective observational hospital based cohort study. Setting: a primary health care centre in rural Nigeria. Study population: 300 patients at risk for development of CVD (patients with hypertension, diabetes, renal disease or established CVD who are enrolled in the Hygeia Community Health Plan. Measurements: demographic and socio- economic data, physical and laboratory examination, CVD risk profile including screening for target organ damage. Measurements will be done at 3 month intervals during 1 year. Direct and indirect costs of CVD prevention care will be estimated. Outcomes: 1 The adjusted cardiovascular quality of care indicator scores based on the "United Kingdom National Health Services Quality and Outcome Framework". 2 The average costs of CVD prevention and treatment per patient per year for patients, the clinic and the insurance company. 3 The estimated net health care costs of standard CVD prevention care per quality-adjusted life year gained. Analysis: The primary outcomes, the score on CVD quality indicators and cost data will be descriptive. The quality scores and cost data will be used to describe the feasibility of CVD prevention care according to international guidelines. A cost-effectiveness analysis will be done using a Markov model. Discussion Results of QUICK-I can

  2. Childhood socioeconomic position, young adult intelligence and fillings of prescribed medicine for prevention of cardiovascular disease in middle-aged men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegbaum, Margit; Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Rasmussen, Jeppe Nørgaard;

    2014-01-01

    To explore the relationship between childhood socioeconomic position (SEP) and filling of medicine prescriptions for prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), with young adult intelligence (IQ) as a potential mediator....

  3. Anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol: possible role in prevention of age-related cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Csiszar, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death among the elderly in the Western world. Resveratrol (3,5,4´-trihydroxystilbene) is a plant-derived polyphenol that was shown to exert diverse anti-aging activity mimicking some of the molecular and functional effects of caloric restriction. This mini-review focuses on the molecular and cellular mechanisms activated by resveratrol in the vascular system, and explores the links between its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects, w...

  4. Cardiovascular disease risk prevention: preliminary survey of baseline knowledge, attitude and practices of a Nigerian rural community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Maduabuchi Oguoma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge and attitude are significant factors impinging on whether individuals seek healthcare service. This flows on to impact public health knowledge of prevalence of diseases, and in turn, the practice of preventive medicine. As part of the international research collaboration agenda for Prediabetes and Cardiovascular Complications Study, a preliminary survey of one of the Ndokwa communities of Nigeria has been carried out. Aim: This study was to understand the baseline knowledge, attitudes and practices of a rural community in regards to cardiovascular diseases, and behavior toward risk management. Materials and Methods: Seventy-four volunteer participants were recruited, after public lectures, through secondary school and churches in the community. The survey was done using questionnaire. The knowledge component comprised questions about educational and personal health opinion. The attitude and practice components comprised questions about exercises and visiting healthcare facilities. Occupational backgrounds were also asked. Results: It is observed that majority of the community dwellers have (1 completed at least secondary education, (2 never attended a health check-up; and (3 do not engage in physical activity in the context of exercise. Twenty of the participants indicated not being in good health, of which only 35% have attended medical check-up for their ailment. Many of those who are yet to seek healthcare service cite affordability as their reason. With specific regards to diabetes and cardiovascular risk, over 71% of the survey participants are yet to do any blood sugar and/or lipid profile tests. Conclusion: This preliminary survey indicates that although the majority of respondents have secondary education and therefore are relatively literate, there is a gap between their knowledge of ill-health versus attitude and practice toward prevention; especially cardiovascular and diabetes diseases.

  5. Triglycerides and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Varbo, Anette

    2014-01-01

    cholesterol might not cause cardiovascular disease as originally thought has now generated renewed interest in raised concentrations of triglycerides. This renewed interest has also been driven by epidemiological and genetic evidence supporting raised triglycerides, remnant cholesterol, or triglyceride......-rich lipoproteins as an additional cause of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Triglycerides can be measured in the non-fasting or fasting states, with concentrations of 2-10 mmol/L conferring increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and concentrations greater than 10 mmol/L conferring increased risk...... of acute pancreatitis and possibly cardiovascular disease. Although randomised trials showing cardiovascular benefit of triglyceride reduction are scarce, new triglyceride-lowering drugs are being developed, and large-scale trials have been initiated that will hopefully provide conclusive evidence...

  6. SUPPRESSION OF RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM TO PREVENT COMPLICATIONS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES: CURRENT "ROLES" DISTRIBUTION FROM CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGIST’S POINT OF VIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Gilyarevskiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A role of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors in cardiovascular diseases treatment and prevention is discussed. Some large randomized clinical trials are analyzed. Physical and chemical properties of drugs and its evidence base are considered among possible factors of ACE inhibitors choice. A problem of ACE inhibitor choice is also discussed in context of secondary prevention of cardiovascular complications in arterial hypertension and after myocardial infarction. It is concluded that the choice of any drug for cardiovascular disease treatment is mainly determined by its evidence base.

  7. SUPPRESSION OF RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM TO PREVENT COMPLICATIONS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES: CURRENT "ROLES" DISTRIBUTION FROM CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGIST’S POINT OF VIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Gilyarevskiy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A role of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors in cardiovascular diseases treatment and prevention is discussed. Some large randomized clinical trials are analyzed. Physical and chemical properties of drugs and its evidence base are considered among possible factors of ACE inhibitors choice. A problem of ACE inhibitor choice is also discussed in context of secondary prevention of cardiovascular complications in arterial hypertension and after myocardial infarction. It is concluded that the choice of any drug for cardiovascular disease treatment is mainly determined by its evidence base.

  8. Lifestyle in Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.O. Younge (John)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Globally, the burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is still increasing. However, in recent decades, better treatment modalities have led to less cardiovascular related deaths. After years of research, we now generally accept that lifestyle factors are the most importa

  9. Coronary artery calcification by computed tomography in epidemiological research and cardiovascular disease prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Sekikawa, Akira; Curb, J David; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Okamura, Tomonori; Choo, Jina; Fujiyoshi, Akira; Masaki, Kamal; Miura, Katsuyuki; Kuller, Lewis H; Shin, Chol; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2012-01-01

    Both American and European guidelines recommend coronary artery calcification (CAC) as a tool for screening asymptomatic individuals at intermediate risk. These recommendations are based on epidemiological studies mostly in the United States (U.S.). We review (1) the use of CAC in primary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) in the U.S., (2) epidemiological studies of CAC in asymptomatic adults outside of the U.S., and (3) international epidemiological studies of CAC. This review does n...

  10. Impact of nutrition since early life on cardiovascular prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Guardamagna Ornella; Abello Francesca; Cagliero Paola; Lughetti Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The cardiovascular disease represents the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western countries and it is related to the atherosclerotic process. Cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, obesity, accelerate the atherosclerotic process which begins in childhood and progresses throughout the life span. The cardiovascular disease risk factor detection and management through prevention delays the atherosclerotic progression towa...

  11. 74. Cardiovascular risk assessment for Saudi university employees and their families: Developing a framework for provision of an evidence-based cardiovascular disease preventative programme

    OpenAIRE

    R. Alzeidan; F. Rabiee; A. Hersi; A. Mandil

    2016-01-01

    In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the primary cause of death among adults, representing 46% of total mortality in 2014. This study’s objectives were to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs), and calculate the cardiovascular risk (CVR) among King Saud University employees and their families. Moreover, it aimed at assessing the possible effects of living in KSA on the heart health of expatriate employees and their families. A cross-s...

  12. 26. Cardiovascular risk assessment for Saudi university employees and their families: developing a framework for provision of an evidence-based cardiovascular disease preventative programme.

    OpenAIRE

    R. Alzeidan; F. Rabiee; A. Hersi; A. Mandil

    2016-01-01

    In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the primary cause of death among adults, representing 46% of total mortality in 2014. This study’s objectives were to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs), and calculate the cardiovascular risk (CVR) among King Saud University employees and their families. Moreover, it aimed at assessing the possible effects of living in KSA on the heart health of expatriate employees and their families.A cross-se...

  13. Ethical considerations in cardiovascular prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follath, F

    2009-12-01

    The fundamental values in medical ethics include the following aspects of professional conduct: (i) actions in the best interest of patients; (ii) first, do no harm; (iii) patients' right to refuse or choose treatments; (iv) fairness and equality in the distribution of healthcare resources; and (v) truthfulness and honesty (informed consent). These values have to be considered in all diagnostic steps and therapeutic decisions. They should also form the basis for discussions of potential conflicts of interest among patients, doctors, healthcare financers and politicians. Cardiovascular (CV) diseases represent the most frequent cause of death and a major healthcare problem in most regions of the world. CV prevention is therefore an important task both in individual subjects and as a means to improve health in the general population. While the merits of treatment in patients with established CV diseases, i.e. secondary prevention, are widely accepted and regarded as necessary, primary prevention with drugs in apparently healthy individuals at an increased risk of future CV events is not free of controversies. The different types of prevention envisaged also give rise to ethical questions: Should all the growing number of classical and newly recognised CV risk markers be a reason for intervention or should they be preferably used for calculating a total risk score? What are the compelling or only relative indications for anti-hypertensive, cholesterol-lowering, anti-diabetic or platelet-inhibiting drugs? Are pre-hypertension, pre-diabetes and marginally elevated cholesterol levels early diseases justifying drug treatment, regardless of the possibility that some prophylactic interventions may be associated with adverse events? Discussions also often arise concerning the role of age, gender and of non-CV co-morbidities for decisions about long-term prevention with drugs. How reliable and applicable are 'evidence-based' guidelines derived from trials in highly selected

  14. Preventing a Cardiovascular Disease Epidemic among Indigenous Populations through Lifestyle Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Stoner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the driving force behind the discrepancy in life expectancy between indigenous and non-indigenous groups in many countries. Preceding CVD many indigenous groups exhibit a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors, including overweight-obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure. In turn, modifiable lifestyle risk factors contribute to the development of this cluster of cardiometabolic conditions. Modifiable lifestyle risk factors include, but are not limited to, physical inactivity, poor nutrition, excessive alcohol consumption, and cigarette smoking. Notably, these metabolic and lifestyle risk factors are relatively simple to monitor and track. The current review will look at modifiable cardiometabolic (overweight-obesity, diabetes mellitus, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure and lifestyle (physical inactivity, poor nutrition, risky alcohol behavior, and cigarette smoking risk factors among indigenous populations from Australia (Aboriginal Australians and Torres Strait Islanders, New Zealand (Mβori and the United States (Native Americans. Discussion will focus on the causal relationship between modifiable lifestyle risk factors and cardiometabolic outcomes, as well as, simple measurements for tracking these risk factors.

  15. Place of the Community-Based Protection Projects in Preventing the Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Metintas

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The community-based protection programs constitute the essential strategy in controlling the cardiovascular diseases (CVD. The community-based protection programs were brought to the agenda in the US in early 1970s. The aim of the programs was to modify the CVD risk factors and also to reduce the morbidity and mortality of such diseases. The community-based protection programs are networks of comprehensive and integrated studies which aim at direct education of the general public, not limited to medical care, use the entire social communication networks, and which obtain support from the leaders in a public. Within the course of time, we observe that the community-based programs evolved in three generations. The goal of the first generation community-based protection programs comprised of applications that targeted the entire society, aimed at forming appropriate behavior in individuals, and contained multiple interventions. Even though the second generation community-based protection programs resembled the first one, their common points were that both were better planned and financed. The third generation community-based protection programs were adapted from the first and second ones, and are being implemented in communities with high prevalence of CVD risk factors, in city centers, in low-income societies, and in groups like school children. Consequently, the community health care policy-makers need to develop new, more effective, commonly accepted and applicable community-based protection programs for the solution of CVD issue. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(4.000: 357-362

  16. Quality indicators for the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease in primary care in nine European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campbell, S.M.; Ludt, S.; Lieshout, J. van; Boffin, N.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Petek, D.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Roland, M.O.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With free movement of labour in Europe, European guidelines on cardiovascular care and the enlargement of the European Union to include countries with disparate health care systems, it is important to develop common quality standards for cardiovascular prevention and risk management acro

  17. [Cardiovascular disease in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Bauersachs, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are among the most frequent complications in pregnancies. Among them preexisting heart diseases including congenital heart disease, genetic cardiomyopathies, myocardial infarction and chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathies display a special challenge for the mother and her physicians. Moreover, the incidence of cardiovascular disease induced by or associated with pregnancy, i.e. hypertensive disorders and peripartum cardiomyopathies, has increased over the past decades. In the present overview we explain why pregnancy is a stress model for the maternal heart and summarize the current knowledge on the influence of pregnancy on preexisting cardiomyopathies. We highlight recent advances in research with regard to hypertensive complications in pregnancy and peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). Moreover, we summarize etiologies, risk factors, pathomechanisms, diagnosis, treatment, management and prognosis. Finally, interdisciplinarity between different clinical fields and basic science is a key requirement to avoid longterm damage to the cardiovascular system induced by pregnancy associated impacts and with this improve women's health in general. PMID:26800071

  18. Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, C. David

    1988-01-01

    Reviews epidemiological studies of cardiovascular diseases especially coronary heart disease (CHD), to document their major public health importance, changes in mortality during this century, and international comparisons of trends. Finds major risk factors for CHD are determined in large part by psychosocial and behavioral mechanisms. Asserts…

  19. Depression and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Steven M; Rumsfeld, John S

    2015-10-01

    There is a wealth of evidence linking depression to increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and worse outcomes among patients with known CVD. In addition, there are safe and effective treatments for depression. Despite this, depression remains under-recognized and undertreated in patients at risk for or living with CVD. In this review, we first summarize the evidence linking depression to increased risk of CVD and worse patient outcomes. We then review the mechanisms by which depression may contribute to cardiovascular risk and poor cardiovascular outcomes. We then summarize prior studies of depression treatment on cardiovascular outcomes. Finally, we offer guidance in the identification and management of depression among CVD populations. Given that 1 in 4 CVD patients has concurrent depression, application of these best-practices will assist providers in achieving optimal outcomes for their CVD patients. PMID:25850976

  20. Significance of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Krutika Gajjar; Dr.Parloop Bhatt; Dr.Yagnik S.Bhalodia; Dr.Sizan B.Patel; Chintan Patel

    2012-01-01

    Considering the high mortality and morbidity rate associated with cardiovascular diseases, Cardiacrehabilitation (CR) is regarded for prevention and management of cardiovascular diseases. CR servicesare generally provided in an outpatient as comprehensive, long-term programs involving medicalevaluation, prescribed exercise, cardiac risk factor modification, education and counseling. This includesnutritional therapies, weight loss program management of lipid abnormalities with diet and medicat...

  1. Healthy Ageing Through Internet Counselling in the Elderly: the HATICE randomised controlled trial for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and cognitive impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Richard, Edo; Jongstra, Susan; Soininen, Hilkka; Brayne, Carol; Moll van Charante, Eric P; Meiller, Yannick; van der Groep, Bram; Beishuizen, Cathrien R L; Mangialasche, Francesca; Barbera, Mariagnese; Ngandu, Tiia; Coley, Nicola; Guillemont, Juliette; Savy, Stéphanie; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular disease and dementia share a number of risk factors including hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, smoking, obesity, diabetes and physical inactivity. The rise of eHealth has led to increasing opportunities for large-scale delivery of prevention programmes encouraging self-management. The aim of this study is to investigate whether a multidomain intervention to optimise self-management of cardiovascular risk factors in older individuals, delivered through an coach-...

  2. Application of infrared thermal imaging in the study of preventing cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases with Chinese medicine health food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ziru; Zhang, Xusheng

    2009-08-01

    To explore the assessing technique which could objectively reflect the characteristics of Chinese medicine in the prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, four balance features of infrared thermal images (ITI) corresponding to the up and down, left and right, proximal and distal balance of blood circulation of human body were studied. First, the ITI features of the middle-aged and elderly people with lipid abnormality history were compared with those of the healthy youth. It was found that the balance state of the youth was significantly better than that of the middle-aged and elderly, Ppathology basis of the influences of Shengyi on the four balance features and its relationship with the clinical outcome deserves further study. So the prospect of infrared thermal imaging is indicated as the suitable evaluation technique which could objectively reflect the whole balance regulation advantage of Chinese medicinal compounds.

  3. The role of IGF-I in the development of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus: is prevention possible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joop)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe incidence of peripheral, cerebro- and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is approximately twice as high as in the non-diabetic population. Conventional cardiovascular risk factors such as plasma lipids, lipoproteins and hypertensi

  4. In silico analysis of Progeria: A genetic disease and natural cardiovascular disorders preventive compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shraddha Mulange

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria (also known as "Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome"(HGPS is an extremely rare, severe, genetic condition wherein symptoms resembling aspects of aging are manifested at an early age. The basic objective of this study is how is it responsible for faster ageing than normal? The study of its bioinformatics aspect explaining where the mutation occurs in normal LMNA gene to form mutated Progerin. We explain its sequential and structural aspects in domain and motif. Structural visualization by Marker view software provides the linear structure of LMNA and mutated LMNA. We studied the properties and specificity of Lonafarnib (an edible drug available in market against Progerin with Docking. Cardiovascular disorders are the major symptoms occurred in Progerin patients. Therefore we found 32 natural compounds with their sources having anti cardiovascular disorders activity. We checked its docking properties and ADMET properties. From this we came to conclude 11 most effective, edible, naturally occurring compounds for cardiovascular disorders in Progerin patients.

  5. [Utility of combined therapy in the prevention and treatment of the cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, V Barrios; Cervantes, C Escobar

    2010-05-01

    Although blood pressure control is crucial in patients with hypertension, current clinical practice guidelines recommend that the goal of treatment should be aimed at not only reducing blood pressure values but decreasing global cardiovascular risk. Available data suggest that blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol control rates, two of the most common cardiovascular risk factors, are low, not only in the primary care setting but also in specialists setting. Clinical trials, such as the Anglo-Scandanavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT), have demonstrated that the integration of a multifactorial approach through the treatment of different risk factors effectively reduces the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of this review was to update the current knowledge about the combined therapy of different risk factors in the hypertensive population. PMID:20359702

  6. Doctors' knowledge, attitudes, and compliance with 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines for prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setia S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sajita Setia,1 Selwyn Sze-Wang Fung,2 David D Waters3 1Medical Affairs, Pfizer Pte Ltd, Singapore; 2Regional Medical Affairs, Pfizer Pte Ltd, Hong Kong; 3Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA Purpose: There is an unmet need for strategies to prevent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in Singapore. The main objective of this study was to investigate Singapore physicians’ response to the 2013 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association (ACC/AHA guidelines for treatment of cholesterol and their impact on clinical practice. Methods: This survey was conducted in two stages, qualitative and quantitative. Physicians were initially screened on the basis of an initial screener questionnaire, and eligible physicians were then included in the study. Results: Qualitative (n=19 and quantitative (n=66 surveys were completed by eligible physicians from Singapore. Physicians were less familiar with the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines (35% as compared with the Singapore Ministry of Health (MoH lipid guidelines 2006 (49%. Of the physicians whose opinion was sought on the ACC/AHA guidelines, more than 50% disagreed with the definition of high-, moderate-, and low-intensity statin therapy; recommendation of atorvastatin 40–80 mg and rosuvastatin 20–40 mg as medications for high-intensity statin therapy; and classification of individuals who would benefit from moderate- to high-intensity statin therapy. Most physicians assumed that Asians may be intolerant to high-intensity statin therapy. Conclusion: Although embracing the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines in clinical practice is expected to provide better clinical care to patients, our study revealed high reluctance by physicians, especially in the use of high-dose statins. However, ACC/AHA guidelines can be easily adopted in Asia as there is a wealth of data available for atorvastatin in primary and secondary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease with

  7. Realistic outcomes: lessons from community-based research and demonstration programs for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelmark, M B; Hunt, M K; Heath, G W; Schmid, T L

    1993-01-01

    Public health departments nation-wide are implementing community-based cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention programs. Many such programs are turning for guidance to three research and demonstration projects: the Stanford Five City Project, the Pawtucket Heart Health Program, and the Minnesota Heart Health Program. This article summarizes some of the lessons learned in these projects and recommends strategies for the new generation of CVD prevention programs. The core of a successful program is the community organization process. This involves identification and activation of key community leaders, stimulation of citizens and organizations to volunteer time and offer resources to CVD prevention, and the promotion of prevention as a community theme. A wide range of intervention settings are available for health promotion. As is true for the workplace, places of worship are receptive to health promotion programs and have access to large numbers of people. Mass media are effective when used in conjunction with complementary messages delivered through other channels, such as school programs, adult education programs, and self-help programs. Community health professionals play a vital role in providing program endorsement and stimulating the participation of other community leaders. School-based programs promote long-term behavior change and reach beyond the school to actively involve parents. Innovative health promotion contests have widespread appeal and promote participation in other community interventions. In the area of evaluation, health program participation rates are appropriate primary outcome measures in most community-oriented prevention programs. Other program evaluation priorities include community analysis and formative evaluation, providing data to fine-tune interventions and define the needs and preferences of the community. It is premature to comment conclusively on the effectiveness of community-based CVD prevention programs in reducing population

  8. Nuclear imaging of cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear imaging methods provide noninvasive indexes of myocardial function, perfusion, and metabolism and are well accepted in clinical cardiology. Advances in prevention and treatment of cardiac disease have resulted in decreasing cardiovascular mortality in industrialized nations. The improvement in therapeutic options has increased the demand for diagnostic tests that might guide clinical decision making. Information beyond the pure anatomic characterization of coronary stenoses is required. Nuclear imaging can be used for early detection and monitoring of the severity and extent of disease. The prognostic potential of such functional testing is being increasingly appreciated and used to guide therapy, thereby resulting in improvement of the quality and cost-effectiveness of the workup of patients with cardiovascular disease. Extensive clinical validation has resulted in growing acceptance of these techniques. Furthermore, ongoing improvement of imaging techniques and development of new radiopharmaceuticals will pave the way for disease-specific, molecular-targeted cardiac imaging in the future. (orig.)

  9. Fish Oil in Cardiovascular Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Alaswad, Khaldoon; Lavie, Carl J.; Milani, Richard V.; O'Keefe, James H

    2002-01-01

    The potential benefits of fish oil have been touted for several decades. The authors review evidence from epidemiologic, retrospective, and controlled prospective clinical trials demonstrating the effects of omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil) for the prevention of major cardiovascular events including myocardial infarction and stroke in primary and especially secondary prevention settings. Fish oil's efficacy in reducing total mortality and sudden cardiac death appears particularly promising, pro...

  10. Traditional Dietary Recommendations for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease: Do They Meet the Needs of Our Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Scholl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of patients with CVD have changed: whereas smoking prevalence declines, obesity and metabolic syndrome are on the rise. Unfortunately, the traditional low-fat diet for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD still seems to be the “mainstream knowledge” despite contradicting evidence. But lowering LDL-cholesterol by the wrong diet even may be counterproductive, if sd-LDL is raised and HDL is lowered. New insights into the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and its influence on the effects of dietary changes have led to a better approach: (1 the higher a patient's insulin resistance, the more important is the glycemic load of the diet. (2 Fat quality is much more important than fat quantity. (3 The best principle for a reduced calorie intake is not fat counting, but a high volume diet with low energy density, which means fibre rich vegetables and fruits. (4 And finally, satiation and palatability of a diet is very important: there is no success without the patient's compliance. Thus, the best approach to the dietary prevention of CVD is a Mediterranean style low-carb diet represented in the LOGI pyramid. Dietary guidelines for the prevention of CVD should to be revised accordingly.

  11. Prevention of cardiovascular disease guided by total risk estimations - challenges and opportunities for practical implementation: highlights of a CardioVascular Clinical Trialists (CVCT) Workshop of the ESC Working Group on CardioVascular Pharmacology and Drug Therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zannad, Faiez

    2011-11-03

    This paper presents a summary of the potential practical and economic barriers to implementation of primary prevention of cardiovascular disease guided by total cardiovascular risk estimations in the general population. It also reviews various possible solutions to overcome these barriers. The report is based on discussion among experts in the area at a special CardioVascular Clinical Trialists workshop organized by the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Drug Therapy that took place in September 2009. It includes a review of the evidence in favour of the \\'treat-to-target\\' paradigm, as well as potential difficulties with this approach, including the multiple pathological processes present in high-risk patients that may not be adequately addressed by this strategy. The risk-guided therapy approach requires careful definitions of cardiovascular risk and consideration of clinical endpoints as well as the differences between trial and \\'real-world\\' populations. Cost-effectiveness presents another issue in scenarios of finite healthcare resources, as does the difficulty of documenting guideline uptake and effectiveness in the primary care setting, where early modification of risk factors may be more beneficial than later attempts to manage established disease. The key to guideline implementation is to improve the quality of risk assessment and demonstrate the association between risk factors, intervention, and reduced event rates. In the future, this may be made possible by means of automated data entry and various other measures. In conclusion, opportunities exist to increase guideline implementation in the primary care setting, with potential benefits for both the general population and healthcare resources.

  12. Clinical Preventive Services for Patients at Risk for Cardiovascular Disease, National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2005-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula W. Yoon, ScD, MPH

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionClinical preventive services can detect diseases early, when they are most treatable, but these services may not be provided as recommended. Assessing the provision of services to patients at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD could help identify disparities and areas for improvement.MethodsWe used data on patient visits (n = 21,261 from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2005-2006, and classified patients with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, or diabetes as being at risk for CVD. We assessed differences in the provision of preventive services offered to patients who were and who were not at risk for CVD. Further, for those at risk, we compared the demographic characteristics of those who had and who had not been offered services.ResultsPatients at risk for CVD received significantly more preventive services compared with those not at risk. For patients at risk for CVD, aspirin therapy was more likely to be recommended to those aged 65 years or older than those aged 45 to 64 years and to men than women. Cholesterol screening was more likely for men and was less likely for patients with Medicare/Medicaid or no insurance than for patients who were insured. Rates of counseling for diet and nutrition, weight reduction, and exercise were low overall, but younger patients received these services more than older patients did.ConclusionPatients at risk for CVD are not all receiving the same level of preventive care, suggesting the need to clarify clinical practice guidelines and provide clinicians with education and support for more effective lifestyle counseling.

  13. The potential impact of new national guidance on primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in people living with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Ahmed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of death in England and Wales. As people living with HIV (PLWH age, proactive management of CVD risk factors is crucial. The long-awaited draft guidelines for CVD from the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE propose lipid modification (with statins and lifestyle modification for 40–74 year olds with >10% (previously >20% 10-year risk of CVD using QRISK2. We currently use Framingham so compared 3 CVD risk calculators in our cohort and analyzed the impact of a change in CVD threshold on the proportion of our patients who would need intervention. Materials and Methods: Framingham, QRISK2 and JBS3 cardiovascular risk calculators were compared in a group of randomly selected patients. Then, to analyze the impact of a change in primary prevention threshold on our cohort, we interrogated a prospectively collected database to identify all individuals who had a documented Framingham risk assessment and applied the current/proposed thresholds accordingly. We performed the same analysis for the three calculator subgroup (recalculating Framingham risk. Finally we surveyed HIV services in England & Wales regarding their choice of calculator. Results: We compared the 3 CVD risk calculators in 100 patients, see Table 1.In terms of eligibility for primary prevention 20.9% (916/4383 had documented Framingham risk assessment as part of routine care. Using a 20% threshold, 8.8% (81/916 would require intervention, increasing to 35.2% (322/916 with a threshold for intervention of 10%. Restricting analysis to the 100 patients to whom we applied all three calculators resulted in the following proportion requiring intervention with a 20%/10% threshold, respectively: Framingham 28%/76%, QRISK2 20%/53%, JBS3 15%/42% (four patients were excluded due to incomplete data. Conclusions: Reducing the threshold for cardiovascular preventative measures to 10% vastly increases the number of patients

  14. Resveratrol and Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Dominique Bonnefont-Rousselot

    2016-01-01

    The increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) has stimulated research for substances that could improve cardiovascular health. Among them, resveratrol (RES), a polyphenolic compound notably present in grapes and red wine, has been involved in the “French paradox”. RES is known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and for its ability to upregulate endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). RES was able to scavenge •OH/O2•− and peroxyl radicals, which can limit the lipid peroxi...

  15. Effect of Crataegus Usage in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention: An Evidence-Based Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Wang; Xingjiang Xiong; Bo Feng

    2013-01-01

    Hawthorn (Crataegus oxyacantha) is a widely used Chinese herb for treatment of gastrointestinal ailments and heart problems and consumed as food. In North America, the role of treatment for heart problems dates back to 1800. Currently, evidence is accumulating from various in vivo and in vitro studies that hawthorn extracts exert a wide range of cardiovascular pharmacological properties, including antioxidant activity, positive inotropic effect, anti-inflammatory effect, anticardiac remodelin...

  16. An integrated approach to preventing cardiovascular disease: community-based approaches, health system initiatives, and public health policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Karwalajtys

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Tina Karwalajtys1, Janusz Kaczorowski2,31Department of Family Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; 2Primary Care & Community Research, Child & Family Research Institute, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaAbstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD is largely the product of interactions among modifiable risk factors that are common in developed nations and increasingly of concern in developing countries. Hypertension is an important precursor to the development of CVD, and although detection and treatment rates have improved in recent years in some jurisdictions, effective strategies and policies supporting a shift in distribution of risk factors at the population level remain paramount. Challenges in managing cardiovascular health more effectively include factors at the patient, provider, and system level. Strategies to reduce hypertension and CVD should be population based, incorporate multilevel, multicomponent, and socioenvironmental approaches, and integrate community resources with public health and clinical care. There is an urgent need to improve monitoring and management of risk factors through community-wide, primary care-linked initiatives, increase the evidence base for community-based prevention strategies, further develop and evaluate promising program components, and develop new approaches to support healthy lifestyle behaviors in diverse age, socioeconomic, and ethnocultural groups. Policy and system changes are critical to reduce risk in populations, including legislation and public education to reduce dietary sodium and trans-fatty acids, food pricing policies, and changes to health care delivery systems to explicitly support prevention and management of CVD.Keywords: risk factors, blood pressure determination, community health services, community health planning, public health practice

  17. Engaging the Entire Care Cascade in Western Kenya: A Model to Achieve the Cardiovascular Disease Secondary Prevention Roadmap Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedanthan, Rajesh; Kamano, Jemima H; Bloomfield, Gerald S; Manji, Imran; Pastakia, Sonak; Kimaiyo, Sylvester N

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the world, with a substantial health and economic burden confronted by low- and middle-income countries. In low-income countries such as Kenya, there exists a double burden of communicable and noncommunicable diseases, and the CVD profile includes many nonatherosclerotic entities. Socio-politico-economic realities present challenges to CVD prevention in Kenya, including poverty, low national spending on health, significant out-of-pocket health expenditures, and limited outpatient health insurance. In addition, the health infrastructure is characterized by insufficient human resources for health, medication stock-outs, and lack of facilities and equipment. Within this socio-politico-economic reality, contextually appropriate programs for CVD prevention need to be developed. We describe our experience from western Kenya, where we have engaged the entire care cascade across all levels of the health system, in order to improve access to high-quality, comprehensive, coordinated, and sustainable care for CVD and CVD risk factors. We report on several initiatives: 1) population-wide screening for hypertension and diabetes; 2) engagement of community resources and governance structures; 3) geographic decentralization of care services; 4) task redistribution to more efficiently use of available human resources for health; 5) ensuring a consistent supply of essential medicines; 6) improving physical infrastructure of rural health facilities; 7) developing an integrated health record; and 8) mobile health (mHealth) initiatives to provide clinical decision support and record-keeping functions. Although several challenges remain, there currently exists a critical window of opportunity to establish systems of care and prevention that can alter the trajectory of CVD in low-resource settings. PMID:26704963

  18. The role of IGF-I in the development of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus: is prevention possible?

    OpenAIRE

    Lamberts, Steven; Janssen, Joop

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe incidence of peripheral, cerebro- and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is approximately twice as high as in the non-diabetic population. Conventional cardiovascular risk factors such as plasma lipids, lipoproteins and hypertension only partially explain this excessive risk of developing atherosclerosis and CVD. Meta-analysis of studies performed in non-diabetic populations indicates that the risk of CVD increases continuously with glucose ...

  19. Effect of crataegus usage in cardiovascular disease prevention: an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Xiong, Xingjiang; Feng, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Hawthorn (Crataegus oxyacantha) is a widely used Chinese herb for treatment of gastrointestinal ailments and heart problems and consumed as food. In North America, the role of treatment for heart problems dates back to 1800. Currently, evidence is accumulating from various in vivo and in vitro studies that hawthorn extracts exert a wide range of cardiovascular pharmacological properties, including antioxidant activity, positive inotropic effect, anti-inflammatory effect, anticardiac remodeling effect, antiplatelet aggregation effect, vasodilating effect, endothelial protective effect, reduction of smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation, protective effect against ischemia/reperfusion injury, antiarrhythmic effect, lipid-lowering effect and decrease of arterial blood pressure effect. On the other hand, reviews of placebo-controlled trials have reported both subjective and objective improvement in patients with mild forms of heart failure (NYHA I-III), hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. This paper discussed the underlying pharmacology mechanisms in potential cardioprotective effects and elucidated the clinical applications of Crataegus and its various extracts. PMID:24459528

  20. Childhood obesity and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bridger, Tracey

    2009-01-01

    Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions. Many of these children have risk factors for later disease, including cardiovascular disease. For optimal cardiovascular health, health care professionals must be able to identify children and youth at risk and provide appropriate support as needed. The present article reviews the current medical literature on obesity and cardiovascular disease risk factors in the paediatric population, the long-term cardiovascular consequences of childhood ...

  1. Formalized 2003 European Guidelines on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Clinical Practice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peleška, Jan; Anger, Z.; Buchtela, David; Tomečková, Marie; Veselý, Arnošt

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 25, - (2004), s. 444. ISSN 0195-668X. [ESC Congress 2004. 28.08.2004-01.09.2004, Munich] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1030915 Keywords : formalized European guidelines on CVD prevention * computer GLIF model * decision algorithm Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information

  2. Periodontitis and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeftha, A; Holmes, H

    2013-03-01

    Periodontal medicine has been studied and reviewed extensively since its introduction to the dental fraternity. The association of periodontal disease with and its effects on the cardiovascular system are amongst the many topics explored. A summary of the research into these associations and the possible mechanisms of any relationship is presented. Although a link between these two chronic inflammatory diseases is evident, the very heterogeneity of the relevant studies has not provided evidence sufficient to support an actual causal relationship. More stringent epidemiologic and intervention studies are required. PMID:23951765

  3. Effect of Crataegus Usage in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention: An Evidence-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hawthorn (Crataegus oxyacantha is a widely used Chinese herb for treatment of gastrointestinal ailments and heart problems and consumed as food. In North America, the role of treatment for heart problems dates back to 1800. Currently, evidence is accumulating from various in vivo and in vitro studies that hawthorn extracts exert a wide range of cardiovascular pharmacological properties, including antioxidant activity, positive inotropic effect, anti-inflammatory effect, anticardiac remodeling effect, antiplatelet aggregation effect, vasodilating effect, endothelial protective effect, reduction of smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation, protective effect against ischemia/reperfusion injury, antiarrhythmic effect, lipid-lowering effect and decrease of arterial blood pressure effect. On the other hand, reviews of placebo-controlled trials have reported both subjective and objective improvement in patients with mild forms of heart failure (NYHA I–III, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. This paper discussed the underlying pharmacology mechanisms in potential cardioprotective effects and elucidated the clinical applications of Crataegus and its various extracts.

  4. Nonfasting hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, B G; Langsted, A; Freiberg, J J

    2009-01-01

    , total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 all associate with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. These new data open the possibility that nonfasting rather than fasting lipid profiles can be used for cardiovascular risk prediction. If implemented, this would...... of cardiovascular disease and early death....

  5. Migraine and cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo E. Bigal

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Migraine, especially migraine with aura is an established risk factor for ischemic lesions of the brain. Recent evidence has also linked migraine with and without aura to a broader range of ischemic vascular disorders including angina, myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization, claudication and cardiovascular mortality. The topic is therefore of considerable interest. Accordingly, herein we review the association between migraine and cardiovascular disease. We start by briefly presenting diagnostic criteria for migraine and revising its pathophysiology. We follow by summarizing the evidence on the topic. We then briefly present the results of a recent meta-analysis. We close by highlighting results of a large epidemiological study conducted after the publication of the meta-analysis.

  6. Do Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Prevent Cardiovascular Disease? A Review of the Randomized Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Kimmig, Lucas M; Karalis, Dean G.

    2013-01-01

    Fish oil is rich in the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Numerous epidemiological studies and several large randomized clinical trials have shown that modest doses of omega-3 PUFAs significantly reduce the risk of unstable angina, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death as well as death in coronary artery disease and heart failure patients. Based on the scientific evidence, the American Heart Association (AHA) has ...

  7. The role of reducing intakes of saturated fat in the prevention of cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Arne; Dyerberg, Jørn; Elwood, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    association between SFA intake relative to refined carbohydrates and the risk of insulin resistance and diabetes has been shown. The effect of diet on a single biomarker is insufficient evidence to assess CHD risk. The combination of multiple biomarkers and the use of clinical endpoints could help......Current dietary recommendations advise reducing the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) to reduce coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but recent findings question the role of SFAs. This expert panel reviewed the evidence and reached the following conclusions: the evidence from epidemiologic...

  8. Risk of cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, Michael; Starup-Linde, Jakob; Thomsen, Jan Lykke Scheel;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Type 2 diabetes (DM) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. We investigated the effects of antidiabetic drugs on the composite endpoint (CE) of ischemic heart disease, heart failure or stroke in DM patients. METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study. Cases were DM patients who......% CI: 16.88-24.12), neuropathy (OR=1.39, 95% CI: 1.05-1.85) and peripheral artery disease (OR=1.31, 95% CI: 1.02-1.69) increased the risk of CE. Biguanides (OR=0.62 95% CI; 0.54-0.71) and liraglutide (OR=0.48 95% CI; 0.38-0.62) significantly decreased the risk of CE as did statin treatment (OR=0.63, 95...

  9. A Path Analysis of a Randomized "Promotora de Salud" Cardiovascular Disease-Prevention Trial among At-Risk Hispanic Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Hendrik Dirk; Balcazar, Hector G.; Castro, Felipe; Schulz, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed effectiveness of an educational community intervention taught by "promotoras de salud" in reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among Hispanics using a structural equation modeling (SEM) approach. Model development was guided by a social ecological framework proposing CVD risk reduction through improvement of protective…

  10. Cardiovascular Risk in Malaysia: causes, consequences and prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Selvarajah, S.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease forms the highest morbidity and mortality worldwide and disproportionately affects low and middle-income developing countries. In developing countries, cardiovascular morbidity and mortality tend to affect the (younger) working adults. This poses a significant burden to the economy. This thesis attempts to investigate the burden of cardiovascular risk factors and disease, and its’ prevention in Malaysia, a middle-income developing country. We described the clustering of...

  11. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES: FOCUS ON ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    OpenAIRE

    V N Shishkova

    2015-01-01

    The question of mutual influence of risk factors for cardiovascular and renal diseases with a focus on atrial fibrillation is considered. Modern approaches to the prevention of major macrovascular events in patients with comorbidity are evaluated.

  12. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES: FOCUS ON ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Shishkova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The question of mutual influence of risk factors for cardiovascular and renal diseases with a focus on atrial fibrillation is considered. Modern approaches to the prevention of major macrovascular events in patients with comorbidity are evaluated.

  13. Hypertriglyceridemia and Cardiovascular Diseases: Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Seung Hwan; Nicholls, Stephen J.; Sakuma, Ichiro; Zhao, Dong; Koh, Kwang Kon

    2016-01-01

    Residual cardiovascular risk and failure of high density lipoprotein cholesterol raising treatment have refocused interest on targeting hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and remnant cholesterol have demonstrated to be important risk factors for cardiovascular disease; this has been demonstrated in experimental, genetic, and epidemiological studies. Fibrates can reduce cardiovascular event rates with or without statins. High dose omega-3 fatty acids co...

  14. Childhood socioeconomic position, young adult intelligence and fillings of prescribed medicine for prevention of cardiovascular disease in middle-aged men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegbaum, Margit; Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Rasmussen, Jeppe Nørgaard; Hendriksen, Carsten; Vass, Mikkel; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Osler, Merete

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the relationship between childhood socioeconomic position (SEP) and filling of medicine prescriptions for prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), with young adult intelligence (IQ) as a potential mediator. DESIGN: Birth cohort study with logistic and Cox-proportional ......OBJECTIVES: To explore the relationship between childhood socioeconomic position (SEP) and filling of medicine prescriptions for prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), with young adult intelligence (IQ) as a potential mediator. DESIGN: Birth cohort study with logistic and Cox...... followed in the Danish National Prescription Register for initiation of and refill persistency for antihypertensives and statins, until the end of 2007 (age 54 years). RESULTS: Low childhood SEP at age 18 was not associated with prescription fillings of antihypertensives, but was weakly associated with...

  15. Patient and general practitioner attitudes to taking medication to prevent cardiovascular disease after receiving detailed information on risks and benefits of treatment: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutridge Kerry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are now effective drugs to prevent cardiovascular disease and guidelines recommend their use. Patients do not always choose to accept preventive medication at levels of risk reduction recommended in guidelines. The purpose of the study was to identify and explore the attitudes of patients and general practitioners towards preventative medication for cardiovascular disease (CVD after they have received information about it; to identify implications for practice and prescribing. Methods Qualitative interviews with GPs and patients following presentation of in depth information about CVD risks and the absolute effects of medication. Setting: GP practices in Birmingham, United Kingdom. Results In both populations: wide variation on attitudes to preventative medication; concerns about unnecessary drug taking & side effects; preferring to consider lifestyle changes first. In patient population: whatever their attitudes to medication were, the vast majority explained that they would ultimately do what their GP recommended; there was some misunderstanding of the distinction between curative and preventative medication. A common theme was the degree of trust in their doctors' judgement and recommendations, which contrasted with scepticism of the role of pharmaceutical companies and academics. Scepticism in guidelines was also common among doctors although many nevertheless recommended treatment for their patients Conclusions A guideline approach to prescribing preventative medication could be against the interests and preferences of the patient. GPs must take extra care to explain what preventative medication is and why it is recommended, attempt to discern preferences and make recommendations balancing these potentially conflicting concerns.

