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Sample records for cardiomyopathy mutations affect

  1. The Mutations Associated with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruti Parvari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure and a major indication for heart transplantation in children and adults. This paper describes the state of the genetic knowledge of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. The identification of the causing mutation is important since presymptomatic interventions of DCM have proven value in preventing morbidity and mortality. Additionally, as in general in genetic studies, the identification of the mutated genes has a direct clinical impact for the families and population involved. Identifying causative mutations immediately amplifies the possibilities for disease prevention through carrier screening and prenatal testing. This often lifts a burden of social isolation from affected families, since healthy family members can be assured of having healthy children. Identification of the mutated genes holds the potential to lead to the understanding of disease etiology, pathophysiology, and therefore potential therapy. This paper presents the genetic variations, or disease-causing mutations, contributing to the pathogenesis of hereditary DCM, and tries to relate these to the functions of the mutated genes.

  2. The Mutations Associated with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Ruti Parvari; Aviva Levitas

    2012-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure and a major indication for heart transplantation in children and adults. This paper describes the state of the genetic knowledge of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The identification of the causing mutation is important since presymptomatic interventions of DCM have proven value in preventing morbidity and mortality. Additionally, as in general in genetic studies, the identification of the mutated genes has a direct clinical impact for the f...

  3. Inherited cardiomyopathies caused by troponin mutations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun-Wei Lu; Xiao-Yan Wu; Sachio Morimoto

    2013-01-01

    Genetic investigations of cardiomyopathy in the recent two decades have revealed a large number of mutations in the genes encoding sarcomeric proteins as a cause of inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), or restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Most functional analyses of the effects of mutations on cardiac muscle contraction have revealed significant changes in the Ca2+-regulatory mechanism, in which cardiac troponin (cTn) plays important structural and functional roles as a key regulatory protein. Over a hundred mutations have been identified in all three subunits of cTn, i.e., cardiac troponins T, I, and C. Recent studies on cTn mutations have provided plenty of evidence that HCM- and RCM-linked mutations increase cardiac myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, while DCM-linked mutations decrease it. This review focuses on the functional consequences of mutations found in cTn in terms of cardiac myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, ATPase activity, force generation, and cardiac troponin I phosphorylation, to understand potential molecular and cellular pathogenic mechanisms of the three types of inherited cardiomyopathy.

  4. MT-CYB mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Havndrup, Ole;

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a characteristic of heart failure. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA, particularly in MT-CYB coding for cytochrome B in complex III (CIII), have been associated with isolated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We hypothesized that MT-CYB mutations might play an important...

  5. Dominant de novo DSP mutations cause erythrokeratodermia-cardiomyopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyden, Lynn M; Kam, Chen Y; Hernández-Martín, Angela; Zhou, Jing; Craiglow, Brittany G; Sidbury, Robert; Mathes, Erin F; Maguiness, Sheilagh M; Crumrine, Debra A; Williams, Mary L; Hu, Ronghua; Lifton, Richard P; Elias, Peter M; Green, Kathleen J; Choate, Keith A

    2016-01-15

    Disorders of keratinization (DOK) show marked genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. In most cases, disease is primarily cutaneous, and further clinical evaluation is therefore rarely pursued. We have identified subjects with a novel DOK featuring erythrokeratodermia and initially-asymptomatic, progressive, potentially fatal cardiomyopathy, a finding not previously associated with erythrokeratodermia. We show that de novo missense mutations clustered tightly within a single spectrin repeat of DSP cause this novel cardio-cutaneous disorder, which we term erythrokeratodermia-cardiomyopathy (EKC) syndrome. We demonstrate that DSP mutations in our EKC syndrome subjects affect localization of desmosomal proteins and connexin 43 in the skin, and result in desmosome aggregation, widening of intercellular spaces, and lipid secretory defects. DSP encodes desmoplakin, a primary component of desmosomes, intercellular adhesion junctions most abundant in the epidermis and heart. Though mutations in DSP are known to cause other disorders, our cohort features the unique clinical finding of severe whole-body erythrokeratodermia, with distinct effects on localization of desmosomal proteins and connexin 43. These findings add a severe, previously undescribed syndrome featuring erythrokeratodermia and cardiomyopathy to the spectrum of disease caused by mutation in DSP, and identify a specific region of the protein critical to the pathobiology of EKC syndrome and to DSP function in the heart and skin. PMID:26604139

  6. [Hereditary amyloid cardiomyopathy related to a mutation at transthyretin protein number 111. A clinical, genetic and echocardiographic study of an affected Danish family].

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    Svendsen, I H; Steensgaard-Hansen, F; Nordvåg, B Y

    1999-09-01

    Amyloidosis is a group of diseases characterized by amyloid deposition in various tissues. The diseases can roughly be divided into hereditary and non-hereditary forms. The hereditary forms are related to a mutation in the serum protein transthyretin which is produced mainly in the liver. The inheritance is autosomal dominant. A family in Denmark has earlier been described as having inherited cardiac amyloidosis with a mutation at amino acid number 111 in the transthyretin protein. The family now has been re-examined because of new diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities. The aims of the study were to identify carriers and non-carriers of the mutant transthyretin methionine 111 linked familial amyloid disease, to detect early signs of the restrictive cardiomyopathy and other clinical manifestations of this disease. Clinical, echocardiographic and genetic examination was carried out. Out of 125 living family members, 99 were available for examination. Twenty-five persons were heterozygous carriers of the mutant transthyretin methionine 111 genotype, while 74 were non-carriers. Eight carriers, all above the age of 35, showed echocardiographic abnormalities suggestive of developing or manifest restrictive cardiomyopathy. Nine carriers had carpal tunnel syndrome as opposed to none of the non-carriers. It is concluded that for early detection of familial amyloid cardiomyopathy, echocardiography is the investigation of choice. The first sign is diastolic dysfunction detected as an abnormal relaxation pattern. Carpal tunnel syndrome appears to be the earliest presenting clinical symptom. Early liver transplantation seems to be curative. PMID:10489791

  7. Subtle abnormalities in contractile function are an early manifestation of sarcomere mutations in dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakdawala, Neal K; Thune, Jens J; Colan, Steven D;

    2012-01-01

    Sarcomere mutations cause both dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM); however, the steps leading from mutation to disease are not well described. By studying mutation carriers before a clinical diagnosis develops, we characterize the early manifestations of sarcomere ...

  8. Unclassifiable arrhythmic cardiomyopathy associated with Emery-Dreifuss caused by a mutation in FHL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Román, I; Navarro, M; Martínez, F; Albert, L; Polo, L; Guardiola, J; García-Molina, E; Muñoz-Esparza, C; López-Ayala, J M; Sabater-Molina, M; Gimeno, J R

    2016-08-01

    Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is a heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by peripheral muscular weakness often associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. We characterize clinically a large family with a mutation in FHL1 gene (p.Cys255Ser). Penetrance was 44%, 100% for males and 18% for females. The heart was the main organ involved. Affected adult males had mild hypertrophy, systolic dysfunction and restriction with non-dilated ventricles. Carriers had significant QTc prolongation. The proband presented with resuscitated cardiac arrest. There were two transplants. Pathological study of explanted heart showed fibrofatty replacement and scarring consistent with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy and prominent left ventricular trabeculations. Myopathic involvement was evident in all males. Females had no significant neuromuscular disease. Mutations in FHL1 cause unclassifiable cardiomyopathy with coexisting EDMD. Prognosis is poor and systolic impairment and arrhythmias are frequent. Thrombopenia and raised creatine phosphokinase should raise suspicion of an FHL-1 disorder in X-linked cardiomyopathy. PMID:26857240

  9. A novel mitochondrial tRNA gene mutation in a chinese family with dilated cardiomyopathy and sensorineural deafness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianghong Wu; Xiumei Xie; Guotian Ma; Guoju Sun; Xiaobin Chen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether a mutation of mitochondrial DNA induces familial dilated cardiomyopathy in Chinese families with cardiomyopathy, and analyzed the correlation between the genotype and phenotype. Methods: Affected members in three Chinese families of the familial dilated cardiomyopathy underwent clinical evaluation and DNA analysis. Polymerase chain reaction and direct DNA sequencing were used to screen for mitochondrial DNA mutation. The type of mtDNA vairations and clinical situation were analysed on the patients with mitochondrial DNA mutation. Results: The mitochondrial A3434G mutation was identified in one of the three families,the 3434 th nucleotide A was replaced by G, which led to change of amino acid. No mutations were identified in the clinically unaffected members of the family and all members of the other two families.Conclusion: This study indicates that the mitochondrial A3434G mutation maybe related with familial dilated cardiomyopathy and deafness.

  10. Mutations in FLNC are Associated with Familial Restrictive Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodehl, Andreas; Ferrier, Raechel A; Hamilton, Sara J; Greenway, Steven C; Brundler, Marie-Anne; Yu, Weiming; Gibson, William T; McKinnon, Margaret L; McGillivray, Barbara; Alvarez, Nanette; Giuffre, Michael; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Gerull, Brenda

    2016-03-01

    Individuals affected by restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) often develop heart failure at young ages resulting in early heart transplantation. Familial forms are mainly caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins and demonstrate a common genetic etiology with other inherited cardiomyopathies. Using next-generation sequencing, we identified two novel missense variants (p.S1624L; p.I2160F) in filamin-C (FLNC), an actin-cross-linking protein mainly expressed in heart and skeletal muscle, segregating in two families with autosomal-dominant RCM. Affected individuals presented with heart failure due to severe diastolic dysfunction requiring heart transplantation in some cases. Histopathology of heart tissue from patients of both families showed cytoplasmic inclusions suggesting protein aggregates, which were filamin-C specific for the p.S1624L by immunohistochemistry. Cytoplasmic aggregates were also observed in transfected myoblast cell lines expressing this mutant filamin-C indicating further evidence for its pathogenicity. Thus, FLNC is a disease gene for autosomal-dominant RCM and broadens the phenotype spectrum of filaminopathies. PMID:26666891

  11. Oxidative Stress in Dilated Cardiomyopathy Caused by MYBPC3 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Lynch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathies can result from mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins including MYBPC3, which encodes cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C. However, whether oxidative stress is augmented due to contractile dysfunction and cardiomyocyte damage in MYBPC3-mutated cardiomyopathies has not been elucidated. To determine whether oxidative stress markers were elevated in MYBPC3-mutated cardiomyopathies, a previously characterized 3-month-old mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM expressing a homozygous MYBPC3 mutation (cMyBP-C(t/t was used, compared to wild-type (WT mice. Echocardiography confirmed decreased percentage of fractional shortening in DCM versus WT hearts. Histopathological analysis indicated a significant increase in myocardial disarray and fibrosis while the second harmonic generation imaging revealed disorganized sarcomeric structure and myocyte damage in DCM hearts when compared to WT hearts. Intriguingly, DCM mouse heart homogenates had decreased glutathione (GSH/GSSG ratio and increased protein carbonyl and lipid malondialdehyde content compared to WT heart homogenates, consistent with elevated oxidative stress. Importantly, a similar result was observed in human cardiomyopathy heart homogenate samples. These results were further supported by reduced signals for mitochondrial semiquinone radicals and Fe-S clusters in DCM mouse hearts measured using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In conclusion, we demonstrate elevated oxidative stress in MYPBC3-mutated DCM mice, which may exacerbate the development of heart failure.

  12. A negative screen for mutations in calstabin 1 and 2 genes in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biagi Diogo G

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calstabins 1 and 2 bind to Ryanodine receptors regulating muscle excitation-contraction coupling. Mutations in Ryanodine receptors affecting their interaction with calstabins lead to different cardiac pathologies. Animal studies suggest the involvement of calstabins with dilated cardiomyopathy. Results We tested the hypothesis that calstabins mutations may cause dilated cardiomyopathy in humans screening 186 patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy for genetic alterations in calstabins 1 and 2 genes (FKBP12 and FKBP12.6. No missense variant was found. Five no-coding variations were found but not related to the disease. Conclusions These data corroborate other studies suggesting that mutations in FKBP12 and FKBP12.6 genes are not commonly related to cardiac diseases.

  13. Missense mutation of the {beta}-cardiac myosin heavy-chain gene in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

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    Arai, Shoichi; Matsuoka, Rumiko; Hirayama, Kenji; Sakurai, Hisanao [Heart Inst. of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-11

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy occurs as an autosomal dominant familial disorder or as a sporadic disease without familial involvement. We describe a missense mutation of the {beta}-cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene, a G to T transversion (741 Gly{r_arrow}Trp) identified by direct sequencing of exon 20 in four individuals affected with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Three individuals with sporadic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, whose parents are clinically and genetically unaffected, had sequence variations of exon 34 of the {alpha}-cardiac MHC gene (a C to T transversion, 1658 Asp{r_arrow}Asp, resulting in FokI site polymorphism), of intron 33 of the {alpha}-cardiac MHC gene (a G to A and an A to T transversion), and also of intron 14 of the {beta}-cardiac MHC gene (a C to T transversion in a patient with Noonan syndrome). Including our case, 30 missense mutations of the {beta}-cardiac MHC gene in 49 families have been reported thus far worldwide. Almost all are located in the region of the gene coding for the globular head of the molecule, and only one mutation was found in both Caucasian and Japanese families. Missense mutations of the {Beta}-cardiac MHC gene in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may therefore differ according to race. 29 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Compound heterozygous or homozygous truncating MYBPC3 mutations cause lethal cardiomyopathy with features of noncompaction and septal defects

    OpenAIRE

    Wessels, Marja W.; Herkert, Johanna C; Frohn-Mulder, Ingrid M.; Dalinghaus, Michiel; van den Wijngaard, Arthur; Ronald R de Krijger; Michels, Michelle; de Coo, Irenaeus FM; Hoedemaekers, Yvonne M; Dooijes, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is usually caused by autosomal dominant pathogenic mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric or sarcomere-associated cardiac muscle proteins. The disease mainly affects adults, although young children with severe HCM have also been reported. We describe four unrelated neonates with lethal cardiomyopathy, and performed molecular studies to identify the genetic defect. We also present a literature overview of reported patients with compound heterozygous o...

  15. Compound heterozygous or homozygous truncating MYBPC3 mutations cause lethal cardiomyopathy with features of noncompaction and septal defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Marja W; Herkert, Johanna C; Frohn-Mulder, Ingrid M; Dalinghaus, Michiel; van den Wijngaard, Arthur; de Krijger, Ronald R; Michels, Michelle; de Coo, Irenaeus FM; Hoedemaekers, Yvonne M; Dooijes, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is usually caused by autosomal dominant pathogenic mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric or sarcomere-associated cardiac muscle proteins. The disease mainly affects adults, although young children with severe HCM have also been reported. We describe four unrelated neonates with lethal cardiomyopathy, and performed molecular studies to identify the genetic defect. We also present a literature overview of reported patients with compound heterozygous or homozygous pathogenic MYBPC3 mutations and describe their clinical characteristics. All four children presented with feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, and dyspnea. They died from cardiac failure before age 13 weeks. Features of left ventricular noncompaction were diagnosed in three patients. In the fourth, hypertrabeculation was not a clear feature, but could not be excluded. All of them had septal defects. Two patients were compound heterozygotes for the pathogenic c.2373dup p.(Trp792fs) and c.2827C>T p.(Arg943*) mutations, and two were homozygous for the c.2373dup and c.2827C>T mutations. All patients with biallelic truncating pathogenic mutations in MYBPC3 reported so far (n=21) were diagnosed with severe cardiomyopathy and/or died within the first few months of life. In 62% (13/21), septal defects or a patent ductus arteriosus accompanied cardiomyopathy. In contrast to heterozygous pathogenic mutations, homozygous or compound heterozygous truncating pathogenic MYBPC3 mutations cause severe neonatal cardiomyopathy with features of left ventricular noncompaction and septal defects in approximately 60% of patients. PMID:25335496

  16. Mutations of Presenilin Genes in Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Duanxiang ; Parks, Sharie B. ; Kushner, Jessica D. ; Nauman, Deirdre ; Burgess, Donna ; Ludwigsen, Susan ; Partain, Julie ; Nixon, Randal R. ; Allen, Charles N. ; Irwin, Robert P. ; Jakobs, Petra M. ; Litt, Michael ; Hershberger, Ray E. 

    2006-01-01

    Two common disorders of the elderly are heart failure and Alzheimer disease (AD). Heart failure usually results from dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). DCM of unknown cause in families has recently been shown to result from genetic disease, highlighting newly discovered disease mechanisms. AD is the most frequent neurodegenerative disease of older Americans. Familial AD is caused most commonly by presenilin 1 (PSEN1) or presenilin 2 (PSEN2) mutations, a discovery that has greatly advanced the fiel...

  17. A new transthyretin mutation associated with amyloid cardiomyopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Saraiva, M.J.; Almeida, M do R; Sherman, W.; Gawinowicz, M; Costa, P.; Costa, P. P.; Goodman, D S

    1992-01-01

    In transthyretin (TTR) a new mutation (TTR-Thr45) has been identified in a patient with familial amyloidosis characterized clinically by prominent cardiomyopathy and the absence of peripheral neuropathy. Comparative peptide mapping by high-performance liquid chromatography of the patient's plasma TTR together with normal TTR showed the presence of an abnormal tryptic peptide in the patient's TTR. The sequence of this peptide (peptide 6, residues 36-48) demonstrated the presence of a threonine...

  18. Mutation-Specific Phenotypes in hiPSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes Carrying Either Myosin-Binding Protein C Or α-Tropomyosin Mutation for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Marisa Ojala; Chandra Prajapati; Risto-Pekka Pölönen; Kristiina Rajala; Mari Pekkanen-Mattila; Jyrki Rasku; Kim Larsson; Katriina Aalto-Setälä

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic cardiac disease, which affects the structure of heart muscle tissue. The clinical symptoms include arrhythmias, progressive heart failure, and even sudden cardiac death but the mutation carrier can also be totally asymptomatic. To date, over 1400 mutations have been linked to HCM, mostly in genes encoding for sarcomeric proteins. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease are still largely unknown. Two founder mutations for HCM in ...

  19. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: How do Mutations Lead to Disease?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsiglia, Júlia Daher Carneiro, E-mail: julia.marsiglia@usp.br; Pereira, Alexandre Costa [Instituto do Coração, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common monogenic genetic cardiac disease, with an estimated prevalence of 1:500 in the general population. Clinically, HCM is characterized by hypertrophy of the left ventricle (LV) walls, especially the septum, usually asymmetric, in the absence of any cardiac or systemic disease that leads to a secondary hypertrophy. The clinical course of the disease has a large inter- and intrafamilial heterogeneity, ranging from mild symptoms of heart failure late in life to the onset of sudden cardiac death at a young age and is caused by a mutation in one of the genes that encode a protein from the sarcomere, Z-disc or intracellular calcium modulators. Although many genes and mutations are already known to cause HCM, the molecular pathways that lead to the phenotype are still unclear. This review focus on the molecular mechanisms of HCM, the pathways from mutation to clinical phenotype and how the disease's genotype correlates with phenotype.

  20. Molecular diagnosis of the transthyretin (TTR) Met111 mutation in familial amyloid cardiomyopathy of Danish origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordvåg, B Y; Husby, G; Ranløv, I; el-Gewely, M R

    1992-06-01

    Familial amyloid cardiomyopathy in a Danish kindred is associated with a specific mutation (Met for Leu111) in the transthyretin (TTR) gene, causing the loss of a recognition site for the restriction enzyme DdeI in the gene. We describe a diagnostic test for the molecular detection of this mutation. A sequence of the TTR gene containing the mutation was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction from isolated genomic DNA of two affected patients and several controls. DdeI digestion of the amplified DNA from the patients revealed 3 bands by gel-electrophoresis, whereas amplified DNA of the controls showed only 2 bands, consistent with complete digestion. Thus, the assumed heterozygous TTR Met111 mutation was confirmed in the affected patients. PMID:1618497

  1. Compound heterozygous or homozygous truncating MYBPC3 mutations cause lethal cardiomyopathy with features of noncompaction and septal defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, Marja W.; Herkert, Johanna C.; Frohn-Mulder, Ingrid M.; Dalinghaus, Michiel; Van Den Wijngaard, Arthur; De Krijger, Ronald R.; Michels, Michelle; De Coo, Irenaeus Fm; Hoedemaekers, Yvonne M.; Dooijes, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is usually caused by autosomal dominant pathogenic mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric or sarcomere-associated cardiac muscle proteins. The disease mainly affects adults, although young children with severe HCM have also been reported. We describe four u

  2. Mutations in NEBL encoding the cardiac Z-disk protein nebulette are associated with various cardiomyopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasov, Pavol; Villard, Eric; Faludi, Reka; Melacini, Paola; Lossie, Janine; Lohmann, Nadine; Richard, Pascale; De Bortoli, Marzia; Angelini, Annalisa; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Sperling, Silke R.; Simor, Tamás; Veselka, Josef; Özcelik, Cemil; Charron, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transgenic mice overexpressing mutated NEBL, encoding the cardiac-specific Z-disk protein nebulette, develop severe cardiac phenotypes. Since cardiomyopathies are commonly familial and because mutations in a single gene may result in variable phenotypes, we tested the hypothesis that NEBL mutations are associated with cardiomyopathy. Material and methods We analyzed 389 patients, including cohorts of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC). The 28 coding exons of the NEBL gene were sequenced. Further bioinformatic analysis was used to distinguish variants. Results In total, we identified six very rare heterozygous missense mutations in NEBL in 7 different patients (frequency 1.8%) in highly conserved codons. The mutations were not detectable in 320 Caucasian sex-matched unrelated individuals without cardiomyopathy and 192 Caucasian sex-matched blood donors without heart disease. Known cardiomyopathy genes were excluded in these patients. The mutations p.H171R and p.I652L were found in 2 HCM patients. Further, p.Q581R and p.S747L were detected in 2 DCM patients, while the mutation p.A175T was identified independently in two unrelated patients with DCM. One LVNC patient carried the mutation p.P916L. All HCM and DCM related mutations were located in the nebulin-like repeats, domains responsible for actin binding. Interestingly, the mutation associated with LVNC was located in the C-terminal serine-rich linker region. Conclusions Our data suggest that NEBL mutations may cause various cardiomyopathies. We herein describe the first NEBL mutations in HCM and LVNC. Our findings underline the notion that the cardiomyopathies are true allelic diseases.

  3. A Systematic Review of Phenotypic Features Associated With Cardiac Troponin I Mutations in Hereditary Cardiomyopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jens; Hey, Thomas; Lambrecht, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic investigations have established that mutations in proteins of the contractile unit of the myocardium, known as the sarcomere, may be associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). It has become clinical...... in relation to phenotypic features reported to be associated with mutations in cardiac troponin I (cTnI; TNNI3), which is a recognized sarcomeric disease gene in all 3 cardiomyopathies. RESULTS: The results of this review did not identify specific genotype-phenotype relations in HCM or DCM, and c...

  4. The Metabolome in Finnish Carriers of the MYBPC3-Q1061X Mutation for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heliö, Tiina; Jääskeläinen, Pertti; Laine, Mika; Hilvo, Mika; Nieminen, Markku S.; Laakso, Markku; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Orešič, Matej; Kuusisto, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Aims Mutations in the cardiac myosin-binding protein C gene (MYBPC3) are the most common genetic cause of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) worldwide. The molecular mechanisms leading to HCM are poorly understood. We investigated the metabolic profiles of mutation carriers with the HCM-causing MYBPC3-Q1061X mutation with and without left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and non-affected relatives, and the association of the metabolome to the echocardiographic parameters. Methods and Results 34 hypertrophic subjects carrying the MYBPC3-Q1061X mutation, 19 non-hypertrophic mutation carriers and 20 relatives with neither mutation nor hypertrophy were examined using comprehensive echocardiography. Plasma was analyzed for molecular lipids and polar metabolites using two metabolomics platforms. Concentrations of branched chain amino acids, triglycerides and ether phospholipids were increased in mutation carriers with hypertrophy as compared to controls and non-hypertrophic mutation carriers, and correlated with echocardiographic LVH and signs of diastolic and systolic dysfunction in subjects with the MYBPC3-Q1061X mutation. Conclusions Our study implicates the potential role of branched chain amino acids, triglycerides and ether phospholipids in HCM, as well as suggests an association of these metabolites with remodeling and dysfunction of the left ventricle. PMID:26267065

  5. Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiomyopathy is the name for diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases enlarge your heart muscle or ... tissue. Some people live long, healthy lives with cardiomyopathy. Some people don't even realize they have ...

  6. Wide spectrum of desmosomal mutations in Danish patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A H; Benn, M; Bundgaard, H;

    2010-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a lethal condition characterised by ventricular tachyarrhythmias, right and/or left ventricular involvement and fibrofatty infiltrations in the myocardium. The disease has been associated with mutations in genes encoding desmosomal proteins....

  7. The role of sarcomere gene mutations in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Daniel Vega; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Hedley, Paula;

    2009-01-01

    We investigated a Danish cohort of 31 unrelated patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC), to assess the role that mutations in sarcomere protein genes play in IDC. Patients were genetically screened by capillary electrophoresis single strand conformation polymorphism and subsequently...

  8. The Nonlinear Structure of the Desmoplakin Plakin Domain and the Effects of Cardiomyopathy-Linked Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Al-Jassar; T. Knowles; M. Jeeves; K. Kami; E. Behr; H. Bikker; M. Overduin; M. Chidgey

    2011-01-01

    Desmoplakin is a cytoplasmic desmosomal protein that plays a vital role in normal intercellular adhesion. Mutations in desmoplakin can result in devastating skin blistering diseases and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, a heart muscle disorder associated with ventricular arrhythmias,

  9. Deception in simplicity: hereditary phospholamban mutations in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Howard S; Ceholski, Delaine K; Trieber, Catharine A

    2015-02-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium pump (SERCA) and its regulator phospholamban are required for cardiovascular function. Phospholamban alters the apparent calcium affinity of SERCA in a process that is modulated by phosphorylation via the β-adrenergic pathway. This regulatory axis allows for the dynamic control of SR calcium stores and cardiac contractility. Herein we focus on hereditary mutants of phospholamban that are associated with heart failure, such as Arg(9)-Cys, Arg(9)-Leu, Arg(9)-His, and Arg(14)-deletion. Each mutant has a distinct effect on PLN function and SR calcium homeostasis. Arg(9)-Cys and Arg(9)-Leu do not inhibit SERCA, Arg(14)-deletion is a partial inhibitor, and Arg(9)-His is comparable to wild-type. While the mutants have distinct functional effects on SERCA, they have in common that they cannot be phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA). Arg(9) and Arg(14) are required for PKA recognition and phosphorylation of PLN. Thus, mutations at these positions eliminate β-adrenergic control and dynamic cardiac contractility. Hydrophobic mutations of Arg(9) cause more complex changes in function, including loss of PLN function and dominant negative interaction with SERCA in heterozygous individuals. In addition, aberrant interaction with PKA may prevent phosphorylation of wild-type PLN and sequester PKA from other local subcellular targets. Herein we consider what is known about each mutant and how the synergistic changes in SR calcium homeostasis lead to impaired cardiac contractility and dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:25563649

  10. Tafazzin gene mutations are uncommon causes of dilated cardiomyopathy in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Taylor

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Barth syndrome is an X-linked genetic condition featuring neutropenia, skeletal myopathy, and dilated cardiomyopathy in boys due to tafazzin (TAZ mutations. Pure dilated cardiomyopathy without other features of Barth syndrome may also result from TAZ mutations and survival into adulthood has been described. Although TAZ testing is routinely included in dilated cardiomyopathy panels in adults, the prevalence of TAZ mutations in the adult population, including women who may be at risk to develop later onset disease due to TAZ mutations, has not been measured. We screened 292 families with dilated cardiomyopathy (209 male and 83 female probands for TAZ mutations using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and sequence analysis. Putative mutations were evaluated based on standard criteria including screening available relatives and healthy controls and for effects on splicing efficiency in the case of one intronic variant. Two variants suspicious for being pathogenic were found in two unrelated families (c.387T>C, Phe128Ser and c.507C>T, Leu169Leu. The Phe128Ser variant had been previously reported as a pathogenic mutation; however we determined that this variant is instead a rare polymorphism restricted to African Americans. The Leu169Leu variant was detected in a male patient and altered RNA processing in our minigene assay supporting a pathogenic role. No mutations in female subjects were detected. Tafazzin mutations were rare in our population of adults with dilated cardiomyopathy and none were found in females. Our findings indicate that genetic testing for tafazzin should not be routinely performed in dilated cardiomyopathy as suggested by current guidelines. Furthermore, the Phe128Ser variant is not pathogenic, but likely represents a benign polymorphism in persons of African American ancestry.

  11. Electrocardiographic features of sarcomere mutation carriers with and without clinically overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakdawala, Neal K; Thune, Jens Jakob; Maron, Barry J;

    2011-01-01

    In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC), electrocardiographic (ECG) changes have been postulated to be an early marker of disease, detectable in sarcomere mutation carriers when left ventricular (LV) wall thickness is still normal. However, the ECG features of mutation carriers have not been fully...

  12. Mutation analysis and evaluation of the cardiac localization of TMEM43 in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A H; Andersen, C B; Tybjærg-Hansen, A;

    2011-01-01

    Christensen AH, Andersen CB, Tybjærg-Hansen A, Haunso S, Svendsen JH. Mutation analysis and evaluation of the cardiac localization of TMEM43 in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. A single report has associated mutations in TMEM43 (LUMA) with a distinctive form of arrhythmogenic righ...

  13. Adverse events in families with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy and mutations in the MYBPC3 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrke Stephanie

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in MYBPC3 encoding myosin binding protein C belong to the most frequent causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM and may also lead to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. MYBPC3 mutations initially were considered to cause a benign form of HCM. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical outcome of patients and their relatives with 18 different MYBPC3 mutations. Methods 87 patients with HCM and 71 patients with DCM were screened for MYBPC3 mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing. Close relatives of mutation carriers were genotyped for the respective mutation. Relatives with mutation were then evaluated by echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging. A detailed family history regarding adverse clinical events was recorded. Results In 16 HCM (18.4% and two DCM (2.8% index patients a mutation was detected. Seven mutations were novel. Mutation carriers exhibited no additional mutations in genes MYH7, TNNT2, TNNI3, ACTC and TPM1. Including relatives of twelve families, a total number of 42 mutation carriers was identified of which eleven (26.2% had at least one adverse event. Considering the twelve families and six single patients with mutations, 45 individuals with cardiomyopathy and nine with borderline phenotype were identified. Among the 45 patients, 23 (51.1% suffered from an adverse event. In eleven patients of seven families an unexplained sudden death was reported at the age between 13 and 67 years. Stroke or a transient ischemic attack occurred in six patients of five families. At least one adverse event occurred in eleven of twelve families. Conclusion MYBPC3 mutations can be associated with cardiac events such as progressive heart failure, stroke and sudden death even at younger age. Therefore, patients with MYBPC3 mutations require thorough clinical risk assessment.

  14. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: from mutation to functional analysis of defective protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapek, P.; Vondrášek, Jiří; Škvor, J.; Brdička, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2011), s. 384-391. ISSN 0353-9504 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00B107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : myosin heavy chain * homology modeling * molecular simulation * inherited cardiomyopathies Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.796, year: 2011

  15. A mutation in the mitochondrial fission gene Dnm1l leads to cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houman Ashrafian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in a number of genes have been linked to inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. However, such mutations account for only a small proportion of the clinical cases emphasising the need for alternative discovery approaches to uncovering novel pathogenic mutations in hitherto unidentified pathways. Accordingly, as part of a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen, we identified a mouse mutant, Python, which develops DCM. We demonstrate that the Python phenotype is attributable to a dominant fully penetrant mutation in the dynamin-1-like (Dnm1l gene, which has been shown to be critical for mitochondrial fission. The C452F mutation is in a highly conserved region of the M domain of Dnm1l that alters protein interactions in a yeast two-hybrid system, suggesting that the mutation might alter intramolecular interactions within the Dnm1l monomer. Heterozygous Python fibroblasts exhibit abnormal mitochondria and peroxisomes. Homozygosity for the mutation results in the death of embryos midway though gestation. Heterozygous Python hearts show reduced levels of mitochondria enzyme complexes and suffer from cardiac ATP depletion. The resulting energy deficiency may contribute to cardiomyopathy. This is the first demonstration that a defect in a gene involved in mitochondrial remodelling can result in cardiomyopathy, showing that the function of this gene is needed for the maintenance of normal cellular function in a relatively tissue-specific manner. This disease model attests to the importance of mitochondrial remodelling in the heart; similar defects might underlie human heart muscle disease.

  16. Association between LMNA mutation and familial and idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy patients in Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙帅

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the association between LMNA gene mutation and familiar dilated cardiomyopathy(DCM)(FDCM)and idiopathic DCM(IDCM)in Uygurs and Han people in Xinjiang area.Methods Peripheral blood samples were collected from 28 family member with FDCM and 123 sporadic patients with IDCM(56 Uygur patients and 67 Han patients),80 Uygur

  17. Identification of Mutations and Evaluation of Cardiomyopathy in Turkish Patients with Primary Carnitine Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Kilic, M.; Özgül, R. K.; Coşkun, T.; Yücel, D.; Karaca, M.; Sivri, H. S.; Tokatli, A.; Şahin, M.; Karagöz, T.; Dursun, A.

    2011-01-01

    Primary systemic carnitine deficiency (SCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by defective cellular carnitine transport. Patients usually present with predominant metabolic or cardiac manifestations. SCD is caused by mutations in the organic cation/carnitine transporter OCTN2 (SLC22A5) gene. Mutation analysis of SLC22A5 gene was carried out in eight Turkish patients from six families. Six patients presented with signs and symptoms of heart failure, cardiomyopathy, and low plasma carni...

  18. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies: how to identify candidate pathogenic mutations by mitochondrial DNA sequencing, MITOMASTER and phylogeny

    OpenAIRE

    Zaragoza, Michael V; Brandon, Martin C; Diegoli, Marta; Arbustini, Eloisa; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2010-01-01

    Pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations leading to mitochondrial dysfunction can cause cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Owing to a high mutation rate, mtDNA defects may occur at any nucleotide in its 16 569 bp sequence. Complete mtDNA sequencing may detect pathogenic mutations, which can be difficult to interpret because of normal ethnic/geographic-associated haplogroup variation. Our goal is to show how to identify candidate mtDNA mutations by sorting out polymorphisms using readily ...

  19. Obtaining insurance after DNA diagnostics: a survey among hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Christiaans, Imke; Kok, Tjitske M; van Langen, Irene M.; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with increased mortality. Disclosure of DNA test results may have social implications such as low access to insurance. In the Netherlands, insurance companies are restricted in the use of genetic information of their clients by the Medical Examination Act. A cross-sectional survey was used to assess the frequency and type of problems encountered by HCM mutation carriers applying for insurance, and associations w...

  20. A Heterozygous ZMPSTE24 Mutation Associated with Severe Metabolic Syndrome, Ectopic Fat Accumulation, and Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galant, Damien; Gaborit, Bénédicte; Desgrouas, Camille; Abdesselam, Ines; Bernard, Monique; Levy, Nicolas; Merono, Françoise; Coirault, Catherine; Roll, Patrice; Lagarde, Arnaud; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Bourgeois, Patrice; Dutour, Anne; Badens, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    ZMPSTE24 encodes the only metalloprotease, which transforms prelamin into mature lamin A. Up to now, mutations in ZMPSTE24 have been linked to Restrictive Dermopathy (RD), Progeria or Mandibulo-Acral Dysplasia (MAD). We report here the phenotype of a patient referred for severe metabolic syndrome and cardiomyopathy, carrying a mutation in ZMPSTE24. The patient presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome associating hypertriglyceridemia, early onset type 2 diabetes, and android obesity with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation but without subcutaneous lipoatrophy. Other clinical features included acanthosis nigricans, liver steatosis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and high myocardial and hepatic triglycerides content. Mutated fibroblasts from the patient showed increased nuclear shape abnormalities and premature senescence as demonstrated by a decreased Population Doubling Level, an increased beta-galactosidase activity and a decreased BrdU incorporation rate. Reduced prelamin A expression by siRNA targeted toward LMNA transcripts resulted in decreased nuclear anomalies. We show here that a central obesity without subcutaneous lipoatrophy is associated with a laminopathy due to a heterozygous missense mutation in ZMPSTE24. Given the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and android obesity in the general population, and in the absence of familial study, the causative link between mutation and phenotype cannot be formally established. Nevertheless, altered lamina architecture observed in mutated fibroblasts are responsible for premature cellular senescence and could contribute to the phenotype observed in this patient. PMID:27120622

  1. A mutation in the {beta}-myosin rod associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has an unexpected molecular phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armel, Thomas Z. [Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Leinwand, Leslie A., E-mail: leslie.leinwand@colorado.edu [Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common, autosomal dominant disorder primarily characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in youth. HCM is caused by mutations in several sarcomeric proteins, with mutations in MYH7, encoding {beta}-MyHC, being the most common. While many mutations in the globular head region of the protein have been reported and studied, analysis of HCM-causing mutations in the {beta}-MyHC rod domain has not yet been reported. To address this question, we performed an array of biochemical and biophysical assays to determine how the HCM-causing E1356K mutation affects the structure, stability, and function of the {beta}-MyHC rod. Surprisingly, the E1356K mutation appears to thermodynamically destabilize the protein, rather than alter the charge profile know to be essential for muscle filament assembly. This thermodynamic instability appears to be responsible for the decreased ability of the protein to form filaments and may be responsible for the HCM phenotype seen in patients.

  2. Three siblings of familial amyloid cardiomyopathy with isoleucine-50 transthyretin mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadamatsu, K; Hayashi, Y; Nakamura, M

    1997-09-19

    We herein describe three siblings with familial amyloid cardiomyopathy in a Japanese family, who demonstrated an Ile-50 mutation in the transthyretin gene. In their clinical course, the symptoms started at from 50 to 55 years of age, and two cases died within 5 years. However, one case is still alive seven years after onset probably due to either the implantation of a pacemaker for a complete atrio-ventricular block or the administration of dimethylsulphoxide. Based on our findings, some differences were observed not only in the mutation of the transthyretin gene but also in the clinical course between our cases and the previously reported cases. PMID:9314208

  3. Autosomal recessive transmission of MYBPC3 mutation results in malignant phenotype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilu Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM due to mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins is most commonly inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Since nearly 50% of HCM cases occur in the absence of a family history, a recessive inheritance pattern may be involved. METHODS: A pedigree was identified with suspected autosomal recessive transmission of HCM. Twenty-six HCM-related genes were comprehensively screened for mutations in the proband with targeted second generation sequencing, and the identified mutation was confirmed with bi-directional Sanger sequencing in all family members and 376 healthy controls. RESULTS: A novel missense mutation (c.1469G>T, p.Gly490Val in exon 17 of MYBPC3 was identified. Two siblings with HCM were homozygous for this mutation, whereas other family members were either heterozygous or wild type. Clinical evaluation showed that both homozygotes manifested a typical HCM presentation, but none of others, including 5 adult heterozygous mutation carriers up to 71 years of age, had any clinical evidence of HCM. CONCLUSIONS: Our data identified a MYBPC3 mutation in HCM, which appeared autosomal recessively inherited in this family. The absence of a family history of clinical HCM may be due to not only a de novo mutation, but also recessive mutations that failed to produce a clinical phenotype in heterozygous family members. Therefore, consideration of recessive mutations leading to HCM is essential for risk stratification and genetic counseling.

  4. Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency, caused by mutated COX6B1, is associated with encephalomyopathy, hydrocephalus and cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulhag, Ulla Najwa; Soiferman, Devorah; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Miller, Chaya; Shaag, Avraham; Elpeleg, Orly; Edvardson, Simon; Saada, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Isolated cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency is a prevalent cause of mitochondrial disease and is mostly caused by nuclear-encoded mutations in assembly factors while rarely by mutations in structural subunits. We hereby report a case of isolated COX deficiency manifesting with encephalomyopathy, hydrocephalus and hypertropic cardiomyopathy due to a missense p.R20C mutation in the COX6B1 gene, which encodes an integral, nuclear-encoded COX subunit. This novel mutation was predicted to be se...

  5. Correction of human phospholamban R14del mutation associated with cardiomyopathy using targeted nucleases and combination therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karakikes, Ioannis; Stillitano, Francesca; Nonnenmacher, Mathieu; Tzimas, Christos; Sanoudou, Despina; Termglinchan, Vittavat; Kong, Chi-Wing; Rushing, Stephanie; Hansen, Jens; Ceholski, Delaine; Kolokathis, Fotis; Kremastinos, Dimitrios; Katoulis, Alexandros; Ren, Lihuan; Cohen, Ninette; Gho, Johannes M. I. H.; Tsiapras, Dimitrios; Vink, Aryan; Wu, Joseph C.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Li, Ronald A.; Hulot, Jean-Sebastien; Kranias, Evangelia G.; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2015-01-01

    A number of genetic mutations is associated with cardiomyopathies. A mutation in the coding region of the phospholamban (PLN) gene (R14del) is identified in families with hereditary heart failure. Heterozygous patients exhibit left ventricular dilation and ventricular arrhythmias. Here we generate i

  6. A recessive homozygous p.Asp92Gly SDHD mutation causes prenatal cardiomyopathy and a severe mitochondrial complex II deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Charlotte L; Ceccatelli Berti, Camilla; Blakely, Emma L; Oláhová, Monika; He, Langping; McMahon, Colin J; Olpin, Simon E; Hargreaves, Iain P; Nolli, Cecilia; McFarland, Robert; Goffrini, Paola; O'Sullivan, Maureen J; Taylor, Robert W

    2015-08-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is a crucial metabolic enzyme complex that is involved in ATP production, playing roles in both the tricarboxylic cycle and the mitochondrial respiratory chain (complex II). Isolated complex II deficiency is one of the rarest oxidative phosphorylation disorders with mutations described in three structural subunits and one of the assembly factors; just one case is attributed to recessively inherited SDHD mutations. We report the pathological, biochemical, histochemical and molecular genetic investigations of a male neonate who had left ventricular hypertrophy detected on antenatal scan and died on day one of life. Subsequent postmortem examination confirmed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with left ventricular non-compaction. Biochemical analysis of his skeletal muscle biopsy revealed evidence of a severe isolated complex II deficiency and candidate gene sequencing revealed a novel homozygous c.275A>G, p.(Asp92Gly) SDHD mutation which was shown to be recessively inherited through segregation studies. The affected amino acid has been reported as a Dutch founder mutation p.(Asp92Tyr) in families with hereditary head and neck paraganglioma. By introducing both mutations into Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we were able to confirm that the p.(Asp92Gly) mutation causes a more severe oxidative growth phenotype than the p.(Asp92Tyr) mutant, and provides functional evidence to support the pathogenicity of the patient's SDHD mutation. This is only the second case of mitochondrial complex II deficiency due to inherited SDHD mutations and highlights the importance of sequencing all SDH genes in patients with biochemical and histochemical evidence of isolated mitochondrial complex II deficiency. PMID:26008905

  7. De novo RRAGC mutation activates mTORC1 signaling in syndromic fetal dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Pamela A; Zimmermann, Michael T; Kim, Maengjo; Evans, Jared M; Xu, Xiaolei; Olson, Timothy M

    2016-08-01

    Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a heritable, genetically heterogeneous disorder with variable age-dependent penetrance. We sought to identify the genetic underpinnings of syndromic, sporadic DCM in a newborn female diagnosed in utero. Postnatal evaluation revealed ventricular dilation and systolic dysfunction, bilateral cataracts, and mild facial dysmorphisms. Comprehensive metabolic and genetic testing, including chromosomal microarray, mitochondrial DNA and targeted RASopathy gene sequencing, and clinical whole exome sequencing for known cardiomyopathy genes was non-diagnostic. Following exclusion of asymptomatic DCM in the parents, trio-based whole exome sequencing was carried out on a research basis, filtering for rare, predicted deleterious de novo and recessive variants. An unreported de novo S75Y mutation was discovered in RRAGC, encoding Ras-related GTP binding C, an essential GTPase in nutrient-activated mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. In silico protein modeling and molecular dynamics simulation predicted the mutation to disrupt ligand interactions and increase the GDP-bound state. Overexpression of RagC(S75Y) rendered AD293 cells partially insensitive to amino acid deprivation, resulting in increased mTORC1 signaling compared to wild-type RagC. These findings implicate mTORC1 dysregulation through a gain-of-function mutation in RagC as a novel molecular basis for syndromic forms of pediatric heart failure, and expand genotype-phenotype correlation in RASopathy-related syndromes. PMID:27234373

  8. Molecular pathology of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutations in the cardiac myosin binding protein C gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, B.; French, J. A.; Carrier, L.; Jeremy, R W; McTaggart, D R; Nicholson, M R; Hambly, B; Semsarian, C; Richmond, D R; Schwartz, K.; Trent, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    DNA studies in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) have shown that it is caused by mutations in genes coding for proteins which make up the muscle sarcomere. The majority of mutations in the FHC genes result from missense changes, although one of the most recent genes to be identified (cardiac myosin binding protein C gene, MYBPC3) has predominantly DNA mutations which produce truncated proteins. Both dominant negative and haploinsufficiency models have been proposed to explain the mol...

  9. Correction of human phospholamban R14del mutation associated with cardiomyopathy using targeted nucleases and combination therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Karakikes, Ioannis; Stillitano, Francesca; Nonnenmacher, Mathieu; Tzimas, Christos; Sanoudou, Despina; Termglinchan, Vittavat; Kong, Chi-Wing; Rushing, Stephanie; Hansen, Jens; Ceholski, Delaine; Kolokathis, Fotis; Kremastinos, Dimitrios; Katoulis, Alexandros; Ren, Lihuan; Cohen, Ninette

    2015-01-01

    International audience A number of genetic mutations is associated with cardiomyopathies. A mutation in the coding region of the phospholamban (PLN) gene (R14del) is identified in families with hereditary heart failure. Heterozygous patients exhibit left ventricular dilation and ventricular arrhyth-mias. Here we generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a patient harbouring the PLN R14del mutation and differentiate them into cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs). We find that the PLN R14del...

  10. Mutation Glu82Lys in lamin A/C gene is associated with cardiomyopathy and conduction defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a form of heart muscle disease characterized by impaired systolic function and ventricular dilation. The mutations in lamin A/C gene have been linked to dilated cardiomyopathy. We screened genetic mutations in a large Chinese family of 50 members including members with dilated cardiomyopathy and found a Glu82Lys substitution mutation in the rod domain of the lamin A/C protein in eight family members, three of them have been diagnosed as dilated cardiomyopathy, one presented with heart dilation. The pathogenic mechanism of lamin A/C gene defect is poorly understood. Glu82Lys mutated lamin A/C and wild type protein was transfected into HEK293 cells. The mutated protein was not properly localized at the inner nuclear membrane and the emerin protein, which interacts with lamin A/C, was also aberrantly distributed. The nuclear membrane structure was disrupted and heterochromatin was aggregated aberrantly in the nucleus of the HEK293 cells stably transfected with mutated lamin A/C gene as determined by transmission electron microscopy

  11. The Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Myosin Mutation R453C Alters ATP Binding and Hydrolysis of Human Cardiac β-Myosin*

    OpenAIRE

    Bloemink, Marieke; Deacon, John; Langer, Stephen; Vera, Carlos; Combs, Ariana; Leinwand, Leslie; Geeves, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    The human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation R453C results in one of the more severe forms of the myopathy. Arg-453 is found in a conserved surface loop of the upper 50-kDa domain of the myosin motor domain and lies between the nucleotide binding pocket and the actin binding site. It connects to the cardiomyopathy loop via a long α-helix, helix O, and to Switch-2 via the fifth strand of the central β-sheet. The mutation is, therefore, in a position to perturb a wide range of myosin molecula...

  12. Genotype phenotype correlations of cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain mutations in Indian patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Taranjit Singh; Ahmad, Shamim; Bahl, Ajay; Ahuja, Monica; Ahluwalia, Tarun Veer Singh; Singh, Balvinder; Talwar, K K; Khullar, Madhu

    The aim of the current study was to determine the frequency of mutations in the beta-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) in a cohort of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and their families, and to investigate correlations between genotype and phenotype. About 130...... consecutive patients diagnosed with HCM or DCM (69 with HCM and 61 with DCM) attending the cardiology clinic of Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research were screened for mutations in the MYH7 gene. The control group for genetic studies consisted of 100 healthy subjects. We report 14...... mutations in 6 probands (5 probands in HCM and 1 proband in DCM) and their family members. Out of these 6 mutations, 3 are new and are being reported for the first time. One known mutation (p.Gly716Arg) was found to be "de novo" which resulted in severe asymmetric septal hypertrophy (31 mm) and resulted in...

  13. A novel mitochondrial ATP8 gene mutation in a patient with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, An I; Hogeveen, Marije; Nijtmans, Leo; van den Brand, Mariel; Janssen, Antoon; Diepstra, Heleen; van den Brandt, Frans; van den Heuvel, Bert; Hol, Frans; Hofste, Tom; Kapusta, Livia; Dillmann, U; Shamdeen, M; Smeitink, J; Smeitink, J; Rodenburg, Richard

    2009-01-01

    To identify the biochemical and molecular genetic defect in a 16-year-old patient presenting with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and neuropathy suspected for a mitochondrial disorder.Measurement of the mitochondrial energy-generating system (MEGS) capacity in muscle and enzyme analysis in muscle and fibroblasts were performed. Relevant parts of the mitochondrial DNA were analysed by sequencing.A homoplasmic nonsense mutation m.8529G→A (p.Trp55X) was found in the mitochondrial ATP8 gene in the patient's fibroblasts and muscle tissue. Reduced complex V activity was measured in the patient's fibroblasts and muscle tissue, and was confirmed in cybrid clones containing patient-derived mitochondrial DNAWe describe the first pathogenic mutation in the mitochondrial ATP8 gene, resulting in an improper assembly and reduced activity of the complex V holoenzyme. PMID:21686774

  14. "Myo-cardiomyopathy" is commonly associated with the A8344G "MERRF" mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catteruccia, Michela; Sauchelli, Donato; Della Marca, Giacomo; Primiano, Guido; Cuccagna, Cristina; Bernardo, Daniela; Leo, Milena; Camporeale, Antonella; Sanna, Tommaso; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Servidei, Serenella

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was to better characterize the clinical phenotype associated with the A8344G "MERRF" mutation of mitochondrial DNA. Fifteen mutated patients were extensively investigated. The frequency of main clinical features was: exercise intolerance and/or muscle weakness 67 %, respiratory involvement 67 %, lactic acidosis 67 %, cardiac abnormalities 53 %, peripheral neuropathy 47 %, myoclonus 40 %, epilepsy 40 %, ataxia 13 %. A restrictive respiratory insufficiency requiring ventilatory support was observed in about half of our patients. One patient developed a severe and rapidly progressive cardiomyopathy requiring cardioverter-defibrillator implantation. Five patients died of overwhelming, intractable lactic acidosis. Serial muscle MRIs identified a consistent pattern of muscle involvement and progression. Cardiac MRI showed non-ischemic late gadolinium enhancement in the left ventricle inferolateral part as early sign of myocardial involvement. Brain spectroscopy demonstrated increased peak of choline and reduction of N-acetylaspartate. Lactate was never detected in brain areas, while it could be documented in ventricles. We confirm that muscle involvement is the most frequent clinical feature associated with A8443G mutation. In contrast with previous reports, however, about half of our patients did not develop signs of CNS involvement even in later stages of the disease. The difference may be related to the infrequent investigation of A8344G mutation in 'pure' mitochondrial myo-cardiomyopathy, representing a bias and a possible cause of syndrome's underestimation. Our study highlights the importance of lactic acidosis and respiratory muscle insufficiency as critical prognostic factors. Muscle and cardiac MRI and brain spectroscopy may be useful tools in diagnosis and follow-up of MERRF. PMID:25559684

  15. A Fetus with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, Restrictive and Single Ventricle Physiology, and a β-Myosin Heavy Chain Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Hinton,Robert B; Michelfelder, Erik C.; Bradley S. Marino; Bove, Kevin E; Ware, Stephanie M.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a significant clinical problem associated with sudden death. A molecular taxonomy is emerging that is refining the clinical classification system. We describe a patient with a pathogenic familial β-myosin heavy chain mutation who was prenatally diagnosed with left ventricular hypoplasia and restrictive diastolic physiology.