  16. Cardiovascular comorbidity in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmohamed, Michael T; Heslinga, Maaike; Kitas, George D

    2015-12-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory joint diseases (IJDs) have an increased risk of premature death compared with the general population, mainly because of the risk of cardiovascular disease, which is similar in patients with RA and in those with diabetes mellitus. Pathogenic mechanisms and clinical expression of cardiovascular comorbidities vary greatly between different rheumatic diseases, but atherosclerosis seems to be associated with all IJDs. Traditional risk factors such as age, gender, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, smoking, obesity and diabetes mellitus, together with inflammation, are the main contributors to the increased cardiovascular risk in patients with IJDs. Although cardiovascular risk assessment should be part of routine care in such patients, no disease-specific models are currently available for this purpose. The main pillars of cardiovascular risk reduction are pharmacological and nonpharmacological management of cardiovascular risk factors, as well as tight control of disease activity. PMID:26282082

  17. Significance of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krutika Gajjar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the high mortality and morbidity rate associated with cardiovascular diseases, Cardiacrehabilitation (CR is regarded for prevention and management of cardiovascular diseases. CR servicesare generally provided in an outpatient as comprehensive, long-term programs involving medicalevaluation, prescribed exercise, cardiac risk factor modification, education and counseling. This includesnutritional therapies, weight loss program management of lipid abnormalities with diet and medication,blood pressure control, diabetes management and stress management. The exercise component of a totalapproach to rehabilitation helps to overcome the fears and anxieties that so many people experience aftera heart attack. Aerobic exercise training program improves cardiovascular fitness in both healthyindividual and cardiac patients. Cardiac rehabilitation prevents and treat cardiovascular disease, reducescardiac risk factors, improving patient’s exercise capacity and enhancing quality of life. Aerobicexercise with intensity of approximately 60 to 70% of the maximal heart rate for 30 to 60 minutes, 3 to 4times a week, for 4 to 6 weeks enhances exercise capacity.

  18. Individual-based primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in Cambodia and Mongolia: early identification and management of hypertension and diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Otgontuya Dugee; Oum Sophal; Palam Enkhtuya; Rani Manju; Buckley Brian S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background To assess the coverage of individual-based primary prevention strategies for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Cambodia and Mongolia: specifically the early identification of hypertension and diabetes mellitus, major proximate physiological CVD risk factors, and management with pharmaceutical and lifestyle advice interventions. Methods Analysis of data collected in national cross-sectional STEPS surveys in 2009 (Mongolia) and 2010 (Cambodia) involving participants aged 25-64...

  19. Are the current recommendations for the use of aspirin in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease applicable in low-income countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noubiap JJ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jean Jacques N Noubiap,1,2 Jobert Richie N Nansseu3,41Department of Medicine, Groote Schuur Hospital, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; 2Medical Diagnostic Center, Yaoundé, Cameroon; 3Sickle Cell Disease Unit, Mother and Child Centre, Chantal BIYA Foundation, Yaoundé, Cameroon; 4Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, CameroonAbstract: Although evidence has accumulated that long-term aspirin therapy is beneficial in secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD, a lot of controversies persist regarding the benefit of aspirin use in primary prevention of CVD. In low-income countries (LIC specifically, the decision to prescribe aspirin for primary CVD prevention is more problematic, as there is a dearth of evidence in this regard. Aspirin has been shown to have relative beneficial effects in preventing a first myocardial infarction, but not stroke. However, as stroke is the prevailing CVD in many LIC, especially in Africa, the benefit of aspirin in these settings is therefore questionable. Indeed, there is no published trial that has evaluated the benefits and risks of continuous aspirin therapy in populations of LIC. Furthermore, though cardiovascular risk assessment is crucial in decision-making for the use of aspirin in primary prevention of CVD, there are no risk assessment tools that have been validated in African populations. Studies are urgently warranted, to determine the usefulness of aspirin in primary prevention of CVD in low-income settings where the drug is highly available and affordable, as CVD is becoming the leading cause of deaths in LIC.Keywords: aspirin, cardiovascular disease, primary prevention, low-income countries

  20. Resveratrol and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Bonnefont-Rousselot

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs has stimulated research for substances that could improve cardiovascular health. Among them, resveratrol (RES, a polyphenolic compound notably present in grapes and red wine, has been involved in the “French paradox”. RES is known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and for its ability to upregulate endothelial NO synthase (eNOS. RES was able to scavenge •OH/O2•− and peroxyl radicals, which can limit the lipid peroxidation processes. Moreover, in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC under glucose-induced oxidative stress, RES restored the activity of dimethylargininedimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH, an enzyme that degrades an endogenous inhibitor of eNOS named asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA. Thus, RES could improve •NO availability and decrease the endothelial dysfunction observed in diabetes. Preclinical studies have made it possible to identify molecular targets (SIRT-1, AMPK, Nrf2, NFκB…; however, there are limited human clinical trials, and difficulties in the interpretation of results arise from the use of high-dose RES supplements in research studies, whereas low RES concentrations are present in red wine. The discussions on potential beneficial effects of RES in CVDs (atherosclerosis, hypertension, stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure should compare the results of preclinical studies with those of clinical trials.

  1. The role of physicians in a community-wide program for prevention of cardiovascular disease: the Minnesota Heart Health Program.

    OpenAIRE

    Mittelmark, M B; Leupker, R V; Grimm, R; Kottke, T. E.; Blackburn, H

    1988-01-01

    The Minnesota Heart Health Program (MHHP) aims to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality by reducing risk factors among the mass of residents in three midwestern communities. A major aspect of the program is the involvement of community physicians because they have high credibility as citizen leaders, especially on health issues. In the MHHP, physicians contributed in a number of ways. The initial contacts with physicians resulted in their providing support and introducti...

  2. Priority setting for the prevention and control of cardiovascular diseases: multi-criteria decision analysis in four eastern Mediterranean countries

    OpenAIRE

    Ghandour, Rula; Shoaibi, Azza; Khatib, Rana; Abu Rmeileh, Niveen; UNAL, Belgin; Sözmen, Kaan; Kılıç, Bülent; Fouad, Fouad; Al Ali, Radwan; Ben Romdhane, Habiba; Aissi, Wafa; Ahmad, Balsam; Capewell, Simon; Critchley, Julia; Husseini, Abdullatif

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the feasibility of using a simple multi-criteria decision analysis method with policy makers/key stakeholders to prioritize cardiovascular disease (CVD) policies in four Mediterranean countries: Palestine, Syria, Tunisia and Turkey. Methods A simple multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) method was piloted. A mixed methods study was used to identify a preliminary list of policy options in each country. These policies were rated by different policymakers/stakeho...

  3. Healthy Ageing Through Internet Counselling in the Elderly: the HATICE randomised controlled trial for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and cognitive impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Edo; Jongstra, Susan; Soininen, Hilkka; Brayne, Carol; Moll van Charante, Eric P; Meiller, Yannick; van der Groep, Bram; Beishuizen, Cathrien R L; Mangialasche, Francesca; Barbera, Mariagnese; Ngandu, Tiia; Coley, Nicola; Guillemont, Juliette; Savy, Stéphanie; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; Peters, Ron J G; van Gool, Willem A; Kivipelto, Miia; Andrieu, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular disease and dementia share a number of risk factors including hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, smoking, obesity, diabetes and physical inactivity. The rise of eHealth has led to increasing opportunities for large-scale delivery of prevention programmes encouraging self-management. The aim of this study is to investigate whether a multidomain intervention to optimise self-management of cardiovascular risk factors in older individuals, delivered through an coach-supported interactive internet platform, can improve the cardiovascular risk profile and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline. Methods and analysis HATICE is a multinational, multicentre, prospective, randomised, open-label blinded end point (PROBE) trial with 18 months intervention. Recruitment of 2600 older people (≥65 years) at increased risk of cardiovascular disease will take place in the Netherlands, Finland and France. Participants randomised to the intervention condition will have access to an interactive internet platform, stimulating self-management of vascular risk factors, with remote support by a coach. Participants in the control group will have access to a static internet platform with basic health information. The primary outcome is a composite score based on the average z-score of the difference between baseline and 18 months follow-up values of systolic blood pressure, low-density-lipoprotein and body mass index. Main secondary outcomes include the effect on the individual components of the primary outcome, the effect on lifestyle-related risk factors, incident cardiovascular disease, mortality, cognitive functioning, mood and cost-effectiveness. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the medical ethics committee of the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam, the Comité de Protection des Personnes Sud Ouest et Outre Mer in France and the Northern Savo Hospital District Research Ethics Committee in Finland. We

  4. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Screening for and Managing Identified Hypertension for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi-Phuong-Lan; Wright, E. Pamela; Nguyen, Thanh-Trung; Schuiling-Veninga, C. C. M.; Bijlsma, M. J.; Nguyen, Thi-Bach-Yen; Postma, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To inform development of guidelines for hypertension management in Vietnam, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of different strategies on screening for hypertension in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods A decision tree was combined with a Markov model to measure incremental cost-effectiveness of different approaches to hypertension screening. Values used as input parameters for the model were taken from different sources. Various screening intervals (one-off, annually, biannually) and starting ages to screen (35, 45 or 55 years) and coverage of treatment were analysed. We ran both a ten-year and a lifetime horizon. Input parameters for the models were extracted from local and regional data. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was used to evaluate parameter uncertainty. A threshold of three times GDP per capita was applied. Results Cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained varied in different screening scenarios. In a ten-year horizon, the cost-effectiveness of screening for hypertension ranged from cost saving to Int$ 758,695 per QALY gained. For screening of men starting at 55 years, all screening scenarios gave a high probability of being cost-effective. For screening of females starting at 55 years, the probability of favourable cost-effectiveness was 90% with one-off screening. In a lifetime horizon, cost per QALY gained was lower than the threshold of Int$ 15,883 in all screening scenarios among males. Similar results were found in females when starting screening at 55 years. Starting screening in females at 45 years had a high probability of being cost-effective if screening biannually was combined with increasing coverage of treatment by 20% or even if sole biannual screening was considered. Conclusion From a health economic perspective, integrating screening for hypertension into routine medical examination and related coverage by health insurance could be recommended. Screening for hypertension has a high probability of

  5. The risk factors and prevention of cardiovascular disease: the importance of electrocardiogram in the diagnosis and treatment of acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosiek, Anna; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Acute coronary syndrome is a leading cause of emergency medical treatment and hospitalization in Poland. High-speed electrocardiogram (ECG) has shown good accuracy of the initial diagnosis and of the final diagnosis in treated cardiac patients. Initial diagnosis and definitive diagnosis were analyzed statistically (PECG analysis (at the stage of prevention). This article presents the inclusion of ECG in the prevention process and shows that it allows for early detection of cardiovascular diseases. In Poland, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients are identified in the ambulance that reduces time to door-to-balloon. PMID:27540297

  6. Adipose Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, and Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Arti; Mehta, Nehal; Reilly, Muredach P.

    2008-01-01

    Adiposity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance are strongly implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. This article reviews the mechanisms of adipose inflammation, because these may represent therapeutic targets for insulin resistance and for prevention of metabolic and cardiovascular consequences of obesity. The initial insult in adipose inflammation and insulin resistance, mediated by macrophage recruitment and endogenous ligand ac...

  7. [New populations at increased cardiovascular risk: Cardiovascular disease in dermatological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy-Gijón, Elena; Meseguer-Yebra, Carmen; Palacio-Aller, Lucía; Godoy-Rocati, Diego Vicente; Lahoz-Rallo, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The increased cardiovascular risk in some dermatological diseases has been demonstrated in recent decades. Diseases such as psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus are currently included in the guidelines for prevention of cardiovascular disease. Other diseases such as androgenic alopecia, polycystic ovary syndrome, hidradenitis suppurativa or lichen planus have numerous studies that point to an increased risk, however, they have not been included in these guidelines. In this article we review the evidence supporting this association, in order to alert the clinician to the need for greater control in cardiovascular risk factors in these patients. PMID:26383179

  8. [Hyperuricemia, gout and cardiovascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Karsten; Burkard, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    Hyperuricemia, gout as well as arterial hypertension and metabolic syndrom are highly prevalent and clinicians are frequently confronted with both conditions in the same patient. Hyperuricemia and gout are associated with cardiovascular comorbidities and a high cardiovascular risk. Despite coherent pathophysiological concepts, it remains to be determined, if this association is independent and causal. In daily clinical practice, cardiovascular risk factors should be thoroughly identified and consequently treated in all patients with hyperuricemia and gout. If preventive treatment of asymptomatic hyperuricemia with urate-lowering agents may improve cardiovascular risk and outcomes remains to be determined and is recommended only in special situations like young patients with severe hyperuricemia. PMID:27008446

  9. Experiences and perceptions about cause and prevention of cardiovascular disease among people with cardiometabolic conditions: findings of in-depth interviews from a peri-urban Nepalese community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Oli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nepal currently faces an increasing burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Earlier studies on health literacy and the behavior dimension of cardiovascular health reported a substantial gap between knowledge and practice. Objective: This qualitative study aimed to deepen understanding of the community perspective on cardiovascular health from the patients’ viewpoint. Design: We conducted in-depth interviews (IDIs with 13 individuals with confirmed heart disease, hypertension, or diabetes mellitus. All participants provided verbal consent. We used an IDI guide to ask respondents about their perception and experiences with CVD, particularly regarding causation and preventability. We manually applied qualitative content analysis to evaluate the data and grouped similar content into categories and subcategories. Results: Respondents perceived dietary factors, particularly consumption of salty, fatty, and oily food, as the main determinants of CVD. Similarly, our respondents unanimously linked smoking, alcohol intake, and high blood pressure with cardiac ailments but reported mixed opinion regarding the causal role of body weight and physical inactivity. Although depressed and stressed at the time of diagnosis, respondents learned to handle their situation better over time. Despite good family support for health care, the financial burden of disease was a major issue. All respondents understood the importance of lifestyle modification and relied upon health professionals for information and motivation. Respondents remarked that community awareness of CVD was inadequate and that medical doctors or trained local people should help increase awareness. Conclusions: This study provided insight into the perceptions of patients regarding CVD. Respondents embraced the importance of lifestyle modification only after receiving their diagnosis. Although better health care is important in terms of aiding patients to better understand and cope with

  10. Experiences and perceptions about cause and prevention of cardiovascular disease among people with cardiometabolic conditions: findings of in-depth interviews from a peri-urban Nepalese community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oli, Natalia; Vaidya, Abhinav; Subedi, Madhusudan; Krettek, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Background Nepal currently faces an increasing burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Earlier studies on health literacy and the behavior dimension of cardiovascular health reported a substantial gap between knowledge and practice. Objective This qualitative study aimed to deepen understanding of the community perspective on cardiovascular health from the patients’ viewpoint. Design We conducted in-depth interviews (IDIs) with 13 individuals with confirmed heart disease, hypertension, or diabetes mellitus. All participants provided verbal consent. We used an IDI guide to ask respondents about their perception and experiences with CVD, particularly regarding causation and preventability. We manually applied qualitative content analysis to evaluate the data and grouped similar content into categories and subcategories. Results Respondents perceived dietary factors, particularly consumption of salty, fatty, and oily food, as the main determinants of CVD. Similarly, our respondents unanimously linked smoking, alcohol intake, and high blood pressure with cardiac ailments but reported mixed opinion regarding the causal role of body weight and physical inactivity. Although depressed and stressed at the time of diagnosis, respondents learned to handle their situation better over time. Despite good family support for health care, the financial burden of disease was a major issue. All respondents understood the importance of lifestyle modification and relied upon health professionals for information and motivation. Respondents remarked that community awareness of CVD was inadequate and that medical doctors or trained local people should help increase awareness. Conclusions This study provided insight into the perceptions of patients regarding CVD. Respondents embraced the importance of lifestyle modification only after receiving their diagnosis. Although better health care is important in terms of aiding patients to better understand and cope with their disease

  11. Radiopharmaceuticals in cardiovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high incidence of cardiovascular disorders and the attendant morbidity and mortality have encouraged the development of new radiopharmaceuticals for the diagnosis and localisation of coronary diseases. Myocardial perfusion imaging is an invaluable tool for the demonstration of transient ischemia and infarction in heart and identification of viable and non-viable myocardial tissue. Thallium chloride (Tl-201) is the agent currently in wide use but its drawbacks have been well recognised. Hence tremendous amount of research work has been carried out to develop a suitable Tc-99m radiopharmaceutical for this purpose which has resulted in the introduction of two Tc-99m labelled radiopharmaceuticals HEXAMIBI and BATO. These are being tried as myocardial imaging agents these days and the choice amongst these depends on concrete clinical situation. The experimental work involving the synthesis of ligand MIBI, formulation into freeze dried KIT form, quality control procedure, biodistribution studies and finally clinical evaluation of locally produced KIT in human volunteers has now been reported here. Our KIT has been produced for the first time in Pakistan and has been tried on forty five patients in Nuclear Medical Centre, AFIP (Rawalpindi). The results obtained are comparable to those of Ti-201 with a slightly higher liver background in case of MIBI but because of the easy availability MIBI has become agent of choice for myocardial perfusion studies. (author)

  12. Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Francisco B; Lavie, Carl J; Blair, Steven N

    2016-05-27

    The prevalence of obesity has increased worldwide over the past few decades. In 2013, the prevalence of obesity exceeded the 50% of the adult population in some countries from Oceania, North Africa, and Middle East. Lower but still alarmingly high prevalence was observed in North America (≈30%) and in Western Europe (≈20%). These figures are of serious concern because of the strong link between obesity and disease. In the present review, we summarize the current evidence on the relationship of obesity with cardiovascular disease (CVD), discussing how both the degree and the duration of obesity affect CVD. Although in the general population, obesity and, especially, severe obesity are consistently and strongly related with higher risk of CVD incidence and mortality, the one-size-fits-all approach should not be used with obesity. There are relevant factors largely affecting the CVD prognosis of obese individuals. In this context, we thoroughly discuss important concepts such as the fat-but-fit paradigm, the metabolically healthy but obese (MHO) phenotype and the obesity paradox in patients with CVD. About the MHO phenotype and its CVD prognosis, available data have provided mixed findings, what could be partially because of the adjustment or not for key confounders such as cardiorespiratory fitness, and to the lack of consensus on the MHO definition. In the present review, we propose a scientifically based harmonized definition of MHO, which will hopefully contribute to more comparable data in the future and a better understanding on the MHO subgroup and its CVD prognosis. PMID:27230640

  13. Cheese and cardiovascular disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerpsted, Julie Bousgaard; Tholstrup, Tine

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, the effect of dairy products on cardiovascular risk is a topic with much debate and conflicting results. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the existing literature regarding the effect of cheese intake and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Studies included...

  14. Matriarchal model for cardiovascular prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, R A; Taylor, E L; Knehans, A; Cleaver, V

    1994-02-01

    Family patterns of cardiovascular risk behavior are well documented. Significant correlation exists between spouse-spouse, parent-child, and sibling-sibling for cholesterol, high- and low-density lipoprotein, diet, physical activity, and smoking. Family/environmental influences are important in how/if risk and/or preventive behavior is learned. The family matriarch commonly functions as gatekeeper, controlling eating behavior, access to health care, and other patterns. She often acts as menu planner, shopper, and preparer of meals for all family members. She provides information and verbal reinforcement about food and is a powerful model concerning dietary practices. In fact, the mother, as head of household in most single-parent families, may be the only adult model for many children. Because relevance and credibility are the most important characteristics of a behavioral model, parents (especially mothers) are strong models for observational learning by children. Risk factor information and risk reduction activities adopted by the matriarch can be generalized to the entire family if she learns the skills to act as a change agent. Initiation of this process of education and training the matriarch lies with primary care providers for women (Ob-Gyns see most women). By teaching risk reduction to the matriarch as a component of primary care, physician interaction can have a rippling effect. PMID:8164913

  15. Evaluation of efficacy of atorvastatin in prevention of cardiovascular risks in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To demonstrate the dual cardiopulmonary protective effects of Atorvastatin in COPD patients, which may become the mainstay of therapy in prevention of exacerbation of COPD and cardiovascular events in COPD patients. Study Design: Quasi experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted over a period of 6 months (December 2010 to May 2011) with an individual study period of 3 months (90 days), conducted in the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics in collaboration with Chest medicine JPMC Karachi. Subjects and Methods: Thirty five moderate stable COPD with post bronchodilator FEV 3mg/l, were evaluated in a quasi experimental trial. The patients were assigned to give tablet Atorvastatin 20 mg once daily for 12 consecutive weeks. The primary study outcome was to evaluate the reduction in cardiovascular risk by evaluating the improvement in FEV1 and reduction in hsCRP levels. Efficacy was evaluated at days 30, 60 and day 90. Results: Out of 35 patients only 33 (94%) patients completed the study. At baseline hsCRP level was 6.45+-0.30 which decreased to 4.6+-0.19 (p<0.05) at day 90. FEV1 at baseline was 2.16+-0.07 and at day 90 FEV1 increased upto 2.48+-0.06 (p<0.01). This shows that, the Atorvastatin can lead to statistically significant decrease in the hsCRP levels and increase the forced expiratory volume in one second. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that Atorvastatin effectively decreases the cardiovascular risk by decreasing the systemic inflammation which was indicated by decreasing the hsCRP levels and it can also improve the pulmonary functional capacity in COPD patients. (author)

  16. Methods of «Gas» Therapy in Primary and Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases at Resort Medical Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid S. Khodasevich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The article considers sanogenetic mechanisms and methods of “gas” therapy, namely ozone therapy and “dry” carbon dioxide baths impact on blood rheological factors, basing on the results of 1847 patients examination with the risk of developing coronary heart disease. The results are worth consideration in terms of “gas” therapy methods implementation for non-drug prevention and treatment of patients with the risk of developing coronary heart disease.

  17. C-reactive protein and cardiovascular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baohua JI

    2004-01-01

    @@ Recently many new disease markers and risk factors have been proposed, but it is not yet clear how far the new markers are validated as predictive risk factors enable us to increase accuracy as well as enhancing our ability to predict cardiovascular (CV) events and to plan prevention and therapy.

  18. Total cardiovascular disease risk assessment: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooney, Marie Therese

    2011-09-01

    The high risk strategy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) requires an assessment of an individual\\'s total CVD risk so that the most intensive risk factor management can be directed towards those at highest risk. Here we review developments in the assessment and estimation of total CVD risk.

  19. Cold Weather and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cold Weather and Cardiovascular Disease Updated:Sep 16,2015 ... Your Heart Health • Watch, Learn & Live Animations Library Cold Weather Fitness Guide Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood ...

  20. The risk factors and prevention of cardiovascular disease: the importance of electrocardiogram in the diagnosis and treatment of acute coronary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosiek, Anna; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Acute coronary syndrome is a leading cause of emergency medical treatment and hospitalization in Poland. High-speed electrocardiogram (ECG) has shown good accuracy of the initial diagnosis and of the final diagnosis in treated cardiac patients. Initial diagnosis and definitive diagnosis were analyzed statistically (Particle presents the inclusion of ECG in the prevention process and shows that it allows for early detection of cardiovascular diseases. In Poland, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients are identified in the ambulance that reduces time to door-to-balloon. PMID:27540297

  1. Nutrição e exercício na prevenção e controle das doenças cardiovasculares Nutrition and exercise on cardiovascular disease prevention and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Beatriz Ribeiro Rique

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available As doenças cardiovasculares constituem a principal causa de mortalidade no mundo e o seu crescimento significativo nos países em desenvolvimento alerta para o potencial impacto nas classes menos favorecidas. São influenciadas por um conjunto de fatores de risco, alguns modificáveis mediante alterações no estilo de vida, como a dieta adequada e o exercício regular. O objetivo da presente revisão é abordar esses aspectos a fim de prevenir e controlar as doenças cardiovasculares. O consumo de vegetais, frutas, grãos integrais, soja, azeite e peixes deve ser aumentado, ainda que limitando a quantidade de gordura. Os alimentos ricos em ácidos graxos saturados e trans devem ser evitados, assim como o uso excessivo de sal e bebidas alcoólicas. Além do exercício aeróbio, as atividades contra resistência vêm aumentando sua importância na reabilitação cardíaca. Essas mudanças de estilo de vida deveriam ser prioridades na Saúde Pública a fim de deter o avanço das doenças cardiovasculares em nosso país.Cardiovascular diseases represent the major worldwide cause of death, and their significant growth in developing countries alerts against their impact on underprivileged classes. Cardiovascular diseases are subject to a set of risk factors, some of which can be altered through changes in lifestyle, such as balanced diet and regular exercising. The purpose of this review is to approach these factors in order to prevent and control cardiovascular diseases. The consumption of vegetables, fruit, whole grains, soybeans, olive oil, and fish must be increased, although limiting the amount of fat. Saturated and trans fatty acids must be avoided, as well as excessive use of salt and alcoholic beverages. Besides aerobics, resistance training activities are increasing their importance in cardiac rehabilitation. Such lifestyle changes should be prioritized by Public Health authorities in order to hold back cardiovascular disease occurrence in

  2. Impact of obesity on cardiovascular disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zalesin, Kerstyn C

    2012-02-01

    Obesity promotes a cascade of secondary pathologies including diabetes, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, inflammation, thrombosis, hypertension, the metabolic syndrome, and OSA, which collectively heighten the risk for cardiovascular disease. Obesity may also be an independent moderator of cardiac risk apart from these comorbid conditions. Rates of obesity and cardiac disease continue to rise in a parallel and exponential manner. Because obesity is potentially one of the most modifiable mediators of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, effective treatment and prevention interventions should have a profound and favorable impact on public health.

  3. Pharmacogenomics and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Roden, Dan M

    2013-01-01

    Variability in drug responsiveness is a sine qua non of modern therapeutics, and the contribution of genomic variation is increasingly recognized. Investigating the genomic basis for variable responses to cardiovascular therapies has been a model for pharmacogenomics in general and has established...... resulted in changes to the product labels but also have led to development of initial clinical guidelines that consider how to facilitate incorporating genetic information to the bedside. This review summarizes the state of knowledge in cardiovascular pharmacogenomics and considers how variants described...

  4. Consumption of polyphenol-rich peach and plum juice prevents risk factors for obesity-related metabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease in Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noratto, Giuliana; Martino, Hercia S D; Simbo, Sunday; Byrne, David; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2015-06-01

    Polyphenols from fruits have been implied in the prevention of risk factors for cardiometabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate if the consumption of peach and plum juice has a protective effect against obesity and metabolic disorders that promote the development of cardiovascular diseases. Obese Zucker and lean rats were fed with peach, plum juice ad libitum or placebo. Body weight gain, biochemical markers and molecular markers for inflammation and cardiovascular disease in heart tissue were quantified. Results show that peach and plum juice consumption protected against a combination of obesity-induced metabolic disorders including hyperglycemia, insulin and leptin resistance, dyslipidemia and low-density lipoprotein oxidation. This was accompanied by a decreased expression of pro-atherogenic and pro-inflammatory biomarkers in plasma and heart tissues including intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, NF-κB and foam cell adherence to aortic arches. In addition, peach and plum juice consumption decreased the levels of angiotensin II in plasma and its receptor Agtr1 in heart tissues, suggesting a role of peach and plum polyphenols as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists. Furthermore, only plum juice significantly prevented body weight gain and increased the ratio high-density lipoprotein cholesterol/total cholesterol in plasma. This effect is most likely attributed to the plum's higher content of polyphenols (three times that of peach). Altogether, these results imply that cardioprotective effects can be achieved by replacing drinks high in sugar content with fruit juice rich in polyphenols in a diet. PMID:25801980

  5. Microparticles as Potential Biomarkers of Cardiovascular Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    França, Carolina Nunes, E-mail: carolufscar24@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de São Paulo - UNIFESP - UNISA, SP, São Paulo (Brazil); Universidade de Santo Amaro - UNISA, SP, São Paulo (Brazil); Izar, Maria Cristina de Oliveira; Amaral, Jônatas Bussador do; Tegani, Daniela Melo; Fonseca, Francisco Antonio Helfenstein [Universidade Federal de São Paulo - UNIFESP - UNISA, SP, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-02-15

    Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease is a choice of great relevance because of its impact on health. Some biomarkers, such as microparticles derived from different cell populations, have been considered useful in the assessment of cardiovascular disease. Microparticles are released by the membrane structures of different cell types upon activation or apoptosis, and are present in the plasma of healthy individuals (in levels considered physiological) and in patients with different pathologies. Many studies have suggested an association between microparticles and different pathological conditions, mainly the relationship with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, the effects of different lipid-lowering therapies have been described in regard to measurement of microparticles. The studies are still controversial regarding the levels of microparticles that can be considered pathological. In addition, the methodologies used still vary, suggesting the need for standardization of the different protocols applied, aiming at using microparticles as biomarkers in clinical practice.

  6. Experiences and perceptions about cause and prevention of cardiovascular disease among people with cardiometabolic conditions: findings of in-depth interviews from a peri-urban Nepalese community

    OpenAIRE

    Oli, Natalia; Vaidya, Abhinav; Subedi, Madhusudan; Krettek, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nepal currently faces an increasing burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Earlier studies on health literacy and the behavior dimension of cardiovascular health reported a substantial gap between knowledge and practice.Objective: This qualitative study aimed to deepen understanding of the community perspective on cardiovascular health from the patients’ viewpoint.Design: We conducted in-depth interviews (IDIs) with 13 individuals with confirmed heart disease, hypertension, or di...

  7. Vitamin B6 and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friso, Simonetta; Lotto, V; Corrocher, R; Choi, Sang Woon

    2012-01-01

    While overt vitamin B6 deficiency is not a frequent finding nowadays in medical practice, evidence suggests that insufficiency of this vitamin is rather widespread in a quite large portion of the population such as the elderly or in not unusual conditions such as that of alcohol addiction. Moreover, a mild deficiency in B6 vitamin is a state that may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Epidemiologic evidence from case control and prospective studies have suggested that low dietary intake or reduced blood concentrations of vitamin B6 is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, although most recent trials demonstrated the ineffectiveness of vitamin B6 supplementation on the prevention of cardiovascular events recurrence. Due to limited and somewhat inconsistent data together with the ample variety of critical functions in which vitamin B6 is involved in the human body, it is very challenging to attempt at establishing a cause and effect relationship between vitamin B6 and risk of cardiovascular disease as it is to delineate the exact mechanism(s) by which vitamin B6 may modulate such risk. In the present chapter we review the currently available knowledge deriving from both epidemiological and mechanistic studies designed to define potential candidate mechanisms for the association of vitamin B6 impairment and risk of cardiovascular disease development. PMID:22116704

  8. Physical activity, obesity and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakka, T A; Bouchard, C

    2005-01-01

    Sedentary lifestyle and overweight are major public health, clinical, and economical problems in modern societies. The worldwide epidemic of excess weight is due to imbalance between physical activity and dietary energy intake. Sedentary lifestyle, unhealthy diet, and consequent overweight and obesity markedly increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Regular physical activity 45-60 min per day prevents unhealthy weight gain and obesity, whereas sedentary behaviors such as watching television promote them. Regular exercise can markedly reduce body weight and fat mass without dietary caloric restriction in overweight individuals. An increase in total energy expenditure appears to be the most important determinant of successful exercise-induced weight loss. The best long-term results may be achieved when physical activity produces an energy expenditure of at least 2,500 kcal/week. Yet, the optimal approach in weight reduction programs appears to be a combination of regular physical activity and caloric restriction. A minimum of 60 min, but most likely 80-90 min of moderate-intensity physical activity per day may be needed to avoid or limit weight regain in formerly overweight or obese individuals. Regular moderate intensity physical activity, a healthy diet, and avoiding unhealthy weight gain are effective and safe ways to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases and to reduce premature mortality in all population groups. Although the efforts to promote cardiovascular health concern the whole population, particular attention should be paid to individuals who are physically inactive, have unhealthy diets or are prone to weight gain. They have the highest risk for worsening of the cardiovascular risk factor profile and for cardiovascular disease. To combat the epidemic of overweight and to improve cardiovascular health at a population level, it is important to develop strategies to increase habitual physical activity and to prevent overweight and obesity in

  9. PPAR Agonists and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C. Calkin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPARs are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors that play important roles in lipid and glucose homeostasis. To the extent that PPAR agonists improve diabetic dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, these agents have been considered to reduce cardiovascular risk. However, data from murine models suggests that PPAR agonists also have independent anti-atherosclerotic actions, including the suppression of vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and activation of the renin angiotensin system. Many of these potentially anti-atherosclerotic effects are thought to be mediated by transrepression of nuclear factor-kB, STAT, and activator protein-1 dependent pathways. In recent clinical trials, PPARα agonists have been shown to be effective in the primary prevention of cardiovascular events, while their cardiovascular benefit in patients with established cardiovascular disease remains equivocal. However, the use of PPARγ agonists, and more recently dual PPARα/γ coagonists, has been associated with an excess in cardiovascular events, possibly reflecting unrecognised fluid retention with potent agonists of the PPARγ receptor. Newer pan agonists, which retain their anti-atherosclerotic activity without weight gain, may provide one solution to this problem. However, the complex biologic effects of the PPARs may mean that only vascular targeted agents or pure transrepressors will realise the goal of preventing atherosclerotic vascular disease.

  10. Vascular composition data supporting the role of N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the prevention of cardiovascular disease events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohwada, Takayuki; Yokokawa, Tetsuro; Kanno, Yuki; Hotsuki, Yu; Sakamoto, Takayuki; Watanabe, Kenichi; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-06-01

    N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are thought to have protective effects against cardiovascular disease. Here, we report the relationship between serum PUFA concentrations and plaque composition, as evaluated by virtual histology-intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS). Consecutive patients (n=61) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were pre-operatively examined using VH-IVUS to assess the composition of culprit plaques. Gray-scale IVUS and VH-IVUS data of fibrous, fibro-fatty, necrotic core, and dense calcium regions of plaques were estimated at the minimal luminal area sites of culprit lesions. Serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and PUFAs, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and arachidonic acid (AA), were compared between patients with (ACS, n=27) and without acute coronary syndrome (non-ACS, n=34) before PCI. Multiple logistic regression analysis of the data showed that EPA/AA under the median was more highly associated with ACS than hsCRP over the median. In addition, EPA/AA was negatively correlated with the percentage of fibrous plaque regions and EPA/AA and DHA/AA were positively correlated with the percentage of dense calcium regions in plaques. Furthermore, the correlation index of EPA/AA was the most highly (R=0.513) correlated with the percentage of dense calcium regions in plaques. PMID:27222841

  11. Helicobacter pylori and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukazman, M; Yeniova, O; Dal, K; Yavuz, B

    2015-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common infections in human. The association between H. pylori and gastrointestinal diseases including peptic ulcer, chronic gastritis, mucosa associated tissue lymphoma (MALT) and gastric cancer is well known. However it was also suggested that H. pylori was linked to various extra-gastrointestinal disorders such as diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease. In this review we summarized the association between H. pylori and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26502864

  12. Cardiovascular disease incidence and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, Stine; Agyemang, Charles; Zwisler, Ann Dorthe;

    2016-01-01

    Studies on cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence and survival show varying results between different ethnic groups. Our aim was to add a new dimension by exploring the role of migrant status in combination with ethnic background on incidence of-and survival from-CVD and more specifically acute...... of some types of cardiovascular disease compared to Danish-born. Family-reunified migrants on the other hand had lower rates of CVD. All migrants had better survival than Danish-born indicating that migrants may not always be disadvantaged in health....

  13. Vitamin D and Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R. Grübler

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency, as well as cardiovascular diseases (CVD and related risk factors are highly prevalent worldwide and frequently co-occur. Vitamin D has long been known to be an essential part of bone metabolism, although recent evidence suggests that vitamin D plays a key role in the pathophysiology of other diseases, including CVD, as well. In this review, we aim to summarize the most recent data on the involvement of vitamin D deficiency in the development of major cardiovascular risk factors: hypertension, obesity and dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney disease and endothelial dysfunction. In addition, we outline the most recent observational, as well as interventional data on the influence of vitamin D on CVD. Since it is still an unresolved issue whether vitamin D deficiency is causally involved in the pathogenesis of CVD, data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs designed to assess the impact of vitamin D supplementation on cardiovascular outcomes are awaited with anticipation. At present, we can only conclude that vitamin D deficiency is an independent cardiovascular risk factor, but whether vitamin D supplementation can significantly improve cardiovascular outcomes is still largely unknown.

  14. Cardiovascular calcification. An inflammatory disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular calcification is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This disease of dysregulated metabolism is no longer viewed as a passive degenerative disease, but instead as an active process triggered by pro-inflammatory cues. Furthermore, a positive feedback loop of calcification and inflammation is hypothesized to drive disease progression in arterial calcification. Both calcific aortic valve disease and atherosclerotic arterial calcification may possess similar underlying mechanisms. Early histopathological studies first highlighted the contribution of inflammation to cardiovascular calcification by demonstrating the accumulation of macrophages and T lymphocytes in 'early' lesions within the aortic valves and arteries. A series of in vitro work followed, which gave a mechanistic insight into the stimulation of smooth muscle cells to undergo osteogenic differentiation and mineralization. The emergence of novel technology, in the form of animal models and more recently molecular imaging, has enabled accelerated progression of this field, by providing strong evidence regarding the concept of this disorder as an inflammatory disease. Although there are still gaps in our knowledge of the mechanisms behind this disorder, this review discusses the various studies that have helped form the concept of the inflammation-dependent cardiovascular calcification paradigm. (author)

  15. Ionizing radiation and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoel, David G

    2006-09-01

    For more than 15 years the A-bomb survivor studies have shown increased noncancer mortality due to radiation exposures. The most prominent cause of this increase is circulatory disease mortality. Although the estimated relative risk is less than for solid cancers (1.2 versus 1.6 per Sv), there are measurable increases in cardiovascular disease mortality at doses greater than 0.5 Sv. The evidence for circulatory diseases in mortality studies of occupational cohorts exposed to external radiation is less compelling. It is generally accepted that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the arteries and a risk factor for myocardial infarction. Immunological markers for inflammatory disease have been shown to be dose related in A-bomb survivors. Evidence from animal studies reveals increased cardiovascular mortality and arterial endothelial damage from both neutron and, to a lesser extent, gamma exposures. PMID:17119211

  16. Other cardiovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005198 Study on the relationship of plasma fib-rinogen, platelet aggregation rate ad peripheral arterial occlusive disease. WANG Jie(王洁), et al. Dept Emerg, Gene Hosp Chin People’s Armed Police Forces, Beijing 100039. Chin J Epidemiol, 2005; 26 (1):1-4. Objective: To detect the relationship of plasma fibrinogen, platelet aggregation rate and peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) in the elderly.

  17. The risk factors and prevention of cardiovascular disease: the importance of electrocardiogram in the diagnosis and treatment of acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosiek A

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Anna Rosiek,1 Krzysztof Leksowski1,2 1Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Nicolas Copernicus University in Torun, 2Department of General Surgery, 10th Military Hospital, Bydgoszcz, Poland Abstract: Acute coronary syndrome is a leading cause of emergency medical treatment and hospitalization in Poland. High-speed electrocardiogram (ECG has shown good accuracy of the initial diagnosis and of the final diagnosis in treated cardiac patients. Initial diagnosis and definitive diagnosis were analyzed statistically (P<0.0001. Although much is said about the prevention of sudden death in heart failure, the elimination of risk factors health care in Poland does not pay due attention to the need for early diagnosis and ECG analysis (at the stage of prevention. This article presents the inclusion of ECG in the prevention process and shows that it allows for early detection of cardiovascular diseases. In Poland, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients are identified in the ambulance that reduces time to door-to-balloon. Keywords: electrical intervention, chest pain, health care delivery, diagnostics, signal transmission, death prevention 

  18. [Secondary nephrotic syndrome due to cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Tomoya; Takahashi, Fumihiko; Kikuchi, Kenjiro

    2004-10-01

    Cardiovascular diseases ralely evoke nephrotic syndrome. Especially hypertensive renal disease (nephroscrelosis) and renovascular hypertension occasionally may lead to nephrotic syndrome. We reported a case of nephrotic syndrome with renovascular hypertension successfully treated with candesartan. In eldery patients cardiovascular diseases are appeared. It is very important for clinicians to detect the mechanism of nephrotic syndrome caused by cardiovascular diseases. PMID:15500142

  19. Cardiovascular disease in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollan, Ivana; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Ahearn, Joseph M; Cohen Tervaert, J W; Curran, Sam; Goodyear, Carl S; Hestad, Knut A; Kahaleh, Bashar; Riggio, Marcello; Shields, Kelly; Wasko, Mary C

    2013-08-01

    Various autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARDs), including rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus, are associated with premature atherosclerosis. However, premature atherosclerosis has not been uniformly observed in systemic sclerosis. Furthermore, although experimental models of atherosclerosis support the role of antiphospholipid antibodies in atherosclerosis, there is no clear evidence of premature atherosclerosis in antiphospholipid syndrome (APA). Ischemic events in APA are more likely to be caused by pro-thrombotic state than by enhanced atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) in ARDs is caused by traditional and non-traditional risk factors. Besides other factors, inflammation and immunologic abnormalities, the quantity and quality of lipoproteins, hypertension, insulin resistance/hyperglycemia, obesity and underweight, presence of platelets bearing complement protein C4d, reduced number and function of endothelial progenitor cells, apoptosis of endothelial cells, epigenetic mechanisms, renal disease, periodontal disease, depression, hyperuricemia, hypothyroidism, sleep apnea and vitamin D deficiency may contribute to the premature CVD. Although most research has focused on systemic inflammation, vascular inflammation may play a crucial role in the premature CVD in ARDs. It may be involved in the development and destabilization of both atherosclerotic lesions and of aortic aneurysms (a known complication of ARDs). Inflammation in subintimal vascular and perivascular layers appears to frequently occur in CVD, with a higher frequency in ARD than in non-ARD patients. It is possible that this inflammation is caused by infections and/or autoimmunity, which might have consequences for treatment. Importantly, drugs targeting immunologic factors participating in the subintimal inflammation (e.g., T- and B-cells) might have a protective effect on CVD. Interestingly, vasa vasorum and cardiovascular adipose tissue may

  20. Contraception and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos-Hesselink, JolienW.; Cornette, Jerome; Sliwa, Karen; Pieper, Petronella G.; Veldtman, Gruschen R.; Johnson, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Contraceptive counselling should begin early in females with heart disease, preferably directly after the start of menstruation. In coming to a decision about the method of contraception, the following issues should be considered: (i) the risk of pregnancy for the mother and the consequences of an u

  1. Cardiovascular Disease Burden: Evolving Knowledge of Risk Factors in Myocardial Infarction and Stroke through Population-Based Research and Perspectives in Global Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUSTAVO B.F. OLIVEIRA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Current knowledge and research perspectives on the top ranking causes of mortality worldwide, i.e., ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases have developed rapidly. In fact, until recently, it was considered that only half of the myocardial infarctions were due to traditional risk factors such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking and diabetes. In addition, most of the available evidence of incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcomes, if not all of it, was derived from studies conducted in developed countries, which included lower proportion of female individuals and with low ethnic diversity. Recent reports by the WHO have provided striking public health information, i.e., the global burden of cardiovascular mortality for the next decades is expected to predominantly occur among developing countries. Therefore, multi-ethnic population-based research including prospective cohorts and, when appropriate, case-control studies, is warranted. These studies should be specifically designed to ascertain key public health measures such as geographic variations in noncommunicable diseases, diagnosis of traditional and potential newly discovered risk factors, causes of death and disability, and gaps for improvement in healthcare prevention (both primary and secondary and specific treatments. As an example, a multinational, multiethnic population-based cohort study is the Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiology (PURE study, which is the largest global initiative of 150,000 adults aged 35-70 yrs, looking at environmental, societal and biological influences on obesity and chronic health conditions such as ischemic heart disease, stroke and cancer among urban and rural communities in low-, middle-, and high-income countries, with national, community, household and individual-level data. Implementation of population-based strategies is crucial to optimizing limited health system resources while improving care and cardiovascular morbidity

  2. NUTRITION IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Ambika Prasad; Debasish

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition in cardiova scular disease stands as query in million CVD patients. Nutritional advice plays a critical role in management horizon of sick cardiacs. No fasting, no feasting; no worry, no curry - should be the basic platform. Fruit, fiber and fish are friendly to them while red meat is a red signal . No stress, no race for them in daily life will add to their food pat tern. Be a vegan - may be the best practice one can...

  3. Genomics in Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Robert; Marian, A.J.; Dandona, Sonny; Alexandre F R Stewart

    2013-01-01

    A paradigm shift towards biology occurred in the 1990’s subsequently catalyzed by the sequencing of the human genome in 2000. The cost of DNA sequencing has gone from millions to thousands of dollars with sequencing of one’s entire genome costing only $1,000. Rapid DNA sequencing is being embraced for single gene disorders, particularly for sporadic cases and those from small families. Transmission of lethal genes such as associated with Huntington’s disease can, through in-vitro fertilizatio...

  4. Sex steroids and cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu Beng Yeap

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available As men grow older, testosterone (T levels decline and the significance of this change is debated. The evidence supporting a causal role for lower circulating T, or its metabolites dihydrotestosterone (DHT and estradiol, in the genesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD in men is limited. Observational studies associate low baseline T levels with carotid atherosclerosis, aortic and peripheral vascular disease, and with the incidence of cardiovascular events and mortality. Studies using mass spectrometry suggest that when total T is assayed optimally, calculation of free T might not necessarily improve risk stratification. There is limited evidence to support an association of estradiol with CVD. Interventional studies of T therapy in men with coronary artery disease have shown beneficial effects on exercise-induced myocardial ischemia. However, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials (RCTs of T therapy in men with the prespecified outcomes of cardiovascular events or deaths are lacking. Meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials of T published up to 2010 found no increase in cardiovascular events, mortality, or prostate cancer with therapy. Recently, in a trial of older men with mobility limitations, men randomized to receive a substantial dose of T reported cardiovascular adverse effects. This phenomenon was not reported from a comparable trial where men received a more conservative dose of T, suggesting a prudent approach should be adopted when considering therapy in frail older men with existing CVD. Adequately powered RCTs of T in middle-aged and older men are needed to clarify whether or not hormonal intervention would reduce the incidence of CVD.

  5. The effectiveness and cost effectiveness of dark chocolate consumption as prevention therapy in people at high risk of cardiovascular disease: best case scenario analysis using a Markov model

    OpenAIRE

    Zomer, Ella; Owen, Alice; Magliano, Dianna J; Liew, Danny; Reid, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To model the long term effectiveness and cost effectiveness of daily dark chocolate consumption in a population with metabolic syndrome at high risk of cardiovascular disease. Design Best case scenario analysis using a Markov model. Setting Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle study. Participants 2013 people with hypertension who met the criteria for metabolic syndrome, with no history of cardiovascular disease and not receiving antihypertensive therapy. Main outcome measures ...

  6. Cardiovascular disease – coronary heart disease – qualitative research

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide (World Health Organisation, 2008). This study focuses coronary heart disease and the management of lifestyle changes in prevention and ongoing treatment. In doing this, cardiac rehabilitation most useful. Through this process, individuals may experience a variety of issues, which may influence their overall health status. Despite the importance of rehabilitation being acknowledged, there is need for a...

  7. NUTRITION IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambika Prasad

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition in cardiova scular disease stands as query in million CVD patients. Nutritional advice plays a critical role in management horizon of sick cardiacs. No fasting, no feasting; no worry, no curry - should be the basic platform. Fruit, fiber and fish are friendly to them while red meat is a red signal . No stress, no race for them in daily life will add to their food pat tern. Be a vegan - may be the best practice one can do when he is prone to get CVD. Avoid concentrated sugar in form of sweets which will cause hyperglycemic wave front mediated endothelial dysfunction. Moderation in nutritional practi ce help them not the e xcessive one if alcohol is taken into account. A void fry otherwise you will cry : S e advise them. No fry, no fast food, no fake beverages - they should follow. Low salt, low calorie and low fat diet should be their dietary principle. A healthy diet will make a man, society, race healthy together.

  8. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FOOD SUPPLEMENTS USED ON THE ACTIVITY OF KINETIC ENDURANCE CHARAKTER APPLIED AS A CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES PREVENTION

    OpenAIRE

    DIČE, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to compare food supplements used on the activity of endurance character and their influence on the cardiovascular system. The teoretical part is pursued to the basic food components and their metabolism and to kinetic activities splitting. The practical part gives information about splitting of sports supplements used on the activity of endurance character, their usage and effects. It deals with the question of human organism behaviour during the strain of endurance ...

  9. Renal Dysfunction and Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Soveri, Inga

    2006-01-01

    Kidney dysfunction increases cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The mechanisms for the risk increase seem to involve a combination of traditional and non-traditional CVD risk factors. We studied renal dysfunction as CVD and mortality risk factor in middle-aged men free from diabetes and CVD. The risk for myocardial infarction (MI) and CVD mortality was increased by ~40% in the 16.5% of men with worse renal function, independent of other CVD risk factors. Renal transplant dysfunction as CVD an...

  10. Psychological stress and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    There is an enormous amount of literature on psychological stress and cardiovascular disease. This report reviews conceptual issues in defining stress and then explores the ramifications of stress in terms of the effects of acute versus long-term stressors on cardiac functioning. Examples of acute stressor studies are discussed in terms of disasters (earthquakes) and in the context of experimental stress physiology studies, which offer a more detailed perspective on underlying physiology. Stu...

  11. Platelet proteomics in cardiovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Vélez; Ángel García

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, platelet proteomics has been applied successfully to the study of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). It is very well known that platelets play a pivotal role in the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying many CVDs, especially acute coronary syndromes (ACSs), since they are implied in thrombus formation after atheroma plaque rupture. This is the reason why molecules involved in platelet activation and aggregation are primary targets for treatment of ACSs. Many efforts are aimed...

  12. Genetic risks for cardiovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zafarmand, M. H.

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD), which involves the heart, brain, and peripheral circulation, is a major health problem world-wide. The development of atherosclerosis is a complex process, and several established risk factors are involved. Nevertheless, these established risk factors do not fully explain the occurrence of CVD and further insight is required in factors such as genetic determinants that may identify individuals at risk. In this thesis we worked on the genetic basis...

  13. MACD: an imaging marker for cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganz, Melanie; de Bruijne, Marleen; Nielsen, Mads

    2010-01-01

    Despite general acceptance that a healthy lifestyle and the treatment of risk factors can prevent the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), CVD are the most common cause of death in Europe and the United States. It has been shown that abdominal aortic calcifications (AAC) correlate strongly...... with coronary artery calcifications. Hence an early detection of aortic calcified plaques helps to predict the risk of related coronary diseases. Also since two thirds of the adverse events have no prior symptoms, possibilities to screen for risk in low cost imaging are important. To this end the Morphological...... imaging markers described. Finally we present that the MACD index predicts cardiovascular death with a hazard ratio of approximately four....

  14. [Cognitive dysfunction in cardiovascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladwig, Karl-Heinz

    2016-08-01

    A multitude of modifiable risk factors during the median phase of life are often causative for cognitive dysfunction (CD) in old age. High evidence exists for cigarette smoking, diabetes, physical inactivity and sleeping disorders. Single large scale population based studies proof it for hypertension, hypercholesterinemia and depression, conflicting evidence exists for obesity and work stress. Little attention is paid to the close association between cardiovascular disease conditions and CD, particularly for atrial fibrillation, heart failure and for older patients with coronary heart disease. Undetected CD may be responsible for non-adherence and failure of self-care programs in chronic heart patients. PMID:27557067

  15. Association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies have supported the notion that subjects with periodontitis and patients with multiple tooth extractions as a result of chronic advanced periodontal disease (PDD) have a greater risk of developing Cardiovascular disease (CVD) than those who had little or no periodontal infection. Periodontitis may predispose affected patients to CVD by elevating systemic C-reactive protein level and pro-inflammatory activity in atherosclerotic lesions and accelerate development of cardiovascular diseases, Oral health variables including loss of teeth, positive plaque Benzoyl-D-L-Arginine- Naphthyl Amide test (BANA) scores, and compliant of xerostomia may by considered as risk indicators for CVD. Exact mechanism which links PDD and CVD has not been firmly established. The link between PDD and CVD may be attributed to bacteria entering blood stream and attaching to the fatty plaque in coronary artery and contributing to clot formation which can lead to heart attack. Inflammation caused by PDD increases the plaque build up. The association between the two disease entities is cause for concern. However, dental and medical practitioners should be aware of these findings to move intelligently to interact with inquiring patients with periodontitis. They should be urged to maintain medical surveillance of their cardiovascular status, and work on controlling or reducing all known risk factors associated with CVD, including periodontal infection. (author)

  16. Risk factors for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and risk reduction by lipid control: the OMEGA study risk factor sub-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Tamio; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Miyazaki, Shigeru; Teramukai, Satoshi; Mori, Yoshihiro; Okuda, Yasuyuki; Hiramatsu, Katsutoshi

    2014-01-01

    To identify risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in hypertensive patients with no history of CVD being treated with antihypertensive drugs, we examined subgroup data (n = 13 052) from the prospective, observational Olmesartan Mega Study to Determine the Relationship between Cardiovascular Endpoints and Blood Pressure Goal Achievement (OMEGA) study. Risk factors for CVD, stroke and coronary heart disease (CHD) were examined using a Cox proportional hazards model. In addition, the effect of statin therapy at baseline on CHD prevention was analyzed in dyslipidemic patients. The factors significantly related to CVD were female (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.637, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.428-0.948), older age (65-69 years: HR = 2.165, 95% CI 1.214-3.861; 70-74 years: HR = 2.324, 95% CI 1.294-4.174; ≥75 years: HR = 2.448, 95% CI 1.309-4.578), family history of CHD (HR = 1.993, 95% CI 1.249-3.179), diabetes (HR = 2.287, 95% CI 1.700-3.078), current smoking (HR = 2.289, 95% CI 1.512-3.466) and alcohol drinking socially (HR = 0.589, 95% CI 0.379-0.913). Diabetes was a risk factor for both stroke and CHD, while age, family history of CHD, and sodium intake score were risk factors for stroke alone. Sex, dyslipidemia, smoking and exercise habits were risk factors for CHD alone. The risk of CHD in dyslipidemic patients on statin treatment was comparable to the risk in patients without dyslipidemia (HR = 1.134, 95% CI 0.604-2.126). However, in dyslipidemic patients not on statin treatment, the HR increased to 1.807 (95% CI 1.156-2.825). In conclusion, some risk factors for CVD in hypertensive patients being treated with antihypertensive drugs with no history of CVD differed between CHD and stroke. These results suggest the importance of managing dyslipidemia with a statin for primary prevention of CHD, as well as the importance of hypertension therapy. PMID:23865387

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species in Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sugamura, Koichi; Keaney, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the ‘free-radical theory’ of disease, researchers have been trying to elucidate the role of oxidative stress from free radicals in cardiovascular disease. Considerable data indicate that ROS and oxidative stress are important features of cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis, hypertension, and congestive heart failure. However, blanket strategies with antioxidants to ameliorate cardiovascular disease have not generally yielded favorable results. However, our understanding...

  18. [Alpha-linolenic acid and cardiovascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristić-Medić, Danijela; Ristić, Gordana; Tepsić, Vesna

    2003-01-01

    IMPORTANCE AND METABOLISM OF ALPHA-LINOLENIC ACID: Alpha-linolenic acid is an essential fatty acid which cannot be produced in the body and must be taken by food. Both in animals and humans, alpha-linolenic acid is desaturated and elongated into eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid. It is also incorporated into plasma and tissue lipids and its conversion is affected by levels of linoleic acid. POTENTIAL ROLE IN PATHOGENESIS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES: Diet enriched in n-3 fatty acids, especially alpha-linolenic acid, reduces the incidence of cardiac death. Studies have shown that alpha linolenic acid prevents ventricular fibrillation which is the main cause of cardiac death. Studies in rats suggest that alpha-linolenic acid may be more effective in preventing ventricular fibrillations than eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid. Furthermore, alpha-linolenic acid is the main fatty acid decreasing platalet aggregation which is an important step in thrombosis i.e. non-fatal myocardial infarction and stroke. DIETARY SOURCES AND NUTRITION RECOMMENDATIONS: Dietary sources include flaxseed and flaxseed oil, canola oil, soybean and soybean oil, pumpkin seed and pumpkin oil, walnuts and walnut oil. Strong evidence supports beneficial effects of alpha-linolenic acid and its dietary sources should be incorporated into balanced diet for prevention of cardiovascular diseases. The recommended daily intake is 2 g with a ratio of 5/1 for linoleic/alpha-linolenic acid. PMID:15510909

  19. The Use of Behavior Change Techniques and Theory in Technologies for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Treatment in Adults: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Sandra J; Sheats, Jylana L; King, Abby C

    2016-01-01

    This review examined the use of health behavior change techniques and theory in technology-enabled interventions targeting risk factors and indicators for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention and treatment. Articles targeting physical activity, weight loss, smoking cessation and management of hypertension, lipids and blood glucose were sourced from PubMed (November 2010-2015) and coded for use of 1) technology, 2) health behavior change techniques (using the CALO-RE taxonomy), and 3) health behavior theories. Of the 984 articles reviewed, 304 were relevant (240=intervention, 64=review). Twenty-two different technologies were used (M=1.45, SD=+/-0.719). The most frequently used behavior change techniques were self-monitoring and feedback on performance (M=5.4, SD=+/-2.9). Half (52%) of the intervention studies named a theory/model - most frequently Social Cognitive Theory, the Trans-theoretical Model, and the Theory of Planned Behavior/Reasoned Action. To optimize technology-enabled interventions targeting CVD risk factors, integrated behavior change theories that incorporate a variety of evidence-based health behavior change techniques are needed. PMID:26902519

  20. Marijuana Use and Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Christopher A; Frishman, William H

    2016-01-01

    Marijuana is currently the most used illicit substance in the world. With the current trend of decriminalization and legalization of marijuana in the US, physicians in the US will encounter more patients using marijuana recreationally over a diverse range of ages and health states. Therefore, it is relevant to review marijuana's effects on human cardiovascular physiology and disease. Compared with placebo, marijuana cigarettes cause increases in heart rate, supine systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and forearm blood flow via increased sympathetic nervous system activity. These actions increase myocardial oxygen demand to a degree that they can decrease the time to exercise-induced angina in patients with a history of stable angina. In addition, marijuana has been associated with triggering myocardial infarctions (MIs) in young male patients. Smoking marijuana has been shown to increase the risk of MI onset by a factor of 4.8 for the 60 minutes after marijuana consumption, and to increase the annual risk of MI in the daily cannabis user from 1.5% to 3% per year. Human and animal models suggest that this effect may be due to coronary arterial vasospasm. However, longitudinal studies have indicated that marijuana use may not have a significant effect on long-term mortality. While further research is required to definitively determine the impact of marijuana on cardiovascular disease, it is reasonable to recommend against recreational marijuana use, especially in individuals with a history of coronary artery disorders. PMID:26886465

  1. A cluster randomised school-based lifestyle intervention programme for the prevention of childhood obesity and related early cardiovascular disease (JuvenTUM 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haller Bernhard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood obesity is not only associated with adult obesity but also with increased risk of adult onset of type 2 diabetes and subsequent coronary heart disease. The potential effects of school-based health intervention programmes on cardiovascular risk and surrogate markers are unclear, as only few studies have attempted to investigate a complete risk profile including a detailed laboratory analysis or micro- and macrovascular function. In this study a comprehensive school-based randomized intervention programme will be investigated in 10-14-year old children addressing the influence of lifestyle intervention on inactivity, cardiometabolic risk factors and early signs of vascular disease. Methods/Design 15 secondary schools in Southern Germany are randomly assigned to intervention or control schools. Children in the fifth grade (10-11 years will be observed over four years. The study combines a school-based with a home-based approach, aiming at children, teachers and parents. The main components are weekly lifestyle-lessons for children, taught by regular classroom teachers to increase physical activity in- and outside of school, to improve eating patterns at school and at home, to reduce media consumption and to amplify well-being. In 4-6 annual meetings, teachers receive information about health-related topics with worksheets for children and supporting equipment, accounting for school-specific needs and strategies. Parents' trainings are provided on a regular basis. All examinations are performed at the beginning and at the end of every school year. Anthropometry includes measurements of BMI, waist and upper arm circumferences, skinfold thickness as well as peripheral blood pressure. Blood sampling includes lipid parameters, insulin, glucose, hsCRP, adiponectin, and IL-6 as well as testosteron and estrogen to determine maturation status. Vascular function is non-invasively assessed by measuring arterial stiffness in large

  2. Improved Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Daniel E; Alexander, Karen; Brindis, Ralph G; Curtis, Anne B; Maurer, Mathew; Rich, Michael W; Sperling, Laurence; Wenger, Nanette K

    2016-01-01

    Longevity is increasing and the population of older adults is growing. The biology of aging is conducive to cardiovascular disease (CVD), such that prevalence of coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, arrhythmia and other disorders are increasing as more adults survive into old age.  Furthermore, CVD in older adults is distinctive, with management issues predictably complicated by multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty and other complexities of care that increase management risks (e.g., bleeding, falls, and rehospitalization) and uncertainty of outcomes.  In this review, state-of-the-art advances in heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, atrial fibrillation, amyloidosis, and CVD prevention are discussed.  Conceptual benefits of treatments are considered in relation to the challenges and ambiguities inherent in their application to older patients. PMID:26918183

  3. Omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil supplements, but not alpha-linolenic acid benefit cardiovascular disease outcomes in primary & secondary prevention studies: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relationship between dietary omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease is uncertain. The published literature is replete with studies of varying methodological quality and sometimes contradictory results. The objective of this work was to conduct a systematic review and critical appraisal ...

  4. Incidence and predictors of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients receiving low-dose aspirin for secondary prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William Ng; Xi Cheng; Chu-Pak Lau; Wai-Man Wong; Wai-Hong Chen; Hung-Fat Tse; Pui-Yin Lee; Kam-Chuen Lai; Sheung-Wai Li; Matthew Ng; Kwok-Fai Lam

    2006-01-01

    AIM: The use of low-dose aspirin to prevent cardiovascular disease events is well established. However,the incidence and predictors of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) with its use are unknown. We studied prospectively the incidence and outcome of peptic ulceration in low-dose aspirin users.METHODS: A total of 991 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) on low-dose aspirin were prospectively followed-up for two years for the occurrence and clinical features of first hospitalized episode of UGIB.RESULTS: UGIB had a bimodal presentation with 45% occurring within four months of aspirin initiation and had an overall prevalence of 1.5% per year. There was no UGIB-related death. Hypertension (OR = 4.6, 95%CI 1.5 - 14.7, P = 0.009), history of peptic ulceration (OR = 3.1,95%CI 1.1 - 9.0, P = 0.039), tertiary education (OR =3.08, 95%CI 1.1 - 9.0, P = 0.039) and higher lean body mass (P = 0.016) were independent factors associated with UGIB. Use of nitrate did not reduce UGIB.CONCLUSION: The incidence of UGIB in patients with CAD on long-term low-dose aspirin is low, but is accompanied with significant morbidity. With prolonged use of aspirin, UGIB continues to be a problem for those with risk factors and especially in patients with a history of peptic ulcers, in which UGIB tends to occur early after aspirin therapy.

  5. Nutrigenomic programming of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozanne, Susan

    2014-10-01

    Over twenty five years ago epidemiological studies revealed that there was a relationship between patterns of early growth and subsequent risk of diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome. Studies of identical twins, individuals who were in utero during periods of famine, discordant siblings and animal models have provided strong evidence that the early environment plays an important role in mediating these relationships. Early nutrition is one such important environmental factor. The concept of early life programming is therefore widely accepted and the underlying mechanisms starting to emerge. These include: (1) Permanent structural changes in an organ due to exposure to suboptimal levels of essential hormones or nutrients during a critical period of development leading to permanent changes in tissue function (2) Persistent epigenetic changes such as DNA methylation and histone modifications and miRNAs leading to changes in gene expression. (3) Permanent effects on regulation of cellular ageing through increases in oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction leading to DNA damage and telomere shortening. Further understanding of these processes will enable the development of preventative and intervention strategies to combat the burden of common diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26461282

  6. Secondary Prevention in the Clinical Management of Patients With Cardiovascular Diseases. Core Components, Standards and Outcome Measures for Referral and Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Piepoli, Massimo F.; Corra, Ugo; Adamopoulos, Stamatis; Benzer, Werner; Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna; Cupples, Margaret; Dendale, Paul; Doherty, Patrick; Gaita, Dan; Hofer, Stefan; McGee, Hannah; Mendes, Miguel; Niebauer, Josef; Pogosova, Nana; Garcia-Porrero, Esteban

    2014-01-01

    Despite major improvements in diagnostics and interventional therapies, cardiovascular diseases remain a major health care and socio-economic burden both in western and developing countries, in which this burden is increasing in close correlation to economic growth. Health authorities and the general population have started to recognize that the fight against these diseases can only be won if their burden is faced by increasing our investment on interventions in lifestyle changes and preventi...

  7. The VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL): Rationale and Design of a Large Randomized Controlled Trial of Vitamin D and Marine Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplements for the Primary Prevention of Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Manson, JoAnn E.; Bassuk, Shari S.; Lee, I-Min; Cook, Nancy R.; Albert, Michelle A.; Gordon, David; Zaharris, Elaine; MacFadyen, Jean G.; Danielson, Eleanor; Lin, Jennifer; Zhang, Shumin M.; Buring, Julie E

    2011-01-01

    Data from laboratory studies, observational research, and/or secondary prevention trials suggest that vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acids may reduce risk for cancer or cardiovascular disease (CVD), but primary prevention trials with adequate dosing in general populations (i.e., unselected for disease risk) are lacking. The ongoing VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL) is a large randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2×2 factorial trial of vitamin D (in the form of vitamin D3 [chole...

  8. Astaxanthin in Cardiovascular Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fassett, Robert G; Coombes, Jeff S

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are established processes contributing to cardiovascular disease caused by atherosclerosis. However, antioxidant therapies tested in cardiovascular disease such as vitamin E, C and β-carotene have proved unsuccessful at reducing cardiovascular events and mortality. Although these outcomes may reflect limitations in trial design, new, more potent antioxidant therapies are being pursued. Astaxanthin, a carotenoid found in microalgae, fungi, complex plants, seaf...

  9. Cardiovascular Disease, Mitochondria, and Traditional Chinese Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Wang; Fei Lin; Li-li Guo; Xing-jiang Xiong; Xun Fan

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that mitochondria play an important role in the cardiovascular system and mutations of mitochondrial DNA affect coronary artery disease, resulting in hypertension, atherosclerosis, and cardiomyopathy. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used for thousands of years to treat cardiovascular disease, but it is not yet clear how TCM affects mitochondrial function. By reviewing the interactions between the cardiovascular system, mitochondrial DNA, and TCM, we sho...

  10. A new Web-based medical tool for assessment and prevention of comprehensive cardiovascular risk

    OpenAIRE

    Daniele Franchi; Davide Cini; Giorgio Iervasi

    2011-01-01

    Daniele Franchi1,2, Davide Cini1, Giorgio Iervasi11Istituto di Fisiologia Clinica, CNR, Pisa, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Oncologia, dei Trapianti e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina, Università di Pisa, Pisa, ItalyBackground: Multifactor cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death; besides well-known cardiovascular risk factors, several emerging factors such as mental stress, diet type, and physical inactivity, have been associated to cardiovascular disease. To date, prevent...

  11. Cardiovascular Involvement in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Amaya-Amaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AD represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD.

  12. Serum triglycerides and risk of cardiovascular disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boullart, I.; Graaf, J. de; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2012-01-01

    Dyslipidemia, especially elevated serum levels of cholesterol, is causally related to cardiovascular disease. The specific role of triglycerides has long been controversial. In this article we discuss the role of serum triglycerides in relation to the risk of cardiovascular disease. First, the (path

  13. Precision Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease and Hunting Elephants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine postulates improved prediction, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease based on patient specific factors especially DNA sequence (i.e., gene) variants. Ideas related to precision medicine stem from the much anticipated "genetic revolution in medicine" arising seamlessly from the human genome project (HGP). In this essay I deconstruct the concept of precision medicine and raise questions about the validity of the paradigm in general and its application to cardiovascular disease. Thus far precision medicine has underperformed based on the vision promulgated by enthusiasts. While niche successes for precision medicine are likely, the promises of broad based transformation should be viewed with skepticism. Open discussion and debate related to precision medicine are urgently needed to avoid misapplication of resources, hype, iatrogenic interventions, and distraction from established approaches with ongoing utility. Failure to engage in such debate will lead to negative unintended consequences from a revolution that might never come. PMID:26902518

  14. Time trends in the prescription of statins for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in the United Kingdom: a cohort study using The Health Improvement Network primary care data

    OpenAIRE

    O'Keeffe, Aidan

    2016-01-01

    Aidan G O’Keeffe,1 Irwin Nazareth,2 Irene Petersen2 1Department of Statistical Science, 2Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London, London, UK Background: Statins are widely prescribed for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Guidelines exist for statin prescriptions, but there is little recent analysis concerning prescription trends over time and how these vary with respect to demographic variables.Methods and results: Using The Health...

  15. Time trends in the prescription of statins for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in the United Kingdom: a cohort study using The Health Improvement Network primary care data

    OpenAIRE

    O’Keeffe AG; Nazareth I; Petersen I.

    2016-01-01

    Aidan G O’Keeffe,1 Irwin Nazareth,2 Irene Petersen2 1Department of Statistical Science, 2Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London, London, UK Background: Statins are widely prescribed for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Guidelines exist for statin prescriptions, but there is little recent analysis concerning prescription trends over time and how these vary with respect to demographic variables.Methods and results: Using The Health Imp...

  16. Epigenetic associations in relation to cardiovascular prevention and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelter-Mahlknecht, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) increasingly burden societies with vast financial and health care problems. Therefore, the importance of improving preventive and therapeutic measures against cardiovascular diseases is continually growing. To accomplish such improvements, research must focus particularly on understanding the underlying mechanisms of such diseases, as in the field of epigenetics, and pay more attention to strengthening primary prevention. To date, preliminary research has found a connection between DNA methylation, histone modifications, RNA-based mechanisms and the development of CVD like atherosclerosis, cardiac hypertrophy, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. Several therapeutic agents based on the findings of such research projects are currently being tested for use in clinical practice. Although these tests have produced promising data so far, no epigenetically active agents or drugs targeting histone acetylation and/or methylation have actually entered clinical trials for CVDs, nor have they been approved by the FDA. To ensure the most effective prevention and treatment possible, further studies are required to understand the complex relationship between epigenetic regulation and the development of CVD. Similarly, several classes of RNA therapeutics are currently under development. The use of miRNAs and their targets as diagnostic or prognostic markers for CVDs is promising, but has not yet been realized. Further studies are necessary to improve our understanding of the involvement of lncRNA in regulating gene expression changes underlying heart failure. Through the data obtained from such studies, specific therapeutic strategies to avoid heart failure based on interference with incRNA pathways could be developed. Together, research and testing findings raise hope for enhancing the therapeutic armamentarium. This review presents the currently available data concerning epigenetic mechanisms and compounds involved in cardiovascular diseases

  17. Impact of nutrition since early life on cardiovascular prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guardamagna Ornella

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cardiovascular disease represents the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western countries and it is related to the atherosclerotic process. Cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, obesity, accelerate the atherosclerotic process which begins in childhood and progresses throughout the life span. The cardiovascular disease risk factor detection and management through prevention delays the atherosclerotic progression towards clinical cardiovascular disease. Dietary habits, from prenatal nutrition, breastfeeding, complementary feeding to childhood and adolescence nutrition play a basic role for this topic. The metabolic and neuroendocrine environment of the fetus is fundamental in the body’s “metabolic programming”. Further several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of breastfeeding on cardiovascular risk factors reduction. Moreover the introduction of complementary foods represents another important step, with particular regard to protein intake. An adequate distribution between macronutrients (lipids, proteins and carbohydrates is required for correct growth development from infancy throughout adolescence and for prevention of several cardiovascular disease risk determinants in adulthood. The purpose of this review is to examine the impact of nutrition since early life on disease. La malattia cardiovascolare rappresenta la principale causa di morbilità e mortalità dei paesi occidentali ed è correlata a degenerazione vascolare aterosclerotica. I fattori di rischio cardiovascolari quali dislipidemia, ipertensione, insulino resistenza e obesità accelerano tale processo il cui esordio è noto sin dell’età pediatrica ed evolve nel corso della vita. L’individuazione e la cura dei fattori di rischio cardiovascolari mediante la prevenzione dei fattori causali ritardano la progressione dell’aterosclerosi e l’insorgenza dei sintomi cardiovascolari. La

  18. Impact of nutrition since early life on cardiovascular prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The cardiovascular disease represents the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western countries and it is related to the atherosclerotic process. Cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, obesity, accelerate the atherosclerotic process which begins in childhood and progresses throughout the life span. The cardiovascular disease risk factor detection and management through prevention delays the atherosclerotic progression towards clinical cardiovascular disease. Dietary habits, from prenatal nutrition, breastfeeding, complementary feeding to childhood and adolescence nutrition play a basic role for this topic. The metabolic and neuroendocrine environment of the fetus is fundamental in the body’s “metabolic programming”. Further several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of breastfeeding on cardiovascular risk factors reduction. Moreover the introduction of complementary foods represents another important step, with particular regard to protein intake. An adequate distribution between macronutrients (lipids, proteins and carbohydrates) is required for correct growth development from infancy throughout adolescence and for prevention of several cardiovascular disease risk determinants in adulthood. The purpose of this review is to examine the impact of nutrition since early life on disease. La malattia cardiovascolare rappresenta la principale causa di morbilità e mortalità dei paesi occidentali ed è correlata a degenerazione vascolare aterosclerotica. I fattori di rischio cardiovascolari quali dislipidemia, ipertensione, insulino resistenza e obesità accelerano tale processo il cui esordio è noto sin dell’età pediatrica ed evolve nel corso della vita. L’individuazione e la cura dei fattori di rischio cardiovascolari mediante la prevenzione dei fattori causali ritardano la progressione dell’aterosclerosi e l’insorgenza dei sintomi cardiovascolari. La nutrizione svolge un ruolo

  19. Cardiovascular diseases: oxidative damage and antioxidant protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P-Y; Xu, X; Li, X-C

    2014-10-01

    Atherosclerosis, the hardening of arteries under oxidative stress is related to oxidative changes of low density lipoproteins (LDL). The antioxidants prevent the formation of oxidized LDL during atherogenesis. Perhaps more than one mechanism is involved in the atherosclerosis disease where LDL is oxidized in all the cells of arterial wall during the development of this disease. The oxidation of LDL produces lipid peroxidation products such as isoprostans from arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, oxysterols from cholesterol, hydroxyl fatty acids, lipid peroxides and aldehydes. The lipid peroxidation bioassay can serve as a marker for the risk of cardiovascular. An in vivo test of levels of oxidative lipid damage is an early prediction of development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Serum paraoxonase (PON) activity is correlated to severity of the coronary artery disease. The antioxidants level in the serum and serum paraoxonase activity provides information for the risk of CVD. The antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase is responsible for dismutation of superoxide, a free radical chain initiator. The subcellular changes in the equilibrium in favor of free radicals can cause increase in the oxidative stress which leads to cardiomyopathy, heart attack or cardiac dysfunction. The oxidative damage and defense of heart disease has been reported where dietary antioxidants protect the free radical damage to DNA, proteins and lipids. The ascorbic acid, vitamin C is an effective antioxidant and high vitamin E intake can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) by inhibition of atherogenic forms of oxidized LDL. The vitamin A and beta-carotene protect lipid peroxidation and provitamin-A activity. It has been recently suggested that the protection of oxidative damage and related CVD is best served by antioxidants found in the fruits and vegetables. The oxidative damage and antioxidant protection of CVD have been described here. PMID:25392110

  20. Testing the use of practice facilitation in a cluster randomized stepped-wedge design trial to improve adherence to cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines: HealthyHearts NYC

    OpenAIRE

    Shelley, Donna R.; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Anane, Sheila; Wu, Winfred Y.; Goldfeld, Keith; Gold, Heather T; Kaplan, Sue; Berry, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Background HealthyHearts NYC (HHNYC) will evaluate the effectiveness of practice facilitation as a quality improvement strategy for implementing the Million Hearts’ ABCS treatment guidelines for reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) among high-risk patients who receive care in primary care practices in New York City. ABCS refers to (A) aspirin in high-risk individuals; (B) blood pressure control; (C) cholesterol management; and (S) smoking cessation. The long-term goal is to create a robust i...

  1. Individual-based primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in Cambodia and Mongolia: early identification and management of hypertension and diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otgontuya Dugee

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the coverage of individual-based primary prevention strategies for cardiovascular disease (CVD in Cambodia and Mongolia: specifically the early identification of hypertension and diabetes mellitus, major proximate physiological CVD risk factors, and management with pharmaceutical and lifestyle advice interventions. Methods Analysis of data collected in national cross-sectional STEPS surveys in 2009 (Mongolia and 2010 (Cambodia involving participants aged 25-64 years: 5433 in Cambodia and 4539 in Mongolia. Results Mongolia has higher prevalence of CVD risk factors than Cambodia --hypertension (36.5% versus 12.3%, diabetes (6.3% versus 3.1%, hypercholesterolemia (8.5% versus 3.2%, and overweight (52.5% versus 15.5%. The difference in tobacco smoking was less notable (32.1% versus 29.4%. Coverage with prior testing for blood glucose in the priority age group 35-64 years remains limited (16.5% in Cambodia and 21.7% in Mongolia. Coverage is higher for hypertension. A large burden of both hypertension and diabetes remains unidentified at current strategies for early identification: only 45.4% (Cambodia to 65.8% (Mongolia of all hypertensives and 22.8% (Mongolia to 50.3% (Cambodia of all diabetics in the age group 35-64 years had been previously diagnosed. Approximately half of all hypertensives and of all diabetics in both countries were untreated. 7.2% and 12.2% of total hypertensive population and 5.9% and 16.1% of total diabetic population in Cambodia and Mongolia, respectively, were untreated despite being previously diagnosed. Only 24.1% and 28.6% of all hypertensives and 15.9% and 23.9% of all diabetics in Mongolia and Cambodia, respectively were adequately controlled. Estimates suggest deficits in delivery of important advice for lifestyle interventions. Conclusions Multifaceted strategies are required to improve early identification, initiation of treatment and improving quality of treatment for common CVD risk

  2. Traffic noise and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Selander, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Traffic noise is an increasing problem in urban areas worldwide, but health effects in relation to traffic noise exposure are not well understood. Several studies show that noise may give rise to acute stress reactions, possibly leading to cardiovascular effects, but the evidence is limited on cardiovascular risks associated with traffic noise exposure. Cardiovascular effects have been indicated for other environmental stressors such as occupational noise exposure and job ...

  3. Effects of Vitamin D3 and Paricalcitol on Immature Cardiomyocytes: A Novel Role for Vitamin D Analogs in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Stefania; Morucci, Gabriele; Branca, Jacopo J. V.; Aterini, Stefano; Amato, Marcello; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are more prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease than in the general population and they are considered the leading cause of death in patients with end-stage renal disease. The discovery that vitamin D3 plays a considerable role in cardiovascular protection has led, in recent years, to an increase in the administration of therapies based on the use of this molecule; nevertheless, several studies warned that an excess of vitamin D3 may increase the risk of hypercalcemia and vascular calcifications. In this study we evaluated the effects of vitamin D3, and of its selective analog paricalcitol, on immature cardiomyocytes. Results show that vitamin D3 induces cAMP-mediated cell proliferation and significant intracellular calcification. Paricalcitol, however, induces cell differentiation, morphological modifications in cell shape and size, and no intracellular calcification. Furthermore, vitamin D3 and paricalcitol differently affect cardiomyoblasts responses to acetylcholine treatment. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the effects of vitamin D3 and paricalcitol on cardiomyoblasts are different and, if these in vitro observations could be extrapolated in vivo, they suggest that paricalcitol has the potential for cardiovascular protection without the risk of inducing intracellular calcification. PMID:23749205

  4. Effects of Vitamin D3 and Paricalcitol on Immature Cardiomyocytes: A Novel Role for Vitamin D Analogs in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ruggiero

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are more prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease than in the general population and they are considered the leading cause of death in patients with end-stage renal disease. The discovery that vitamin D3 plays a considerable role in cardiovascular protection has led, in recent years, to an increase in the administration of therapies based on the use of this molecule; nevertheless, several studies warned that an excess of vitamin D3 may increase the risk of hypercalcemia and vascular calcifications. In this study we evaluated the effects of vitamin D3, and of its selective analog paricalcitol, on immature cardiomyocytes. Results show that vitamin D3 induces cAMP-mediated cell proliferation and significant intracellular calcification. Paricalcitol, however, induces cell differentiation, morphological modifications in cell shape and size, and no intracellular calcification. Furthermore, vitamin D3 and paricalcitol differently affect cardiomyoblasts responses to acetylcholine treatment. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the effects of vitamin D3 and paricalcitol on cardiomyoblasts are different and, if these in vitro observations could be extrapolated in vivo, they suggest that paricalcitol has the potential for cardiovascular protection without the risk of inducing intracellular calcification.

  5. Cardiovascular Disease, Mitochondria, and Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies demonstrated that mitochondria play an important role in the cardiovascular system and mutations of mitochondrial DNA affect coronary artery disease, resulting in hypertension, atherosclerosis, and cardiomyopathy. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM has been used for thousands of years to treat cardiovascular disease, but it is not yet clear how TCM affects mitochondrial function. By reviewing the interactions between the cardiovascular system, mitochondrial DNA, and TCM, we show that cardiovascular disease is negatively affected by mutations in mitochondrial DNA and that TCM can be used to treat cardiovascular disease by regulating the structure and function of mitochondria via increases in mitochondrial electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, modulation of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis, and decreases in mitochondrial ROS. However further research is still required to identify the mechanism by which TCM affects CVD and modifies mitochondrial DNA.

  6. Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Csányi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the special issue “Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease” authors were invited to submit papers that investigate key questions in the field of cardiovascular free radical biology. The original research articles included in this issue provide important information regarding novel aspects of reactive oxygen species (ROS-mediated signaling, which have important implications in physiological and pathophysiological cardiovascular processes. The issue also included a number of review articles that highlight areas of intense research in the fields of free radical biology and cardiovascular medicine.