  16. Quality of Life and Psychological Distress in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mutation Carriers: A Cross-Sectional Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Christiaans; I.M. van Langen; E. Birnie; G.J. Bonsel; A.A.M. Wilde; E.M.A. Smets

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with heart failure and sudden death. Quality of life and psychological distress were found to be impaired in HCM patients but have never been assessed in mutation carriers, with or without manifest HCM. We aimed to ass

  17. Exome sequencing of patients with histiocytoid cardiomyopathy reveals a de novo NDUFB11 mutation that plays a role in the pathogenesis of histiocytoid cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, Bahig M; Cundiff, Caitlin A; Lee, Kevin; Sabharwal, Ankit; Lalwani, Mukesh Kumar; Davis, Angela K; Agrawal, Vartika; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Iannucci, Glen J; Gibson, Greg

    2015-09-01

    Histiocytoid cardiomyopathy (Histiocytoid CM) is a rare form of cardiomyopathy observed predominantly in newborn females that is fatal unless treated early in life. We have performed whole exome sequencing on five parent-proband trios and identified nuclear-encoded mitochondrial protein mutations in three cases. The molecular genetic basis of Histiocytoid CM remains unknown despite several hypotheses in medical literature. The findings presented in this manuscript may represent components of genetic etiologies for this heterogeneous disease. Two probands had de novo non-sense mutations in the second exon of the X-linked nuclear gene NDUFB11. A third proband was doubly heterozygous for inherited rare variants in additional components of complex I, NDUFAF2 and NDUFB9, confirming that Histiocytoid CM is genetically heterogeneous. In a fourth case, the proband with Histiocytoid CM inherited a mitochondrial mutation from her heteroplasmic mother, as did her brother who presented with cardiac arrhythmia. Strong candidate recessive or compound heterozygous variants were not found for this individual or for the fifth case. Although NDUFB11 has not been implicated before in cardiac pathology, morpholino-mediated knockdown of ndufb11 in zebrafish embryos generated defective cardiac tissue with cardiomegaly, looping defects, and arrhythmia which suggests the role of NDUFB11 in the pathogenesis of this abnormal cardiac pathology. Taken together, the unbiased whole exome sequencing approach confirms the suspected genetic heterogeneity of Histiocytoid CM. Therefore, the novel NDUFB11 mutation may cause a complex 1 deficiency in synergy with additional unknown mtDNA variants. PMID:25921236

  18. An Indian family with an Emery-Dreifuss myopathy and familial dilated cardiomyopathy due to a novel LMNA mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushal B Jadhav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Emery-Dreifuss myopathy can be associated with a cardiomyopathy and cardiac dysrhythmias. The inheritance pattern of Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD is X linked, whereas EDMD2 is autosomal dominant. EDMD2 is caused by lamin A/C gene (LMNA mutations that produce alterations in the lamin proteins that are integral to nuclear and cell integrity. A 53-year-old man was brought to us with a right internal carotid artery dissection. Detailed work-up of the patient and family members revealed some unusual features, and genetic sequencing of the LMNA gene was undertaken. A novel mutation was identified in two of the samples sent for analysis. We present the first Indian family of EDMD2 with familial dilated cardiomyopathy and cardiac dysrhythmias in whom LMNA gene sequencing was performed. A novel mutation was identified and additional unusual clinical features were described.

  19. Truncating plakophilin-2 mutations in arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy are associated with protein haploinsufficiency in both myocardium and epidermis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torsten B; Nissen, Peter H; Palmfeldt, Johan;

    2014-01-01

    unrelated patients with AC identified 10 different PKP2 mutations in 12 index patients. One patient, heterozygous for a PKP2 nonsense mutation, developed severe heart failure and underwent cardiac transplantation. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry of the explanted heart showed a significant decrease......BACKGROUND: Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is a hereditary cardiac condition associated with ventricular arrhythmias, heart failure, and sudden death. The disease is most often caused by mutations in the desmosomal gene for plakophilin-2 (PKP2), which is expressed in both myocardial and...

  20. Dystrophin-Deficient Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamdar, Forum; Garry, Daniel J

    2016-05-31

    Dystrophinopathies are a group of distinct neuromuscular diseases that result from mutations in the structural cytoskeletal Dystrophin gene. Dystrophinopathies include Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy, as well as DMD and BMD female carriers. The primary presenting symptom in most dystrophinopathies is skeletal muscle weakness. However, cardiac muscle is also a subtype of striated muscle and is similarly affected in many of the muscular dystrophies. Cardiomyopathies associated with dystrophinopathies are an increasingly recognized manifestation of these neuromuscular disorders and contribute significantly to their morbidity and mortality. Recent studies suggest that these patient populations would benefit from cardiovascular therapies, annual cardiovascular imaging studies, and close follow-up with cardiovascular specialists. Moreover, patients with DMD and BMD who develop end-stage heart failure may benefit from the use of advanced therapies. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, cardiac involvement, and treatment of cardiomyopathy in the dystrophic patient. PMID:27230049

  1. The mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation associated to multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in a patient with Wolfram syndrome and cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezghani, Najla [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Mnif, Mouna [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna, E-mail: emna_mkaouar@mail2world.com [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Kallel, Nozha [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Salem, Ikhlass Haj [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Fakhfakh, Faiza [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We reported a patient with Wolfram syndrome and dilated cardiomyopathy. {yields} We detected the ND1 mitochondrial m.3337G>A mutation in 3 tested tissues (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). {yields} Long-range PCR amplification revealed the presence of multiple mitochondrial deletions in the skeletal muscle. {yields} The deletions remove several tRNA and protein-coding genes. -- Abstract: Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare hereditary disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). It is a heterogeneous disease and full characterization of all clinical and biological features of this disorder is difficult. The wide spectrum of clinical expression, affecting several organs and tissues, and the similarity in phenotype between patients with Wolfram syndrome and those with certain types of respiratory chain diseases suggests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) involvement in Wolfram syndrome patients. We report a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome including diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy and neurological complications. The results showed the presence of the mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation in almost homoplasmic form in 3 tested tissues of the proband (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). In addition, the long-range PCR amplifications revealed the presence of multiple deletions of the mitochondrial DNA extracted from the patient's skeletal muscle removing several tRNA and protein-coding genes. Our study reported a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy, in whom we detected the ND1 m.3337G>A mutation with mitochondrial multiple deletions.

  2. The mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation associated to multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in a patient with Wolfram syndrome and cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We reported a patient with Wolfram syndrome and dilated cardiomyopathy. → We detected the ND1 mitochondrial m.3337G>A mutation in 3 tested tissues (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). → Long-range PCR amplification revealed the presence of multiple mitochondrial deletions in the skeletal muscle. → The deletions remove several tRNA and protein-coding genes. -- Abstract: Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare hereditary disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). It is a heterogeneous disease and full characterization of all clinical and biological features of this disorder is difficult. The wide spectrum of clinical expression, affecting several organs and tissues, and the similarity in phenotype between patients with Wolfram syndrome and those with certain types of respiratory chain diseases suggests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) involvement in Wolfram syndrome patients. We report a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome including diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy and neurological complications. The results showed the presence of the mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation in almost homoplasmic form in 3 tested tissues of the proband (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). In addition, the long-range PCR amplifications revealed the presence of multiple deletions of the mitochondrial DNA extracted from the patient's skeletal muscle removing several tRNA and protein-coding genes. Our study reported a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy, in whom we detected the ND1 m.3337G>A mutation with mitochondrial multiple deletions.

  3. Diltiazem Treatment for Preclinical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mutation Carriers: A Pilot Randomized Trial to Modify Disease Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Carolyn Y.; Lakdawala, Neal K.; Cirino, Allison L.; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Sparks, Elizabeth; Abbasi, Siddique A.; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Antman, Elliott M.; Semsarian, Christopher; González, Arantxa; López, Begoña; Diez, Javier; Orav, E. John; Colan, Steven D.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is caused by sarcomere mutations and characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) with increased risk of heart failure and sudden death. HCM typically cannot be diagnosed early in life, although subtle phenotypes are present. Animal studies indicate alterations in intracellular calcium handling before LVH develops. Furthermore, early treatment with diltiazem appeared to attenuate disease emergence. Objectives To assess the safety, feasibility, and effect of diltiazem as disease-modifying therapy for at-risk HCM mutation carriers. Methods In a pilot, double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 38 sarcomere mutation carriers without LVH (mean age 15.8 years) to therapy with diltiazem 360 mg/day (or 5 mg/kg/day) or placebo. Treatment duration ranged from 12 to 42 months (median 25 months). Study procedures included electrocardiography, echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and serum biomarker measurement. Results Diltiazem was not associated with serious adverse events. Heart rate and blood pressure did not differ significantly between groups. However, mean left ventricular end diastolic diameter improved towards normal in the diltiazem group but decreased further in controls (change in z-scores, +0.6 vs. −0.5; P<0.001). Mean LV thickness-to-dimension ratio was stable in the diltiazem group, but increased in controls (−0.02 vs. +0.15; P=0.04). Among MYBPC3 mutation carriers, LV wall thickness and mass, diastolic filling, and cardiac troponin I levels improved in those taking diltiazem compared with controls. Four participants developed overt HCM, two in each treatment group. Conclusions Preclinical administration of diltiazem is safe and may improve early LV remodeling in HCM. This novel strategy merits further exploration. PMID:25543971

  4. Myocardial structural alteration and systolic dysfunction in preclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Hang Yiu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the presence of myocardial structural alterations and subtle myocardial dysfunction during familial screening in asymptomatic mutation carriers without hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM phenotype. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Sixteen HCM families with pathogenic mutation were studied and 46 patients with phenotype expression (Mut+/Phen+ and 47 patients without phenotype expression (Mut+/Phen- were observed. Twenty-five control subjects, matched with the Mut+/Phen- group, were recruited for comparison. Echocardiography was performed to evaluate conventional parameters, myocardial structural alteration by calibrated integrated backscatter (cIBS and global and segmental longitudinal strain by speckle tracking analysis. All 3 groups had similar left ventricular dimensions and ejection fraction. Basal anteroseptal cIBS was the highest in Mut+/Phen+ patients (-14.0±4.6 dB, p-19.0 dB basal anteroseptal cIBS or >-18.0% basal anteroseptal longitudinal strain had a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 72% in differentiating Mut+/Phen- group from controls. CONCLUSION: The use of cIBS and segmental longitudinal strain can differentiate HCM Mut+/Phen- patients from controls with important clinical implications for the family screening and follow-up of these patients.

  5. Connexin 43 remodeling induced by LMNA gene mutation Glu82Lys in familial dilated cardiomyopathy with atrial ventricular block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Li-ping; WANG Lin; WANG Hui; ZHANG Yin-hui; PU Jie-lin

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutations in the lamin A/C gene (LMNA) may cause familial dilated cardiomyopathy (dilated cardiomyopathy) characterized by early onset atrio-ventricular block (A-V block) before the manifestation of dilated cardiomyopathy and high risk of sudden death due to ventricular arrhythmia, which is very similar to the phenotype of gap junction related heart disease. This study aimed to determine the expression and localization of connexins in neonatal myocytes transfected with wild-type (WT) or mutant LMNA to elucidate how these mutations cause heart diseases. Methods We studied the connexin 43 (Cx43) and connexin 40 (Cx40) expression in cultured neonatal myocytes transfected with wild-type (WT) or mutant LMNA (Glu82Lys (E82K) and Arg644Cys (R644C) using confocal imaging and Western blotting analysis.Results Cx43 protein expression was reduced by 40% in cells transfected with LMNA E82K than that in cells transfected with WT LMNA cDNA. Confocal imaging showed that the Cx43 located inside the cells by LMNA E82K. By contrast, LMNA E82K mutation had no effect on expression and localization of Cx40. LMNA R644C transfection did not show any significant effects on gap junctions at all.Conclusions Our findings suggest that LMNA E82K significantly reduced the Cx43 expression and altered its localization which may be one of the pathological mechanisms underlying LMNA-related heart disease.

  6. R25G mutation in exon 1 of LMNA gene is associated with dilated cardiomyopathy and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Wo-liang; HUANG Wei-jun; HUANG Chun-yan; WANG Jing-feng; XIE Shuang-lun; NIE Ru-qiong; LIU Ying-mei; LIU Pin-ming; ZHOU Shu-xian; CHEN Su-qin

    2009-01-01

    Background Mutations of the LMNA gene encoding lamin A and C are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), conduction system defects and skeletal muscle dystrophy. Here we report a family with a mutation of the LMNA gene to identify the relationship between genotype and phenotype.Methods All 30 members of the family underwent clinical and genetic evaluation. A mutation analysis of the LMNA gene was performed. All of the 12 exons of LMNA gene were extended with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the PCR products were screened for gene mutation by direct sequencing.Results Ten members of the family had limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and 6 are still alive. Two patients suffered from DCM. Cardiac arrhythmias included atrioventricular block and atrial fibrillation; sudden death occurred in 2 patients. The pattern of inheritance was autosomal dominant. Mutation c.73C>G (R25G) in exon 1 encoding the globular domains was confirmed in all of the affected members, resulting in the conversion of arginine (Arg) to glycine (Gly). Conclusions The mutation R25G in exon 1 of LMNA gene we reported here in a Chinese family had a phenotype of malignant arrhythmia and mild LGMD, suggesting that patients with familial DCM, conduction system defects and skeletal muscle dystrophy should be screened by genetic testing for the LMNA gene.

  7. Identification of novel mutations including a double mutation in patients with inherited cardiomyopathy by a targeted sequencing approach using the Ion Torrent PGM system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Cao, Hong; Song, Yindi; Feng, Yue; Ding, Xiaoxue; Pang, Mingjie; Zhang, Yunmei; Zhang, Hong; Ding, Jiahuan; Xia, Xueshan

    2016-06-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathy is the major cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and heart failure (HF). The disease is associated with extensive genetic heterogeneity; pathogenic mutations in cardiac sarcomere protein genes, cytoskeletal protein genes and nuclear envelope protein genes have been linked to its etiology. Early diagnosis is conducive to clinical monitoring and allows for presymptomatic interventions as needed. In the present study, the entire coding sequences and flanking regions of 12 major disease (cardiomyopathy)-related genes [namely myosin, heavy chain 7, cardiac muscle, β (MYH7); myosin binding protein C, cardiac (MYBPC3); lamin A/C (LMNA); troponin I type 3 (cardiac) (TNNI3); troponin T type 2 (cardiac) (TNNT2); actin, α, cardiac muscle 1 (ACTC1); tropomyosin 1 (α) (TPM1); sodium channel, voltage gated, type V alpha subunit (SCN5A); myosin, light chain 2, regulatory, cardiac, slow (MYL2); myosin, heavy chain 6, cardiac muscle, α (MYH6); myosin, light chain 3, alkali, ventricular, skeletal, slow (MYL3); and protein kinase, AMP-activated, gamma 2 non-catalytic subunit  (PRKAG2)] in 8 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and in 8 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) were amplified and then sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) system. As a result, a novel heterozygous mutation (MYH7, p.Asn885Thr) and a variant of uncertain significance (TNNT2, p.Arg296His) were identified in 2 patients with HCM. These 2 missense mutations, which were absent in the samples obtained from the 200 healthy control subjects, altered the amino acid that was evolutionarily conserved among a number of vertebrate species; this illustrates that these 2 non-synonymous mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of HCM. Moreover, a double heterozygous mutation (PRKAG2, p.Gly100Ser plus MYH7, p.Arg719Trp) was identified in a patient with severe familial HCM, for the first time to the best of our

  8. A Novel Homoplasmic Mutation in mtDNA with a Single Evolutionary Origin as a Risk Factor for Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Wee Soo; Tanaka, Masashi; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Hemmi, Chieko; Toyo-oka, Teruhiko

    2000-01-01

    To clarify the relationship between variation in mtDNA and the development of cardiomyopathy (CM), the complete sequences of mtDNAs of two brothers with dilated CM were compared with those of 181 patients who had CM and with those of 168 control subjects. Five patients with CM shared a novel homoplasmic point mutation (G12192A tRNAHis), and all of them demonstrated the evolutionarily related D-loop sequence. The results suggest that this novel mutation originated from the same ancestor and th...

  9. Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilichou, Kalliopi; Thiene, Gaetano; Bauce, Barbara; Rigato, Ilaria; Lazzarini, Elisabetta; Migliore, Federico; Perazzolo Marra, Martina; Rizzo, Stefania; Zorzi, Alessandro; Daliento, Luciano; Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is a heart muscle disease clinically characterized by life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias and pathologically by an acquired and progressive dystrophy of the ventricular myocardium with fibro-fatty replacement. Due to an estimated prevalence of 1:2000-1:5000, AC is listed among rare diseases. A familial background consistent with an autosomal-dominant trait of inheritance is present in most of AC patients; recessive variants have also been reported, either or not associated with palmoplantar keratoderma and woolly hair. AC-causing genes mostly encode major components of the cardiac desmosome and up to 50% of AC probands harbor mutations in one of them. Mutations in non-desmosomal genes have been also described in a minority of AC patients, predisposing to the same or an overlapping disease phenotype. Compound/digenic heterozygosity was identified in up to 25% of AC-causing desmosomal gene mutation carriers, in part explaining the phenotypic variability. Abnormal trafficking of intercellular proteins to the intercalated discs of cardiomyocytes and Wnt/beta catenin and Hippo signaling pathways have been implicated in disease pathogenesis.AC is a major cause of sudden death in the young and in athletes. The clinical picture may include a sub-clinical phase; an overt electrical disorder; and right ventricular or biventricular pump failure. Ventricular fibrillation can occur at any stage. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies led to identify biventricular and dominant left ventricular variants, thus supporting the use of the broader term AC.Since there is no "gold standard" to reach the diagnosis of AC, multiple categories of diagnostic information have been combined and the criteria recently updated, to improve diagnostic sensitivity while maintaining specificity. Among diagnostic tools, contrast enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance is playing a major role in detecting left dominant forms of AC, even preceding morpho

  10. Correction of human phospholamban R14del mutation associated with cardiomyopathy using targeted nucleases and combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakikes, Ioannis; Stillitano, Francesca; Nonnenmacher, Mathieu; Tzimas, Christos; Sanoudou, Despina; Termglinchan, Vittavat; Kong, Chi-Wing; Rushing, Stephanie; Hansen, Jens; Ceholski, Delaine; Kolokathis, Fotis; Kremastinos, Dimitrios; Katoulis, Alexandros; Ren, Lihuan; Cohen, Ninette; Gho, Johannes M I H; Tsiapras, Dimitrios; Vink, Aryan; Wu, Joseph C; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Li, Ronald A; Hulot, Jean-Sebastien; Kranias, Evangelia G; Hajjar, Roger J

    2015-01-01

    A number of genetic mutations is associated with cardiomyopathies. A mutation in the coding region of the phospholamban (PLN) gene (R14del) is identified in families with hereditary heart failure. Heterozygous patients exhibit left ventricular dilation and ventricular arrhythmias. Here we generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a patient harbouring the PLN R14del mutation and differentiate them into cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs). We find that the PLN R14del mutation induces Ca(2+) handling abnormalities, electrical instability, abnormal cytoplasmic distribution of PLN protein and increases expression of molecular markers of cardiac hypertrophy in iPSC-CMs. Gene correction using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) ameliorates the R14del-associated disease phenotypes in iPSC-CMs. In addition, we show that knocking down the endogenous PLN and simultaneously expressing a codon-optimized PLN gene reverses the disease phenotype in vitro. Our findings offer novel strategies for targeting the pathogenic mutations associated with cardiomyopathies. PMID:25923014

  11. Gene expression patterns in transgenic mouse models of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutations in myosin regulatory light chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenrui; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Zhou, Zhiqun; Aguiar-Pulido, Vanessa; Narasimhan, Giri; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2016-07-01

    Using microarray and bioinformatics, we examined the gene expression profiles in transgenic mouse hearts expressing mutations in the myosin regulatory light chain shown to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We focused on two malignant RLC-mutations, Arginine 58→Glutamine (R58Q) and Aspartic Acid 166 → Valine (D166V), and one benign, Lysine 104 → Glutamic Acid (K104E)-mutation. Datasets of differentially expressed genes for each of three mutants were compared to those observed in wild-type (WT) hearts. The changes in the mutant vs. WT samples were shown as fold-change (FC), with stringency FC ≥ 2. Based on the gene profiles, we have identified the major signaling pathways that underlie the R58Q-, D166V- and K104E-HCM phenotypes. The correlations between different genotypes were also studied using network-based algorithms. Genes with strong correlations were clustered into one group and the central gene networks were identified for each HCM mutant. The overall gene expression patterns in all mutants were distinct from the WT profiles. Both malignant mutations shared certain classes of genes that were up or downregulated, but most similarities were noted between D166V and K104E mice, with R58Q hearts showing a distinct gene expression pattern. Our data suggest that all three HCM mice lead to cardiomyopathy in a mutation-specific manner and thus develop HCM through diverse mechanisms. PMID:26906074

  12. Retrospective molecular detection of Transthyretin Met 111 mutation in a Danish kindred with familial amyloid cardiomyopathy, using DNA from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordvåg, B Y; Ranløv, I; Riise, H M; Husby, G; el-Gewely, M R

    1993-10-01

    Severe familial amyloid cardiomyopathy (FAC) in a Danish kindred is associated with a specific mutation (Met for Leu 111) in the transthyretin (TTR) gene. The mutation causes the loss of a DdeI restriction site in the gene, allowing molecular diagnostic studies. We studied formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues, up to 39 years old, from 29 family members of this kindred. DNA was partially purified from deparaffinized tissue sections and a DNA sequence of the TTR gene flanking the mutation site was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by restriction enzyme analysis. Amplified DNA was obtained from tissues representing 23 of the 29 persons. Ten out of the 23 family members were found to carry the TTR Met 111 mutation, whereas 13 were not affected. The results were consistent with known clinical data and with corresponding serum TTR examinations. This retrospective study shows that archival tissues can be used to confirm the diagnosis and disease pattern in members of families affected by hereditary diseases. PMID:8406434

  13. Familial dilated cardiomyopathy associated with congenital defects in the setting of a novel VCL mutation (Lys815Arg in conjunction with a known MYPBC3 variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn S. Wells

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is a primary myocardial disorder characterized by ventricular chamber enlargement and systolic dysfunction. Twenty to fifty percent of idiopathic DCM cases are thought to have a genetic cause. Of more than 30 genes known to be associated with DCM, rare variants in the VCL and MYBPC3 genes have been reported in several cases of DCM. In this report, we describe a family with DCM and congenital abnormalities who carry a novel missense mutation in the VCL gene. More severely affected family members also possess a second missense variant in MYBPC3, raising the possibility that this variant may be a disease modifier. Intere - stingly, many of the affected individuals also have congenital defects, including two with bicuspid aortic valve with aortic regurgitation. We discuss the implications of the family history and genetic information on management of at-risk individuals with aortic regurgitation.

  14. Double heterozygosity for mutations in the β-myosin heavy chain and in the cardiac myosin binding protein C genes in a family with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Richard, P.; Isnard, R.; Carrier, L.; Dubourg, O.; Donatien, Y.; Mathieu, B.; Bonne, G.; Gary, F; Charron, P; HAGEGE, A.; Komajda, M; Schwartz, K.; Hainque, B

    1999-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal dominant disease, caused by mutations in several sarcomeric protein genes. So far, seven genes have been shown to be associated with the disease with the β-myosin heavy chain (MYH7) and the cardiac myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) genes being the most frequently involved.
We performed electrocardiography (ECG) and echocardiography in 15 subjects with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from a French Caribbean family. Genet...

  15. Mitochondrial 12S Ribosomal RNA A1555G Mutation Associated with Cardiomyopathy and Hearing Loss following High-Dose Chemotherapy and Repeated Aminoglycoside Exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Anne-Sofie; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Jensen, Tim;

    2014-01-01

    A 19-month-old girl with the A1555G mitochondrial mutation in the 12S ribosomal RNA gene and acute myelogenous leukemia developed dilated cardiomyopathy and bilateral sensorineural hearing loss before undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. She had received gentamicin during episodes of ...... febrile neutropenia. Testing for the A1555G mutation is recommended in patients frequently treated with aminoglycosides....

  16. A mutation in the human phospholamban gene, deleting arginine 14, results in lethal, hereditary cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Haghighi, Kobra; Kolokathis, Fotis; Gramolini, Anthony O.; Waggoner, Jason R.; Pater, Luke; Lynch, Roy A.; Fan, Guo-Chang; Tsiapras, Dimitris; Parekh, Rohan R.; Dorn, Gerald W., II; MacLennan, David H.; Kremastinos, Dimitrios Th; Kranias, Evangelia G.

    2006-01-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-cycling proteins are key regulators of cardiac contractility, and alterations in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-cycling properties have been shown to be causal of familial cardiomyopathies. Through genetic screening of dilated cardiomyopathy patients, we identified a previously uncharacterized deletion of arginine 14 (PLN-R14Del) in the coding region of the phospholamban (PLN) gene in a large family with hereditary heart failure. No homozygous individuals were ide...

  17. Recurrent missense mutations in TMEM43 (ARVD5) due to founder effects cause arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies in the UK and Canada

    KAUST Repository

    Haywood, Annika F M

    2012-11-15

    AimsAutosomal dominant arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) (in the group of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies) is a common cause of sudden cardiac death in young adults. It is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous, with 12 loci (ARVC/D1-12) and eight genes identified, the majority of which encode structural proteins of cardiac desmosomes. The most recent gene identified, TMEM43, causes disease due to a missense mutation in a non-desmosomal gene (p.S358L) in 15 extended families from Newfoundland, Canada. To determine whether mutations in TMEM43 cause ARVC/D and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy in other populations, we fully re-sequenced TMEM43 on 143 ARVC/D probands (families) from the UK and 55 probands (from 55 families) from Newfoundland.Methods and resultsBidirectional sequencing of TMEM43 including intron-exon boundaries revealed 33 variants, the majority located in non-coding regions of TMEM43. For the purpose of validation, families of probands with rare, potentially deleterious coding variants were subjected to clinical and molecular follow-up. Three missense variants of uncertain significance (p.R28W, p.E142K, p.R312W) were located in highly conserved regions of the TMEM43 protein. One variant (p.R312W) also co-segregated with relatives showing clinical signs of disease. Genotyping and expansion of the disease-associated haplotype in subjects with the p.R312W variant from Newfoundland, Canada, and the UK suggest common ancestry.ConclusionAlthough the p.R312W variant was found in controls (3/378), identification of an ancestral disease p R312W haplotype suggests that the p.R312W variant is a pathogenic founder mutation. © 2012 The Author.

  18. A novel mutation and first report of dilated cardiomyopathy in ALG6-CDG (CDG-Ic: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zagal Ahmad

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG are an expanding group of inherited metabolic diseases with multisystem involvement. ALG6-CDG (CDGIc is an endoplasmatic reticulum defect in N-glycan assembly. It is usually milder than PMM2-CDG (CDG-Ia and so is its natural course. It is characterized by psychomotor retardation, seizures, ataxia, and hypotonia. In contrast to PMM2-CDG (CDGIa, there is no cerebellar hypoplasia. Cardiomyopathy has been reported in a few CDG types and in a number of patients with unexplained CDG. We report an 11 year old Saudi boy with severe psychomotor retardation, seizures, strabismus, inverted nipples, dilated cardiomyopathy, and a type 1 pattern of serum transferrin isoelectrofocusing. Phosphomannomutase and phosphomannose isomerase activities were normal in fibroblasts. Full gene sequencing of the ALG6 gene revealed a novel mutation namely c.482A>G (p.Y161C and heterozygosity in the parents. This report highlights the importance to consider CDG in the differential diagnosis of unexplained cardiomyopathy.

  19. Vigorous physical activity impairs myocardial function in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and in mutation positive family members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saberniak, Jørg; Hasselberg, Nina E; Borgquist, Rasmus; Platonov, Pyotr G; Sarvari, Sebastian I; Smith, Hans-Jørgen; Ribe, Margareth; Holst, Anders G; Edvardsen, Thor; Haugaa, Kristina H

    2014-01-01

    patients and 45 mutation-positive family members. Athletes were defined as subjects with ≥4 h vigorous exercise/week [≥1440 metabolic equivalents (METs × minutes/week)] during a minimum of 6 years. Athlete definition was fulfilled in 37/110 (34%) subjects. We assessed right ventricular (RV) and left......AIMS: Exercise increases risk of ventricular arrhythmia in subjects with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). We aimed to investigate the impact of exercise on myocardial function in ARVC subjects. METHODS AND RESULTS: We included 110 subjects (age 42 ± 17 years), 65 ARVC...

  20. Stop-gain mutations in PKP2 are associated with a later age of onset of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Alcalde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC is a cardiac disease characterized by the presence of fibrofatty replacement of the right ventricular myocardium, which may cause ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Pathogenic mutations in several genes encoding mainly desmosomal proteins have been reported. Our aim is to perform genotype-phenotype correlations to establish the diagnostic value of genetics and to assess the role of mutation type in age-related penetrance in ARVC. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty unrelated Spanish patients underwent a complete clinical evaluation. They all were screened for PKP2, DSG2, DSC2, DSP, JUP and TMEM43 genes. A total of 70 relatives of four families were also studied. The 30 patients fulfilled definite disease diagnostic criteria. Genetic analysis revealed a pathogenic mutation in 19 patients (13 in PKP2, 3 in DSG2, 2 in DSP, and 1 in DSC2. Nine of these mutations created a truncated protein due to the generation of a stop codon. Familial assessment revealed 28 genetic carriers among family members. Stop-gain mutations were associated to a later age of onset of ARVC, without differences in the severity of the pathology. CONCLUSIONS: Familial genetic analysis helps to identify the cause responsible for the pathology. In discrepancy with previous studies, the presence of a truncating protein does not confer a worse severity. This information could suggest that truncating proteins may be compensated by the normal allele and that missense mutations may act as poison peptides.

  1. A family with a dystrophin gene mutation specifically affecting dystrophin expression in the heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muntoni, F.; Davies, K.; Dubowitz, V. [Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We recently described a family with X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy where a large deletion in the muscle promoter region of the dystrophin gene was associated with a severe dilated cardiomyopathy in absence of clinical skeletal muscle involvement. The deletion removed the entire muscle promoter region, the first muscle exon and part of intron 1. The brain and Purkinje cell promoters were not affected by the deletion. Despite the lack of both the muscle promoter and the first muscle exon, dystrophin was detected immunocytochemically in relative high levels in the skeletal muscle of the affected males. We have now found that both the brain and Purkinje cell promoters were transcribed at high levels in the skeletal muscle of these individuals. This phenomenon, that does not occur in normal skeletal muscle, indicates that these two isoforms, physiologically expressed mainly in the central nervous system, can be transcribed and be functionally active in skeletal muscle under specific circumstances. Contrary to what is observed in skeletal muscle, dystrophin was not detected in the heart of one affected male using immunocytochemistry and an entire panel of anti-dystrophin antibodies. This was most likely the cause for the pronounced cardiac fibrosis observed and eventually responsible for the severe cardiac involvement invariably seen in seven affected males. In conclusion, the mutation of the muscle promoter, first muscle exon and part of intron 1 specifically affected expression of dystrophin in the heart. We believe that this deletion removes sequences involved in regulation of dystrophin expression in the heart and are at the moment characterizing other families with X-linked cardiomyopathy secondary to a dystrophinopathy.

  2. A novel mitochondrial ATP8 gene mutation in a patient with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and neuropathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonckheere, A.I.; Hogeveen, M.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Brand, M.A.M. van den; Janssen, A.J.M.; Diepstra, J.H.S.; Brandt, FC van den; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Hol, F.A.; Hofste, T.G.; Kapusta, L.; Dillmann, U.; Shamdeen, M.G.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify the biochemical and molecular genetic defect in a 16-year-old patient presenting with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and neuropathy suspected for a mitochondrial disorder. METHODS: Measurement of the mitochondrial energy-generating system (MEGS) capacity in muscle and enzyme

  3. Obtaining insurance after DNA diagnostics: a survey among hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Christiaans; T.M. Kok; I.M. van Langen; E. Birnie; G.J. Bonsel; A.A.M. Wilde; E.M.A. Smets

    2010-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with increased mortality. Disclosure of DNA test results may have social implications such as low access to insurance. In the Netherlands, insurance companies are restricted in the use of genetic information of their c

  4. Genetic counseling and cardiac care in predictively tested hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers: The patients' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiaans, Imke; Van Langen, Irene M.; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with sudden cardiac death. Predictive genetic counseling and testing are performed using adapted Huntington guidelines, that is, psychosocial care and time for reflection are not obligatory and the test result can be d

  5. Genetic counseling and cardiac care in predictively tested hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers: The patients' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Christiaans; I.M. van Langen; E. Birnie; G.J. Bonsel; A.A.M. Wilde; E.M.A. Smets

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with sudden cardiac death. predictive genetic counseling and testing are performed using adapted Huntington guidelines, that is, psychosocial care and time for reflection are not obligatory and the test result can be d

  6. Obtaining insurance after DNA diagnostics : A survey among hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiaans, Imke; Kok, Tjitske M.; Van Langen, Irene M.; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with increased mortality. Disclosure of DNA test results may have social implications such as low access to insurance. In the Netherlands, insurance companies are restricted in the use of genetic information of their c

  7. Echocardiographic strain imaging to assess early and late consequences of sarcomere mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ho, Carolyn Y; Carlsen, Christian; Thune, Jens Jakob;

    2009-01-01

    overt disease despite normal ejection fraction. We propose that diastolic dysfunction is an early consequence of sarcomere mutations, whereas systolic dysfunction results from mutations combined with subsequent pathological remodeling. Identifying mechanistic pathways triggered by these mutations may...

  8. A novel LMNA mutation (R189W in familial dilated cardiomyopathy: evidence for a 'hot spot' region at exon 3: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biagini Andrea

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We describe a case of a patient with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and cardiac conduction abnormalities who presented a strong family history of sudden cardiac death. Genetic screening of lamin A/C gene revealed in proband the presence of a novel missense mutation (R189W, near the most prevalent lamin A/C mutation (R190W, suggesting a "hot spot" region at exon 3.

  9. Cardiac troponin structure-function and the influence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated mutations on modulation of contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuanhua; Regnier, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac troponin (cTn) acts as a pivotal regulator of muscle contraction and relaxation and is composed of three distinct subunits (cTnC: a highly conserved Ca(2+) binding subunit, cTnI: an actomyosin ATPase inhibitory subunit, and cTnT: a tropomyosin binding subunit). In this mini-review, we briefly summarize the structure-function relationship of cTn and its subunits, its modulation by PKA-mediated phosphorylation of cTnI, and what is known about how these properties are altered by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) associated mutations of cTnI. This includes recent work using computational modeling approaches to understand the atomic-based structural level basis of disease-associated mutations. We propose a viewpoint that it is alteration of cTnC-cTnI interaction (rather than the Ca(2+) binding properties of cTn) per se that disrupt the ability of PKA-mediated phosphorylation at cTnI Ser-23/24 to alter contraction and relaxation in at least some HCM-associated mutations. The combination of state of the art biophysical approaches can provide new insight on the structure-function mechanisms of contractile dysfunction resulting cTnI mutations and exciting new avenues for the diagnosis, prevention, and even treatment of heart diseases. PMID:26851561

  10. Exome sequencing identified mutations in CASK and MYBPC3 as the cause of a complex dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstein, Eyal; Tzur, Shay; Bormans, Concetta; Behar, Doron M

    2016-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing for clinical applications is now an integral part of medical genetics practice. Though most studies are performed in order to establish diagnoses in individuals with rare and clinically unrecognizable disorders, due to the constantly decreasing costs and commercial availability, whole-exome sequencing has gradually become the initial tool to study patients with clinically recognized disorders when more than one gene is responsible for the phenotype or in complex phenotypes, when variants in more than one gene can be the cause for the disease. Here we report a patient presenting with a complex phenotype consisting of severe, adult-onset, dilated cardiomyopathy, hearing loss and developmental delay, in which exome sequencing revealed two genetic variants that are inherited from a healthy mother: a novel missense variant in the CASK gene, mutations in which cause a spectrum of neurocognitive manifestations, and a second variant, in MYBPC3, that is associated with hereditary cardiomyopathy. We conclude that although the potential for co-occurrence of rare diseases is higher when analyzing undefined phenotypes in consanguineous families, it should also be given consideration in the genetic evaluation of complex phenotypes in non-consanguineous families. PMID:27173948

  11. Peripartum cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiomyopathy - peripartum ... Cardiomyopathy occurs when there is damage to the heart. As a result, the heart muscle becomes weak ... the lungs, liver, and other body systems. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a form of dilated cardiomyopathy in which ...

  12. No mutation but high mRNA expression of Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor was observed in both dilated and ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatrai, Eniko; Bedi, Katalin; Kovalszky, Ilona; Hartyanszky, Istvan; Laszik, Andras; Acsady, Gyorgy; Sotonyi, Peter; Hubay, Marta

    2011-10-10

    The most common causes of acute myocarditis and the possible consequence of dilated cardiomyopathy are virus infections. The receptor of the two most common viruses connected to these myocardial diseases was identified as Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor. The purpose of this study was to assess Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor mRNA expression in the myocardium and search for mutations in the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor gene to compare dilated, inflammatory and ischemic cardiomyopathy with control group. All the myocardial samples were obtained from 35 explanted hearts during heart transplantation, than DNA and RNA were isolated from the muscle samples. cDNA was generated from RNA using reverse transcription, and real-time PCR was performed with relative quantification by β-actin gene as endogenous control. Using DNA extracted from the myocardial samples, we sequenced all the seven exons of the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor gene. Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor mRNA expression was higher in both ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy groups than in inflammatory cardiomyopathy and healthy control groups. Sequencing of CAR gene showed no sign of mutation. Therefore, the sequences result of CAR exons did not show any mutation or polymorphism, that explains a determinant role of CAR in dilated or ischemic CM. Our results suggest that high mRNA expression of Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor may support its role in regeneration of the damaged myocardium rather than having any role in viral mediated heart disease. PMID:21641134

  13. Mutations affecting gyrase in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, J.K.; Cabrera-Juarez, E.; Albritton, W.L.; Spikes, D.; Mutschler, A.

    1985-11-01

    Mutants separately resistant to novobiocin, coumermycin, nalidixic acid, and oxolinic acid contained gyrase activity as measured in vitro that was resistant to the antibiotics, indicating that the mutations represented structural alterations of the enzyme. One Novr mutant contained an altered B subunit of the enzyme, as judged by the ability of a plasmid, pNov1, containing the mutation to complement a temperature-sensitive gyrase B mutation in Escherichia coli and to cause novobiocin resistance in that strain. Three other Novr mutations did not confer antibiotic resistance to the gyrase but appeared to increase the amount of active enzyme in the cell. One of these, novB1, could only act in cis, whereas a new mutation, novC, could act in trans. An RNA polymerase mutation partially substituted for the novB1 mutation, suggesting that novB1 may be a mutation in a promoter region for the B subunit gene. Growth responses of strains containing various combinations of mutations on plasmids or on the chromosome indicated that low-level resistance to novobiocin or coumermycin may have resulted from multiple copies of wild-type genes coding for the gyrase B subunit, whereas high-level resistance required a structural change in the gyrase B gene and was also dependent on alteration in a regulatory region. When there was mismatch at the novB locus, with the novB1 mutation either on a plasmid or the chromosome, and the corresponding wild-type gene present in trans, chromosome to plasmid recombination during transformation was much higher than when the genes matched, probably because plasmid to chromosome recombination, eliminating the plasmid, was inhibited by the mismatch.

  14. Cardiac MRI assessed left ventricular hypertrophy in differentiating hypertensive heart disease from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy attributable to a sarcomeric gene mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the value of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI)-assessed left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in differentiating between hypertensive heart disease and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). 95 unselected subjects with mild-to-moderate hypertension, 24 patients with HCM attributable to the D175N mutation of the α-tropomyosin gene and 17 control subjects were studied by cine CMRI. Left ventricular (LV) quantitative and qualitative characteristics were evaluated. LV maximal end-diastolic wall thickness, wall thickness-to-LV volume ratio, end-diastolic septum thickness and septum-to-lateral wall thickness ratio were useful measures for differentiating between LVH due to hypertension and HCM. The most accurate measure for identifying patients with HCM was the LV maximal wall thickness ≥17 mm, with a sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and accuracy of 90%, 93%, 86%, 95% and 91%, respectively. LV maximal wall thickness in the anterior wall, or regional bulging in left ventricular wall was found only in patients with HCM. LV mass index was not discriminant between patients with HCM and those with LVH due to hypertension. LV maximal thickness measured by CMRI is the best anatomical parameter in differentiating between LVH due to mild-to-moderate hypertension and HCM attributable to a sarcomeric mutation. CMRI assessment of location and quality of LVH is also of value in differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  15. Cardiac MRI assessed left ventricular hypertrophy in differentiating hypertensive heart disease from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy attributable to a sarcomeric gene mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipola, Petri [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Kuopio (Finland); Magga, Jarkko; Peuhkurinen, Keijo [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Medicine, Kuopio (Finland); Husso, Minna [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Jaeaeskelaeinen, Pertti; Kuusisto, Johanna [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Medicine, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, Heart Center, P.O. Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland)

    2011-07-15

    To evaluate the value of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI)-assessed left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in differentiating between hypertensive heart disease and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). 95 unselected subjects with mild-to-moderate hypertension, 24 patients with HCM attributable to the D175N mutation of the {alpha}-tropomyosin gene and 17 control subjects were studied by cine CMRI. Left ventricular (LV) quantitative and qualitative characteristics were evaluated. LV maximal end-diastolic wall thickness, wall thickness-to-LV volume ratio, end-diastolic septum thickness and septum-to-lateral wall thickness ratio were useful measures for differentiating between LVH due to hypertension and HCM. The most accurate measure for identifying patients with HCM was the LV maximal wall thickness {>=}17 mm, with a sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and accuracy of 90%, 93%, 86%, 95% and 91%, respectively. LV maximal wall thickness in the anterior wall, or regional bulging in left ventricular wall was found only in patients with HCM. LV mass index was not discriminant between patients with HCM and those with LVH due to hypertension. LV maximal thickness measured by CMRI is the best anatomical parameter in differentiating between LVH due to mild-to-moderate hypertension and HCM attributable to a sarcomeric mutation. CMRI assessment of location and quality of LVH is also of value in differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiomyopathy - restrictive; Infiltrative cardiomyopathy ... In a case of restrictive cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle is normal size or slightly enlarged. Most of the time, it also pumps normally. However, it does not ...

  17. Mutations in GTPBP3 Cause a Mitochondrial Translation Defect Associated with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Kopajtich, Robert; Nicholls, Thomas J.; Rorbach, Joanna; Metodiev, Metodi D.; Freisinger, Peter; Mandel, Hanna; Vanlander, Arnaud; Ghezzi, Daniele; Carrozzo, Rosalba; Taylor, Robert W.; Marquard, Klaus; Murayama, Kei; Wieland, Thomas; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Mayr, Johannes A.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory chain deficiencies exhibit a wide variety of clinical phenotypes resulting from defective mitochondrial energy production through oxidative phosphorylation. These defects can be caused by either mutations in the mtDNA or mutations in nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins. The underlying pathomechanisms can affect numerous pathways involved in mitochondrial physiology. By whole-exome and candidate gene sequencing, we identified 11 individuals from 9 families carrying comp...

  18. A Restrictive Cardiomyopathy Mutation in an Invariant Proline at the Myosin Head/Rod Junction Enhances Head Flexibility and Function, Yielding Muscle Defects in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achal, Madhulika; Trujillo, Adriana S; Melkani, Girish C; Farman, Gerrie P; Ocorr, Karen; Viswanathan, Meera C; Kaushik, Gaurav; Newhard, Christopher S; Glasheen, Bernadette M; Melkani, Anju; Suggs, Jennifer A; Moore, Jeffrey R; Swank, Douglas M; Bodmer, Rolf; Cammarato, Anthony; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2016-06-01

    An "invariant proline" separates the myosin S1 head from its S2 tail and is proposed to be critical for orienting S1 during its interaction with actin, a process that leads to muscle contraction. Mutation of the invariant proline to leucine (P838L) caused dominant restrictive cardiomyopathy in a pediatric patient (Karam et al., Congenit. Heart Dis. 3:138-43, 2008). Here, we use Drosophila melanogaster to model this mutation and dissect its effects on the biochemical and biophysical properties of myosin, as well as on the structure and physiology of skeletal and cardiac muscles. P838L mutant myosin isolated from indirect flight muscles of transgenic Drosophila showed elevated ATPase and actin sliding velocity in vitro. Furthermore, the mutant heads exhibited increased rotational flexibility, and there was an increase in the average angle between the two heads. Indirect flight muscle myofibril assembly was minimally affected in mutant homozygotes, and isolated fibers displayed normal mechanical properties. However, myofibrils degraded during aging, correlating with reduced flight abilities. In contrast, hearts from homozygotes and heterozygotes showed normal morphology, myofibrillar arrays, and contractile parameters. When P838L was placed in trans to Mhc(5), an allele known to cause cardiac restriction in flies, it did not yield the constricted phenotype. Overall, our studies suggest that increased rotational flexibility of myosin S1 enhances myosin ATPase and actin sliding. Moreover, instability of P838L myofibrils leads to decreased function during aging of Drosophila skeletal muscle, but not cardiac muscle, despite the strong evolutionary conservation of the P838 residue. PMID:27107639

  19. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy corresponds to a syndrome characterized by a transient myocardial dysfunction affecting the left ventricular apex that classically occurs after major physical or emotional stress (also called 'broken heart syndrome' or 'stress-induced cardiomyopathy'). The author describes the case of a patient with takotsubo cardiomyopathy induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage. (author)

  20. A Novel Mutation in the CYP11B1 Gene Causes Steroid 11β-Hydroxylase Deficient Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia with Reversible Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Alqahtani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH due to steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency is the second most common form of CAH, resulting from a mutation in the CYP11B1 gene. Steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency results in excessive mineralcorticoids and androgen production leading to hypertension, precocious puberty with acne, enlarged penis, and hyperpigmentation of scrotum of genetically male infants. In the present study, we reported 3 male cases from a Saudi family who presented with penile enlargement, progressive darkness of skin, hypertension, and cardiomyopathy. The elder patient died due to heart failure and his younger brothers were treated with hydrocortisone and antihypertensive medications. Six months following treatment, cardiomyopathy disappeared with normal blood pressure and improvement in the skin pigmentation. The underlying molecular defect was investigated by PCR-sequencing analysis of all coding exons and intron-exon boundary of the CYP11B1 gene. A novel biallelic mutation c.780 G>A in exon 4 of the CYP11B1 gene was found in the patients. The mutation created a premature stop codon at amino acid 260 (p.W260∗, resulting in a truncated protein devoid of 11β-hydroxylase activity. Interestingly, a somatic mutation at the same codon (c.779 G>A, p.W260∗ was reported in a patient with papillary thyroid cancer (COSMIC database. In conclusion, we have identified a novel nonsense mutation in the CYP11B1 gene that causes classic steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficient CAH. Cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure can be reversed by early diagnosis and treatment.

  1. A Novel Mutation in the CYP11B1 Gene Causes Steroid 11β-Hydroxylase Deficient Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia with Reversible Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Mohammad A; Shati, Ayed A; Zou, Minjing; Alsuheel, Ali M; Alhayani, Abdullah A; Al-Qahtani, Saleh M; Gilban, Hessa M; Meyer, Brain F; Shi, Yufei

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency is the second most common form of CAH, resulting from a mutation in the CYP11B1 gene. Steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency results in excessive mineralcorticoids and androgen production leading to hypertension, precocious puberty with acne, enlarged penis, and hyperpigmentation of scrotum of genetically male infants. In the present study, we reported 3 male cases from a Saudi family who presented with penile enlargement, progressive darkness of skin, hypertension, and cardiomyopathy. The elder patient died due to heart failure and his younger brothers were treated with hydrocortisone and antihypertensive medications. Six months following treatment, cardiomyopathy disappeared with normal blood pressure and improvement in the skin pigmentation. The underlying molecular defect was investigated by PCR-sequencing analysis of all coding exons and intron-exon boundary of the CYP11B1 gene. A novel biallelic mutation c.780 G>A in exon 4 of the CYP11B1 gene was found in the patients. The mutation created a premature stop codon at amino acid 260 (p.W260 (∗) ), resulting in a truncated protein devoid of 11β-hydroxylase activity. Interestingly, a somatic mutation at the same codon (c.779 G>A, p.W260 (∗) ) was reported in a patient with papillary thyroid cancer (COSMIC database). In conclusion, we have identified a novel nonsense mutation in the CYP11B1 gene that causes classic steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficient CAH. Cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure can be reversed by early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26265915

  2. A Mitochondrial DNA A8701G Mutation Associated with Maternally Inherited Hypertension and Dilated Cardiomyopathy in a Chinese Pedigree of a Consanguineous Marriage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Zhu; Xiang Gu; Chao Xu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases, including dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and hypertension, are the leading cause of death worldwide.The role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the pathogenesis of these diseases has not been completely clarified.In this study, we evaluate whether A8701G mutation is associated with maternally inherited hypertension and DCM in a Chinese pedigree of a consanguineous marriage.Methods: Fourteen subjects in a three-generation Han Chinese family with hypertension and DCM, in which consanguineous marriage was present in the parental generation, were interviewed.We divided all the family members into case (7 maternal members) and control group (7 nonmaternal members) for comparison.Clinical evaluations and sequence analysis ofmtDNA were obtained from all participants.Frequency differences between maternal and nonmaternal members were tested to locate the disease-associated mutations.Results: The majority of the family members presented with a maternal inheritance of hypertension and DCM.Sequence analysis of mtDNA in this pedigree identified eight mtDNA mutations.Among the mutations identified, there was only one significant mutation: A8701G (P =0.005), which is a homoplasmic mitochondrial missense mutation in all the matrilineal relatives.There was no clear evidence for any synergistic effects between A8701G and other mutations.Conclusions: A8701G mutation may act as an inherited risk factor for the matrilineal transmission of hypertension and DCM in conj unction with genetic disorders caused by consanguineous marriage.

  3. Maternally inherited cardiomyopathy and hearing loss associated with a novel mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA{sup Lys} gene (G8363A)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santorelli, F.M.; Mak, Suk-Chun; El-Schahawi, M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    A novel G8363A mutation in the mtDNA tRNA{sup Lys} gene was associated, in two unrelated families, with a syndrome consisting of encephalomyopathy, sensorineural hearing loss, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Muscle biopsies from the probands showed mitochondrial proliferation and partial defects of complexes I, III, and IV of the electron-transport chain. The G8363A mutation was very abundant (>95%) in muscle samples from the probands and was less copious in blood from 18 maternal relatives (mean 81.3% {plus_minus} 8.5%). Single-muscle-fiber analysis showed significantly higher levels of mutant genomes in cytochrome c oxidase-negative fibers than in cytochrome c oxidase-positive fibers. The mutation was not found in >200 individuals, including normal controls and patients with other mitochondrial encephalomyopathies, thus fulfilling accepted criteria for pathogenicity. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Echocardiography and cardiac MRI in mutation-negative hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in an older patient: a case defining the need for ICD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Fatima; Degnan, Kathleen O; Seidman, Christine E; Mangion, Judy R

    2014-08-01

    We report the case of a 67-year-old man with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who presented for a second opinion about implantable cardio-defibrillator (ICD) placement after a witnessed syncopal episode. Despite his older age, being mutation-negative, and having a maximal septal thickness of 2.2 cm on echocardiography, he demonstrated rapid progression of myocardial fibrosis on cardiac MRI, correlating to ventricular tachyarrhythmias and syncope. We review the role of echocardiography and cardiac MRI in optimizing medical care for such patients who may not otherwise meet criteria for an ICD placement or further interventions. PMID:24816179

  5. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of LmnaH222P/H222P mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in LmnaH222P/H222P mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male LmnaH222P/H222P mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of LmnaH222P/H222P mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left ventricular fractional

  6. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muchir, Antoine, E-mail: a.muchir@institut-myologie.org [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Wu, Wei [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Sera, Fusako; Homma, Shunichi [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Worman, Howard J., E-mail: hjw14@columbia.edu [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left

  7. Large-scale mapping of mutations affecting zebrafish development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuhauss Stephan C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale mutagenesis screens in the zebrafish employing the mutagen ENU have isolated several hundred mutant loci that represent putative developmental control genes. In order to realize the potential of such screens, systematic genetic mapping of the mutations is necessary. Here we report on a large-scale effort to map the mutations generated in mutagenesis screening at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology by genome scanning with microsatellite markers. Results We have selected a set of microsatellite markers and developed methods and scoring criteria suitable for efficient, high-throughput genome scanning. We have used these methods to successfully obtain a rough map position for 319 mutant loci from the Tübingen I mutagenesis screen and subsequent screening of the mutant collection. For 277 of these the corresponding gene is not yet identified. Mapping was successful for 80 % of the tested loci. By comparing 21 mutation and gene positions of cloned mutations we have validated the correctness of our linkage group assignments and estimated the standard error of our map positions to be approximately 6 cM. Conclusion By obtaining rough map positions for over 300 zebrafish loci with developmental phenotypes, we have generated a dataset that will be useful not only for cloning of the affected genes, but also to suggest allelism of mutations with similar phenotypes that will be identified in future screens. Furthermore this work validates the usefulness of our methodology for rapid, systematic and inexpensive microsatellite mapping of zebrafish mutations.

  8. Pediatric Cardiomyopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Pediatric Cardiomyopathies Updated:Oct 22,2015 Patient education material ... oxygen or high blood pressure. According to the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry, one in every 100,000 children ...

  9. Dilated cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiomyopathy - dilated ... The most common causes of dilated cardiomyopathy are: Heart disease caused by a narrowing of the arteries Poorly controlled high blood pressure There are many other causes of dilated ...

  10. A Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Identify Gene Mutations in Early- and Late-Onset Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients of an Italian Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubattu, Speranza; Bozzao, Cristina; Pennacchini, Ermelinda; Pagannone, Erika; Musumeci, Beatrice Maria; Piane, Maria; Germani, Aldo; Savio, Camilla; Francia, Pietro; Volpe, Massimo; Autore, Camillo; Chessa, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of sarcomere protein genes in patients fulfilling the clinical diagnostic criteria for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) identifies a disease-causing mutation in 35% to 60% of cases. Age at diagnosis and family history may increase the yield of mutations screening. In order to assess whether Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) may fulfil the molecular diagnostic needs in HCM, we included 17 HCM-related genes in a sequencing panel run on PGM IonTorrent. We selected 70 HCM patients, 35 with early (≤25 years) and 35 with late (≥65 years) diagnosis of disease onset. All samples had a 98.6% average of target regions, with coverage higher than 20× (mean coverage 620×). We identified 41 different mutations (seven of them novel) in nine genes: MYBPC3 (17/41 = 41%); MYH7 (10/41 = 24%); TNNT2, CAV3 and MYH6 (3/41 = 7.5% each); TNNI3 (2/41 = 5%); GLA, MYL2, and MYL3 (1/41=2.5% each). Mutation detection rate was 30/35 (85.7%) in early-onset and 8/35 (22.9%) in late-onset HCM patients, respectively (p NGS revealed higher mutations yield in patients with early onset and with a family history of HCM. Appropriate patient selection can increase the yield of genetic testing and make diagnostic testing cost-effective. PMID:27483260

  11. A Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Identify Gene Mutations in Early- and Late-Onset Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients of an Italian Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubattu, Speranza; Bozzao, Cristina; Pennacchini, Ermelinda; Pagannone, Erika; Musumeci, Beatrice Maria; Piane, Maria; Germani, Aldo; Savio, Camilla; Francia, Pietro; Volpe, Massimo; Autore, Camillo; Chessa, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of sarcomere protein genes in patients fulfilling the clinical diagnostic criteria for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) identifies a disease-causing mutation in 35% to 60% of cases. Age at diagnosis and family history may increase the yield of mutations screening. In order to assess whether Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) may fulfil the molecular diagnostic needs in HCM, we included 17 HCM-related genes in a sequencing panel run on PGM IonTorrent. We selected 70 HCM patients, 35 with early (≤25 years) and 35 with late (≥65 years) diagnosis of disease onset. All samples had a 98.6% average of target regions, with coverage higher than 20× (mean coverage 620×). We identified 41 different mutations (seven of them novel) in nine genes: MYBPC3 (17/41 = 41%); MYH7 (10/41 = 24%); TNNT2, CAV3 and MYH6 (3/41 = 7.5% each); TNNI3 (2/41 = 5%); GLA, MYL2, and MYL3 (1/41=2.5% each). Mutation detection rate was 30/35 (85.7%) in early-onset and 8/35 (22.9%) in late-onset HCM patients, respectively (p NGS revealed higher mutations yield in patients with early onset and with a family history of HCM. Appropriate patient selection can increase the yield of genetic testing and make diagnostic testing cost-effective. PMID:27483260

  12. Quality of life and psychological distress in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers: A cross-sectional cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiaans, Imke; Van Langen, Irene M.; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Smets, Ellen M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with heart failure and sudden death.Quality of life and psychological distress were found to be impaired in HCM patients but have never been assessed in mutationcarriers, with or without manifest HCM. We aimed to asses

  13. Calcium Ions in Inherited Cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Angelidis, Christos; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Bouras, Georgios; Davlouros, Periklis; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Goudevenos, John; Cleman, Michael W; Lekakis, John

    2016-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies are a known cause of heart failure, although the pathways and mechanisms leading from mutation to the heart failure phenotype have not been elucidated. There is strong evidence that this transition is mediated, at least in part, by abnormal intracellular Ca(2+) handling, a key ion in ventricular excitation, contraction and relaxation. Studies in human myocytes, animal models and in vitro reconstituted contractile protein complexes have shown consistent correlations between Ca(2+) sensitivity and cardiomyopathy phenotype, irrespective of the causal mutation. In this review we present the available data about the connection between mutations linked to familial hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM) and restrictive (RCM) cardiomyopathy, right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) as well as left ventricular non-compaction and the increase or decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity, together with the results of attempts to reverse the manifestation of heart failure by manipulating Ca(2+) homeostasis. PMID:26411603

  14. DNA analysis in inherited cardiomyopathies : Current status and clinical relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y.; Van den Berg, Maarten P.; Van Tintelen, J. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Most hypertrophic cardiomyopathies and a subset of dilated and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathies are familial diseases. They generally show an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and have underlying mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric, cytoskeletal, nuclear envelope, and des

  15. The study of mutations presence in exons 27 and 29 of MYBPC3 gene by PCR-SSCP/HA method in patients with hypertrophy cardiomyopathy in Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari province

    OpenAIRE

    Saeidi M; Doosti A; Parchami Bajue S; Hashemzadeh Chaleshtori M

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Hypertrophy cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common type of heart disease with monogenic inheritance distinguished by thickening of left ventricle, contractile dysfunction and potentially fatal arrhythmias. Great progress in clarifying the genetic basis of HCM obtained. It was identified more than 900 unique mutations in 20 genes. Mutations in the gene MYBPC3 (which encodes the cardiac Myosin binding protein C) are about 40% of clinical cases. This study aimed to investig...

  16. The LMNA mutation p.Arg321Ter associated with dilated cardiomyopathy leads to reduced expression and a skewed ratio of lamin A and lamin C proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease of the heart muscle characterized by cardiac chamber enlargement and reduced systolic function of the left ventricle. Mutations in the LMNA gene represent the most frequent known genetic cause of DCM associated with disease of the conduction systems. The LMNA gene generates two major transcripts encoding the nuclear lamina major components lamin A and lamin C by alternative splicing. Both haploinsuffiency and dominant negative effects have been proposed as disease mechanism for premature termination codon (PTC) mutations in LMNA. These mechanisms however are still not clearly established. In this study, we used a representative LMNA nonsense mutation, p.Arg321Ter, to shed light on the molecular disease mechanisms. Cultured fibroblasts from three DCM patients carrying this mutation were analyzed. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and sequencing of these PCR products indicated that transcripts from the mutant allele were degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) mechanism. The fact that no truncated mutant protein was detectable in western blot (WB) analysis strengthens the notion that the mutant transcript is efficiently degraded. Furthermore, WB analysis showed that the expression of lamin C protein was reduced by the expected approximately 50%. Clearly decreased lamin A and lamin C levels were also observed by immunofluorescence microscopy analysis. However, results from both WB and nano-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry demonstrated that the levels of lamin A protein were more reduced suggesting an effect on expression of lamin A from the wild type allele. PCR analysis of the ratio of lamin A to lamin C transcripts showed unchanged relative amounts of lamin A transcript suggesting that the effect on the wild type allele was operative at the protein level. Immunofluorescence microscopy analysis showed no abnormal nuclear morphology of patient fibroblast cells. Based on these data, we propose that

  17. The LMNA mutation p.Arg321Ter associated with dilated cardiomyopathy leads to reduced expression and a skewed ratio of lamin A and lamin C proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Saaidi, Rasha [Research Unit for Molecular Medicine, Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Rasmussen, Torsten B. [Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Palmfeldt, Johan [Research Unit for Molecular Medicine, Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Nissen, Peter H. [Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Beqqali, Abdelaziz [Heart Failure Research Center, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hansen, Jakob [Department of Forensic Medicine, Bioanalytical Unit, University of Aarhus (Denmark); Pinto, Yigal M. [Heart Failure Research Center, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boesen, Thomas [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, University of Aarhus (Denmark); Mogensen, Jens [Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Bross, Peter, E-mail: peter.bross@ki.au.dk [Research Unit for Molecular Medicine, Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2013-11-15

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease of the heart muscle characterized by cardiac chamber enlargement and reduced systolic function of the left ventricle. Mutations in the LMNA gene represent the most frequent known genetic cause of DCM associated with disease of the conduction systems. The LMNA gene generates two major transcripts encoding the nuclear lamina major components lamin A and lamin C by alternative splicing. Both haploinsuffiency and dominant negative effects have been proposed as disease mechanism for premature termination codon (PTC) mutations in LMNA. These mechanisms however are still not clearly established. In this study, we used a representative LMNA nonsense mutation, p.Arg321Ter, to shed light on the molecular disease mechanisms. Cultured fibroblasts from three DCM patients carrying this mutation were analyzed. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and sequencing of these PCR products indicated that transcripts from the mutant allele were degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) mechanism. The fact that no truncated mutant protein was detectable in western blot (WB) analysis strengthens the notion that the mutant transcript is efficiently degraded. Furthermore, WB analysis showed that the expression of lamin C protein was reduced by the expected approximately 50%. Clearly decreased lamin A and lamin C levels were also observed by immunofluorescence microscopy analysis. However, results from both WB and nano-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry demonstrated that the levels of lamin A protein were more reduced suggesting an effect on expression of lamin A from the wild type allele. PCR analysis of the ratio of lamin A to lamin C transcripts showed unchanged relative amounts of lamin A transcript suggesting that the effect on the wild type allele was operative at the protein level. Immunofluorescence microscopy analysis showed no abnormal nuclear morphology of patient fibroblast cells. Based on these data, we propose that

  18. The classical pink-eyed dilution mutation affects angiogenic responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Michael S; Boyartchuk, Victor; Rohan, Richard M; Birsner, Amy E; Dietrich, William F; D'Amato, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the process by which new blood vessels are formed from existing vessels. Mammalian populations, including humans and mice, harbor genetic variations that alter angiogenesis. Angiogenesis-regulating gene variants can result in increased susceptibility to multiple angiogenesis-dependent diseases in humans. Our efforts to dissect the complexity of the genetic diversity that regulates angiogenesis have used laboratory animals due to the availability of genome sequence for many species and the ability to perform high volume controlled breeding. Using the murine corneal micropocket assay, we have observed more than ten-fold difference in angiogenic responsiveness among various mouse strains. This degree of difference is observed with either bFGF or VEGF induced corneal neovascularization. Ongoing mapping studies have identified multiple loci that affect angiogenic responsiveness in several mouse models. In this study, we used F2 intercrosses between C57BL/6J and the 129 substrains 129P1/ReJ and 129P3/J, as well as the SJL/J strain, where we have identified new QTLs that affect angiogenic responsiveness. In the case of AngFq5, on chromosome 7, congenic animals were used to confirm the existence of this locus and subcongenic animals, combined with a haplotype-based mapping approach that identified the pink-eyed dilution mutation as a candidate polymorphism to explain AngFq5. The ability of mutations in the pink-eyed dilution gene to affect angiogenic response was demonstrated using the p-J allele at the same locus. Using this allele, we demonstrate that pink-eyed dilution mutations in Oca2 can affect both bFGF and VEGF-induced corneal angiogenesis. PMID:22615734

  19. Identification of the Syrian hamster cardiomyopathy gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, V; Okazaki, Y; Belsito, A; Piluso, G; Matsuda, Y; Politano, L; Nigro, G; Ventura, C; Abbondanza, C; Molinari, A M; Acampora, D; Nishimura, M; Hayashizaki, Y; Puca, G A

    1997-04-01

    The BIO14.6 hamster is a widely used model for autosomal recessive cardiomyopathy. These animals die prematurely from progressive myocardial necrosis and heart failure. The primary genetic defect leading to the cardiomyopathy is still unknown. Recently, a genetic linkage map localized the cardiomyopathy locus on hamster chromosome 9qa2.1-b1, excluding several candidate genes. We now demonstrate that the cardiomyopathy results from a mutation in the delta-sarcoglycan gene that maps to the disease locus. This mutation was completely coincident with the disease in backcross and F2 pedigrees. This constitutes the first animal model identified for human sarcoglycan disorders. PMID:9097966

  20. Genotype-phenotype correlation between the cardiac myosin binding protein C mutation A31P and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a cohort of Maine Coon cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granström, S; Godiksen, M T N; Christiansen, M;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A missense mutation (A31P) in the cardiac myosin binding protein C gene has been associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) in Maine Coon cats. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of A31P on development of HCM, myocardial diastolic dysfunction detected by color...... tissue Doppler imaging and occurrence of cardiac death during longitudinal follow-up in a cohort of Maine Coon cats. ANIMALS: The original cohort comprised 282 cats (158 of wild-type genotype, 99 heterozygous for A31P and 25 homozygous for A31P). METHODS: Prospective longitudinal study including...... echocardiography and registration of survival. RESULTS: The median age at the initial examination was 1.7 years (range, 0.8-9.2 years) and 6.4% (18/282) of the cats were diagnosed with HCM. One hundred sixty-five cats were eligible for echocardiographic re-examination, and during an average follow-up period of 2...

  1. Novel Phenotype–Genotype Correlations of Restrictive Cardiomyopathy With Myosin-Binding Protein C (MYBPC3) Gene Mutations Tested by Next-Generation Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Wei; Lu, Chao-Xia; Wang, Yi-Ning; Liu, Fang; Chen, Wei; Liu, Yong-Tai; Han, Ye-Chen; Cao, Jian; Zhang, Shu-Yang; Zhang, Xue

    2015-01-01

    Background MYBPC3 dysfunctions have been proven to induce dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and/or left ventricular noncompaction; however, the genotype–phenotype correlation between MYBPC3 and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) has not been established. The newly developed next-generation sequencing method is capable of broad genomic DNA sequencing with high throughput and can help explore novel correlations between genetic variants and cardiomyopathies. Methods and Results ...

  2. Dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide techniques are easily obtainable, noninvasive examinations that provide useful information in the evaluation, diagnosis and management of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. The gated blood pool scan allows the assessment of ventricular size, configuration, and wall and septal thickness. These data allow the functional class of the cardiomyopathy (congestive, restrictive or hypertrophic) to be defined. Often THallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging adds further information and is particularly useful in distinguishing congestive cardiomyopathy from severe coronary artery disease and in depicting septal abnormalities in hipertrophic cardiomyopathy. Useful as these techniques are, they are not substitutes for conventional approaches to diagnosis. Careful history taking and physical examination, as well as scrutiny of the electrocardiogram, chest X-ray and echocardiogram should be standard practice for the evaluation of patients with suspected cardiomyopathy. Judicious use of noninvasive techniques may obviate the need for cardiac catheterization in many patients

  3. Comparative cardiac pathological changes of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) affected with heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI), cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) and pancreas disease (PD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yousaf, Muhammad Naveed; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Skjødt, Karsten;

    2013-01-01

    The heart is considered the powerhouse of the cardiovascular system. Heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI), cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) and pancreas disease (PD) are cardiac diseases of marine farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) which commonly affect the heart in addition to the skeletal...... muscle, liver and pancreas. The main findings of these diseases are necrosis and inflammatory cells infiltrates affecting different regions of the heart. In order to better characterize the cardiac pathology, study of the inflammatory cell characteristics and cell cycle protein expression was undertaken...

  4. Private Mitochondrial DNA Variants in Danish Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Havndrup, Ole; Hedley, Paula L.; Jensen, Morten K.; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Pham, Tam T.; Bundgaard, Henning; Christiansen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic cardiac disease primarily caused by mutations in genes coding for sarcomeric proteins. A molecular-genetic etiology can be established in ~60% of cases. Evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups are susceptibility factors for HCM. Several polymorphic mtDNA variants are associated with a variety of late-onset degenerative diseases and affect mitochondrial function. We examined the role of private, non-haplogroup associated, mi...

  5. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennira, S; Demiraj, A; Khouaja, A; Boujnah, M R

    2006-10-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare and under recognized form of dilated cardiomyopathy, defined as a heart failure in the last month of pregnancy or in the first five months post-partum with absence of determinable cause for cardiac failure and absence of demonstrable heart disease. The incidence of peripartum cardiomyopathy ranges from 1 in 1300 to 1 in 15,000 pregnancy. Advanced maternal age, multiparity, twin births, preeclampsia and black race are known risk factors. The etiology of peripartum cardiomyopathy remains unknown but viral, autoimmune or idiopathic myocarditis are highly suggested. The clinical presentation on patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy is similar to that of patients with systolic heart failure. The treatment is based on drugs for sympyomatic control. Studies in graeter populations are need to determine the role of immunosupressive treatment. About half patients of peripartum cardiomyopathy recover. The left ventricular ejection fraction and the left ventricular end-diastolic diameter are statistically significant prognostic factors. The risk of developing peripartum cardiomyopathy in subsequent pregnancies remains high. The place of dobutamine stress test in counseling the patients who desire pregnancy must be more studied. PMID:17078264

  6. Mutational Analysis of Influenza A Virus Nucleoprotein: Identification of Mutations That Affect RNA Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Mena, Ignacio; Jambrina, Enrique; Albo, Carmen; Perales, Beatriz; Ortín, Juan; Arrese, Marta; Vallejo, Dolores; Portela, Agustín

    1999-01-01

    The influenza A virus nucleoprotein (NP) is a multifunctional polypeptide which plays a pivotal role in virus replication. To get information on the domains and specific residues involved in the different NP activities, we describe here the preparation and characterization of 20 influenza A virus mutant NPs. The mutations, mostly single-amino-acid substitutions, were introduced in a cDNA copy of the A/Victoria/3/75 NP gene and, in most cases, affected residues located in regions that were hig...

  7. What Causes Cardiomyopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cardiomyopathy? Cardiomyopathy can be acquired or inherited. “Acquired” means ... case when the disease occurs in children. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy usually is inherited. It’s caused by ...

  8. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-06-26

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed. PMID:27354892

  9. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed. PMID:27354892

  10. Importance of genetic evaluation and testing in pediatric cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad; Tariq; Stephanie; M; Ware

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are clinically heterogeneous heart muscle disorders that are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Phenotypes include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. There is substantial evidence for a genetic contribution to pediatric cardiomyopathy. To date, more than 100 genes have been implicated in cardiomyopathy, but comprehensive genetic diagnosis has been problematic because of the large number of genes, the private nature of mutations, and difficulties in interpreting novel rare variants. This review will focus on current knowledge on the genetic etiologies of pediatric cardiomyopathy and their diagnostic relevance in clinical settings. Recent developments in sequencing technologies are greatly impacting the pace of gene discovery and clinical diagnosis. Understanding the genetic basis for pediatric cardiomyopathy and establishing genotypephenotype correlations may help delineate the molecular and cellular events necessary to identify potential novel therapeutic targets for heart muscle dysfunction in children.

  11. A recessive homozygous p.Asp92Gly SDHD mutation causes prenatal cardiomyopathy and a severe mitochondrial complex II deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Alston, Charlotte L; Ceccatelli Berti, Camilla; Blakely, Emma L; Oláhová, Monika; He, Langping; McMahon, Colin J.; Olpin, Simon E.; Hargreaves, Iain P.; Nolli, Cecilia; McFarland, Robert; Goffrini, Paola; O’Sullivan, Maureen J.; Taylor, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is a crucial metabolic enzyme complex that is involved in ATP production, playing roles in both the tricarboxylic cycle and the mitochondrial respiratory chain (complex II). Isolated complex II deficiency is one of the rarest oxidative phosphorylation disorders with mutations described in three structural subunits and one of the assembly factors; just one case is attributed to recessively inherited SDHD mutations. We report the pathological, biochemical, histoche...

  12. Molecular genetics and pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is defined as a disease of functional impairment in the cardiac muscle and its etiology includes both extrinsic and intrinsic factors. Cardiomyopathy caused by the intrinsic factors is called as primary cardiomyopathy of which two major clinical phenotypes are hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Genetic approaches have revealed the disease genes for hereditary primary cardiomyopathy and functional studies have demonstrated that characteristic functional alterations induced by the disease-associated mutations are closely related to the clinical types, such that increased and decreased Ca(2+) sensitivities of muscle contraction are associated with HCM and DCM, respectively. In addition, recent studies have suggested that mutations in the Z-disc components found in HCM and DCM may result in increased and decreased stiffness of sarcomere, respectively. Moreover, functional analysis of mutations in the other components of cardiac muscle have suggested that the altered response to metabolic stresses is associated with cardiomyopathy, further indicating the heterogeneity in the etiology and pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy. PMID:26178429

  13. Mutations affecting the chemosensory neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starich, T A; Herman, R K; Kari, C K; Yeh, W H; Schackwitz, W S; Schuyler, M W; Collet, J; Thomas, J H; Riddle, D L

    1995-01-01

    We have identified and characterized 95 mutations that reduce or abolish dye filling of amphid and phasmid neurons and that have little effect on viability, fertility or movement. Twenty-seven mutations occurred spontaneously in strains with a high frequency of transposon insertion. Sixty-eight were isolated after treatment with EMS. All of the mutations result in defects in one or more chemosensory responses, such as chemotaxis to ammonium chloride or formation of dauer larvae under conditions of starvation and overcrowding. Seventy-five of the mutations are alleles of 12 previously defined genes, mutations which were previously shown to lead to defects in amphid ultrastructure. We have assigned 20 mutations to 13 new genes, called dyf-1 through dyf-13. We expect that the genes represented by dye-filing defective mutants are important for the differentiation of amphid and phasmid chemosensilla. PMID:7705621

  14. Mutations Affecting the Chemosensory Neurons of Caenorhabditis Elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Starich, T. A.; Herman, R. K.; Kari, C. K.; Yeh, W. H.; Schackwitz, W. S.; Schuyler, M. W.; Collet, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Riddle, D L

    1995-01-01

    We have identified and characterized 95 mutations that reduce or abolish dye filling of amphid and phasmid neurons and that have little effect on viability, fertility or movement. Twenty-seven mutations occurred spontaneously in strains with a high frequency of transposon insertion. Sixty-eight were isolated after treatment with EMS. All of the mutations result in defects in one or more chemosensory responses, such as chemotaxis to ammonium chloride or formation of dauer larvae under conditio...

  15. An explicitly solvated full atomistic model of the cardiac thin filament and application on the calcium binding affinity effects from familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy linked mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    The previous version of our cardiac thin filament (CTF) model consisted of the troponin complex (cTn), two coiled-coil dimers of tropomyosin (Tm), and 29 actin units. We now present the newest revision of the model to include explicit solvation. The model was developed to continue our study of genetic mutations in the CTF proteins which are linked to familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathies. Binding of calcium to the cTnC subunit causes subtle conformational changes to propagate through the cTnC to the cTnI subunit which then detaches from actin. Conformational changes propagate through to the cTnT subunit, which allows Tm to move into the open position along actin, leading to muscle contraction. Calcium disassociation allows for the reverse to occur, which results in muscle relaxation. The inclusion of explicit TIP3 water solvation allows for the model to get better individual local solvent to protein interactions; which are important when observing the N-lobe calcium binding pocket of the cTnC. We are able to compare in silica and in vitro experimental results to better understand the physiological effects from mutants, such as the R92L/W and F110V/I of the cTnT, on the calcium binding affinity compared to the wild type.

  16. Diagnostic yield, interpretation, and clinical utility of mutation screening of sarcomere encoding genes in Danish hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients and relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Paal Skytt; Havndrup, Ole; Hougs, Lotte; Sørensen, Karina M; Jensen, Morten; Larsen, Lars Allan; Hedley, Paula; Bie Thomsen, Alex Rojas; Moolman-Smook, Johanna; Christiansen, Michael; Bundgaard, Henning

    2008-01-01

    persons. Index patients were screened for mutations in all coding regions of 10 sarcomere genes (MYH7, MYL3, MYBPC3, TNNI3, TNNT2, TPM1, ACTC, CSRP3, TCAP, and TNNC1) and five exons of TTN. Relatives were screened for presence of minor or major diagnostic criteria for HCM and tracking of DNA variants was...

  17. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouquet, Frédéric; Bouabdallaoui, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    The peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare form of dilated cardiomyopathy resulting from alteration of angiogenesis toward the end of pregnancy. The diagnosis is based on the association of clinical heart failure and systolic dysfunction assessed by echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnoses to rule out are myocardial infarction, amniotic liquid embolism, myocarditis, inherited cardiomyopathy, and history of treatment by anthracycline. Risk factors are advance maternal age (>30), multiparity, twin pregnancy, African origin, obesity, preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, and prolonged tocolytic therapy. Treatment of acute phase is identical to usual treatment of acute systolic heart failure. After delivery, VKA treatment should be discussed in case of systolic function <25% because of higher risk of thrombus. A specific treatment by bromocriptine can be initiated on a case-by-case basis. Complete recovery of systolic function is observed in 50% of cases. The mortality risk is low. Subsequent pregnancy should be discouraged, especially if systolic function did not recover. PMID:26160284

  18. Mutations induced by ultraviolet radiation affecting virulence in Puccinia striiformis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uredospores of parent culture, cy 29-1, were treated by ultraviolet radiation and mutations to virulent were tested on resistant wheat cultivars inoculated with treated spores. 7 mutant cultures virulent to the test cultivars were developed with estimated mutation rate 10~6~10~4. The virulence of mutant cultures was different from the all known races of stripe rust. Resistance segregation to mutant cultures was detected in two test cultivars. The results suggested that mutation was important mechanism of virulence variation operative in asexual population of rust fungi

  19. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel LMNA Splice-Site Mutation and Multigenic Heterozygosity of Potential Modifiers in a Family with Sick Sinus Syndrome, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Sudden Cardiac Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael V Zaragoza

    Full Text Available The goals are to understand the primary genetic mechanisms that cause Sick Sinus Syndrome and to identify potential modifiers that may result in intrafamilial variability within a multigenerational family. The proband is a 63-year-old male with a family history of individuals (>10 with sinus node dysfunction, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and sudden death. We used exome sequencing of a single individual to identify a novel LMNA mutation and demonstrated the importance of Sanger validation and family studies when evaluating candidates. After initial single-gene studies were negative, we conducted exome sequencing for the proband which produced 9 gigabases of sequencing data. Bioinformatics analysis showed 94% of the reads mapped to the reference and identified 128,563 unique variants with 108,795 (85% located in 16,319 genes of 19,056 target genes. We discovered multiple variants in known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes that may serve as potential modifiers in disease expression. To identify candidate mutations, we focused on ~2,000 variants located in 237 genes of 283 known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes. We filtered the candidates to 41 variants in 33 genes using zygosity, protein impact, database searches, and clinical association. Only 21 of 41 (51% variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. We selected nine confirmed variants with minor allele frequencies G, a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation as the primary mutation with rare or novel variants in HCN4, MYBPC3, PKP4, TMPO, TTN, DMPK and KCNJ10 as potential modifiers and a mechanism consistent with haploinsufficiency.

  20. A Genetic Variants Database for Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia/Cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaag, Paul A.; Jongbloed, Jan D. H.; van den Berg, Maarten P.; van der Smagt, Jasper J.; Jongbloed, Roselie; Bikker, Hennie; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; van Tintelen, J. Peter

    2009-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) is a hereditary cardiomyopathy characterized by fibrofatty replacement of cardiomyocytes, ventricular tachyarrhythmias and sudden death. ARVD/C is mainly caused by mutations in genes encoding desmosomal proteins. However, the pathoge

  1. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, A; Zaccaria, R; Bombardieri, G; Gasbarrini, A; Pola, P

    2007-06-01

    Decompensated liver cirrhosis is characterized by a peripheral vasodilation with a low-resistance hyperdynamic circulation. The sustained increase of cardiac work load associated with such a condition may result in an inconstant and often subclinical series of heart abnormalities, constituting a new clinical entity known as "cirrhotic cardiomyopathy". Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is variably associated with baseline increase in cardiac output, defective myocardial contractility and lowered systo-diastolic response to inotropic and chronotropic stimuli, down-regulated beta-adrenergic function, slight histo-morphological changes, and impaired electric "recovery" ability of ventricular myocardium. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is usually clinically latent or mild, likely because the peripheral vasodilation significantly reduces the left ventricle after-load, thus actually "auto-treating" the patient and masking any severe manifestation of heart failure. In cirrhotic patients, the presence of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may become unmasked and clinically evident by certain treatment interventions that increase the effective blood volume and cardiac pre-load, including surgical or transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunts, peritoneo-venous shunts (LeVeen) and orthotopic liver transplantation. Under these circumstances, an often transient overt congestive heart failure may develop, with increased cardiac output as well as right atrial, pulmonary artery and capillary wedge pressures. PMID:17383244

  2. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Hüche; Munk, Kim; Goetzsche, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sparse information with regard to the electrocardiographic (ECG) changes in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is available. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and electrocardiographic changes in a Danish cohort of patients with TC. We discuss the...

  3. LMNA cardiomyopathy: cell biology and genetics meet clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T. Lu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes A-type nuclear lamins (intermediate filament proteins expressed in most differentiated somatic cells, cause a diverse range of diseases, called laminopathies, that selectively affect different tissues and organ systems. The most prevalent laminopathy is cardiomyopathy with or without different types of skeletal muscular dystrophy. LMNA cardiomyopathy has an aggressive clinical course with higher rates of deadly arrhythmias and heart failure than most other heart diseases. As awareness among physicians increases, and advances in DNA sequencing methods make the genetic diagnosis of LMNA cardiomyopathy more common, cardiologists are being faced with difficult questions regarding patient management. These questions concern the optimal use of intracardiac cardioverter defibrillators to prevent sudden death from arrhythmias, and medical interventions to prevent heart damage and ameliorate heart failure symptoms. Data from a mouse model of LMNA cardiomyopathy suggest that inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways are beneficial in preventing and treating cardiac dysfunction; this basic research discovery needs to be translated to human patients.

  4. Factors affecting the spontaneous mutational spectra in somatic mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.А. Ковальова

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available  In our survey of references we are discussed the influence of factors biological origin on the spontaneous mutation specters in mammalian. Seasonal and age components influence on the frequence of cytogenetic anomalies. The immune and endocrinous systems are take part in control of the alteration of the spontaneous mutation specters. Genetical difference of sensibility in animal and human at the alteration of factors enviroment as and  genetical differences of repair systems activity are may influence on individual variation of spontaneous destabilization characters of chromosomal apparatus.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA mutations affect calcium handling in differentiated neurons.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trevelyan, A.J.; Kirby, D.M.; Smulders-Srinivasan, T.K.; Nooteboom, M.; Acin-Perez, R.; Enriquez, J.A.; Whittington, M.A.; Lightowlers, R.N.; Turnbull, D.M.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial genome are associated with a wide range of neurological symptoms, but many aspects of the basic neuronal pathology are not understood. One candidate mechanism, given the well-established role of mitochondria in calcium buffering, is a deficit in neuronal calcium homoeo

  6. The callipyge mutation and other genes that affect muscle hypertrophy in sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Cockett Noelle E; Smit Maria A; Bidwell Christopher A; Segers Karin; Hadfield Tracy L; Snowder Gary D; Georges Michel; Charlier Carole

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Genetic strategies to improve the profitability of sheep operations have generally focused on traits for reproduction. However, natural mutations exist in sheep that affect muscle growth and development, and the exploitation of these mutations in breeding strategies has the potential to significantly improve lamb-meat quality. The best-documented mutation for muscle development in sheep is callipyge (CLPG), which causes a postnatal muscle hypertrophy that is localized to the pelvic l...

  7. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gonzalo; Guzzo-Merello; Marta; Cobo-Marcos; Maria; Gallego-Delgado; Pablo; Garcia-Pavia

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is the most frequently consumed toxic substance in the world. Low to moderate daily intake of alcohol has been shown to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. In contrast, exposure to high levels of alcohol for a long period could lead to progressive cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. Cardiac dysfunction associated with chronic and excessive alcohol intake is a specific cardiac disease known as alcoholic cardiomyopathy(ACM). In spite of its clinical importance, data on ACM and how alcohol damages the heart are limited. In this review, we evaluate available evidence linking excessive alcohol consumption with heart failure and dilated cardiomyopathy. Additionally, we discuss the clinical presentation, prognosis and treatment of ACM.

  8. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sénior, Juan Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy or stress-induced cardiomyopathy is often diagnosed as an acute coronary syndrome in postmenopausal women, because its clinical presentation may mimic an acute myocardial infarction: anginal chest pain, changes in the ST segment and T wave in precordial leads and elevated cardiac biomarkers of necrosis. It is characterized by systolic dysfunction with transient ballooning of the apical and middle portions of the left ventricle in the absence of significant coronary disease. Prognosis is good and complete recovery occurs in days to weeks. We report three cases of postmenopausal women with initial diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction; no significant coronary lesions were found in the coronary angiography; apical ballooning, characteristic of this syndrome, was observed on left ventriculography. On follow-up, the three patients had complete recovery of systolic function at six weeks.

  9. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiese, Signe; Hove, Jens D; Bendtsen, Flemming;

    2014-01-01

    Cirrhosis is known to cause alterations in the systemic haemodynamic system. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy designates a cardiac dysfunction that includes impaired cardiac contractility with systolic and diastolic dysfunction, as well as electromechanical abnormalities in the absence of other known...... causes of cardiac disease. This condition is primarily revealed by inducing physical or pharmacological stress, but echocardiography is excellent at revealing diastolic dysfunction and might also be used to detect systolic dysfunction at rest. Furthermore, measurement of circulating levels of cardiac...... relation to invasive procedures such as shunt insertion and liver transplantation. Current pharmacological treatment is nonspecific and directed towards left ventricular failure, and liver transplantation is currently the only proven treatment with specific effect on cirrhotic cardiomyopathy....

  10. Nonsense mutations in the human β-globin gene affect mRNA metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of premature translation termination mutations (nonsense mutations) have been described in the human α- and β-globin genes. Studies on mRNA isolated from patients with β0-thalassemia have shown that for both the β-17 and the β-39 mutations less than normal levels of β-globin mRNA accumulate in peripheral blood cells. (The codon at which the mutation occurs designates the name of the mutation; there are 146 codons in human β-globin mRNA). In vitro studies using the cloned β-39 gene have reproduced this effect in a heterologous transfection system and have suggested that the defect resides in intranuclear metabolism. The authors have asked if this phenomenon of decreased mRNA accumulation is a general property of nonsense mutations and if the effect depends on the location or the type of mutation. Toward this end, they have studied the effect of five nonsense mutations and two missense mutations on the expression of human β-globin mRNA in a heterologous transfection system. In all cases studied, the presence of a translation termination codon correlates with a decrease in the steady-state level of mRNA. The data suggest that the metabolism of a mammalian mRNA is affected by the presence of a mutation that affects translation

  11. Mutation of the Zinc-Binding Metalloprotease Motif Affects Bacteroides fragilis Toxin Activity but Does Not Affect Propeptide Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Franco, Augusto A.; Buckwold, Simy L.; Shin, Jai W.; Ascon, Miguel; Sears, Cynthia L.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the role of the zinc-binding metalloprotease in Bacteroides fragilis toxin (BFT) processing and activity, the zinc-binding consensus sequences (H348, E349, H352, G355, H358, and M366) were mutated by site-directed-mutagenesis. Our results indicated that single point mutations in the zinc-binding metalloprotease motif do not affect BFT processing but do reduce or eliminate BFT biologic activity in vitro.

  12. Mutation of the Zinc-Binding Metalloprotease Motif Affects Bacteroides fragilis Toxin Activity but Does Not Affect Propeptide Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Augusto A.; Buckwold, Simy L.; Shin, Jai W.; Ascon, Miguel; Sears, Cynthia L.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the role of the zinc-binding metalloprotease in Bacteroides fragilis toxin (BFT) processing and activity, the zinc-binding consensus sequences (H348, E349, H352, G355, H358, and M366) were mutated by site-directed-mutagenesis. Our results indicated that single point mutations in the zinc-binding metalloprotease motif do not affect BFT processing but do reduce or eliminate BFT biologic activity in vitro. PMID:16041055

  13. Increased Ac excision (iae): Arabidopsis thaliana mutations affecting Ac transposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maize transposable element Ac is highly active in the heterologous hosts tobacco and tomato, but shows very much reduced levels of activity in Arabidopsis. A mutagenesis experiment was undertaken with the aim of identifying Arabidopsis host factors responsible for the observed low levels of Ac activity. Seed from a line carrying a single copy of the Ac element inserted into the streptomycin phosphotransferase (SPT) reporter fusion, and which displayed typically low levels of Ac activity, were mutagenized using gamma rays. Nineteen mutants displaying high levels of somatic Ac activity, as judged by their highly variegated phenotypes, were isolated after screening the M2 generation on streptomycin-containing medium. The mutations fall into two complementation groups, iae1 and iae2, are unlinked to the SPT::Ac locus and segregate in a Mendelian fashion. The iae1 mutation is recessive and the iae2 mutation is semi-dominant. The iae1 and iae2 mutants show 550- and 70-fold increases, respectively, in the average number of Ac excision sectors per cotyledon. The IAE1 locus maps to chromosome 2, whereas the SPT::Ac reporter maps to chromosome 3. A molecular study of Ac activity in the iae1 mutant confirmed the very high levels of Ac excision predicted using the phenotypic assay, but revealed only low levels of Ac re-insertion. Analyses of germinal transposition in the iae1 mutant demonstrated an average germinal excision frequency of 3% and a frequency of independent Ac re-insertions following germinal excision of 22%. The iae mutants represents a possible means of improving the efficiency of Ac/Ds transposon tagging systems in Arabidopsis, and will enable the dissection of host involvement in Ac transposition and the mechanisms employed for controlling transposable element activity

  14. Nature of induced mutations affecting disease reaction in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three genes, Lr20, Sr15 and Pml conferring resistance to some strains of Puccinia recondita, P. graminis tritici and Erysiphe graminis tritici, respectively, have never been observed to undergo genetic recombination. Since genotypes possessing one of the alleles always possessed the other two, the hypothesis of one gene with pleiotropic effects was tested. Seeds of a homozygous line possessing the gene(s) in coupling with a recessive chlorophyll marker, cn-Ala, were treated with three levels of EMS. Very high rates of mutation were observed. Changes with respect to Pml were independent of changes with respect to Lr20 and Sr15 indicating molecular independence of the product of the Pml allele. On the other hand, all instances of change with respect to Lr20 were associated with changes of Sr15. With both Lr20 and Sr15 a range of variation in infection types produced by the mutant lines was established but the rankings of the degree of change monitored by the respective pathogens were not identical. It is suggested that the same host gene product is recognized by the products of the avirulence alleles of the two rust pathogens. Screening with virulent counterparts of the three pathogens failed to detect instances of obvious mutations producing new resistances. The results are considered in relation to the gene-for-gene hypothesis. (author)

  15. Factors affecting mutational specificity induced by ionizing radiation and oxidizing radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose to analyze the factors affecting the specificity of mutational change as induced by ionizing radiation and oxidizing radicals. We want to understand not only the rules that affect base substitution, but also the mechanism(s) by which additions and deletions are produced, since detections are a common consequence of radiation. We wish to carry out this analysis in an in vitro mutation system that permits us to analyze the role of base sequence, of polymerase and of mutagenic agent. Our system is designed to screen out most direct breaks as a cause of mutation and should indicate the changes resulting from base damage to the DNA

  16. Clinical Features and Echocardiographic Findings in Children with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Blesneac

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, one of the most common inherited cardiomyopathies, is a heterogeneous disease resulting from sarcomeric protein mutations, with an incidence in the adult population of 1:500. Current information on the epidemiology and outcomes of this disease in children is limited. Methods: Thirty-four children diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the Pediatric Cardiology Department from Tîrgu Mureș were evaluated concerning familial and personal history, clinical, paraclinical and therapeutic aspects. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was defined by the presence of a hypertrophied, non-dilated ventricle, in the absence of a cardiac or systemic disease that could produce ventricular hypertrophy. Results: The youngest diagnosed child was a neonate, a total of 10 patients being diagnosed until 1 year of age. In 6 cases a positive familial history was found. Noonan syndrome was found in 2 cases. Only 21 patients were symptomatic, the predominant symptoms being shortness of breath on exertion with exercise limitations. Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction was present in 21 cases (61.7%. Twenty-four patients were on β-blocking therapy, while 4 patients underwent septal myectomy. Conclusions: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a heterogeneous disorder in terms of evolution, age of onset, type and extent of hypertrophy, and the risk of sudden death. It can affect children of any age. There is a need for a complex evaluation, including familial and personal anamnesis, clinical examination, electrocardiogram and echocardiography of all patients. It is highly important to develop screening strategies, including genetic testing, for an early diagnosis, especially in asymptomatic patients with a positive familial background

  17. Enhanced troponin I binding explains the functional changes produced by the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation A8V of cardiac troponin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zot, Henry G; Hasbun, Javier E; Michell, Clara A; Landim-Vieira, Maicon; Pinto, Jose R

    2016-07-01

    Higher affinity for TnI explains how troponin C (TnC) carrying a causative hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation, TnC(A8V), sensitizes muscle cells to Ca(2+). Muscle fibers reconstituted with TnC(A8V) require ∼2.3-fold less [Ca(2+)] to achieve 50% maximum-tension compared to fibers reconstituted with wild-type TnC (TnC(WT)). Binding measurements rule out a significant change in N-terminus Ca(2+)-affinity of isolated TnC(A8V), and TnC(A8V) binds the switch-peptide of troponin-I (TnI(sp)) ∼1.6-fold more strongly than TnC(WT); thus we model the TnC-TnI(sp) interaction as competing with the TnI-actin interaction. Tension data are well-fit by a model constrained to conditions in which the affinity of TnC(A8V) for TnI(sp) is 1.5-1.7-fold higher than that of TnC(WT) at all [Ca(2+)]. Mean ATPase rates of reconstituted cardiac myofibrils is greater for TnC(A8V) than TnC(WT) at all [Ca(2+)], with statistically significant differences in the means at higher [Ca(2+)]. To probe TnC-TnI interaction in low Ca(2+), displacement of bis-ANS from TnI was monitored as a function of TnC. Whereas Ca(2+)-TnC(WT) displaces significantly more bis-ANS than Mg(2+)-TnC(WT), Ca(2+)-TnC(A8V) displaces probe equivalently to Mg(2+)-TnC(A8V) and Ca(2+)-TnC(WT), consistent with stronger Ca(2+)-independent TnC(A8V)-TnI(sp). A Matlab program for computing theoretical activation is reported. Our work suggests that contractility is constantly above normal in hearts made hypertrophic by TnC(A8V). PMID:26976709

  18. Incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Abelmann, Walter H.

    1985-01-01

    Full reliable data on the incidence and prevalence of dilated cardiomyopathy are not available. In the United States, at least 0.7% of cardiac deaths are attributable to cardiomyopathy. Dilated cardiomyopathy probably contributes the great majority of these cases. The mortality rate for cardiomyopathy in males is twice that of females, and for blacks it is 2.4 times that of whites. Cardiomyopathy was diagnosed in 0.67% of patients discharged from hospitals in 1979 with diagnoses of disease of...

  19. The callipyge mutation and other genes that affect muscle hypertrophy in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cockett Noelle E

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic strategies to improve the profitability of sheep operations have generally focused on traits for reproduction. However, natural mutations exist in sheep that affect muscle growth and development, and the exploitation of these mutations in breeding strategies has the potential to significantly improve lamb-meat quality. The best-documented mutation for muscle development in sheep is callipyge (CLPG, which causes a postnatal muscle hypertrophy that is localized to the pelvic limbs and loin. Enhanced skeletal muscle growth is also observed in animals with the Carwell (or rib-eye muscling mutation, and a double-muscling phenotype has been documented for animals of the Texel sheep breed. However, the actual mutations responsible for these muscular hypertrophy phenotypes in sheep have yet to be identified, and further characterization of the genetic basis for these phenotypes will provide insight into the biological control of muscle growth and body composition.

  20. Mutations in many genes affect aggressive behavior in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Zwarts Liesbeth; Edwards Alexis C; Yamamoto Akihiko; Callaerts Patrick; Mackay Trudy FC

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Aggressive behavior in animals is important for survival and reproduction. Identifying the underlying genes and environmental contexts that affect aggressive behavior is important for understanding the evolutionary forces that maintain variation for aggressive behavior in natural populations, and to develop therapeutic interventions to modulate extreme levels of aggressive behavior in humans. While the role of neurotransmitters and a few other molecules in mediating and mo...

  1. In vitro evaluation of mitochondrial dysfunction and treatment with adeno-associated virus vector in fibroblasts from Doberman Pinschers with dilated cardiomyopathy and a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Ivan; Estrada, Amara H; Winter, Brandy D; Erger, Kirsten E; Conlon, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of fibroblasts from Doberman Pinschers with and without dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and mutation of the gene for pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isozyme 4 (PDK4) and to evaluate in vitro whether treatment with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (ie, gene therapy) would alter metabolic efficiency. ANIMALS 10 Doberman Pinschers screened for DCM and PDK4 mutation. PROCEDURES Fibroblasts were harvested from skin biopsy specimens obtained from Doberman Pinschers, and dogs were classified as without DCM or PDK4 mutation (n = 3) or with occult DCM and heterozygous (4) or homozygous (3) for PDK4 mutation. Fibroblasts were or were not treated with tyrosine mutant AAV type 2 vector containing PDK4 at multiplicities of infection of 1,000. Mitochondrial OCR was measured to evaluate mitochondrial metabolism. The OCR was compared among dog groups and between untreated and treated fibroblasts within groups. RESULTS Mean ± SD basal OCR of fibroblasts from heterozygous (74 ± 8 pmol of O2/min) and homozygous (58 ± 12 pmol of O2/min) dogs was significantly lower than that for dogs without PDK4 mutation (115 ± 9 pmol of O2/min). After AAV transduction, OCR did not increase significantly in any group (mutation-free group, 121 ± 26 pmol of O2/min; heterozygous group, 88 ± 6 pmol of O2/min; homozygous group, 59 ± 3 pmol of O2/min). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Mitochondrial function was altered in skin fibroblasts of Doberman Pinschers with DCM and PDK4 mutation. Change in mitochondrial function after in vitro gene therapy at the multiplicities of infection used in this study was not significant. (Am J Vet Res 2016;77:156-161). PMID:27027709

  2. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens H

    2010-01-01

    Increased cardiac output was first described in patients with cirrhosis more than fifty years ago. Later, various observations have indicated the presence of a latent cardiac dysfunction, which includes a combination of reduced cardiac contractility with systolic and diastolic dysfunction and......, nitric oxide overproduction, and cannabinoid receptor activation. Systolic incompetence in patients can be revealed by pharmacological or physical strain and during stressful procedures, such as transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt insertion and liver transplantation. Systolic dysfunction has...... cirrhotic patients and it may be normalised by beta-blockers. No specific therapy for cirrhotic cardiomyopathy can be recommended, but treatment should be supportive and directed against the cardiac dysfunction. Future research should better describe the prevalence, impact on morbidity and survival, and...

  3. MeCP2 Rett mutations affect large scale chromatin organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Noopur Agarwal; Becker, Annette; Jost, K Laurence;

    2011-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurological, X chromosomal-linked disorder associated with mutations in the MECP2 gene. MeCP2 protein has been proposed to play a role in transcriptional regulation as well as in chromatin architecture. Since MeCP2 mutant cells exhibit surprisingly mild changes in gene...... expression, we have now explored the possibility that Rett mutations may affect the ability of MeCP2 to bind and organize chromatin. We found that all but one of the 21 missense MeCP2 mutants analyzed accumulated at heterochromatin and about half of them were significantly affected. Furthermore, two...

  4. Types of Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ventricles, making it harder for the heart to pump blood. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy also can cause stiffness of the ... Over time, the heart loses the ability to pump blood effectively. Dilated cardiomyopathy can lead to heart failure , ...

  5. Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search The Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation (CCF) is a national, non-profit organization focused on pediatric cardiomyopathy, a chronic disease of the heart muscle. CCF is dedicated to accelerating the search for ...

  6. Athletes’ Stress Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Gavrilova

    2012-01-01

    The article is focused on the examination of 1352 male athletes, engaged in different sports, actively training and participating in competitions. Stress cardiomyopathy was exposed in 14.8 % of cases. The article considers differential diagnostics of stress cardiomyopathy.

  7. RARE CASES OF HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY: VARIANTS AND CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    V. Yu. Zimina; G. V. Mislitskaya; S. A. Sayganov; S. D. Dzakhova

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy belongs to a group of hereditary diseases due to sarcomere gene mutation. This abnormality is characterized by the development of symmetric or asymmetric hypertrophy of left ventricular myocardium with its normal contractile function or hypercontractility. Authors provide a brief overview of variants of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and phenocopies of this disease, when structural changes in the heart are not the result of classic sarcomere gene mutation. In patients...

  8. Troponin Ⅰ,cardiac diastolic dysfunction and restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-pei HUANG; Jian-feng DU

    2004-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diseases of heart muscle that are associated with cardiac dysfunction. Molecular genetic studies performed to date have demonstrated that the damage or mutations in several sarcomeric contractile protein genes are associated with the development of the diseases. In this review, cardiac troponin Ⅰ, one of the sarcomeric thin filament protein, will be discussed regarding its role in cardiac function, its deficiency-related diastolic dysfunction, and the mutation of this protein-mediated restrictive cardiomyopathy.

  9. Grain legume cultivars derived from induced mutations, and mutations affecting nodulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two hundred and sixty-five grain legume cultivars developed using induced mutations have been released in 32 countries. A maximum number of cultivars have been released in soybean (58), followed by common bean (50), groundnut (44), pea (32) and mungbean (14). Gamma or x-ray exposures of seeds led to the direct development of 111 cultivars, while neutron and chemical mutagen treatments resulted in 8 and 36 cultivars respectively. One hundred and three cultivars have been developed using mutants in cross breeding. Attempts have been made to estimate the successful dose range for gamma and x-rays, defined as the dose range, which led to the development, registration and release of a maximum number of mutant cultivars. Exposures to seeds ranging between 100-200 Gy in all grain legumes, except faba bean, resulted in 49 out of 111 cultivars being developed as direct mutants. Successful doses reported for faba bean are lower than 100 Gy. Modified crop plant characters are listed. Besides the development of new cultivars, a large number of induced mutants that show altered nodulation pattern have been isolated in grain legumes. Such mutants have made a significant contribution in basic studies on host-symbiont interactions and towards cloning of plant genes related to symbiosis and nitrogen fixation. Their exploitation in breeding programs for enhancing nitrogen fixation is just beginning. Available information on nodulation mutants in grain legume crops is summarised. Mainly, four types of nodulation mutants have been isolated. They show either: no nodulation (nod -), few nodules (nod +/-), ineffective nodulation (Fix-), hypernodulation (nod ++) or hypernodulation even in the presence of otherwise inhibitory nitrate levels (nts). Hypernodulating and nts mutants are of great interest. A soybean cultivar incorporating nts trait has been released in Australia. (author)

  10. MR imaging in cardiomyopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the WHO classification, cardiomyopathies are a group of diseases which are associated with myocardial dysfunction and can be classified either as primary or secondary cardiomyopathies. Genetic disorders have been identified in certain primary cardiomyopathies, however often the etiology remains unknown. The term ''secondary cardiomyopathy'' is used to specify diseases with the clinical indications of a cardiomyopathy, but can be attributed to a certain pathophysiological mechanism such as exposure to toxic substances, metabolic syndromes or systemic diseases. Based on morphological and functional criteria, primary cardiomyopathies are divided into dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). During the last two decades MR imaging has emerged to a well established diagnostic tool for the understanding and treatment of cardiomyopathies. Morphological and functional information can be achieved with a high level of accuracy and reproducibility. Tissue alteration of the myocardium can be detected assessing regional contrast enhancement, T1- and T2-signal intensities and chemical shift phenomena. This article describes characteristic aspects of MR imaging for the diagnosis of primary and secondary cardiomyopathies. (orig.)