  7. Prevention and management of work-related cardiovascular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akizumi Tsutsumi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disorders (CVDs constitute a major burden for health of working populations throughout the world with as much as 50% of all causes of death and at least 25% of work disability. There are some changes in CVD risk factors among occupational classes. This is mainly due to the new types of work-related causes of morbidity associated with the recent developments in global work life, particularly in the industrialized countries. Meanwhile, in the developing countries or those in transition (e.g., in Eastern Europe, CVD mortality is increasing due to major socioeconomic changes, the demographic transition and rapid industrialisation and urbanisation, all leading to growing challenges to cardiovascular health. Better control of known risk factors (i.e., smoking, obesity, physical inactivity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and high blood glucose is effective to prevent CVD incidence. But the expected improvement has not been achieved. The obstacles of achieving such impact are due to lack of awareness, lack of policies and their implementation into practice and shortage of infrastructures and human resources. These are needed for wide-scale and long-term programme implementation. Considering the WHO Global Strategy on Occupational Health for All, the WHO Global Action Plan on Workers’ Health, the WHO Programme on Prevention of Non-communicable Diseases and the ILO Decent Work agenda, the 6th ICOH International Conference on Work Environment and Cardiovascular Diseases adopted the Tokyo Declaration.

  8. Prevention and management of work-related cardiovascular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Akizumi

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disorders (CVDs) constitute a major burden for health of working populations throughout the world with as much as 50% of all causes of death and at least 25% of work disability. There are some changes in CVD risk factors among occupational classes. This is mainly due to the new types of work-related causes of morbidity associated with the recent developments in global work life, particularly in the industrialized countries. Meanwhile, in the developing countries or those in transition (e.g., in Eastern Europe), CVD mortality is increasing due to major socioeconomic changes, the demographic transition and rapid industrialisation and urbanisation, all leading to growing challenges to cardiovascular health. Better control of known risk factors (i.e., smoking, obesity, physical inactivity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and high blood glucose) is effective to prevent CVD incidence. But the expected improvement has not been achieved. The obstacles of achieving such impact are due to lack of awareness, lack of policies and their implementation into practice and shortage of infrastructures and human resources. These are needed for wide-scale and long-term programme implementation. Considering the WHO Global Strategy on Occupational Health for All, the WHO Global Action Plan on Workers' Health, the WHO Programme on Prevention of Non-communicable Diseases and the ILO Decent Work agenda, the 6th ICOH International Conference on Work Environment and Cardiovascular Diseases adopted the Tokyo Declaration. PMID:26159941

  9. Estimation of the burden of cardiovascular disease attributable to modifiable risk factors and cost-effectiveness analysis of preventative interventions to reduce this burden in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martí Sebastián

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the primary cause of mortality and morbidity in Argentina representing 34.2% of deaths and 12.6% of potential years of life lost (PYLL. The aim of the study was to estimate the burden of acute coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke and the cost-effectiveness of preventative population-based and clinical interventions. Methods An epidemiological model was built incorporating prevalence and distribution of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, hyperglycemia, overweight and obesity, smoking, and physical inactivity, obtained from the Argentine Survey of Risk Factors dataset. Population Attributable Fraction (PAF of each risk factor was estimated using relative risks from international sources. Total fatal and non-fatal events, PYLL and Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY were estimated. Costs of event were calculated from local utilization databases and expressed in international dollars (I$. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER were estimated for six interventions: reducing salt in bread, mass media campaign to promote tobacco cessation, pharmacological therapy of high blood pressure, pharmacological therapy of high cholesterol, tobacco cessation therapy with bupropion, and a multidrug strategy for people with an estimated absolute risk > 20% in 10 years. Results An estimated total of 611,635 DALY was lost due to acute CHD and stroke for 2005. Modifiable risk factors explained 71.1% of DALY and more than 80% of events. Two interventions were cost-saving: lowering salt intake in the population through reducing salt in bread and multidrug therapy targeted to persons with an absolute risk above 20% in 10 years; three interventions had very acceptable ICERs: drug therapy for high blood pressure in hypertensive patients not yet undergoing treatment (I$ 2,908 per DALY saved, mass media campaign to promote tobacco cessation amongst smokers (I$ 3,186 per DALY saved, and lowering cholesterol with

  10. Absolute risk representation in cardiovascular disease prevention: comprehension and preferences of health care consumers and general practitioners involved in a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Rebecca

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communicating risk is part of primary prevention of coronary heart disease and stroke, collectively referred to as cardiovascular disease (CVD. In Australia, health organisations have promoted an absolute risk approach, thereby raising the question of suitable standardised formats for risk communication. Methods Sixteen formats of risk representation were prepared including statements, icons, graphical formats, alone or in combination, and with variable use of colours. All presented the same risk, i.e., the absolute risk for a 55 year old woman, 16% risk of CVD in five years. Preferences for a five or ten-year timeframe were explored. Australian GPs and consumers were recruited for participation in focus groups, with the data analysed thematically and preferred formats tallied. Results Three focus groups with health consumers and three with GPs were held, involving 19 consumers and 18 GPs. Consumers and GPs had similar views on which formats were more easily comprehended and which conveyed 16% risk as a high risk. A simple summation of preferences resulted in three graphical formats (thermometers, vertical bar chart and one statement format as the top choices. The use of colour to distinguish risk (red, yellow, green and comparative information (age, sex, smoking status were important ingredients. Consumers found formats which combined information helpful, such as colour, effect of changing behaviour on risk, or comparison with a healthy older person. GPs preferred formats that helped them relate the information about risk of CVD to their patients, and could be used to motivate patients to change behaviour. Several formats were reported as confusing, such as a percentage risk with no contextual information, line graphs, and icons, particularly those with larger numbers. Whilst consumers and GPs shared preferences, the use of one format for all situations was not recommended. Overall, people across groups felt that risk

  11. Molecular imaging in cardiovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized and developing countries. In clinical practice, the in-vivo identification of atherosclerotic lesions, which can lead to complications such as heart attack or stroke, remains difficult. Imaging techniques provide the reference standard for the detection of clinically significant atherosclerotic changes in the coronary and carotid arteries. The assessment of the luminal narrowing is feasible, while the differentiation of stable and potentially unstable or vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is currently not possible using non-invasive imaging. With high spatial resolution and high soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a suitable method for the evaluation of the thin arterial wall. In clinical practice, native MRI of the vessel wall already allows the differentiation and characterization of components of atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries and the aorta. Additional diagnostic information can be gained by the use of non-specific MRI contrast agents. With the development of targeted molecular probes, that highlight specific molecules or cells, pathological processes can be visualized at a molecular level with high spatial resolution. In this review article, the development of pathophysiological changes leading to the development of the arterial wall are introduced and discussed. Additionally, principles of contrast enhanced imaging with non-specific contrast agents and molecular probes will be discussed and latest developments in the field of molecular imaging of the vascular wall will be introduced.

  12. Platelet proteomics in cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Vélez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, platelet proteomics has been applied successfully to the study of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs. It is very well known that platelets play a pivotal role in the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying many CVDs, especially acute coronary syndromes (ACSs, since they are implied in thrombus formation after atheroma plaque rupture. This is the reason why molecules involved in platelet activation and aggregation are primary targets for treatment of ACSs. Many efforts are aimed at finding drugs that inhibit platelet activation; however it is difficult to separate the therapeutic benefits from harmful effects because pathological and physiological functions of platelets are due to the same mechanisms. Given that platelets lack a nucleus, proteomics is regarded as an ideal method to approach their biochemistry. Current platelet proteomic studies are focusing on the identification of platelet molecular and functional changes in normal and pathological states, enriching the comprehension of platelet biological function, and screening for new biomarkers and antiplatelet agents. In the present article, we introduce the reader to platelet biology and function, and revise recent advances in platelet proteomics applied to the study of CVDs, including a special emphasis on sample preparation requirements for proteome analysis of platelet clinical samples.

  13. Erectile dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ophuis, A.J.M. Oude; Nijeholt, A.A.B. Lycklama à

    2006-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a highly prevalent disease, especially in cardiovascular-compromised men. Many of the well-established risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also risk factors for erectile dysfunction. A correlation between erectile dysfunction and endothelial dysfunction is well established. It is postulated that erectile dysfunction with an arteriovascular aetiology can predate and be an indicator of potential coronary artery disease. In this paper we will attempt to increase a...

  14. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in carotid atherosclerotic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Huijun; Wang Jinnan; Li Rui; Ferguson Marina S; Kerwin William S; Dong Li; Canton Gador; Hatsukami Thomas S; Yuan Chun

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease affecting many vascular beds. Disease progression leads to acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke and death. The diseased carotid alone is responsible for one third of the 700,000 new or recurrent strokes occurring yearly in the United States. Imaging plays an important role in the management of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) of the carotid vessel wall is one promi...

  15. [Acute cardiovascular disease and job retention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantoni-Quinton, Sophie; Tellart, Anne-Sophie; Cambier-Langrand, Evodie; Fassier, Jean Baptiste; Mounier-Vehier, Claire

    2016-05-01

    Since it allows a better quality of life, return to work must be considered ever since the early stages of the health care pathway following a cardiovascular disease. Seeing the occupational physician beforehand, so as to anticipate the return to work, is crucial. Dialogue between cardiologists, general practitioners and occupational physician, still observing medical confidentiality, must allow a better quality of return to work. Being recognized as a handicapped worker is a key element in the prevention of socio-professional exclusion. Even when dealing with long sick leave, permanent functional injuries or job loss, guiding the patients towards the appropriate person can improve return to work and job retention in the long term. PMID:27021479

  16. Endocannabinoids and cardiovascular prevention: real progress?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livio Dei Cas

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The prevalence of obesity continues to increase and represents one of the principal causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. After the discovery of a specific receptor of the psychoactive principle of marijuana, the cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands, several studies have demonstrated the role of this system in the control of food intake and energy balance and its overactivity in obesity. Recent studies with the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant have demonstrated favorable effects such as a reduction in body weight and waist circumference and an improvement in metabolic factors (cholesterol, triglycerides, glycemia etc. Therefore, the antagonism of the endocannabinoid (EC system, if recent data can be confirmed, could be a new treatment target for high risk overweight or obese patients. Obesity is a growing problem that has epidemic proportions worldwide and is associated with an increased risk of premature death (1-3. Individuals with a central deposition of fats have elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality (including stroke, heart failure and myocardial infarction and, because of a growing prevalence not only in adults but also in adolescents, it was reclassified in AHA guidelines as a “major modifiable risk factor” for coronary heart disease (4, 5. Although first choice therapy in obesity is based on correcting lifestyle (diet and physical activity in patients with abdominal obesity and high cardiovascular risk and diabetes, often it is necessary to use drugs which reduce the risks. The EC system represents a new target for weight control and the improvement of lipid and glycemic metabolism (6, 7. (Heart International 2007; 3: 27-34

  17. Nutrition and Cardiovascular Disease: Finding the Perfect Recipe for Cardiovascular Health

    OpenAIRE

    Alice Ravera; Valentina Carubelli; Edoardo Sciatti; Ivano Bonadei; Elio Gorga; Dario Cani; Enrico Vizzardi; Marco Metra; Carlo Lombardi

    2016-01-01

    The increasing burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) despite the progress in management entails the need of more effective preventive and curative strategies. As dietary-associated risk is the most important behavioral factor influencing global health, it appears the best target in the challenge against CVD. Although for many years, since the formulation of the cholesterol hypothesis, a nutrient-based approach was attempted for CVD prevention and treatment, in recent years a dietary-based ap...

  18. 动机性访谈在心脑血管疾病一级预防中的应用%Appl ication of motivational interview in primary prevention of patients with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆萍静; 王霞; 李莉莉

    2014-01-01

    介绍了动机性访谈的概念、原则、技巧及在心脑血管疾病一级预防中的应用研究进展,认为动机性访谈是一种有效的干预方法,在控制心脑血管疾病危险因素方面取得了积极效果。%It introduced the concept,principle and skills of motivational in-terview and research progress on its application in primary prevention of patients with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.It thought that motivational interview was an effective intervention method,and positive results have been achieved in the control of risk factors of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease.

  19. Association of ADIPOR2 gene variants with cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes risk in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance: the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksson Johan G

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adiponectin is an adipokine with insulin-sensitising and anti-atherogenic effects. Two receptors for adiponectin, ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2, have been characterized that mediate effects of adiponectin in various tissues. We examined whether genetic variation in ADIPOR2 predicts the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD and/or Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT participating the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS. Methods CVD morbidity and mortality data were collected during a median follow-up of 10.2 years (range 1-13 years and conversion from IGT to T2DM was assessed during a median follow-up of 7 years (range 1-11 years. Altogether eight SNPs in the ADIPOR2 locus were genotyped in 484 participants of the DPS. Moreover, the same SNPs were genotyped and the mRNA expression levels of ADIPOR2 were determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and subcutaneous adipose tissue samples derived from 56 individuals participating in the Genobin study. Results In the DPS population, four SNPs (rs10848554, rs11061937, rs1058322, rs16928751 were associated with CVD risk, and two remained significant (p = 0.014 for rs11061937 and p = 0.020 for rs1058322 when all four were included in the same multi-SNP model. Furthermore, the individuals homozygous for the rare minor alleles of rs11061946 and rs11061973 had increased risk of converting from IGT to T2DM. Allele-specific differences in the mRNA expression levels for the rs1058322 variant were seen in peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from participants of the Genobin study. Conclusions Our results suggest that SNPs in the ADIPOR2 may modify the risk of CVD in individuals with IGT, possibly through alterations in the mRNA expression levels. In addition an independent genetic signal in ADIPOR2 locus may have an impact on the risk of developing T2DM in individuals with IGT. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00518167

  20. Estrogen Signaling and Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen has pleiotropic effects on the cardiovascular system. The mechanisms by which estrogen confers these pleiotropic effects on cardiovascular function is under active investigation. Until a decade ago, all estrogen signaling was thought to occur by estrogen binding to nuclear estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ), which bind to DNA and function as ligand activated transcription factors. Estrogen binding to the receptor alters gene expression thereby altering cell function. In 2000 estrogen w...

  1. Cardiovascular health knowledge and preventive practices in people living with HIV in Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Temu, Tecla M.; Kirui, Nicholas; Wanjalla, Celestine; Ndungu, Alfred M.; Kamano, Jemima H.; Inui, Thomas S; Bloomfield, Gerald S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors contribute to increase risk of CVD in people living with HIV (PLWH). Of all world regions, sub-Saharan Africa has the highest prevalence of HIV yet little is known about PLWH’s CVD knowledge and self- perceived risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). In this study, we assessed PLWH’s knowledge, perception and attitude towards cardiovascular diseases and their prevention. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in the largest...

  2. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Emerging Adults in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, Demetrius Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to examine factors associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among emerging adults in college aged 18-25 years. CVD risks that develop during this period often persist into adulthood making it an ideal time to target CVD prevention. The specific aims of this dissertation were to 1) explore perceptions…

  3. Cardiovascular prevention guidelines in daily practice: a comparison of EUROASPIRE I, II, and III surveys in eight European countries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kotseva, Kornelia

    2009-03-14

    The first and second EUROASPIRE surveys showed high rates of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease. The third EUROASPIRE survey was done in 2006-07 in 22 countries to see whether preventive cardiology had improved and if the Joint European Societies\\' recommendations on cardiovascular disease prevention are being followed in clinical practice.

  4. Top 10 Myths about Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Top 10 Myths about Cardiovascular Disease Updated:May 20,2016 How ... Let’s set the record straight on some common myths. “I’m too young to worry about heart ...

  5. Nutrition and cardiovascular diseases of women.

    OpenAIRE

    Dustan, H P

    1987-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and hypertension are, by far, the most common cardiovascular diseases affecting women, and both are influenced by diet. Atherosclerosis occurs more commonly in men than women; generally women are 10 to 15 years older than men when symptoms develop. The prevalence of hypertension is about equal in the two sexes, particularly in middle aged and older persons. These cardiovascular diseases are major causes of death and disability in this country. Atherosclerosis results in myocar...

  6. Oxidants and antioxidants in cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ekblom, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction and stroke, are the main reason of death in Sweden and Western Europe. High iron stores are believed to produce oxygen radicals, which is the presumed putative mechanism behind lipid peroxidation, atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular disease. Iron levels are associated with the hemochromatosis associated HFE single nucleotide polymorphisms C282Y and H63D. Bilirubin is an antioxidant present in relatively high levels ...

  7. Cardiovascular risk and hippocampal thickness in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donix, Markus; Scharf, Maria; Marschner, Kira; Werner, Annett; Sauer, Cathrin; Gerner, Antje; Nees, Josef A; Meyer, Shirin; Donix, Katharina L; Von Kummer, Rüdiger; Holthoff, Vjera A

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors influence onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Among cognitively healthy people, changes in brain structure and function associated with high blood pressure, diabetes, or other vascular risks suggest differential regional susceptibility to neuronal damage. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, hippocampal and medial temporal lobe atrophy indicate early neuronal loss preferentially in key areas for learning and memory. We wanted to investigate whether this regional cortical thinning would be modulated by cardiovascular risk factors. We utilized high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and a cortical unfolding technique to determine the cortical thickness of medial temporal subregions in 30 patients with Alzheimer's disease. Cardiovascular risk was assessed using a sex-specific multivariable risk score. Greater cardiovascular risk was associated with cortical thinning in the hippocampus CA2/3/dentate gyrus area but not other hippocampal and medial temporal subregions. APOE genotype, a family history of Alzheimer's disease, and age did not influence cortical thickness. Alzheimer's disease-related atrophy could mask the influence of genetic risk factors or age on regional cortical thickness in medial temporal lobe regions, whereas the impact of vascular risk factors remains detectable. This highlights the importance of cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment in patients with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24228185

  8. Cardiovascular Risk and Hippocampal Thickness in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Donix

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular risk factors influence onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Among cognitively healthy people, changes in brain structure and function associated with high blood pressure, diabetes, or other vascular risks suggest differential regional susceptibility to neuronal damage. In patients with Alzheimer’s disease, hippocampal and medial temporal lobe atrophy indicate early neuronal loss preferentially in key areas for learning and memory. We wanted to investigate whether this regional cortical thinning would be modulated by cardiovascular risk factors. We utilized high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and a cortical unfolding technique to determine the cortical thickness of medial temporal subregions in 30 patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Cardiovascular risk was assessed using a sex-specific multivariable risk score. Greater cardiovascular risk was associated with cortical thinning in the hippocampus CA2/3/dentate gyrus area but not other hippocampal and medial temporal subregions. APOE genotype, a family history of Alzheimer’s disease, and age did not influence cortical thickness. Alzheimer’s disease-related atrophy could mask the influence of genetic risk factors or age on regional cortical thickness in medial temporal lobe regions, whereas the impact of vascular risk factors remains detectable. This highlights the importance of cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

  9. Epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, D.

    2001-01-01

    Within Europe large differences exist in mortality from coronary heart disease and stroke. These diseases show a clear West-East gradient with high rates in Eastern Europe. In spite the decreasing trend in age-adjusted cardiovascular disease mortality in Western European countries an increase in the

  10. Cardiovascular Disease and Thyroid Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Jens; Selmer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid function has a profound effect on the heart, and both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates are increased in hyperthyroidism. New-onset atrial fibrillation carries a prolonged risk for the development of hyperthyroidism, suggesting altered availability of thyroid hormones at the ce......Thyroid function has a profound effect on the heart, and both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates are increased in hyperthyroidism. New-onset atrial fibrillation carries a prolonged risk for the development of hyperthyroidism, suggesting altered availability of thyroid hormones...... at the cellular level. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with increased left ventricular mass of the heart, which reverts after obtaining euthyroidism. Mortality and risk of major cardiovascular events are increased. Subclinical hypothyroidism is also associated with subtle changes in the heart, e.g. its...

  11. Cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Julian Wright; Alastair Hutchison

    2009-01-01

    Julian Wright, Alastair HutchisonManchester Institute of Nephrology and Transplantation, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UKAbstract: Patients with chronic kidney disease have a high burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The vast majority of patients with chronic kidney disease do not progress to end stage renal failure, but do have a significantly higher incidence of all cardiovascular co-morbidities. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors only partially account for this ...

  12. Risk of cardiovascular disease following radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excess radiation-induced cardiac mortalities have been reported among radiotherapy patients. Many case reports describe the occurrence of atherosclerosis following radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease and breast cancer. Some case reports describe the cerebral infarction following radiotherapy to neck region, and of peripheral vascular disease of the lower extremities following radiotherapy to the pelvic region. The association of atomic bomb radiation and cardiovascular disease has been examined recently by incidence studies and prevalence studies of various endpoints of atherosclerosis; all endpoints indicated an increase of cardiovascular disease in the exposed group. It is almost certain that the cardiovascular disease is higher among atomic bomb survivors. However, since a heavy exposure of 10-40 Gy is delivered in radiotherapy and the bomb survivors were exposed to radiation at high dose and dose-rate, the question is whether the results can be extrapolated to individuals exposed to lower levels of radiation. Some recent epidemiological studies on occupationally exposed workers and population living near Chernobyl have provided the evidence for cardiovascular disease being a significant late effect at relatively low doses of radiation. However, the issue of non-cancer mortality from radiation is complicated by lack of adequate information on doses, and many other confounding factors (e.g., smoking habits or socio-economic status). This presentation will evaluate possible radiobiological mechanisms for radiation-induced cardiovascular disease, and will address its relevance to radiation protection management at low doses and what the impact might be on future radiation risk assessments. (authors)

  13. Hedgehog morphogen in cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, Maarten F.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Spek, C. Arnold

    2006-01-01

    In this review, we focus on the basic biology of the important developmental Hedgehog ( Hh) protein family, its general function in development, pathway mechanisms, and gene discovery and nomenclature. Hh function in cardiovascular development and recent findings concerning Hh signaling in ischemia

  14. The BioImage Study: novel approaches to risk assessment in the primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease--study design and objectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muntendam, Pieter; McCall, Carol; Sanz, Javier;

    2010-01-01

    eligibility criteria were randomized to a telephonic health survey only (survey only: n = 865), standard risk assessment (Framingham only: n = 718), or comprehensive risk assessment in a dedicated mobile facility equipped with advanced imaging tools (n = 6,104). Baseline examination included assessment of...... cardiovascular risk factors and screening for subclinical (asymptomatic) atherosclerosis with quantification of coronary artery calcification by computed tomography (CT), measurement of intima-media thickness, presence of carotid atherosclerotic plaques and abdominal aortic aneurysm by ultrasound, and ankle......The identification of asymptomatic individuals at risk for near-term atherothrombotic events to ensure optimal preventive treatment remains a challenging goal. In the BioImage Study, novel approaches are tested in a typical health-plan population. Based on certain demographic and risk...

  15. Cardiovascular Disease and Chronic Inflammation in End Stage Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Zyga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD is one of the most severe diseases worldwide. In patients affected by CKD, a progressive destruction of the nephrons is observed not only in structuralbut also in functional level. Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease of large and medium-sized arteries. It is characterized by the deposition of lipids and fibrous elements and is a common complication of the uremic syndrome because of the coexistence of a wide range of risk factors. High blood pressure, anaemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, high oxidative stress are some of the most common factors that cause cardiovascular disease and atherogenesis in patients suffering from End Stage Kidney Disease (ESRD. At the same time, the inflammatory process constitutes a common element in the apparition and development of CKD. A wide range of possible causes can justify the development of inflammation under uremic conditions. Such causes are oxidative stress, oxidation, coexistentpathological conditions as well as factors that are due to renal clearance techniques. Patients in ESRD and coronary disease usually show increased acute phase products. Pre-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-a, and acute phase reactants, such as CRP and fibrinogen, are closely related. The treatment of chronic inflammation in CKD is of high importance for the development ofthe disease as well as for the treatment of cardiovascular morbidity.Conclusions: The treatment factors focus on the use of renin-angiotensic system inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid, statins and anti-oxidant treatment in order to prevent the action of inflammatorycytokines that have the ability to activate the mechanisms of inflammation.

  16. Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease and stroke prevention Heart Health and Stroke Heart disease and stroke prevention Related information Learn more about ... well-being. Does menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) prevent heart disease? Once you reach menopause, your ovaries stop making ...

  17. Vaccine-Preventable Childhood Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Vaccines and Immunizations Share Compartir Vaccine-Preventable Childhood Diseases On this Page Protect Your ... American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP). Descriptions of Vaccine-preventable Child Diseases The following vaccine-preventable diseases, ...

  18. Pediatric Blood Pressure and Adult Preclinical Markers of Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Magnussen, Costan G.; Kylie J. Smith

    2016-01-01

    A high blood pressure level in adults is considered the single most important modifiable risk factor for global disease burden, especially those of cardiovascular (CV) origin such as stroke and ischemic heart disease. Because blood pressure levels have been shown to persist from childhood to adulthood, elevations in pediatric levels have been hypothesized to lead to increased CV burden in adulthood and, as such, might provide a window in the life course where primordial and primary prevention...

  19. Dysregulation of Histone Acetyltransferases and Deacetylases in Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yonggang Wang; Xiao Miao; Yucheng Liu; Fengsheng Li; Quan Liu; Jian Sun; Lu Cai

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide despite advances in its prevention and management. A comprehensive understanding of factors which contribute to CVD is required in order to develop more effective treatment options. Dysregulation of epigenetic posttranscriptional modifications of histones in chromatin is thought to be associated with the pathology of many disease models, including CVD. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylases (HDACs) are reg...

  20. Uric acid lowering therapy in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volterrani, Maurizio; Iellamo, Ferdinando; Sposato, Barbara; Romeo, Franco

    2016-06-15

    Recent evidence would indicate that high serum uric acid (SUA) levels can be a significant and independent risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemic heart disease and heart failure. In the last few years an independent risk relationship between hyperuricemia, cardiovascular disease and mortality has also been reported. Hyperuricemia has been shown as an independent risk factor for acute myocardial infarction and an independent and conjoint association of either gout and SUA with total and cardiovascular mortality has been reported, with mortality impact in gout patients increasing with rising SUA concentrations, even for SUA levels in the normal to high range. These findings prompted a growing research interest on the possible benefits of uric acid lowering drugs in cardiovascular diseases. Indeed, clinical studies have reported on the beneficial effects of uric acid lowering drugs, in particular of xanthine oxidase inhibitors, in hypertension, ischemic heart disease and heart failure. Two main mechanisms have been claimed to explain the dangerous effects of hyperuricemia and, as a consequence, the benefits of uric acid lowering therapy: endothelial dysfunction and systemic inflammation. This brief review aims to summarize current evidence from human studies on the role of acid uric lowering therapy in cardiovascular diseases for practical and clinical purposes. The possible mechanisms underlying the benefits of acid uric lowering therapy are also addressed. PMID:26386814

  1. Modelos experimentales de enfermedad cardiovascular Experimental models of cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gil Hernández

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo describe los modelos experimentales de utilidad clínica en el estudio de las enfermedades cardiovasculares y hace énfasis en los modelos usados para determinar los mecanismos fisiopatológicos de la aterosclerosis, así como para evaluar los efectos de productos nutricionales y farmacológicos sobre el desarrollo de este proceso inflamatorio complejo común a muchas enfermedades cardiovasculares. Se revisan los modelos animales en los que se puede inducir aterosclerosis por cambios en la composición de la dieta y los modelos animales en los que la alteración de uno o más genes (animales knock-out y knock-in, o la incorporación de genes foráneos de otras especies, da lugar a la aparición de hiperlipidemia con riesgo asociado de aparición de enfermedad cardiovascular temprana. Por otra parte, se consideran algunas de las líneas celulares más utilizadas en el estudio de los mecanismos moleculares de la aterogénesis y de evaluación de sustancias con interés nutricional o farmacológico.The present work describes clinically useful experimental models for the study of cardiovascular disease and emphasites the models used to determine the pathophysiologic mechanisms of atherosclerosis, as well as to evaluate the effects of nutritional and pharmacological products on the development of this complex inflammatory process present in many cardiovascular diseases. Animal models in which ahterosclerosis may be induced by dietary changes are reviewed, as well as those in which modification in one or more genes (knock-out and knock-in animals, or the incorporation of foreign genes from other species lead to early cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, some of the cell lines most frequently used in studying molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis and assessment of substances with nutritional or pharmacological interest are considered.

  2. Increased Prevalence of Cardiovascular and Autoimmune Diseases in Periodontitis Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nesse, Willem; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Abbas, Frank; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Stijger, Astrid; Tromp, Jan A. H.; van Dijk, Johan L.; Vissink, Arjan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Associations between periodontitis and cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases are most often assessed in patients with a particular cardiovascular or autoimmune disease. To prevent selection bias, this study assesses the existence of associations between periodontitis and cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases in patients attending a dental or periodontal clinic. Methods: Data were collected from 1,276 randomly selected dental records from patients attending a dental (n = 588) or ...

  3. Implementing the European guidelines for cardiovascular disease prevention in the primary care setting in Cyprus: Lessons learned from a health care services study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philalithis Anastasios

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent guidelines recommend assessment and treatment of the overall risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD through management of multiple risk factors in patients at high absolute risk. The aim of our study was to assess the level of cardiovascular risk in patients with known risk factors for CVD by applying the SCORE risk function and to study the implications of European guidelines on the use of treatment and goal attainment for blood pressure (BP and lipids in the primary care of Cyprus. Methods Retrospective chart review of 1101 randomly selected patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2, or hypertension or hyperlipidemia in four primary care health centres. The SCORE risk function for high-risk regions was used to calculate 10-year risk of cardiovascular fatal event. Most recent values of BP and lipids were used to assess goal attainment to international standards. Most updated medications lists were used to compare proportions of current with recommended antihypertensive and lipid-lowering drug (LLD users according to European guidelines. Results Implementation of the SCORE risk model labelled overall 39.7% (53.6% of men, 31.3% of women of the study population as high risk individuals (CVD, DM2 or SCORE ≥5%. The SCORE risk chart was not applicable in 563 patients (51.1% due to missing data in the patient records, mostly on smoking habits. The LDL-C goal was achieved in 28.6%, 19.5% and 20.9% of patients with established CVD, DM2 (no CVD and SCORE ≥5%, respectively. BP targets were achieved in 55.4%, 5.6% and 41.9% respectively for the above groups. There was under prescription of antihypertensive drugs, LLD and aspirin for all three high risk groups. Conclusion This study demonstrated suboptimal control and under-treatment of patients with cardiovascular risk factors in the primary care in Cyprus. Improvement of documentation of clinical information in the medical records as well as GPs training for implementation

  4. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Edmondson, Donald; Cohen, Beth E.

    2013-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder initiated by exposure to a traumatic event and characterized by intrusive thoughts about the event, attempts to avoid reminders of the event, and physiological hyperarousal. In a number of large prospective observational studies, PTSD has been associated with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. Also, in recent years, a number of studies have shown that cardiovascular events can themselves cause PTSD in more than 1 in...

  5. Redox signaling in cardiovascular health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Madamanchi, Nageswara R.; Runge, Marschall S.

    2013-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of the activity of a vast array of intracellular proteins and signaling pathways by reactive oxygen species (ROS) governs normal cardiovascular function. However, data from experimental and animal studies strongly support that dysregulated redox signaling, resulting from hyper-activation of various cellular oxidases or mitochondrial dysfunction, is integral to the pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In this review, we address how redox signa...

  6. Association between alcohol and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, Michael V; Dale, Caroline E; Zuccolo, Luisa;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To use the rs1229984 variant in the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B gene (ADH1B) as an instrument to investigate the causal role of alcohol in cardiovascular disease. DESIGN: Mendelian randomisation meta-analysis of 56 epidemiological studies. PARTICIPANTS: 261 991 individuals of European...... descent, including 20 259 coronary heart disease cases and 10 164 stroke events. Data were available on ADH1B rs1229984 variant, alcohol phenotypes, and cardiovascular biomarkers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Odds ratio for coronary heart disease and stroke associated with the ADH1B variant in all individuals...... disease than those without the genetic variant. This suggests that reduction of alcohol consumption, even for light to moderate drinkers, is beneficial for cardiovascular health....

  7. Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Beginning in Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Young Mi

    2010-01-01

    Although the clinical manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease, appear from middle age, the process of atherosclerosis can begin early in childhood. The early stage and progression of atherosclerosis in youth are influenced by risk factors that include obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and smoking, and by the presence of specific diseases, such as diabetes mellitus and Kawasaki disease (KD). The existing evidence...

  8. The use of Aspirin in Primary Prevention of cardiovascular disease: new updates El uso de la Aspirina en la Prevención Primaria de la enfermedad cardiovascular: nuevas actualizaciones O uso da Aspirina na Prevenção Primária da doença cardiovascular: novas atualizações

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Filipe Cavadas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Many times the Family Physicians need to make the decision of start to use or not aspirin in their patients. Although the benefits of treatment with aspirin in reducing the risk of myocardial infarction (MI, stroke or vascular cause of death among men and women with pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD are well established, the role of aspirin in primary prevention is less clear. So, the objective of this work is to determine the indications of aspirin use for the primary prevention of CVD in adults, based in the best available evidence. The author searched evidence-based reviews, guidelines, meta-analysis, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials, in Medline database and evidence-based medicine sites, using the MeSH terms: “Aspirin and Primary Prevention”. The search was limited to articles published between January 2000 and December 2009 in English, Spanish and Portuguese. The Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT of the American Family Physician was used to assess the Level of Evidence. The conclusions are: the men between 45 and 79 years should be encouraged to use aspirin if the potential cardiovascular benefit, prevention of MI, outweighs the potential damage of gastrointestinal (GI bleeding (SOR A; the women between 55 and 79 years should be encouraged to use aspirin if the potential cardiovascular benefit, the prevention of stroke, outweighs the potential damage of GI bleeding (SOR A; aspirin can reduce the risk of MI in the diabetic males (SOR B; consider the use of aspirin for primary prevention of CVD in diabetes type 1 and type 2 with increased cardiovascular risk, including those aged >40 years or who have additional risk factors (family history of CVD, hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia, and albuminuria ( SOR B.

    A menudo, los médicos de familia tienen que decidir se inician o no el uso de la aspirina en los pacientes. Aunque los beneficios de la terapia con aspirina en la reducción del riesgo de

  9. Incidence of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease in Mexican Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-07

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Angina Pectoris; Death, Sudden, Cardiac; Cerebrovascular Disorders; Peripheral Vascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Diabetes Mellitus, Non-insulin Dependent; Diabetes Mellitus

  10. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in carotid atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Huijun

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease affecting many vascular beds. Disease progression leads to acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke and death. The diseased carotid alone is responsible for one third of the 700,000 new or recurrent strokes occurring yearly in the United States. Imaging plays an important role in the management of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR of the carotid vessel wall is one promising modality in the evaluation of patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. Advances in carotid vessel wall CMR allow comprehensive assessment of morphology inside the wall, contributing substantial disease-specific information beyond luminal stenosis. Although carotid vessel wall CMR has not been widely used to screen for carotid atherosclerotic disease, many trials support its potential for this indication. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding carotid vessel wall CMR and its potential clinical application for management of carotid atherosclerotic disease.

  11. Endemic Cardiovascular Diseases of the Poorest Billion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Gene F; Mayosi, Bongani M; Mocumbi, Ana O; Miranda, J Jaime; Ezzati, Majid; Jain, Yogesh; Robles, Gisela; Benjamin, Emelia J; Subramanian, S V; Bukhman, Gene

    2016-06-14

    The poorest billion people are distributed throughout the world, though most are concentrated in rural sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) data can be sparse in low- and middle-income countries beyond urban centers. Despite this urban bias, CVD registries from the poorest countries have long revealed a predominance of nonatherosclerotic stroke, hypertensive heart disease, nonischemic and Chagas cardiomyopathies, rheumatic heart disease, and congenital heart anomalies, among others. Ischemic heart disease has been relatively uncommon. Here, we summarize what is known about the epidemiology of CVDs among the world's poorest people and evaluate the relevance of global targets for CVD control in this population. We assessed both primary data sources, and the 2013 Global Burden of Disease Study modeled estimates in the world's 16 poorest countries where 62% of the population are among the poorest billion. We found that ischemic heart disease accounted for only 12% of the combined CVD and congenital heart anomaly disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) in the poorest countries, compared with 51% of DALYs in high-income countries. We found that as little as 53% of the combined CVD and congenital heart anomaly burden (1629/3049 DALYs per 100 000) was attributed to behavioral or metabolic risk factors in the poorest countries (eg, in Niger, 82% of the population among the poorest billion) compared with 85% of the combined CVD and congenital heart anomaly burden (4439/5199 DALYs) in high-income countries. Further, of the combined CVD and congenital heart anomaly burden, 34% was accrued in people under age 30 years in the poorest countries, while only 3% is accrued under age 30 years in high-income countries. We conclude although the current global targets for noncommunicable disease and CVD control will help diminish premature CVD death in the poorest populations, they are not sufficient. Specifically, the current framework (1) excludes deaths of

  12. Space radiation and cardiovascular disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerma, Marjan; Nelson, Gregory A; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Koturbash, Igor; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2015-12-26

    Future long-distance space missions will be associated with significant exposures to ionizing radiation, and the health risks of these radiation exposures during manned missions need to be assessed. Recent Earth-based epidemiological studies in survivors of atomic bombs and after occupational and medical low dose radiation exposures have indicated that the cardiovascular system may be more sensitive to ionizing radiation than was previously thought. This has raised the concern of a cardiovascular disease risk from exposure to space radiation during long-distance space travel. Ground-based studies with animal and cell culture models play an important role in estimating health risks from space radiation exposure. Charged particle space radiation has dense ionization characteristics and may induce unique biological responses, appropriate simulation of the space radiation environment and careful consideration of the choice of the experimental model are critical. Recent studies have addressed cardiovascular effects of space radiation using such models and provided first results that aid in estimating cardiovascular disease risk, and several other studies are ongoing. Moreover, astronauts could potentially be administered pharmacological countermeasures against adverse effects of space radiation, and research is focused on the development of such compounds. Because the cardiovascular response to space radiation has not yet been clearly defined, the identification of potential pharmacological countermeasures against cardiovascular effects is still in its infancy. PMID:26730293

  13. Improved Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes in Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Forman, Daniel E.; Karen Alexander; Brindis, Ralph G.; Curtis, Anne B; Mathew Maurer; Rich, Michael W.; Laurence Sperling; Nanette K. Wenger

    2016-01-01

    Longevity is increasing and the population of older adults is growing. The biology of aging is conducive to cardiovascular disease (CVD), such that prevalence of coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, arrhythmia and other disorders are increasing as more adults survive into old age.  Furthermore, CVD in older adults is distinctive, with management issues predictably complicated by multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty and other complexities of care that increase manag...

  14. Improving the quality of cardiovascular preventive care in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Lobo, Claudia

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis we target cardiovascular preventive care from a continuous quality improvement point of view in a project called CARPE (CArdiovascular Risk reduction in Primary carE). We created a multifaceted intervention based on a ·quality cycle· and used outreach visitors for its implementation, since this approach has proven successful in modifying professional behavior. 13 In addressing prevention we considered Donebedian's model 14 to assess quality of care: i.e. we distingu...

  15. Childhood cardiovascular risk factors in South Asians: A cause of concern for adult cardiovascular disease epidemic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular risk factors in children are increasing at an alarming rate in the western world. However, there is limited information regarding these in the South Asian children. This review attempts at summarizing such evidence. South Asians are remarkable for the earlier onset of adult cardiovascular disease (CVD) by almost a decade compared to the Caucasians. We identified published literature, mainly on PubMed, Embase and Cochrane library using specific search terms such as lipid abnormalities, high blood pressure, hyperglycemia, tobacco use, obesity, physical inactivity, and unhealthy dietary practices. Atherosclerotic CVD processes begin early in childhood and are influenced over the life course by genetic and potentially modifiable risk factors and environmental exposure. 80% of adult CVD burden will fall on the developing nations by 2020. The concept of primordial prevention is fast emerging as a necessary prevention tool to curb adult CVD epidemic. Established guidelines and proven preventive strategies on cardiovascular health exist; however, are always implemented half-heartedly. Composite screening and prediction tools for adults can be adapted and validated in children tailored to South Asian population. South Asian children could be at a greater risk of developing cardiovascular risk factors at an earlier stage, thus, timely interventions are imperative

  16. A systematic review on the application of cardiovascular risk prediction models in pharmacoeconomics, with a focus on primary prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevanovic, Jelena; Postma, Maarten J.; Pechlivanoglou, Petros

    2012-01-01

    Background: Long-term trials on the effectiveness of pharmacological treatment for primary cardiovascular disease prevention are scant. For that reason risk prediction models are used as a tool to project changes in cardiovascular disease incidence due to changes in risk factor levels observed in sh

  17. Positron Emission Tomography in inflammatory cardiovascular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, Renata Christian Martins; Gouvea, Clecio Maria, E-mail: renatafelix@cardiol.br, E-mail: renata.felix@inc.saude.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Carneiro, Michel Pontes [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    Many articles have demonstrated the role of PET-CT in the evaluation of inflammatory and infectious diseases of the cardiovascular system. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the literature on this topic to identify clinical situations in which there is evidence of the usefulness of PET-CT in diagnostic and therapeutic evaluation.

  18. HIV infection, aging and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petoumenos, Kathy; Worm, Signe W

    2011-01-01

    , including cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is suggested that CVD occurs earlier among HIV-positive patients compared with HIV-negative patients, and at a higher rate. Several factors have been proposed to contribute to this. First, the traditional CVD risk factors are highly prevalent in this population...