  11. Pregnancy, cardiomyopathies, and genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Tintelen, J. Peter; Pieper, Petronella G.; Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y.; Van den Berg, Maarten P.

    2014-01-01

    Although familial forms of cardiomyopathy such as hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy have been recognized for decades, it is only recently that much of the genetic basis of these inherited cardiomyopathies has been elucidated. This has provided important insights into the pathophysiological mech

  12. Drastic Ca2+ sensitization of myofilament associated with a small structural change in troponin I in inherited restrictive cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six missense mutations in human cardiac troponin I (cTnI) were recently found to cause restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). We have bacterially expressed and purified these human cTnI mutants and examined their functional and structural consequences. Inserting the human cTnI into skinned cardiac muscle fibers showed that these mutations had much greater Ca2+-sensitizing effects on force generation than the cTnI mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The mutation K178E in the second actin-tropomyosin (Tm) binding region showed a particularly potent Ca2+-sensitizing effect among the six RCM-causing mutations. Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that this mutation does not extensively affect the structure of the whole cTnI molecule, but induces an unexpectedly subtle change in the structure of a region around the mutated residue. The results indicate that the K178E mutation has a localized effect on a structure that is critical to the regulatory function of the second actin-Tm binding region of cTnI. The present study also suggests that both HCM and RCM involving cTnI mutations share a common feature of increased Ca2+ sensitivity of cardiac myofilament, but more severe change in Ca2+ sensitivity is associated with the clinical phenotype of RCM

  13. The rare Costello variant HRAS c.173C>T (p.T58I) with severe neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiippala, Anita; Vasilescu, Catalina; Tallila, Jonna; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Paetau, Anders; Tyni, Tiina; Suomalainen, Anu; Euro, Liliya; Ojala, Tiina

    2016-06-01

    We report a 10-year-old girl presenting with severe neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), feeding difficulties, mildly abnormal facial features, and progressive skeletal muscle symptoms but with normal cognitive development. Targeted oligonucleotide-selective sequencing of 101 cardiomyopathy genes revealed the genetic diagnosis, and the mutation was verified by Sanger sequencing in the patient and her parents. To offer insights into the potential mechanism of patient mutation, protein structural analysis was performed using the resolved structure of human activated HRAS protein with bound GTP analogue (PDB id 5P21) in Discovery Studio 4.5 (Dassault Systèmes Biovia, San Diego, CA). The patient with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and normal cognitive development was diagnosed with an HRAS mutation c.173C>T (p.T58I), a milder variant of Costello syndrome affecting a highly conserved amino acid, threonine 58. Our analysis suggests that the p.G12 mutations slow GTP hydrolysis rendering HRAS unresponsive to GTPase activating proteins, and resulting in permanently active state. The p.T58I mutation likely affects binding of guanidine-nucleotide-exchange factors, thereby promoting the active state but also allowing for slow inactivation. Patients with the HRAS mutation c.173C>T (p.T58I) might go undiagnosed because of the milder phenotype compared with other mutations causing Costello syndrome. We expand the clinical and molecular picture of the rare HRAS mutation by reporting the first case in Europe and the fourth case in the literature. Our protein structure analysis offers insights into the mechanism of the mildly activating p.T58I mutation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26888048

  14. Mutations affecting RNA polymerase I-stimulated exchange and rDNA recombination in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOT1 is a cis-acting recombination-stimulatory sequence isolated from the rDNA repeat unit of yeast. The ability of HOT1 to stimulate mitotic exchange appears to depend on its ability to promote high levels of RNA polymerase I transcription. A qualitative colony color sectoring assay was developed to screen for trans-acting mutations that alter the activity of HOT1. Both hypo-recombination and hyper-recombination mutants were isolated. Genetic analysis of seven HOT1 recombination mutants (hrm) that decrease HOT1 activity shows that they behave as recessive nuclear mutations and belong to five linkage groups. Three of these mutations, hrm1, hrm2, and hrm3, also decrease rDNA exchange but do not alter recombination in the absence of HOT1. Another mutation, hrm4, decreases HOT1-stimulated recombination but does not affect rDNA recombination or exchange in the absence of HOT1. Two new alleles of RAD52 were also isolated using this screen. With regard to HOT1 activity, rad52 is epistatic to all four hrm mutations indicating that the products of the HRM genes and of RAD52 mediate steps in the same recombination pathway. Finding mutations that decrease both the activity of HOT1 and exchange in the rDNA supports the hypothesis that HOT1 plays a role in rDNA recombination

  15. Different inactivating mutations of the mineralocorticoid receptor in fourteen families affected by type I pseudohypoaldosteronism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorato, Paola; Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Armanini, Decio; Kuhnle, Ursula; Khaldi, Yasmina; Salomon, Rémi; Abadie, Véronique; Di Battista, Eliana; Naselli, Arturo; Racine, Alain; Bosio, Maurizio; Caprio, Massimiliano; Poulet-Young, Véronique; Chabrolle, Jean-Pierre; Niaudet, Patrick; De Gennes, Christiane; Lecornec, Marie-Hélène; Poisson, Elodie; Fusco, Anna Maria; Loli, Paola; Lombès, Marc; Zennaro, Maria-Christina

    2003-06-01

    We have analyzed the human mineralocorticoid receptor (hMR) gene in 14 families with autosomal dominant or sporadic pseudohypoaldosteronism (PHA1), a rare form of mineralocorticoid resistance characterized by neonatal renal salt wasting and failure to thrive. Six heterozygous mutations were detected. Two frameshift mutations in exon 2 (insT1354, del8bp537) and one nonsense mutation in exon 4 (C2157A, Cys645stop) generate truncated proteins due to premature stop codons. Three missense mutations (G633R, Q776R, L979P) differently affect hMR function. The DNA binding domain mutant R633 exhibits reduced maximal transactivation, although its binding characteristics and ED(50) of transactivation are comparable with wild-type hMR. Ligand binding domain mutants R776 and P979 present reduced or absent aldosterone binding, respectively, which is associated with reduced or absent ligand-dependent transactivation capacity. Finally, P979 possesses a transdominant negative effect on wild-type hMR activity, whereas mutations G633R and Q776R probably result in haploinsufficiency in PHA1 patients. We conclude that hMR mutations are a common feature of autosomal dominant PHA1, being found in 70% of our familial cases. Their absence in some families underscores the importance of an extensive investigation of the hMR gene and the role of precise diagnostic procedures to allow for identification of other genes potentially involved in the disease. PMID:12788847

  16. A novel mutation in TFL1 homolog affecting determinacy in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanasekar, P; Reddy, K S

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in the widely conserved Arabidopsis Terminal Flower 1 (TFL1) gene and its homologs have been demonstrated to result in determinacy across genera, the knowledge of which is lacking in cowpea. Understanding the molecular events leading to determinacy of apical meristems could hasten development of cowpea varieties with suitable ideotypes. Isolation and characterization of a novel mutation in cowpea TFL1 homolog (VuTFL1) affecting determinacy is reported here for the first time. Cowpea TFL1 homolog was amplified using primers designed based on conserved sequences in related genera and sequence variation was analysed in three gamma ray-induced determinate mutants, their indeterminate parent "EC394763" and two indeterminate varieties. The analyses of sequence variation exposed a novel SNP distinguishing the determinate mutants from the indeterminate types. The non-synonymous point mutation in exon 4 at position 1,176 resulted from transversion of cytosine (C) to adenine (A) leading to an amino acid change (Pro-136 to His) in determinate mutants. The effect of the mutation on protein function and stability was predicted to be detrimental using different bioinformatics/computational tools. The functionally significant novel substitution mutation is hypothesized to affect determinacy in the cowpea mutants. Development of suitable regeneration protocols in this hitherto recalcitrant crop and subsequent complementation assay in mutants or over-expressing assay in parents could decisively conclude the role of the SNP in regulating determinacy in these cowpea mutants. PMID:25146839

  17. Prevalence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsung O Cheng

    2004-01-01

    @@ To the Editor: I read with interest the recent article on cardiac troponin T (TNNT2) mutations in Chinese patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) by Wu et al.1 The authors cited a prevalence of HCM of 0.2% in general population, but did not indicate whether it referred to the general population in China or some other countries.

  18. Mutation in the Monocarboxylate Transporter 12 Gene Affects Guanidinoacetate Excretion but Does Not Cause Glucosuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhayat, Nasser; Simonin, Alexandre; Anderegg, Manuel; Pathare, Ganesh; Lüscher, Benjamin P; Deisl, Christine; Albano, Giuseppe; Mordasini, David; Hediger, Matthias A; Surbek, Daniel V; Vogt, Bruno; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Kloeckener-Gruissem, Barbara; Fuster, Daniel G

    2016-05-01

    A heterozygous mutation (c.643C>A; p.Q215X) in the monocarboxylate transporter 12-encoding gene MCT12 (also known as SLC16A12) that mediates creatine transport was recently identified as the cause of a syndrome with juvenile cataracts, microcornea, and glucosuria in a single family. Whereas the MCT12 mutation cosegregated with the eye phenotype, poor correlation with the glucosuria phenotype did not support a pathogenic role of the mutation in the kidney. Here, we examined MCT12 in the kidney and found that it resides on basolateral membranes of proximal tubules. Patients with MCT12 mutation exhibited reduced plasma levels and increased fractional excretion of guanidinoacetate, but normal creatine levels, suggesting that MCT12 may function as a guanidinoacetate transporter in vivo However, functional studies in Xenopus oocytes revealed that MCT12 transports creatine but not its precursor, guanidinoacetate. Genetic analysis revealed a separate, undescribed heterozygous mutation (c.265G>A; p.A89T) in the sodium/glucose cotransporter 2-encoding gene SGLT2 (also known as SLC5A2) in the family that segregated with the renal glucosuria phenotype. When overexpressed in HEK293 cells, the mutant SGLT2 transporter did not efficiently translocate to the plasma membrane, and displayed greatly reduced transport activity. In summary, our data indicate that MCT12 functions as a basolateral exit pathway for creatine in the proximal tubule. Heterozygous mutation of MCT12 affects systemic levels and renal handling of guanidinoacetate, possibly through an indirect mechanism. Furthermore, our data reveal a digenic syndrome in the index family, with simultaneous MCT12 and SGLT2 mutation. Thus, glucosuria is not part of the MCT12 mutation syndrome. PMID:26376857

  19. Water Collective Dynamics in Whole Photosynthetic Green Algae as Affected by Protein Single Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Daniela; Rea, Giuseppina; Lambreva, Maya D; Haertlein, Michael; Moulin, Martine; De Francesco, Alessio; Campi, Gaetano

    2016-07-01

    In the context of the importance of water molecules for protein function/dynamics relationship, the role of water collective dynamics in Chlamydomonas green algae carrying both native and mutated photosynthetic proteins has been investigated by neutron Brillouin scattering spectroscopy. Results show that single point genetic mutation may notably affect collective density fluctuations in hydrating water providing important insight on the transmission of information possibly correlated to biological functionality. In particular, we highlight that the damping factor of the excitations is larger in the native compared to the mutant algae as a signature of a different plasticity and structure of the hydrogen bond network. PMID:27300078

  20. X-Linked Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Cardiospecific Phenotype of Dystrophinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Nakamura

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLDCM is a distinct phenotype of dystrophinopathy characterized by preferential cardiac involvement without any overt skeletal myopathy. XLDCM is caused by mutations of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD gene and results in lethal heart failure in individuals between 10 and 20 years. Patients with Becker muscular dystrophy, an allelic disorder, have a milder phenotype of skeletal muscle involvement compared to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and sometimes present with dilated cardiomyopathy. The precise relationship between mutations in the DMD gene and cardiomyopathy remain unclear. However, some hypothetical mechanisms are being considered to be associated with the presence of some several dystrophin isoforms, certain reported mutations, and an unknown dystrophin-related pathophysiological mechanism. Recent therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the severe dystrophinopathy phenotype, appears promising, but the presence of XLDCM highlights the importance of focusing on cardiomyopathy while elucidating the pathomechanism and developing treatment.

  1. Private mitochondrial DNA variants in danish patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Havndrup, Ole;

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic cardiac disease primarily caused by mutations in genes coding for sarcomeric proteins. A molecular-genetic etiology can be established in ~60% of cases. Evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups are susceptibility factors for HCM....... Several polymorphic mtDNA variants are associated with a variety of late-onset degenerative diseases and affect mitochondrial function. We examined the role of private, non-haplogroup associated, mitochondrial variants in the etiology of HCM. In 87 Danish HCM patients, full mtDNA sequencing revealed 446...... MT-CYB: m.15024G>A, p.C93Y remained. A detailed analysis of these variants indicated that none of them are likely to cause HCM. In conclusion, private mtDNA mutations are frequent, but they are rarely, if ever, associated with HCM....

  2. Mouse Models in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Lodder, Elisabeth M.; Rizzo, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a heart muscle disorder characterized by fibro-fatty replacement of cardiomyocytes. The cardinal manifestations are arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, and seldom heart failure. Mutations in genes encoding desmosomal proteins and their interaction partners have been implicated in the pathogenesis of ARVC and it is now widely accepted that ARVC is a disease caused by abnormal cell–cell adhesion. The mechanism(s) by which mutations in des...

  3. Counselling issues in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, B.; French, J. A.; Jeremy, R W; French, P; McTaggart, D R; Nicholson, M R; Semsarian, C; Richmond, D R; Trent, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    To illustrate the variable clinical presentations and rates of progression in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC), phenotypes and genotypes were compared in three FHC families with different genetic defects. In the first family, the FHC abnormality was a protein truncating mutation (Gln969X) in the cardiac myosin binding protein C gene. The second family had a missense change (Asn755Lys) in the same gene. A missense mutation (Arg453Cys) in the cardiac beta myosin heavy chain gene was p...

  4. Insights into restrictive cardiomyopathy from clinical and animal studies

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diseases that primarily affect the myocardium, leading to serious cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. Out of the three major categories of cardiomyopathies (hypertrophic, dilated and restrictive), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is less common and also the least studied. However, the prognosis for RCM is poor as some patients dying in their childhood. The molecular mechanisms behind the disease development and progression are not very clear and the treatment of RCM is...

  5. Progranulin Mutations Affects Brain Oscillatory Activity in Fronto-Temporal Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Davide V.; Benussi, Luisa; Fostinelli, Silvia; Ciani, Miriam; Binetti, Giuliano; Ghidoni, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a clinical stage indicating a prodromal phase of dementia. This practical concept could be used also for fronto-temporal dementia (FTD). Progranulin (PGRN) has been recently recognized as a useful diagnostic biomarker for fronto-temporal lobe degeneration (FTLD) due to GRN null mutations. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a reliable tool in detecting brain networks changes. The working hypothesis of the present study is that EEG oscillations could detect different modifications among FTLD stages (FTD-MCI versus overt FTD) as well as differences between GRN mutation carriers versus non-carriers in patients with overt FTD. Materials and Methods: EEG in all patients and PGRN dosage in patients with a clear FTD were detected. The cognitive state has been investigated through mini mental state examination (MMSE). Results: MCI-FTD showed a significant lower spectral power in both alpha and theta oscillations as compared to overt FTD. GRN mutations carriers affected by FTLD show an increase in high alpha and decrease in theta oscillations as compared to non-carriers. Conclusion: EEG frequency rhythms are sensible to different stage of FTD and could detect changes in brain oscillatory activity affected by GRN mutations. PMID:26973510

  6. Human junctophilin-2 undergoes a structural rearrangement upon binding PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and the S101R mutation identified in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy obviates this response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Hayley J; Davenport, John Bernard; Collins, Richard F; Trafford, Andrew W; Pinali, Christian; Kitmitto, Ashraf

    2013-12-01

    JP2 (junctophilin-2) is believed to hold the transverse tubular and jSR (junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum) membranes in a precise geometry that facilitates excitation-contraction coupling in cardiomyocytes. We have expressed and purified human JP2 and shown using electron microscopy that the protein forms elongated structures ~15 nm long and 2 nm wide. Employing lipid-binding assays and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation we have determined that JP2 is selective for PS (phosphatidylserine), with a Kd value of ~0.5 μM, with the N-terminal domain mediating this interaction. JP2 also binds PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 at a different site than PS, resulting in the protein adopting a more flexible conformation; this interaction is modulated by both Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions. We show that the S101R mutation identified in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy leads to modification of the protein secondary structure, forming a more flexible molecule with an increased affinity for PS, but does not undergo a structural transition in response to binding PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. In conclusion, the present study provides new insights into the structural and lipid-binding properties of JP2 and how the S101R mutation may have an effect upon the stability of the dyad organization with the potential to alter JP2-protein interactions regulating Ca(2+) cycling. PMID:24001019

  7. Germline Missense Mutations Affecting KRAS Isoform B Are Associated with a Severe Noonan Syndrome Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Carta, Claudio; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Stella, Lorenzo; Vasta, Isabella; Sarkozy, Anna; Digilio, Cristina; Palleschi, Antonio; Pizzuti, Antonio; Grammatico, Paola; Zampino, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gelb, Bruce D.; Tartaglia, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a developmental disorder characterized by short stature, facial dysmorphia, congenital heart disease, and multiple skeletal and hematologic defects. NS is an autosomal dominant trait and is genetically heterogeneous. Gain of function of SHP-2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase that positively modulates RAS signaling, is observed in nearly 50% of affected individuals. Here, we report the identification of heterozygous KRAS gene mutations in two subjects exhibiting a severe...

  8. Mutations in the human adenosine deaminase gene that affect protein structure and RNA splicing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adenosine deaminase deficiency is one cause of the genetic disease severe combined immunodeficiency. To identify mutations responsible for ADA deficiency, the authors synthesized cDNAs to ADA mRNAs from two cell lines, GM2756 and GM2825A, derived from ADA-deficient immunodeficient patients. Sequence analysis of GM2756 cDNA clones revealed a different point mutation in each allele that causes amino acid changes of alanine to valine and arginine to histidine. One allele of GM2825A also has a point mutation that causes an alanine to valine substitution. The other allele of GM2825A was found to produce an mRNA in which exon 4 had been spliced out but had no other detrimental mutations. S1 nuclease mapping of GM2825A mRNA showed equal abundance of the full-length ADA mRNA and the ADA mRNA that was missing exon 4. Several of the ADA cDNA clones extended 5' of the major initiation start site, indicating multiple start sites for ADA transcription. The point mutations in GM2756 and GM2825A and the absence of exon 4 in GM2825A appear to be directly responsible for the ADA deficiency. Comparison of a number of normal and mutant ADA cDNA sequences showed a number of changes in the third base of codons. These change do not affect the amino acid sequence. Analyses of ADA cDNAs from different cell lines detected aberrant RNA species that either included intron 7 or excluded exon 7. Their presence is a result of aberrant splicing of pre-mRNAs and is not related to mutations that cause ADA deficiency

  9. DNAJC19, a mitochondrial cochaperone associated with cardiomyopathy, forms a complex with prohibitins to regulate cardiolipin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter-Dennerlein, Ricarda; Korwitz, Anne; Haag, Mathias; Tatsuta, Takashi; Dargazanli, Sascha; Baker, Michael; Decker, Thorsten; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Rugarli, Elena I; Langer, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Prohibitins form large protein and lipid scaffolds in the inner membrane of mitochondria that are required for mitochondrial morphogenesis, neuronal survival, and normal lifespan. Here, we have defined the interactome of PHB2 in mitochondria and identified DNAJC19, mutated in dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia, as binding partner of PHB complexes. We observed impaired cell growth, defective cristae morphogenesis, and similar transcriptional responses in the absence of either DNAJC19 or PHB2. The loss of PHB/DNAJC19 complexes affects cardiolipin acylation and leads to the accumulation of cardiolipin species with altered acyl chains. Similar defects occur in cells lacking the transacylase tafazzin, which is mutated in Barth syndrome. Our experiments suggest that PHB/DNAJC19 membrane domains regulate cardiolipin remodeling by tafazzin and explain similar clinical symptoms in two inherited cardiomyopathies by an impaired cardiolipin metabolism in mitochondrial membranes. PMID:24856930

  10. Study the presence of mutations in exons 30 and 33 MYBPC3 gene in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by PCR-SSCP/HA method in Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikhshahrokh A; Hashemzadeh Chaleshteri M; Doosti A; Parchami Barjoui S

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: HCM is a common form of hereditary heart disease with Mendelian inheritance that is a frequent cause of sudden cardiac death in the people younger than 35 years. In more than 50% of cases the cause of HCM identified as gene mutations. Mutations in the gene MYBPC3 (which encodes the cardiac Myosin binding protein C) are about 40% of clinical cases. This study was aimed to investigate the presence of mutations in exons 30 and 33 MYBPC3 gene in patients with hypertrophic car...

  11. RARE CASES OF HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY: VARIANTS AND CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Zimina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy belongs to a group of hereditary diseases due to sarcomere gene mutation. This abnormality is characterized by the development of symmetric or asymmetric hypertrophy of left ventricular myocardium with its normal contractile function or hypercontractility. Authors provide a brief overview of variants of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and phenocopies of this disease, when structural changes in the heart are not the result of classic sarcomere gene mutation. In patients with some phenocopies concentric left ventricular hypertrophy can transform into its dilatation with reduced contractility. Such variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is presented in the first clinical observation. The second case shows that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be one of the symptoms of the disease with other reasons for poor outcome.

  12. ramR Mutations Affecting Fluoroquinolone Susceptibility in Epidemic Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Kentucky ST198

    OpenAIRE

    Axel eCloeckaert

    2013-01-01

    A screening for non-target mutations affecting fluoroquinolone susceptibility was conducted in epidemic multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198. Among a panel of representative isolates (n=30), covering the epidemic, only three showed distinct mutations in ramR resulting in enhanced expression of genes encoding the AcrAB-TolC efflux system and low increase in ciprofloxacin MIC. No mutations were detected in other regulatory regions of this efflux system. Ciprofloxacin r...

  13. ramR mutations affecting fluoroquinolone susceptibility in epidemic multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198

    OpenAIRE

    Baucheron, Sylvie; Le Hello, Simon; Doublet, Benoît; Giraud, Etienne; Weill, François-Xavier; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2013-01-01

    International audience A screening for non-target mutations affecting fluoroquinolone susceptibility was conducted in epidemic multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198. Among a panel of representative isolates (n = 27), covering the epidemic, only three showed distinct mutations in ramR resulting in enhanced expression of genes encoding the AcrAB-TolC efflux system and low increase in ciprofloxacin MIC. No mutations were detected in other regulatory regions of this ef...

  14. ramR mutations affecting fluoroquinolone susceptibility in epidemic multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A screening for non-target mutations affecting fluoroquinolone susceptibility was conducted in epidemic multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198. Among a panel of representative isolates (n = 27), covering the epidemic, only three showed distinct mutations in ramR resulting in enhanced expression of genes encoding the AcrAB-TolC efflux system and low increase in ciprofloxacin MIC. No mutations were detected in other regulatory regions of this efflux system. Ciprofloxacin...

  15. Pathogenesis of Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimaki, Angeliki; Kleber, Andre G; Saffitz, Jeffrey E

    2015-11-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM) is a primary myocardial disease. It is characterized by frequent ventricular arrhythmias and increased risk of sudden cardiac death typically arising as an early manifestation before the onset of significant myocardial remodelling. Myocardial degeneration, often confined to the right ventricular free wall, with replacement by fibrofatty scar tissue, develops in many patients. ACM is a familial disease but genetic penetrance can be low and disease expression is highly variable. Inflammation might promote disease progression. It also appears that exercise increases disease penetrance and accelerates its development. More than 60% of probands harbour mutations in genes that encode desmosomal proteins, which has raised the possibility that defective cell-cell adhesion might play a role in disease pathogenesis. Recent advances have implicated changes in the canonical wingless-type mouse mammary tumour virus integration site (Wnt)/β-catenin and Hippo signalling pathways and defects in forwarding trafficking of ion channels and other proteins to the intercalated disk in cardiac myocytes. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the pathogenesis of ACM and highlight future research directions. PMID:26199027

  16. AAV9-mediated gene transfer of desmin ameliorates cardiomyopathy in desmin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckmann, M B; Bauer, R; Jungmann, A; Winter, L; Rapti, K; Strucksberg, K-H; Clemen, C S; Li, Z; Schröder, R; Katus, H A; Müller, O J

    2016-08-01

    Mutations of the human desmin (DES) gene cause autosomal dominant and recessive myopathies affecting skeletal and cardiac muscle tissue. Desmin knockout mice (DES-KO), which develop progressive myopathy and cardiomyopathy, mirror rare human recessive desminopathies in which mutations on both DES alleles lead to a complete ablation of desmin protein expression. Here, we investigated whether an adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer of wild-type desmin cDNA (AAV-DES) attenuates cardiomyopathy in these mice. Our approach leads to a partial reconstitution of desmin protein expression and the de novo formation of the extrasarcomeric desmin-syncoilin network in cardiomyocytes of treated animals. This finding was accompanied by reduced fibrosis and heart weights and improved systolic left-ventricular function when compared with control vector-treated DES-KO mice. Since the re-expression of desmin protein in cardiomyocytes of DES-KO mice restores the extrasarcomeric desmin-syncoilin cytoskeleton, attenuates the degree of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and improves contractile function, AAV-mediated desmin gene transfer may be a novel and promising therapeutic approach for patients with cardiomyopathy due to the complete lack of desmin protein expression. PMID:27101257

  17. Mutation types and aging differently affect revertant fiber expansion in dystrophic mdx and mdx52 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Echigoya

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, one of the most common and lethal genetic disorders, and the mdx mouse myopathies are caused by a lack of dystrophin protein. These dystrophic muscles contain sporadic clusters of dystrophin-expressing revertant fibers (RFs, as detected by immunohistochemistry. RFs are known to arise from muscle precursor cells with spontaneous exon skipping (alternative splicing and clonally expand in size with increasing age through the process of muscle degeneration/regeneration. The expansion of revertant clusters is thought to represent the cumulative history of muscle regeneration and proliferation of such precursor cells. However, the precise mechanisms by which RFs arise and expand are poorly understood. Here, to test the effects of mutation types and aging on RF expansion and muscle regeneration, we examined the number of RFs in mdx mice (containing a nonsense mutation in exon 23 and mdx52 mice (containing deletion mutation of exon 52 with the same C57BL/6 background at 2, 6, 12, and 18months of age. Mdx mice displayed a significantly higher number of RFs compared to mdx52 mice in all age groups, suggesting that revertant fiber expansion largely depends on the type of mutation and/or location in the gene. A significant increase in the expression and clustering levels of RFs was found beginning at 6months of age in mdx mice compared with mdx52 mice. In contrast to the significant expansion of RFs with increasing age, the number of centrally nucleated fibers and embryonic myosin heavy chain-positive fibers (indicative of cumulative and current muscle regeneration, respectively decreased with age in both mouse strains. These results suggest that mutation types and aging differently affect revertant fiber expansion in mdx and mdx52 mice.

  18. Segmental overgrowth syndrome due to an activating PIK3CA mutation identified in affected muscle tissue by exome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Maria; Sunde, Lone; Weigert, Karen Petra; Bogaard, Pauline Wilhemina; Lildballe, Dorte Launholt

    Mosaic PIK3CA-mutations have been described in an increasing number of overgrowth syndromes. We describe a patient with a previously unreported segmental overgrowth syndrome with the mutation, PIKCA3 c.3140A>G (p.His1047Arg) in affected tissue diagnosed by exome sequencing. This PIK3CA-associated...

  19. Keshan disease and mitochondrial cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Fuyu

    2006-01-01

    Keshan disease (KD) is a potentially fatal form of cardiomyopathy (disease of the heart muscle) endemic in certain areas of China. From 1984 to 1986, a national comprehensive scientific investigation on KD in Chuxiong region of Yunnan Province in the southwest China was conducted. The investigation team was composed of epidemiologists, clinic doctors, pathologists, biochemists, biophysicists and specialists in ecological environment. Results of pathological, biochemical and biophysical as well as clinical studies showed: an obvious increase of enlarged and swollen mitochondria with distended crista membranes in myocardium from patients with KD; significant reductions in the activity of oxidative phosphorylation (succinate dehydrogenase, cytochrome oxidase, succinate oxidase, H+-ATPase) of affected mitochondria; decrease in CoQ, cardiolipin, Se and GSHPx activity, while obvious increase in the Ca2+ content. So, it was suggested that mitochondria are the predominant target of the pathogenic factors of KD. Before Chuxiong KD survey only a few cases of mitochondrial cardiomyopathy were studied. During the multidisciplinary scientific investigation on KD in Chuxiong a large amount of samples from KD cases and the positive controls were examined. On the basis of the results obtained it was suggested that KD might be classified as a "Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathy" endemic in China. This is one of the achievements in the three years' survey in Chuxiong and is valuable not only to the deeper understanding of pathogenic mechanism of KD but also to the study of mitochondrial cardiomyopathy in general.Keshan disease is not a genetic disease, but is closely related to the malnutrition (especially microelement Se deficiency). KD occurs along a low Se belt, and Se supplementation has been effective in prevention of such disease. The incidence of KD has sharply decreased along with the steady raise of living standard and realization of preventive measures. At present, patients of

  20. ramR Mutations Affecting Fluoroquinolone Susceptibility in Epidemic Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Kentucky ST198

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AxelCloeckaert

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A screening for non-target mutations affecting fluoroquinolone susceptibility was conducted in epidemic multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198. Among a panel of representative isolates (n=30, covering the epidemic, only three showed distinct mutations in ramR resulting in enhanced expression of genes encoding the AcrAB-TolC efflux system and low increase in ciprofloxacin MIC. No mutations were detected in other regulatory regions of this efflux system. Ciprofloxacin resistance in serovar Kentucky ST198 is thus currently mainly due to multiple target gene mutations.

  1. Identification of a mutation affecting an alanine-alpha-ketoisovalerate transaminase activity in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkinham, J O

    1979-10-01

    A mutation affecting alanine-alpha-ketoisovalerate transaminase activity has been shown to be cotransducible with ilv gene cluster. The transaminase deficiency results in conditional isoleucine auxotrophy in the presence of alanine. PMID:396446

  2. Mutations affecting excision of the intron from a eukaryotic dimeric tRNA precursor.

    OpenAIRE

    Willis, I; Hottinger, H; Pearson, D.; Chisholm, V; Leupold, U; Söll, D

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of a Schizosaccharomyces pombe opal suppressor serine tRNA gene (sup9-e) and of 12 in vivo-generated mutant genes, which have lost the ability to suppress UGA mutations, have been determined. Analysis of the expression of these genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in vitro and in vivo systems has revealed defects in tRNA gene transcription and precursor tRNA processing. Single base changes in the D-loop, the intron and the extra arm affect the efficiency of splicing of t...

  3. The effect of cardiomyopathy mutation (R97L) in mouse cardiac troponin T on the muscle length-mediated recruitment of crossbridges is modified divergently by α- and β-myosin heavy chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollapudi, Sampath K; Chandra, Murali

    2016-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutations in cardiac troponin T (TnT) lead to sudden cardiac death. Augmented myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity is a common feature in TnT mutants, but such observations fail to provide a rational explanation for severe cardiac phenotypes. To better understand the mutation-induced effect on the cardiac phenotype, it is imperative to determine the effects on dynamic contractile features such as the muscle length (ML)-mediated activation against α- and β-myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. α- and β-MHC are not only differentially expressed in rodent and human hearts, but they also modify ML-mediated activation differently. Mouse analog of human TnTR94L (TnTR97L) or wild-type TnT was reconstituted into de-membranated muscle fibers from normal (α-MHC) and transgenic (β-MHC) mouse hearts. TnTR97L augmented myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity by a similar amount in α- and β-MHC fibers. However, TnTR97L augmented the negative impact of strained crossbridges on other crossbridges (γ) by 22% in α-MHC fibers, but attenuated γ by 21% in β-MHC fibers. TnTR97L decreased the magnitude of ML-mediated recruitment of crossbridges (ER) by 37% in α-MHC fibers, but increased ER by 35% in β-MHC fibers. We provide a mechanistic basis for the TnTR97L-induced effects in α- and β-MHC fibers and discuss the relevance to human hearts. PMID:26792537

  4. Mutations in SGOL1 cause a novel cohesinopathy affecting heart and gut rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetaille, Philippe; Preuss, Christoph; Burkhard, Silja; Côté, Jean-Marc; Houde, Christine; Castilloux, Julie; Piché, Jessica; Gosset, Natacha; Leclerc, Séverine; Wünnemann, Florian; Thibeault, Maryse; Gagnon, Carmen; Galli, Antonella; Tuck, Elizabeth; Hickson, Gilles R; El Amine, Nour; Boufaied, Ines; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; de Santa Barbara, Pascal; Faure, Sandrine; Jonzon, Anders; Cameron, Michel; Dietz, Harry C; Gallo-McFarlane, Elena; Benson, D Woodrow; Moreau, Claudia; Labuda, Damian; Zhan, Shing H; Shen, Yaoqing; Jomphe, Michèle; Jones, Steven J M; Bakkers, Jeroen; Andelfinger, Gregor

    2014-11-01

    The pacemaking activity of specialized tissues in the heart and gut results in lifelong rhythmic contractions. Here we describe a new syndrome characterized by Chronic Atrial and Intestinal Dysrhythmia, termed CAID syndrome, in 16 French Canadians and 1 Swede. We show that a single shared homozygous founder mutation in SGOL1, a component of the cohesin complex, causes CAID syndrome. Cultured dermal fibroblasts from affected individuals showed accelerated cell cycle progression, a higher rate of senescence and enhanced activation of TGF-β signaling. Karyotypes showed the typical railroad appearance of a centromeric cohesion defect. Tissues derived from affected individuals displayed pathological changes in both the enteric nervous system and smooth muscle. Morpholino-induced knockdown of sgol1 in zebrafish recapitulated the abnormalities seen in humans with CAID syndrome. Our findings identify CAID syndrome as a novel generalized dysrhythmia, suggesting a new role for SGOL1 and the cohesin complex in mediating the integrity of human cardiac and gut rhythm. PMID:25282101

  5. Mouse models in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Lodder, Elisabeth M.; Stefania eRizzo

    2012-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a heart muscle disorder characterized by fibrofatty replacement of cardiomyocytes. The cardinal manifestations are arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death and seldom heart failure. Mutations in genes encoding desmosomal proteins and their interaction partners have been implicated in the pathogenesis of ARVC and it is now widely accepted that ARVC is a disease caused by abnormal cell-cell adhesion due to defects in desmosomes. The mechanism(s...

  6. Outcome in patients treated with isolated liver transplantation for familial transthyretin amyloidosis to prevent cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Laerke M; Penninga, Luit; Villadsen, Gerda E;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Familial transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis is caused by different TTR mutations resulting in different clinical phenotypes of the disease. The Leu111Met mutation causes severe restrictive cardiomyopathy. Liver transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for patients with TT...... patients with familial TTR amyloidosis due to Leu111Met mutation. Appropriate timing of LTx is of utmost importance to avoid development of severe amyloid cardiomyopathy and the need for combined heart and liver transplantation.......BACKGROUND: Familial transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis is caused by different TTR mutations resulting in different clinical phenotypes of the disease. The Leu111Met mutation causes severe restrictive cardiomyopathy. Liver transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for patients with TTR...... occurred. Two patients (33%) underwent cardiac transplantation during follow-up due to progressive cardiomyopathy. The remaining four patients experienced no echocardiographic or clinical deterioration of cardiac function following LTx. CONCLUSION: Isolated LTx appears to be a valuable treatment option for...

  7. Atlas of the clinical genetics of human dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haas, Jan; Frese, Karen S; Peil, Barbara;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Numerous genes are known to cause dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). However, until now technological limitations have hindered elucidation of the contribution of all clinically relevant disease genes to DCM phenotypes in larger cohorts. We now utilized next-generation sequencing to overcome these......, leading to 99.1% coverage of the target region with at least 50-fold and a mean read depth of 2415. In this well characterized cohort, we find the highest number of known cardiomyopathy mutations in plakophilin-2, myosin-binding protein C-3, and desmoplakin. When we include yet unknown but predicted...... disease variants, we find titin, plakophilin-2, myosin-binding protein-C 3, desmoplakin, ryanodine receptor 2, desmocollin-2, desmoglein-2, and SCN5A variants among the most commonly mutated genes. The overlap between DCM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and channelopathy causing mutations is...

  8. Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy Caused by a Novel Frameshift in the BAG3 Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Toro

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy, a major cause of chronic heart failure and cardiac transplantation, is characterized by left ventricular or biventricular heart dilatation. In nearly 50% of cases the pathology is inherited, and more than 60 genes have been reported as disease-causing. However, in 30% of familial cases the mutation remains unidentified even after comprehensive genetic analysis. This study clinically and genetically assessed a large Spanish family affected by dilated cardiomyopathy to search for novel variations.Our study included a total of 100 family members. Clinical assessment was performed in alive, and genetic analysis was also performed in alive and 1 deceased relative. Genetic screening included resequencing of 55 genes associated with sudden cardiac death, and Sanger sequencing of main disease-associated genes. Genetic analysis identified a frame-shift variation in BAG3 (p.H243Tfr*64 in 32 patients. Genotype-phenotype correlation identified substantial heterogeneity in disease expression. Of 32 genetic carriers (one deceased, 21 relatives were clinically affected, and 10 were asymptomatic. Seventeen of the symptomatic genetic carriers exhibited proto-diastolic septal knock by echocardiographic assessment.We report p.H243Tfr*64_BAG3 as a novel pathogenic variation responsible for familial dilated cardiomyopathy. This variation correlates with a more severe phenotype of the disease, mainly in younger individuals. Genetic analysis in families, even asymptomatic individuals, enables early identification of individuals at risk and allows implementation of preventive measures.

  9. Review of cardiomyopathy imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiomyopathies are increasingly being detected on both routine and non-routine imaging. Furthermore, the diagnosis of cardiomyopathy is changing from the traditional method of clinical presentation and cardiac morphology to a quantifiable method based on both cardiac morphology and function. With cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, coronary computed tomography and nuclear medicine increasingly being utilized along with echocardiography in the diagnostic process, it is important for the radiologist to be aware of the relevant criteria in formulating a diagnosis. We aim to provide an overview of the imaging characteristics of the most commonly encountered cardiomyopathies

  10. Rapidly Progressing Chagas Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollowed, John; McCullough, Matthew; Sanchez, Daniel; Traina, Mahmoud; Hernandez, Salvador; Murillo, Efrain

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasiteTrypanosoma cruzi, can cause a potentially life-threatening cardiomyopathy in approximately 10-40% of afflicted individuals. The decline in cardiac function characteristically progresses over the course of many years. We report a case of Chagas disease in which the patient experienced an atypical rapid deterioration to severe cardiomyopathy over the course of 16 months. This case argues the need for increased routine surveillance for patients with confirmedT. cruziinfection, who are determined to be at high-risk for worsening cardiomyopathy. PMID:26856912

  11. Review of cardiomyopathy imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunaratnam, Kughan, E-mail: Kughan@hotmail.com [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia); Wong, Lok Hun, E-mail: nuhkol@hotmail.com [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia); Nasis, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.nasis@southernhealth.org.au [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia); Ellims, Andris, E-mail: aellims@hotmail.com [The Alfred Hospital, 55 Commercial Road, Melbourne, VIC 3004 (Australia); Nandurkar, Dee, E-mail: nandurkar.dee@gmail.com [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia); Soo, Geoffrey, E-mail: geoffrey.soo@southernhealth.org.au [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia); Cameron, James, E-mail: james.cameron@monash.edu.au [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia); Troupis, John, E-mail: john.troupis@southernhealth.org.au [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia)

    2013-10-01

    Cardiomyopathies are increasingly being detected on both routine and non-routine imaging. Furthermore, the diagnosis of cardiomyopathy is changing from the traditional method of clinical presentation and cardiac morphology to a quantifiable method based on both cardiac morphology and function. With cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, coronary computed tomography and nuclear medicine increasingly being utilized along with echocardiography in the diagnostic process, it is important for the radiologist to be aware of the relevant criteria in formulating a diagnosis. We aim to provide an overview of the imaging characteristics of the most commonly encountered cardiomyopathies.

  12. Novel SCARB2 mutation in action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome and evaluation of SCARB2 mutations in isolated AMRF features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopfner Franziska

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome is a hereditary form of progressive myoclonus epilepsy associated with renal failure. It is considered to be an autosomal-recessive disease related to loss-of-function mutations in SCARB2. We studied a German AMRF family, additionally showing signs of demyelinating polyneuropathy and dilated cardiomyopathy. To test the hypothesis whether isolated appearance of individual AMRF syndrome features could be related to heterozygote SCARB2 mutations, we screened for SCARB2 mutations in unrelated patients showing isolated AMRF features. Methods In the AMRF family all exons of SCARB2 were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. The mutation screening of unrelated patients with isolated AMRF features affected by either epilepsy (n = 103, progressive myoclonus epilepsy or generalized epilepsy, demyelinating polyneuropathy (n = 103, renal failure (n = 192 or dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 85 was performed as high resolution melting curve analysis of the SCARB2 exons. Results A novel homozygous 1 bp deletion (c.111delC in SCARB2 was found by sequencing three affected homozygous siblings of the affected family. A heterozygous sister showed generalized seizures and reduction of nerve conduction velocity in her legs. No mutations were found in the epilepsy, renal failure or dilated cardiomyopathy samples. In the polyneuropathy sample two individuals with demyelinating disease were found to be carriers of a SCARB2 frameshift mutation (c.666delCCTTA. Conclusions Our findings indicate that demyelinating polyneuropathy and dilated cardiomyopathy are part of the action myoclonus-renal failure syndrome. Moreover, they raise the possibility that in rare cases heterozygous SCARB2 mutations may be associated with PNP features.

  13. Comparison Between Clinical and Echocardiographic Findings in Infants and Children Diagnosed with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Blesneac; Carmen Şuteu; Rodica Togănel; Theodora Benedek; Benedek I.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a rather common hereditary disease with an autozomal dominant character, caused by mutations of genes that code for proteins of the cardiac sarcomere. The observed prevalence of this disease is much lower in pediatric patients compared to adults, because it’s late gene expression. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy presenting in infancy has been shown to have a very high mortality.

  14. Genetic and clinical profile of Indian patients of idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy with and without hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Taranjit Singh; Ahmad, Shamim; Ahluwalia, Tarun Veer Singh;

    2009-01-01

    Both idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy (IRCM) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) are part of the same disease spectrum and are due to sarcomeric gene mutations. A patient with restrictive physiology without left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) would be diagnosed as IRCM, while one with LVH...

  15. A Novel Mutation in the CYP11B1 Gene Causes Steroid 11β-Hydroxylase Deficient Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia with Reversible Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Alqahtani, Mohammad A.; Ayed A. Shati; Minjing Zou; Alsuheel, Ali M.; Alhayani, Abdullah A.; Al-Qahtani, Saleh M.; Gilban, Hessa M.; Meyer, Brain F.; Yufei Shi

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency is the second most common form of CAH, resulting from a mutation in the CYP11B1 gene. Steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency results in excessive mineralcorticoids and androgen production leading to hypertension, precocious puberty with acne, enlarged penis, and hyperpigmentation of scrotum of genetically male infants. In the present study, we reported 3 male cases from a Saudi family who presented with penile enlargem...

  16. Multiple myeloma is affected by multiple and heterogeneous somatic mutations in adhesion- and receptor tyrosine kinase signaling molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a largely incurable plasma cell malignancy with a poorly understood and heterogeneous clinical course. To identify potential, functionally relevant somatic mutations in MM, we performed whole-exome sequencing of five primary MM, corresponding germline DNA and six MM cell lines, and developed a bioinformatics strategy that also integrated published mutational data of 38 MM patients. Our analysis confirms that identical, recurrent mutations of single genes are infrequent in MM, but highlights that mutations cluster in important cellular pathways. Specifically, we show enrichment of mutations in adhesion molecules of MM cells, emphasizing the important role for the interaction of the MM cells with their microenvironment. We describe an increased rate of mutations in receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and associated signaling effectors, for example, in EGFR, ERBB3, KRAS and MAP2K2, pointing to a role of aberrant RTK signaling in the development or progression of MM. The diversity of mutations affecting different nodes of a particular signaling network appears to be an intrinsic feature of individual MM samples, and the elucidation of intra- as well as interindividual redundancy in mutations that affect survival pathways will help to better tailor targeted therapeutic strategies to the specific needs of the MM patient

  17. Sex differences in cardiomyopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, Sven; van der Meer, Peter; van Tintelen, J. Peter; van den Berg, Maarten P.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of heart muscle diseases with a variety of specific phenotypes. According to the contemporary European Society of Cardiology classification, they are classified into hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular (ARVC), restrictive (RC

  18. Functional and splicing defect analysis of 23 ACVRL1 mutations in a cohort of patients affected by Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdos Alaa El Din

    Full Text Available Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia syndrome (HHT or Rendu-Osler-Weber (ROW syndrome is an autosomal dominant vascular disorder. Two most common forms of HHT, HHT1 and HHT2, have been linked to mutations in the endoglin (ENG and activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ACVRL1or ALK1 genes respectively. This work was designed to examine the pathogenicity of 23 nucleotide variations in ACVRL1 gene detected in more than 400 patients. Among them, 14 missense mutations and one intronic variant were novels, and 8 missense mutations were previously identified with questionable implication in HHT2. The functionality of missense mutations was analyzed in response to BMP9 (specific ligand of ALK1, the maturation of the protein products and their localization were analyzed by western blot and fluorescence microscopy. The splicing impairment of the intronic and of two missense mutations was examined by minigene assay. Functional analysis showed that 18 out of 22 missense mutations were defective. Splicing analysis revealed that one missense mutation (c.733A>G, p.Ile245Val affects the splicing of the harboring exon 6. Similarly, the intronic mutation outside the consensus splicing sites (c.1048+5G>A in intron 7 was seen pathogenic by splicing study. Both mutations induce a frame shift creating a premature stop codon likely resulting in mRNA degradation by NMD surveillance mechanism. Our results confirm the haploinsufficiency model proposed for HHT2. The affected allele of ACVRL1 induces mRNA degradation or the synthesis of a protein lacking the receptor activity. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that functional and splicing analyses together, represent two robust diagnostic tools to be used by geneticists confronted with novel or conflicted ACVRL1 mutations.

  19. A novel class of mutations that affect DNA replication in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordman, Jared; Skovgaard, Ole; Wright, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Over-initiation of DNA replication in cells containing the cold-sensitive dnaA(cos) allele has been shown to lead to extensive DNA damage, potentially due to head-to-tail replication fork collisions that ultimately lead to replication fork collapse, growth stasis and/or cell death. Based on the...... assumption that suppressors of the cold-sensitive phenotype of the cos mutant should include mutations that affect the efficiency and/or regulation of DNA replication, we subjected a dnaA(cos) mutant strain to transposon mutagenesis and selected mutant derivatives that could form colonies at 30°C. Four...... suppressors of the dnaA(cos)-mediated cold sensitivity were identified and further characterized. Based on origin to terminus ratios, chromosome content per cell, measured by flow cytometry, and sensitivity to the replication fork inhibitor hydroxyurea, the suppressors fell into two distinct categories: those...

  20. Novel somatic mutations in large granular lymphocytic leukemia affecting the STAT-pathway and T-cell activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T-cell large granular lymphocytic (T-LGL) leukemia is a clonal disease characterized by the expansion of mature CD3+CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. It is often associated with autoimmune disorders and immune-mediated cytopenias. Our recent findings suggest that up to 40% of T-LGL patients harbor mutations in the STAT3 gene, whereas STAT5 mutations are present in 2% of patients. In order to identify putative disease-causing genetic alterations in the remaining T-LGL patients, we performed exome sequencing from three STAT mutation-negative patients and validated the findings in 113 large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia patients. On average, 11 CD8+ LGL leukemia cell-specific high-confidence nonsynonymous somatic mutations were discovered in each patient. Interestingly, all patients had at least one mutation that affects either directly the STAT3-pathway (such as PTPRT) or T-cell activation (BCL11B, SLIT2 and NRP1). In all three patients, the STAT3 pathway was activated when studied by RNA expression or pSTAT3 analysis. Screening of the remaining 113 LGL leukemia patients did not reveal additional patients with same mutations. These novel mutations are potentially biologically relevant and represent rare genetic triggers for T-LGL leukemia, and are associated with similar disease phenotype as observed in patients with mutations in the STAT3 gene

  1. New perspectives in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.M. Kofflard (Marcel)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractHypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a primary cardiac disorder with a heterogeneous expression. Although relatively uncommon, the disease has been studied extensively as appears from the numerous studies that have explored specific facets of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This review will focus

  2. Exercise Rehabilitation in Pediatric Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Somarriba, Gabriel; Extein, Jason; Miller, Tracie L.

    2008-01-01

    Children with cardiomyopathy carry significant risk of morbidity and mortality. New research and technology have brought about significant advancements to the diagnosis and clinical management of children with cardiomyopathy. However, currently heart transplantation remains the standard of care for children with symptomatic and progressive cardiomyopathy. Cardiovascular rehabilitation programs have yielded success in improving cardiac function, overall physical activity, and quality of life i...

  3. Dilated cardiomyopathy following trastuzumab chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Karmakar

    2012-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity manifesting as dilated cardiomyopathy is a rarely reported adverse effect of trastuzumab. We hereby report a case of dilated cardiomyopathy, which occurred following trastuzumab chemotherapy in a 32-year-old female. The patient responded to discontinuation of trastuzumab and standard medical treatment. Extensive search of Indian literature revealed no reported case of dilated cardiomyopathy occurring due to trastuzumab.

  4. Nonsense mutations in the human beta-globin gene affect mRNA metabolism.

    OpenAIRE

    Baserga, S J; Benz, E J

    1988-01-01

    A number of premature translation termination mutations (nonsense mutations) have been described in the human alpha- and beta-globin genes. Studies on mRNA isolated from patients with beta zero-thalassemia have shown that for both the beta-17 and the beta-39 mutations less than normal levels of beta-globin mRNA accumulate in peripheral blood cells. (The codon at which the mutation occurs designates the name of the mutation; there are 146 codons in human beta-globin mRNA.) In vitro studies usi...

  5. Screening of Three Novel Candidate Genes in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Alex Hørby; Benn, Marianne; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Haunso, Stig; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2011-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) has been associated with mutations in genes encoding cellular adhesion proteins. However, only about 40% of patients have mutations in known genes. We hypothesized that mutations in the genes encoding ß-catenin (CTNNB1), a-T-catenin (CTNNA3...

  6. Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhuang; Di Xu

    2009-01-01

    Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy(TC) is a recently described acute cardiac syndrome, which the latest cardiomyopathy classification of the European Society of Cardiology describes as an unclassified cardiomyopathy. TC mimics acute myocardial infarction(AMI) and is characterised by ischaemic chest symptoms, an elevated electrocardiogram ST-segment, and moderately increased levels of cardiac disease markers. However, patients with TC have no coronary angiogram-detectable or non-obstructive coronary arterial disease(CAD), and left ventriculography documents transient left apical and middle ventricular wall dysfunction. In this review, we describe TC and evaluate epidemiological, clinical and instrumental features, pathophysiological mechanisms, therapy and prognosis of this syndrome, with a view to raising awareness of the disease.

  7. AG10 inhibits amyloidogenesis and cellular toxicity of the familial amyloid cardiomyopathy-associated V122I transthyretin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penchala, Sravan C; Connelly, Stephen; Wang, Yu; Park, Miki S; Zhao, Lei; Baranczak, Aleksandra; Rappley, Irit; Vogel, Hannes; Liedtke, Michaela; Witteles, Ronald M; Powers, Evan T; Reixach, Natàlia; Chan, William K; Wilson, Ian A; Kelly, Jeffery W; Graef, Isabella A; Alhamadsheh, Mamoun M

    2013-06-11

    The misassembly of soluble proteins into toxic aggregates, including amyloid fibrils, underlies a large number of human degenerative diseases. Cardiac amyloidoses, which are most commonly caused by aggregation of Ig light chains or transthyretin (TTR) in the cardiac interstitium and conducting system, represent an important and often underdiagnosed cause of heart failure. Two types of TTR-associated amyloid cardiomyopathies are clinically important. The Val122Ile (V122I) mutation, which alters the kinetic stability of TTR and affects 3% to 4% of African American subjects, can lead to development of familial amyloid cardiomyopathy. In addition, aggregation of WT TTR in individuals older than age 65 y causes senile systemic amyloidosis. TTR-mediated amyloid cardiomyopathies are chronic and progressive conditions that lead to arrhythmias, biventricular heart failure, and death. As no Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs are currently available for treatment of these diseases, the development of therapeutic agents that prevent TTR-mediated cardiotoxicity is desired. Here, we report the development of AG10, a potent and selective kinetic stabilizer of TTR. AG10 prevents dissociation of V122I-TTR in serum samples obtained from patients with familial amyloid cardiomyopathy. In contrast to other TTR stabilizers currently in clinical trials, AG10 stabilizes V122I- and WT-TTR equally well and also exceeds their efficacy to stabilize WT and mutant TTR in whole serum. Crystallographic studies of AG10 bound to V122I-TTR give valuable insights into how AG10 achieves such effective kinetic stabilization of TTR, which will also aid in designing better TTR stabilizers. The oral bioavailability of AG10, combined with additional desirable drug-like features, makes it a very promising candidate to treat TTR amyloid cardiomyopathy. PMID:23716704

  8. TERT promoter mutations in bladder cancer affect patient survival and disease recurrence through modification by a common polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachakonda, P Sivaramakrishna; Hosen, Ismail; de Verdier, Petra J; Fallah, Mahdi; Heidenreich, Barbara; Ryk, Charlotta; Wiklund, N Peter; Steineck, Gunnar; Schadendorf, Dirk; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv

    2013-10-22

    The telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter, an important element of telomerase expression, has emerged as a target of cancer-specific mutations. Originally described in melanoma, the mutations in TERT promoter have been shown to be common in certain other tumor types that include glioblastoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and bladder cancer. To fully define the occurrence and effect of the TERT promoter mutations, we investigated tumors from a well-characterized series of 327 patients with urothelial cell carcinoma of bladder. The somatic mutations, mainly at positions -124 and -146 bp from ATG start site that create binding motifs for E-twenty six/ternary complex factors (Ets/TCF), affected 65.4% of the tumors, with even distribution across different stages and grades. Our data showed that a common polymorphism rs2853669, within a preexisting Ets2 binding site in the TERT promoter, acts as a modifier of the effect of the mutations on survival and tumor recurrence. The patients with the mutations showed poor survival in the absence [hazard ratio (HR) 2.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-4.70] but not in the presence (HR 0.42, 95% CI 0.18-1.01) of the variant allele of the polymorphism. The mutations in the absence of the variant allele were highly associated with the disease recurrence in patients with Tis, Ta, and T1 tumors (HR 1.85, 95% CI 1.11-3.08). The TERT promoter mutations are the most common somatic lesions in bladder cancer with clinical implications. The association of the mutations with patient survival and disease recurrence, subject to modification by a common polymorphism, can be a unique putative marker with individualized prognostic potential. PMID:24101484

  9. Breast tumor specific mutation in GATA3 affects physiological mechanisms regulating transcription factor turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Adomas, Aleksandra B; Grimm, Sara A.; Malone, Christine; Takaku, Motoki; Sims, Jennifer K.; Wade, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The transcription factor GATA3 is a favorable prognostic indicator in estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-positive breast tumors in which it participates with ERα and FOXA1 in a complex transcriptional regulatory program driving tumor growth. GATA3 mutations are frequent in breast cancer and have been classified as driver mutations. To elucidate the contribution(s) of GATA3 alterations to cancer, we studied two breast cancer cell lines, MCF7, which carries a heterozygous frameshift mutation ...

  10. Identification of Novel Mutations in HEXA Gene in Children Affected with Tay Sachs Disease from India

    OpenAIRE

    Mehul Mistri; Tamhankar, Parag M; Frenny Sheth; Daksha Sanghavi; Pratima Kondurkar; Swapnil Patil; Susan Idicula-Thomas; Sarita Gupta; Jayesh Sheth

    2012-01-01

    Tay Sachs disease (TSD) is a neurodegenerative disorder due to β-hexosaminidase A deficiency caused by mutations in the HEXA gene. The mutations leading to Tay Sachs disease in India are yet unknown. We aimed to determine mutations leading to TSD in India by complete sequencing of the HEXA gene. The clinical inclusion criteria included neuroregression, seizures, exaggerated startle reflex, macrocephaly, cherry red spot on fundus examination and spasticity. Neuroimaging criteria included thala...

  11. Novel C3 mutation p.Lys65Gln in aHUS affects complement factor H binding.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volokhina, E.; Westra, D.; Xue, X.; Gros, P.; Kar, N.C. van de; Heuvel, L.P. van den

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is associated with mutations affecting complement proteins and regulators and with autoantibodies against complement factor H (CFH). Approximately half of the aHUS patients progress to end-stage renal disease. DNA analysis of the risk factor gene

  12. Novel C3 mutation p.Lys65Gln in aHUS affects complement factor H binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volokhina, E.B.; Westra, D.; Xue, X; Gros, P.; van der Kar, N.C.A.J.; van den Heuvel, L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is associated with mutations affecting complement proteins and regulators and with autoantibodies against complement factor H (CFH). Approximately half of the aHUS patients progress to end-stage renal disease. DNA analysis of the risk factor genes

  13. Mutations Affecting Synthesis of β-Galactosidase Activity in the Yeast KLUYVEROMYCES LACTIS

    OpenAIRE

    Sheetz, R. Michael; Dickson, Robert C.

    1980-01-01

    Fifty-one mutants of Kluyveromyces lactis that cannot grow on lactose (Lac-) were isolated and characterized. All of the mutations are in nuclear genes, are recessive in their wild-type allele and define seven complementation groups, which we designate lac3 through lac9. Strains bearing mutations in lac3, lac5, lac7, lac8 and lac9 are also unable to grow on galactose (Gal-). Since the Gal- and Lac- phenotype co-segregate, they are probably due to a single mutation. Strains bearing mutations i...

  14. Sequence Environment of Mutation Affects Stability and Folding in Collagen Model Peptides of Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    OpenAIRE

    Bryan, Michael A.; Cheng, Haiming; Brodsky, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI), a disorder characterized by fragile bones, is often a consequence of missense mutations in type I collagen which change one Gly in the repeating (Gly-Xaaa-Yaa)n sequence to a larger amino acid. The impact of local environment and the identity of the residue replacing Gly was investigated using two sets of triple-helical peptides. Gly mutations in the highly stable (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10 system are compared with mutations in T1-865 peptides where the mutation is located ...

  15. FIRING PROPERTY OF INFERIOR COLLICULUS NEURONS AFFECTED BY FMR1 GENE MUTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brittany Mott; SUN Wei

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental retardation affecting up to 1 in 4000 individuals. The syn-drome is induced by a mutation in the FMR1 gene, causing a deficiency in its gene by-product FMRP. Impairment in the nor-mal functioning of FMRP leads to learning and memory deficits and heightened sensitivity to sensory stimuli, including sound (hyperacusis). The molecular basis of fragile X syndrome is thoroughly understood;however, the neural mechanisms underly-ing hyperacusis have not yet been determined. As the inferior colliculus (IC) is the principal midbrain nucleus of the auditory pathway, the current study addresses the questions underlying the neural mechanism of hyperacusis within the IC of fragile X mice. Acute experiments were performed in which electrophysiological recordings of the IC in FMR1-KO and WT mice were measured. Results showed that Q-values for WT were significantly larger than that of FMR-1 KO mice, indicating that WT mice exhibit sharper tuning curves than FMR1-KO mice. We also found the ratio of the monotonic neurons in the KO mice was much higher than the WT mice. These results suggest that lack of FMRP in the auditory system affects the developmental maturation and function of structures within the auditory pathway, and in this case specifically the IC. The dysfunction ob-served within the auditory neural pathway and in particular the IC may be related to the increased susceptibility to sound as seen in individuals with fragile X syndrome. Our study may help on understanding the mechanisms of the fragile X syndrome and hyperacusis.

  16. The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Noureldin Radwa A; Liu Songtao; Nacif Marcelo S; Judge Daniel P; Halushka Marc K; Abraham Theodore P; Ho Carolyn; Bluemke David A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic disease of the heart. HCM is characterized by a wide range of clinical expression, ranging from asymptomatic mutation carriers to sudden cardiac death as the first manifestation of the disease. Over 1000 mutations have been identified, classically in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins. Noninvasive imaging is central to the diagnosis of HCM and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is increasingly used to characterize morp...

  17. RBM20, a gene for hereditary cardiomyopathy, regulates titin splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Wei; Schafer, Sebastian; Greaser, Marion L.; Radke, Michael H.; Liss, Martin; Govindarajan, Thirupugal; Maatz, Henrike; Schulz, Herbert; Li, Shijun; Parrish, Amanda M.; Dauksaite, Vita; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Klaassen, Sabine; Gerull, Brenda; Thierfelder, Ludwig

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in the adaptation of cardiac function exemplified by the isoform switch of titin, which adjusts ventricular filling. We previously identified a rat strain deficient in titin splicing. Using genetic mapping, we found a loss-of-function mutation in RBM20 as the underlying cause for the pathological titin isoform expression. Mutations in human RBM20 have previously been shown to cause dilated cardiomyopathy. We showed that the phenotype of Rbm20 deficient ...

  18. Mutations affecting both the rearranged and the unrearranged PML alleles in refractory acute promyelocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaccarino, Licia; Ottone, Tiziana; Divona, Mariadomenica; Cicconi, Laura; Cairoli, Roberto; Voso, Maria Teresa; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) is characterized by the PML/RARA fusion transcript. PML and RARA mutations have been shown to directly respond to arsenic trioxide (ATO) and all-trans retinoic (ATRA). We analysed the prevalence of PML mutations in 32 patients with de novo or therapy-related APL (t-APL; n = 5), treated with ATO. We identified one ATO-resistant t-APL patient, who presented a PML A216T mutation in both the rearranged and unrearranged PML alleles, and two mutations in the rearranged RARA gene. In this patient, subclones with different PML and RARA mutations acquired clonal dominance during the disease course, probably leading to treatment resistance. PMID:26728337

  19. Identification of novel mutations in HEXA gene in children affected with Tay Sachs disease from India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehul Mistri

    Full Text Available Tay Sachs disease (TSD is a neurodegenerative disorder due to β-hexosaminidase A deficiency caused by mutations in the HEXA gene. The mutations leading to Tay Sachs disease in India are yet unknown. We aimed to determine mutations leading to TSD in India by complete sequencing of the HEXA gene. The clinical inclusion criteria included neuroregression, seizures, exaggerated startle reflex, macrocephaly, cherry red spot on fundus examination and spasticity. Neuroimaging criteria included thalamic hyperdensities on CT scan/T1W images of MRI of the brain. Biochemical criteria included deficiency of hexosaminidase A (less than 2% of total hexosaminidase activity for infantile patients. Total leukocyte hexosaminidase activity was assayed by 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine lysis and hexosaminidase A activity was assayed by heat inactivation method and 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine-6-sulphate lysis method. The exons and exon-intron boundaries of the HEXA gene were bidirectionally sequenced using an automated sequencer. Mutations were confirmed in parents and looked up in public databases. In silico analysis for mutations was carried out using SIFT, Polyphen2, MutationT@ster and Accelrys Discovery Studio softwares. Fifteen families were included in the study. We identified six novel missense mutations, c.340 G>A (p.E114K, c.964 G>A (p.D322N, c.964 G>T (p.D322Y, c.1178C>G (p.R393P and c.1385A>T (p.E462V, c.1432 G>A (p.G478R and two previously reported mutations. c.1277_1278insTATC and c.508C>T (p.R170W. The mutation p.E462V was found in six unrelated families from Gujarat indicating a founder effect. A previously known splice site mutation c.805+1 G>C and another intronic mutation c.672+30 T>G of unknown significance were also identified. Mutations could not be identified in one family. We conclude that TSD patients from Gujarat should be screened for the common mutation p.E462V.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: familial restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions familial restrictive cardiomyopathy familial restrictive cardiomyopathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Open All Close All Description Familial restrictive cardiomyopathy is a genetic form of heart disease. For ...

  1. Private mitochondrial DNA variants in danish patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M Hagen

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is a genetic cardiac disease primarily caused by mutations in genes coding for sarcomeric proteins. A molecular-genetic etiology can be established in ~60% of cases. Evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplogroups are susceptibility factors for HCM. Several polymorphic mtDNA variants are associated with a variety of late-onset degenerative diseases and affect mitochondrial function. We examined the role of private, non-haplogroup associated, mitochondrial variants in the etiology of HCM. In 87 Danish HCM patients, full mtDNA sequencing revealed 446 variants. After elimination of 312 (69.9% non-coding and synonymous variants, a further 109 (24.4% with a global prevalence > 0.1%, three (0.7% haplogroup associated and 19 (2.0% variants with a low predicted in silico likelihood of pathogenicity, three variants: MT-TC: m.5772G>A, MT-TF: m.644A>G, and MT-CYB: m.15024G>A, p.C93Y remained. A detailed analysis of these variants indicated that none of them are likely to cause HCM. In conclusion, private mtDNA mutations are frequent, but they are rarely, if ever, associated with HCM.

  2. Heterozygosity for the classical galactosemia mutation does not affect ovarian reserve and menopausal age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knauff, Erik A. H.; Richardus, Renate; Eijkemans, Marinus J.; Broekinans, Frank J.; de Jong, Frank J.; Fauser, Bart C. J. M.; Bosch, Annet M.

    2007-01-01

    Female patients with classical galactosemia (galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase [GALT] deficiency) frequently suffer from premature ovarian failure, despite treatment with a galactose-restricted diet. Earlier research has suggested an association between heterozygosity for GALT mutations and ea

  3. Female infant with oncocytic cardiomyopathy and microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS): A clue to the pathogenesis of oncocytic cardiomyopathy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, L.M.; Krous, H.F.; Eichenfield, L.F.; Swalwell, C.I.; Jones, M.C. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    A infant girl had red stellate skin lesions on the cheeks and neck, and mildly short palpebral fissures. Her skin abnormality was typical of microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS), a newly recognized syndrome consisting of congenital linear skin defects and ocular abnormalities in females monosomic for Xp22. She died suddenly and unexpectedly at age 4 months; the cause of death was ascribed to oncocytic cardiomyopathy. Oncocytic cardiomyopathy occurs only in young children, who present with refractory arrhythmias leading to cardiac arrest. The coexistence of two rare conditions, one of which is mapped to the X chromosome, and an excess of affected females with oncocytic cardiomyopathy is also X-linked, with Xp22 being a candidate region. Overlapping manifestations in the two conditions (ocular abnormalities in cases of oncocytic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias in MLS) offer additional support for this hypothesis. 43 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Search for mutations affecting protein structure in children of atomic bomb survivors: preliminary report.

    OpenAIRE

    Neel, J. V.; Satoh, C; Hamilton, H B; Otake, M; Goriki, K; Kageoka, T; Fujita, M.; Neriishi, S; Asakawa, J

    1980-01-01

    A total of 289,868 locus tests, based on 28 different protein phenotypes and using one-dimensional electrophoresis to detect variant proteins, has yielded one probable mutation in the offspring of "proximally exposed" parents, who received an estimated average gonadal exposure of 31 to 39 rem in the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. There were no mutations in 208,196 locus tests involving children of "distally exposed" parents, who had essentially no radiation exposure.

  5. Search for mutations affecting protein structure in children of atomic bomb survivors: preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 289,868 locus tests, based on 28 different protein phenotypes and using one-dimensional electrophoresis to detect variant proteins, has yielded one probable mutation in the offspring of proximally exposed parents, who received an estimated average gonadal exposure of 31 to 39 rem in the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. There were no mutations in 208,196 locus tests involving children of distally exposed parents, who had essentially no radiation exposure

  6. Novel missense mutation in the GALNS gene in an affected patient with severe form of mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedhassani, Seyed Mohammad; Hashemi-Gorji, Feyzollah; Yavari, Mahdieh; Mirfakhraie, Reza

    2015-10-23

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA), also known as Morquio A, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS), which causes major skeletal and connective tissue abnormalities and affects multiple organ systems. In this study, one MPS IVA patient with a severe form from consanguine large Iranian family has been investigated. To find a mutation, all of the 14 exons and intron-exon junctions of GALNS gene were sequenced. Sequencing results were analyzed using bioinformatic analysis in order to predict probable pathogenic effect of the variant. One novel homozygous missense mutation in exon 5, c.542A>G (p.Y181C), was found in the proband. That was predicted as being probably pathogenic by bioinformatics analysis. Segregation and familial study confirmed this pathogenic mutation. In conclusion, we have identified the novel mutation responsible for MPS IVA in an Iranian patient to assist in the diagnosis, genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis of the affected families. PMID:26276046

  7. HERC 1 ubiquitin ligase mutation affects neocortical, CA3 hippocampal and spinal cord projection neurons. An ultrastructural study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío eRuiz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous mutation tambaleante is caused by the Gly483Glu substitution in the highly conserved N terminal RCC1-like domain of the HERC1 protein, which leads to the increase of mutated protein levels responsible for cerebellar Purkinje cell death by autophagy. Until now, Purkinje cells have been the only central nervous neurons reported as being targeted by the mutation, and their degeneration elicits an ataxic syndrome in adult mutant mice. However, the ultrastructural analysis performed here demonstrates that signs of autophagy, such as autophagosomes, lysosomes, and altered mitochondria, are present in neocortical pyramidal, CA3 hippocampal pyramidal, and spinal cord motor neurons. The main difference is that the reduction in the number of neurons affected in the tambaleante mutation in the neocortex, the hippocampus, and the spinal cord is not so evident as the dramatic loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Interestingly, signs of autophagy are absent in both interneurons and neuroglia cells. Affected neurons have in common that they are projection neurons which receive strong and varied synaptic inputs, and possess the highest degree of neuronal activity. Therefore, because the integrity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for protein degradation and, hence, for normal protein turnover, it could be hypothesized that the deleterious effects of the misrouting of these pathways would depend directly on the neuronal activity.

  8. HERC 1 Ubiquitin Ligase Mutation Affects Neocortical, CA3 Hippocampal and Spinal Cord Projection Neurons: An Ultrastructural Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva María; Bachiller, Sara; Rosa, José Luis; Armengol, José Angel

    2016-01-01

    The spontaneous mutation tambaleante is caused by the Gly483Glu substitution in the highly conserved N terminal RCC1-like domain of the HERC1 protein, which leads to the increase of mutated protein levels responsible for cerebellar Purkinje cell death by autophagy. Until now, Purkinje cells have been the only central nervous neurons reported as being targeted by the mutation, and their degeneration elicits an ataxic syndrome in adult mutant mice. However, the ultrastructural analysis performed here demonstrates that signs of autophagy, such as autophagosomes, lysosomes, and altered mitochondria, are present in neocortical pyramidal, CA3 hippocampal pyramidal, and spinal cord motor neurons. The main difference is that the reduction in the number of neurons affected in the tambaleante mutation in the neocortex, the hippocampus, and the spinal cord is not so evident as the dramatic loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Interestingly, signs of autophagy are absent in both interneurons and neuroglia cells. Affected neurons have in common that they are projection neurons which receive strong and varied synaptic inputs, and possess the highest degree of neuronal activity. Therefore, because the integrity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for protein degradation and hence, for normal protein turnover, it could be hypothesized that the deleterious effects of the misrouting of these pathways would depend directly on the neuronal activity. PMID:27147983

  9. Saw-tooth cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karatza Ageliki A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present an unusual case of cardiomyopathy in a two month old male infant with a grade-I systolic murmur. Echocardiographic examination disclosed left ventricular (LV, dysplasia with saw-tooth like inwards myocardial projections extending from the lateral walls towards the LV cavity. There was mild LV systolic dysfunction with apical hypokinesia. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance demonstrated in detail these cross bridging muscular projections originating from the inferior interventricular septum and lateral LV wall, along with areas of hypokinesis at the LV septum and apex in a noncoronary distribution, without any late gadolinium enhancement. We have termed this condition saw-tooth cardiomyopathy because of the very characteristic appearance.

  10. Humoral immunity in cardiomyopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Lowry, P J; Thompson, R. A.; Littler, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    Sera from patients with heart disease were examined by single sandwich indirect immunofluorescence for the presence of antibodies to human heart muscle. Endocardial biopsy specimens were also examined by direct immunofluorescence for deposition of antibodies in vivo. No consistent or specific abnormality was found in the biopsy specimens or sera of patients with congestive cardiomyopathy. The presence of anti-heart antibodies in cardiac disease appears to reflect damage to cardiac muscle what...

  11. Saw-tooth cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Karatza Ageliki A; Danias Peter G; Davlouros Periklis A; Kiaffas Maria G; Alexopoulos Dimitrios

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We present an unusual case of cardiomyopathy in a two month old male infant with a grade-I systolic murmur. Echocardiographic examination disclosed left ventricular (LV), dysplasia with saw-tooth like inwards myocardial projections extending from the lateral walls towards the LV cavity. There was mild LV systolic dysfunction with apical hypokinesia. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance demonstrated in detail these cross bridging muscular projections originating from the inferior interve...

  12. Search for gene mutations affecting protein structure in children of A-bomb survivors, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Children who were born between May 1, 1946 and April 1, 1971 to survivor(s) exposed to A-bombing within 2,000 m from the hypocenter in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were selected as exposed group; their sex- and age-matched children born to survivor(s) who were exposed at 2,500 m or farther were selected as control group. When these children were in junior high school, mutation of protein structure was examined by using electrophoresis and by determining red cell enzymes with decreased activity and heat-unstable red cell enzymes. Electrophoretic study revealed a ''rare type of protein mutation'' in 635 of 12,242 individuals in the exposed group and in 448 of 10,154 individuals in the control group. The number of locuses in all proteins examined was calculated. The number of locuses per protein was corrected using the rate of parents' mutation type, and relative number of locuses were obtained. As a result, there was no difference in the mutation frequency per locus and generation between the exposed and control groups. Among children having red cell enzymes with decreased activity, mutant in triose phosphate isomerase was detected in one child in the exposed group, in whom electrophoretic pattern was normal and red cell enzymes were stable to heat. Heat-unstable red cell enzymes were seen in 9 children and their parents. However, family survey revealed genetic mutation in all instances irrespective of A-bombing. (Namekawa, K.)

  13. Screening of mutations affecting protein stability and dynamics of FGFR1—A simulation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. George Priya Doss

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Single amino acid substitutions in Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1 destabilize protein and have been implicated in several genetic disorders like various forms of cancer, Kallamann syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Jackson Weiss syndrome, etc. In order to gain functional insight into mutation caused by amino acid substitution to protein function and expression, special emphasis was laid on molecular dynamics simulation techniques in combination with in silico tools such as SIFT, PolyPhen 2.0, I-Mutant 3.0 and SNAP. It has been estimated that 68% nsSNPs were predicted to be deleterious by I-Mutant, slightly higher than SIFT (37%, PolyPhen 2.0 (61% and SNAP (58%. From the observed results, P722S mutation was found to be most deleterious by comparing results of all in silico tools. By molecular dynamics approach, we have shown that P722S mutation leads to increase in flexibility, and deviated more from the native structure which was supported by the decrease in the number of hydrogen bonds. In addition, biophysical analysis revealed a clear insight of stability loss due to P722S mutation in FGFR1 protein. Majority of mutations predicted by these in silico tools were in good concordance with the experimental results.

  14. A fluoroquinolone resistance associated mutation in gyrA affects DNA supercoiling in Campylobacter jejuni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eHan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fluoroquinolone (FQ-resistant Campylobacter has become a concern for public health. To facilitate the control of FQ-resistant Campylobacter, it is necessary to understand the impact of FQ resistance on the fitness of Campylobacter in its natural hosts as understanding fitness will help to determine and predict the persistence of FQ-resistant Campylobacter. Previously it was shown that acquisition of resistance to FQ antimicrobials enhanced the in vivo fitness of FQ-resistant Campylobacter. In this study, we confirmed the role of the Thr-86-Ile mutation in GyrA in modulating Campylobacter fitness by reverting the mutation to the wild-type allele, which resulted in the loss of the fitness advantage. Additionally, we determined if the resistance-conferring GyrA mutations alter the enzymatic function of the DNA gyrase. Recombinant wild-type gyrase and mutant gyrases with three different types of mutations (Thr-86-Ile, Thr-86-Lys, and Asp-90-Asn, which are associated with FQ resistance in Campylobacter, were generated in E. coli and compared for their supercoiling activities using an in vitro assay. The mutant gyrase with the Thr-86-Ile change showed a greatly reduced supercoiling activity compared with the wild-type gyrase, while other mutant gyrases did not show an altered supercoiling. Furthermore, we measured DNA supercoiling within Campylobacter cells using a reporter plasmid. Consistent with the results from the in vitro supercoiling assay, the FQ-resistant mutant carrying the Thr-86-Ile change in GyrA showed much less DNA supercoiling than the wild-type strain and the mutant strains carrying other mutations. Together, these results indicate that the Thr-86-Ile mutation, which is predominant in clinical FQ-resistant Campylobacter, modulates DNA supercoiling homeostasis in FQ-resistant Campylobacter.

  15. Mutations affecting mRNA processing and fimbrial biogenesis in the Escherichia coli pap operon.

    OpenAIRE

    P. Nilsson; Naureckiene, S; Uhlin, B E

    1996-01-01

    The Escherichia coli pap genetic determinant includes 11 genes and encodes expression of Pap pili on the bacterial surface. An RNase E-dependent mRNA-processing event in the intercistronic papB-papA region results in the accumulation of a papA-gene-specific mRNA in considerable excess of the primary papB-papA mRNA transcription product. We have introduced mutations in the intercistronic region and studied the effect in vivo of these mutations on the processing event, PapA protein expression, ...

  16. Non-compaction of the ventricular myocardium, a cardiomyopathy in search of a pathoanatomical definition

    OpenAIRE

    Val-Bernal, José Fernando; Garijo, M.F.; Rodriguez-Villar, Diana; D. Val

    2010-01-01

    Ventricular non-compaction is a rare cardiomyopathy characterized by numerous, excessively prominent ventricular trabeculations and deep intertrabecular recesses communicating with the ventricular cavity. The lesion is postulated to result from an intrauterine developmental arrest that stops compaction of the myocardial fiber meshwork. This cardiomyopathy affects the left ventricle, with or without concomitant right ventricular involvement. The disease is now seen w...

  17. Severity of cardiomyopathy associated with adenine nucleotide translocator-1 deficiency correlates with mtDNA haplogroup

    OpenAIRE

    Strauss, Kevin A.; DuBiner, Lauren; Simon, Mariella; Zaragoza, Michael; Sengupta, Partho P.; Li, Peng; Narula, Navneet; Dreike, Sandra; Platt, Julia; Procaccio, Vincent; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma R.; Puffenberger, Erik G.; Kelley, Richard I.; Morton, D. Holmes; Narula, Jagat

    2013-01-01

    Mutations of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)–encoded mitochondrial proteins can cause cardiomyopathy associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Hence, the cardiac phenotype of nuclear DNA mitochondrial mutations might be modulated by mtDNA variation. We studied a 13-generation Mennonite pedigree with autosomal recessive myopathy and cardiomyopathy due to an SLC25A4 frameshift null mutation (c.523delC, p.Q175RfsX38), which codes for the heart-muscle isoform of the adenine nucleotide...

  18. Comparison Between Clinical and Echocardiographic Findings in Infants and Children Diagnosed with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Blesneac

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a rather common hereditary disease with an autozomal dominant character, caused by mutations of genes that code for proteins of the cardiac sarcomere. The observed prevalence of this disease is much lower in pediatric patients compared to adults, because it’s late gene expression. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy presenting in infancy has been shown to have a very high mortality.

  19. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy as a cause of sudden death in young people: Literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Mazić Sanja; Lazović Biljana; Đelić Marina

    2012-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia is a progressive condition with right ventricular myocardium being replaced by fibro-fatty tissue. It is a hereditary disorder mostly caused by desmosome gene mutations. The prevalence of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is about 1/1000-5000. Clinical presentation is usually related to ventricular tachycardias, syncope or presyncopa, or ventricular fibrillation leading to cardiac arrest, mostly in young people and ...

  20. Mitochondrial Haplogroups Modify the Risk of Developing Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in a Danish Population

    OpenAIRE

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Hedley, Paula L.; Jensen, Morten K.; Havndrup, Ole; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Moolman-Smook, Johanna C.; Larsen, Severin O.; Bundgaard, Henning; Christiansen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in genes coding for proteins involved in sarcomere function. The disease is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Evolutionarily developed variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), defining mtDNA haplogroups and haplogroup clusters, is associated with functional differences in mitochondrial function and susceptibility to various diseases, including ischemic cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that mtDNA haplogroups, in...

  1. Transcriptional regulation of cardiac genes balance pro- and anti-hypertrophic mechanisms in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Nina Gennebäck; Gerhard Wikström; Urban Hellman; Jane-Lise Samuel; Anders Waldenström; Stellan Mörner

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy. HCM is often hereditary, but our knowledge of the mechanisms leading from mutation to phenotype is incomplete. The transcriptional expression patterns in the myocar - dium of HCM patients may contribute to understanding the mechanisms that drive and stabilize the hypertrophy. Cardiac myectomies/biopsies from 8 patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) and 5 controls were studied ...

  2. Mechanisms of the pathogenesis of troponin T-based familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maass, AH; Leinwand, LA

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in cardiac troponin T (cTnT) cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy characterized by comparatively little cardiac hypertrophy, but a high incidence of sudden cardiac death. Transgenic mice modeling this disease have smaller cardiomyocytes, leading to smaller hearts. However, different mutations

  3. Rooting, growth, and color mutation of poinsettias affected by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of gamma-radiation on the rooting, growth, and color mutation in poinsettia. Using 10 poinsettia varieties ('Lollipop', 'Little Peace', 'Happy Day', 'Early Bird', 'Pixy Red', 'Happy Time', 'Heidi', 'Red Bell', 'Clara', and 'Scarlet') bred by National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science, 100 Gy of gamma ray was irradiated at the stage of callused cuttings. Four weeks after sticking cuttings in the rooting media, 8 cultivars showed 100% of root formation, but 'Early Bird' rooted 24.4% and even died off during the cutting propagation. After planting rooted cuttings, survival rate until flowering time varied among irradiated cultivars. While 'Pixy Red' and 'Heidi' survived about 98%, 'Clara', 'Happy Day', and 'Early Bird' survived lesser than 30%. All irradiated plants showed remarkably shorter plant height, lesser branch numbers than non-irradiated control plants. Thirty color mutants were obtained among 281 plants survived until flowering time. Nine were complete color mutated branches, whereas 21 mutants were partially color mutated bracts and transitional leaves. Color patterns mutated by 100 Gy of gamma ray were divided into pink, hot pink, light red and spotted (pink spots with red main color). Pink mutants were commonly obtained. Complete color mutants were discovered from 4 plants of 'Pixy Red', 2 plants of 'Red Bell' and 3 plants of Lollipop

  4. Mutations in NRXN1 in a family multiply affected with brain disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duong, Linh; Klitten, Laura L; Møller, Rikke S;

    2012-01-01

    deleterious to NRXN1. The deletion was passed on from the patient's mother who was clinically characterized by sub-diagnostic autistic traits in addition to type 1 diabetes mellitus. The point mutation was subsequently found in the patient's brother, suffering from a psychotic disorder, which implies that the...

  5. Breast tumor specific mutation in GATA3 affects physiological mechanisms regulating transcription factor turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transcription factor GATA3 is a favorable prognostic indicator in estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-positive breast tumors in which it participates with ERα and FOXA1 in a complex transcriptional regulatory program driving tumor growth. GATA3 mutations are frequent in breast cancer and have been classified as driver mutations. To elucidate the contribution(s) of GATA3 alterations to cancer, we studied two breast cancer cell lines, MCF7, which carries a heterozygous frameshift mutation in the second zinc finger of GATA3, and T47D, wild-type at this locus. Immunofluorescence staining and subcellular fractionation were employed to verify cellular localization of GATA3 in T47D and MCF7 cells. To test protein stability, cells were treated with translation inhibitor, cycloheximide or proteasome inhibitor, MG132, and GATA3 abundance was measured over time using immunoblot. GATA3 turn-over in response to hormone was determined by treating the cells with estradiol or ERα agonist, ICI 182,780. DNA binding ability of recombinant GATA3 was evaluated using electrophoretic mobility shift assay and heparin chromatography. Genomic location of GATA3 in MCF7 and T47D cells was assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). GATA3 localized in the nucleus in T47D and MCF7 cells, regardless of the mutation status. The truncated protein in MCF7 had impaired interaction with chromatin and was easily released from the nucleus. Recombinant mutant GATA3 was able to bind DNA to a lesser degree than the wild-type protein. Heterozygosity for the truncating mutation conferred protection from regulated turnover of GATA3, ERα and FOXA1 following estrogen stimulation in MCF7 cells. Thus, mutant GATA3 uncoupled protein-level regulation of master regulatory transcription factors from hormone action. Consistent with increased protein stability, ChIP-seq profiling identified greater genome-wide accumulation of GATA3 in MCF7 cells bearing the mutation

  6. Two siblings diagnosed to have transthyretin-related familial amyloid cardiomyopathy around the same time at different hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamura, Masatoshi; Terasaki, Fumio; Ishibashi, Kazuya; Shimazaki, Chihiro; Kimura, Fumiharu; Kuwabara, Hiroko; Tsuji, Motomu; Shibayama, Yuro; Sekijima, Yoshiki; Tojo, Kana; Ishizaka, Nobukazu

    2012-01-01

    Mutation in the transthyretin (TTR) gene may clinically manifest as cardiomyopathy. Here, we describe 69-year-old and 72-year-old brothers who were diagnosed as having TTR-related familial amyloid cardiomyopathy by endomyocardial biopsy at different hospitals at around the same time. They were not from an endemic area of familial amyloid polyneuropathy. Genetic analysis showed a base change in the TTR gene leading to a p.Val30Met mutation in both patients. Screening of family members, as well as detailed family history taking, is important for the diagnosis of cardiomyopathy of unknown etiology. PMID:22382560

  7. Degenerate in vitro genetic selection reveals mutations that diminish alfalfa mosaic virus RNA replication without affecting coat protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Gail; Petrillo, Jessica; Guogas, Laura; Gehrke, Lee

    2004-08-01

    The alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNAs are infectious only in the presence of the viral coat protein; however, the mechanisms describing coat protein's role during replication are disputed. We reasoned that mechanistic details might be revealed by identifying RNA mutations in the 3'-terminal coat protein binding domain that increased or decreased RNA replication without affecting coat protein binding. Degenerate (doped) in vitro genetic selection, based on a pool of randomized 39-mers, was used to select 30 variant RNAs that bound coat protein with high affinity. AUGC sequences that are conserved among AMV and ilarvirus RNAs were among the invariant nucleotides in the selected RNAs. Five representative clones were analyzed in functional assays, revealing diminished viral RNA expression resulting from apparent defects in replication and/or translation. These data identify a set of mutations, including G-U wobble pairs and nucleotide mismatches in the 5' hairpin, which affect viral RNA functions without significant impact on coat protein binding. Because the mutations associated with diminished function were scattered over the 3'-terminal nucleotides, we considered the possibility that RNA conformational changes rather than disruption of a precise motif might limit activity. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments showed that the 3' RNA conformation was indeed altered by nucleotide substitutions. One interpretation of the data is that coat protein binding to the AUGC sequences determines the orientation of the 3' hairpins relative to one another, while local structural features within these hairpins are also critical determinants of functional activity. PMID:15254175

  8. The DMRT3 'Gait keeper' mutation affects performance of Nordic and Standardbred trotters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäderkvist, K; Andersson, L S; Johansson, A M; Árnason, T; Mikko, S; Eriksson, S; Andersson, L; Lindgren, G

    2014-10-01

    In a previous study it was shown that a nonsense mutation in the DMRT3 gene alters the pattern of locomotion in horses and that this mutation has a strong positive impact on trotting performance of Standardbreds. One aim of this study was to test if racing performance and trotting technique in the Nordic (Coldblood) trotters are also influenced by the DMRT3 genotype. Another aim was to further investigate the effect of the mutation on performance in Standardbreds, by using a within-family analysis and genotype-phenotype correlations in a larger horse material than in the previous study. We genotyped 427 Nordic trotters and 621 Standardbreds for the DMRT3 nonsense mutation and a SNP in strong linkage disequilibrium with it. In Nordic trotters, we show that horses homozygous for the DMRT3 mutation (A) had significantly higher EBV for trotting performance traits than heterozygous (CA) or homozygous wild-type (CC) horses (P = 0.001). Furthermore, AA homozygotes had a higher proportion of victories and top 3 placings than horses heterozygous or homozygous wild-type, when analyzing performance data for the period 3 to 6 yr of age (P = 0.06 and P = 0.05, respectively). Another finding in the Nordic trotters was that the DMRT3 mutation influenced trotting technique (P = 2.1 × 10(-8)). Standardbred horses homozygous AA had significantly higher EBV for all traits than horses with at least 1 wild-type allele (CA and CC; P = 1.6 × 10(-16)). In a within-family analysis of Standardbreds, we found significant differences in several traits (e.g., earnings, P = 0.002; number of entered races, P = 0.004; and fraction of offspring that entered races, P = 0.002) among paternal half-sibs with genotype AA or CA sired by a CA stallion. For most traits, we found significant differences at young ages. For Nordic trotters, most of the results were significant at 3 yr of age but not for the older ages, and for the Standardbreds most of the results for the ages 3 to 5 were significant. For

  9. Transient congenital hypothyroidism caused by compound heterozygous mutations affecting the NADPH-oxidase domain of DUOX2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa-Ogasawara, Atsuko; Abe, Kiyomi; Ogikubo, Sayaka; Narumi, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Satoh, Mari

    2016-03-01

    Here, we describe three cases of loss-of-function mutations in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase (NOX) domain of dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2) occurring along with concurrent missense mutations in thyroid peroxidase (TPO), leading to transient congenital hypothyroidism (CH). Three Japanese boys with nonconsanguineous parents were diagnosed with CH during their neonatal screenings. All patients presented with moderate-to-severe neonatal hypothyroidism and were diagnosed with transient CH after re-evaluation of thyroid function. Two siblings were compound heterozygous for p.[R1110Q]+[Y1180X] in DUOX2; one of them was also heterozygous for p.[R361L] in TPO. The third patient was compound heterozygous for p.[L1160del]+[R1334W] in DUOX2 and heterozygous for p.[P883S] in TPO. This is the first report of a de novo L1160del mutation affecting the DUOX2 gene and of the novel mutations Y1180X in DUOX2 and R361L in TPO. R1110Q and L1160del were found to reduce H2O2 production (5%-9%, p<0.01), while Y1180X, which introduces a premature stop codon, did not confer detectable H2O2 production (-0.7%±0.6%, p<0.01). Moreover, R1334W, a missense mutation possibly affecting electron transfer, led to reduced H2O2 production (24%±0.9%, p<0.01) in vitro, and R1110Q and R1334W resulted in reduced protein expression. Y1180X was detected in a 120 kDa truncated form, whereas L1160del expression was maintained. Further, R361L, a novel missense mutation in TPO, caused partial reduction in peroxidase activity (20.6%±0.8%, p=0.01), whereas P883S, a missense variant, increased it (133.7%±2.8%, p=0.02). The protein expression levels in the case of R361L and P883S were maintained. In conclusion, we provide clinical and in vitro demonstrations of different functional defects and phenotypic heterogeneity in the same thyroid hormonogenesis pathway. PMID:26565538

  10. Point mutation in the mouse P2X7 receptor affects intercellular calcium waves in astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia O Suadicani

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Purinergic P2 receptors and gap junctions are two groups of proteins involved in the transmission of ICWs (intercellular calcium waves) between astrocytes. The extent to which ICWs spread among these glial cells depends on the amount of ATP released, which can occur through membrane channels, as well as other pathways. Our previous studies have shown that the pore-forming P2X7R (P2X7 receptor) contributes to the amplification of ICW spread by providing sites of ATP release through Panx1 (Pannexin1) channels. To gain insight into the signal transduction events mediating this response we compared the properties of the P2X7R–Panx1 complex in astrocytes from a mouse strain (C57Bl/6) containing a naturally occurring point mutation (P451L) in the C-terminus of the P2X7R to that of non-mutated receptors (Balb/C mice). Electrophysiological, biochemical, pharmacological and fluorescence imaging techniques revealed that the P451L mutation located in the SH3 domain (a Src tyrosine kinase-binding site) of the C-terminus of the P2X7R attenuates Panx1 currents, ATP release and the distance of ICW spread between astrocytes. Similar results were obtained when using the Src tyrosine inhibitor (PP2) and a membrane-permeant peptide spanning the P451L mutation of the P2X7R of the C57Bl6 astrocytes. These results support the participation of a tyrosine kinase of the Src family in the initial steps mediating the opening of Panx1 channels following P2X7R stimulation and in the transmission of calcium signals among astrocytes.

  11. Emergent Transport Properties of Molecular Motor Ensemble Affected by Single Motor Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Bhaban, Shreyas; Materassi, Donatello; Li, Mingang; Hays, Thomas; Salapaka, Murti

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular transport is an essential function in eucaryotic cells, facilitated by motor proteins - proteins converting chemical energy into kinetic energy. It is known that motor proteins work in teams enabling unidirectional and bidirectional transport of intracellular cargo over long distances. Disruptions of the underlying transport mechanisms, often caused by mutations that alter single motor characteristics, are known to cause neurodegenerative diseases. For example, phosphorylation o...

  12. Differences in the evolutionary history of disease genes affected by dominant or recessive mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Albà M Mar; Furney Simon J; López-Bigas Núria

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Global analyses of human disease genes by computational methods have yielded important advances in the understanding of human diseases. Generally these studies have treated the group of disease genes uniformly, thus ignoring the type of disease-causing mutations (dominant or recessive). In this report we present a comprehensive study of the evolutionary history of autosomal disease genes separated by mode of inheritance. Results We examine differences in protein and coding...

  13. Gly369Cys mutation in mouse FGFR3 causes achondroplasia by affecting both chondrogenesis and osteogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lin; Adar, Rivka; Yang, Xiao; Monsonego, Efrat O.; Li, Cuiling; Hauschka, Peter V; Yayon, Avner; Deng, Chu-Xia

    1999-01-01

    Missense mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) result in several human skeletal dysplasias, including the most common form of dwarfism, achondroplasia. Here we show that a glycine-to-cysteine substitution at position 375 (Gly375Cys) in human FGFR3 causes ligand-independent dimerization and phosphorylation of FGFR3 and that the equivalent substitution at position 369 (Gly369Cys) in mouse FGFR3 causes dwarfism with features mimicking human achondroplasia. Accordingly, homozyg...

  14. ARRHYTHMOGENIC CALMODULIN MUTATIONS AFFECT THE ACTIVATION AND TERMINATION OF CARDIAC RYANODINE RECEPTOR MEDIATED CA2+ RELEASE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Mads Toft; Chazin, Walter J.; Chen, Wayne S.R.;

    . Taken together, all CaM mutations induced an excessive fractional Ca2+ release from internal Ca2+ stores. Interestingly, we demonstrate that the presence of the RyR2 CaMBD decrease the WT CaM C-lobe apparent KD for Ca2+ binding >80 fold to 30 nM. This suggests that Ca2+ binding to the C-lobe of Ca......M would be nearly saturated at diastolic Ca2+ concentrations (~100 nM), and that the C-lobe of CaM would constitutively anchor to RyR2 in a Ca2+ bound state throughout the ECC cycle. Conversely, the N-lobe of CaM seems poised to be sensing changes in physiological Ca2+ with an apparent KD of ~800 nM in...... the presence of RyR2 CaMBD. The D95V, N97S and D129G mutations lowered the affinity of Ca2+ binding of the C-lobe of CaM, to apparent KDs of ~ 140, 150, and 4000 nM, respectively, consistent with the critical role of these residues in Ca2+ binding to the C-lobe. Thus, we suggest that these mutations...

  15. Chagas Disease Cardiomyopathy: Immunopathology and Genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edecio Cunha-Neto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in Latin America and affects ca. 10 million people worldwide. About 30% of Chagas disease patients develop chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC, a particularly lethal inflammatory cardiomyopathy that occurs decades after the initial infection, while most patients remain asymptomatic. Mortality rate is higher than that of noninflammatory cardiomyopathy. CCC heart lesions present a Th1 T-cell-rich myocarditis, with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and prominent fibrosis. Data suggest that the myocarditis plays a major pathogenetic role in disease progression. Major unmet goals include the thorough understanding of disease pathogenesis and therapeutic targets and identification of prognostic genetic factors. Chagas disease thus remains a neglected disease, with no vaccines or antiparasitic drugs proven efficient in chronically infected adults, when most patients are diagnosed. Both familial aggregation of CCC cases and the fact that only 30% of infected patients develop CCC suggest there might be a genetic component to disease susceptibility. Moreover, previous case-control studies have identified some genes associated to human susceptibility to CCC. In this paper, we will review the immunopathogenesis and genetics of Chagas disease, highlighting studies that shed light on the differential progression of Chagas disease patients to CCC.

  16. RBM20, a gene for hereditary cardiomyopathy, regulates titin splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Schafer, Sebastian; Greaser, Marion L.; Radke, Michael H.; Liss, Martin; Govindarajan, Thirupugal; Maatz, Henrike; Schulz, Herbert; Li, Shijun; Parrish, Amanda M.; Dauksaite, Vita; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Klaassen, Sabine; Gerull, Brenda; Thierfelder, Ludwig; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Hacker, Timothy A.; Saupe, Kurt W.; Dec, G. William; Ellinor, Patrick T.; MacRae, Calum A.; Spallek, Bastian; Fischer, Robert; Perrot, Andreas; Özcelik, Cemil; Saar, Kathrin; Hubner, Norbert; Gotthardt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in the adaptation of cardiac function exemplified by the isoform switch of titin, which adjusts ventricular filling. We previously identified a rat strain deficient in titin splicing. Using genetic mapping, we found a loss-of-function mutation in RBM20 as the underlying cause for the pathological titin isoform expression. Mutations in human RBM20 have previously been shown to cause dilated cardiomyopathy. We showed that the phenotype of Rbm20 deficient rats resembles the human pathology. Deep sequencing of the human and rat cardiac transcriptome revealed an RBM20 dependent regulation of alternative splicing. Additionally to titin we identified a set of 30 genes with conserved regulation between human and rat. This network is enriched for genes previously linked to cardiomyopathy, ion-homeostasis, and sarcomere biology. Our studies emphasize the importance of posttranscriptional regulation in cardiac function and provide mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of human heart failure. PMID:22466703

  17. ACE I/D polymorphism in Indian patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Taranjit Singh; Dhandapany, Perundurai Subramaniam; Ahluwalia, Tarun Veer Singh;

    2008-01-01

    The study was carried to determine the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism with the risk of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM).......The study was carried to determine the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism with the risk of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM)....

  18. Heterozygous nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 mutations affect monocyte maturation in Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the function of monocytes in Crohn's disease (CD) patients and to correlate this with diseaseassociated nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2) gene variants.METHODS: Monocytes from 47 consecutively referred CD patients and 9 healthy blood donors were cultured with interleukin (IL)-4 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or muramyldipeptide (MDP), the putative ligand of NOD2.RESULTS: We found that monocytes from CD patients differentiated in vitro to mature dendritic cells (DCs), as determined by immunophenotype and morphology.NOD2 genotype was assessed in all subjects, and we observed high CD86 expression on immature and LPS-stimulated DCs in NOD2 mutated CD patients, as compared with wtNOD2 CD patients and controls. By contrast, CD86 expression levels of DCs induced to maturity with MDP derived from NOD2-mutated subjects were comparable to those of normal subjects. The amount of IL-12p70 in patient-cell cultures was larger than in controls after LPS treatment, but not after treatment with MDP.CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that DCs obtained from patients with mutations in the NOD2 gene display an activated phenotype characterized by high CD86 expression, but have a diminished response to MDP when compared to the terminal differentiation phase. We speculate that the altered differentiation of monocytes might lead to an imbalance between inflammation and the killing ability of monocytes, and may be relevant to the pathogenesis of CD.

  19. Mutations altering the gammaretrovirus endoproteolytic motif affect glycosylation of the envelope glycoprotein and early events of the virus life cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argaw, Takele; Wilson, Carolyn A., E-mail: carolyn.wilson@fda.hhs.gov

    2015-01-15

    Previously, we found that mutation of glutamine to proline in the endoproteolytic cleavage signal of the PERV-C envelope (RQKK to RPKK) resulted in non-infectious vectors. Here, we show that RPKK results in a non-infectious vector when placed in not only a PERV envelope, but also the envelope of a related gammaretrovirus, FeLV-B. The amino acid substitutions do not prevent envelope precursor cleavage, viral core and genome assembly, or receptor binding. Rather, the mutations result in the formation of hyperglycosylated glycoprotein and a reduction in the reverse transcribed minus strand synthesis and undetectable 2-LTR circular DNA in cells exposed to vectors with these mutated envelopes. Our findings suggest novel functions associated with the cleavage signal sequence that may affect trafficking through the glycosylation machinery of the cell. Further, the glycosylation status of the envelope appears to impact post-binding events of the viral life cycle, either membrane fusion, internalization, or reverse transcription. - Highlights: • Env cleavage signal impacts infectivity of gammaretroviruses. • Non-infectious mutants have hyper-glycosylated envelope that bind target cells. • Non-infectious mutants have defects in the formation of the double-stranded DNA. • Env cleavage motif has functions beyond cleavage of the env precursor.

  20. The prevalence of ABCB1:c.227_230delATAG mutation in affected dog breeds from European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdova, Zuzana; Turnova, Evelina; Bielikova, Marcela; Turna, Jan; Dudas, Andrej

    2016-06-01

    Deletion of 4-base pairs in the canine ABCB1 (MDR1) gene, responsible for encoding P-glycoprotein, leads to nonsense frame-shift mutation, which causes hypersensitivity to macrocyclic lactones drugs (e.g. ivermectin). To date, at least 12 purebred dog breeds have been found to be affected by this mutation. The aim of this study was to update information about the prevalence of ABCB1 mutation (c.227_230delATAG) in predisposed breeds in multiple European countries. This large scale survey also includes countries which were not involved in previous studies. The samples were collected in the period from 2012 to 2014. The overview is based on genotyping data of 4729 individuals. The observed mutant allele frequencies were 58.5% (Smooth Collie), 48.3% (Rough Collie), 35% (Australian Shepherd), 30.3% (Shetland Sheepdog), 28.1% (Silken Windhound), 26.1% (Miniature Australian Shepherd), 24.3% (Longhaired Whippet), 16.2% (White Swiss Shepherd) and 0% (Border Collie). The possible presence of an ABCB1 mutant allele in Akita-Inu breed has been investigated with negative results. This information could be helpful for breeders in optimization of their breeding strategy and for veterinarians when prescribing drug therapy for dogs of predisposed breeds. PMID:27234542

  1. X-Linked Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Cardiospecific Phenotype of Dystrophinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Akinori Nakamura

    2015-01-01

    X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLDCM) is a distinct phenotype of dystrophinopathy characterized by preferential cardiac involvement without any overt skeletal myopathy. XLDCM is caused by mutations of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene and results in lethal heart failure in individuals between 10 and 20 years. Patients with Becker muscular dystrophy, an allelic disorder, have a milder phenotype of skeletal muscle involvement compared to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and sometime...