  19. Lifestyle factors and risk of cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoevenaar-Blom, M.P.

    2013-01-01

     Background Evidence is accumulating that lifestyle factors influence the incidence of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular diseases (CVD). A healthy diet, being physically active, moderate alcohol consumption and not smoking are associated with a lower CVD risk. In addition to

  20. Positron Emission Tomography in inflammatory cardiovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many articles have demonstrated the role of PET-CT in the evaluation of inflammatory and infectious diseases of the cardiovascular system. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the literature on this topic to identify clinical situations in which there is evidence of the usefulness of PET-CT in diagnostic and therapeutic evaluation

  1. Astaxanthin in Cardiovascular Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Fassett

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and inflammation are established processes contributing to cardiovascular disease caused by atherosclerosis. However, antioxidant therapies tested in cardiovascular disease such as vitamin E, C and β-carotene have proved unsuccessful at reducing cardiovascular events and mortality. Although these outcomes may reflect limitations in trial design, new, more potent antioxidant therapies are being pursued. Astaxanthin, a carotenoid found in microalgae, fungi, complex plants, seafood, flamingos and quail is one such agent. It has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Limited, short duration and small sample size studies have assessed the effects of astaxanthin on oxidative stress and inflammation biomarkers and have investigated bioavailability and safety. So far no significant adverse events have been observed and biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation are attenuated with astaxanthin supplementation. Experimental investigations in a range of species using a cardiac ischaemia-reperfusion model demonstrated cardiac muscle preservation when astaxanthin is administered either orally or intravenously prior to the induction of ischaemia. Human clinical cardiovascular studies using astaxanthin therapy have not yet been reported. On the basis of the promising results of experimental cardiovascular studies and the physicochemical and antioxidant properties and safety profile of astaxanthin, clinical trials should be undertaken.

  2. Translational In Vivo Models for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliegner, Daniela; Gerdes, Christoph; Meding, Jörg; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are still the first leading cause of death and morbidity in developed countries. Experimental cardiology research and preclinical drug development in cardiology call for appropriate and especially clinically relevant in vitro and in vivo studies. The use of animal models has contributed to expand our knowledge and our understanding of the underlying mechanisms and accordingly provided new approaches focused on the improvement of diagnostic and treatment strategies of various cardiac pathologies.Numerous animal models in different species as well as in small and large animals have been developed to address cardiovascular complications, including heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, and thrombotic diseases. However, a perfect model of heart failure or other indications that reproduces every aspect of the natural disease does not exist. The complexity and heterogeneity of cardiac diseases plus the influence of genetic and environmental factors limit to mirror a particular disease with a single experimental model.Thus, drug development in the field of cardiology is not only very challenging but also inspiring; therefore animal models should be selected that reflect as best as possible the disease being investigated. Given the wide range of animal models, reflecting critical features of the human pathophysiology available nowadays increases the likelihood of the translation to the patients. Furthermore, this knowledge and the increase of the predictive value of preclinical models help us to find more efficient and reliable solutions as well as better and innovative treatment strategies for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26552402

  3. Cardiovascular Risk in Malaysia: causes, consequences and prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selvarajah, S.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease forms the highest morbidity and mortality worldwide and disproportionately affects low and middle-income developing countries. In developing countries, cardiovascular morbidity and mortality tend to affect the (younger) working adults. This poses a significant burden to the ec

  4. CETP inhibitors and cardiovascular disease: Time to think again

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Norman E.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) lowers plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and raises high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, suggesting it might prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD). From the outset, however, the concept has been controversial owing to uncertainty about its effects on HDL function and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Although there has long been good evidence that CETP inhibition reduces atherosclerosis in rabbits, the fir...

  5. Socioeconomic disparities in risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Wielgosz, A T; Spasoff, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Despite a general decline in mortality rates in recent decades, these rates are substantially higher among lower socioeconomic groups. To determine target groups for preventive health promotion programs, the prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease by socioeconomic group in Canadian adults aged 20 to 69 years was examined through comparison of estimates from the 1978-79 Canada Health Survey, the 1981 Canada Fitness Survey and the labour force smoking surveys of 1975 and 1983. Lev...

  6. Cardiovascular Disease in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsnefes, Mark M.

    2012-01-01

    More than a decade ago, cardiovascular disease (CVD) was recognized as a major cause of death in children with advanced CKD. This observation has sparked the publication of multiple studies assessing cardiovascular risk, mechanisms of disease, and early markers of CVD in this population. Similar to adults, children with CKD have an extremely high prevalence of traditional and uremia-related CVD risk factors. Early markers of cardiomyopathy, such as left ventricular hypertrophy and dysfunction...

  7. Personalized Medicine in Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Moo-Sik; Flammer, Andreas J.; Lerman, Lilach O.; Lerman, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a novel medical model with all decisions and practices being tailored to individual patients in whatever ways possible. In the era of genomics, personalized medicine combines the genetic information for additional benefit in preventive and therapeutic strategies. Personalized medicine may allow the physician to provide a better therapy for patients in terms of efficiency, safety and treatment length to reduce the associated costs. There was a remarkable growth in scie...

  8. Cardiovascular Disease in Central and East Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Kozela

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD contributes greatly to inequalities in health in Europe. The CVD death rate in Ukraine (the highest is seven fold higher than in France (the lowest. There is also a striking difference in CVD mortality between European Union (EU members before the enlargement in 2004 and Central and East European (CEE countries that joined the EU in 2004 and non-EU countries. The difference in CVD mortality between West and East Europe grew during the 1970s and 1980s when rates declined in the West and either remained the same or rose in the CEE countries. Political reforms at the beginning of the 1990s, which were followed by great socio-economic changes coincided with further diversification in CVD mortality in CEE countries. Diverse trends in CVD mortality were followed by larger gaps in life expectancy between West and East Europe and within the CEE.Rapid development of high technology treatment procedures, which followed the economic recovery of the CEE countries, would have only limited influence on the overall control of CVD. Exposure to classic risk factors might largely explain the longitudinal trend in falling CVD mortality in some countries, but it is unlikely that it could explain rapid changes in the others. Still, large potential to control the disease lies in developing effective preventive policies with targets to lower exposure to the classic CVD risk factors. The recent history of CVD in CEE countries makes the “alcohol hypothesis” less convincing as an explanation for CVD mortality trends and differences between East and West Europe. The hypothesis that dynamic changes in CVD mortality in CEE countries are triggered and explained largely by psychosocial factors is attractive. However, if confirmed, transforming such knowledge into a practical health policy would be a great challenge.

  9. Functional Foods as Modifiers of Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Carol

    2009-01-01

    There is growing consensus that systemic inflammation is at the heart of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Inflammation is a key feature of the immune system, functioning to defend tissue integrity and function. However, chronic stimulation of inflammatory mediators leads to lasting vascular reactivity, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, and, subsequently, chronic disease. Dietary practices to minimize inflammatory stimuli and CVD risk include regular intakes of fatty fish rich in the eicosapent...

  10. Cardiovascular implications of endodontic bone disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dessì, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) have a complex etiology determined by risk factors, which are in turn associated to a strong genetic component and to environmental factors. In the biological background for the development of CVD, low-grade chronic inflammation plays a role as a pathogenetic determinant of atherosclerosis. Dental infections have been associated with CVD. Periodontal disease is a chronic infection of the supporting tissues of the tooth that can lead to teeth loss. In recent years...

  11. Quality of life evaluation in cardiovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zdravković Marija; Krotin Mirjana; Deljanin-Ilić Marina; Zdravković Darko

    2010-01-01

    Definition of quality of life. In recent years, quality of life has become a very important measure of treatment of disease and successful therapy, regarding not only general health of an individual patient but also of the whole population In 1993 the WHO proclaimed 'Vision of health for all', as 'Add years to life' but also 'Add life to years', emphasizing quality of life to be as important as life duration. Although the remaining life expectancy in patients with cardiovascular disease is pr...

  12. Hyperhomocysteinemia and Cardiovascular Disease: A Transitory Glance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohilla Ankur

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperhomocysteinemia (Hhcy is a medical condition characterized by abnormally large levels of homocysteine in blood. The involvement of homocysteine (Hcy in various biochemical reactions causes deficiencies of the vitamins like pyridoxine (B6, folic acid (B9, or B12 leading to higher Hcy levels. Hhcy has been considered as an independent risk factor for various cardiovascular diseases like endothelial dysfunction, vascular inflammation, atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. The review article critically explains about the mechanisms involved in the Hhcy-induced development and progression of various cardiovascular disorders

  13. Rare cardiovascular diseases in the context of occupational health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Salska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In Poland like in other European countries a favorable trend towards reducing morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease has been observed. Nevertheless they are still one of the most important health problems in the population, responsible for nearly half of all deaths, including premature deaths. They also affect the quality of life in terms of health and socio-economic development, limiting the possibility of taking and/or continuing employment. Nowadays, cardiovascular diseases have become more common among young, professionally active people. Their professional activity, work organization and exposure to a broad range of occupational factors and environmental conditions may significantly influence the development and course of the cardiovascular disease. The aim of the study was to present the relationship between occupation and some rarer diseases and cardiovascular pathologies, as well as those in which this relationship has not as yet been fully evidenced, however, they may play an important role in workers’ health care. In this paper tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy, aortic aneurysm, aortic dissection, pericardial tamponade, Brugada syndrome and sudden cardiac death are discussed. In addition, the authors indicate new issues emerging along with the development of modern diagnostic and therapeutic techniques in cardiology, such as the care of patients with implanted pace-maker and the use of automated external defibrillators. These issues are presented in the context of their relationship with the occupation, taking into account the activities possibly to be undertaken under preventive care programs. Med Pr 2014;65(6:847–856

  14. Influence of maternal dysmetabolic conditions during pregnancy on cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinski, Wulf; Nicolaides, Eric; Liguori, Antonio; Napoli, Claudio

    2009-09-01

    Pathogenic factors associated with maternal hypercholesterolemia, obesity, and diabetic conditions during pregnancy influence fetal development and predispose offspring to cardiovascular disease. Animal models have established cause-effect relationships consistent with epidemiological findings in humans and have demonstrated, in principle, that interventions before or during pregnancy can reduce or prevent pathogenic in utero programming. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which maternal dysmetabolic conditions enhance disease susceptibility in offspring. Identification of these mechanisms is rendered more difficult by the fact that programming effects in offspring may be latent and may require conventional risk factors and inherited genetic co-factors to become clinically manifest. Given the increasing prevalence of maternal risk factors, which is expected to lead to a wave of cardiovascular disease in the coming decades, and the length of prospective studies on developmental programming in humans, greater-than-usual emphasis on experimental models and translational studies is necessary. PMID:19655024

  15. Endothelial progenitor cells in cardiovascular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Poay; Sian; Sabrina; Lee; Kian; Keong; Poh

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been associated with the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. Adult endothelial progenitor cells(EPCs) are derived from hematopoietic stem cells and are capable of forming new blood vessels through a process of vas-culogenesis. There are studies which report correlations between circulating EPCs and cardiovascular risk fac-tors. There are also studies on how pharmacotherapies may influence levels of circulating EPCs. In this review, we discuss the potential role of endothelial progenitor cells as both diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. In addition, we look at the interaction between cardio-vascular pharmacotherapies and endothelial progenitor cells. We also discuss how EPCs can be used directly and indirectly as a therapeutic agent. Finally, we evalu-ate the challenges facing EPC research and how these may be overcome.

  16. Register-based studies of cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildstrøm, Steen Z; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Madsen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The use of the unique personal identification number in the Nordic database systems enables the researchers to link the registers at the individual level. The registers can be used for both defining specific patient populations and to identify later events during follow-up. This rev...... the hospitalisation rate and treatment of cardiovascular disease. The risk of unmeasured factors affecting the results calls for cautious interpretation of the results.......-up. This review gives three examples within cardiovascular epidemiology to illustrate the use of the national administrative registers available to all researchers upon request. Research topics: The hospitalisation rate of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was expected to be increased and case-fatality rate......-based treatment increased significantly over time and adherence to treatment was high. Finally, use of specific nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs by healthy subjects was associated with a dose-dependent increase in cardiovascular risk. CONCLUSION: The nationwide registers have proven very useful in monitoring...

  17. Nutrition and Cardiovascular Disease: Finding the Perfect Recipe for Cardiovascular Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Ravera

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD despite the progress in management entails the need of more effective preventive and curative strategies. As dietary-associated risk is the most important behavioral factor influencing global health, it appears the best target in the challenge against CVD. Although for many years, since the formulation of the cholesterol hypothesis, a nutrient-based approach was attempted for CVD prevention and treatment, in recent years a dietary-based approach resulted more effective in reducing cardiovascular risk worldwide. After the publication of randomized trials on the remarkable effects of the Mediterranean diet and the Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH diet on CVD, new efforts were put on research about the effects of complex dietary interventions on CVD. The purpose of this paper is to review the evidence on dietary interventions in the prevention and disease modification of CVD, focusing on coronary artery disease and heart failure, the main disease responsible for the enormous toll taken by CVD worldwide.

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and cardiovascular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohui Duan; Yongfen Qi; Chaoshu Tang

    2009-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) serves several important functions, mainly post-translational modification, folding and assembly of newly synthesized secretary proteins, synthesizing lipids and cellular calcium storage. Various factors can disrupt ER homeostasis and disturb its functions, which leads to the accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins and to potential cellular dysfunction and pathological consequences, collectively termed ER stress. Recent progress suggests that ER stress plays a key role in the immune response, diabetes, tumor growth, and some neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, ER stress is involved in several processes of cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, cardiomyopathy, cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and atherosclerosis. Further research on the relation of ER stress to cardiovascular diseases will greatly enhance the understanding of these pathological processes and provide novel avenues to potential therapies.

  19. Role of gamma-glutamyltransferase in cardiovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Shengyang; Jiang, Donglin; Tao, Yijia

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are threatening human health with rising morbidity and mortality rates. Gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) has been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, especially coronary artery disease, and the prognosis of cardiovascular disease may be predicted by increasing GGT levels. GGT levels are related to cardiovascular emergencies of chronic heart failure, and an elevated GGT level has been shown to be an independent predictive maker for cardia...

  20. CORonary Diet Intervention with Olive oil and cardiovascular PREVention study (the CORDIOPREV study): Rationale, methods, and baseline characteristics: A clinical trial comparing the efficacy of a Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil versus a low-fat diet on cardiovascular disease in coronary patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Lista, Javier; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Alcala-Diaz, Juan F; Perez-Caballero, Ana I; Gomez-Delgado, Francisco; Fuentes, Francisco; Quintana-Navarro, Gracia; Lopez-Segura, Fernando; Ortiz-Morales, Ana M; Delgado-Casado, Nieves; Yubero-Serrano, Elena M; Camargo, Antonio; Marin, Carmen; Rodriguez-Cantalejo, Fernando; Gomez-Luna, Purificacion; Ordovas, Jose M; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) represents a major global health burden. However, despite the well-known influence that dietary habits exert over the progression of this disease, there are no well-established and scientifically sound dietary approaches to prevent the onset of clinical outcomes in secondary prevention. The objective of the CORonary Diet Intervention with Olive oil and cardiovascular PREVention study (CORDIOPREV study, clinical trials number NCT00924937) is to compare the ability of a Mediterranean diet rich in virgin olive oil versus a low-fat diet to influence the composite incidence of cardiovascular events after 7 years in subjects with documented CHD at baseline. For this purpose, we enrolled 1,002 coronary patients from Spain. Baseline assessment (2009-2012) included detailed interviews and measurements to assess dietary, social, and biological variables. Results of baseline characteristics: The CORDIOPREV study in Spain describes a population with a high body mass index (37.2% overweight and 56.3% obesity) and with a median of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol of 88.5 mg/dL (70.6% of the patients having study, which will test for the first time the efficacy of a Mediterranean diet rich in extra virgin olive oil as compared with a low-fat diet on the incidence of CHD recurrence in a long-term follow-up study. PMID:27297848

  1. Krill oil for cardiovascular risk prevention: is it for real?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, James M; Howard, Patricia A

    2014-11-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids play an important role in cardiovascular health. Although it is suggested that individuals obtain these nutrients through diet, many prefer to rely on supplements. Fish oil supplements are widely used, yet large capsule sizes and tolerability make them less than ideal. Recently, krill oil has emerged as a potential alternative for omega-3 supplementation. This article will discuss what is known about krill oil and its potential use in cardiovascular risk prevention. PMID:25477562

  2. Krill Oil for Cardiovascular Risk Prevention: Is It for Real?

    OpenAIRE

    Backes, James M; Howard, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids play an important role in cardiovascular health. Although it is suggested that individuals obtain these nutrients through diet, many prefer to rely on supplements. Fish oil supplements are widely used, yet large capsule sizes and tolerability make them less than ideal. Recently, krill oil has emerged as a potential alternative for omega-3 supplementation. This article will discuss what is known about krill oil and its potential use in cardiovascular risk prevention.

  3. Recreational football for disease prevention and treatment in untrained men: a narrative review examining cardiovascular health, lipid profile, body composition, muscle strength and functional capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Hansen, Peter Riis; Dvorak, Jiri; Krustrup, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Over the past 10 years, researchers have studied the effects of recreational football training as a health-promoting activity for participants across the lifespan. This has important public health implications as over 400 million people play football annually. Results from the first randomised controlled trial, published in the BJSM in January 2009, showed that football increased maximal oxygen uptake and muscle and bone mass, and lowered fat percentage and blood pressure, in untrained men, and since then more than 70 articles about football for health have been published, including publications in two supplements of the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports in 2010 and 2014, prior to the FIFA World Cup tournaments in South Africa and Brazil. While studies of football training effects have also been performed in women and children, this article reviews the current evidence linking recreational football training with favourable effects in the prevention and treatment of disease in adult men. PMID:25878072

  4. Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Using Framingham Risk Score in Korean Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Jin-Young; Park, Wan

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer survivors. The aim of this study was to investigate the modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors and 10-year probability of the disease based on the Framingham risk score in cancer survivors, compared with the general population. Methods A total of 1,225 cancer survivors and 5,196 non-cancer controls who participated in the 2007–2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were enrolled. We assessed modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors including smoking, body mass index, physical inactivity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and elevated blood glucose level. The 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease was determined by applying the Framingham cardiovascular disease risk equation among cancer survivors and non-cancer controls, ranging from 30 to 74 years old who had no overt cardiovascular diseases. Results The proportion of subjects who had higher fasting glucose levels, hemoglobin A1c levels, systolic blood pressure, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and those who had lower high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels was significantly higher in the cancer survivors than in the non-cancer controls. The average 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease among the cancer survivors was higher than that in the non-cancer controls in both men and women. The average 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease in relation to the cancer type was significantly higher in patients with hepatic, colon, lung, breast, and gastric cancer. Conclusion Cancer survivors have a higher cardiovascular disease risk and 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease than non-cancer controls. Control of cardiovascular disease risk factors and implementation of a well-defined cardiovascular disease prevention program are needed for treating cancer survivors. PMID:27468342

  5. T cell senescence and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hee Tae; Park, Sungha; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Lee, Won-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Age-related changes in the immune system, commonly termed "immunosenescence," contribute to deterioration of the immune response and fundamentally impact the health and survival of elderly individuals. Immunosenescence affects both the innate and adaptive immune systems; however, the most notable changes are in T cell immunity and include thymic involution, the collapse of T cell receptor (TCR) diversity, an imbalance in T cell populations, and the clonal expansion of senescent T cells. Senescent T cells have the ability to produce large quantities of proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic mediators; thus, they have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases. Recently, an increasing body of evidence has suggested that senescent T cells also have pathogenic potential in cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction, underscoring the detrimental roles of these cells in various chronic inflammatory responses. Given that cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death worldwide, there is great interest in understanding the contribution of age-related immunological changes to its pathogenesis. In this review, we discuss general features of age-related alterations in T cell immunity and the possible roles of senescent T cells in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26188489

  6. Strain Echocardiography in Acute Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favot, Mark; Courage, Cheryl; Ehrman, Robert; Khait, Lyudmila; Levy, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Echocardiography has become a critical tool in the evaluation of patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with acute cardiovascular diseases and undifferentiated cardiopulmonary symptoms. New technological advances allow clinicians to accurately measure left ventricular (LV) strain, a superior marker of LV systolic function compared to traditional measures such as ejection fraction, but most emergency physicians (EPs) are unfamiliar with this method of echocardiographic assessment. This article discusses the application of LV longitudinal strain in the ED and reviews how it has been used in various disease states including acute heart failure, acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and pulmonary embolism. It is important for EPs to understand the utility of technological and software advances in ultrasound and how new methods can build on traditional two-dimensional and Doppler techniques of standard echocardiography. The next step in competency development for EP-performed focused echocardiography is to adopt novel approaches such as strain using speckle-tracking software in the management of patients with acute cardiovascular disease. With the advent of speckle tracking, strain image acquisition and interpretation has become semi-automated making it something that could be routinely added to the sonographic evaluation of patients presenting to the ED with cardiovascular disease. Once strain imaging is adopted by skilled EPs, focused echocardiography can be expanded and more direct, phenotype-driven care may be achievable for ED patients with a variety of conditions including heart failure, ACS and shock. PMID:26823931

  7. Community interventions for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Donna R; Assaf, Annlouise R

    2005-12-01

    Review of the community-based CVD intervention programs suggests that a number of components have been successful using varying methods and materials for CVD risk reduction. It should be noted, however, that in multi-intervention programs it is often difficult to determine which components of the intervention were responsible for the overall success of the study. The community-based approach to CVD prevention is generalizable, cost-effective (because of the use of mass communication methods), and has the potential for modifying the environment and influencing health policies. Based on the experiences and successes of a number of community projects, recommendations have been proposed for developing future programs. Although they are not totally comprehensive, it has been suggested that a community-based intervention program should consider the following recommendations: 1) An understanding of the community: the needs and priorities of the community should be assessed, and close collaboration with individuals from the community, including community leaders, opinion leaders, community health care providers, and community organizations from various sectors of the community, should be consulted. Efforts should be focused on underserved and vulnerable populations. 2) Inclusion of community activities: these activities should be integrated within the context of the community environment, including primary health care services, voluntary organizations, grocery stores, restaurants, work sites, schools, and local media. 3) Inclusion mass media messages: the mass media can provide information and reinforcement of the behavior change. 4) Develop cost-effective interventions to assure that the community is exposed to an effective dose of the intervention. 5) Work with community organizations to help change social and physical environments to make them more conducive to health and healthy life-styles changes. 6) Develop a reliable monitoring and evaluation system: monitor the

  8. Insulin resistance: The linchpin between prediabetes and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Martin R; Carbajal, Horacio A; Espeche, Walter G; Aizpurúa, Marcelo; Leiva Sisnieguez, Carlos E; Leiva Sisnieguez, Betty C; Stavile, Rodolfo N; March, Carlos E; Reaven, Gerald M

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that cardiovascular disease occurs to the greatest extent in persons with prediabetes mellitus who are also insulin resistant. In 2003, 664 non-diabetic women (n = 457) and men (n = 207), aged 52 ± 16 and 53 ± 15 years, were surveyed during a programme for cardiovascular disease prevention. Fasting plasma glucose concentrations defined participants as having normal fasting plasma glucose (fasting plasma glucose <5.6 mmol/L) or prediabetes mellitus (fasting plasma glucose ⩾5.6 and <7.0 mmol/L). The tertile of prediabetes mellitus subjects with the highest fasting plasma insulin concentration was classified as insulin resistant. Baseline cardiovascular disease risk factors were accentuated in prediabetes mellitus versus normal fasting glucose, particularly in prediabetes mellitus/insulin resistant. In 2012, 86% of the sample were surveyed again, and the crude incidence for cardiovascular disease was higher in subjects with prediabetes mellitus versus normal fasting glucose (13.7 vs 6.0/100 persons/10 years; age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio = 1.88, p = 0.052). In prediabetes mellitus, the crude incidences were 22.9 versus 9.6/100 persons/10 years in insulin resistant versus non-insulin resistant persons (age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio = 2.36, p = 0.040). In conclusion, cardiovascular disease risk was accentuated in prediabetes mellitus/insulin resistant individuals, with a relative risk approximately twice as high compared to prediabetes mellitus/non-insulin resistant subjects. PMID:26802220

  9. Noninvasive Test Detects Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    At NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NASA-developed Video Imaging Communication and Retrieval (VICAR) software laid the groundwork for analyzing images of all kinds. A project seeking to use imaging technology for health care diagnosis began when the imaging team considered using the VICAR software to analyze X-ray images of soft tissue. With marginal success using X-rays, the team applied the same methodology to ultrasound imagery, which was already digitally formatted. The new approach proved successful for assessing amounts of plaque build-up and arterial wall thickness, direct predictors of heart disease, and the result was a noninvasive diagnostic system with the ability to accurately predict heart health. Medical Technologies International Inc. (MTI) further developed and then submitted the technology to a vigorous review process at the FDA, which cleared the software for public use. The software, patented under the name Prowin, is being used in MTI's patented ArterioVision, a carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) test that uses ultrasound image-capturing and analysis software to noninvasively identify the risk for the major cause of heart attack and strokes: atherosclerosis. ArterioVision provides a direct measurement of atherosclerosis by safely and painlessly measuring the thickness of the first two layers of the carotid artery wall using an ultrasound procedure and advanced image-analysis software. The technology is now in use in all 50 states and in many countries throughout the world.

  10. Therapy of obese patient with Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jindal, Ankur; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Brietzke, Stephen; Sowers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions and is a significant public health concern. Obesity is associated with increased diabetes, cardiovascular and kidney disease, and associated morbidity and mortality. Despite the increasing public health problem of obesity, there is a dearth of effective treatment options. Following the FDA mandated withdrawal of sibutramine, the treatment options for obesity were limited to orlistat as the only pharmacological treatment option for long term management ...

  11. Next generation sequencing in cardiovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Faita, Francesca; Vecoli, Cecilia; Foffa, Ilenia; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, the advent of next generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the approach to genetic studies, making whole-genome sequencing a possible way of obtaining global genomic information. NGS has very recently been shown to be successful in identifying novel causative mutations of rare or common Mendelian disorders. At the present time, it is expected that NGS will be increasingly important in the study of inherited and complex cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). However, the...

  12. Psychosocial Stress and Cardiovascular Disease: Pathophysiological Links

    OpenAIRE

    Bairey Merz, C. Noel; Dwyer, James; Nordstrom, Cheryl K; Walton, Kenneth G.; Salerno, John W.; Schneider, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    The remarkable decline in cardiovascular disease (CVD) experienced in developed countries over the last 40 years appears to have abated. Currently, many CVD patients continue to show cardiac events despite optimal treatment of traditional risk factors. This evidence suggests that additional interventions, particularly those aimed at nontraditional factors, might be useful for continuing the decline. Psychosocial stress is a newly recognized (nontraditional) risk factor that appears to contrib...

  13. Future of Pharmacogenetics in Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    van Schie, Rianne; Verhoef, Talitha; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; de Boer, Anthonius; van der Meer, F. J. M.; Redekop, Ken; Thariani, Rahber

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Pharmacogenetics is the study of variations in DNA sequence as related to drug response (European Medicines Agency [EMA], 2007). Several gene-drug interactions have been discovered in the field of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). These gene-drug interactions can help to identify nonresponse to drugs, estimate dose requirements or identify an increased risk of developing adverse drug reactions. An individualized approach based on pharmacogenetic testing will provide ph...

  14. Does Drinking Tea Protect Against Cardiovascular Disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Natasha

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence supports the hypothesis that tea does, in fact protect against cardiovascular disease. Some of the latest data by Hodgson et al, suggests that dietary flavonoids in tea significantly improves endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent flow-mediated vasodilation (2.3%; P=.008 & 4.2%; P=.03 respectively). Similar results were obtained in a study by Duffy et al, where it was found that short- and long-term tea consumption significantly improved endothelium dependent flow-m...

  15. INHIBITION OF KIDNEY DISORDERS IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES: THE ROLE OF ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTOR BLOCKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Fomin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of renal disorders in cardiovascular diseases are presented. The main of these mechanisms is an endothelium dysfunction. It is related with some factors: arterial hypertension, insulin resistance syndrome, diabetes type 2, dyslipidemia, obesity. Approaches to prevention of kidney disorder and cardiovascular complications are discussed with focus on usage of angiotensin II receptor blockers.

  16. Strategies for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Claudio

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently accompanied by multimorbidities in affected patients. Even though the majority of these comorbidities are also related to advanced age and cigarette smoke, also COPD itself has significant impact on insurgence, or worsening of these conditions. As a consequence, COPD is regarded as a complex disease with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary involvement. According to current guidelines for the management of COPD patients, the comprehensive treatment of this condition should target respiratory symptoms as well as comorbidities. Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent comorbidities in COPD patients and there are several strategies for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in COPD patients. These include smoking cessation, pharmacologic prevention of cardiovascular disease, and the treatment of COPD. Beta-blockers for the prevention of cardiovascular disease have been traditionally limited in COPD patients, albeit current evidence supporting their efficacy and safety in these patients. With regard to COPD medications, corticosteroids are generally not recommended, except for exacerbations, while long-acting beta2-agonists have demonstrated an acceptable profile of cardiovascular safety. Long-acting anticholinergic bronchodilators, in particular tiotropium in the mist inhaler formulation, have been associated with an increased risk of major cardiovascular events and mortality. Data on this issue remain, however, controversial. Glycopyrronium, a recently introduced anticholinergic, demonstrated. a rapid and sustained relief of respiratory symptoms with a favorable safety profile and no increase in cardiovascular risk, in monotherapy and in combination with a long-acting beta2-agonist in a comprehensive trial program indicating a valid option for COPD patients with CV comorbidities. PMID:25655487

  17. Bridging science and health policy in cardiovascular disease: focus on lipid management: A Report from a Session held during the 7th International Symposium on Multiple Risk Factors in Cardiovascular Diseases: Prevention and Intervention--Health Policy, in Venice, Italy, on 25 October, 2008.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Atella, V

    2009-06-10

    In Europe, cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents the main cause of morbidity and mortality, costing countries euro 190 billion yearly (2006). CVD prevention remains unsatisfactory across Europe largely due to poor control of CVD risk factors (RFs), growing incidence of obesity and diabetes, and sedentary lifestyle\\/poor dietary habits. Hypercholesterolaemia is a proven CVD RF, and LDL-C lowering slows atherosclerotic progression and reduces major coronary events. Lipid-lowering therapy is cost-effective, and intensive treatment of high-risk patients further improves cost effectiveness. In Italy, models indicate that improved cholesterol management translates into potential yearly savings of euro 2.9-4 billion. Identifying and eliminating legislative and administrative barriers is essential to providing optimal lipid care to high-risk patients. Public health and government policy can influence clinical practice rapidly, and guideline endorsement via national health policy may reduce the CVD burden and change physician and patient behaviour. Action to reduce CVD burden should ideally include the integration of strategies to lower the incidence of major CV events, improvement in total CV risk estimation, database monitoring of CVD trends, and development of population educational initiatives on CVD prevention. Failure to bridge the gap between science and health policy, particularly in relation to lipid management, could result in missed opportunities to reverse the burgeoning epidemic of CVD in Europe.

  18. Sleep duration, cardiovascular disease, and proinflammatory biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grandner MA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael A Grandner,1,2 Megan R Sands-Lincoln,3 Victoria M Pak,2,4 Sheila N Garland1,5 1Behavioral Sleep Medicine Program, Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, PA, USA; 2Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania, PA, USA; 3Center for Evidence Based Medicine, Elsevier Inc, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Division of Sleep Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, PA, USA; 5Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, PA, USA Abstract: Habitual sleep duration has been associated with cardiometabolic disease, via several mechanistic pathways, but few have been thoroughly explored. One hypothesis is that short and/or long sleep duration is associated with a proinflammatory state, which could increase risk for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. This hypothesis has been largely explored in the context of experimental sleep deprivation studies which have attempted to demonstrate changes in proinflammatory markers following acute sleep loss in the laboratory. Despite the controlled environment available in these studies, samples tend to lack generalization to the population at large and acute sleep deprivation may not be a perfect analog for short sleep. To address these limitations, population based studies have explored associations between proinflammatory markers and habitual sleep duration. This review summarizes what is known from experimental and cross-sectional studies about the association between sleep duration, cardiovascular disease, and proinflammatory biomarkers. First, the association between sleep duration with both morbidity and mortality, with a focus on cardiovascular disease, is reviewed. Then, a brief review of the potential role of proinflammatory markers in cardiovascular disease is presented. The majority of this review details specific findings related to specific

  19. Why we should not skip aspirin in cardiovascular prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrör, K

    2016-01-01

    Since more than 20 years, aspirin is an approved and established first-line antiplatelet medication in cardiovascular prevention. This is partially due to ist unique mode of action which is not shared with any other antiplatelet agent as well by the reliability of its pharmacological efficacy: inhibition of platelet COX-1 and subsequent thromboxane formation in almost every patient. Aspirin acts synergistic with ADP-antagonists in dual antiplatelet therapy of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) and is also approved for long-term secondary prevention. Patients with atrial fibrillation are an exception and benefit more from anticoagulants. After the introduction of the new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), i.e. direct inhibitors of factor Xa or thrombin formation, there is a renewed discussion about the role of antiplatelet agents, specifically if additional dual antiplatelet treatment is still necessary for an optimum clinical effect or whether one component, such as aspirin might be skipped in favor of other classes of oral antiplatelet agents, such as ADP-antagonists. The available data are insufficient to recommend this because of a low number of studies and a still uncertain benefit/risk (bleeding) ratio. More research on aspirin as a chemopreventive appears also to be necessary and is going on, in particular in individuals at high-risk for vascular thrombotic diseases (diabetics, preeclampsia, venous thromboembolism). PMID:25891122

  20. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PERIODONTAL DISEASE (PD AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE (CVD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Trevisan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The recent focus on the potential link between periodontal and cardiovascular disease (PD and CVD  is part of the larger renewed interest on the role of infection and inflammation in the etiology of atherosclerosis and its clinical manifestations.  Periodontal Disease is an inflammatory process affecting the periodontium, the tissue that surrounds and supports the teeth . The process usually starts with an inflammatory process of the gum (gingivitis but it may progress with an extensive involvement of the gum, as well as the periodontal ligament and the bone surrounding the teeth resulting in substantial bone loss. Periodontal disease is a common oral pathological condition in the adult age and represents the leading cause of tooth loss. PD prevalence increases with age and there are estimates that up to 49,000,000 Americans may suffer from some form of gum disease. The gingival plaque associated with PD is colonized by a number of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria that have been shown to affect the initiation and development of PD and have been associated with the potential etiological role of PD in CVD and other chronic conditions. A potential etiological link between PD and CVD may have important public health implications as both the exposure (PD and the outcomes (CVD are highly prevalent in industrialized societies. In situations in which both the exposure and the outcome are highly prevalent even modest associations, like those observed in the studies reporting on the link between PD and CVD outcomes, may have relevance. There are  not  definite data on the effect of periodontal treatment on CVD clinical outcomes (either in primary or secondary prevention however it should be pointed out that the limited (both in terms of numbers and study design experimental evidence in humans suggests a possible beneficial effect of periodontal treatment of indices of functional and structural vascular health.

  1. Androgen therapy and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    K-CY McGrath; LS McRobb; AK Heather

    2008-01-01

    K-CY McGrath1, LS McRobb1,2, AK Heather1,21Heart Research Institute, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 2Discipline of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death in Western society today. There is a striking gender difference in CVD with men predisposed to earlier onset and more severe disease. Following the recent reevaluation and ongoing debate regarding the estrogen protection hypothesis, and given that androgen ...

  2. Cardiovascular disease could be contained based on currently available data!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofodile, Okom Nkili F C

    2006-01-01

    Largely due to better control of infectious diseases and significant advances in biomedical research, life expectancy worldwide has increased dramatically in the last three decades. However, as the average age of the population has risen, the incidence of chronic age-related diseases such as arthritis, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, cardiovascular disease, cancer, osteoporosis, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and late-onset diabetes have increased and have become serious public health problem, as well. The etiology of these disorders is still incompletely understood, therefore, neither preventive strategies nor long-term effective treatment modalities are available for these disorders. In keeping with the aforementioned, the ultimate goal in cardiovascular research is to prevent the onset of cardiovascular episodes and thereby allow successful ageing without morbidity and cognitive decline. Herein, I argue that cardiovascular episodes could be contained with relatively simple approaches. Cardiovascular disorder is characterized by cellular and molecular changes that are commonplace in age-related diseases in other organ system, such alterations include increased level of oxidative stress, perturbed energy metabolism, and "horror autotoxicus" largely brought about by the perturbation of ubiquitin -proteasome system, and excessive oxidative stress damage to the cardiac muscle cells and tissues, and cross-reactions of specific antibodies against human heat shock protein 60 with that of mycobacterial heat shock protein 65. "Horror autotoxicus", a Latin expression, is a term coined by Paul Ehrlich at the turn of the last century to describe autoimmunity to self, or the attack of "self" by immune system, which ultimately results to autoimmune condition. Based on the currently available data, the risk of cardiovascular episodes and several other age-related disorders, including cancer, Alzheimer's disease and diabetes, is known to be influenced by the nature and level of food

  3. Heavy Metal Poisoning and Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman M. Alissa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is an increasing world health problem. Traditional risk factors fail to account for all deaths from CVD. It is mainly the environmental, dietary and lifestyle behavioral factors that are the control keys in the progress of this disease. The potential association between chronic heavy metal exposure, like arsenic, lead, cadmium, mercury, and CVD has been less well defined. The mechanism through which heavy metals act to increase cardiovascular risk factors may act still remains unknown, although impaired antioxidants metabolism and oxidative stress may play a role. However, the exact mechanism of CVD induced by heavy metals deserves further investigation either through animal experiments or through molecular and cellular studies. Furthermore, large-scale prospective studies with follow up on general populations using appropriate biomarkers and cardiovascular endpoints might be recommended to identify the factors that predispose to heavy metals toxicity in CVD. In this review, we will give a brief summary of heavy metals homeostasis, followed by a description of the available evidence for their link with CVD and the proposed mechanisms of action by which their toxic effects might be explained. Finally, suspected interactions between genetic, nutritional and environmental factors are discussed.

  4. Molecular Modeling Approach to Cardiovascular Disease Targetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Sekhar Akula,

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease, including stroke, is the leading cause of illness and death in the India. A number of studies have shown that inflammation of blood vessels is one of the major factors that increase the incidence of heart diseases, including arteriosclerosis (clogging of the arteries, stroke and myocardial infraction or heart attack. Studies have associated obesity and other components of metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular risk factors, with lowgradeinflammation. Furthermore, some findings suggest that drugs commonly prescribed to the lower cholesterol also reduce this inflammation, suggesting an additional beneficial effect of the stains. The recent development of angiotensin 11 (Ang11 receptor antagonists has enabled to improve significantly the tolerability profile of thisgroup of drugs while maintaining a high clinical efficacy. ACE2 is expressed predominantly in the endothelium and in renal tubular epithelium, and it thus may be an import new cardiovascular target. In the present study we modeled the structure of ACE and designed an inhibitor through using ARGUS lab and the validation of the Drug molecule is done basing on QSAR properties and Cache for this protein through CADD.

  5. Carbon dioxide balneotherapy and cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagourelias, Efstathios D.; Zorou, Paraskevi G.; Tsaligopoulos, Miltiadis; Athyros, Vasilis G.; Karagiannis, Asterios; Efthimiadis, Georgios K.

    2011-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) balneotherapy is a kind of remedy with a wide spectrum of applications which have been used since the Middle Ages. However, its potential use as an adjuvant therapeutic option in patients with cardiovascular disease is not yet fully clarified. We performed a thorough review of MEDLINE Database, EMBASE, ISI WEB of Knowledge, COCHRANE database and sites funded by balneotherapy centers across Europe in order to recognize relevant studies and aggregate evidence supporting the use of CO2 baths in various cardiovascular diseases. The three main effects of CO2 hydrotherapy during whole body or partial immersion, including decline in core temperature, an increase in cutaneous blood flow, and an elevation of the score on thermal sensation, are analyzed on a pathophysiology basis. Additionally, the indications and contra-indications of the method are presented in an evidence-based way, while the need for new methodologically sufficient studies examining the use of CO2 baths in other cardiovascular substrates is discussed.

  6. The global burden of cardiovascular diseases: a challenge to improve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, Shanthi; Chestnov, Oleg

    2014-05-01

    There are many challenges that need to be overcome to address the global cardiovascular disease epidemic. They include (1) lack of multisectoral action to support reduction of behavioral risk factors and their determinants, (2) weak public health and health care system capacity for forging an accelerated national response, and (3) inefficient use of limited resources. To make progress, countries need to develop and implement multisectoral national action plans guided by the global action plan for prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases, strengthen surveillance and monitoring systems, and set national targets consistent with global voluntary targets, which are to be attained by 2025. In addition, a set of cost-effective preventive and curative interventions need to be prioritized. Further, resources need to be generated and capacity developed to ensure sustainable country-wide implementation of the prioritized interventions. According to WHO estimates, the implementation of a core set of very cost-effective interventions for prevention and control of cardiovascular disease requires about 4 % of current health spending in lower income countries, 2 % in lower middle income countries, and less than 1 % in upper middle income and high income countries. PMID:24718672

  7. Cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naranjo, Antonio; Sokka, Tuulikki; Descalzo, Miguel;

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: We analyzed the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its association with traditional CV risk factors, clinical features of RA, and the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in a multinational cross...... by patients. The clinical assessment included a review of clinical features of RA and exposure to DMARDs over the course of RA. Comorbidities were recorded; CV morbidity included myocardial infarction, angina, coronary disease, coronary bypass surgery, and stroke. Traditional risk factors recorded were...... any CV event and age and male gender and between extra-articular disease and myocardial infarction. Prolonged exposure to methotrexate (HR 0.85; 95% CI 0.81 to 0.89), leflunomide (HR 0.59; 95% CI 0.43 to 0.79), sulfasalazine (HR 0.92; 95% CI 0.87 to 0.98), glucocorticoids (HR 0.95; 95% CI 0.92 to 0...