  2. High incidence of Noonan syndrome features including short stature and pulmonic stenosis in patients carrying NF1 missense mutations affecting p.Arg1809: genotype-phenotype correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Xie, Jing; Gomes, Alicia; Sharp, Angela; Callens, Tom; Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Ying; Cochran, Meagan; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Atkin, Joan; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barnett, Christopher P; Crenshaw, Melissa; Bartholomew, Dennis W; Basel, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most frequent genetic disorders, affecting 1:3,000 worldwide. Identification of genotype-phenotype correlations is challenging because of the wide range clinical variability, the progressive nature of the disorder, and extreme diversity of the mutational spectrum. We report 136 individuals with a distinct phenotype carrying one of five different NF1 missense mutations affecting p.Arg1809. Patients presented with multiple cafe-au-lait macules (CALM)...

  3. Cine MRI of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cine MRI was performed using 1.5T or 0.5T MR units in eleven patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Septal and posterior wall thickness measured by cine MRI correlated well with those obtained by ultrasonographic cardiogram. In hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, cine MRI demonstrated the site and nature of obstructive change in left ventricle. Cine MRI also showed flow void due to mitral regurgitation successfully. We considered cine MRI is useful means to evaluate the anatomical and functional findings in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (author)

  4. Microfibrillar cardiomyopathy: A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narender Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfibrillar cardiomyopathy is a very rare cause of restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM. The index case was a male patient who presented with shortness of breath and pedal edema. Further clinical investigations favored a clinical diagnosis of RCM. An endomyocardial biopsy revealed subendocardial and interstitial hyaline eosinophillic material resembling amyloid that did not stain with Congo red. An electron microscopic examination showed that this material was composed of twisted linear and bundles of tangled microfibrils. The etiology of the microfibrillar deposition is currently unknown. The pathologists should entertain the diagnosis of microfibrillar cardiomyopathy in suspected cases of amyloidosis that are negative for Congo red.

  5. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  6. Systematic review of pregnancy in women with inherited cardiomyopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, Sebastien P. J.; van der Smagt, Jasper J.; van den Berg, Maarten P.; Sollie, Krystyna M.; Pieper, Petronella G.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y.

    2011-01-01

    Pregnancy exposes women with inherited cardiomyopathies to increased risk for heart failure and arrhythmias. In this paper, we review the clinical course and management of pregnant women with the following inherited cardiomyopathies: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogeni

  7. Genetic bases of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Rampazzo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC is a heart muscle disease in which the pathological substrate is a fibro-fatty replacement of the right ventricular myocardium. The major clinical features are different types of arrhythmias with a left branch block pattern. ARVC shows autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Recessive forms were also described, although in association with skin disorders. Ten genetic loci have been discovered so far and mutations were reported in five different genes. ARVD1 was associated with regulatory mutations of transforming growth factor beta-3 (TGFβ3, whereas ARVD2, characterized by effort-induced polymorphic arrhythmias, was associated with mutations in cardiac ryanodine receptor-2 (RYR2. All other mutations identified to date have been detected in genes encoding desmosomal proteins: plakoglobin (JUP which causes Naxos disease (a recessive form of ARVC associated with palmoplantar keratosis and woolly hair; desmoplakin (DSP which causes the autosomal dominant ARVD8 and plakophilin-2 (PKP2 involved in ARVD9. Desmosomes are important cell-to-cell adhesion junctions predominantly found in epidermis and heart; they are believed to couple cytoskeletal elements to plasma membrane in cell-to-cell or cell-to-substrate adhesions.

  8. Idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy - perspectives from genetics studies. Is it time to redefine these disorders?

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay Bahl; Uma Nahar Saikia; Madhu Khullar

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy (IRC) is a rare form of heart muscle disease. Genetic studies have revealed that in about half the cases, IRC forms part of the hereditary sarcomeric contractile protein disease spectrum. Mutations in several sarcomere protein encoding genes are detected in 33-66% of cases. Among these, the mutations most commonly involve TNNI3 and MYH7. There is a disproportionately high incidence of TNNI3 mutations in patients with restrictive physiology. De novo mutati...

  9. Genetic analysis of jumbled spine and ribs (Jsr) mutation affecting the vertebral development in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Shinya; Asano, Atsushi; Kon, Yasuhiro; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2002-10-01

    The jumbled spine and ribs (Jsr) mouse was derived from a spontaneous mutation. As the phenotype, a shortened trunk and kinky tail are characteristic Jsr traits. In this study, on high resolution mapping it was found that Lunatic fringe (Lfng) mapped at the same position as Jsr. Lfng was identified as the candidate gene for Jsr, but sequence analysis of this gene revealed no substitution in the coding region of cDNA. Therefore, we adopted the strategy of positional cloning for Jsr using a mouse bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. A BAC contig was constructed from three BAC clones showing positive signals of Lfng and 11MMHAP75FRD8.seq near the Jsr locus on chromosome 5. Based on the genetic mapping of both T7 and sp6 ends of a clone of BAC382-O-7 (BAC382), the Jsr gene was considered to exist in BAC382 and to be positioned near the sp6 side. PMID:12392169

  10. Tachycardia-induced Cardiomyopathy (Tachycardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan A. Mohamed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The term tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy or tachycardiomyopathy refers to impairment in left ventricular function secondary to chronic tachycardia, which is partially or completely reversible once the tachyarrhythmia is controlled. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy has been shown to occur both in experimental models and in patients with incessant tachyarrhythmia.Data from several studies and from case reports have shown that rate control by means of cardioversion, negative chronotropic agents, and surgical or catheter-based atrioventricular node ablation, resulted in significant improvement of systolic function.The diagnosis of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy is usually made following observation of marked improvement in systolic function after normalization of heart rate. Clinicians should be aware that patients with unexplained systolic dysfunction may have tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy, and that controlling the arrhythmia may result in improvement of systolic function.

  11. Experimental and molecular dynamics studies showed that CBP KIX mutation affects the stability of CBP:c-Myb complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoux, Anne; Jindal, Darren; Tamas, Tamara C; Lim, Benjamin W H; Pollard, Drake; Xu, Wu

    2016-06-01

    The coactivators CBP (CREBBP) and its paralog p300 (EP300), two conserved multi-domain proteins in eukaryotic organisms, regulate gene expression in part by binding DNA-binding transcription factors. It was previously reported that the CBP/p300 KIX domain mutant (Y650A, A654Q, and Y658A) altered both c-Myb-dependent gene activation and repression, and that mice with these three point mutations had reduced numbers of platelets, B cells, T cells, and red blood cells. Here, our transient transfection assays demonstrated that mouse embryonic fibroblast cells containing the same mutations in the KIX domain and without a wild-type allele of either CBP or p300, showed decreased c-Myb-mediated transcription. Dr. Wright's group solved a 3-D structure of the mouse CBP:c-Myb complex using NMR. To take advantage of the experimental structure and function data and improved theoretical calculation methods, we performed MD simulations of CBP KIX, CBP KIX with the mutations, and c-Myb, as well as binding energy analysis for both the wild-type and mutant complexes. The binding between CBP and c-Myb is mainly mediated by a shallow hydrophobic groove in the center where the side-chain of Leu302 of c-Myb plays an essential role and two salt bridges at the two ends. We found that the KIX mutations slightly decreased stability of the CBP:c-Myb complex as demonstrated by higher binding energy calculated using either MM/PBSA or MM/GBSA methods. More specifically, the KIX mutations affected the two salt bridges between CBP and c-Myb (CBP-R646 and c-Myb-E306; CBP-E665 and c-Myb-R294). Our studies also revealed differing dynamics of the hydrogen bonds between CBP-R646 and c-Myb-E306 and between CBP-E665 and c-Myb-R294 caused by the CBP KIX mutations. In the wild-type CBP:c-Myb complex, both of the hydrogen bonds stayed relatively stable. In contrast, in the mutant CBP:c-Myb complex, hydrogen bonds between R646 and E306 showed an increasing trend followed by a decreasing trend, and hydrogen

  12. Familial neurofibromatosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzpatrick, A. P.; Emanuel, R W

    1988-01-01

    Two siblings from a family in which neurofibromatosis was inherited as an autosomal dominant had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and neurofibromatosis. Idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may have occurred by chance in two first degree relatives with neurofibromatosis. An alternative explantation is that these diseases are both manifestations of a common hereditary defect of neural crest tissue. Another possibility is that abnormalities of catecholamine metabolism and nerve growth factor in ne...

  13. New insights into cirrhotic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Hove, Jens D; Dixen, Ulrik;

    2013-01-01

    beta-receptor function seem involved in the autonomic and cardiac dysfunction. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy can be revealed by tissue Doppler imaging but is best demasked by physical or pharmacological stress. Liver transplantation may revert cardiac dysfunction but surgery and shunt insertion may also......Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy designates a cardiac dysfunction, which includes reduced cardiac contractility with systolic and diastolic dysfunction, and presence of electrophysiological abnormalities in particular prolongation of the QT interval. Several pathophysiological mechanisms including reduced...

  14. [Application of next-generation semiconductor sequencing technologies in genetic diagnosis of inherited cardiomyopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Zhao; Hong, Zhang; Xueshan, Xia

    2015-07-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathy is the most common hereditary cardiac disease. It also causes a significant proportion of sudden cardiac deaths in young adults and athletes. So far, approximately one hundred genes have been reported to be involved in cardiomyopathies through different mechanisms. Therefore, the identification of the genetic basis and disease mechanisms of cardiomyopathies are important for establishing a clinical diagnosis and genetic testing. Next-generation semiconductor sequencing (NGSS) technology platform is a high-throughput sequencer capable of analyzing clinically derived genomes with high productivity, sensitivity and specificity. It was launched in 2010 by Life Technologies of USA, and it is based on a high density semiconductor chip, which was covered with tens of thousands of wells. NGSS has been successfully used in candidate gene mutation screening to identify hereditary disease. In this review, we summarize these genetic variations, challenge and application of NGSS in inherited cardiomyopathy, and its value in disease diagnosis, prevention and treatment. PMID:26351163

  15. MRI of restrictive cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of MRI in combination of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging for the identification of restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Methods: One hundred sixteen patients with RCM underwent ECG, thoracic radiography, echocardiography and MRI. The final diagnosis was made on comprehensive evaluation in consideration of patient history, clinical symptoms and imaging appearances. Fifty-five normal subjects were used as the controls. All patients were divided into two groups according to contrast-enhanced MRI patterns: RCM with delayed enhancement (RCM with DE, n=35) and RCM without delayed enhancement (RCM without DE, n=81). Bi-atrial and bi-ventricular size, ventricular septal and left free wall thickness were measured. A paired t-test was used for statistic analysis. Results: Bi-atrial size, right ventricular diastolic diameter (RVDD), ventricular septal and left free wall thickness were significantly larger in RCM patients than in normal subjects (P0.05). Visual observation showed mild mitral regurgitation (50 cases), moderate mitral regurgitation (24 cases ), mild tricuspid regurgitation (32 cases) and severe tricuspid regurgitation (46 cases). Thirty-five RCMs with DE presented diffuse (15 cases) or segmental (20 cases) enhancement. Twelve RCMs with diffuse delayed enhancement showed powdery, enhancement, and 3 showed petaline enhancement. Three cases with powdery enhancement were histologically proven as myocardial amyloidosis. Ventricular septum was the most vulnerable segment in patients with segmental enhancement. Six cases presented subendocardial enhancement that corresponded to apical obliteration, of which one case was confirmed as hypereosinophilia by bone marrow biopsy and the other 14 cases didn't present any regular enhancement. In 81 RCMs without DE, marked bi-atrial dilation, near-normal ventricular chambers and near-normal ventricular thickness were presented. Conclusion: MRI is an excellent imaging modality for

  16. An obstetric emergency called peripartum cardiomyopathy!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Nissar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM is a rare obstetric emergency affecting women in late pregnancy or up to five months of postpartum period. The etiology of PPCM is still not known. It has potentially devastating effects on mother and fetus if not treated early. The signs, symptoms and treatment of PPCM are similar to that of heart failure. Early diagnosis and proper management is the corner stone for better outcome of these patients. The only way to prevent PPCM is to avoid further pregnancies.

  17. The flexibility of two tropomyosin mutants, D175N and E180G, that cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaochuan; Suphamungmee, Worawit [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Janco, Miro; Geeves, Michael A. [School of Biosciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NJ (United Kingdom); Marston, Steven B. [National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London W12 0NN (United Kingdom); Fischer, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.fischer@iwr.uni-heidelberg.de [Computational Biochemistry Group, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg D-69120 (Germany); Lehman, William, E-mail: wlehman@bu.edu [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118 (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Well-known tropomyosin mutants, D175N and E180G are linked to cardiomyopathies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural mechanics of D175N and E180G tropomyosins have been investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer D175N and E180G mutations increase both local and global tropomyosin flexibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In muscle, this increased flexibility will enhance myosin interactions on actin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extra myosin interaction can alter cardiac Ca{sup 2+}-switching, leading to dysfunction. -- Abstract: Point mutations targeting muscle thin filament proteins are the cause of a number of cardiomyopathies. In many cases, biological effects of the mutations are well-documented, whereas their structural and mechanical impact on filament assembly and regulatory function is lacking. In order to elucidate molecular defects leading to cardiac dysfunction, we have examined the structural mechanics of two tropomyosin mutants, E180G and D175N, which are associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Tropomyosin is an {alpha}-helical coiled-coil dimer which polymerizes end-to-end to create an elongated superhelix that wraps around F-actin filaments of muscle and non-muscle cells, thus modulating the binding of other actin-binding proteins. Here, we study how flexibility changes in the E180G and D175N mutants might affect tropomyosin binding and regulatory motion on F-actin. Electron microscopy and Molecular Dynamics simulations show that E180G and D175N mutations cause an increase in bending flexibility of tropomyosin both locally and globally. This excess flexibility is likely to increase accessibility of the myosin-binding sites on F-actin, thus destabilizing the low-Ca{sup 2+} relaxed-state of cardiac muscle. The resulting imbalance in the on-off switching mechanism of the mutants will shift the regulatory equilibrium towards Ca{sup 2+}-activation of cardiac muscle, as is observed in affected

  18. Genetics Home Reference: arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ARVC arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy ( ARVC ) is a form of heart disease that ...

  19. Mutations that affect structure and assembly of light-harvesting proteins in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain 6701

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain 6701 was mutagenized with UV irradiation and screened for pigment changes that indicated genetic lesions involving the light-harvesting proteins of the phycobilisome. A previous examination of the pigment mutant UV16 showed an assembly defect in the phycocyanin component of the phycobilisome. Mutagenesis of UV16 produced an additional double mutant, UV16-40, with decreased phycoerythrin content. Phycocyanin and phycoerythrin were isolated from UV16-40 and compared with normal biliproteins. The results suggested that the UV16 mutation affected the alpha subunit of phycocyanin, while the phycoerythrin beta subunit from UV16-40 had lost one of its three chromophores. Characterization of the unassembled phycobilisome components in these mutants suggests that these strains will be useful for probing in vivo the regulated expression and assembly of phycobilisomes

  20. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugaa, Kristina H; Haland, Trine F; Leren, Ida S; Saberniak, Jørg; Edvardsen, Thor

    2016-07-01

    This review aims to give an update on the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is mainly an autosomal dominant inherited disease linked to mutations in genes encoding desmosomes or desmosome-related proteins. Classic symptoms include palpitations, cardiac syncope, and aborted cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias. Heart failure may develop in later stages. Diagnosis is based on the presence of major and minor criteria from the Task Force Criteria revised in 2010 (TFC 2010), which includes evaluation of findings from six different diagnostic categories. Based on this, patients are classified as having possible, borderline, or definite ARVC. Imaging is important in ARVC diagnosis, including both echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for detecting structural and functional abnormalities, but importantly these findings may occur after electrical alterations and ventricular arrhythmias. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) and signal-averaged ECGs are analysed for depolarization and repolarization abnormalities, including T-wave inversions as the most common ECG alteration. Ventricular arrhythmias are common in ARVC and are considered a major diagnostic criterion if originating from the RV inferior wall or apex. Family history of ARVC and detection of an ARVC-related mutation are included in the TFC 2010 and emphasize the importance of family screening. Electrophysiological studies are not included in the diagnostic criteria, but may be important for differential diagnosis including RV outflow tract tachycardia. Further differential diagnoses include sarcoidosis, congenital abnormalities, myocarditis, pulmonary hypertension, dilated cardiomyopathy, and athletic cardiac adaptation, which may mimic ARVC. PMID:26498164

  1. Molecular analysis of HEXA gene in Argentinean patients affected with Tay-Sachs disease: possible common origin of the prevalent c.459+5A>G mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, Stefania; Montalvo, Annalisa; Blanco, Mariana; Zanin, Irene; Amartino, Hernan; Vlahovicek, Kristian; Szlago, Marina; Schenone, Andrea; Pittis, Gabriela; Bembi, Bruno; Dardis, Andrea

    2012-05-15

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited disorder caused by the deficient activity of hexosaminidase A due to mutations in the HEXA gene. Up to date there is no information regarding the molecular genetics of TSD in Argentinean patients. In the present study we have studied 17 Argentinean families affected by TSD, including 20 patients with the acute infantile form and 3 with the sub-acute form. Overall, we identified 14 different mutations accounting for 100% of the studied alleles. Eight mutations were novel: 5 were single base changes leading to drastic residue changes or truncated proteins, 2 were small deletions and one was an intronic mutation that may cause a splicing defect. Although the spectrum of mutations was highly heterogeneous, a high frequency of the c.459+5G>A mutation, previously described in different populations was found among the studied cohort. Haplotype analysis suggested that in these families the c.459+5G>A mutation might have arisen by a single mutational event. PMID:22441121

  2. Arabidopsis AtADF1 is Functionally Affected by Mutations on Actin Binding Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hai Dong; Wei-Ping Tang; Jia-Yao Liu

    2013-01-01

    The plant actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) binds to both monomeric and filamentous actin,and is directly involved in the depolymerization of actin filaments.To better understand the actin binding sites of the Arabidopsis thaliana L.AtADF1,we generated mutants of AtADF1 and investigated their functions in vitro and in vivo.Analysis of mutants harboring amino acid substitutions revealed that charged residues (Arg98 and Lys100) located at the α-helix 3 and forming an actin binding site together with the N-terminus are essential for both G-and F-actin binding.The basic residues on the β-strand 5 (K82/A) and the α-helix 4 (R135/A,R137/A) form another actin binding site that is important for F-actin binding.Using transient expression of CFP-tagged AtADF1 mutant proteins in onion (Allium cepa) peel epidermal cells and transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana L.plants overexpressing these mutants,we analyzed how these mutant proteins regulate actin organization and affect seedling growth.Our results show that the ADF mutants with a lower affinity for actin filament binding can still be functional,unless the affinity foractin monomers is also affected.The G-actin binding activity of the ADF plays an essential role in actin binding,depolymerization of actin polymers,and therefore in the control of actin organization.

  3. CNS disease triggering Takotsubo stress cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Wahbi, Karim

    2014-12-15

    There are a number of hereditary and non-hereditary central nervous system (CNS) disorders, which directly or indirectly affect the heart (brain-heart disorders). The most well-known of these CNS disorders are epilepsy, stroke, infectious or immunological encephalitis/meningitis, migraine, and traumatic brain injury. In addition, a number of hereditary and non-hereditary neurodegenerative disorders may impair cardiac functions. Affection of the heart may manifest not only as arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, autonomic impairment, systolic dysfunction/heart failure, arterial hypertension, or pulmonary hypertension, but also as stress cardiomyopathy (Takotsubo syndrome, TTS). CNS disease triggering TTS includes subarachnoid bleeding, epilepsy, ischemic stroke, intracerebral bleeding, migraine, encephalitis, traumatic brain injury, PRES syndrome, or ALS. Usually, TTS is acutely precipitated by stress triggered by various different events. TTS is one of the cardiac abnormalities most frequently induced by CNS disorders. Appropriate management of TTS from CNS disorders is essential to improve the outcome of affected patients. PMID:25213573

  4. High Incidence of Noonan Syndrome Features Including Short Stature and Pulmonic Stenosis in Patients carrying NF1 Missense Mutations Affecting p.Arg1809: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Xie, Jing; Gomes, Alicia; Sharp, Angela; Callens, Tom; Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Ying; Cochran, Meagan; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Atkin, Joan; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barnett, Christopher P; Crenshaw, Melissa; Bartholomew, Dennis W; Basel, Lina; Bellus, Gary; Ben-Shachar, Shay; Bialer, Martin G; Bick, David; Blumberg, Bruce; Cortes, Fanny; David, Karen L; Destree, Anne; Duat-Rodriguez, Anna; Earl, Dawn; Escobar, Luis; Eswara, Marthanda; Ezquieta, Begona; Frayling, Ian M; Frydman, Moshe; Gardner, Kathy; Gripp, Karen W; Hernández-Chico, Concepcion; Heyrman, Kurt; Ibrahim, Jennifer; Janssens, Sandra; Keena, Beth A; Llano-Rivas, Isabel; Leppig, Kathy; McDonald, Marie; Misra, Vinod K; Mulbury, Jennifer; Narayanan, Vinodh; Orenstein, Naama; Galvin-Parton, Patricia; Pedro, Helio; Pivnick, Eniko K; Powell, Cynthia M; Randolph, Linda; Raskin, Salmo; Rosell, Jordi; Rubin, Karol; Seashore, Margretta; Schaaf, Christian P; Scheuerle, Angela; Schultz, Meredith; Schorry, Elizabeth; Schnur, Rhonda; Siqveland, Elizabeth; Tkachuk, Amanda; Tonsgard, James; Upadhyaya, Meena; Verma, Ishwar C; Wallace, Stephanie; Williams, Charles; Zackai, Elaine; Zonana, Jonathan; Lazaro, Conxi; Claes, Kathleen; Korf, Bruce; Martin, Yolanda; Legius, Eric; Messiaen, Ludwine

    2015-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most frequent genetic disorders, affecting 1:3,000 worldwide. Identification of genotype-phenotype correlations is challenging because of the wide range clinical variability, the progressive nature of the disorder, and extreme diversity of the mutational spectrum. We report 136 individuals with a distinct phenotype carrying one of five different NF1 missense mutations affecting p.Arg1809. Patients presented with multiple café-au-lait macules (CALM) with or without freckling and Lisch nodules, but no externally visible plexiform neurofibromas or clear cutaneous neurofibromas were found. About 25% of the individuals had Noonan-like features. Pulmonic stenosis and short stature were significantly more prevalent compared with classic cohorts (P < 0.0001). Developmental delays and/or learning disabilities were reported in over 50% of patients. Melanocytes cultured from a CALM in a segmental NF1-patient showed two different somatic NF1 mutations, p.Arg1809Cys and a multi-exon deletion, providing genetic evidence that p.Arg1809Cys is a loss-of-function mutation in the melanocytes and causes a pigmentary phenotype. Constitutional missense mutations at p.Arg1809 affect 1.23% of unrelated NF1 probands in the UAB cohort, therefore this specific NF1 genotype-phenotype correlation will affect counseling and management of a significant number of patients. PMID:26178382

  5. Polymorphism in the alpha cardiac muscle actin 1 gene is associated to susceptibility to chronic inflammatory cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Farage Frade

    Full Text Available AIMS: Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic in Latin America, and may lead to a life-threatening inflammatory dilated, chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC. One third of T. cruzi-infected individuals progress to CCC while the others remain asymptomatic (ASY. A possible genetic component to disease progression was suggested by familial aggregation of cases and the association of markers of innate and adaptive immunity genes with CCC development. Since mutations in multiple sarcomeric genes, including alpha-cardiac actin (ACTC1 have been involved in hereditary dilated cardiomyopathy, we investigated the involvement of the ACTC1 gene in CCC pathogenesis. METHODS AND RESULTS: We conducted a proteomic and genetic study on a Brazilian study population. The genetic study was done on a main cohort including 118 seropositive asymptomatic subjects and 315 cases and the replication was done on 36 asymptomatic and 102 CCC cases. ACTC1 protein and mRNA levels were lower in myocardial tissue from patients with end-stage CCC than those found in hearts from organ donors. Genotyping a case-control cohort of CCC and ASY subjects for all informative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the ACTC1 gene identified rs640249 SNP, located at the 5' region, as associated to CCC. Associations are borderline after correction for multiple testing. Correlation and haplotype analysis led to the identification of a susceptibility haplotype. Functional assays have shown that the rs640249A/C polymorphism affects the binding of transcriptional factors in the promoter regions of the ACTC1 gene. Confirmation of the detected association on a larger independent replication cohort will be useful. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic variations at the ACTC1 gene may contribute to progression to chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy among T. cruzi-infected patients, possibly by modulating transcription factor binding to ACTC1 promoter regions.

  6. Thallium scintigraphy for the prognosis of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the significance of perfusion defects demonstrated by thallium-201 and age in the prognosis of patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. Seventy-four dilated cardiomyopathy patients underwent thallium scintigraphy as well as clinical and hemodynamic examination. Abnormal perfusion defects were present in 23 of 38 patients aged <60 years (61%) and in 26 of 36 elderly patients aged ≥60 years (72%; NS). Univariate analysis showed that such perfusion defects were a significant predictor of cardiac death only in patients aged <60 years (p=0.015). Stepwise discriminant analysis also revealed that perfusion defects were a significant predictor in patients aged <60 years (Wilks' lambda 0.499, chi-square test 20.2, p=0.003). Perfusion defects were not more important than the history of syncope or stroke in elderly dilated cardiomyopathy patients. Twenty-one patients died of disease-related causes during 58±43 months. The five-year survival rate was better in patients aged <60 years without than in those with perfusion defects (100% vs 58.4%, respectively), but not affected in patients aged ≥60 years (66.7% vs 62.2%). Thallium scintigraphy is valuable for the prognosis of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy aged <60 years who are usually candidates for heart transplantation. Absence of thallium perfusion defects may indicate good long-term prognosis. (author)

  7. Thallium scintigraphy for the prognosis of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabe, Toshikazu; Furuno, Takashi; Kitaoka, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Yoshihisa; Yamasaki, Naohito; Doi, Yoshinori [Kochi Medical School, Nankoku (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    This study evaluated the significance of perfusion defects demonstrated by thallium-201 and age in the prognosis of patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. Seventy-four dilated cardiomyopathy patients underwent thallium scintigraphy as well as clinical and hemodynamic examination. Abnormal perfusion defects were present in 23 of 38 patients aged <60 years (61%) and in 26 of 36 elderly patients aged {>=}60 years (72%; NS). Univariate analysis showed that such perfusion defects were a significant predictor of cardiac death only in patients aged <60 years (p=0.015). Stepwise discriminant analysis also revealed that perfusion defects were a significant predictor in patients aged <60 years (Wilks' lambda 0.499, chi-square test 20.2, p=0.003). Perfusion defects were not more important than the history of syncope or stroke in elderly dilated cardiomyopathy patients. Twenty-one patients died of disease-related causes during 58{+-}43 months. The five-year survival rate was better in patients aged <60 years without than in those with perfusion defects (100% vs 58.4%, respectively), but not affected in patients aged {>=}60 years (66.7% vs 62.2%). Thallium scintigraphy is valuable for the prognosis of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy aged <60 years who are usually candidates for heart transplantation. Absence of thallium perfusion defects may indicate good long-term prognosis. (author)

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI has been proposed as a noninvasive method for evaluating patients with a variety of cardiomyopathies. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) is defined as a primary disorder of the right ventricle characterized by partial or total replacement of muscle by adipose or fibrous tissue. Its diagnosis currently rests on techniques that accurately identify specific anatomic and functional abnormalities of the right ventricle. The aim of our study was to analyze the MRI features in 41 patients (age 19-64 years; 26 patients with ARVD, 7 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 8 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)). They were investigated by spin-echo (SE) and gradient-echo (GE) Cine using a 0.5T unit Toshiba 50A with cardiac software. SE and Cine MRI allowed assessment of localization (hence type of HC) and extent of changes in visualized wall and ventricular dysfunction. In all patients with ARVD MRI SE-T1 W allowed localization of the abnormally bright signal intensity from the RV-free wall, apex and subtricuspid region, characteristic for the subcutenous fat. In 8 patients the structural changes were also present in left ventricular myocardium. MRI can be a useful method in supplying additional information to that obtained in 2D Echo by identifying the site, extent and type of cardiomyopathy. MRI is a very useful non-invasive method in diagnosis of ARVD. (author)

  9. Severity of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assess the severity of dilated cardiomyopathy, thallium scan was performed in 60 cases. In 16 of all, serial thallium scan was performed in the periods of average 26 months. In these cases, extension of perfusion defect was observed from apical to inferoposterior regions. Therefore, we classified dilated cardiomyopathy into three groups by thallium scan; (I) dilated left ventricular type (n = 16), (II) apical hypoperfusion type (n = 12), (III) inferoposterior perfusion defect type (n = 32). These groups were correlated with hemodynamic findings. All patients had also cardiac catheterization and gated blood pool scan. As results, group III had high incidence of right ventricular and lung thallium uptake and patchy pattern compared to other groups. Group III had also high incidence of dyspnoea on exertion, S3 and ECG abnormalities. In hemodynamics, end-diastolic ventricular volume index and end-systolic ventricular volume index increased and, right ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular ejection fraction decreased according to the severity of dilated cardiomyopathy from group I to III. In addition, the incidence of mitral regurgitation and dyskinesis was observed highly in group III. In conclusion, perfusion defect was frequently demonstrated in dilated cardiomyopathy without coronary artery stenosis. And right and left ventricular function was depressed according to the extension of perfusion defect. (author)

  10. Mutations Affecting the SAND Domain of DEAF1 Cause Intellectual Disability with Severe Speech Impairment and Behavioral Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Rajamanickam, Shivakumar; Jensik, Philip J.; Vergult, Sarah; de Rocker, Nina; Newhall, Kathryn J.; Raghavan, Ramya; Reardon, Sara N.; Jarrett, Kelsey; McIntyre, Tara; Bulinski, Joseph; Ownby, Stacy L.; Huggenvik, Jodi I.; McKnight, G. Stanley; Rose, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we identified in two individuals with intellectual disability (ID) different de novo mutations in DEAF1, which encodes a transcription factor with an important role in embryonic development. To ascertain whether these mutations in DEAF1 are causative for the ID phenotype, we performed targeted resequencing of DEAF1 in an additional cohort of over 2,300 individuals with unexplained ID and identified two additional individuals with de novo mutations in this gene. All four individuals ...

  11. Fanconi anemia with biallelic FANCD1/BRCA2 mutations - Case report of a family with three affected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svojgr, Karel; Sumerauer, David; Puchmajerova, Alena; Vicha, Ales; Hrusak, Ondrej; Michalova, Kyra; Malis, Josef; Smisek, Petr; Kyncl, Martin; Novotna, Drahuse; Machackova, Eva; Jencik, Jan; Pycha, Karel; Vaculik, Miroslav; Kodet, Roman; Stary, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Fanconi anemia, complementation group D1 with bi-allelic FANCD1 (BRCA2) mutations, is a very rare genetic disorder characterized by early onset of childhood malignancies, including acute leukemia, brain cancer and nephroblastoma. Here, we present a case report of a family with 3 affected children in terms of treatment outcome, toxicity and characterization of the malignancies using comprehensive cytogenetic analysis. The first child was diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia when he was 11 months old. During chemotherapy, he suffered from repeated pancytopenia, sepsis and severe vincristine polyneuropathy, and 18 months after primary diagnosis, he succumbed to secondary acute monocytic leukemia. The second child was diagnosed with stage 2 triphasic nephroblastoma (Wilms tumor), when he was 3 years and 11 months old. During chemotherapy, he suffered from vincristine polyneuropathy. Currently, he is in complete remission, 29 months following the initial diagnosis. The third child was diagnosed with medulloblastoma with classical histology, when she was 4 years and 5 months old. After the first cycle of chemotherapy, she suffered from prolonged pancytopenia, sepsis and severe skin and mucosal toxicity. Six weeks after primary diagnosis, a first relapse in the posterior fossa was diagnosed, and at 7 and half months after primary diagnosis, a second relapse was diagnosed that led to the patient's death. Our case report underscores tumor heterogeneity, treatment toxicity and poor outcome in Fanconi anemia patients of complementation group D1. PMID:26657402

  12. Molecular profiling of dilated cardiomyopathy that progresses to heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakimoto, Hiroko; Gorham, Joshua M.; Conner, David A.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Parfenov, Michael G.; DePalma, Steve R.; Eminaga, Seda; Konno, Tetsuo; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is defined by progressive functional and structural changes. We performed RNA-seq at different stages of disease to define molecular signaling in the progression from pre-DCM hearts to DCM and overt heart failure (HF) using a genetic model of DCM (phospholamban missense mutation, PLNR9C/+). Pre-DCM hearts were phenotypically normal yet displayed proliferation of nonmyocytes (59% relative increase vs. WT, P = 8 × 10−4) and activation of proinflammatory signaling with notable cardiomyocyte-specific induction of a subset of profibrotic cytokines including TGFβ2 and TGFβ3. These changes progressed through DCM and HF, resulting in substantial fibrosis (17.6% of left ventricle [LV] vs. WT, P = 6 × 10−33). Cardiomyocytes displayed a marked shift in metabolic gene transcription: downregulation of aerobic respiration and subsequent upregulation of glucose utilization, changes coincident with attenuated expression of PPARα and PPARγ coactivators -1α (PGC1α) and -1β, and increased expression of the metabolic regulator T-box transcription factor 15 (Tbx15). Comparing DCM transcriptional profiles with those in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) revealed similar and distinct molecular mechanisms. Our data suggest that cardiomyocyte-specific cytokine expression, early fibroblast activation, and the shift in metabolic gene expression are hallmarks of cardiomyopathy progression. Notably, key components of these profibrotic and metabolic networks were disease specific and distinguish DCM from HCM.

  13. Cardiac MRI in a Patient with Coincident Left Ventricular Non-Compaction and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alizadeh-Sani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy is a rare congenital cardiomyopathy that affects both children and adults. Since the clinical manifestations are not sufficient to establish diagnosis, echocardiography is the diagnostic tool that makes it possible to document ventricular non-compaction and establish prognostic factors. We report a 47-year-old woman with a history of dilated cardiomyopathy with unknown etiology. Echocardiography showed mild left ventricular enlargement with severe systolic dysfunction (EF = 20-25%. According to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging findings non-compaction left ventricle with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was considered, and right ventricular septal biopsy was recommended. Right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy showed moderate hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes with foci of myocytolysis and moderate interstitial fibrosis. No evidence of infiltrative deposition was seen.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Open All Close All Description Dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia (DCMA) syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  15. The KCNE genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a candidate gene study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Haundrup, Ole; Andersen, Paal S;

    2011-01-01

    The gene family KCNE1-5, which encode modulating β-subunits of several repolarising K+-ion channels, has been associated with genetic cardiac diseases such as long QT syndrome, atrial fibrillation and Brugada syndrome. The minK peptide, encoded by KCNE1, is attached to the Z-disc of the sarcomere...... as well as the T-tubules of the sarcolemma. It has been suggested that minK forms part of an "electro-mechanical feed-back" which links cardiomyocyte stretching to changes in ion channel function. We examined whether mutations in KCNE genes were associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a...

  16. Pharmacogenomic considerations in the treatment of the pediatric cardiomyopathy called Barth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Ashim; Kahlon, Parmbir; Donoho, Timothy; Doyle, Ian C

    2014-01-01

    Barth syndrome (BTHS) is a genetic, X-linked, rare but often fatal, pediatric skeletal- and cardiomyopathy occurring due to mutations in the tafazzin gene (TAZ). TAZ encodes a transacylase involved in phospholipid biosynthesis, also called tafazzin, which is responsible for remodeling the inner mitochondrial membrane phospholipid, cardiolipin (CL). Tafazzin mutations lead to compositional alterations in CL molecular species, causing extensive mitochondrial aberrations and ultrastructural muscle damage. There are no specific treatments or cure for BTHS. Current therapy is largely palliative and aimed at treatment of organ-specific complications during disease progression. Polypharmacy frequently occurs during treatment and may lead to severe adverse events. Adverse reactions may originate from exogenous factors such as the inadvertent co-administration of contraindicated drugs. Theoretically, endogenous factors such as polymorphic variations in genes encoding drug metabolizing enzymes may also precipitate fatal toxicity. Investigation of the consequences of pharmacogenomic variations on BTHS therapy is lacking. To our knowledge, this review presents the first examination of the possible sources of pharmacogenomic variations that may affect BTHS therapy. We also explore BTHSspecific patents for possible treatment options. The patents discussed suggest innovative strategies for treatment, including feeding linoleic acid to patients to overcome compositional CL deficiency; or the use of 2S,4R ketoconazole formulations to augment CL levels; or the delivery of mitochondrial stabilizing cargo. Future research directions are also discussed. PMID:25185984

  17. Identification of a mutation in the CHAT gene of Old Danish Pointing Dogs affected with congenital myasthenic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proschowsky, Helle Friis; Flagstad, Annette; Cirera, Susanna; Jørgensen, Claus Bøttcher; Fredholm, Merete

    2007-01-01

    The presence of a recessive inherited muscle disease in Old Danish Pointing Dogs has been well known for years. Comparisons of this disease with myasthenic diseases of other dog breeds and humans have pointed toward a defect in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine possibly due to...... decreased activity of the enzyme choline acetyltransferase. We sequenced exons 5-18 of the gene encoding choline acetyltransferase (CHAT) in 2 affected and 2 unaffected dogs and identified a G to A missense mutation in exon 6. The mutation causes a valine to methionine substitution and segregates in...

  18. Risk of Cardiomyopathy in Younger Persons With a Family History of Death from Cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranthe, Mattis F; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Øyen, Nina;

    2015-01-01

    at the population level is unclear. In a nationwide cohort, we examined the risk of cardiomyopathy by family history of premature death (data, we constructed a cohort of 3.9 million persons born from 1950 to 2008. We......BACKGROUND: Recommendations for presymptomatic screening of relatives of cardiomyopathy patients are based on findings from tertiary centers. Cardiomyopathy inheritance patterns are fairly well understood, but how cardiomyopathy in younger persons (... ascertained family history of premature (

  19. Serum lipidomics meets cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: profiling of subjects at risk of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Sysi-Aho

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, characterized by left ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction, constitutes a significant cause for heart failure, sudden cardiac death or need for heart transplantation. Lamin A/C gene (LMNA on chromosome 1p12 is the most significant disease gene causing DCM and has been reported to cause 7-9% of DCM leading to cardiac transplantation. We have previously performed cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to LMNA carriers to describe the early phenotype. Clinically, early recognition of subjects at risk of developing DCM would be important but is often difficult. Thus we have earlier used the MRI findings of these LMNA carriers for creating a model by which LMNA carriers could be identified from the controls at an asymptomatic stage. Some LMNA mutations may cause lipodystrophy. To characterize possible effects of LMNA mutations on lipid profile, we set out to apply global serum lipidomics using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in the same LMNA carriers, DCM patients without LMNA mutation and controls. All DCM patients, with or without LMNA mutation, differed from controls in regard to distinct serum lipidomic profile dominated by diminished odd-chain triglycerides and lipid ratios related to desaturation. Furthermore, we introduce a novel approach to identify associations between the molecular lipids from serum and the MR images from the LMNA carriers. The association analysis using dependency network and regression approaches also helped us to obtain novel insights into how the affected lipids might relate to cardiac shape and volume changes. Our study provides a framework for linking serum derived molecular markers not only with clinical endpoints, but also with the more subtle intermediate phenotypes, as derived from medical imaging, of potential pathophysiological relevance.

  20. Molecular analysis using DHPLC of cystic fibrosis: increase of the mutation detection rate among the affected population in Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardone Anna

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis (CF is a multisystem disorder characterised by mutations of the CFTR gene, which encodes for an important component in the coordination of electrolyte movement across of epithelial cell membranes. Symptoms are pulmonary disease, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, male infertility and elevated sweat concentrations. The CFTR gene has numerous mutations (>1000 and functionally important polymorphisms (>200. Early identification is important to provide appropriate therapeutic interventions, prognostic and genetic counselling and to ensure access to specialised medical services. However, molecular diagnosis by direct mutation screening has proved difficult in certain ethnic groups due to allelic heterogeneity and variable frequency of causative mutations. Methods We applied a gene scanning approach using DHPLC system for analysing specifically all CFTR exons and characterise sequence variations in a subgroup of CF Italian patients from the Lazio region (Central Italy characterised by an extensive allelic heterogeneity. Results We have identified a total of 36 different mutations representing 88% of the CF chromosomes. Among these are two novel CFTR mutations, including one missense (H199R and one microdeletion (4167delCTAAGCC. Conclusion Using this approach, we were able to increase our standard power rate of mutation detection of about 11% (77% vs. 88%.

  1. Comprehensive RNA Analysis of the NF1 Gene in Classically Affected NF1 Affected Individuals Meeting NIH Criteria has High Sensitivity and Mutation Negative Testing is Reassuring in Isolated Cases With Pigmentary Features Only

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, D. G.; N. Bowers; Burkitt-Wright, E.; Miles, E.; S. Garg; Scott-Kitching, V.; Penman-Splitt, M.; Dobbie, A.; Howard, E.; Ealing, J.; Vassalo, G.; Wallace, A. J.; Newman, W.; ,; Huson, S M

    2016-01-01

    Background The detection rate for identifying the underlying mutation in neurocutaneous syndromes is affected by the sensitivity of the mutation test and the heterogeneity of the disease based on the diagnostic criteria. Neurofibromatosis type (NF1) has been defined for 29 years by the National Institutes for Health (NIH) criteria which include ≥ 6 Café au Lait macules (CAL) as a defining criterion. The discovery of SPRED1 as a cause of Legius syndrome which is manifested by CAL, freckling an...

  2. Comprehensive RNA Analysis of the NF1 Gene in Classically Affected NF1 Affected Individuals Meeting NIH Criteria has High Sensitivity and Mutation Negative Testing is Reassuring in Isolated Cases With Pigmentary Features Only

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, D. G.; N. Bowers; Burkitt-Wright, E.; Miles, E.; S. Garg; Scott-Kitching, V.; Penman-Splitt, M.; Dobbie, A.; Howard, E.; Ealing, J.; Vassalo, G.; Wallace, A. J.; Newman, W.; Huson, S M

    2016-01-01

    Background: The detection rate for identifying the underlying mutation in neurocutaneous syndromes is affected by the sensitivity of the mutation test and the heterogeneity of the disease based on the diagnostic criteria. Neurofibromatosis type (NF1) has been defined for 29 years by the National Institutes for Health (NIH) criteria which include ≥6 Café au Lait macules (CAL) as a defining criterion. The discovery of SPRED1 as a cause of Legius syndrome which is manifested by CAL, freckling an...

  3. Mutations in Exons of the CYP17- Ⅱ Gene Affect Sex Steroid Concentration in Male Japanese Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ruiqin; HU Jian; HAN Weiguo; ZHANG Jianan; WANG Qingqing; YUAN Yuren; LIU Qun; HE Feng; WEN Haishen; LI Jifang; SHI Bao; SHI Dan; LIU Miao; MU Weijie; ZHANG Yuanqing

    2012-01-01

    As a specific gene of fish,cytochrome P450c 17-Ⅱ (CYP17-Ⅱ) gene plays a key role in the growth,development and reproduction level of fish.In this study,the single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique was used to characterize polymorphisms within the coding region of CYP17- Ⅱ gene in a population of 75 male Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in CYP17-Ⅱ gene of Japanese flounder.They were c.G594A (p.G188R),c.G939A and c.G1502A (p.G490D).SNP1 (c.G594A),located in exon 4 of CYP17-Ⅱ gene,was significantly associated with gonadosomatic index (GSI).Individuals with genotype GG of SNP1 had significantly lower GSI (P<0.05) than those with genotype AA or AG.SNP2 (c.G939A) located at the CpG island of CYP17-Ⅱ gene.The mutation changed the methylation of exon 6.Individuals with genotype AA of SNP2 had significantly lower serum testosterone (T) level and hepatosomatic index (HSI) compared to those with genotype GG.The results suggested that SNP2 could influence the reproductive endocrine of male Japanese flounder.However,the SNP3 (c.G 1502A) located in exon 9 did not affect the four measured reproductive traits.This study showed that CYP17-Ⅱgene could be a potentially useful candidate gene for the research of genetic breeding and physiological aspects of Japanese flounder.

  4. Structure of the SLC7A7 Gene and Mutational Analysis of Patients Affected by Lysinuric Protein Intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Sperandeo, Maria Pia; Bassi, Maria Teresa; Riboni, Mirko; Parenti, Giancarlo; Buoninconti, Anna; Manzoni, Marta; Incerti, Barbara; Larocca, Maria Rosaria; Di Rocco, Maja; Strisciuglio, Pietro; Dianzani, Irma; Parini, Rossella; Candito, Miranda; Endo, Fumio; Ballabio, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) is a rare autosomal recessive defect of cationic amino acid transport caused by mutations in the SLC7A7 gene. We report the genomic structure of the gene and the results of the mutational analysis in Italian, Tunisian, and Japanese patients. The SLC7A7 gene consists of 10 exons; sequences of all of the exon-intron boundaries are reported here. All of the mutant alleles were characterized and eight novel mutations were detected, including two missense mutati...

  5. Mitochondrial haplogroups modify the risk of developing hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Hedley, Paula L;

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in genes coding for proteins involved in sarcomere function. The disease is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Evolutionarily developed variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), defining mtDNA haplogroups and...... haplogroup clusters, is associated with functional differences in mitochondrial function and susceptibility to various diseases, including ischemic cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that mtDNA haplogroups, in particular H, J and K, might modify disease susceptibility to HCM. Mitochondrial DNA, isolated from...... suggests that mtDNA haplotypes may be of significance in determining whether a physiological hypertrophy develops into myopathy. mtDNA haplotypes may have the potential of becoming significant biomarkers in cardiomyopathy....

  6. Prevention of exercised induced cardiomyopathy following Pip-PMO treatment in dystrophic mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Corinne A; Saleh, Amer F; Carr, Carolyn A; Hammond, Suzan M; Coenen-Stass, Anna M L; Godfrey, Caroline; McClorey, Graham; Varela, Miguel A; Roberts, Thomas C; Clarke, Kieran; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew J A

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene. In addition to skeletal muscle wasting, DMD patients develop cardiomyopathy, which significantly contributes to mortality. Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) are a promising DMD therapy, restoring functional dystrophin protein by exon skipping. However, a major limitation with current AOs is the absence of dystrophin correction in heart. Pip peptide-AOs demonstrate high activity in cardiac muscle. To determine their therapeutic value, dystrophic mdx mice were subject to forced exercise to model the DMD cardiac phenotype. Repeated peptide-AO treatments resulted in high levels of cardiac dystrophin protein, which prevented the exercised induced progression of cardiomyopathy, normalising heart size as well as stabilising other cardiac parameters. Treated mice also exhibited significantly reduced cardiac fibrosis and improved sarcolemmal integrity. This work demonstrates that high levels of cardiac dystrophin restored by Pip peptide-AOs prevents further deterioration of cardiomyopathy and pathology following exercise in dystrophic DMD mice. PMID:25758104

  7. Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: vectorcardiographic findings in echocardiographically unaffected relative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loperfido, F; Fiorilli, R; Digaetano, A; Di Gennaro, M; Santarelli, P; Bellocci, F; Coppola, E; Zecchi, P

    1982-01-01

    The electrocardiographic and vectorcardiographic (Frank system) features of the first degree relatives of subjects with documented familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were analysed. A total of nine affected members and 29 relatives were examined in four families. THe subjects were considered to be affected when the septal to free posterior wall thickness ratio exceeded 1.3 at M-mode echocardiography. Four relatives had asymmetric septal hypertrophy. Among 25 relatives without evidence of asymmetric septal hypertrophy, two over 20 years and 10 under 20 years of age showed increased voltage of QRS anterior forces (Qz amplitude greater than 0.80 mV) on the orthogonal electrocardiogram. The vectorcardiographic data of the relatives under 20 years of age without evidence of asymmetric septal hypertrophy (18 subjects) were compared with those of 38 normal control subjects of comparable age range. The young relatives without disproportionate septal hypertrophy had significantly greater Qz amplitude and Q/Rz ratio than the normal control subjects. In contrast, the echocardiographic data were not significantly different. We suggest that the electrocardiographic finding of abnormal anterior forces in one or more first degree relatives of subjects with documented hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may constitute a valuable aid in ascertaining the genetic transmission of the disease and in recognising affected members without echocardiographic evidence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Images PMID:7200794

  8. Myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is multifactorial and explains the occurrence of angina, in about 50% of patients. The pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia may be explained by the increase of the ventricular mass and relative paucity of the coronary microcirculation; the elevated ventricular filling pressures and myocardial stiffness causing a compression of the coronary microvessels; the impaired coronary vasodilator flow reserve caused by anatomic and functional abnormalities; and the systolic compression of epicardial vessel (myocardial bridges). Myocardial ischemia must be investigated by perfusion scintigraphic methods since its presence influences the prognosis and has relevant clinical implications for management of patients. Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and documented myocardial ischemia usually need to undergo invasive coronary angiography to exclude the presence of concomitant atherosclerotic coronary disease. (author)

  9. A novel mutation in the NOD2 gene associated with Blau syndrome: a Norwegian family with four affected members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, N; Ursin, K; Rødevand, E;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blau syndrome is a chronic granulomatous disease with an autosomal dominant trait characterized by the triad granulomatous dermatitis, arthritis, and uveitis. It is caused by mutations in the NOD2 gene, also termed the CARD15 gene. OBJECTIVE: To report a novel mutation in the NOD2 gene...... associated with Blau syndrome. METHODS AND RESULTS: The proband was a 68-year-old ethnic Norwegian male who had uveitis and arthritis since 10 years of age followed by lifelong recurrent arthritis and chronic eye involvement. Genetic analysis showed a heterozygous c.1814 C>A, T605N mutation in NOD2 that has...... not previously been described. All of his three children had Blau syndrome and had inherited the NOD2 mutation. The proband's first son had exanthema, arthritis, and uveitis from 10 years of age and later presented with granulomatous lymphadenopathy, granulomatous parotitis, and granulomatous...

  10. A novel point mutation within the EDA gene causes an exon dropping in mature RNA in Holstein Friesian cattle breed affected by X-linked anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pariset Lorraine

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X-linked anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia is a disorder characterized by abnormal development of tissues and organs of ectodermal origin caused by mutations in the EDA gene. The bovine EDA gene encodes the ectodysplasin A, a membrane protein expressed in keratinocytes, hair follicles and sweat glands, which is involved in the interactions between cell and cell and/or cell and matrix. Four mutations causing ectodermal dysplasia in cattle have been described so far. Results We identified a new single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at the 9th base of exon 8 in the EDA gene in two calves of Holstein Friesian cattle breed affected by ectodermal dysplasia. This SNP is located in the exonic splicing enhancer (ESEs recognized by SRp40 protein. As a consequence, the spliceosome machinery is no longer able to recognize the sequence as exonic and causes exon skipping. The mutation determines the deletion of the entire exon (131 bp in the RNA processing, causing a severe alteration of the protein structure and thus the disease. Conclusion We identified a mutation, never described before, that changes the regulation of alternative splicing in the EDA gene and causes ectodermal dysplasia in cattle. The analysis of the SNP allows the identification of carriers that can transmit the disease to the offspring. This mutation can thus be exploited for a rational and efficient selection of unequivocally healthy cows for breeding.

  11. A search for mutations affecting protein structure in children of proximally and distally exposed atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 289,868 locus tests based on 28 different protein phenotypes, employing one-dimensional electrophoresis to detect variant proteins, has yielded one probable mutation in the offspring of 'proximally exposed' parents, who received an estimated average gonadal exposure dose of between 31 and 39 rem from the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. There were no mutations in 208,196 locus tests involving children of 'distally exposed' parents, who had essentially no radiation exposure. (author)

  12. Primary Carnitine Deficiency and Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Lijun; Huang, Meirong; Chen, Shubao

    2013-01-01

    Carnitine is essential for the transfer of long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into mitochondria for subsequent β-oxidation. A lack of carnitine results in impaired energy production from long-chain fatty acids, especially during periods of fasting or stress. Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial β-oxidation resulting from defective carnitine transport and is one of the rare treatable etiologies of metabolic cardiomyopathies. Patients affec...

  13. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a historical note

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ To the Editor: I read with interest the case report of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a Chinese woman.1 Unfortunately, the authors mistakenly attributed the original description of this syndrome to Tsuchihashi et al in 2001.2Actually Dote et al3 first described this syndrome in 1991, ten years before Tsuchihashi et al did.2 Incidentally, the authors did make a reference in their case report to the article by Dote et al3 which was cited as reference 1.

  14. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer G. Duncan

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is common in patients with diabetes and is a significant contributor to the high mortality rates associated with diabetes. Heart failure is common in diabetic patients, even in the absence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, an entity known as diabetic cardiomyopathy. Evidence indicates that myocardial metabolism is altered in diabetes, which likely contributes to contractile dysfunction and ventricular failure. The mitochondria are the center of metabolism, and...

  15. Mutation of light-dependent phosphorylation sites of the Drosophila transient receptor potential-like (TRPL) ion channel affects its subcellular localization and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Alexander C; Oberacker, Tina; Pfannstiel, Jens; Weigold, Sebastian; Will, Carina; Huber, Armin

    2013-05-31

    The Drosophila phototransduction cascade terminates in the opening of the ion channel transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL). Contrary to TRP, TRPL undergoes light-dependent subcellular trafficking between rhabdomeric photoreceptor membranes and an intracellular storage compartment, resulting in long term light adaptation. Here, we identified in vivo phosphorylation sites of TRPL that affect TRPL stability and localization. Quantitative mass spectrometry revealed a light-dependent change in the TRPL phosphorylation pattern. Mutation of eight C-terminal phosphorylation sites neither affected multimerization of the channels nor the electrophysiological response of flies expressing the mutated channels. However, these mutations resulted in mislocalization and enhanced degradation of TRPL after prolonged dark-adaptation. Mutation of subsets of the eight C-terminal phosphorylation sites also led to a reduction of TRPL content and partial mislocalization in the dark. This suggests that a light-dependent switch in the phosphorylation pattern of the TRPL channel mediates stable expression of TRPL in the rhabdomeres upon prolonged dark-adaptation. PMID:23592784

  16. Mutation of Light-dependent Phosphorylation Sites of the Drosophila Transient Receptor Potential-like (TRPL) Ion Channel Affects Its Subcellular Localization and Stability*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Alexander C.; Oberacker, Tina; Pfannstiel, Jens; Weigold, Sebastian; Will, Carina; Huber, Armin

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila phototransduction cascade terminates in the opening of the ion channel transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL). Contrary to TRP, TRPL undergoes light-dependent subcellular trafficking between rhabdomeric photoreceptor membranes and an intracellular storage compartment, resulting in long term light adaptation. Here, we identified in vivo phosphorylation sites of TRPL that affect TRPL stability and localization. Quantitative mass spectrometry revealed a light-dependent change in the TRPL phosphorylation pattern. Mutation of eight C-terminal phosphorylation sites neither affected multimerization of the channels nor the electrophysiological response of flies expressing the mutated channels. However, these mutations resulted in mislocalization and enhanced degradation of TRPL after prolonged dark-adaptation. Mutation of subsets of the eight C-terminal phosphorylation sites also led to a reduction of TRPL content and partial mislocalization in the dark. This suggests that a light-dependent switch in the phosphorylation pattern of the TRPL channel mediates stable expression of TRPL in the rhabdomeres upon prolonged dark-adaptation. PMID:23592784

  17. Cardiomyopathies and the Armed Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, D A; Cox, A T; Boos, C; Hardman, R; Sharma, S

    2015-09-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a group of heterogeneous myocardial diseases that are frequently inherited and are a recognised cause of premature sudden cardiac death in young individuals. Incomplete expressions of disease and the overlap with the physiological cardiac manifestations of regular intensive exercise create diagnostic challenges in young athletes and military recruits. Early identification is important because sudden death in the absence of prodromal symptoms is a common presentation, and there are several therapeutic strategies to minimise this risk. This paper examines the classification and clinical features of cardiomyopathies with specific reference to a military population and provides a detailed account of the optimum strategy for diagnosis, indications for specialist referral and specific guidance on the occupational significance of cardiomyopathy. A 27-year-old Lance Corporal Signaller presents to his Regimental medical officer (RMO) after feeling 'light-headed' following an 8 mile unloaded run. While waiting to see the RMO, the medical sergeant records a 12-lead ECG. The ECG is reviewed by the RMO immediately prior to the consultation and shows voltage criteria for left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and inverted T-waves in II, III, aVF and V1-V3 (Figure 1). This Lance Corporal is a unit physical training instructor and engages in >10 h of aerobic exercise per week. He is a non-smoker and does not have any significant medical history. PMID:26246349

  18. Recent views on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent Views on Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy provides a review of results obtained in the area of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, as well as a perspective for the future treatment of this cardiac disorder. The debate on the existence of a true obstruction to left ventricular outflow is expertly presented, as are current concepts of pathophysiology. Long-term treatment with the calcium antagonist, verapamil is thoroughly reviewed and surgical treatment and its implications, as applied to 160 patients suffering from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, is thoroughly discussed. In addition, presentations on echocardiography and radionuclide cardiology as non-invasive procedures provide up-to-date views. Results obtained from pressure-volume loops and stress-strain relationships in patients with HCM, both before and after verapamil and propranolol treatments, are of special interest. To provide a better insight of this peculiar disease, two hemodynamic concepts - cavity angulation and atrioventricle - are introduced, emphasizing the interaction between morphology and function, and stressing the importance of the integrity of left atrial function. (Auth.)

  19. Skeletal muscle involvement in cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limongelli, Giuseppe; D'Alessandro, Raffaella; Maddaloni, Valeria; Rea, Alessandra; Sarkozy, Anna; McKenna, William J

    2013-12-01

    The link between heart and skeletal muscle disorders is based on similar molecular, anatomical and clinical features, which are shared by the 'primary' cardiomyopathies and 'primary' neuromuscular disorders. There are, however, some peculiarities that are typical of cardiac and skeletal muscle disorders. Skeletal muscle weakness presenting at any age may indicate a primary neuromuscular disorder (associated with creatine kinase elevation as in dystrophinopathies), a mitochondrial disease (particularly if encephalopathy, ocular myopathy, retinitis, neurosensorineural deafness, lactic acidosis are present), a storage disorder (progressive exercise intolerance, cognitive impairment and retinitis pigmentosa, as in Danon disease), or metabolic disorders (hypoglycaemia, metabolic acidosis, hyperammonaemia or other specific biochemical abnormalities). In such patients, skeletal muscle weakness usually precedes the cardiomyopathy and dominates the clinical picture. Nevertheless, skeletal involvement may be subtle, and the first clinical manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder may be the occurrence of heart failure, conduction disorders or ventricular arrhythmias due to cardiomyopathy. ECG and echocardiogram, and eventually, a more detailed cardiovascular evaluation may be required to identify early cardiac involvement. Paediatric and adult cardiologists should be proactive in screening for neuromuscular and related disorders to enable diagnosis in probands and evaluation of families with a focus on the identification of those at risk of cardiac arrhythmia and emboli who may require specific prophylactic treatments, for example, pacemaker, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and anticoagulation. PMID:24149064

  20. [Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy: a specific entity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondex, A; Arlès, F; Lipovac, A-S; Richecoeur, M; Bronstein, J-A

    2012-04-01

    Cirrhosis is a frequent and severe condition, which is the late stage of numerous chronic liver diseases. It is associated with major hemodynamic alterations characteristic of hyperdynamic circulation and with a series of structural, functional, electrophysiological and biological heart abnormalities termed cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. The pathogenesis of this syndrome is multifactorial. It is usually clinically latent or mild, likely because the peripheral vasodilatation significantly reduces the left ventricle afterload. However, sudden changes of hemodynamic state (vascular filling, surgical or transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunts, peritoneo-venous shunts and orthotopic liver transplantation) or myocardial contractility (introduction of beta-blocker therapy) can unmask its presence, and sometimes convert latent to overt heart failure. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may also contribute to the pathogenesis of hepatorenal syndrome. This entity has been described recently, and its diagnostic criteria are still under debate. To date, current management recommendations are empirical, nonspecific measures. Recognition of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy depends on a high level of awareness for the presence of this syndrome, particularly in patients with advanced cirrhosis who undergo significant surgical, pharmacological or physiological stresses. PMID:22115174

  1. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy as a cause of sudden death in young people: Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazić Sanja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia is a progressive condition with right ventricular myocardium being replaced by fibro-fatty tissue. It is a hereditary disorder mostly caused by desmosome gene mutations. The prevalence of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is about 1/1000-5000. Clinical presentation is usually related to ventricular tachycardias, syncope or presyncopa, or ventricular fibrillation leading to cardiac arrest, mostly in young people and athletes. It may be difficult to make the diagnosis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy due to several problems arising from the specificity of electrocardiograph abnormalities, different potential etiologies of ventricular arrhythmias with a left bundle branch morphology, the assessment of the right ventricular structure and function, and the interpretation of endomyocardial biopsy findings. Therefore, standardized diagnostic criteria have been proposed by the Study Group on arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy of the European Society of Cardiology. In order to make the diagnosis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, a number of clinical tests are employed, including the electrocardiogram, echocardiography, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, myocardial biopsy, right ventricular angiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and genetic testing. The therapeutic options include beta blockers, antiarrhythmic drugs, catheter ablation, and implantable cardioverter defibrillator. The implantable cardioverter defibrillator is the most effective safe-guard against arrhythmic sudden death. Preparticipation screening for sport eligibility has been proven to be effective in detecting asymptomatic patients and sport disqualification has been lifesaving, substantially declining sudden death in young athletes.

  2. Cellular interference in craniofrontonasal syndrome: males mosaic for mutations in the X-linked EFNB1 gene are more severely affected than true hemizygotes

    OpenAIRE

    Twigg, SR; Babbs, C.; van den Elzen, ME; Goriely, A.; Taylor, S.; McGowan, SJ; Giannoulatou, E; Lonie, L; Ragoussis, J; Sadighi Akha, E; Knight, SJ; Zechi-Ceide, RM; Hoogeboom, JA; Pober, BR; Toriello, HV

    2013-01-01

    Craniofrontonasal syndrome (CFNS), an X-linked disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations of EFNB1, exhibits a paradoxical sex reversal in phenotypic severity: females characteristically have frontonasal dysplasia, craniosynostosis and additional minor malformations, but males are usually more mildly affected with hypertelorism as the only feature. X-inactivation is proposed to explain the more severe outcome in heterozygous females, as this leads to functional mosaicism for cells with dif...

  3. Transient stress cardiomyopathies in the elderly: Clinical & Pathophysiologic considerations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael A Chen

    2012-01-01

    Transient stress-induced cardiomyopathies have been increasingly recognized and while rare,they tend to affect elderly women more than other demographic groups.One type,often called tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC),is typically triggered by significant emotional or physical stress and is associated with chest pain,electrocardiogram (ECG) changes and abnormal cardiac enzymes.Significant left ventricular regional wall motion abnormalities usually include an akinetic "ballooning" apex with normal or hyperdynamic function of the base.A second type,often called neurogenic stunned myocardium,typically associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage,also usually presents with ECG changes and positive enzymes,but the typical wall motion abnormalities seen include normal basal and apical left ventricular contraction with akinesis of the mid-cavity in a circumferential fashion.The pathophysiology,clinical care and typical courses,are reviewed.

  4. Factor V Leiden mutation does not affect coagulopathy or outcome in lethal H1N1 influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, M; van der Sluijs, K F; Roelofs, J J T H; Levi, M; Van't Veer, C; van der Poll, T

    2010-12-01

    Influenza A is a major cause of mortality. Knowledge on coagulation activation in influenza infection is limited. The factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation is possibly subject to positive selection pressure. It is unknown whether this mutation impacts on the outcome of severe influenza. In the present study, the effect of lethal influenza on pulmonary and systemic coagulation activation and whether or not FVL mutation alters coagulation activation in and the course of lethal influenza, was determined. Wild-type mice, and mice heterozygous or homozygous for FVL were infected intranasally with a lethal dose of H1N1 (haemagglutinin 1 and neuraminidase 1) influenza A. Mice were sacrificed after 48 or 96 h for determination of coagulation activation, histopathology, pulmonary inflammatory parameters and viral load, or were observed in a survival study. Extensive local and systemic coagulation activation during lethal influenza was demonstrated by increased lung and plasma levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes and fibrin degradation products, and by pulmonary fibrin deposition. FVL mutation did not influence the procoagulant response, lung histopathology or survival. FVL mice demonstrated elevated viral loads 48 h after infection. In conclusion, coagulation is activated locally and systemically during lethal murine influenza A infection. The FVL mutation does not influence coagulation activation, lung inflammation or survival in lethal influenza A. PMID:20413539

  5. Mutation Analysis of Mitochondrial tRNA Gene in Patients with Primary Dilated Cardiomyopathy%原发性扩张型心肌病的线粒体tRNA基因突变分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李红超; 舒红英; 李晓杰; 倪斌; 谢海龙; 周海燕; 倪崖

    2015-01-01

    To identify the potential pathogenic mutations of mitochondrial tRNA in patients with primary dilated cardio-myopathy(DCM) and the possible association of the mutations with DCM.Paraffin-embedded myocardial tissues from two patients with DCM and 10 healthy controls,which were discarded after forensic examination,were used for the study.PCR amplification wasperformed for the mitochondrial tRNA genes and direct sequencing was conducted.Sequencing re-sults showed no variation for mitochondrial tRNA genes in the normal myocardial tissues.The tRNAVal G1664A variation and tRNAMet T4454C variation were identified in patients with DCM.These two variations were previously reported as polymorphism in MitoMap.There was no pathogenic mutation detected in mitochondrial tRNA genes of the two patients with DCM.A patient pool of large sample size is expected for analysis of the pathogenic mutations,polymorphism loci and haplogroup that might be associated with DCM.%为寻找原发性扩张型心肌病病例是否存在已知以及未知的线粒体tRNA致病性突变,以探讨扩张型心肌病可能的发病原因.收集2例原发性扩张型心肌病患者和10例正常对照尸检心肌组织石蜡标本,针对22种线粒体tRNA基因分别设计一对引物,PCR扩增后并测序分析线粒体tRNA基因突变情况.结果在对照样本中未检测到线粒体tRNA变异位点,在1例患者中检测到了tRNAVal基因G1664A变异,Mitomap已有报道为多态性位点;于另1例患者中检测到tRNAMetT4454C变异,有文章报道该位点与线粒体功能障碍有关,Mitomap报道为多态性位点.本研究中2例病例中未检测到线粒体tRNA致病性突变位点,可能与病例个体的心衰程度有关,有必要扩大样本量深入研究线粒体tRNA以及mtDNA其他基因突变与原发性扩张型心肌病之间的关系,以寻找可能的致病突变位点、易感的多态性位点或者单倍体群,为认识原发性扩张型心肌病的发病机制进一步提供理论基础和依据.

  6. Left ventricular diastolic properties in dilated cardiomyopathy, transmural myocardial infarction, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Left ventricular (LV) diastolic properties in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), transmural myocardial infarction (TMI), and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) were evaluated. Radionuclide angiography and M-mode echocardiography were performed for 11 cases of DCM, 40 cases of TMI, 21 cases of HCM, and nine normal control subjects. In DCM, the peak filling rate (PFR) and filling fraction (FF) were significantly reduced, but the time to the peak filling rate (TPFR) was not prolonged. In TMI, both the PFR and FF were significantly reduced. Moreover, the TPFR was significantly prolonged in TMI as compared to DCM. Although depression of the PFR in HCM was not apparent, prolongation of the TPFR in HCM was marked. In DCM, there was good correlation between the PFR and left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) (r = 0.71, p < 0.03). In TMI, there was a good correlation between the TPFR and the standard deviation of the LV phase angle histogram (SDP), indicating LV asynergy (r = 0.589, p < 0.005). In HCM, both the FF and PFR correlated inversely with the LV wall thickness (r = -0.74, p < 0.008; r = -0.581, p < 0.03, respectively). These results indicate that various factors affect LV diastolic properties in heart disease, and that radionuclide angiography is a valuable technique for evaluating LV diastolic function. (author)

  7. The site-directed mutation I(L177)H in Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center affects coordination of P(A) and B(B) bacteriochlorophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilieva, L G; Fufina, T Y; Gabdulkhakov, A G; Leonova, M M; Khatypov, R A; Shuvalov, V A

    2012-08-01

    To explore the influence of the I(L177)H single mutation on the properties of the nearest bacteriochlorophylls (BChls), three reaction centers (RCs) bearing double mutations were constructed in the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, and their properties and pigment content were compared with those of the correspondent single mutant RCs. Each pair of the mutations comprised the amino acid substitution I(L177)H and another mutation altering histidine ligand of BChl P(A) or BChl B(B). Contrary to expectations, the double mutation I(L177)H+H(L173)L does not bring about a heterodimer RC but causes a 46nm blue shift of the long-wavelength P absorbance band. The histidine L177 or a water molecule were suggested as putative ligands for P(A) in the RC I(L177)H+H(L173)L although this would imply a reorientation of the His backbone and additional rearrangements in the primary donor environment or even a repositioning of the BChl dimer. The crystal structure of the mutant I(L177)H reaction center determined to a resolution of 2.9Å shows changes at the interface region between the BChl P(A) and the monomeric BChl B(B). Spectral and pigment analysis provided evidence for β-coordination of the BChl B(B) in the double mutant RC I(L177)H+H(M182)L and for its hexacoordination in the mutant reaction center I(L177)H. Computer modeling suggests involvement of two water molecules in the β-coordination of the BChl B(B). Possible structural consequences of the L177 mutation affecting the coordination of the two BChls P(A) and B(B) are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial. PMID:22365928

  8. TET2 Mutations Affect Non-CpG Island DNA Methylation at Enhancers and Transcription Factor-Binding Sites in Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Jumpei; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Lu, Yue; Cesaroni, Matteo; Madzo, Jozef; Neumann, Frank; He, Rong; Taby, Rodolphe; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Macrae, Trisha; Ostler, Kelly R; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Liang, Shoudan; Estecio, Marcos R; Godley, Lucy A; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2015-07-15

    TET2 enzymatically converts 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine as well as other covalently modified cytosines and its mutations are common in myeloid leukemia. However, the exact mechanism and the extent to which TET2 mutations affect DNA methylation remain in question. Here, we report on DNA methylomes in TET2 wild-type (TET2-WT) and mutant (TET2-MT) cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). We analyzed 85,134 CpG sites [28,114 sites in CpG islands (CGI) and 57,020 in non-CpG islands (NCGI)]. TET2 mutations do not explain genome-wide differences in DNA methylation in CMML, and we found few and inconsistent differences at CGIs between TET2-WT and TET2-MT cases. In contrast, we identified 409 (0.71%) TET2-specific differentially methylated CpGs (tet2-DMCs) in NCGIs, 86% of which were hypermethylated in TET2-MT cases, suggesting a strikingly different biology of the effects of TET2 mutations at CGIs and NCGIs. DNA methylation of tet2-DMCs at promoters and nonpromoters repressed gene expression. Tet2-DMCs showed significant enrichment at hematopoietic-specific enhancers marked by H3K4me1 and at binding sites for the transcription factor p300. Tet2-DMCs showed significantly lower 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in TET2-MT cases. We conclude that leukemia-associated TET2 mutations affect DNA methylation at NCGI regions containing hematopoietic-specific enhancers and transcription factor-binding sites. PMID:25972343

  9. Feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: variations on a theme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history and the physical, radiographic, electrocardiographic, echocardiographic, haemo-dynamic and angiocardiographic findings from 18 cats with idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are described. These data document a diverse spectrum of clinical manifestations of this disease in cats. The variety and complexity of feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy complicate the diagnosis and challenge the idea that this disorder is a single disease entity

  10. Restrictive Cardiomyopathy: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Bin Abdullah*, Mehboob.M.Kalburgi, Sahana Shetty and Satyasrinivas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a 28 years old male presenting with heart failure. A thorough clinical evaluation directed us towards restrictive heart disease. Doppler echocardiographic study was used as a main modality of diagnosis and cardiac catheterization confirmed the diagnosis of idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy. We express the contribution of clinical findings and appropriate diagnostic measures in approaching a case of Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM.

  11. Reciprocal mouse and human limb phenotypes caused by gain- and loss-of-function mutations affecting Lmbr1.

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, R.M.; Marker, P. C.; Roessler, E.; Dutra, A.; Schimenti, J C; Muenke, M; Kingsley, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The major locus for dominant preaxial polydactyly in humans has been mapped to 7q36. In mice the dominant Hemimelic extra toes (Hx) and Hammertoe (Hm) mutations map to a homologous chromosomal region and cause similar limb defects. The Lmbr1 gene is entirely within the small critical intervals recently defined for both the mouse and human mutations and is misexpressed at the exact time that the mouse Hx phenotype becomes apparent during limb development. This result suggests that Lmbr1 may un...

  12. ESR1 mutations affect anti-proliferative responses to tamoxifen through enhanced cross-talk with IGF signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelsomino, Luca; Gu, Guowei; Rechoum, Yassine; Beyer, Amanda R; Pejerrey, Sasha M; Tsimelzon, Anna; Wang, Tao; Huffman, Kenneth; Ludlow, Andrew; Andò, Sebastiano; Fuqua, Suzanne A W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to address the role of ESR1 hormone-binding mutations in breast cancer. Soft agar anchorage-independent growth assay, Western blot, ERE reporter transactivation assay, proximity ligation assay (PLA), coimmunoprecipitation assay, silencing assay, digital droplet PCR (ddPCR), Kaplan-Meier analysis, and statistical analysis. It is now generally accepted that estrogen receptor (ESR1) mutations occur frequently in metastatic breast cancers; however, we do not yet know how to best treat these patients. We have modeled the three most frequent hormone-binding ESR1 (HBD-ESR1) mutations (Y537N, Y537S, and D538G) using stable lentiviral transduction in human breast cancer cell lines. Effects on growth were examined in response to hormonal and targeted agents, and mutation-specific changes were studied using microarray and Western blot analysis. We determined that the HBD-ESR1 mutations alter anti-proliferative effects to tamoxifen (Tam), due to cell-intrinsic changes in activation of the insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) signaling pathway and levels of PIK3R1/PIK3R3. The selective estrogen receptor degrader, fulvestrant, significantly reduced the anchorage-independent growth of ESR1 mutant-expressing cells, while combination treatments with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus, or an inhibitor blocking IGF1R, and the insulin receptor significantly enhanced anti-proliferative responses. Using digital drop (dd) PCR, we identified mutations at high frequencies ranging from 12 % for Y537N, 5 % for Y537S, and 2 % for D538G in archived primary breast tumors from women treated with adjuvant mono-tamoxifen therapy. The HBD-ESR1 mutations were not associated with recurrence-free or overall survival in response in this patient cohort and suggest that knowledge of other cell-intrinsic factors in combination with ESR1 mutation status will be needed determine anti-proliferative responses to Tam. PMID:27178332

  13. PERIPARTUM CARDIOMYOPATHY--REPORT OF 16 CASES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨佳欣; 刘俊涛; 边旭明

    2002-01-01

    Objective.To analyze the clinical characteristics of peripartum cardiomyopathy and to evaluate the different factors that influence the prognosis of the peripartum cardiomyopathy.Method.A retrospective review was undertaken on records of women who were diagnosed with peripartum cardiomyopathy at Peking Union Medical College Hospital between Jan.1983 and May 1999.Results.During the research period,only 16 pregnant women were documented as peripartum cardiomyopathy.Some of the women undertook ultrasonic cardiographic (UCG) examination that showed decreased systolic function.Seven women were complicated with pregnancy induced hypertension.Three died of disseminated intravascular coagulation,embolism and cardiogenic shock respectively.Conclusion.Early diagnosis of the peripartum cardiomyopathy is extremely important.The UCG can provide helpful information on disease progression or regression.

  14. COL1A2 gene analysis in a Czech osteogenesis imperfecta patient: a candidate novel mutation in a patient affected by osteogenesis imperfecta type 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrušková L

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lucie Hrušková,1 Ivo Mařík,2,3 Stella Mazurová,1 Pavel Martásek,1 Ivan Mazura1 1Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic; 2Ambulant Centre for Defects of Locomotor Apparatus 1.1.c., Prague, Czech Republic; 3Faculty of Medical Studies, West Bohemia University, Pilsen, Czech RepublicAbstract: Osteogenesis imperfecta is a heritable bone fragility disease with a heterogenic genetic origin. Most cases result from mutations of either the COL1A1 gene or the COL1A2 gene. We identified a novel COL1A2 gene mutation in a Czech patient, born to unaffected parents, who was diagnosed according to clinical and anthropometric findings and radiographic features as having type 3 osteogenesis imperfecta, which is a severe form of this disease. The identified Gly814Trp mutation was predicted by a number of complementary bioinformatic programs to result in functional alteration of the protein. This case report provides both evidence of a novel COL1A2 mutation resulting in type 3 osteogenesis imperfecta and a genotype:phenotype correlation in this affected individual. Keywords: osteogenesis imperfecta type 3, collagen, alpha-2 (I chain, substitution, sequencing 

  15. An elusive factor affecting mutation frequency in Tradescantia stamen hairs: its influence on r.b.e

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of data from several experiments designed to determine either relative biological effectiveness (r.b.e.) or oxygen-enhancement ratios (o.e.r.) as a function of neutron energy revealed a puzzling variability in mutational response for pink mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs. For some reason that could not be determined, when the exposure fixtures and accompanying experimental procedures were changed as necessitated by the two studies, the expected mutation frequencies changed for X-rays and for four neutron energies. The other four neutron energies have the expected results. As a consequence of these changes in mutation frequencies, the magnitude of r.b.e. values changed as well as the relationship of r.b.e. to neutron energy. Consequently, when r.b.e. values were determined using a closed but aerated exposure fixture instead of exposures made in free air, the resulting r.b.e. versus neutron-energy curve more closely paralleled that found by others for the inhibition of root growth in Vicia faba. (author)

  16. Disease-causing missense mutations affect enzymatic activity, stability and oligomerization of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keyser, B.; Muhlhausen, C.; Dickmanns, A.; Muschol, N.; Ullrich, K.; Braulke, T.; Christensen, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1) is an autosomal recessive neurometabolic disorder caused by mutations in the glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase gene (GCDH), leading to an accumulation and high excretion of glutaric acid and 3-hydroxyglutaric acid. Considerable variation in severity of the clinical phenotype...

  17. Reciprocal mouse and human limb phenotypes caused by gain- and loss-of-function mutations affecting Lmbr1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R M; Marker, P C; Roessler, E; Dutra, A; Schimenti, J C; Muenke, M; Kingsley, D M

    2001-01-01

    The major locus for dominant preaxial polydactyly in humans has been mapped to 7q36. In mice the dominant Hemimelic extra toes (Hx) and Hammertoe (Hm) mutations map to a homologous chromosomal region and cause similar limb defects. The Lmbr1 gene is entirely within the small critical intervals recently defined for both the mouse and human mutations and is misexpressed at the exact time that the mouse Hx phenotype becomes apparent during limb development. This result suggests that Lmbr1 may underlie preaxial polydactyly in both mice and humans. We have used deletion chromosomes to demonstrate that the dominant mouse and human limb defects arise from gain-of-function mutations and not from haploinsufficiency. Furthermore, we created a loss-of-function mutation in the mouse Lmbr1 gene that causes digit number reduction (oligodactyly) on its own and in trans to a deletion chromosome. The loss of digits that we observed in mice with reduced Lmbr1 activity is in contrast to the gain of digits observed in Hx mice and human polydactyly patients. Our results suggest that the Lmbr1 gene is required for limb formation and that reciprocal changes in levels of Lmbr1 activity can lead to either increases or decreases in the number of digits in the vertebrate limb. PMID:11606546

  18. A genome-wide association study identifies two loci associated with heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villard, Eric; Perret, Claire; Gary, Françoise; Proust, Carole; Dilanian, Gilles; Hengstenberg, Christian; Ruppert, Volker; Arbustini, Eloisa; Wichter, Thomas; Germain, Marine; Dubourg, Olivier; Tavazzi, Luigi; Aumont, Marie-Claude; DeGroote, Pascal; Fauchier, Laurent; Trochu, Jean-Noël; Gibelin, Pierre; Aupetit, Jean-François; Stark, Klaus; Erdmann, Jeanette; Hetzer, Roland; Roberts, Angharad M.; Barton, Paul J.R.; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Aslam, Uzma; Duboscq-Bidot, Laëtitia; Meyborg, Matthias; Maisch, Bernhard; Madeira, Hugo; Waldenström, Anders; Galve, Enrique; Cleland, John G.; Dorent, Richard; Roizes, Gerard; Zeller, Tanja; Blankenberg, Stefan; Goodall, Alison H.; Cook, Stuart; Tregouet, David A.; Tiret, Laurence; Isnard, Richard; Komajda, Michel; Charron, Philippe; Cambien, François

    2011-01-01

    Aims Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a major cause of heart failure with a high familial recurrence risk. So far, the genetics of DCM remains largely unresolved. We conducted the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify loci contributing to sporadic DCM. Methods and results One thousand one hundred and seventy-nine DCM patients and 1108 controls contributed to the discovery phase. Pools of DNA stratified on disease status, population, age, and gender were constituted and used for testing association of DCM with 517 382 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Three DCM-associated SNPs were confirmed by individual genotyping (P < 5.0 10−7), and two of them, rs10927875 and rs2234962, were replicated in independent samples (1165 DCM patients and 1302 controls), with P-values of 0.002 and 0.009, respectively. rs10927875 maps to a region on chromosome 1p36.13 which encompasses several genes among which HSPB7 has been formerly suggested to be implicated in DCM. The second identified locus involves rs2234962, a non-synonymous SNP (c.T757C, p. C151R) located within the sequence of BAG3 on chromosome 10q26. To assess whether coding mutations of BAG3 might cause monogenic forms of the disease, we sequenced BAG3 exons in 168 independent index cases diagnosed with familial DCM and identified four truncating and two missense mutations. Each mutation was heterozygous, present in all genotyped relatives affected by the disease and absent in a control group of 347 healthy individuals, strongly suggesting that these mutations are causing the disease. Conclusion This GWAS identified two loci involved in sporadic DCM, one of them probably implicates BAG3. Our results show that rare mutations in BAG3 contribute to monogenic forms of the disease, while common variant(s) in the same gene are implicated in sporadic DCM. PMID:21459883

  19. Exome and deep sequencing of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma reveal somatic mutations that affect key pathways involved in cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasorsa, Vito Alessandro; Formicola, Daniela; Pignataro, Piero; Cimmino, Flora; Calabrese, Francesco Maria; Mora, Jaume; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Pantile, Marcella; Zanon, Carlo; De Mariano, Marilena; Longo, Luca; Hogarty, Michael D.; de Torres, Carmen; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Iolascon, Achille; Capasso, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of somatic mutation of the most aggressive forms of neuroblastoma is not completely determined. We sought to identify potential cancer drivers in clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Whole exome sequencing was conducted on 17 germline and tumor DNA samples from high-risk patients with adverse events within 36 months from diagnosis (HR-Event3) to identify somatic mutations and deep targeted sequencing of 134 genes selected from the initial screening in additional 48 germline and tumor pairs (62.5% HR-Event3 and high-risk patients), 17 HR-Event3 tumors and 17 human-derived neuroblastoma cell lines. We revealed 22 significantly mutated genes, many of which implicated in cancer progression. Fifteen genes (68.2%) were highly expressed in neuroblastoma supporting their involvement in the disease. CHD9, a cancer driver gene, was the most significantly altered (4.0% of cases) after ALK. Other genes (PTK2, NAV3, NAV1, FZD1 and ATRX), expressed in neuroblastoma and involved in cell invasion and migration were mutated at frequency ranged from 4% to 2%. Focal adhesion and regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathways, were frequently disrupted (14.1% of cases) thus suggesting potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent disease progression. Notably BARD1, CHEK2 and AXIN2 were enriched in rare, potentially pathogenic, germline variants. In summary, whole exome and deep targeted sequencing identified novel cancer genes of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Our analyses show pathway-level implications of infrequently mutated genes in leading neuroblastoma progression. PMID:27009842

  20. Cardiac effects of the c.1583 C→G LMNA mutation in two families with Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Shen, Hongrui; Zhao, Zhe; Bing, Qi; Hu, Jing

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to examine and analyze cardiac involvement in two Emery‑Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) pedigrees caused by the c.1583 C→G mutation of the lamin A/C gene (LMNA). The clinical and genetic characteristics of members of two families with EDMD were evaluated by performing neurological examinations, skeletal muscle biopsies, cardiac evaluations, including electrocardiography, 24 h Holter, ultrasound cardiography and 99TcM‑MIBI‑gated myocardiac perfusion imaging, and genomic DNA sequencing. Family history investigations revealed an autosomal dominant transmission pattern of the disease in Family 1 and a sporadic case in Family 2. The three affected patients exhibited typical clinical features of EDMD, including joint contractures, muscle weakness and cardiac involvement. Muscle histopathological investigation revealed dystrophic features. In addition, each affected individual exhibited either cardiac arrhythmia, which was evident as sinus tachycardia, atrial flutter or complete atrioventricular inhibition. Cardiac imaging revealed dilated cardiomyopathy in two of the individuals, one of whom was presented with heart failure. The second patient presented with no significant abnormalities in cardiac structure or function. The three affected individuals exhibited a heterozygous missense mutation in the LMNA gene (c.1583 C→G), which caused a T528R amino acid change in the LMNA protein. In conclusion, the present study identified three patients with EDMD, exhibiting the same dominant LMNA mutation and presenting with a spectrum of severe cardiac abnormalities, including cardiac conduction system defects, cardiomyopathy and heart failure. As LMNA mutations have been associated with at least six clinical disorders, including EDMD, the results of the present study provide additional mutational and functional data, which may assist in further establishing LMNA mutational variation and disease pathogenesis. PMID:26165385

  1. Differentiation of ischemic cardiomyopathy from idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether ischemic cardiomyopathy (ischemic DCM) could be distinguished from idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (idiopathic DCM) by radionuclide cardiac imaging, seven patients with ischemic DCM and eight patients with idiopathic DCM were studied with thallium scanning and gated cardiac blood pool imaging at rest and during exercise. The resting ejection fraction of the two groups were similar (ischemic DCM 20.7+-9.0%, idiopathic DCM 26.0+-13.4%, ns), and the change in the ejection fraction during exercise were also similar. Both groups showed no increment of ejection fraction during exercise. Thallium scan showed perfusion defect in 14 of 15 patients. The perfusion defects were extensive in ischemic DCM than idiopathic DCM (defect score 49.6+-5.7 vs. 21.1+-13.2%, p>0.001). Moreover, the distribution of the defects were different; in ischemic DCM the defects were distributed according to the territory of coronary arteries, but in idiopathic DCM, defects were seen frequently in the apex or at the base of left ventricle. In conclusion, resting thallium scan was most reliable imaging technique to distinguish ischemic DCM from idiopathic DCM. (author)

  2. Ergotamine-Induced Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozpelit, Ebru; Ozpelit, Mehmet E; Akdeniz, Bahri; Göldeli, Özhan

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is a recently increasing diagnosed disease showed by transient apical or mid-apical left ventricular dysfunction. It is known as a disease of postmenopausal women, which is usually triggered by emotional or physical stress. Although the trigger is mostly endogenous, some drugs have also been reported as the cause. Published case reports of TC associated with drug usage consist of sympathomimetic drugs, inotropic agents, thyroid hormone, cocaine, and 5-fluorouracil. We present an unusual case of TC in which the possible trigger is ergotamine toxicity. PMID:25099482

  3. ANO5 mutations in the Dutch limb girdle muscular dystrophy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kooi, Anneke J; Ten Dam, Leroy; Frankhuizen, Wendy S; Straathof, Chiara S M; van Doorn, Pieter A; de Visser, Marianne; Ginjaar, Ieke B

    2013-06-01

    A Dutch cohort of 105 limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) patients were subject to subsequent genetic investigations. In half the families a causative mutation was found. Recently mutations were identified in ANO5 causing LGMD2L and Miyoshi-like myopathy (MMD3), but could also be found in patients with hyperCKemia only. Therefore, we analysed the index cases of the remaining 31 as yet undiagnosed families from our previously described cohort of LGMD patients for the presence of ANO5 mutations. Detailed history and neurological examination were available for all patients. Serum creatine kinase (CK) activity, skeletal muscle computed tomography (CT) and cardiological investigations were performed. Mutations in ANO5 were found in 16% of the families: 11 index patients and two sibs, eight males and five females. The founder mutation c.191dupA was present in 8 out of 13 patients. Ten different pathogenic mutations were identified of which seven were novel: five missense and two splice site mutations. The age of these patients ranged from 26 to 69 years and the age of onset varied from 21 to 57 years. Symptoms at onset were related to proximal leg weakness. The weakness was slowly progressive. Calf hypertrophy was present in three patients. Males were more severely affected than females. Serum CK activity was highly elevated in the early stage of disease and moderately increased in later stages. Muscle biopsy showed predominantly dystrophic changes. One patient had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, two others had intraventricular septum thickening. PMID:23607914

  4. Cellular interference in craniofrontonasal syndrome: males mosaic for mutations in the X-linked EFNB1 gene are more severely affected than true hemizygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twigg, Stephen R F; Babbs, Christian; van den Elzen, Marijke E P; Goriely, Anne; Taylor, Stephen; McGowan, Simon J; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Lonie, Lorne; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Sadighi Akha, Elham; Knight, Samantha J L; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M; Hoogeboom, Jeannette A M; Pober, Barbara R; Toriello, Helga V; Wall, Steven A; Rita Passos-Bueno, M; Brunner, Han G; Mathijssen, Irene M J; Wilkie, Andrew O M

    2013-04-15

    Craniofrontonasal syndrome (CFNS), an X-linked disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations of EFNB1, exhibits a paradoxical sex reversal in phenotypic severity: females characteristically have frontonasal dysplasia, craniosynostosis and additional minor malformations, but males are usually more mildly affected with hypertelorism as the only feature. X-inactivation is proposed to explain the more severe outcome in heterozygous females, as this leads to functional mosaicism for cells with differing expression of EPHRIN-B1, generating abnormal tissue boundaries-a process that cannot occur in hemizygous males. Apparently challenging this model, males occasionally present with a more severe female-like CFNS phenotype. We hypothesized that such individuals might be mosaic for EFNB1 mutations and investigated this possibility in multiple tissue samples from six sporadically presenting males. Using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography, massively parallel sequencing and multiplex-ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to increase sensitivity above standard dideoxy sequencing, we identified mosaic mutations of EFNB1 in all cases, comprising three missense changes, two gene deletions and a novel point mutation within the 5' untranslated region (UTR). Quantification by Pyrosequencing and MLPA demonstrated levels of mutant cells between 15 and 69%. The 5' UTR variant mutates the stop codon of a small upstream open reading frame that, using a dual-luciferase reporter construct, was demonstrated to exacerbate interference with translation of the wild-type protein. These results demonstrate a more severe outcome in mosaic than in constitutionally deficient males in an X-linked dominant disorder and provide further support for the cellular interference mechanism, normally related to X-inactivation in females. PMID:23335590

  5. Cellular interference in craniofrontonasal syndrome: males mosaic for mutations in the X-linked EFNB1 gene are more severely affected than true hemizygotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twigg, Stephen R.F.; Babbs, Christian; van den Elzen, Marijke E.P.; Goriely, Anne; Taylor, Stephen; McGowan, Simon J.; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Lonie, Lorne; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Akha, Elham Sadighi; Knight, Samantha J.L.; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M.; Hoogeboom, Jeannette A.M.; Pober, Barbara R.; Toriello, Helga V.; Wall, Steven A.; Rita Passos-Bueno, M.; Brunner, Han G.; Mathijssen, Irene M.J.; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.

    2013-01-01

    Craniofrontonasal syndrome (CFNS), an X-linked disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations of EFNB1, exhibits a paradoxical sex reversal in phenotypic severity: females characteristically have frontonasal dysplasia, craniosynostosis and additional minor malformations, but males are usually more mildly affected with hypertelorism as the only feature. X-inactivation is proposed to explain the more severe outcome in heterozygous females, as this leads to functional mosaicism for cells with differing expression of EPHRIN-B1, generating abnormal tissue boundaries—a process that cannot occur in hemizygous males. Apparently challenging this model, males occasionally present with a more severe female-like CFNS phenotype. We hypothesized that such individuals might be mosaic for EFNB1 mutations and investigated this possibility in multiple tissue samples from six sporadically presenting males. Using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography, massively parallel sequencing and multiplex-ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to increase sensitivity above standard dideoxy sequencing, we identified mosaic mutations of EFNB1 in all cases, comprising three missense changes, two gene deletions and a novel point mutation within the 5′ untranslated region (UTR). Quantification by Pyrosequencing and MLPA demonstrated levels of mutant cells between 15 and 69%. The 5′ UTR variant mutates the stop codon of a small upstream open reading frame that, using a dual-luciferase reporter construct, was demonstrated to exacerbate interference with translation of the wild-type protein. These results demonstrate a more severe outcome in mosaic than in constitutionally deficient males in an X-linked dominant disorder and provide further support for the cellular interference mechanism, normally related to X-inactivation in females. PMID:23335590

  6. The co-occurrence of mtDNA mutations on different oxidative phosphorylation subunits, not detected by haplogroup analysis, affects human longevity and is population specific

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raule, Nicola; Sevini, Federica; Li, Shengting;

    2014-01-01

    To re-examine the correlation between mtDNA variability and longevity, we examined mtDNAs from samples obtained from over 2200 ultranonagenarians (and an equal number of controls) collected within the framework of the GEHA EU project. The samples were categorized by high-resolution classification......, while about 1300 mtDNA molecules (650 ultranonagenarians and an equal number of controls) were completely sequenced. Sequences, unlike standard haplogroup analysis, made possible to evaluate for the first time the cumulative effects of specific, concomitant mtDNA mutations, including those that per se...... analysis, suggests that mitochondrial DNA variation does affect human longevity, but its effect is heavily influenced by the interaction between mutations concomitantly occurring on different mtDNA genes....

  7. [Classification, genetic predisposition and risk factors for the development of cardiomyopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankuweit, S; Richter, A; Ruppert, V; Funck, R; Maisch, B

    2008-04-01

    Cardiomyopathies are an important and diverse group of heart muscle diseases in which the heart muscle itself is structural or functional abnormal. This often results in severe heart failure accompanied by arrhythmias and/or sudden death. Clinical and morphological diversity of cardiomyopathies can reflect the broad spectrum of distinct underlying molecular causes or genetic heterogeneity. In addition, modifying genes, life style and additional factors were reported to influence onset of disease, disease progression and prognosis. The individual patient's phenotype may reflect a summation and/or interaction of the underlying mutation with other genetic or environmental factors. During the last years major advances have been made in the understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of this type of disease. Nevertheless, much more progress in the identification of underlying mutations, susceptibility genes and modifier genes is important and indispensable for the development of new etiology orientated forms of therapy. PMID:18274717

  8. PINK1 loss-of-function mutations affect mitochondrial complex I activity via NdufA10 ubiquinone uncoupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Vanessa A; Haddad, Dominik; Craessaerts, Katleen; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Swerts, Jef; Vilain, Sven; Aerts, Liesbeth; Overbergh, Lut; Grünewald, Anne; Seibler, Philip; Klein, Christine; Gevaert, Kris; Verstreken, Patrik; De Strooper, Bart

    2014-04-11

    Under resting conditions, Pink1 knockout cells and cells derived from patients with PINK1 mutations display a loss of mitochondrial complex I reductive activity, causing a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. Analyzing the phosphoproteome of complex I in liver and brain from Pink1(-/-) mice, we found specific loss of phosphorylation of serine-250 in complex I subunit NdufA10. Phosphorylation of serine-250 was needed for ubiquinone reduction by complex I. Phosphomimetic NdufA10 reversed Pink1 deficits in mouse knockout cells and rescued mitochondrial depolarization and synaptic transmission defects in pink(B9)-null mutant Drosophila. Complex I deficits and adenosine triphosphate synthesis were also rescued in cells derived from PINK1 patients. Thus, this evolutionary conserved pathway may contribute to the pathogenic cascade that eventually leads to Parkinson's disease in patients with PINK1 mutations. PMID:24652937

  9. Abnormal Calcium Handling Properties Underlie Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Pathology in Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lan, Feng; Lee, Andrew S.; Liang, Ping; Sanchez-Freire, Veronica; Nguyen, Patricia K; Wang, Li; Han, Leng; Yen, Michelle; Wang, Yongming; Sun, Ning; Abilez, Oscar J.; Hu, Shijun; Ebert, Antje D.; Navarrete, Enrique G.; Simmons, Chelsey S.

    2013-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a prevalent hereditary cardiac disorder linked to arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. While the causes of HCM have been identified as genetic mutations in the cardiac sarcomere, the pathways by which sarcomeric mutations engender myocyte hypertrophy and electrophysiological abnormalities are not understood. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying HCM development, we generated patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs)...

  10. HIV-1 protease inhibitor mutations affect the development of HIV-1 resistance to the maturation inhibitor bevirimat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fun, A.; Maarseveen van, N. M.; Pokorná, Jana; Maas, R. E.; Schipper, P. J.; Konvalinka, Jan; Nijhuis, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 70 (2011), s. 1-12. ISSN 1742-4690 Grant ostatní: European Union(XE) LWSHP-CT-2007-037693 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : immunodeficiency-virus type-1 * gag spacer peptide-1 * replication capacity * compensatory mutations * cleavage sites Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 6.470, year: 2011

  11. Mutations Affecting Potassium Import Restore the Viability of the Escherichia coli DNA Polymerase III holD Mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Adeline

    2016-01-01

    Mutants lacking the ψ (HolD) subunit of the Escherichia coli DNA Polymerase III holoenzyme (Pol III HE) have poor viability, but a residual growth allows the isolation of spontaneous suppressor mutations that restore ΔholD mutant viability. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of two suppressor mutations in the trkA and trkE genes, involved in the main E. coli potassium import system. Viability of ΔholD trk mutants is abolished on media with low or high K+ concentrations, where alternative K+ import systems are activated, and is restored on low K+ concentrations by the inactivation of the alternative Kdp system. These findings show that the ΔholD mutant is rescued by a decrease in K+ import. The effect of trk inactivation is additive with the previously identified ΔholD suppressor mutation lexAind that blocks the SOS response indicating an SOS-independent mechanism of suppression. Accordingly, although lagging-strand synthesis is still perturbed in holD trkA mutants, the trkA mutation allows HolD-less Pol III HE to resist increased levels of the SOS-induced bypass polymerase DinB. trk inactivation is also partially additive with an ssb gene duplication, proposed to stabilize HolD-less Pol III HE by a modification of the single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) binding mode. We propose that lowering the intracellular K+ concentration stabilizes HolD-less Pol III HE on DNA by increasing electrostatic interactions between Pol III HE subunits, or between Pol III and DNA, directly or through a modification of the SSB binding mode; these three modes of action are not exclusive and could be additive. To our knowledge, the holD mutant provides the first example of an essential protein-DNA interaction that strongly depends on K+ import in vivo. PMID:27280472

  12. [Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: origin and variants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronov, D M

    2008-01-01

    This literature review is devoted to the " tako-tsubo " cardiomyopathy - rare type of cardiomyopathy characterized by transient myocardial stunning. In acute phase the disease resembles myocardial infarction. However no involvement of coronary arteries is found at angiography. Echocardiography and ventriculography reveal a- or - hypokinesia of various parts of the left ventricle. Classic (initial) variant of the disease is associated with concomitant apical akinesia and hyperkinesis of basal segments. The heart acquires a distinctive configuration with ballooning apex which resembles device used to trap octopus. The author refers to described by him 11 cases of myocardial damage with infarct-like clinic without changes of coronary arteries in healthy men younger than 35 years (D.M.Aronow, 1968, 1974). These cases occurred during severe physical stress and had in their basis hypercatecholaminemia which led to reversible myocardial damage of the myocardium which corresponded to modern concept of myocardial stunning. During exercise tests these patients had 3 times greater increase of urinal epinephrine excretion compared with 61 patients of the same age with atherosclerotic heart disease. PMID:18991836

  13. Current Understanding of Molecular Pathology and Treatment of Cardiomyopathy in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Tirsa L. E. van Westering; Betts, Corinne A.; Wood, Matthew J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic muscle disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene resulting in the loss of the protein dystrophin. Patients do not only experience skeletal muscle degeneration, but also develop severe cardiomyopathy by their second decade, one of the main causes of death. The absence of dystrophin in the heart renders cardiomyocytes more sensitive to stretch-induced damage. Moreover, it pathologically alters intracellular calcium (Ca2+) concentration, neuronal...

  14. Accelerating restrictive cardiomyopathy after liver transplantation in a patient with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Robin Jason; Meyers Sheridan; Nahlawi Maher; Puthumana Jyothy; Lomasney Jon; Mehlman David; Rigolin Vera; Davidson Charles

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Hereditary amyloidodis is a rare disease process with a propensity to cause polyneuropathies, autonomic dysfunction, and restrictive cardiomyopathy. It is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner, with disease onset usually in the 20s-40s. The most common hereditary amyloidogenic protein, transthyretin, is synthesized in the liver and lies on Chromosome 18. Over 80 amyloidogenic transthyretin mutations have been described, the majority of which are neuropathic and hen...

  15. Milder clinical course of Type IV 3-methylglutaconic aciduria due to a novel mutation in TMEM70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchelochkov, Oleg A; Li, Fang-Yuan; Wang, Jing; Zhan, Hongli; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Jefferies, John Lynn; Wong, Lee-Jun; Scaglia, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are a large and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders posing a significant diagnostic challenge. Only approximately 10-20% of patients have identifiable alterations in their mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The remaining ~80-90% of affected patients likely harbor mutations in nuclear genes, most of which are still poorly characterized, and therefore not amenable to efficient screening using currently available molecular methods. Here we present a patient, who has been followed since birth after presenting with neonatal hyperammonemia, lactic acidosis, Reye-like syndrome episodes, and ventricular tachyarrhythmia. Initial biochemical work-up revealed hyperalaninemia, normal plasma glutamine, mild orotic aciduria and significant amounts of urinary 3-methylglutaconic (3-MGC) and 3-methylglutaric (3-MGA) acids. Muscle biopsy demonstrated the presence of ragged-red fibers and non-specific structural abnormalities of mitochondria. The activities of respiratory chain enzymes (complexes I-IV) showed no deficiency. Mutational analysis of the entire mitochondrial genome did not reveal deleterious point mutations or large deletions. Long-term follow-up was significant for a later-onset hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, muscle weakness, and exercise intolerance. Although she had frequent episodes of Reye-like episodes in infancy and early childhood, mostly triggered by illnesses, these symptoms improved significantly with the onset of puberty. In the light of recent reports linking cases of type IV 3-methylglutaconic aciduria (3-MGCA) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to mutations in TMEM70, we proceeded with sequencing analysis of this gene. We identified one previously reported splice site mutation, c.317-2A>G and a novel mutation c.494G>A (p.G165D) in an evolutionarily conserved region predicted to be deleterious. This variant was not identified in 100 chromosomes of healthy control subjects and 200 chromosomes of patients with cardiomyopathies. Western

  16. Mutations that abrogate transactivational activity of the feline leukemia virus long terminal repeat do not affect virus replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U3 region of the LTR of oncogenic Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV) and feline leukemia viruses (FeLV) have been previously reported to activate expression of specific cellular genes in trans, such as MHC class I, collagenase IV, and MCP-1, in an integration-independent manner. It has been suggested that transactivation of these specific cellular genes by leukemia virus U3-LTR may contribute to the multistage process of leukemogenesis. The U3-LTR region, necessary for gene transactivational activity, also contains multiple transcription factor-binding sites that are essential for normal virus replication. To dissect the promoter activity and the gene transactivational activity of the U3-LTR, we conducted mutational analysis of the U3-LTR region of FeLV-A molecular clone 61E. We identified minimal nucleotide substitution mutants on the U3 LTR that did not disturb transcription factor-binding sites but abrogated its ability to transactivate the collagenase gene promoter. To determine if these mutations actually have altered any uncharacterized important transcription factor-binding site, we introduced these U3-LTR mutations into the full-length infectious molecular clone 61E. We demonstrate that the mutant virus was replication competent but could not transactivate cellular gene expression. These results thus suggest that the gene transactivational activity is a distinct property of the LTR and possibly not related to its promoter activity. The cellular gene transactivational activity-deficient mutant FeLV generated in this study may also serve as a valuable reagent for testing the biological significance of LTR-mediated cellular gene activation in the tumorigenesis caused by leukemia viruses

  17. Evolving Approaches to Genetic Evaluation of Specific Cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Loon Yee Louis; Moran, Rocio T; Tang, W H Wilson

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of the genetic basis of cardiomyopathy has expanded significantly over the past 2 decades. The increasing availability, shortening diagnostic time, and lowering costs of genetic testing have provided researchers and physicians with the opportunity to identify the underlying genetic determinants for thousands of genetic disorders, including inherited cardiomyopathies, in effort to improve patient morbidities and mortality. As such, genetic testing has advanced from basic scientific research to clinical application and has been incorporated as part of patient evaluations for suspected inherited cardiomyopathies. Genetic evaluation framework of inherited cardiomyopathies typically encompasses careful evaluation of family history, genetic counseling, clinical screening of family members, and if appropriate, molecular genetic testing. This review summarizes the genetics, current guideline recommendations, and evidence supporting the genetic evaluation framework of five hereditary forms of cardiomyopathy: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), and left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC). PMID:26472190

  18. Point mutations in EBV gH that abrogate or differentially affect B cell and epithelial cell fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Liguo; Lindsey M Hutt-Fletcher

    2007-01-01

    Cell fusion mediated by Epstein-Barr virus requires three conserved glycoproteins, gB and gHgL, but activation is cell type specific. B cell fusion requires interaction between MHC-class II and a fourth virus glycoprotein, gp42, which complexes non-covalently with gHgL. Epithelial cell fusion requires interaction between gHgL and a novel epithelial cell coreceptor and is blocked by excess gp42. We show here that gp42 interacts directly with gH and that point mutations in the region of gH reco...