  8. The relationships between cardiovascular disease and diabetes: focus on pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacic, Jason C; Castellano, Jose M; Farkouh, Michael E; Fuster, Valentin

    2014-03-01

    There is a looming global epidemic of obesity and diabetes. Of all the end-organ effects caused by diabetes, the cardiovascular system is particularly susceptible to the biologic perturbations caused by this disease, and many patients may die from diabetes-related cardiovascular complications. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the pathobiology of the diabetic vasculature and heart. Clinical studies have illuminated the optimal way to treat patients with cardiovascular manifestations of this disease. This article reviews these aspects of diabetes and the cardiovascular system, broadly classified into diabetic vascular disease, diabetic cardiomyopathy, and the clinical management of the diabetic cardiovascular disease patient. PMID:24582091

  9. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults The ... Recommendation | 1 Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults Potential ...

  10. [Socioeconomic class as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Ch; Ackermann-Liebrich, U

    2005-09-01

    in staying healthy. Therefore prevention of cardiovascular disease should not be restricted to minimisation of risk factors or to the measurement of certain blood-values and treatments. Efforts must also go into creating the conditions for a healthier life and promote possibilities for healthier behaviour in all socioeconomic classes. PMID:16218492

  11. Targeting the aldosterone pathway in cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Azizi, Michel; Bauersachs, Johann;

    2012-01-01

    Accumulated evidence has demonstrated that aldosterone is a key player in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular (CV) disease. Multiple clinical trials have documented that intervention in the aldosterone pathway can reduce blood pressure and lower albuminuria and improve outcome in patients with heart...... failure or myocardial infarction. Recent studies have unraveled details about the role of aldosterone at the cellular level in CV disease. The relative importance of glucocorticoids and aldosterone in terms of mineralocorticoid receptor activation is currently being debated. Also, studies are addressing...... which aldosterone modulator to use, which timing of treatment to aim for, and in which population to intervene. This review provides an overview of recent developments in the understanding of the role of aldosterone in CV disease, with particular reference to mechanisms and potential targets...

  12. Association between alcohol and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, Michael V; Dale, Caroline E; Zuccolo, Luisa;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To use the rs1229984 variant in the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B gene (ADH1B) as an instrument to investigate the causal role of alcohol in cardiovascular disease. DESIGN: Mendelian randomisation meta-analysis of 56 epidemiological studies. PARTICIPANTS: 261 991 individuals of European...... descent, including 20 259 coronary heart disease cases and 10 164 stroke events. Data were available on ADH1B rs1229984 variant, alcohol phenotypes, and cardiovascular biomarkers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Odds ratio for coronary heart disease and stroke associated with the ADH1B variant in all individuals...... and by categories of alcohol consumption. RESULTS: Carriers of the A-allele of ADH1B rs1229984 consumed 17.2% fewer units of alcohol per week (95% confidence interval 15.6% to 18.9%), had a lower prevalence of binge drinking (odds ratio 0.78 (95% CI 0.73 to 0.84)), and had higher abstention (odds ratio 1.27 (1...

  13. Dysregulation of Histone Acetyltransferases and Deacetylases in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide despite advances in its prevention and management. A comprehensive understanding of factors which contribute to CVD is required in order to develop more effective treatment options. Dysregulation of epigenetic posttranscriptional modifications of histones in chromatin is thought to be associated with the pathology of many disease models, including CVD. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs and deacetylases (HDACs are regulators of histone lysine acetylation. Recent studies have implicated a fundamental role of reversible protein acetylation in the regulation of CVDs such as hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, diabetic cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease, arrhythmia, and heart failure. This reversible acetylation is governed by enzymes that HATs add or HDACs remove acetyl groups respectively. New evidence has revealed that histone acetylation regulators blunt cardiovascular and related disease states in certain cellular processes including myocyte hypertrophy, apoptosis, fibrosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. The accumulating evidence of the detrimental role of histone acetylation in cardiac disease combined with the cardioprotective role of histone acetylation regulators suggests that the use of histone acetylation regulators may serve as a novel approach to treating the millions of patients afflicted by cardiac diseases worldwide.

  14. Lifestyle Decreases Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Slavíček, Jaroslav; Kittnar, Otomar; Fraser, Gary E.; Medová, Eva; Konečná, Jana; Žižka, Robert; Dohnalová, Alena; Novák, Vladimír

    2008-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality of the cardiovascular diseases is high in the developed countries. The lifestyle changes are capable to decrease it by 50%. The aim of the present study was to measure the parameters of some risk factors before and after a one-week NEW START rehabilitative retreat. 1,349 volunteers, 320 men, 1,029 woman, mean age 51±14.5 (SD) years participated in 30 rehabilitative retreats from 1999–2006 in the Czech Republic, using a low-fat, low-energy, lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet...

  15. Pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lucia Pacifico; Valerio Nobili; Caterina Anania; Paola Verdecchia; Claudio Chiesa

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a range of liver histology severity and outcomes in the absence of chronic alcohol use. The mildest form is simple steatosis in which triglycerides accumulate within hepatocytes. A more advanced form of NAFLD, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, includes inflammation and liver cell injury, progressive to cryptogenic cirrhosis. NAFLD has become the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children and adolescents. The recent rise in the prevalence rates of overweight and obesity likely explains the NAFLD epidemic worldwide. NAFLD is strongly associated with abdominal obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia, and most patients have evidence of insulin resistance. Thus, NAFLD shares many features of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), a highly atherogenic condition, and this has stimulated interest in the possible role of NAFLD in the development of atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence suggests that NAFLD is associated with a significantly greater overall mortality than in the general population, as well as with increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), independently of classical atherosclerotic risk factors. Yet, several studies including the pediatric population have reported independent associations between NAFLD and impaired flow-mediated vasodilatation and increased carotid artery intimal medial thickness-two reliable markers of subclinical atherosclerosis-after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and MetS. Therefore, the rising prevalence of obesity-related MetS and NAFLD in childhood may lead to a parallel increase in adverse cardiovascular outcomes. In children, the cardiovascular system remains plastic and damage-reversible if early and appropriate interventions are established effectively. Therapeutic goals for NAFLD should address nutrition, physical activity, and avoidance of smoking to prevent not only end-stage liver disease but also CVD.

  16. Circulating soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor predicts cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and mortality in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugen-Olsen, J; Andersen, O; Linneberg, A; Ladelund, S; Hansen T, W; Langkilde, A; Petersen, Janne; Pielak, T; Møller, N. L.; Jeppesen, J; Lyngbæk, S; Fenger, M; Olsen M, H; Borch-Johnsen, K; Jørgensen, Torben; Haugaard S, B; Hildebrandt, P. R.

    2010-01-01

    Low-grade inflammation is thought to contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD), type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), cancer and mortality. Biomarkers of inflammation may aid in risk prediction and enable early intervention and prevention of disease.......Low-grade inflammation is thought to contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD), type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), cancer and mortality. Biomarkers of inflammation may aid in risk prediction and enable early intervention and prevention of disease....

  17. ROLE OF VARIOUS RISK FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranay Wal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Coronary Artery Disease (CAD is the leading cause of cardiovascular mortality world wide. Increasing rate of CAD mortality and projected rise in CAD mortality for 2020 in the developing world necessitates immediate prevention and control measures. Cardiovascular disease (CVD is generally due to reduced blood flow to the heart, brain or body caused by atheroma or thrombosis. It is increasingly common after the age of 60, but rare below the age of 30. Plaques (plates of fatty atheroma build up in different arteries during adult life. These can eventually cause narrowing of the arteries, or trigger a local thrombosis (blood clot which completely blocks the blood flow. Despite scientific evidence that evidence based drug therapy reduce mortality in patients with established CAD, these therapies continue to be underutilized in patients receiving conventional care. It is essential to identify and manage risk factors for coronary artery diseases and to implement unique and creative approaches to stimulate better adherence to practice guidelines, to improve the quality of care given to patients with CAD. Reduction of SBP, DBP, heart rate, and body fat%, total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL after regular yogic practices is beneficial for cardiac and hypertensive patients. Emphasis focusing on conventional risk factors, lifestyle modifications, smoking cessation, reduction of central obesity through dietary modification and exercise, can be proved to be the key interventions for preventing CAD.

  18. Circulating endothelial cells in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boos, Christopher J; Lip, Gregory Y H; Blann, Andrew D

    2006-10-17

    Quantification of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) in peripheral blood is developing as a novel and reproducible method of assessing endothelial damage/dysfunction. The CECs are thought to be mature cells that have detached from the intimal monolayer in response to endothelial injury and are a different cell population to endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The EPCs are nonleukocytes derived from the bone marrow that are believed to have proliferative potential and may be important in vascular regeneration. Currently accepted methods of CEC quantification include the use of immunomagnetic bead separation (with cell counting under fluorescence microscopy) and flow cytometry. Several recent studies have shown increased numbers of CECs in cardiovascular disease and its risk factors, such as unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes mellitus, and critical limb ischemia, but no change in stable intermittent claudication, essential hypertension, or atrial fibrillation. Furthermore, CEC quantification at 48 h after acute myocardial infarction has been shown to be an accurate predictor of major adverse coronary events and death at both 1 month and 1 year. This article presents an overview of the pathophysiology of CECs in the setting of cardiovascular disease and a brief comparison with EPCs. PMID:17045885

  19. Lifestyle decreases risk factors for cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavícek, Jaroslav; Kittnar, Otomar; Fraser, Gary E; Medová, Eva; Konecná, Jana; Zizka, Robert; Dohnalová, Alena; Novák, Vladimir

    2008-12-01

    The morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases is high in the developed countries. The lifestyle changes are capable to decrease it by 50%. The aim of the present study was to measure the parameters of some risk factors before and after a one-week NEW START rehabilitative retreat. 1349 volunteers, 320 men, 1029 woman, mean age 51 +/- 14.5 (SD) years participated in 30 rehabilitative retreats from 1999-2006 in the Czech Republic, using a low-fat, low-energy, lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet and exercise, in a stress-free environment. Body weight, height, BMI, blood pressure, heart rate, serum cholesterol and blood glucose were measured. Body weight decreased in 1223 measured persons from 71.2 +/- 14.38 (SD) to 70.6 +/- 14.02 kg (placto-ovo vegetarians and Seventh-day Adventists than in controls who never observed the diet and avail the lifestyle programs. The parameters were nonsignificantly changed one year after finishing the retreat in the sample of 68 persons showing the positive effect of retreats. Our results showed, that the intake of a low-fat, low-energy diet, over the course of one week in a stress-free environment, had positive impact on the risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:19256282

  20. Androgen therapy and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K-CY McGrath

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available K-CY McGrath1, LS McRobb1,2, AK Heather1,21Heart Research Institute, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 2Discipline of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD remains the leading cause of death in Western society today. There is a striking gender difference in CVD with men predisposed to earlier onset and more severe disease. Following the recent reevaluation and ongoing debate regarding the estrogen protection hypothesis, and given that androgen use and abuse is increasing in our society, the alternate view that androgens may promote CVD in men is assuming increasing importance. Whether androgens adversely affect CVD in either men or women remains a contentious issue within both the cardiovascular and endocrinological fraternities. This review draws from basic science, animal and clinical studies to outline our current understanding regarding androgen effects on atherosclerosis, the major CVD, and asks where future directions of atherosclerosis-related androgen research may lie.

  1. Cardiovascular disease in renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Emily P; Fellström, Bengt C; Holdaas, Hallvard; Jardine, Alan G

    2010-05-01

    Renal transplant recipients have a markedly increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population, although considerably lower than that of patients receiving maintenance haemodialysis. CVD in transplant recipients is poorly characterised and differs from the nonrenal population, with a much higher proportion of fatal to nonfatal cardiac events. In addition to traditional ischaemic heart disease risk factors such as age, gender, diabetes and smoking, there are additional factors to consider in this population such as the importance of hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy and uraemic cardiomyopathy. There are factors specific to transplantation such immunosuppressive therapies and graft dysfunction which contribute to this altered risk profile. However, understanding and treatment is limited by the absence of large randomised intervention trials addressing risk factor modification, with the exception of the ALERT study. The approach to managing these patients should begin early and be multifactorial in nature. PMID:20586909

  2. Work Stress as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2015-09-01

    The role of psychosocial work stress as a risk factor for chronic disease has been the subject of considerable debate. Many researchers argue in support of a causal connection while others remain skeptical and have argued that the effect on specific health conditions is either negligible or confounded. This review of evidence from over 600,000 men and women from 27 cohort studies in Europe, the USA and Japan suggests that work stressors, such as job strain and long working hours, are associated with a moderately elevated risk of incident coronary heart disease and stroke. The excess risk for exposed individuals is 10-40 % compared with those free of such stressors. Differences between men and women, younger versus older employees and workers from different socioeconomic backgrounds appear to be small, indicating that the association is robust. Meta-analyses of a wider range of health outcomes show additionally an association between work stress and type 2 diabetes, though not with common cancers or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, suggesting outcome specificity. Few studies have addressed whether mitigation of work stressors would reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. In view of the limited interventional evidence on benefits, harms and cost-effectiveness, definitive recommendations have not been made (e.g. by the US Preventive Services Taskforce) for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease via workplace stress reduction. Nevertheless, governments are already launching healthy workplace campaigns, and preventing excessive work stress is a legal obligation in several countries. Promoting awareness of the link between stress and health among both employers and workers is an important component of workplace health promotion. PMID:26238744

  3. Nutrigenomics, the microbiome, and gene environment interactions: new directions in cardiovascular disease research, prevention, and treatment. A scientific statement From the American Heart Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiometabolic diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide and are strongly linked to both genetic and nutritional factors. The field of nutrigenomics encompasses multiple approaches aimed at understanding the effects of diet on health or disease development, including nutrigenetic studies in...

  4. The BioImage Study: novel approaches to risk assessment in the primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease--study design and objectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muntendam, Pieter; McCall, Carol; Sanz, Javier;

    2010-01-01

    The identification of asymptomatic individuals at risk for near-term atherothrombotic events to ensure optimal preventive treatment remains a challenging goal. In the BioImage Study, novel approaches are tested in a typical health-plan population. Based on certain demographic and risk characteris......The identification of asymptomatic individuals at risk for near-term atherothrombotic events to ensure optimal preventive treatment remains a challenging goal. In the BioImage Study, novel approaches are tested in a typical health-plan population. Based on certain demographic and risk...

  5. Patients with psoriasis have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Skov, Lone; Hansen, Peter Riis

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic immunoinflammatory disease that affects 2-3% of the population and shares pathophysiologic mechanisms and risk factors with cardiovascular diseases. Studies have suggested psoriasis as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and Danish guidelines on...... cardiovascular risk factor modification in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis have recently been published. We provide a short review of the current evidence and the Danish guidelines....

  6. Cardiovascular disease in Navajo Indians with type 2 diabetes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoy, W; Light, A; Megill, D

    1995-01-01

    Rates of both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease have risen sharply in recent years among Navajo Indians, the largest reservation-based American Indian tribe, but the association between the two conditions is not entirely clear. Rates of cardiovascular disease and some possible associations in several hundred diabetic and non-diabetic Navajos were estimated. Nearly one-third (30.9 percent) of those with diabetes had formal diagnoses of cardiovascular disease--25.3 percent had heart di...

  7. Sex Differences in the Developmental Origins of Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Intapad, Suttira; Ojeda, Norma B.; Dasinger, John Henry; Alexander, Barbara T.

    2014-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) proposes that adverse events during early life program an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Experimental models provide proof of concept but also indicate that insults during early life program sex differences in adult blood pressure and cardiovascular risk. This review will highlight the potential mechanisms that contribute to the etiology of sex differences in the developmental programming of cardiovascular disease.

  8. Genetics, Disease Prevention and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the genetic terms used on this page Genetics, Disease Prevention and Treatment Overview How can learning ... gov] Top of page How can knowing about genetics help treat disease? Every year, more than two ...

  9. Antioxidant Micronutrients in the Prevention of Age-related Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Polidori M

    2003-01-01

    The role and functions of antioxidant micronutrients such as ascorbate (vitamin C), a-tocopherol (vitamin E) and carotenoids that are provided through the diet in aging and in the prevention of age-related diseases are discussed in the present work. In general, a healthy lifestyle involving regular exercise and avoidance of tobacco or alcohol abuse are the key to the prevention of several age-related diseases including cardiovascular diseases, dementia and cancer. A balanced and regular nutri...

  10. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in pericardial diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francone Marco

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The pericardium and pericardial diseases in particular have received, in contrast to other topics in the field of cardiology, relatively limited interest. Today, despite improved knowledge of pathophysiology of pericardial diseases and the availability of a wide spectrum of diagnostic tools, the diagnostic challenge remains. Not only the clinical presentation may be atypical, mimicking other cardiac, pulmonary or pleural diseases; in developed countries a shift for instance in the epidemiology of constrictive pericarditis has been noted. Accurate decision making is crucial taking into account the significant morbidity and mortality caused by complicated pericardial diseases, and the potential benefit of therapeutic interventions. Imaging herein has an important role, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is definitely one of the most versatile modalities to study the pericardium. It fuses excellent anatomic detail and tissue characterization with accurate evaluation of cardiac function and assessment of the haemodynamic consequences of pericardial constraint on cardiac filling. This review focuses on the current state of knowledge how CMR can be used to study the most common pericardial diseases.

  11. Plasma proteomics to identify biomarkers – application to cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Christian Beck

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an unmet need for new cardiovascular biomarkers. Despite this only few biomarkers for the diagnosis or screening of cardiovascular diseases have been implemented in the clinic. Thousands of proteins can be analysed in plasma by mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies. Therefore, this technology may therefore identify new biomarkers that previously have not been associated with cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we summarize the key challenges and considerations, including strategies, recent discoveries and clinical applications in cardiovascular proteomics that may lead to the discovery of novel cardiovascular biomarkers.

  12. Medical management of the patient with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mask, A G

    2000-06-01

    Cigarette smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and periodontal disease have been established as major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Dentists and physicians should work aggressively to educate periodontitis patients about this relationship in an effort to improve the quality of health and contribute to their long-term survival. Blood pressure should be checked at the initial dental visit and at each subsequent visit in patients whose blood pressure is found to be high and/or has a history of hypertension. Dental and medical assistants should receive in-service training to assure competency in measuring blood pressures. All staff should be certified in basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Emergency protocol procedures should be in writing and rehearsed regularly. Patients should take their blood pressure medication as usual on the day of the dental procedure. It is helpful for the patients to bring all medications to the office for review at the time of the dental procedure. Good communication should be established between the dentist and physician to maximize good dental and physical health. Because the patient with periodontal disease is at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, a standardized form should be developed for the convenient exchange of vital information, including but not limited to: blood pressure, medications, allergies, medical conditions and pertinent highlights of dental procedures. Minimize stress in patients with coronary artery disease. This includes providing solid local anesthesia, avoidance of intravascular medication injections, and encouraging relaxation techniques. Antibiotic prophylaxis is indicated in patients with valvular heart disease but does not guarantee the prevention of endocarditis. These patients should be alerted to monitor any symptoms such as fever, chills or shortness of breath. It has also been documented that toothbrushing, flossing and home plaque removers can cause transient bacteremia in

  13. Quality of life evaluation in cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdravković Marija

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Definition of quality of life. In recent years, quality of life has become a very important measure of treatment of disease and successful therapy, regarding not only general health of an individual patient but also of the whole population In 1993 the WHO proclaimed 'Vision of health for all', as 'Add years to life' but also 'Add life to years', emphasizing quality of life to be as important as life duration. Although the remaining life expectancy in patients with cardiovascular disease is prolonged, there is still medical challenge: 'How to improve quality of life in these patients?'. Measurement of quality of life. Quality of life can be defined as the patient's perception of impact of disease and concomitant therapy and procedures on his physical and working capacity, emotional role, social communication and general health. Different types of standardized questionnaires for quality of life evaluation It can be measured by general health questionnaires and specified questionnaires for disease. Questionnaire SF-36 is regarded as one of the most reliable, considering the great number of publications. Conclusion. The most important step in complicated evaluation of quality of life is the adequate selection of questionnaire with a high confidence.

  14. Cardiovascular disease and hypertension in sub-Saharan Africa: burden, risk and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappuccio, Francesco Paolo; Miller, Michelle Avril

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease, including stroke, heart failure and kidney disease, has been common in sub-Saharan Africa for many years, and rapid urbanization is causing an upsurge of ischaemic heart disease and metabolic disorders. At least two-thirds of cardiovascular deaths now occur in low- and middle-income countries, bringing a double burden of disease to poor and developing world economies. High blood pressure (or hypertension) is by far the commonest underlying risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Its prevention, detection, treatment and control in sub-Saharan Africa are haphazard and suboptimal. This is due to a combination of lack of resources and health-care systems, non-existent effective preventive strategies at a population level, lack of sustainable drug therapy, and barriers to complete compliance with prescribed medications. The economic impact for loss of productive years of life and the need to divert scarce resources to tertiary care are substantial. PMID:27001886

  15. A Web Based Cardiovascular Disease Detection System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshraideh, Hussam; Otoom, Mwaffaq; Al-Araida, Aseel; Bawaneh, Haneen; Bravo, José

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) is one of the most catastrophic and life threatening health issue nowadays. Early detection of CVD is an important solution to reduce its devastating effects on health. In this paper, an efficient CVD detection algorithm is identified. The algorithm uses patient demographic data as inputs, along with several ECG signal features extracted automatically through signal processing techniques. Cross-validation results show a 98.29 % accuracy for the decision tree classification algorithm. The algorithm has been integrated into a web based system that can be used at anytime by patients to check their heart health status. At one end of the system is the ECG sensor attached to the patient's body, while at the other end is the detection algorithm. Communication between the two ends is done through an Android application. PMID:26293754

  16. Mechanisms Linking Red Blood Cell Disorders and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Mozos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to review the main pathophysiological links between red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, provides a brief description of the latest studies in this area, and considers implications for clinical practice and therapy. Anemia is associated with a special risk in proatherosclerotic conditions and heart disease and became a new therapeutic target. Guidelines must be updated for the management of patients with red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, and targets for hemoglobin level should be established. Risk scores in several cardiovascular diseases should include red blood cell count and RDW. Complete blood count and hemorheological parameters represent useful, inexpensive, widely available tools for the management and prognosis of patients with coronary heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, arrhythmias, and stroke. Hypoxia and iron accumulation cause the most important cardiovascular effects of sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Patients with congenital chronic hemolytic anemia undergoing splenectomy should be monitored, considering thromboembolic and cardiovascular risk.

  17. Risk of cardiovascular disease in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nynne; Nyboe; Andersen; Tine; Jess

    2014-01-01

    Abundant scientific evidence supporting an association between inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and venous thromboembolic events, caused by an IBD related hypercoagulability, is acknowledged and thromboprophylactic treatment strategies are now implemented in the management of IBD patients. In contrary, the risk of arterial thromboembolic disease, as ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular events, and mesenteric ischemia in patients with IBD remains uncertain and the magnitude of a potentially increased risk is continuously debated, with ambiguous risk estimates among studies. The evident role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis forms the basis of a biological plausible link; the chronic systemic inflammation in IBD patients increases the risk of atherosclerosis and thereby the risk of thrombotic events. Further, studies have shown that the burden of traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia is lower in IBD populations, thus further strengthen the role of non-traditional risk factors, as chronic inflammation in the linking of the two disease entities. Likewise, mortality from cardiovascular disease in IBD remains questioned. The aim of the current review is to give an up-date on the existing evidence of the possible association between IBD and cardiovascular disease and to discuss traditional and non-traditional risk factors.

  18. Secondary prevention through cardiac rehabilitation: from knowledge to implementation. A position paper from the Cardiac Rehabilitation Section of the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piepoli, Massimo Francesco; Corrà, Ugo; Benzer, Werner;

    2010-01-01

    cardiovascular health outcomes. Secondary prevention through exercise-based CR is the intervention with the best scientific evidence to contribute to decrease morbidity and mortality in coronary artery disease, in particular after myocardial infarction but also incorporating cardiac interventions and chronic...... patients eligible. Thus a novel, disease-oriented document has been generated, where all components of CR for cardiovascular conditions have been revised, presenting both well-established and controversial aspects. A general table applicable to all cardiovascular conditions and specific tables for each...

  19. Social status and cardiovascular disease: a Mediterranean case. Results from the Italian Progetto CUORE cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilotto Lorenza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Social factors could offer useful information for planning prevention strategy for cardiovascular diseases. This analysis aims to explore the relationship between education, marital status and major cardiovascular risk factors and to evaluate the role of social status indicators in predicting cardiovascular events and deaths in several Italian cohorts. Methods The population is representative of Italy, where the incidence of the disease is low. Data from the Progetto CUORE, a prospective study of cohorts enrolled between 1983-1997, were used; 7520 men and 13127 women aged 35-69 years free of previous cardiovascular events and followed for an average of 11 years. Educational level and marital status were used as the main indicators of social status. Results About 70% of the studied population had a low or medium level of education (less than high school and more than 80% was married or cohabitating. There was an inverse relationship between educational level and major cardiovascular risk factors in both genders. Significantly higher major cardiovascular risk factors were detected in married or cohabitating women, with the exception of smoking. Cardiovascular risk score was lower in married or cohabitating men. No relationship between incidence of cardiac events and the two social status indicators was observed. Cardiovascular case-fatality was significantly higher in men who were not married and not cohabitating (HR 3.20, 95%CI: 2.21-4.64. The higher cardiovascular risk observed in those with a low level of education deserves careful attention even if during the follow-up it did not seem to determine an increase of cardiac events. Conclusions Preventive interventions on cardiovascular risk should be addressed mostly to people with less education. Cardiovascular risk score and case-fatality resulted higher in men living alone while cardiovascular factors were higher in women married or cohabitating. Such gender differences seem

  20. Secretory Phospholipase A2-IIA and Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, Michael V; Simon, Tabassome; Exeter, Holly J;

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the role of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-IIA in cardiovascular disease.......This study sought to investigate the role of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-IIA in cardiovascular disease....

  1. Quantifying cardiovascular disease risk factors in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, I M; Skaaby, T; Ellervik, C;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a previous meta-analysis on categorical data we found an association between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease and associated risk factors. OBJECTIVES: To quantify the level of cardiovascular disease risk factors in order to provide additional data for the clinical management...

  2. Blood donation and cardiovascular disease. Addressing the healthy donor effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peffer, K.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the possible protective effect of frequent blood donation on cardiovascular disease was studied. Previous research has shown that high iron stores could have damaging effects on developing cardiovascular disease, and that blood donation lowers iron stores. Lowering iron stores throug

  3. Project h[schwa]li?dx[superscript w]/Healthy Hearts across Generations: Development and Evaluation Design of a Tribally Based Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Intervention for American Indian Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Karina L.; LaMarr, June; Levy, Rona L.; Pearson, Cynthia; Maresca, Teresa; Mohammed, Selina A.; Simoni, Jane M.; Evans-Campbell, Teresa; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Fryberg, Sheryl; Jobe, Jared B.

    2012-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) populations are disproportionately at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, and obesity, compared with the general US population. This article describes the h[schwa]li?dx[superscript w]/Healthy Hearts Across Generations project, an AIAN-run, tribally based randomized controlled trial (January…

  4. Return on Investment for Digital Behavioral Counseling in Patients With Prediabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqing Su, MS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction We calculated the health and economic impacts of participation in a digital behavioral counseling service that is designed to promote a healthful diet and physical activity for cardiovascular disease prevention in adults with prediabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factors (Prevent, Omada Health, San Francisco, California. This program enhances the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program. Participants completed a 16-week core program followed by an ongoing maintenance program. Methods Analysis was conducted for 2 populations meeting criteria for lifestyle intervention: 1 prediabetes (n = 1,663, and 2 high cardiovascular disease risk (n = 2,152. The Markov-based model simulated clinical and economic outcomes related to obesity and diabetes annually over 10 years for the 2 defined populations. Comparisons were made between participants and propensity-matched controls from the community. Results The return-on-investment break-even point was 3 years in both populations. Simulated return on investment for the population with prediabetes was $9 and $1,565 at years 3 and 5, respectively. Simulated return on investment for the population with cardiovascular disease risk was $96 and $1,512 at years 3 and 5, respectively. Results suggest that program participation reduces diabetes incidence by 30% to 33% and stroke by 11% to 16% over 5 years. Conclusion Digital Behavioral Counseling provides significant health benefits to patients with prediabetes and cardiovascular disease and a positive return on investment.

  5. A Speedy Cardiovascular Diseases Classifier Using Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wah Ching Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Each year, some 30 percent of global deaths are caused by cardiovascular diseases. This figure is worsening due to both the increasing elderly population and severe shortages of medical personnel. The development of a cardiovascular diseases classifier (CDC for auto-diagnosis will help address solve the problem. Former CDCs did not achieve quick evaluation of cardiovascular diseases. In this letter, a new CDC to achieve speedy detection is investigated. This investigation incorporates the analytic hierarchy process (AHP-based multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA to develop feature vectors using a Support Vector Machine. The MCDA facilitates the efficient assignment of appropriate weightings to potential patients, thus scaling down the number of features. Since the new CDC will only adopt the most meaningful features for discrimination between healthy persons versus cardiovascular disease patients, a speedy detection of cardiovascular diseases has been successfully implemented.

  6. Anaphylaxis and cardiovascular disease: therapeutic dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, P; Simons, F E R

    2015-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) increases the risk of severe or fatal anaphylaxis, and some medications for CVD treatment can exacerbate anaphylaxis. The aim of this article is to review the effect of anaphylaxis on the heart, the potential impact of medications for CVD on anaphylaxis and anaphylaxis treatment, and the cardiovascular effects of epinephrine. The therapeutic dilemmas arising from these issues are also discussed and management strategies proposed. PubMed searches were performed for the years 1990-2014 inclusive, using terms such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, adrenaline, allergic myocardial infarction, anaphylaxis, angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs), beta-adrenergic blockers, epinephrine, and Kounis syndrome. Literature analysis indicated that: cardiac mast cells are key constituents of atherosclerotic plaques; mast cell mediators play an important role in acute coronary syndrome (ACS); patients with CVD are at increased risk of developing severe or fatal anaphylaxis; and medications for CVD treatment, including beta-adrenergic blockers and ACE inhibitors, potentially exacerbate anaphylaxis or make it more difficult to treat. Epinephrine increases myocardial contractility, decreases the duration of systole relative to diastole, and enhances coronary blood flow. Its transient adverse effects include pallor, tremor, anxiety, and palpitations. Serious adverse effects (including ventricular arrhythmias and hypertension) are rare, and are significantly more likely after intravenous injection than after intramuscular injection. Epinephrine is life-saving in anaphylaxis; second-line medications (including antihistamines and glucocorticoids) are not. In CVD patients (especially those with ACS), the decision to administer epinephrine for anaphylaxis can be difficult, and its benefits and potential harms need to be carefully considered. Concerns about potential adverse effects need to be weighed against concerns about possible death from

  7. Micro RNAs as mediators of cardiovascular disease: Targets to be manipulated

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seahyoung; Lee; Eunhyun; Choi; Sung-Man; Kim; Ki-Chul; Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease has been the leading cause of death worldwide for the last few decades. Even with therapid progression of the biomedical field, conquering/managing cardiovascular disease is not an easy task because it is multifactorial disease. One of the key players of the development and progression of numerous diseases is micro RNA(mi RNA). These small, non-coding RNAs bind to target m RNAs to inhibit translations of and/or degrade the target m RNAs, thus acting as negative regulators of gene expressions. Accumulating evidence indicates that non-physiological expressions of mi RNAs contribute to both development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Since even a single mi RNA can have multiple targets, dysregulation of mi RNAs can lead to catastrophic changes of proteins that may be important for maintaining physiologic conditions of cells, tissues, and organs. Current knowledge on the role of mi RNAs in cardiovascular disease is mostly based on the observational data such as microarray of mi RNAs in animal disease models, thus relatively lacking insight of how such dysregulation of mi RNAs is initiated and regulated. Consequently, future research should aim to elucidate the more comprehensive mechanisms of mi RNA dysregulation during pathogenesis of the cardiovascular system so that appropriate countermeasures to prevent/manage cardiovascular disease can be developed.

  8. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Older People with Intellectual Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Channa

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Chapter 1 General introduction There is an increasing group of older people with intellectual disability in The Netherlands, reaching almost the same life expectancy as the general population. Age-related diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer and dementia are now the most encountered diseases and causes of death in older people with intellectual disabilities. Although cardiovascular disease is a major risk for older people with intellectual disabilities...

  9. Prevalence of Cardiovascular disease risk among Medical Students in South India

    OpenAIRE

    Biswajit Paul; Vidhyaa Nayaaki; Mousumi Sen; Rita Isaac

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are global epidemic and contribute to double burden in developing countries. Individual’s dietary habits and risk behavior influence the onset and progression of CVDs. Medical students are future role models of the society and their knowledge, habits and behavior can influence their practice in prevention of CVDs in general population. Aims & Objectives: To assess the prevalence of common cardiovascular risk factors among a sample of medical stud...

  10. Estimating the value of information in strategies for identifying patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tom Marshall

    2006-01-01

    Background There are many different potential strategies for identification of patients eligible for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. The ability to use a more efficient strategy has a value. This paper models the costs and benefits of a number of identification strategies and estimates the additional value of an information-based strategy. Design Modelling study. Methods Ten-year Framingham cardiovascular risk was calculated for each individual in a population of 4471 pers...

  11. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease: focus on glucagon-like peptide-1 based therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Stranges, Paul; Khanderia, Ujjaini

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a well known risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). While glycemic control has consistently been shown to prevent microvascular complications, large randomized trials have not demonstrated the same consistent beneficial effects of intensive glycemic control in improving cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. Thus, optimal glucose control alone is not sufficient to reduce CV risk. Aggressive management of CV risk factors such as blood pressure, lipids, and body weight is also ...

  12. Cardiovascular Disease in South Asian Migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Eshan; Razak, Fahad; Lear, Scott A; Anand, Sonia S

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents a significant cause of global mortality and morbidity. South Asians (SAs) have a particularly high burden of coronary artery disease (CAD). This review describes current literature regarding the prevalence, incidence, etiology, and prognosis of CVD in SA migrants to high-income nations. We conducted a narrative review of CVD in the SA diaspora through a search of MEDLINE and PubMed. We included observational studies, randomized clinical trials, nonsystematic reviews, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses written in English. Of 15,231 articles identified, 827 articles were screened and 124 formed the basis for review. SA migrants have a 1.5-2 times greater prevalence of CAD than age- and sex-adjusted Europids. Increased abdominal obesity and body fat and increased burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia appear to be primary drivers of the excess CAD burden in SAs. Sedentary lifestyle and changes in diet after immigration are important contributors to weight gain and adiposity. Early life factors, physical activity patterns and, in some cases, reduced adherence to medical therapy may contribute to increased CVD risks in SAs. Novel biomarkers like leptin and adipokines may show distinct patterns in SAs and provide insights into cardiometabolic risk determinants. In conclusion, SAs have distinct CVD risk predispositions, with a complex relationship to cultural, innate, and acquired factors. Although CVD risk factor management and treatment among SAs is improving, opportunities exist for further advances. PMID:26321436

  13. Lipoprotein(a in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Malaguarnera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein(a (Lp(a is an LDL-like molecule consisting of an apolipoprotein B-100 (apo(B-100 particle attached by a disulphide bridge to apo(a. Many observations have pointed out that Lp(a levels may be a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Lp(a inhibits the activation of transforming growth factor (TGF and contributes to the growth of arterial atherosclerotic lesions by promoting the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and the migration of smooth muscle cells to endothelial cells. Moreover Lp(a inhibits plasminogen binding to the surfaces of endothelial cells and decreases the activity of fibrin-dependent tissue-type plasminogen activator. Lp(a may act as a proinflammatory mediator that augments the lesion formation in atherosclerotic plaques. Elevated serum Lp(a is an independent predictor of coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction. Furthermore, Lp(a levels should be a marker of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, saphenous vein bypass graft atherosclerosis, and accelerated coronary atherosclerosis of cardiac transplantation. Finally, the possibility that Lp(a may be a risk factor for ischemic stroke has been assessed in several studies. Recent findings suggest that Lp(a-lowering therapy might be beneficial in patients with high Lp(a levels. A future therapeutic approach could include apheresis in high-risk patients in order to reduce major coronary events.

  14. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice on Cardiovascular Disease among Women in North-Eastcoast Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Rosediani Muhamad; Ranimah Yahya; Harmy Mohamed Yusoff

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a leading killer not only in men but also in women worldwide and primary target for prevention. However, majority initial researchers believed it was mainly a men’s disease that resulted in fewer women being informed regarding the disease.Aim and Objectives: A cross sectional study was conducted to determine the level of knowledge, attitude and practice on cardiovascular disease among women attended outpatient clinics with Family Medicine Speciali...

  15. Plasma proteomics to identify biomarkers - Application to cardiovascular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Overgaard, Martin; Melholt Rasmussen, Lars

    , this technology may therefore identify new biomarkers that previously have not been associated with cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we summarize the key challenges and considerations, including strategies, recent discoveries and clinical applications in cardiovascular proteomics that may lead......There is an unmet need for new cardiovascular biomarkers. Despite this only few biomarkers for the diagnosis or screening of cardiovascular diseases have been implemented in the clinic. Thousands of proteins can be analysed in plasma by mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies. Therefore...

  16. Vitamin D and Disease Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin D and Disease Prevention Why is vitamin D important for health? Vitamin D is a hot topic in the news, thanks ... is controversy, though, over the effects of vitamin D on health other than the bones. Doctors have ...

  17. The emerging role of outdoor and indoor air pollution in cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinta C Uzoigwe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Outdoor and indoor air pollution poses a significant cardiovascular risk, and has been associated with atherosclerosis, the main underlying pathology in many cardiovascular diseases. Although, it is well known that exposure to air pollution causes pulmonary disease, recent studies have shown that cardiovascular health consequences of air pollution generally equal or exceed those due to pulmonary diseases. The objective of this article is to evaluate the current evidence on the emerging role of environmental air pollutions in cardiovascular disease, with specific focus on the types of air pollutants and mechanisms of air pollution-induced cardiotoxicity. Published literature on pollution was systematically reviewed and cited in this article. It is hoped that this review will provide a better understanding of the harmful cardiovascular effects induced by air pollution exposure. This will help to bring a better understanding on the possible preventive health measures and will also serve regulatory agencies and researchers. In addition, elucidating the biological mechanisms underlying the link between air pollution and cardiovascular disease is an essential target in developing novel pharmacological strategies aimed at decreasing adverse effects of air pollution on cardiovascular system.

  18. Cardiovascular disease: the new epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikem, Ifechukwude; Sumpio, Bauer E

    2011-12-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is now facing a double burden of disease where patients are suffering from non-communicable diseases such as coronary heart disease, along with the burden of the current human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. Due to this double burden, cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention and treatment has been overlooked, allowing the rates to continue to rise unchecked. A series of searches were conducted using PubMed as the primary database. From these searches, journal articles were compiled that related to diabetes, obesity and smoking rates in SSA. Also, the prevalence of CVD in the USA was reviewed. Although the USA has higher rates of CVD now, the rates were on the decline compared with SSA. Due to 'Westernization' of SSA, the rates of CVD risk factors, such as diabetes, are expected to increase by 50%. Because of this, 80% of CVD deaths worldwide took place in developing countries like those in SSA. Although HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is the current epidemic in SSA, CVD disease poses a threat as the new epidemic because of the increasing rates of these CVD risk factors. Without combating this disease now, SSA is facing an epidemiological shift from AIDS to CVD being the leading cause of death. PMID:21940758

  19. Atrial Fibrillation and Non-cardiovascular Diseases: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Ferreira

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and is associated with an unfavorable prognosis, increasing the risk of stroke and death. Although traditionally associated with cardiovascular diseases, there is increasing evidence of high incidence of AF in patients with highly prevalent noncardiovascular diseases, such as cancer, sepsis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, obstructive sleep apnea and chronic kidney disease. Therefore, considerable number of patients has been affected by these comorbidities, leading to an increased risk of adverse outcomes.The authors performed a systematic review of the literature aiming to better elucidate the interaction between these conditions.Several mechanisms seem to contribute to the concomitant presence of AF and noncardiovascular diseases. Comorbidities, advanced age, autonomic dysfunction, electrolyte disturbance and inflammation are common to these conditions and may predispose to AF.The treatment of AF in these patients represents a clinical challenge, especially in terms of antithrombotic therapy, since the scores for stratification of thromboembolic risk, such as the CHADS2 and CHA2DS2VASc scores, and the scores for hemorrhagic risk, like the HAS-BLED score have limitations when applied in these conditions.The evidence in this area is still scarce and further investigations to elucidate aspects like epidemiology, pathogenesis, prevention and treatment of AF in noncardiovascular diseases are still needed.

  20. C-reactive protein, cytokines and inflammation in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucova, M; Bernadic, M; Buckingham, T

    2008-01-01

    Inflammation of vascular cell wall is the key problem and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines play a great role in it. These molecules, togheter with C-reactive protein (CRP) can predict risk of coronary events. It is questionable to what extend are CRP and pro-inflammatory cytokines purely acute phase markers and to what extend are they active inflammatory participants. Besides inflammation, other prominent mechanism in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis--underlying causes of coronary events, is genetics. Gene polymorphisms including polymorphisms of inflammatory markers are studied and one of them, polymorphism of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1/CCL2) and its receptor CCR2 (key components of atherosclerosis) belong to most studied one. MCP-1/CCL2 and CCR2 polymorphisms have been implicated as susceptibility factors for chronic stable angina pectoris and myocardial infarction by several independent investigators. It seems that CCL2/CCR2 axis plays an important role both in post-ischemic and post-reperfusion inflammation and could become a new therapeutic goal in selected cardiovascular diseases as well as in stroke in future. Inhibition of this axis disrupts ischemic-reperfusion injury by decreasing edema, leucocyte infiltration and expression of inflammatory mediators. One can suppose that identifying genes influencing inflammatory biomarkers might improve understanding of genetic determinants of cardiovascular disease our management and prevention (Tab. 2, Fig. 1, Ref. 105). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk. PMID:18837239

  1. Links between Vitamin D Deficiency and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Mozos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper was to review the most important mechanisms explaining the possible association of vitamin D deficiency and cardiovascular diseases, focusing on recent experimental and clinical data. Low vitamin D levels favor atherosclerosis enabling vascular inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, formation of foam cells, and proliferation of smooth muscle cells. The antihypertensive properties of vitamin D include suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, renoprotective effects, direct effects on endothelial cells and calcium metabolism, inhibition of growth of vascular smooth muscle cells, prevention of secondary hyperparathyroidism, and beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors. Vitamin D is also involved in glycemic control, lipid metabolism, insulin secretion, and sensitivity, explaining the association between vitamin D deficiency and metabolic syndrome. Vitamin D deficit was associated in some studies with the number of affected coronary arteries, postinfarction complications, inflammatory cytokines and cardiac remodeling in patients with myocardial infarction, direct electromechanical effects and inflammation in atrial fibrillation, and neuroprotective effects in stroke. In peripheral arterial disease, vitamin D status was related to the decline of the functional performance, severity, atherosclerosis and inflammatory markers, arterial stiffness, vascular calcifications, and arterial aging. Vitamin D supplementation should further consider additional factors, such as phosphates, parathormone, renin, and fibroblast growth factor 23 levels.

  2. How Should We Treat Depression in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Kronish, Ian M.; Krupka, David J.; Davidson, Karina W.

    2012-01-01

    Among patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD), depression is highly prevalent and is associated with worse cardiovascular prognosis and lower quality of life. Treatments for depression in CVD patients produce modest, but clinically significant reductions in depressive symptoms and show promise for improving cardiovascular prognosis. While tricyclics should generally be avoided, antidepressants from multiple other classes appear to be safe in cardiac patients. A strategy of engaging patient...

  3. Sexual counseling and cardiovascular disease: practical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Elaine E; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2015-01-01

    Patients with cardiovascular disease and their partners expect health care providers to provide sexual counseling to assist them in maintaining sexual quality of life. Evidence suggests however, that there is a gap in integrating evidence into practice and that relatively few cardiac patients receive sexual counseling. This can result in negative psychological, physical, and quality of life outcomes for couples who may needlessly decide sexual activity is too risky and cease all sexual activity. Two scientific statements now exist that provide ample guidance to health care providers in discussing this important topic. Using a team approach that includes physicians, nurses, physical therapists, rehabilitation staff, and others is important to ensure that sexual counseling occurs throughout recovery. In addition, several trials using interventional approaches for sexual counseling provide insight into successful approaches for sexual counseling in practice. This article provides practical strategies and evidence-based approaches for assessment and sexual counseling for all cardiac patients and their partners, and specific counseling for those with ischemic conditions, heart failure, and implanted devices. PMID:25219908

  4. Sexual counseling and cardiovascular disease: practical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine E Steinke

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with cardiovascular disease and their partners expect health care providers to provide sexual counseling to assist them in maintaining sexual quality of life. Evidence suggests however, that there is a gap in integrating evidence into practice and that relatively few cardiac patients receive sexual counseling. This can result in negative psychological, physical, and quality of life outcomes for couples who may needlessly decide sexual activity is too risky and cease all sexual activity. Two scientific statements now exist that provide ample guidance to health care providers in discussing this important topic. Using a team approach that includes physicians, nurses, physical therapists, rehabilitation staff, and others is important to ensure that sexual counseling occurs throughout recovery. In addition, several trials using interventional approaches for sexual counseling provide insight into successful approaches for sexual counseling in practice. This article provides practical strategies and evidence-based approaches for assessment and sexual counseling for all cardiac patients and their partners, and specific counseling for those with ischemic conditions, heart failure, and implanted devices.

  5. Positive emotion and cardiovascular disease in elderly people

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Lina; Li, Yun; Feng, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease in elderly people is a psychosomatic disease, but the research on the relationship between positive emotion and cardiovascular diseases is few. Most previous studies have focused on a range of health status changes caused by negative emotion but have ignored the role of positive emotion in elderly people. Positive emotion has been considered a protective factor against health problems in elderly people. Research shows that a significant relationship between positive emo...

  6. Educational inequality in cardiovascular disease depends on diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne V; Koch, Mette B; Davidsen, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Social inequality is present in the morbidity as well as the mortality of cardiovascular diseases. This paper aims to quantify and compare the level of educational inequality across different cardiovascular diagnoses. DESIGN: Register based study. METHODS: Comparison of the extent...... index of inequality: -29 (-35.1; -21.9) to -1 (-4.8; -3.8)). CONCLUSION: The degree of educational inequality in cardiovascular diseases depends on the diagnosis, with the highest inequality in ischaemic heart disease, acute myocardial infarction, heart failure and stroke. Small differences were found...... of inequality across different cardiovascular diagnoses requires a measure of inequality which is comparable across subgroups with different educational distributions. The slope index of inequality and the relative index of inequality were applied for measuring inequalities in incidence of six cardiovascular...

  7. Cardiovascular disease documentation and counseling in electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jaeyong; Huerta, Timothy R; Ford, Eric W

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between clinical reminders generated by electronic medical record (EMR) systems and providers giving prevention counseling to patients at-risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Data were extracted from the 2012 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS). Results indicate that the providers routinely using clinical reminders are significantly more likely to document height and weight data to determine risk and provide the recommended counseling to patients that merit the intervention. The findings are important for policymakers and managers that have been promoting the adoption of more sophisticated EMR decision support functionalities across the care delivery spectrum. In particular, the ability to intervene prior to negative health events is an important feature of the movement to improve care quality and reduce costs. PMID:27002255

  8. Depression and cardiovascular disease: the end of simple models

    OpenAIRE

    de Jonge, Peter; Roest, Annelieke M.

    2012-01-01

    In this editorial, we propose that the association between depression and cardiovascular disease may be conceptualised as a continuous, bidirectional process that originates in youth. The paper by Aberg and colleagues in this issue adds to this literature showing that low cardiovascular fitness at adolescence increases the risk of future depression.

  9. Pharmacogenetics in Cardiovascular Disease is there clinical relevance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maitland-Van Der Zee, A.

    2014-01-01

    • Objectives: To give an up-to-date overview of the research in pharmacogenetics of cardiovascular disease, and the clinical implications of this research. • Methods: In this lecture I will focus on these groups cardiovascular drugs where many pharmacogenetics studies have been performed (including

  10. Gender differences in developmental programming of cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasinger, John Henry; Alexander, Barbara T

    2016-03-01

    Hypertension is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death worldwide. Although multiple factors contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension, studies by Dr David Barker reporting an inverse relationship between birth weight and blood pressure led to the hypothesis that slow growth during fetal life increased blood pressure and the risk for cardiovascular disease in later life. It is now recognized that growth during infancy and childhood, in addition to exposure to adverse influences during fetal life, contributes to the developmental programming of increased cardiovascular risk. Numerous epidemiological studies support the link between influences during early life and later cardiovascular health; experimental models provide proof of principle and indicate that numerous mechanisms contribute to the developmental origins of chronic disease. Sex has an impact on the severity of cardiovascular risk in experimental models of developmental insult. Yet, few studies examine the influence of sex on blood pressure and cardiovascular health in low-birth weight men and women. Fewer still assess the impact of ageing on sex differences in programmed cardiovascular risk. Thus, the aim of the present review is to highlight current data about sex differences in the developmental programming of blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26814204

  11. Inflammation, immune activation, and cardiovascular disease in HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nou, Eric; Lo, Janet; Grinspoon, Steven K

    2016-06-19

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in people living with HIV. Several epidemiological studies have shown an increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke compared to uninfected controls. Although traditional risk factors contribute to this increased risk of cardiovascular disease, HIV-specific mechanisms likely also play a role. Systemic inflammation has been linked to cardiovascular disease in several populations suffering from chronic inflammation, including people living with HIV. Although antiretroviral therapy reduces immune activation, levels of inflammatory markers remain elevated compared to uninfected controls. The causes of this sustained immune response are likely multifactorial and incompletely understood. In this review, we summarize the evidence describing the relationship between inflammation and cardiovascular disease and discuss potential anti-inflammatory treatment options for cardiometabolic disease in people living with HIV. PMID:27058351

  12. Apolipoprotein E: from cardiovascular disease to neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahley, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E was initially described as a lipid transport protein and major ligand for low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors with a role in cholesterol metabolism and cardiovascular disease. It has since emerged as a major risk factor (causative gene) for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Detailed understanding of the structural features of the three isoforms (apoE2, apoE3, and apoE4), which differ by only a single amino acid interchange, has elucidated their unique functions. ApoE2 and apoE4 increase the risk for heart disease: apoE2 increases atherogenic lipoprotein levels (it binds poorly to LDL receptors), and apoE4 increases LDL levels (it binds preferentially to triglyceride-rich, very low density lipoproteins, leading to downregulation of LDL receptors). ApoE4 also increases the risk for neurodegenerative diseases, decreases their age of onset, or alters their progression. ApoE4 likely causes neurodegeneration secondary to its abnormal structure, caused by an interaction between its carboxyl- and amino-terminal domains, called domain interaction. When neurons are stressed or injured, they synthesize apoE to redistribute cholesterol for neuronal repair or remodeling. However, because of its altered structure, neuronal apoE4 undergoes neuron-specific proteolysis, generating neurotoxic fragments (12-29 kDa) that escape the secretory pathway and cause mitochondrial dysfunction and cytoskeletal alterations, including tau phosphorylation. ApoE4-associated pathology can be prevented by small-molecule structure correctors that block domain interaction by converting apoE4 to a molecule that resembles apoE3 both structurally and functionally. Structure correctors are a potential therapeutic approach to reduce apoE4 pathology in both cardiovascular and neurological disorders. PMID:27277824

  13. Hormone therapy in menopause: An update on cardiovascular disease considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Georgina E; Shufelt, Chrisandra L

    2015-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the number one cause of death and morbidity worldwide, and while overall CVD incidence rates declined in both genders between 1999 and 2007, age-specific data suggest that coronary risk factors in women are on the rise. While early observational data favored menopausal hormone therapy's (MHT's) role in primary CVD prevention, the initial interventional study data from the WHI did not. Further detailed analyses of both observational and interventional data have pointed to the possibility that MHT may play a role in primary CVD prevention if initiated within 10 years of menopause and less than 60 years of age (the timing hypothesis). Unanswered questions remain regarding the optimal route and dosage of estrogen in MHT. Data so far, favor transdermal estradiol over conventional-dose CEE with respect to CVD risk and oral estradiol over conventional-dose CEE with respect to stroke risk. Low-dose oral CEE may similarly have benefit over conventional-dose oral CEE for some CVD events. In addition, the transdermal route of delivery may avoid the excess risk of certain CVD events associated with MHT and lower doses of estrogen may have fewer adverse effects than the doses previously tested in WHI. Because questions regarding benefits versus risks remain, MHT is yet to be recommended for CVD prevention. However, it is indicated for menopausal symptom management in women within 10 years of menopause and under the age of 60 years, in whom it does not appear to carry increased cardiovascular risk. Additional research is ongoing and needed to confirm or refute the comparative safety of the various MHT options. PMID:26270318

  14. [Cardiovascular diseases, medical apocalypse of the 21st century?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielnik, Małgorzata; Steciwko, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this article is to bring forward and realise the size of cardiovascular diseases and the burden of its numbers that concern practising doctors in Lower Silesia, in Poland, Europe and the world. Every fourth patient knocking at the GP's door comes with a problem with the circulatory system. These diseases are the reason for every second in hospitalization or referral to a specialist. The most common diagnosis is not the common cold but arterial hypertension. Three of the most common diseases in patients over 65 years old are: hypertension, ischaemic heart disease, and atherosclerosis of the brain arteries. Poland belongs to the group of developed countries with an emerging economy, where degenerative diseases dominate, and cardiovascular diseases account for the biggest problems within the Health System. Nearly half of male deaths (46%) and over half of female deaths (56%) are the consequence of cardiovascular diseases. 80% of people around the world live in developing economies, where cardiovascular diseases cause 23% of all deaths. Every fifth person lives in a developed country and has a 50% chance of dying because of cardiovascular diseases. Will these diseases become "the number one killer" of the 21st century? 27% lost healthy life years are due to arterial hypertension, ischeamic heart disease, and congestive heart failure so their epidemiology is being regarded in this article. PMID:15518325

  15. Safety of varenicline in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Stacy L; Boomershine, Virginia; Raney, Erin

    2014-02-01

    Smoking cessation lowers the risk of death substantially in patients with cardiovascular disease. Although varenicline is an effective medication for smoking cessation, its safety in this population has been questioned and evaluated in several studies. In 2 randomized controlled trials of patients with cardiovascular disease, the rates of serious cardiovascular events were up to 2% higher in patients receiving varenicline than placebo, though the differences were not statistically significant. In the first meta-analysis of mostly trials involving patients with a history of cardiovascular disease, varenicline was found to significantly increase the risk of cardiovascular events by 72%; however, a second meta-analysis did not find a significant increased risk. In an observational study, varenicline was not associated with an increased risk of events when compared to bupropion in a subgroup analysis of patients with a history of cardiovascular disease. Because the evidence on the safety of varenicline in this population is limited and conflicting, additional data are needed to formulate stronger conclusions. In the meantime, health care professionals should consider individual smoking patterns, concomitant medical conditions, and cost when recommending smoking cessation pharmacotherapy for patients with cardiovascular disease. PMID:24080536

  16. Evaluation of bad habits as risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in Sarajevo Canton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suada Branković

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases by its frequency, epidemic expenditure, socio-medical consequences and with high mortality are becoming the biggest problem of modern medicine. Mortality from cardiovascular diseases declines due to prevention measures in developed countries, in developing countries and countries in transition it increases. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of harmful habits and connection as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in economically active population in the Canton of Sarajevo.Methods: The study was conducted among the active population of Sarajevo Canton. Randomly selected 443 respondents from different groups of workers aged 18-65 years, who voluntarily joined the study. Weperformed a study intersection descriptive method of research. Instrument for conducting research was a set of questionnaires, designed for research purposes.Results: The results study showed that the study group, current smokers occupy 45%, 1.8% occasional smokers who smoke and the rest of nonsmokers. It was shown that subjects who consume alcohol in biggestpercentage 73.4% consumed the same day, while the smallest percentage 2.7% comprise the same subjects who consumed annually.Conclusions: The prevalence of harmful habits as risk factors for cardiovascular disease among subjects in the Sarajevo Canton is evident represented. It is a significant development of the country, because it affects the health promotion strategy, which consequently changes the behavior based on individual needs. Health education and promotion of health can be reduced or completely prevented by a number of risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

  17. Intervention Fidelity for a Complex Behaviour Change Intervention in Community Pharmacy Addressing Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, K. P.; O'Reilly, S. L.; George, J.; Peterson, G. M.; Jackson, S. L.; Duncan, G.; Howarth, H.; Dunbar, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Delivery of cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention programs by community pharmacists appears effective and enhances health service access. However, their capacity to implement complex behavioural change processes during patient counselling remains largely unexplored. This study aims to determine intervention fidelity by pharmacists…

  18. Audit of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Supported Adults with Intellectual Disability Attending an Ageing Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Robyn A.; Schluter, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor profile for older adults with intellectual disability (ID). As many CVD risk factors are treatable by lifestyle changes, confirmation of the risk factor profile for older adults with ID could substantially impact upon preventive health practices for this group. Method:…

  19. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a novel predictor of cardiovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masahide Hamaguchi; Takahiro Kato; Junichi Okuda; Kazunori Ida; Toshikazu Yoshikawa; Takao Kojima; Noriyuki Takeda; Chisato Nagata; Jun Takeda; Hiroshi Sarui; Yutaka Kawahito; Naohisa Yoshida; Atsushi Suetsugu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To clarify whether nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.METHODS: We carried out a prospective observational study with a total of 1637 apparently healthy Japanese men and women who were recruited from a health check-up program. NAFLD was diagnosed by abdominal ultrasonography. The metabolic syndrome (MS) was defined according to the modified National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) ATP in criteria. Five years after the baseline evaluations, the incidence of cardiovascular disease was assessed by a self-administered questionnaire.RESULTS: Among 1221 participants available for outcome analyses, the incidence of cardiovascular disease was higher in 231 subjects with NAFLD at baseline (5 coronary heart disease, 6 ischemic stroke, and 1 cerebral hemorrhage) than 990 subjects without NAFLD (3 coronary heart disease, 6 ischemic stroke, and 1 cerebral hemorrhage). Multivariate analyses indicated that NAFLD was a predictor of cardiovascular disease independent of conventional risk factors (odds ratio 4.12, 95% CI, 1.58 to 10.75, P = 0.004). MS was alsoindependently associated with cardiovascular events. But simultaneous inclusion of NAFLD and MS in a multivariate model revealed that NAFLD but not MS retained a statistically significant correlation with cardiovascular disease.CONCLUSION: Although both of them were predictors of cardiovascular disease, NAFLD but not MS retained a statistically significant correlation with cardiovascular disease in a multivariate model. NAFLD is a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease and may play a central role in the cardiovascular risk of MS.

  20. Homocysteine, B-vitamins and cardiovascular disease: epidemiologic evidence.

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoef, P.

    1996-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease constitutes a major public health problem in the Netherlands and other Western countries. Elevated plasma homocysteine has attracted growing interest as a "new" risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Homocysteine is formed from the essential amino acid methionine. Defective Homocysteine, metabolism may lead to elevation of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy). Genetic enzyme deficiencies or inadequate intake of vitamins B 6 , B 12 , and folate, all important cof...

  1. Metabolic Syndrome, Chronic Kidney, and Cardiovascular Diseases: Role of Adipokines

    OpenAIRE

    Manfredi Tesauro; Maria Paola Canale; Giuseppe Rodia; Nicola Di Daniele; Davide Lauro; Angelo Scuteri; Carmine Cardillo

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease, whose incidence is alarmingly growing. It is associated with metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular complications. These complications are clustered in the metabolic syndrome (MetS) leading to high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity predisposes to diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis, and focal and segmental glomerular sclerosis and represents an independent risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease ...

  2. Astaxanthin: A Potential Therapeutic Agent in Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fassett, Robert G; Coombes, Jeff S

    2011-01-01

    Astaxanthin is a xanthophyll carotenoid present in microalgae, fungi, complex plants, seafood, flamingos and quail. It is an antioxidant with anti-inflammatory properties and as such has potential as a therapeutic agent in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Synthetic forms of astaxanthin have been manufactured. The safety, bioavailability and effects of astaxanthin on oxidative stress and inflammation that have relevance to the pathophysiology of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, h...

  3. Postprandial dysmetabolism and cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Tushuizen, M.E.; Diamant, M.; Heine, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions. The so-called traditional risk factors cannot fully explain the excessive cardiovascular disease risk of type 2 diabetic patients. Numerous studies indicate that postprandial metabolic derangements, most notably hyperglycaemia and hypertriglyceridaemia, which are exaggerated and prolonged in type 2 diabetes, are important cardiovascular disease risk factors since they induce oxidative stress and endothelial...

  4. Cardiovascular disease among Alaska Natives: a review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Schumacher, Catherine; Davidson, Michael; Ehrsam, Gretchen

    2003-01-01

    Background. We reviewed the literature of population-based studies regarding heart disease and stroke occurrence among Alaska Natives. The existing literature suggests that differences in cardiovascular mortality rates and risk factors exist in Alaska Natives by ethnicity and residence. However, data sources are largely limited to mortality data and small community-based studies. Objectives. Because cardiovascular disease occurrence has not been well studied among Alaska Natives, it is import...

  5. Peripheral blood derived cells and angiogenesis in cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Post, S

    2009-01-01

    Patients suffering from myocardial infarction (MI), atherosclerosis and Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia type 1 (HHT-1) all have diseased and dysfunctional blood vessels. Cardiovascular repair in these diseases occurs not only locally, but also peripheral blood (progenitor) cells and cytokines/growth factors positively contribute to repair of malfunctioning tissue. In this thesis several aspects of cardiovascular repair have been explored. First, we show that in MI patients relatively la...

  6. Tissue-specific insulin signaling, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rask-Madsen, Christian; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Impaired insulin signaling is central to the development of the metabolic syndrome and can promote cardiovascular disease indirectly through development of abnormal glucose and lipid metabolism, hypertension and a proinflammatory state. However, insulin action directly on vascular endothelium, atherosclerotic plaque macrophages, and in the heart, kidney, and retina has now been described, and impaired insulin signaling in these locations can alter progression of cardiovascular disease in the ...

  7. Exposure to cold environments at working places and cardiovasculare disease

    OpenAIRE

    Florin MITU; Maria Magdalena LEON

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are among the most frequent causes of illness and death among the active population, especially in industrialized countries, but also in developing countries. In industrialized countries are registered between 15% and 20% of workers suffering from cardiovascular disease while risk increases with age: between 45 and 64 years more than one third of deaths are recorded in men and one fourth in women. Working in cold microclimate can lead to health problems, decrease perfo...

  8. A polypill strategy to improve global secondary cardiovascular prevention: from concept to reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, José M; Sanz, Ginés; Fernandez Ortiz, Antonio; Garrido, Ester; Bansilal, Sameer; Fuster, Valentin

    2014-08-12

    The prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) by using a polypill has gained increasing momentum as a strategy to contain progression of the disease. Since its initial conception just over a decade ago, only a handful of trials have been completed assessing the efficacy and safety of this innovative concept. The results of these trials have supported the viability of the polypill in CVD prevention and management, albeit with a few caveats, essentially related to the lack of evidence on the effect of the polypill to effectively reduce cardiovascular events. The polypill has the potential to control the global health epidemic of CVD by effectively reaching underdeveloped regions of the world, simplifying healthcare delivery, improving cost-effectiveness, increasing medication adherence, and supporting a comprehensive prescription of evidence-based cardioprotective drugs. Major trials underway will provide definitive evidence on the efficacy of the polypill in reducing cardiovascular events in a cost-effective manner. The results of these studies will determine whether a polypill strategy can quell the burgeoning public health challenge of CVD and will potentially provide the evidence to implement an effective, simple, and innovative solution to restrain the global CVD pandemic. PMID:25104532

  9. Sleep Deficiency and Deprivation Leading to Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Kohansieh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep plays a vital role in an individual’s mental, emotional, and physiological well-being. Not only does sleep deficiency lead to neurological and psychological disorders, but also the literature has explored the adverse effects of sleep deficiency on the cardiovascular system. Decreased quantity and quality of sleep have been linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. We explore the literature correlating primary sleep deficiency and deprivation as a cause for cardiovascular disease and cite endothelial dysfunction as a common underlying mechanism.

  10. Cardiovascular disease among people with drug use disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thylstrup, Birgitte; Clausen, Thomas; Hesse, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To present the prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a national cohort of patients seeking treatment for drug use disorders (DUD). Methods This is a longitudinal record linkage study of consecutive DUD treatment admissions between 2000 and 2006 from Denmark. Results...... treatment (SHR = 1.15, p = 0.022). The use of amphetamines was negatively associated with the risk of CVD within this cohort (SHR = 0.75, p = 0.001). Conclusions Patients injecting drugs using prescribed methadone were at elevated risk for cardiovascular disease and should be monitored for CVD. Opioid...... medications should be evaluated in terms of their cardiovascular sequelae....

  11. National differences in screening programmes for cardiovascular risks could obstruct understanding of cardiovascular prevention studies in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L. Thio; T.B. Twickler; M.J. Cramer; P. Giral

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In North-West Europe, cardiovascular disease is still a major cause of death and despite several efforts (e.g. European guidelines and conferences) cardiovascular risk factors are still inconsistently diagnosed and treated. Methods We evaluated the first consultations of patients in two

  12. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance findings in a case of Danon disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kosieradzka Agnieszka; Walczak Ewa; Kuch Marek; Kownacki Lukasz; Piotrowska-Kownacka Dorota; Fidzianska Anna; Krolicki Leszek

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Danon disease is a rare X-linked dominant lysosomal glycogen storage disease that can lead to severe ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure. We report a case of Danon disease with cardiac involvement evaluated with cardiovascular magnetic resonance, including late gadolinium enhancement and perfusion studies.

  13. Periodontal associations in cardiovascular diseases: The latest evidence and understanding

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, C.M.; Kim, J.W.M.; Quan, V.H.; Nguyen, B.H.; Tran, S D

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are inflammatory diseases. Recent epidemiological studies have associated the effect of periodontitis on CVD progression. Findings of oral pathogens in carotid atheromas provided a plausible relationship between these two diseases. One possible mechanism is the infiltration of oral/periodontal pathogens through inflamed and ulcerated gingival epithelium. This results in translocation of oral pathogens throughout the systemic circulation affecting ...

  14. ATHEROSCLEROTIC CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN OLDER ADULTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

    OpenAIRE

    Barzilay, Joshua I.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Kizer, Jorge R.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus exerts a strong effect on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk into older age (beyond ages 70 to 74 years). This effect is particularly noticeable with regard to coronary artery disease and cerebral microvascular disease. Thus Diabetes Mellitus in older age deserves the same careful medical attention as it does in middle age.

  15. Role of ASA in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casado-Arroyo, R.; Bayrak, F.; Sarkozy, A.; Chierchia, G.B.; Asmundis, C. de; Brugada, P.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, which includes coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease and peripheral artery disease, is the leading cause of death in developed countries. Evidence from basic research, clinical investigations, observational epidemiologic studies and randomized clinical trials has pr

  16. Childhood cardiovascular risk factors in South Asians: A cause of concern for adult cardiovascular disease epidemic

    OpenAIRE

    Duggirala Sivaram Prasad; Zubair Kabir; Ashok Kumar Dash; Bhagabati Charan Das

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors in children are increasing at an alarming rate in the western world. However, there is limited information regarding these in the South Asian children. This review attempts at summarizing such evidence. South Asians are remarkable for the earlier onset of adult cardiovascular disease (CVD) by almost a decade compared to the Caucasians. We identified published literature, mainly on PubMed, Embase and Cochrane library using specific search terms such as lipid abnorma...

  17. The nutritional epidemiology of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehl, W A

    1977-11-30

    A basic review of the extensive literature focusing on the major risk factors of atherosclerotic coronary heart disease and stroke, i.e., elevation of blood lipids related to diet, blood pressure elevation, and genetic factors using the traditional epidemiological model of interaction between host, agent, and environment, has strongly supported the concept that diet and particularly saturated fat and/or cholesterol are significant contributors to the elevation of blood lipids, especially cholesterol, and contribute importantly to the premature development and mortality of atherosclerotic coronary heart disease. Certainly genetics exert an important impact on this process. To date it remains unclear whether or not major changes in the dietary pattern of huge population groups can be practically effected. The minor dietary modifications so far studied in the average atherosclerosis-prone population cannot be anticipated to make a major dent in the epidemic proportions of atherosclerotic coronary heart disease. It is quite clear that prospective preventive medicine must be implemented at a very early age in the pediatric age group, in which atherosclerosis is now recognized by many as the number one pediatric problem. Tremendous biochemical advances have provided new insights in knowledge regarding the transport of blood lipids, particularly cholesterol, and the regulatory mechanisms at the cellular level for cholesterol under normal circumstances and in the genetic influenced hyperlipidemias (TABLE 4). A bright future lies ahead for the reduction of the epidemic of atherosclerosis which could be greatly enhanced by a greater personal responsibility for health care and a much more careful and prudent diet selection and exercise managment. PMID:211922

  18. Mind Your Mouth: Preventing Gum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Mind Your Mouth Preventing Gum Disease If you have ... day. search Features Can We Prevent Alzheimer's Disease? Mind Your Mouth Wise Choices Links To Prevent Gum ...

  19. Metabolic Syndrome, Chronic Kidney, and Cardiovascular Diseases: Role of Adipokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfredi Tesauro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic disease, whose incidence is alarmingly growing. It is associated with metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular complications. These complications are clustered in the metabolic syndrome (MetS leading to high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity predisposes to diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis, and focal and segmental glomerular sclerosis and represents an independent risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Albuminuria is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs. Microalbuminuria has been described as early manifestation of MetS-associated kidney damage and diabetic nephropathy. Obesity and MetS affect renal physiology and metabolism through mechanisms which include altered levels of adipokines such as leptin and adiponectin, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Secretory products of adipose tissue also deeply and negatively influence endothelial function. A better understanding of these interactions will help in designing more effective treatments aimed to protect both renal and cardiovascular systems.

  20. Physiological and Pharmacological Roles of FGF21 in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is one of the most severe diseases in clinics. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 is regarded as an important metabolic regulator playing a therapeutic role in diabetes and its complications. The heart is a key target as well as a source of FGF21 which is involved in heart development and also induces beneficial effects in CVDs. Our review is to clarify the roles of FGF21 in CVDs. Strong evidence showed that the development of CVDs including atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, myocardial ischemia, cardiac hypertrophy, and diabetic cardiomyopathy is associated with serum FGF21 levels increase which was regarded as a compensatory response to induced cardiac protection. Furthermore, administration of FGF21 suppressed the above CVDs. Mechanistic studies revealed that FGF21 induced cardiac protection likely by preventing cardiac lipotoxicity and the associated oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. Normally, FGF21 induced therapeutic effects against CVDs via activation of the above kinases-mediated pathways by directly binding to the FGF receptors of the heart in the presence of β-klotho. However, recently, growing evidence showed that FGF21 induced beneficial effects on peripheral organs through an indirect way mediated by adiponectin. Therefore whether adiponectin is also involved in FGF21-induced cardiac protection still needs further investigation.

  1. Awareness of cardiovascular disease in eastern Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadira A Al-Baghli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To estimate the awareness of cardiovascular disease (CVD and their determinants in a screening campaign in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: All national residents in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia aged 30 years and above, were invited to participate in a screening campaign for the early detection of diabetes and hypertension at more than 300 examination posts throughout the eastern province. A pre-structured questionnaire was designed to collect data on age, gender, marital status, education level, occupation, lifestyle habits, and history of heart attack, angina, arterial disease, stroke, and transient ischemic attack. Weight, height, blood pressure, and glucose concentration were measured. Results: Out of 197,681 participants, 5372 (2.7% were aware of a history of a CVD. The prevalence correlated well with age. It was higher in women, widows, and subjects with lower level of education. More than 75% of affected subjects had two or more risk factors. Conclusion: A substantial proportion of those with a history of CVD had multiple risk factors, necessitating an effective, focused policy for the prevention and treatment. Increased effort is required to promote an awareness of cardiac disease and also probably target primary care providers involved in the screening process.

  2. Is vitamin B12 deficiency a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in vegetarians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Roman

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe the role of vitamin B12 deficiency in cardiovascular disease development among vegetarians. Vegetarians have a high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency. Deficiency of this vitamin is associated with a variety of atherogenic processes that are mainly, but not exclusively, due to vitamin B12 deficiency-induced hyperhomocysteinemia. Each 5-μmol/L increase above 10 μmol/L of serum homocysteine is associated with a 20% increased risk of circulatory health problems. Mean homocysteine concentration >10 μmol/L among vegetarians was reported in 32 of 34 reports. Macrocytosis associated with vitamin B12 deficiency is also associated with fatal and non-fatal coronary disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, and other circulatory health problems. Compared with non-vegetarians, vegetarians have an improved profile of the traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, including serum lipids, blood pressure, serum glucose concentration, and weight status. However, not all studies that assessed cardiovascular disease incidence among vegetarians reported a protective effect. Among studies that did show a lower prevalence of circulatory health problems, the effect was not as pronounced as expected, which may be a result of poor vitamin B12 status due to a vegetarian diet. Vitamin B12 deficiency may negate the cardiovascular disease prevention benefits of vegetarian diets. In order to further reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, vegetarians should be advised to use vitamin B12 supplements. PMID:25998928

  3. Primary prevention of diabetes mellitus type 2 and cardiovascular diseases using a cognitive behavior program aimed at lifestyle changes in people at risk: Design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinapaw Marijke J

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of people with cardiovascular disease (CVD and diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM is growing rapidly. To a large extend, this increase is due to lifestyle-dependent risk factors, such as overweight, reduced physical activity, and an unhealthy diet. Changing these risk factors has the potential to postpone or prevent the development of T2DM and CVD. It is hypothesized that a cognitive behavioral program (CBP, focused in particular on motivation and self-management in persons who are at high risk for CVD and/or T2DM, will improve their lifestyle behavior and, as a result, will reduce their risk of developing T2DM and CVD. Methods 12,000 inhabitants, 30-50 years of age living in several municipalities in the semi-rural region of West-Friesland will receive an invitation from their general practitioner (n = 13 to measure their own waist circumference with a tape measure. People with abdominal obesity (male waist ≥ 102 cm, female waist ≥ 88 cm will be invited to participate in the second step of the screening which includes blood pressure, a blood sample and anthropometric measurements. T2DM and CVD risk scores will then be calculated according to the ARIC and the SCORE formulae, respectively. People with a score that indicates a high risk of developing T2DM and/or CVD will then be randomly assigned to the intervention group (n = 300 or the control group (n = 300. Participants in the intervention group will follow a CBP aimed at modifying their dietary behavior, physical activity, and smoking behavior. The counseling methods that will be used are motivational interviewing (MI and problem solving treatment (PST, which focus in particular on intrinsic motivation for change and self-management of problems of the participants. The CBP will be provided by trained nurse practitioners in the participant's general practice, and will consists of a maximum of six individual sessions of 30 minutes, followed by 3-monthly booster

  4. Free Radicals and Antioxidants in Cardiovascular Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. V Luximon-Ramma

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Current hypotheses favour the concept that lowering oxidative stress can have a health benefit. Free radicals can be overproduced or the natural antioxidant system defenses weakened, first resulting in oxidative stress, and then leading to oxidative injury and disease. Cardiovascular disease is one example of this process. This disorder continues to be the major cause of premature death worldwide. Oxidation of human low-density lipoproteins is considered an early step in the progression and eventual development of atherosclerosis, one of the leading causes to cardiovascular dysfunction. Compelling support for the involvement of free radicals in disease development originates from epidemiological studies showing that an enhanced antioxidant status is associated with reduced risk of several diseases. Dietary nutraceuticals such as vitamins C, E and polyphenolics and reduction of cardiovascular disease incidence are a notable example. This paper reviews the biology of ROS/RNS, their pathways through which they relate to the pathology of cardiovascular disease and discusses the putative roles that antioxidants, including phenolics, may play in controlling oxidative stress and reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease.

  5. Antioxidant Micronutrients in the Prevention of Age-related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polidori M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The role and functions of antioxidant micronutrients such as ascorbate (vitamin C, a-tocopherol (vitamin E and carotenoids that are provided through the diet in aging and in the prevention of age-related diseases are discussed in the present work. In general, a healthy lifestyle involving regular exercise and avoidance of tobacco or alcohol abuse are the key to the prevention of several age-related diseases including cardiovascular diseases, dementia and cancer. A balanced and regular nutrition with at least five portions of fruit and vegetables per day is a critical constituent of such a healthy lifestyle.

  6. Poverty, malnutrition, underdevelopment and cardiovascular disease: a South African perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorster, H H; Kruger, A

    2007-01-01

    This article explores possible mechanisms to explain the known relationships between poverty, undernutrition, underdevelopment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in developing countries. Poverty is a multidimensional concept. It is both a cause and consequence of undernutrition. The article shows how malnutrition during pregnancy could lead to low birth-weight babies, who are not only at increased risk of mental and physical underdevelopment, but also 'programmed' to be at increased risk of CVD and other non-communicable diseases in adult life. The underdevelopment leads to decreased 'human capital and competence' with an inability to create food security and an enabling environment for self and family to escape poverty and undernutrition in the next generation. It is accepted that a lack of education and knowledge in the poor for primary prevention of CVD through healthy eating patterns and lifestyles, as well as limited access to healthcare services for secondary prevention and treatment contribute to CVD. This article postulates that the link between poverty and CVD in South Africa can be explained by the high prevalence of undernutrition in one- to nine year- old children (9% underweight, 23% stunted and 3% wasted), the high prevalence of overweight and obesity in adults (54.5% in white men and 58.5% in African women) as well as the negative trends in nutrient intakes when Africans (the population group with the largest numbers of poor people) urbanise, acculturate and adopt westernised eating patterns that will increase CVD risk. In conclusion, we plead for a holistic, integrated but transdisciplinary and multisectorial approach to break the vicious circle of poverty and undernutrition for the longterm prevention of CVD. PMID:17985032

  7. [Role of endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions in intracellular calcium homeostasis and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Jia, Hang-Huan; Xu, Man; Yu, Xiao-Jiang; Liu, Long-Zhu; Zang, Wei-Jin

    2016-08-25

    Calcium overload is one of the important mechanisms of cardiovascular disease. Endoplasmic reticulum is an important organelle which regulates intracellular calcium homeostasis by uptake, storage and mobilization of calcium. So it plays a critical role in regulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum, which is widely distributed in cytoplasm, has a large number of membrane junction sites. Recent studies have reported that these junction sites are distributed on plasma membrane and organelle membranes (mitochondria, lysosomes, Golgi apparatus, etc.), separately. They could form complexes to regulate calcium transport. In this review, we briefly outlined the recent research progresses of endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions in intracellular calcium homeostasis and cardiovascular disease, which may offer a new strategy for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27546511

  8. A new Web-based medical tool for assessment and prevention of comprehensive cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Franchi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Daniele Franchi1,2, Davide Cini1, Giorgio Iervasi11Istituto di Fisiologia Clinica, CNR, Pisa, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Oncologia, dei Trapianti e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina, Università di Pisa, Pisa, ItalyBackground: Multifactor cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death; besides well-known cardiovascular risk factors, several emerging factors such as mental stress, diet type, and physical inactivity, have been associated to cardiovascular disease. To date, preventive strategies are based on the concept of absolute risk calculated by different algorithms and scoring systems. However, in general practice the patient's data collection represents a critical issue.Design: A new multipurpose computer-based program has been developed in order to:1 easily calculate and compare the absolute cardiovascular risk by the Framingham, Procam, and Progetto Cuore algorithms; 2 to design a web-based computerized tool for prospective collection of structured data; 3 to support the doctor in the decision-making process for patients at risk according to recent international guidelines.Methods: During a medical consultation the doctor utilizes a common computer connected by Internet to a medical server where all the patient's data and software reside. The program evaluates absolute and relative cardiovascular risk factors, personalized patient's goals, and multiparametric trends, monitors critical parameter values, and generates an automated medical report.Results: In a pilot study on 294 patients (47% males; mean age 60 ± 12 years [± SD] the global time to collect data at first consultation was 13 ± 11 minutes which declined to 8 ± 7 minutes at the subsequent consultation. In 48.2% of cases the program revealed 2 or more primary risk factor parameters outside guideline indications and gave specific clinical suggestions to return altered parameters to target values.Conclusion: The web-based system proposed here may represent a feasible and

  9. The PreCardio-study protocol – a randomized clinical trial of a multidisciplinary electronic cardiovascular prevention programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobs Nele

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular diseases (CVD are the leading cause of death and the third cause of disability in Europe. Prevention programmes should include interventions aimed at a reduction of medical risk factors (hypertension, hypercholesterol, hyperglycemia, overweight and obesity as well as behavioural risk factors (sedentary lifestyle, high fat intake and low fruit and vegetable intake, smoking. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a multifaceted, multidisciplinary electronic prevention programme on cardiovascular risk factors. Methods/Design In a randomized controlled trial, one group will receive a maximal intervention (= intervention group. The intervention group will be compared to the control group receiving a minimal intervention. An inclusion of 350 patients in total, with a follow-up of 3 years is foreseen. The inclusion criteria are age between 25–65 and insured by the Onderlinge Ziekenkas, insuring for guaranteed income in case of illness for self-employed. The maximal intervention group receives several prevention consultations by their general practitioner (GP using a new type of cardiovascular risk calculator with personalised feedback on behavioural risk factors. These patients receive a follow-up with intensive support of health behaviour change via different methods, i.e. a tailored website and personal advice of a multidisciplinary team (psychologist, physiotherapist and dietician. The aim of this strategy is to reduce cardiovascular risk factors according to the guidelines. The primary outcome measures will be cardiovascular risk factors. The secondary outcome measures are cardiovascular events, quality of life, costs and incremental cost effectiveness ratios. The control group receives prevention consultations using a new type of cardiovascular risk calculator and general feedback. Discussion This trial incorporates interventions by GPs and other health professionals aiming at a reduction of

  10. Framingham risk score with cardiovascular events in chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Chia Chen

    Full Text Available The Framingham Risk Score (FRS was developed to predict coronary heart disease in various populations, and it tended to under-estimate the risk in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients. Our objectives were to determine whether FRS was associated with cardiovascular events, and to evaluate the role of new risk markers and echocardiographic parameters when they were added to a FRS model. This study enrolled 439 CKD patients. The FRS is used to identify individuals categorically as "low" (4.7 cm, left ventricular hypertrophy or left ventricular ejection fraction<50% to the FRS model significantly improves the predictive values for cardiovascular events. In CKD patients, "high" risk categorized by FRS predicts cardiovascular events. Novel biomarkers and echocardiographic parameters provide additional predictive values for cardiovascular events. Future study is needed to assess whether risk assessment enhanced by using these biomarkers and echocardiographic parameters might contribute to more effective prediction and better care for patients.

  11. Cocoa Polyphenols and Inflammatory Markers of Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasiruddin Khan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the beneficial effect of plant-derived food intake in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD. The potential bioactivity of cocoa and its polyphenolic components in modulating cardiovascular health is now being studied worldwide and continues to grow at a rapid pace. In fact, the high polyphenol content of cocoa is of particular interest from the nutritional and pharmacological viewpoints. Cocoa polyphenols are shown to possess a range of cardiovascular-protective properties, and can play a meaningful role through modulating different inflammatory markers involved in atherosclerosis. Accumulated evidence on related anti-inflammatory effects of cocoa polyphenols is summarized in the present review.

  12. Cocoa polyphenols and inflammatory markers of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nasiruddin; Khymenets, Olha; Urpí-Sardà, Mireia; Tulipani, Sara; Garcia-Aloy, Mar; Monagas, María; Mora-Cubillos, Ximena; Llorach, Rafael; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the beneficial effect of plant-derived food intake in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The potential bioactivity of cocoa and its polyphenolic components in modulating cardiovascular health is now being studied worldwide and continues to grow at a rapid pace. In fact, the high polyphenol content of cocoa is of particular interest from the nutritional and pharmacological viewpoints. Cocoa polyphenols are shown to possess a range of cardiovascular-protective properties, and can play a meaningful role through modulating different inflammatory markers involved in atherosclerosis. Accumulated evidence on related anti-inflammatory effects of cocoa polyphenols is summarized in the present review. PMID:24566441

  13. Are There Genetic Paths Common to Obesity, Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors?

    OpenAIRE

    Rankinen, Tuomo; Sarzynski, Mark A; Ghosh, Sujoy; Bouchard, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Clustering of obesity, coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular disease risk factors is observed in epidemiological studies and clinical settings. Twin and family studies have provided some supporting evidence for the clustering hypothesis. Loci nearest a lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) showing genome-wide significant associations with coronary artery disease, body mass index, C-reactive protein, blood pressure, lipids, and type 2 diabetes mellitus were selected for pathway and n...

  14. Biomarkers: A Challenging Conundrum in Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, Peter; King, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    The use of biomarkers has proven utility in cardiovascular medicine and holds great promise for future advances, but their application requires considerable rigor in thinking and methodology. Numerous confounding factors can cloud the clinical and investigative uses of biomarkers. Yet, the thoughtful and critical use of biomarkers can doubtless aid discovery of new pathogenic pathways, identify novel therapeutic targets, and provide a bridge between the laboratory and the clinic. Biomarkers can provide diagnostic and prognostic tools to the practitioner. The careful application of biomarkers can also help design and guide clinical trials required to establish the efficacy of novel interventions to improve patient outcomes. Point of care testing, technological advances, such as microfluidic and wearable devices, and the power of omics approaches all promise to elevate the potential contributions of biomarkers to discovery science, translation, clinical trials, and the practice of cardiovascular medicine. PMID:26543097

  15. Adipose tissue, the skeleton and cardiovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiklund, Peder

    2011-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the Western World, although the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) has declined over the last decades. However, obesity, which is one of the most important risk factors for CVD, is increasingly common. Osteoporosis is also on the rise because of an aging population. Based on considerable overlap in the prevalence of CVD and osteoporosis, a shared etiology has been proposed. Furthermore, the possibility of interplay between the skeleton and adipose tissue has received increasing attention the last few years with the discovery that leptin can influence bone metabolism and that osteocalcin can influence adipose tissue. A main aim of this thesis was to investigate the effects of fat mass distribution and bone mineral density on the risk of MI. Using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) we measured 592 men and women for regional fat mass in study I. In study II this was expanded to include 3258 men and women. In study III 6872 men and women had their bone mineral density measured in the total hip and femoral neck using DEXA. We found that a fat mass distribution with a higher proportion of abdominal fat mass was associated with both an adverse risk factor profile and an increased risk of MI. In contrast, a higher gynoid fat mass distribution was associated with a more favorable risk factor profile and a decreased risk of MI, highlighting the different properties of abdominal and gynoid fat depots (study I-II). In study III, we investigated the association of bone mineral density and risk factors shared between CVD and osteoporosis, and risk of MI. We found that lower bone mineral density was associated with hypertension, and also tended to be associated to other CVD risk factors. Low bone mineral density was associated with an increased risk of MI in both men and women, apparently independently of the risk factors studied (study III). In study IV, we investigated 50 healthy, young men to determine if

  16. Adipose tissue, the skeleton and cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the Western World, although the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) has declined over the last decades. However, obesity, which is one of the most important risk factors for CVD, is increasingly common. Osteoporosis is also on the rise because of an aging population. Based on considerable overlap in the prevalence of CVD and osteoporosis, a shared etiology has been proposed. Furthermore, the possibility of interplay between the skeleton and adipose tissue has received increasing attention the last few years with the discovery that leptin can influence bone metabolism and that osteocalcin can influence adipose tissue. A main aim of this thesis was to investigate the effects of fat mass distribution and bone mineral density on the risk of MI. Using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) we measured 592 men and women for regional fat mass in study I. In study II this was expanded to include 3258 men and women. In study III 6872 men and women had their bone mineral density measured in the total hip and femoral neck using DEXA. We found that a fat mass distribution with a higher proportion of abdominal fat mass was associated with both an adverse risk factor profile and an increased risk of MI. In contrast, a higher gynoid fat mass distribution was associated with a more favorable risk factor profile and a decreased risk of MI, highlighting the different properties of abdominal and gynoid fat depots (study I-II). In study III, we investigated the association of bone mineral density and risk factors shared between CVD and osteoporosis, and risk of MI. We found that lower bone mineral density was associated with hypertension, and also tended to be associated to other CVD risk factors. Low bone mineral density was associated with an increased risk of MI in both men and women, apparently independently of the risk factors studied (study III). In study IV, we investigated 50 healthy, young men to determine if

  17. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk and evidence-based management of cholesterol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyajeet Roy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An elevated level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is directly associated with development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, which may present as coronary heart disease, stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. The new cholesterol management guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association aim to address a comprehensive approach to prevent and reduce the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The new guidelines recommend initiation of heart healthy lifestyle modifications and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase inhibitor ("statin" therapy in individuals who are at a high risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. It is estimated that these guidelines could result in "statin" therapy for one in every three adults in the United States. This article presents a review of the current cholesterol management guidelines, recommendations from relevant randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses obtained from the searches in Medline/PubMed and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and publications from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service, and the United States Preventive Services Task Force.

  18. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and the Relationship of Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim Çakır

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a common endocrine disorder affecting at least 5-10% of women of reproductive age. PCOS is characterized by hyperandrogenism, menstrual disturbance, anovulation, infertility and obesity and, also associated with increased number of cardiovascular risk factors and early atherosclerosis. Hyperinsulinemia is a frequent finding in PCOS patients and has cause-and-effect relationship with low-grade chronic inflammation and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 33-7

  19. HDL Revisited: New Opportunities for Managing Dyslipoproteinaemia and Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Watts, Gerald F.; Burnett, John R

    2004-01-01

    Low concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol constitute a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). There is increasing evidence that increasing HDL-cholesterol levels reduces cardiovascular risk. The phenotype of low HDL cholesterol with or without elevated triglycerides is common and it is characteristic of patients with central obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus; conditions associated with increased cardiovascular risk and are par...

  20. Tai Chi Chuan Exercise for Patients with Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ching Lan; Ssu-Yuan Chen; May-Kuen Wong; Jin Shin Lai

    2013-01-01

    Exercise training is the cornerstone of rehabilitation for patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although high-intensity exercise has significant cardiovascular benefits, light-to-moderate intensity aerobic exercise also offers health benefits. With lower-intensity workouts, patients may be able to exercise for longer periods of time and increase the acceptance of exercise, particularly in unfit and elderly patients. Tai Chi Chuan (Tai Chi) is a traditional Chinese mind-body exercise. T...

  1. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and the Relationship of Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Evrim Çakır; Erman Çakal; Mustafa Özbek; Mustafa Şahin; Tuncay Delibaşı

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder affecting at least 5-10% of women of reproductive age. PCOS is characterized by hyperandrogenism, menstrual disturbance, anovulation, infertility and obesity and, also associated with increased number of cardiovascular risk factors and early atherosclerosis. Hyperinsulinemia is a frequent finding in PCOS patients and has cause-and-effect relationship with low-grade chronic inflammation and increased risk of cardiovascular disease...

  2. Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) in the treatment of cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tassell, Mary C.; Rosari Kingston; Deirdre Gilroy; Mary Lehane; Ambrose Furey

    2010-01-01

    The medicinal properties of hawthorn (Crataegus spp., a genus comprising approximately 300 species) have been utilized by many cultures for a variety of therapeutic purposes for many centuries. In the Western world cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become one of the single most significant causes of premature death. Echoing this situation, more recent research into the therapeutic benefits of hawthorn preparations has focused primarily upon its cardiovascular effects. This review covers resear...

  3. Cocoa Polyphenols and Inflammatory Markers of Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nasiruddin Khan; Olha Khymenets; Mireia Urpí-Sardà; Sara Tulipani; Mar Garcia-Aloy; María Monagas; Ximena Mora-Cubillos; Rafael Llorach; Cristina Andres-Lacueva

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the beneficial effect of plant-derived food intake in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The potential bioactivity of cocoa and its polyphenolic components in modulating cardiovascular health is now being studied worldwide and continues to grow at a rapid pace. In fact, the high polyphenol content of cocoa is of particular interest from the nutritional and pharmacological viewpoints. Cocoa polyphenols are shown to possess a range of ca...

  4. Cardiovascular disease risk in adults with spastic bilateral cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Slot, Wilma; Roebroeck, Marij; Nieuwenhuijsen, Channah; Bergen, Michael; Stam, Henk; Burdorf, Alex; Berg-Emons, Rita

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To explore: (i) cardiovascular disease risk factors and the 10-year clustered risk of a fatal cardiovascular event in adults with spastic bilateral cerebral palsy; and (ii) relationships between the 10-year risk and body fat, aerobic fitness and physical activity. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: Forty-three adults with spastic bilateral cerebral palsy without severe cognitive impairment (mean age 36.6 years (standard deviation 6); 27 men). Methods: Biological a...

  5. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Cardiovascular Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Sang-Bing; Andrew R. Hall; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2013-01-01

    Significance: Mitochondria are dynamic organelles capable of changing their shape and distribution by undergoing either fission or fusion. Changes in mitochondrial dynamics, which is under the control of specific mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins, have been implicated in cell division, embryonic development, apoptosis, autophagy, and metabolism. Although the machinery for modulating mitochondrial dynamics is present in the cardiovascular system, its function there has only recently be...

  6. Factors influencing the relation between alcohol and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbaek, Morten

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Light-to-moderate alcohol intake is known to have cardioprotective properties in some subsets of the population. This review focuses on factors that modify the relation between alcohol and cardiovascular disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Several large American studies have shown...... to a binge - intake of alcohol have benefits with regard to cardiovascular disease. Prospective studies from the UK, Sweden and Denmark have further suggested that wine drinkers have a lower mortality than beer and spirits drinkers. SUMMARY: The J-shaped relation between alcohol intake and cardiovascular...... that the J-shaped relation is influenced by age and coronary heart disease risk-factor status since only middle-aged and elderly and those already at risk of developing coronary heart disease seem protected by drinking alcohol. It has also been suggested that only those who have a steady - in contrast...

  7. Risk of bleeding related to antithrombotic treatment in cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Olesen, Jonas B; Charlot, Mette;

    2012-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy is a cornerstone of treatment in patients with cardiovascular disease with bleeding being the most feared complication. This review describes the risk of bleeding related to different combinations of antithrombotic drugs used for cardiovascular disease: acute coronary...... syndrome (ACS), atrial fibrillation (AF), cerebrovascular (CVD) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Different risk assessment schemes and bleeding definitions are compared. The HAS-BLED risk score is recommended in patients with AF and in ACS patients with AF. In patients with ACS with or without...

  8. Management of Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Kristensen, Søren Lund; Ahlehoff, Ole

    2016-01-01

    An increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been observed in a range of chronic inflammatory diseases (CID), including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The increased risk of CVDs and reduced life expectancy in...... gained considerable interest in recent years. We briefly summarize the current level of evidence of the association between CIDs and CVD and cardiovascular risk management recommendations. Perspectives of ongoing and planned trials are discussed in consideration of potential ways to improve primary and...

  9. Epidemiology of Multimorbidity in Older Adults with Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Susan P; Saraf, Avantika A

    2016-05-01

    Multimorbidity is the most significant condition affecting older adults, and it impacts every component of health care management and delivery. Multimorbidity significantly increases with age. For individuals with a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, multimorbidity has a significant effect on the presentation of the disease and the diagnosis, management, and patient-centered preferences in care. Evidence-based therapeutics have focused on cardiovascular focused morbidity. Over the next 25 years, the proportion of adults aged 65 and older is estimated to increase three-fold. The needs of these patients require a fundamental shift in care from single disease practices to a more patient-centered framework. PMID:27113142

  10. Cystatin C and the relation to cardiovascular disease : studies on the relative importance of genetic and environmental factors

    OpenAIRE

    Arpegård, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Various manifestations of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease are a common clinical problem affecting millions of people each year and the prevalence increases globally. This strengthens the incentives to improve the tools for primary and secondary prevention. Cystatin C is, besides its role as a marker of renal function, a promising biomarker of vascular damage and vascular disease, which might add value to risk prediction in cardiovascular burdened individuals as well as in persons free ...

  11. Cardiovascular disease treatment among patients with severe mental illness : a data linkage study between primary and secondary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Woodhead, C.; Ashworth, M; Broadbent, B.; Callard, F.; HOTOPF, M; Schofield, P; Soncul, M.; Stewart, R. J.; Henderson, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Suboptimal treatment of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) among patients with severe mental illness (SMI) may contribute to physical health disparities. Aim To identify SMI characteristics associated with meeting CVD treatment and prevention guidelines. Design and setting Population-based electronic health record database linkage between primary care and the sole provider of secondary mental health care services in south east London, UK. Method Cardiovascular disease preval...

  12. THE INDOOR-OUTDOOR AIR-POLLUTION CONTINUUM AND THE BURDEN OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE: AN OPPORTUNITY FOR IMPROVING GLOBAL HEALTH

    OpenAIRE

    Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Brook, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Current understanding of the association between household air-pollution (HAP) and cardiovascular disease is primarily derived from outdoor air-pollution studies. The lack of accurate information on the contribution of HAP to cardiovascular events has prevented inclusion of such data in global burden of disease estimates with consequences in terms of health care allocation and national/international priorities. Understanding the health risks, exposure characterization, epidemiology and econom...

  13. Regulation of CaMKII signaling in cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya Yordanova Mollova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a major cause of death in the developed countries. (Murray and Lopez, 1996;Koitabashi and Kass, 2012. Adverse cardiac remodeling that precedes heart muscle dysfunction is characterized by a myriad of molecular changes affecting the cardiomyocyte. Among these, alterations in protein kinase pathways play often an important mediator role since they link upstream pathologic stress signaling with downstream regulatory programs and thus affect both the structural and functional integrity of the heart muscle. In the context of cardiac disease, a profound understanding for the overriding mechanisms that regulate protein kinase activity (protein-protein interactions, post-translational modifications, or targeting via anchoring proteins is crucial for the development of specific and effective pharmacological treatment strategies targeting the failing myocardium.In this review, we focus on several mechanisms of upstream regulation of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaM Kinase II, CaMKII that play a relevant pathophysiological role in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease; precise targeting of these mechanisms might therefore represent novel and promising tools for prevention and treatment of HF.

  14. Cardiovascular diseases and risk factors among Chinese immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhizhong; Zhao, Dong

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and major CVD risk factors, including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and smoking among Chinese immigrants by a systematic review of studies from various countries. PubMed and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched for studies of the prevalence of major CVDs and risk factors, and of CVD mortality among Chinese immigrants. The search identified 386 papers, 16 of which met the inclusion criteria for this review. In mainland China, there is a pattern of high stroke prevalence but low coronary heart disease (CHD) prevalence. Among Chinese immigrants, there is a much lower prevalence and mortality of stroke, but a higher prevalence and mortality of CHD, even though these are lower than the rates in immigrants of other ethnicities in the host country. The prevalence of CVD risk factors is also markedly different in immigrants. Compared with mainland Chinese, Chinese immigrants have a higher prevalence of diabetes and hypertension, higher serum cholesterol, poorer dietary patterns, and higher prevalence of obesity and smoking. Thus, the epidemiological pattern of CVD among Chinese immigrants changes compared with resident mainland Chinese. The less healthy environmental factor after immigration may be a major trigger in the adverse CVD status of Chinese immigrants. It is important for policy-makers to pay more attention to specific minority immigrant groups, and to implement more effective preventive measures to improve the health of immigrant populations. PMID:26350421

  15. Aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, John A

    2006-01-01

    There is significant evidence that low-dose aspirin is effective in preventing the first myocardial infarction in men and ischemic stroke in women. There is also an increased risk for major gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage and a suggestive, but nonsignificant, increase in the risk for hemorrhagic stroke. If there is a history of ulcer disease or upper-gastrointestinal tract bleeding, Helicobacter pylori should be eradicated (if present) and a proton pump inhibitor used with aspirin therapy. In conclusion, the benefits of low-dose aspirin (75-162 mg/day) in the prevention of myocardial infarction in men and thrombotic stroke in women generally outweigh the risks of serious bleeding in adults with a coronary heart disease risk >1% per year or >1% in 10 years. PMID:17066145

  16. Flavonoid intake and cardiovascular disease mortality in a prospective cohort of US adults1234

    OpenAIRE

    McCullough, Marjorie L.; Peterson, Julia J.; Patel, Roshni; Jacques, Paul F.; Shah, Roma; Dwyer, Johanna T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Flavonoids are plant-based phytochemicals with cardiovascular protective properties. Few studies have comprehensively examined flavonoid classes in relation to cardiovascular disease mortality.

  17. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Older People with Intellectual Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.F. de Winter (Channa)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Chapter 1 General introduction There is an increasing group of older people with intellectual disability in The Netherlands, reaching almost the same life expectancy as the general population. Age-related diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer and dementia are

  18. Credit scores, cardiovascular disease risk, and human capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Salomon; Caspi, Avshalom; Belsky, Daniel W; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Sanders, Seth; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E

    2014-12-01

    Credit scores are the most widely used instruments to assess whether or not a person is a financial risk. Credit scoring has been so successful that it has expanded beyond lending and into our everyday lives, even to inform how insurers evaluate our health. The pervasive application of credit scoring has outpaced knowledge about why credit scores are such useful indicators of individual behavior. Here we test if the same factors that lead to poor credit scores also lead to poor health. Following the Dunedin (New Zealand) Longitudinal Study cohort of 1,037 study members, we examined the association between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and the underlying factors that account for this association. We find that credit scores are negatively correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Variation in household income was not sufficient to account for this association. Rather, individual differences in human capital factors—educational attainment, cognitive ability, and self-control—predicted both credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and accounted for ∼45% of the correlation between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk. Tracing human capital factors back to their childhood antecedents revealed that the characteristic attitudes, behaviors, and competencies children develop in their first decade of life account for a significant portion (∼22%) of the link between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk at midlife. We discuss the implications of these findings for policy debates about data privacy, financial literacy, and early childhood interventions. PMID:25404329

  19. Rationale and methods of the European Study on Cardiovascular Risk Prevention and Management in Daily Practice (EURIKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez Francisco

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The EURIKA study aims to assess the status of primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD across Europe. Specifically, it will determine the degree of control of cardiovascular risk factors in current clinical practice in relation to the European guidelines on cardiovascular prevention. It will also assess physicians' knowledge and attitudes about CVD prevention as well as the barriers impeding effective risk factor management in clinical practice. Methods/Design Cross-sectional study conducted simultaneously in 12 countries across Europe. The study has two components: firstly at the physician level, assessing eight hundred and nine primary care and specialist physicians with a daily practice in CVD prevention. A physician specific questionnaire captures information regarding physician demographics, practice settings, cardiovascular prevention beliefs and management. Secondly at the patient level, including 7641 patients aged 50 years or older, free of clinical CVD and with at least one classical risk factor, enrolled by the participating physicians. A patient-specific questionnaire captures information from clinical records and patient interview regarding sociodemographic data, CVD risk factors, and current medications. Finally, each patient provides a fasting blood sample, which is sent to a central laboratory for measuring serum lipids, apolipoproteins, hemoglobin-A1c, and inflammatory biomarkers. Discussion Primary prevention of CVD is an extremely important clinical issue, with preventable circulatory diseases remaining the leading cause of major disease burden. The EURIKA study will provide key information to assess effectiveness of and attitudes toward primary prevention of CVD in Europe. A transnational study creates opportunities for benchmarking good clinical practice across countries and improving outcomes. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00882336.

  20. Functional foods for dyslipidaemia and cardiovascular risk prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirtori, Cesare R; Galli, Claudio; Anderson, James W; Sirtori, Elena; Arnoldi, Anna

    2009-12-01

    A food can be regarded as 'functional' if it can demonstrate a beneficial efficacy on one or more target functions in the body in a convincing way. Beyond adequate nutritional qualities, functional foods should either improve the state of health and wellbeing and/or reduce the risk of disease. Functional foods that are marketed with claims of heart disease reduction focus primarily on the major risk factors, i.e. cholesterol, diabetes and hypertension. Some of the most innovative products are designed to be enriched with 'protective' ingredients, believed to reduce risk. They may contain, for example, soluble fibre (from oat and psyllium), useful both for lowering cholesterol and blood pressure, or fructans, effective in diabetes. Phytosterols and stanols lower LDL-cholesterol in a dose-dependent manner. Soya protein is more hypocholesterolaemic in subjects with very high initial cholesterol and recent data indicate also favourable activities in the metabolic syndrome. n-3 Fatty acids appear to exert significant hypotriacylglycerolaemic effects, possibly partly responsible for their preventive activity. Dark chocolate is gaining much attention for its multifunctional activities, useful both for the prevention of dyslipidaemia as well as hypertension. Finally, consensus opinions about tea and coffee have not emerged yet, and the benefits of vitamin E, garlic, fenugreek and policosanols in the management of dyslipidaemia and prevention of arterial disease are still controversial. PMID:20003590

  1. Geochemistry of water in relation to cardiovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Relations between trace and major element chemistry of drinking water and cardiovascular diseases are reviewed and documented. Several aspects of the problem, related both to the pathway that drinking water takes to man and to its transit through man, are reviewed. Several steps in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease that could be affected by water factors were explored. There is little evidence bearing on the contribution from drinking water to human tissue levels of cadmium, chromium, or zinc. Copper and magnesium levels of tissues may be related to drinking water, but confirmatory evidence is needed. Lead levels in blood and other tissues are most certainly affected by lead levels in drinking water in areas where these levels are unusually elevated. There is little evidence that relatively low levels of lead are toxic to the cardiovascular system, except for the causation of cardiomyopathy. The protective action of selenium and zinc applies mainly to cadmium toxicity. The mode of the protective action of silicon, if any, is unclear at present. Some epidemiological associations between the cadmium level or cadmium:zinc ratio and cardiovascular disease have been reported, but are contradictory. Some epidemiological support exists for a protective effect by selenium; results for zinc are equivocal. Interactions within the human system involving calcium and selected trace elements might be very important for the cardiovascular system. Review of the epidemiological literature indicates that there may be a water factor associated with cardiovascular disease. Its effects, if any, must be very weak in comparison with the effects of known risk factors. The reported inverse relationship between mortality from cardiovascular diseases and hardness of local drinking water supplies appears to be considerably less distinctive in small regional studies. (ERB)

  2. Family history of vascular disease and the risk of cardiovascular events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijmans, M.

    2015-01-01

    A positive family history of cardiovascular disease is an established risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. In clinical practice, this evident relation between the presence of cardiovascular disease in families and first cardiovascular events has resulted in family history being

  3. Syndrom-Pathogen Effect of Ozone Therapy and Nauheim Baths on Patients with Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena I. Sycheva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite different theories of atherogenesis, pathogenesis of this disease is, foremost, associated with the lipid storage disease, blood rheological properties, lipid peroxidation. Microcirculation disorders have significant role for pathogenesis of many illnesses, primarily, cardiovascular. Among possible reasons of increased risk of their pathway are the increase in the activity of sympathetic neurovegetative system, psychoemotional tension emergion. Application of ‘gas’ therapy methods, such as ozone therapy and carbon dioxide in the form of Nauheim baths is one of the prospect trends in preventive treatment. The obtained results of these methods application in the course of resort treatment showed positive dynamics for homeostasis indicants. They can serve as an indication for the use of carbon dioxide and, especially, ozone therapy for multifactor preventive treatment of patients with cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Importância da gordura alimentar na prevenção e no controle de distúrbios metabólicos e da doença cardiovascular Importance of the dietary fat on the prevention and control of metabolic disturbances and cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Pita Lottenberg

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A Organização Mundial da Saúde (OMS reiterou recentemente que o consumo de dietas inadequadas e a inatividade física estão entre os dez principais fatores de mortalidade. Diversos ensaios aleatorizados demonstram que intervenções alimentares adequadas podem diminuir ou prevenir significativamente o aparecimento de várias doenças crônicas não transmissíveis. Neste contexto, o papel da dieta vem sendo exaustivamente avaliado em estudos clínicos e epidemiológicos. Assim, já foi bem estabelecido na literatura que a quantidade e o tipo de gordura alimentar exercem influência direta sobre fatores de risco cardiovascular, tais como a concentração de lípides e de lipoproteínas plasmáticas, bem como sua associação a processos inflamatórios. Os ácidos graxos participam de complexos sistemas de sinalização intracelular, função que vem sendo bastante explorada. Os ácidos graxos poli-insaturados não somente influenciam a composição das membranas, metabolismo celular e sinais de tradução, mas também modulam a expressão de genes, regulando a atividade e a produção de diversos fatores de transcrição. A proposta deste artigo é rever tópicos relevantes referentes ao metabolismo de lípides e os relacionar a terapias nutricionais que possam contribuir para a prevenção e o tratamento de doenças associadas.The World Health Organization (WHO has recently reinforced the fact that inadequate diets, along with physical inactivity, are among the ten main determinant factors of mortality. Several randomized trials demonstrated that dietary interventions may lower or even prevent the occurrence of several non-communicable diseases. In this context, the role of diet has been exhaustively evaluated in several clinical and epidemiological studies. Thus, it is well established in literature that the amount and type of dietary fat have a direct influence on cardiovascular risk factors, such as lipids and plasma lipoprotein

  5. Recent progress in gene therapy for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Ryuichi

    2002-12-01

    Gene therapy is emerging as a potential strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, such as peripheral arterial disease, ischemic heart disease, restenosis after angioplasty, vascular bypass graft occlusion and transplant coronary vasculopathy, for which no known effective therapy exists. The first human trial in cardiovascular disease started in 1994 treating peripheral vascular disease with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and since then, many different potent angiogenic growth factors have been tested in clinical trials for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease. In addition, therapeutic angiogenesis using the VEGF gene has been used to treat ischemic heart disease since 1997. The results from these clinical trials have exceeded expectations; improvement in the clinical symptoms of peripheral arterial disease and ischemic heart disease has been reported. Another strategy for combating the disease processes, targeting the transcriptional process, has been tested in a human trial. IN particular, transfection of cis-element double-stranded (ds) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) (= decoy) is a powerful tool in a new class of anti-gene strategies. Transfection of ds-ODN corresponding to the cis sequence will attenuate the authentic cis-trans interaction, leading to removal of trans-factors from the endogenous cis-elements and subsequent modulation of gene expression. Genetically modified vein grafts transfected with a decoy against E2F, an essential transcription factor in cell cycle progression, appear to have long-term potency in human patients. There is great potential in gene therapy for cardiovascular disease. PMID:12499610

  6. Vitamines en visvetzuren ter preventie van hart- en vaatziekten: Gezondmakers uit potjes en flesjes T2 = Health from jars and bottles. Vitamins and fish oil fatty acids for prevention of cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severs, A.H.; Bouterse-van Haaren, M.R.T.

    2000-01-01

    A high dietary intake of antioxidants ascorbic acid, tocopherol and beta-carotene and 1 or 2 servings of fish per week is associated with a lower risk of coronary heart diseases, but the 'evidence' for a preventive effect still has not been produced. A raised homocysteine level can be lowered with f

  7. MicroRNAs Expression Profiles in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Bronze-da-Rocha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current search for new markers of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs is explained by the high morbidity and mortality still observed in developed and developing countries due to cardiovascular events. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs have emerged as potential new biomarkers and are small sequences of RNAs that regulate gene expression at posttranscriptional level by inhibiting translation or inducing degradation of the target mRNAs. Circulating miRNAs are involved in the regulation of signaling pathways associated to aging and can be used as novel diagnostic markers for acute and chronic diseases such as cardiovascular pathologies. This review summarizes the biogenesis, maturation, and stability of miRNAs and their use as potential biomarkers for coronary artery disease (CAD, myocardial infarction (MI, and heart failure (HF.

  8. The impact of mast cells on cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritikou, Eva; Kuiper, Johan; Kovanen, Petri T; Bot, Ilze

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells comprise an innate immune cell population, which accumulates in tissues proximal to the outside environment and, upon activation, augments the progression of immunological reactions through the release and diffusion of either pre-formed or newly generated mediators. The released products of mast cells include histamine, proteases, as well as a variety of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, which act on the surrounding microenvironment thereby shaping the immune responses triggered in various diseased states. Mast cells have also been detected in the arterial wall and are implicated in the onset and progression of numerous cardiovascular diseases. Notably, modulation of distinct mast cell actions using genetic and pharmacological approaches highlights the crucial role of this cell type in cardiovascular syndromes. The acquired evidence renders mast cells and their mediators as potential prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in a broad spectrum of pathophysiological conditions related to cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25959384

  9. Patients with premature cardiovascular disease and a positive family history for cardiovascular disease are prone to recurrent events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Mulders; Z. Meyer; C. van der Donk; A.A. Kroon; I. Ferreira; C.D.A. Stehouwer; S.J. Pinto-Sietsma

    2011-01-01

    Background: Premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) is treated in the same way as CVD of advanced age. However, in patients with premature CVD and a family history of CVD, different -possibly genetic-mechanisms may underlie this disease, which current medical treatment is not targeted to. This sugges

  10. Divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Beth J; Kaandorp, Joepe J; Kane, Andrew D; Camm, Emily J; Lusby, Ciara; Cross, Christine M; Nevin-Dolan, Rhianon; Thakor, Avnesh S; Derks, Jan B; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Ozanne, Susan E; Giussani, Dino A

    2016-05-01

    Aging and developmental programming are both associated with oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, suggesting common mechanistic origins. However, their interrelationship has been little explored. In a rodent model of programmed cardiovascular dysfunction we determined endothelial function and vascular telomere length in young (4 mo) and aged (15 mo) adult offspring of normoxic or hypoxic pregnancy with or without maternal antioxidant treatment. We show loss of endothelial function [maximal arterial relaxation to acetylcholine (71 ± 3 vs. 55 ± 3%) and increased vascular short telomere abundance (4.2-1.3 kb) 43.0 ± 1.5 vs. 55.1 ± 3.8%) in aged vs. young offspring of normoxic pregnancy (P compared with aged offspring of untreated hypoxic pregnancy had lower levels of short telomeres (vascular short telomere length abundance 35.1 ± 2.5 vs. 48.2 ± 2.6%) and of plasma proinflammatory chemokine (24.6 ± 2.8 vs. 36.8 ± 5.5 pg/ml, P cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease, and aging being decelerated by antioxidants even prior to birth.-Allison, B. J., Kaandorp, J. J., Kane, A. D., Camm, E. J., Lusby, C., Cross, C. M., Nevin-Dolan, R., Thakor, A. S., Derks, J. B., Tarry-Adkins, J. L., Ozanne, S. E., Giussani, D. A. Divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26932929

  11. Lifestyle Risk Factors and Cardiovascular Disease in Cubans and Cuban Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa S. Burroughs Peña

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in Cuba. Lifestyle risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD in Cubans have not been compared to risk factors in Cuban Americans. Articles spanning the last 20 years were reviewed. The data on Cuban Americans are largely based on the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES, 1982–1984, while more recent data on epidemiological trends in Cuba are available. The prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus remains greater in Cuban Americans than in Cubans. However, dietary preferences, low physical activity, and tobacco use are contributing to the rising rates of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and CHD in Cuba, putting Cubans at increased cardiovascular risk. Comprehensive national strategies for cardiovascular prevention that address these modifiable lifestyle risk factors are necessary to address the increasing threat to public health in Cuba.

  12. Astaxanthin: A Potential Therapeutic Agent in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Fassett

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin is a xanthophyll carotenoid present in microalgae, fungi, complex plants, seafood, flamingos and quail. It is an antioxidant with anti-inflammatory properties and as such has potential as a therapeutic agent in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Synthetic forms of astaxanthin have been manufactured. The safety, bioavailability and effects of astaxanthin on oxidative stress and inflammation that have relevance to the pathophysiology of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, have been assessed in a small number of clinical studies. No adverse events have been reported and there is evidence of a reduction in biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation with astaxanthin administration. Experimental studies in several species using an ischaemia-reperfusion myocardial model demonstrated that astaxanthin protects the myocardium when administered both orally or intravenously prior to the induction of the ischaemic event. At this stage we do not know whether astaxanthin is of benefit when administered after a cardiovascular event and no clinical cardiovascular studies in humans have been completed and/or reported. Cardiovascular clinical trials are warranted based on the physicochemical and antioxidant properties, the safety profile and preliminary experimental cardiovascular studies of astaxanthin.

  13. Secretory Phospholipase A2-IIA and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Michael V.; Simon, Tabassome; Exeter, Holly J.; Folkersen, Lasse; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Guardiola, Montse; Cooper, Jackie A.; Palmen, Jutta; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Carruthers, Kathryn F.; Horne, Benjamin D.; Brunisholz, Kimberly D.; Mega, Jessica L.; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Li, Mingyao; Leusink, Maarten; Trompet, Stella; Verschuren, Jeffrey J.W.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Dehghan, Abbas; Nelson, Christopher P.; Kotti, Salma; Danchin, Nicolas; Scholz, Markus; Haase, Christiane L.; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Staines-Urias, Eleonora; Goel, Anuj; van 't Hooft, Ferdinand; Gertow, Karl; de Faire, Ulf; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Tremoli, Elena; Baldassarre, Damiano; Veglia, Fabrizio; Holdt, Lesca M.; Beutner, Frank; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Navis, Gerjan J.; Mateo Leach, Irene; Breitling, Lutz P.; Brenner, Hermann; Thiery, Joachim; Dallmeier, Dhayana; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Stephens, Jeffrey W.; Hofker, Marten H.; Tedgui, Alain; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Adamkova, Vera; Pitha, Jan; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Cramer, Maarten J.; Nathoe, Hendrik M.; Spiering, Wilko; Klungel, Olaf H.; Kumari, Meena; Whincup, Peter H.; Morrow, David A.; Braund, Peter S.; Hall, Alistair S.; Olsson, Anders G.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Trip, Mieke D.; Tobin, Martin D.; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Koenig, Wolfgang; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Teupser, Daniel; Day, Ian N.M.; Carlquist, John F.; Gaunt, Tom R.; Ford, Ian; Sattar, Naveed; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Schwartz, Gregory G.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Morris, Richard W.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Poledne, Rudolf; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Keating, Brendan J.; van der Harst, Pim; Price, Jackie F.; Mehta, Shamir R.; Yusuf, Salim; Witteman, Jaqueline C.M.; Franco, Oscar H.; Jukema, J. Wouter; de Knijff, Peter; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Rader, Daniel J.; Farrall, Martin; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kivimaki, Mika; Fox, Keith A.A.; Humphries, Steve E.; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Palmer, Tom M.; Eriksson, Per; Paré, Guillaume; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Mallat, Ziad; Casas, Juan P.; Talmud, Philippa J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to investigate the role of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-IIA in cardiovascular disease. Background Higher circulating levels of sPLA2-IIA mass or sPLA2 enzyme activity have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events. However, it is not clear if this association is causal. A recent phase III clinical trial of an sPLA2 inhibitor (varespladib) was stopped prematurely for lack of efficacy. Methods We conducted a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis of 19 general population studies (8,021 incident, 7,513 prevalent major vascular events [MVE] in 74,683 individuals) and 10 acute coronary syndrome (ACS) cohorts (2,520 recurrent MVE in 18,355 individuals) using rs11573156, a variant in PLA2G2A encoding the sPLA2-IIA isoenzyme, as an instrumental variable. Results PLA2G2A rs11573156 C allele associated with lower circulating sPLA2-IIA mass (38% to 44%) and sPLA2 enzyme activity (3% to 23%) per C allele. The odds ratio (OR) for MVE per rs11573156 C allele was 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98 to 1.06) in general populations and 0.96 (95% CI: 0.90 to 1.03) in ACS cohorts. In the general population studies, the OR derived from the genetic instrumental variable analysis for MVE for a 1-log unit lower sPLA2-IIA mass was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.96 to 1.13), and differed from the non-genetic observational estimate (OR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.61 to 0.79). In the ACS cohorts, both the genetic instrumental variable and observational ORs showed a null association with MVE. Instrumental variable analysis failed to show associations between sPLA2 enzyme activity and MVE. Conclusions Reducing sPLA2-IIA mass is unlikely to be a useful therapeutic goal for preventing cardiovascular events. PMID:23916927

  14. Heart valve disease: investigation by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Myerson Saul G

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has become a valuable investigative tool in many areas of cardiac medicine. Its value in heart valve disease is less well appreciated however, particularly as echocardiography is a powerful and widely available technique in valve disease. This review highlights the added value that CMR can bring in valve disease, complementing echocardiography in many areas, but it has also become the first-line investigation in some, such as pulmonary valve di...

  15. Systemic Inflammation in Cardiovascular and Periodontal Disease: Comparative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Glurich, Ingrid; Grossi, Sara; Albini, Boris; Ho, Alex; Shah, Rashesh; Zeid, Mohamed; Baumann, Heinz; Genco, Robert J.; De Nardin, Ernesto

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have implicated periodontal disease (PD) as a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). These studies addressed the premise that local infection may perturb the levels of systemic inflammatory mediators, thereby promoting mechanisms of atherosclerosis. Levels of inflammatory mediators in the sera of subjects with only PD, only CVD, both diseases, or neither condition were compared. Subjects were assessed for levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), se...

  16. Insulin Resistance and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Postmenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, Michelle D; Hedlin, Haley; Stefanick, Marcia L;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insulin resistance is associated with diabetes mellitus, but it is uncertain whether it improves cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk prediction beyond traditional cardiovascular risk factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified 15,288 women from the Women's Health Initiative Biomarkers....../HDL-C, or impaired fasting glucose (serum glucose ≥110 mg/dL) to traditional risk factors in separate Cox multivariable analyses and assessed risk discrimination and reclassification. The study end point was major CVD events (nonfatal and fatal coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke) within 10 years, which...

  17. Results From the Periodontitis and Vascular Events (PAVE) Study: A Pilot Multicentered, Randomized, Controlled Trial to Study Effects of Periodontal Therapy in a Secondary Prevention Model of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offenbacher, Steven; Beck, James D.; Moss, Kevin; Mendoza, Luisito; Paquette, David W.; Barrow, David A.; Couper, David J.; Stewart, Dawn D.; Falkner, Karen L.; Graham, Susan P.; Grossi, Sara; Gunsolley, John C.; Madden, Theresa; Maupome, Gerardo; Trevisan, Maurizio; Van Dyke, Thomas E.; Genco, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Background In the Periodontitis and Vascular Events (PAVE) pilot study, periodontal therapy was provided as an intervention in a secondary cardiac event prevention model through five coordinated cardiac– dental centers. Methods Subjects were randomized to either community care or protocol provided scaling and root planing to evaluate effects on periodontal status and systemic levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Results After 6 months, there was a significant reduction in mean probing depth and extent of 4- or 5-mm pockets. However, there were no significant differences in attachment levels, bleeding upon probing, or extent of subgingival calculus comparing subjects assigned to protocol therapy (n = 151) to those assigned to community care (n = 152). Using intent-to-treat analyses, there was no significant effect on serum hs-CRP levels at 6 months. However, 48% of the subjects randomized to community care received preventive or periodontal treatments. Secondary analyses demonstrated that consideration of any preventive or periodontal care (i.e., any treatment) compared to no treatment showed a significant reduction in the percentage of people with elevated hs-CRP (values >3 mg/l) at 6 months. However, obesity nullified the periodontal treatment effects on hs-CRP reduction. The adjusted odds ratio for hs-CRP levels >3 mg/l at 6 months for any treatment versus no treatment among non-obese individuals was 0.26 (95%confidence interval: 0.09 to 0.72), adjusting for smoking, marital status, and gender. Conclusion This pilot study demonstrated the critical role of considering obesity as well as rigorous preventive and periodontal care in trials designed to reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:19186958

  18. How Can Heart Disease be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Heart Disease Be Prevented? Taking action to control your risk factors can help prevent or delay coronary heart disease (CHD). Your risk for CHD increases with the ...

  19. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to content Skip to navigation Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion health.gov healthfinder.gov healthypeople. ... Patient Safety Healthy People healthfinder The Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Our Work The Office of ...

  20. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Unexplained Respiratory Disease Outbreaks (URDO) European Legionnaires’ Disease Surveillance Network (ELDSNet) Prevention Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...