  19. The nuclear SUV3-1 mutation affects a variety of post-transcriptional processes in yeast mitochondria.

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad-Webb, H; Perlman, P S; Zhu, H.; Butow, R A

    1990-01-01

    The SUV3-1 mutation was isolated earlier as a suppressor of a deletion of a conserved RNA processing site (dodecamer) near the 3' end of the var1 gene. Previous studies indicate that the suppressor enhances translation of mutant var1 messages; unexpectedly, it also causes over-accumulation of excised intron RNA of the large rRNA gene intron and blocks cleavage at the dodecamer site within that intron. In this study most mitochondrial genes in SUV3-1 and suv3 nuclear contexts are surveyed for ...

  20. Mutations in Protocadherin 15 and Cadherin 23 Affect Tip Links and Mechanotransduction in Mammalian Sensory Hair Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Alagramam, Kumar N.; Goodyear, Richard J.; Ruishuang Geng; Furness, David N.; Van Aken, Alexander F J; Walter Marcotti; Kros, Corné J.; Richardson, Guy P.

    2011-01-01

    Immunocytochemical studies have shown that protocadherin-15 (PCDH15) and cadherin-23 (CDH23) are associated with tip links, structures thought to gate the mechanotransducer channels of hair cells in the sensory epithelia of the inner ear. The present report describes functional and structural analyses of hair cells from Pcdh15(av3J) (av3J), Pcdh15(av6J) (av6J) and Cdh23(v2J) (v2J) mice. The av3J and v2J mice carry point mutations that are predicted to introduce premature stop codons in the tr...

  1. The V122I cardiomyopathy variant of transthyretin increases the velocity of rate-limiting tetramer dissociation, resulting in accelerated amyloidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Xin; Buxbaum, Joel N.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2001-01-01

    The transthyretin (TTR) amyloid diseases are of keen interest, because there are >80 mutations that cause, and a few mutations that suppress, disease. The V122I variant is the most common amyloidogenic mutation worldwide, producing familial amyloidotic cardiomyopathy primarily in individuals of African descent. The substitution shifts the tetramer-folded monomer equilibrium toward monomer (lowers tetramer stability) and lowers the kinetic barrier associated with ra...

  2. DNA Microarray and Gene Ontology Enrichment Analysis Reveals That a Mutation in opsX Affects Virulence and Chemotaxis in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong-Il; Park, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial leaf blight (BLB) in rice (Oryza sativa L.). In this study, we investigated the effect of a mutation in opsX (XOO1056), which encodes a saccharide biosynthesis regulatory protein, on the virulence and bacterial chemotaxis of Xoo. We performed DNA microarray analysis, which showed that 63 of 2,678 genes, including genes related to bacterial motility (flagellar and chemotaxis proteins) were significantly downregulated (<−2 log2 fold changes) by the mutation in opsX. Indeed, motility assays showed that the mutant strain was nonmotile on semisolid agar swarm plates. In addition, a mutant strain (opsX::Tn5) showed decreased virulence against the susceptible rice cultivar, IR24. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR reaction was performed to confirm the expression levels of these genes, including those related to flagella and chemotaxis, in the opsX mutant. Our findings revealed that mutation of opsX affects both virulence and bacterial motility. These results will help to improve our understanding of Xoo and provide insight into Xoo-rice interactions. PMID:27298594

  3. Removal of gating in voltage-dependent ClC-2 chloride channel by point mutations affecting the pore and C-terminus CBS-2 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusef, Yamil R; Zúñiga, Leandro; Catalán, Marcelo; Niemeyer, María Isabel; Cid, L Pablo; Sepúlveda, Francisco V

    2006-04-01

    Functional and structural studies demonstrate that Cl(-) channels of the ClC family have a dimeric double-barrelled structure, with each monomer contributing an identical pore. Studies with ClC-0, the prototype ClC channel, show the presence of independent mechanisms gating the individual pores or both pores simultaneously. A single-point mutation in the CBS-2 domain of ClC-0 has been shown to abolish slow gating. We have taken advantage of the high conservation of CBS domains in ClC channels to test for the presence of a slow gate in ClC-2 by reproducing this mutation (H811A). ClC-2-H811A showed faster opening kinetics and opened at more positive potentials than ClC-2. There was no difference in [Cl(-)](i) dependence. Additional neutralization of a putative pore gate glutamate side chain (E207V) abolished all gating. Resolving slow and fast gating relaxations, however, revealed that the H811A mutation affected both fast and slow gating processes in ClC-2. This suggests that slow and fast gating in ClC-2 are coupled, perhaps with slow gating contributing to the operation of the pore E207 as a protopore gate. PMID:16469788

  4. Discovery of a potentially deleterious variant in TMEM87B in a patient with a hemizygous 2q13 microdeletion suggests a recessive condition characterized by congenital heart disease and restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Curtis R.; Geiger, Elizabeth A.; Salvador, Blake J.; Elias, Ellen R.; Cavanaugh, Jean L.; Chatfield, Kathryn C.; Miyamoto, Shelley D.; Shaikh, Tamim H.

    2016-01-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a rare cause of heart muscle disease with the highest mortality rate among cardiomyopathy types. The etiology of RCM is poorly understood, although genetic causes have been implicated, and syndromic associations have been described. Here, we describe a patient with an atrial septal defect and restrictive cardiomyopathy along with craniofacial anomalies and intellectual disabilities. Initial screening using chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) identified a maternally inherited 2q13 microdeletion. The patient had many of the features reported in previous cases with the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome. However, the inheritance of the microdeletion from an unaffected mother combined with the low incidence (10%) and milder forms of cardiac defects in previously reported cases made the clinical significance of the CMA results unclear. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) with trio-based analysis was performed and identified a paternally inherited TMEM87B mutation (c.1366A>G, p.Asn456Asp) in the patient. TMEM87B, a highly conserved, transmembrane protein of currently unknown function, lies within the critical region of the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome. Furthermore, a recent study had demonstrated that depletion of TMEM87B in zebrafish embryos affected cardiac development and led to cardiac hypoplasia. Thus, by combining CMA and WES, we potentially uncover an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a severe cardiac phenotype caused by mutations in TMEM87B. This study expands the spectrum of phenotypes associated with the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome and also further suggests the role of TMEM87B in its etiology, especially the cardiac pathology. PMID:27148590

  5. Discovery of a potentially deleterious variant in TMEM87B in a patient with a hemizygous 2q13 microdeletion suggests a recessive condition characterized by congenital heart disease and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hung-Chun; Coughlin, Curtis R; Geiger, Elizabeth A; Salvador, Blake J; Elias, Ellen R; Cavanaugh, Jean L; Chatfield, Kathryn C; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Shaikh, Tamim H

    2016-05-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a rare cause of heart muscle disease with the highest mortality rate among cardiomyopathy types. The etiology of RCM is poorly understood, although genetic causes have been implicated, and syndromic associations have been described. Here, we describe a patient with an atrial septal defect and restrictive cardiomyopathy along with craniofacial anomalies and intellectual disabilities. Initial screening using chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) identified a maternally inherited 2q13 microdeletion. The patient had many of the features reported in previous cases with the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome. However, the inheritance of the microdeletion from an unaffected mother combined with the low incidence (10%) and milder forms of cardiac defects in previously reported cases made the clinical significance of the CMA results unclear. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) with trio-based analysis was performed and identified a paternally inherited TMEM87B mutation (c.1366A>G, p.Asn456Asp) in the patient. TMEM87B, a highly conserved, transmembrane protein of currently unknown function, lies within the critical region of the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome. Furthermore, a recent study had demonstrated that depletion of TMEM87B in zebrafish embryos affected cardiac development and led to cardiac hypoplasia. Thus, by combining CMA and WES, we potentially uncover an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a severe cardiac phenotype caused by mutations in TMEM87B. This study expands the spectrum of phenotypes associated with the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome and also further suggests the role of TMEM87B in its etiology, especially the cardiac pathology. PMID:27148590

  6. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy screening in young athletes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rappoport, W.J. [Arizona Heart Inst., Phoenix, AZ (United States); Steingard, P.M. [Phoenix Suns, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of sudden death during vigorous exercise. Early identification of this abnormality by ECG screening of high-school athletes before they participate in competitive sports helps save lives. (orig.)

  7. Left Ventricular Noncompaction: A Distinct Genetic Cardiomyopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbustini, Eloisa; Favalli, Valentina; Narula, Nupoor; Serio, Alessandra; Grasso, Maurizia

    2016-08-30

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) describes a ventricular wall anatomy characterized by prominent left ventricular (LV) trabeculae, a thin compacted layer, and deep intertrabecular recesses. Individual variability is extreme, and trabeculae represent a sort of individual "cardioprinting." By itself, the diagnosis of LVNC does not coincide with that of a "cardiomyopathy" because it can be observed in healthy subjects with normal LV size and function, and it can be acquired and is reversible. Rarely, LVNC is intrinsically part of a cardiomyopathy; the paradigmatic examples are infantile tafazzinopathies. When associated with LV dilation and dysfunction, hypertrophy, or congenital heart disease, the genetic cause may overlap. The prevalence of LVNC in healthy athletes, its possible reversibility, and increasing diagnosis in healthy subjects suggests cautious use of the term LVNC cardiomyopathy, which describes the morphology but not the functional profile of the cardiomyopathy. PMID:27561770

  8. [Ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients with cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, K.; Christensen, A.H.; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to determine the number and distribution of cardiomyopathies as the aetiology of ventricular tachyarrhythmias among patients discharged from the Department of Cardiology, Rigshospitalet. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was a retrospective review of...... patients discharged with the diagnostic codes ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation or premature ventricular contractions with cardiomyopathy as the presumed aetiology. Patients discharged during a period of 6 years and 5 months were included in the study. The patients were characterized by...... disease, gender, age, previous cardiac arrest and treatment with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). RESULTS: 993 patients were screened and 128 patients with cardiomyopathy were identified, corresponding to 13% of the screened patients. 58 (45%) of the patients had dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM...

  9. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T.; Hauptman, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:27127432

  10. Unveiling nonischemic cardiomyopathies with cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Niti R; Peterson, Tyler J; Young, Phillip M; Araoz, Philip A; Glockner, James; Mankad, Sunil V; Williamson, Eric E

    2014-02-01

    Cardiomyopathy is defined as a heterogeneous group of myocardial disorders with mechanical or electrical dysfunction. Identification of the etiology is important for accurate diagnosis, treatment and prognosis, but continues to be challenging. The ability of cardiac MRI to non-invasively obtain 3D-images of unparalleled resolution without radiation exposure and to provide tissue characterization gives it a distinct advantage over any other diagnostic tool used for evaluation of cardiomyopathies. Cardiac MRI can accurately visualize cardiac morphology and function and also help identify myocardial edema, infiltration and fibrosis. It has emerged as an important diagnostic and prognostic tool in tertiary care centers for work up of patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. This review covers the role of cardiac MRI in evaluation of nonischemic cardiomyopathies, particularly in the context of other diagnostic and prognostic imaging modalities. PMID:24417294

  11. Epidemiology and genetics of dilated cardiomyopathy in the Indian context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ushasree B

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM still remains to be a poorly understood and less analyzed group of cardiac-muscle disorders when compared to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM. Also, the vast clinical heterogeneity among the patients has rendered the small and isolated kindred studies less informative on the genetics and epidemiology of DCM. Aim of the study: The study aimed at understanding the epidemiology and genetics of DCMs in the Indian context. Materials and methods/ Statistical analysis: One hundred seven DCM patients and 105 healthy individuals were included in the study for epidemiological and genetic risk factor identification and to fit the possible mode of inheritance. Single′s ascertainment methodology for segregation analysis and Penrose frequency estimates were followed to evaluate for the role of specific epidemiological factors in the disease etiology. Chi-square analysis was carried out to interpret the results statistically. Results and Conclusion: Our study suggests that epidemiological factors like gender, age at onset and vegetarian diet in conjunction with sarcomere gene mutations may play a role in the disease expression. Similarly, segregation analysis for the possible mode of inheritance showed a deviation from the autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, strengthening the underlying genetic heterogeneity of DCM.

  12. Loss-of-function mutations in Rab escort protein 1 (REP-1 affect intracellular transport in fibroblasts and monocytes of choroideremia patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V Strunnikova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Choroideremia (CHM is a progressive X-linked retinopathy caused by mutations in the CHM gene, which encodes Rab escort protein-1 (REP-1, an escort protein involved in the prenylation of Rabs. Under-prenylation of certain Rabs, as a result of loss of function mutations in REP-1, could affect vesicular trafficking, exocytosis and secretion in peripheral cells of CHM patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate this hypothesis, intracellular vesicle transport, lysosomal acidification and rates of proteolytic degradation were studied in monocytes (CD14+ fraction and primary skin fibroblasts from the nine age-matched controls and thirteen CHM patients carrying 10 different loss-of-function mutations. With the use of pHrodo BioParticles conjugated with E. coli, collagen I coated FluoSpheres beads and fluorescent DQ ovalbumin with BODYPY FL dye, we demonstrated for the first time that lysosomal pH was increased in monocytes of CHM patients and, as a consequence, the rates of proteolytic degradation were slowed. Microarray analysis of gene expression revealed that some genes involved in the immune response, small GTPase regulation, transcription, cell adhesion and the regulation of exocytosis were significantly up and down regulated in cells from CHM patients compared to controls. Finally, CHM fibroblasts secreted significantly lower levels of cytokine/growth factors such as macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, pigment epithelial derived factor (PEDF, tumor necrosis factor (TNF alpha, fibroblast growth factor (FGF beta and interleukin (lL-8. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated for the first time that peripheral cells of CHM patients had increased pH levels in lysosomes, reduced rates of proteolytic degradation and altered secretion of cytokines. Peripheral cells from CHM patients expose characteristics that were not previously recognized and could used as an alternative models to study the effects of different

  13. MELAS syndrome and cardiomyopathy: linking mitochondrial function to heart failure pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ying-Han R; Yogasundaram, Haran; Parajuli, Nirmal; Valtuille, Lucas; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure remains an important clinical burden, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in its pathogenesis. The heart has a high metabolic demand, and mitochondrial function is a key determinant of myocardial performance. In mitochondrial disorders, hypertrophic remodeling is the early pattern of cardiomyopathy with progression to dilated cardiomyopathy, conduction defects and ventricular pre-excitation occurring in a significant proportion of patients. Cardiac dysfunction occurs in approximately a third of patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, a stereotypical example of a mitochondrial disorder leading to a cardiomyopathy. We performed unique comparative ultrastructural and gene expression in a MELAS heart compared with non-failing controls. Our results showed a remarkable increase in mitochondrial inclusions and increased abnormal mitochondria in MELAS cardiomyopathy coupled with variable sarcomere thickening, heterogeneous distribution of affected cardiomyocytes and a greater elevation in the expression of disease markers. Investigation and management of patients with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy should follow the well-described contemporary heart failure clinical practice guidelines and include an important role of medical and device therapies. Directed metabolic therapy is lacking, but current research strategies are dedicated toward improving mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial disorders. PMID:26712328

  14. A proton leak current through the cardiac sodium channel is linked to mixed arrhythmia and the dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Gosselin-Badaroudine

    Full Text Available Cardiac Na(+ channels encoded by the SCN5A gene are essential for initiating heart beats and maintaining a regular heart rhythm. Mutations in these channels have recently been associated with atrial fibrillation, ventricular arrhythmias, conduction disorders, and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM.We investigated a young male patient with a mixed phenotype composed of documented conduction disorder, atrial flutter, and ventricular tachycardia associated with DCM. Further family screening revealed DCM in the patient's mother and sister and in three of the mother's sisters. Because of the complex clinical phenotypes, we screened SCN5A and identified a novel mutation, R219H, which is located on a highly conserved region on the fourth helix of the voltage sensor domain of Na(v1.5. Three family members with DCM carried the R219H mutation.The wild-type (WT and mutant Na(+ channels were expressed in a heterologous expression system, and intracellular pH (pHi was measured using a pH-sensitive electrode. The biophysical characterization of the mutant channel revealed an unexpected selective proton leak with no effect on its biophysical properties. The H(+ leak through the mutated Na(v1.5 channel was not related to the Na(+ permeation pathway but occurred through an alternative pore, most probably a proton wire on the voltage sensor domain.We propose that acidification of cardiac myocytes and/or downstream events may cause the DCM phenotype and other electrical problems in affected family members. The identification of this clinically significant H(+ leak may lead to the development of more targeted treatments.

  15. Evolving anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging in the early detection and prognosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Valentin; van der Zee, Sarina; Miller, Marc A

    2009-12-01

    Evolving imaging modalities in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), such as tissue Doppler, speckle tracking, measures of myocardial blood flow, and cardiac magnetic resonance with gadolinium enhancement, have advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of myocardial dysfunction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. These modalities have the potential to differentiate HCM from other causes of left ventricular hypertrophy when there is uncertainty about the diagnosis and to identify affected individuals in the pre-clinical phase of the disease process. Furthermore, preliminary data suggests that functional imaging techniques may add incremental value to conventional risk stratification tools to identify individuals at high risk for sudden death or progression to congestive heart failure. PMID:20559998

  16. Non-invasive evaluation of arrhythmic risk in dilated cardiomyopathy:From imaging to electrocardiographic measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Massimo; Iacoviello; Francesco; Monitillo

    2014-01-01

    Malignant ventricular arrhythmias are a major adverse event and worsen the prognosis of patients affected by ischemic and non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy.The main parameter currently used to stratify arrhythmic risk and guide decision making towards the implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator is the evaluation of the left ventricular ejection fraction.However,this strategy is characterized by several limitations and consequently additional parameters have been suggested in order to improve arrhythmic risk stratification.The aim of this review is to critically revise the prognostic significance of non-invasive diagnostic tools in order to better stratify the arrhythmic risk prognosis of dilated cardiomyopathy patients.

  17. Antioxidant and Cardioprotective Effect of Coconut Water against Doxorubicin Induced Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Nnodim Johnkennedy; Dike-Ndudim Joy; Elendu Humphrey Ndubueze; Nwagbaraocha Melvina; Egbuobi Richard; Onyeze Vitus

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cardiomyopathy is a chronic dis-order affecting the muscle of the heart. It mayresult in to heart failure. Aim: To investigatethe effects of coconut water on antioxidant andcardiac markers on doxorubicin induced cardi-omyopathy in wistar rats. Material and Meth-ods: 21 wistar rats were divided into 3 groupsof 7 rats per group. Group I served as Controlwhile Group II and Group III were administered2.5mg/Kg doxorubicin. Group III in additionwas administered with 3ml of coconut water...

  18. Acute gastritis-induced Takotsubo's cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Villablanca, Pedro A.; Sukhal, Shashvat; Ansari, Asimul; Mohammed, Dergham

    2013-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A 50-year-old lady presented with epigastralgia, electrocardiogram (ECG) showed T-wave inversions and the echocardiogram low ejection fraction (EF) with apical ballooning. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed gastritis. She recovered with proton pump inhibitors treatment. This is the first case that describes gastritis-induced stress cardiomyopathy. Clinicians should be aware of Takotsubo's cardiomyopathy (TCM) as a possible complication of gastritis.

  19. RATIONAL PHARMACOTHERAPY IN TAKOTSUBO CARDIOMYOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marchev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rational pharmacotherapy in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is based on clinical picture and data of functional and laboratory investigations of concrete patient. In patients with hypotension and moderate-to-severe left ventricle outflow tract obstruction inotropic agents must not to be used because they can worsen the degree of obstruction. In these patients beta blockers can improve hemodynamics by causing resolution of the obstruction. If intraventricular thrombus is detected, anticoagulation for at least 3 months is recommended. The duration of anticoagulant therapy may be modified depending on the extent of cardiac function recovery and thrombus resolution. For patients without thrombus but with severe left ventricular dysfunction, anticoagulation is recommended until the akinesis or dyskinesis has resolved but not more than 3 months.

  20. Stimulant-related Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Mike; Riguzzi, Christine; Frenkel, Oron; Nagdev, Arun

    2015-03-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is a rare but increasingly recognized mimic of acute coronary syndrome. Patients present with angina,ST-segment changes on electrocardiogram (both elevations and depressions),and rapid rises in cardiac biomarkers. Many kinds of stressful events have been associated with TC, but only a handful of drug-related cases have previously been reported. We describe the case of a 58-year-old woman who developed TC 2 days after crack cocaine use, a diagnosis first suggested as bedside echocardiography in the emergency department.Recognition of the classic echocardiographic appearance of TC—apical hypokinesis causing “ballooning” of the left ventricle during systole—may greatly assist providers in the early identification of this condition. PMID:25308824

  1. Cosegregation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a fragile site on chromosome 16 in a large Italian family.

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ferraro; Scarton, G; Ambrosini, M

    1990-01-01

    We studied the karyotypes of 10 members of a family in whom hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is segregating as an autosomal dominant trait. In all those affected by the disease, a fragile site on the long arm of chromosome 16 was found, expressed with different frequencies, but the unaffected family members did not show this trait.

  2. Mutations in the DNA-binding domain of NR2E3 affect in vivo dimerization and interaction with CRX.

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    Raphael Roduit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: NR2E3 (PNR is an orphan nuclear receptor essential for proper photoreceptor determination and differentiation. In humans, mutations in NR2E3 have been associated with the recessively inherited enhanced short wavelength sensitive (S- cone syndrome (ESCS and, more recently, with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP. NR2E3 acts as a suppressor of the cone generation program in late mitotic retinal progenitor cells. In adult rod photoreceptors, NR2E3 represses cone-specific gene expression and acts in concert with the transcription factors CRX and NRL to activate rod-specific genes. NR2E3 and CRX have been shown to physically interact in vitro through their respective DNA-binding domains (DBD. The DBD also contributes to homo- and heterodimerization of nuclear receptors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed NR2E3 homodimerization and NR2E3/CRX complex formation in an in vivo situation by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET(2. NR2E3 wild-type protein formed homodimers in transiently transfected HEK293T cells. NR2E3 homodimerization was impaired in presence of disease-causing mutations in the DBD, except for the p.R76Q and p.R104W mutant proteins. Strikingly, the adRP-linked p.G56R mutant protein interacted with CRX with a similar efficiency to that of NR2E3 wild-type and p.R311Q proteins. In contrast, all other NR2E3 DBD-mutant proteins did not interact with CRX. The p.G56R mutant protein was also more effective in abolishing the potentiation of rhodospin gene transactivation by the NR2E3 wild-type protein. In addition, the p.G56R mutant enhanced the transrepression of the M- and S-opsin promoter, while all other NR2E3 DBD-mutants did not. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest different disease mechanisms in adRP- and ESCS-patients carrying NR2E3 mutations. Titration of CRX by the p.G56R mutant protein acting as a repressor in trans may account for the severe clinical phenotype in adRP patients.

  3. Management of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvano, Maria; Mastella, Giulio; Zorzi, Alessandro; Migliore, Federico; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Bauce, Barbara; Rigato, Ilaria; Perazzolo Marra, Martina; Iliceto, Sabino; Thiene, Gaetano; Basso, Cristina; Corrado, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a genetically determined heart muscle disorder, predisposing to sudden cardiac death (SCD), particularly in young patients and athletes. Pathological features include loss of myocytes and fibrofatty replacement of right ventricular myocardium; a biventricular involvement is often observed. The diagnosis of ARVC (prevalence 1:5.000 in the general population) does not rely on a single gold standard test but is achieved using a scoring system, proposed in 2010 by an International Task Force, which encompasses familial and genetic factors, ECG abnormalities, arrhythmias, and structural/functional ventricular alterations. The main goal of treatment is the prevention of SCD. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is the only proven "lifesaving" therapy; however, it is associated with a significant morbidity due to device-related complications and inappropriate ICD interventions. Other treatment options such as life style changes, antiarrhythmic drugs, beta-blockers and catheter ablation may reduce the arrhythmic burden and alleviate symptoms, without evident impact on prevention of SCD. Selection of patient candidates to ICD implantation is the most challenging issue in the clinical management of ARVC. This article reviews the current perspective on management of ARVC, focusing on clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, risk stratification and therapeutic strategies of affected patients. PMID:27186923

  4. Epidemiology and genetics of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanjore Reena

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is a heart muscle disorder and is known to be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Mutations in several sarcomeric, cytoskeletal and mitochondrial genes have been reported in HCM. Though many cases of HCM are being identified, there is limited data regarding the epidemiology and genetics of HCM in India. Aim: Therefore the present study is envisaged at identifying the epidemiological variables in HCM and fitting a probability model assuming dominant mode of inheritance in HCM, which may in turn shed light on the heterogeneity of this complex disorder. Materials AND Methods: The 127 HCM cases were divided into subtypes based on pattern of hypertrophy. Chi square analysis, odds ratio, probability, relative frequency, penetrance and heritability estimates were calculated apart from epidemiological variables. Results: The HCM subtypes revealed the heterogeneous nature of the condition suggesting that the genes/mutations involved in their pathogenesis are different and this is supported by distinctive differences observed in their probability, heritability and penetrance estimates apart from epidemiological variables. An increased male preponderance was observed with the sex ratio being 3.7:1. The age at onset was found to be more than a decade early in familial cases (30 ± 10 yrs compared to non familial cases (44 ± 14 yrs. Chi square analysis revealed obstructive HCM to be following autosomal dominant mode of inheritance where as non-obstructive HCM was significantly deviating. The level of deviation was significantly high for the middle onset group compared to early and late onset groups, therefore this group may be considered as an admixture wherein genes/gene modifiers and environmental variables may be contributing to the heterogeneity and this is further supported by odds ratio. Conclusions: The study thus brings out the complexity of HCM and suggests that modes of inheritance other than

  5. Mutations in BIN1 Associated with Centronuclear Myopathy Disrupt Membrane Remodeling by Affecting Protein Density and Oligomerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tingting; Shi, Zheng; Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of membrane shapes is central to many cellular phenomena. Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain-containing proteins are key players for membrane remodeling during endocytosis, cell migration, and endosomal sorting. BIN1, which contains an N-BAR domain, is assumed to be essential for biogenesis of plasma membrane invaginations (T-tubules) in muscle tissues. Three mutations, K35N, D151N and R154Q, have been discovered so far in the BAR domain of BIN1 in patients with centronuclear myopathy (CNM), where impaired organization of T-tubules has been reported. However, molecular mechanisms behind this malfunction have remained elusive. None of the BIN1 disease mutants displayed a significantly compromised curvature sensing ability. However, two mutants showed impaired membrane tubulation both in vivo and in vitro, and displayed characteristically different behaviors. R154Q generated smaller membrane curvature compared to WT N-BAR. Quantification of protein density on membranes revealed a lower membrane-bound density for R154Q compared to WT and the other mutants, which appeared to be the primary reason for the observation of impaired deformation capacity. The D151N mutant was unable to tubulate liposomes under certain experimental conditions. At medium protein concentrations we found ‘budding’ structures on liposomes that we hypothesized to be intermediates during the tubulation process except for the D151N mutant. Chemical crosslinking assays suggested that the D151N mutation impaired protein oligomerization upon membrane binding. Although we found an insignificant difference between WT and K35N N-BAR in in vitro assays, depolymerizing actin in live cells allowed tubulation of plasma membranes through the K35N mutant. Our results provide insights into the membrane-involved pathophysiological mechanisms leading to human disease. PMID:24755653

  6. Using answer set programming to integrate RNA expression with signalling pathway information to infer how mutations affect ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodorou, Irene; Ziehm, Matthias; Wieser, Daniela; Alic, Nazif; Partridge, Linda; Thornton, Janet M

    2012-01-01

    A challenge of systems biology is to integrate incomplete knowledge on pathways with existing experimental data sets and relate these to measured phenotypes. Research on ageing often generates such incomplete data, creating difficulties in integrating RNA expression with information about biological processes and the phenotypes of ageing, including longevity. Here, we develop a logic-based method that employs Answer Set Programming, and use it to infer signalling effects of genetic perturbations, based on a model of the insulin signalling pathway. We apply our method to RNA expression data from Drosophila mutants in the insulin pathway that alter lifespan, in a foxo dependent fashion. We use this information to deduce how the pathway influences lifespan in the mutant animals. We also develop a method for inferring the largest common sub-paths within each of our signalling predictions. Our comparisons reveal consistent homeostatic mechanisms across both long- and short-lived mutants. The transcriptional changes observed in each mutation usually provide negative feedback to signalling predicted for that mutation. We also identify an S6K-mediated feedback in two long-lived mutants that suggests a crosstalk between these pathways in mutants of the insulin pathway, in vivo. By formulating the problem as a logic-based theory in a qualitative fashion, we are able to use the efficient search facilities of Answer Set Programming, allowing us to explore larger pathways, combine molecular changes with pathways and phenotype and infer effects on signalling in in vivo, whole-organism, mutants, where direct signalling stimulation assays are difficult to perform. Our methods are available in the web-service NetEffects: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/thornton-srv/software/NetEffects. PMID:23251396

  7. Tumor necrosis factor alpha polymorphism in heart failure/cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadlamani, Lou; Iyengar, Srinivas

    2004-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-alpha) is a proinflammatory cytokine that is produced by activated macrophages. It has been shown to stimulate the release of endothelial cytokines and NO, increase vascular permeability, decrease contractility, and induce a prothrombotic state. The most studied TNF-a gene mutation in heart disease is a gamma to alpha substitution, which occurs when 308 nucleotides move upstream from the transcription initiation site in the TNF promoter and has been associated with elevated levels of TNF-alpha. The TNF1 allele (wild type) contains gamma at this site, while the TNF2 allele has an alpha substitution at the site. The TNF2 allele is a more powerful transcriptional activator, therefore leading to higher TNF-alpha levels. Most of the studies to date have failed to conclusively show any link between the polymorphism and heart disease, both coronary artery disease and cardiomyopathy/heart failure. PMID:15591843

  8. Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy : diagnosis, genetic background, and risk management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneweg, J. A.; van der Heijden, J. F.; Dooijes, D.; van Veen, T. A. B.; van Tintelen, J. P.; Hauer, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC), also known as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C), is a hereditary disease characterised by ventricular arrhythmias, right ventricular and/or left ventricular dysfunction, and fibrofatty replacement of cardiomyocytes. Patients with A

  9. Novel and recurrent mutations in the TAT gene in Tunisian families affected with Richner-Hanhart syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyacoub, Yosra; Zribi, Hela; Azzouz, Hatem; Nasrallah, Fehmi; Abdelaziz, Rim Ben; Kacem, Monia; Rekaya, Ben; Messaoud, Olfa; Romdhane, Lilia; Charfeddine, Cherine; Bouziri, Mustapha; Bouziri, Sonia; Tebib, Neji; Mokni, Mourad; Kaabachi, Naziha; Boubaker, Samir; Abdelhak, Sonia

    2013-10-15

    Tyrosinemia type II, also designated as oculocutaneous tyrosinemia or Richner-Hanhart syndrome (RHS), is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder. In the present study, we report clinical features and molecular genetic investigation of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene in two young patients, both born to consanguineous unions between first-degree cousins. These two unrelated families originated from Northern and Southern Tunisia. The clinical diagnosis was based on the observation of several complications related to Richner-Hanhart syndrome: recurrent eye redness, tearing and burning pain, photophobia, bilateral pseudodendritic keratitis, an erythematous and painful focal palmo-plantar hyperkeratosis and a mild delay of mental development. The diagnosis was confirmed by biochemical analysis. Sequencing of the TAT gene revealed the presence of a previously reported missense mutation (c.452G>A, p.Cys151Tyr) in a Tunisian family, and a novel G duplication (c.869dupG, p.Trp291Leufs 6). Early diagnosis of RHS and protein-restricted diet are crucial to reduce the risk and the severity of long-term complications of hypertyrosinemia such as intellectual disability. PMID:23954227

  10. Mutation in the xpsD gene of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri affects cellulose degradation and virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cristina Baptista

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, the causal agent of citrus canker, is a major threat to the citrus industry worldwide. Although this is a leaf spot pathogen, it bears genes highly related to degradation of plant cell walls, which are typically found in plant pathogens that cause symptoms of tissue maceration. Little is known on Xac capacity to cause disease and hydrolyze cellulose. We investigated the contribution of various open reading frames on degradation of a cellulose compound by means of a global mutational assay to selectively screen for a defect in carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase secretion in X. axonopodis pv. citri. Screening on CMC agar revealed one mutant clone defective in extracellular glycanase activity, out of nearly 3,000 clones. The insertion was located in the xpsD gene, a component of the type II secretion system (T2SS showing an influence in the ability of Xac to colonize tissues and hydrolyze cellulose. In summary, these data show for the first time, that X. axonopodis pv. citri is capable of hydrolyzing cellulose in a T2SS-dependent process. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the ability to degrade cellulose contributes to the infection process as a whole.

  11. A new infantile case of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency. Cardiomyopathy as a presenting symptom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabás, A; Duque, J; Gort, L

    2007-02-01

    alpha-N-Acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency is a lysosomal disorder with clinically very different infantile and adult forms. To date, 12 patients from eight families are known. Neuroaxonal dystrophy or moderate psychomotor retardation, without visceral involvement, have been reported in the infantile form. We describe a new Spanish patient with Schindler disease who presented with hepatomegaly and cardiomyopathy, traits not previously associated with this disease. There was no dysmorphism or neurological involvement in the patient, who died at the age of 8 months. alpha-N-Acetylgalactosaminidase activity was reduced in fibroblasts and liver to 1.6% and 0.57% of controls, respectively. Several lysosomal enzyme activities associated with infantile cardiomyopathy were found in the normal ranges. The patient was a compound heterozygote for the novel mutation p.D217N (c.649G>A) in exon 6 and the already reported mutation p.E325K (c.973G>A) in exon 8. The description of this new case broadens the clinical spectrum of the infantile forms and indicates that Schindler disease should be considered in the diagnosis of metabolic cardiomyopathies. PMID:17171432

  12. The N370S (Asn370-->Ser) mutation affects the capacity of glucosylceramidase to interact with anionic phospholipid-containing membranes and saposin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvioli, Rosa; Tatti, Massimo; Scarpa, Susanna; Moavero, Sabrina Maria; Ciaffoni, Fiorella; Felicetti, Federica; Kaneski, Christine R; Brady, Roscoe O; Vaccaro, Anna Maria

    2005-08-15

    The properties of the endolysosomal enzyme GCase (glucosylceramidase), carrying the most prevalent mutation observed in Gaucher patients, namely substitution of an asparagine residue with a serine at amino acid position 370 [N370S (Asn370-->Ser) GCase], were investigated in the present study. We previously demonstrated that Sap (saposin) C, the physiological GCase activator, promotes the association of GCase with anionic phospholipid-containing membranes, reconstituting in this way the enzyme activity. In the present study, we show that, in the presence of Sap C and membranes containing high levels of anionic phospholipids, both normal and N370S GCases are able to associate with the lipid surface and to express their activity. Conversely, when the amount of anionic phospholipids in the membrane is reduced (approximately 20% of total lipids), Sap C is still able to promote binding and activation of the normal enzyme, but not of N370S GCase. The altered interaction of the mutated enzyme with anionic phospholipid-containing membranes and Sap C was further demonstrated in Gaucher fibroblasts by confocal microscopy, which revealed poor co-localization of N370S GCase with Sap C and lysobisphosphatidic acid, the most abundant anionic phospholipid in endolysosomes. Moreover, we found that N370S Gaucher fibroblasts accumulate endolysosomal free cholesterol, a lipid that might further interfere with the interaction of the enzyme with Sap C and lysobisphosphatidic acid-containing membranes. In summary, our results show that the N370S mutation primarily affects the interaction of GCase with its physiological activators, namely Sap C and anionic phospholipid-containing membranes. We thus propose that the poor contact between N370S GCase and its activators may be responsible for the low activity of the mutant enzyme in vivo. PMID:15826241

  13. A transthyretin variant, Asp18Asn, associated with amyloid cardiomyopathy: a new African-American variant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarta, C Cristina; Falk, Rodney H

    2012-12-01

    In this report, we describe the clinical features of a transthyretin (TTR) gene mutation (Asp18Asn) in a 54-year-old Liberian male presenting with congestive heart failure due to amyloid cardiomyopathy, in the absence of neurologic impairment. Review of the literature revealed only two other documented cases of this mutation, neither of whom was described in any detail. Follow-up information on these cases revealed that they were of African origin, as was one other unpublished case. We therefore believe that this is the second TTR mutation associated with isolated cardiac manifestations to be described in patients of African origin. It appears to be far less common than the previously described Val122Ile mutation but onset may be at an earlier age, potentially making heart transplantation a viable option should heart failure become severe. PMID:23126592

  14. A new 4D trajectory-based approach unveils abnormal LV revolution dynamics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Madeo

    Full Text Available The assessment of left ventricular shape changes during cardiac revolution may be a new step in clinical cardiology to ease early diagnosis and treatment. To quantify these changes, only point registration was adopted and neither Generalized Procrustes Analysis nor Principal Component Analysis were applied as we did previously to study a group of healthy subjects. Here, we extend to patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy the original approach and preliminarily include genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals to explore the potential that incumbent pathology might also be detected. Using 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography, we recorded left ventricular shape of 48 healthy subjects, 24 patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 3 genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals. We then applied Generalized Procrustes Analysis and Principal Component Analysis and inter-individual differences were cleaned by Parallel Transport performed on the tangent space, along the horizontal geodesic, between the per-subject consensuses and the grand mean. Endocardial and epicardial layers were evaluated separately, different from many ecocardiographic applications. Under a common Principal Component Analysis, we then evaluated left ventricle morphological changes (at both layers explained by first Principal Component scores. Trajectories' shape and orientation were investigated and contrasted. Logistic regression and Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were used to compare these morphometric indicators with traditional 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters. Geometric morphometrics indicators performed better than 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters in recognizing pathology both in systole and diastole. Genotype positive/phenotype negative individuals clustered with patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy during diastole, suggesting that incumbent pathology may indeed be foreseen by

  15. Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Association with PulmonaryArtery Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Peighambari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy is an uncommon condition constituting 1% -2% of the cases with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM diagnosis. We interestingly report two patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in association with significant pulmonary artery hypertension without any other underlying reason for pulmonary hypertension. The patients were assessed by echocardiography, cardiac catheterization and pulmonary function parameters study.

  16. Mapping of equine cerebellar abiotrophy to ECA2 and identification of a potential causative mutation affecting expression of MUTYH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, Leah S; Cooper, Caitlin A; Famula, Thomas R; Murray, James D; Penedo, M Cecilia T

    2011-02-01

    Equine Cerebellar Abiotrophy (CA) is a neurological disease found in Arabian horses. CA is characterized by post-natal degeneration of the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. Signs of CA include ataxia, head tremors, and a lack of balance equilibrium. We have discovered a linkage of the CA phenotype to a microsatellite marker on ECA2 and identified a region of conserved homozygosity spanning approximately 142 kb. Complete sequencing of the four genes in this region identified one SNP found only in Arabian horses, located in exon 4 of TOE1 and approximately 1200 base pairs upstream of MUTYH, adjacent to a possible binding site for the transcription factor GATA2. qPCR analysis of cDNA from the cerebella of affected and unaffected horses suggested that MUTYH expression is down-regulated in affected horses. This SNP may therefore have a function effect on TOE1, or a regulatory effect on MUTYH by negatively affecting the binding affinity of GATA2. PMID:21126570

  17. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  18. Novel ETHE1 mutation in a carrier couple having prior offspring affected with ethylmalonic encephalopathy: Genetic analysis, clinical management and reproductive outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, David J

    2010-03-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is an autosomally recessive inherited disorder with a relentlessly progressive decline in neurological function, usually fatal by the age of ten. It is characterised by generalised hypotonia, psychomotor regression, spastic tetraparesis, dystonia, seizures and, eventually, global neurological failure. Approximately 50 reports have been published worldwide describing this devastating disease, most involving patients of Mediterranean or Arab origin. The fundamental defect in EE likely involves the impairment of a mitochondrial sulphur dioxygenase coded by the ETHE1 gene responsible for the catabolism of sulphide, which subsequently accumulates to toxic levels. A diagnosis of EE should initiate careful genetic evaluation and counselling, particularly if the parents intend to have additional offspring. The present report describes the diagnosis of EE in a reproductive endocrinology context, where both members of a non-consanguineous couple were confirmed to be carriers of an identical A↷G mutation. This previously unknown mutation at nucleotide position c.494 resulted in an amino acid substitution, p.Asp165Gly. Although consideration was given to in vitro fertilisation, embryo biopsy and single gene pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, the couple decided to first utilise a less aggressive therapeutic approach with donor sperm insemination. Pregnancy with a low risk of EE was indeed achieved; however, the infant was affected with a different anomaly (hypoplastic left heart). As this case demonstrates, prior to the initiation of fertility therapy, genetic analysis may be used to provide a confirmatory diagnosis when EE is suspected.

  19. Metabolic imaging of patients with cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cardiomyopathies comprise a diverse group of illnesses that can be characterized functionally by several techniques. However, the delineation of derangements of regional perfusion and metabolism have been accomplished only relatively recently with positron emission tomography (PET). Regional myocardial accumulation and clearance of 11C-palmitate, the primary myocardial substrate under most conditions, demonstrate marked spatial heterogeneity when studied under fasting conditions or with glucose loading. PET with 11C-palmitate permits the noninvasive differentiation of patients with nonischemic from ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, since patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy demonstrate large zones of intensely depressed accumulation of 11C-palmitate, probably reflecting prior infarction. Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy demonstrate relatively unique patterns of myocardial abnormalities of perfusion and metabolism. The availability of new tracers and techniques for the evaluation of myocardial metabolism (11C-acetate), perfusion (H2(15)O), and autonomic tone (11-C-hydroxyephedrine) should facilitate further understanding of the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathies

  20. Cardiomyopathy in captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J T; Garner, M M

    2000-09-01

    From 1994 to 1999, 16 captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris), from among 42 necropsy cases, were diagnosed with cardiomyopathy. The incidence of cardiomyopathy in this study population was 38%. Fourteen of 16 hedgehogs with cardiomyopathy were males and all hedgehogs were adult (>1 year old). Nine hedgehogs exhibited 1 or more of the following clinical signs before death: heart murmur, lethargy, icterus, moist rales, anorexia, dyspnea, dehydration, and weight loss. The remaining 7 hedgehogs died without premonitory clinical signs. Gross findings were cardiomegaly (6 cases), hepatomegaly (5 cases), pulmonary edema (5 cases), pulmonary congestion (4 cases), hydrothorax (3 cases), pulmonary infarct (1 case), renal infarcts (1 case), ascites (1 case), and 5 cases showed no changes. Histologic lesions were found mainly within the left ventricular myocardium and consisted primarily of myodegeneration, myonecrosis, atrophy, hypertrophy, and disarray of myofibers. All hedgehogs with cardiomyopathy had myocardial fibrosis, myocardial edema, or both. Other common histopathologic findings were acute and chronic passive congestion of the lungs, acute passive congestion of the liver, renal tubular necrosis, vascular thrombosis, splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis, and hepatic lipidosis. This is the first report of cardiomyopathy in African hedgehogs. PMID:11021439

  1. Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) caused by duplication of exons 3-6 of the dystrophin gene presenting as dilated cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, A.C.; Allingham-Hawkins, D.J.; Becker, L. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is a progressive myocardial disease presenting with congestive heart failure in teenage males without clinical signs of skeletal myopathy. Tight linkage of XLCM to the DMD locus has been demonstrated; it has been suggested that, at least in some families, XLCM is a {open_quotes}dystrophinopathy.{close_quotes} We report a 14-year-old boy who presented with acute heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy. He had no history of muscle weakness, but physical examination revealed pseudohypertrophy of the calf muscles. He subsequently received a heart transplantation. Family history was negative. Serum CK level at the time of diagnosis was 10,416. Myocardial biopsy showed no evidence of carditis. Dystrophin staining of cardiac and skeletal muscle with anti-sera to COOH and NH{sub 2}termini showed a patchy distribution of positivity suggestive of Becker muscular dystrophy. Analysis of 18 of the 79 dystrophin exons detected a duplication that included exons 3-6. The proband`s mother has an elevated serum CK and was confirmed to be a carrier of the same duplication. A mutation in the muscle promotor region of the dystrophin gene has been implicated in the etiology of SLCM. However, Towbin et al. (1991) argued that other 5{prime} mutations in the dystrophin gene could cause selective cardiomyopathy. The findings in our patient support the latter hypothesis. This suggests that there are multiple regions in the dystrophin gene which, when disrupted, can cause isolated dilated cardiomyopathy.

  2. Meta-analysis of clinical characteristics of 299 carriers of LMNA gene mutations : do lamin A/C mutations portend a high risk of sudden death?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voogt, WG; van der Kooi, AJ; van Tintelen, JP; Bonne, G; Ben Yaou, R; Duboc, D; Rossenbacker, T; Heidbuchel, H; de Visser, M; Crijns, HJGM; Pinto, YM; van Berlo, Jop H.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated common clinical characteristics of patients with lamin A/C gene mutations that cause either isolated dilated cardiornyopathy or dilated cardiomyopathy in association with skeletal muscular dystrophy. We pooled clinical data of all published carriers of lamin A/C gene mutations a

  3. Autonomic Findings in Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio; Martinez, Jose; Katz, Stuart D; Tully, Lisa; Reynolds, Harmony R

    2016-01-15

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) often occurs after emotional or physical stress. Norepinephrine levels are unusually high in the acute phase, suggesting a hyperadrenergic mechanism. Comparatively little is known about parasympathetic function in patients with TC. We sought to characterize autonomic function at rest and in response to physical and emotional stimuli in 10 women with a confirmed history of TC and 10 age-matched healthy women. Sympathetic and parasympathetic activity was assessed at rest and during baroreflex stimulation (Valsalva maneuver and tilt testing), cognitive stimulation (Stroop test), and emotional stimulation (event recall, patients). Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and measurement of brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation were also performed. TC women (tested an average of 37 months after the event) had excessive pressor responses to cognitive stress (Stroop test: p emotional arousal (recall of TC event: p = 0.03 vs baseline). Pressor responses to hemodynamic stimuli were also amplified (Valsalva overshoot: p <0.05) and prolonged (duration: p <0.01) in the TC women compared with controls. Plasma catecholamine levels did not differ between TC women and controls. Indexes of parasympathetic (vagal) modulation of heart rate induced by respiration and cardiovagal baroreflex gain were significantly decreased in the TC women versus controls. In conclusion, even long after the initial episode, women with previous episode of TC have excessive sympathetic responsiveness and reduced parasympathetic modulation of heart rate. Impaired baroreflex control may therefore play a role in TC. PMID:26743349

  4. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  5. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Singh Gulati, G., E-mail: gulatigurpreet@rediffmail.com [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Seth, S. [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Sharma, S. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India)

    2012-02-15

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  6. Mutations in protocadherin 15 and cadherin 23 affect tip links and mechanotransduction in mammalian sensory hair cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar N Alagramam

    Full Text Available Immunocytochemical studies have shown that protocadherin-15 (PCDH15 and cadherin-23 (CDH23 are associated with tip links, structures thought to gate the mechanotransducer channels of hair cells in the sensory epithelia of the inner ear. The present report describes functional and structural analyses of hair cells from Pcdh15(av3J (av3J, Pcdh15(av6J (av6J and Cdh23(v2J (v2J mice. The av3J and v2J mice carry point mutations that are predicted to introduce premature stop codons in the transcripts for Pcdh15 and Cdh23, respectively, and av6J mice have an in-frame deletion predicted to remove most of the 9th cadherin ectodomain from PCDH15. Severe disruption of hair-bundle morphology is observed throughout the early-postnatal cochlea in av3J/av3J and v2J/v2J mice. In contrast, only mild-to-moderate bundle disruption is evident in the av6J/av6J mice. Hair cells from av3J/av3J mice are unaffected by aminoglycosides and fail to load with [(3H]-gentamicin or FM1-43, compounds that permeate the hair cell's mechanotransducer channels. In contrast, hair cells from av6J/av6J mice load with both FM1-43 and [(3H]-gentamicin, and are aminoglycoside sensitive. Transducer currents can be recorded from hair cells of all three mutants but are reduced in amplitude in all mutants and have abnormal directional sensitivity in the av3J/av3J and v2J/v2J mutants. Scanning electron microscopy of early postnatal cochlear hair cells reveals tip-link like links in av6J/av6J mice, substantially reduced numbers of links in the av3J/av3J mice and virtually none in the v2J/v2J mice. Analysis of mature vestibular hair bundles reveals an absence of tip links in the av3J/av3J and v2J/v2J mice and a reduction in av6J/av6J mice. These results therefore provide genetic evidence consistent with PCDH15 and CDH23 being part of the tip-link complex and necessary for normal mechanotransduction.

  7. A CIS-Dominant Mutation in ASPERGILLUS NIDULANS Affecting the Expression of the amdS Gene in the Presence of Mutations in the Unlinked Gene, amdA

    OpenAIRE

    Hynes, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    A mutant producing very high levels of the acetamidase enzyme encoded by the amdS gene has been isolated in a strain containing the amdA7 mutation, which itself causes high levels of this enzyme. Genetic analysis has shown that this mutation, designated amdI66, is adjacent to the amdS gene and is cis-dominant in its effect. The amdI66 mutation has little effect on amdS expression when present in strains not containing the amdA7 mutation. Two other amdA mutations investigated also interact wit...

  8. Modeling the mitochondrial cardiomyopathy of Barth syndrome with induced pluripotent stem cell and heart-on-chip technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; McCain, Megan L; Yang, Luhan; He, Aibin; Pasqualini, Francesco Silvio; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Yuan, Hongyan; Jiang, Dawei; Zhang, Donghui; Zangi, Lior; Geva, Judith; Roberts, Amy E; Ma, Qing; Ding, Jian; Chen, Jinghai; Wang, Da-Zhi; Li, Kai; Wang, Jiwu; Wanders, Ronald J A; Kulik, Wim; Vaz, Frédéric M; Laflamme, Michael A; Murry, Charles E; Chien, Kenneth R; Kelley, Richard I; Church, George M; Parker, Kevin Kit; Pu, William T

    2014-06-01

    Study of monogenic mitochondrial cardiomyopathies may yield insights into mitochondrial roles in cardiac development and disease. Here, we combined patient-derived and genetically engineered induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with tissue engineering to elucidate the pathophysiology underlying the cardiomyopathy of Barth syndrome (BTHS), a mitochondrial disorder caused by mutation of the gene encoding tafazzin (TAZ). Using BTHS iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs), we defined metabolic, structural and functional abnormalities associated with TAZ mutation. BTHS iPSC-CMs assembled sparse and irregular sarcomeres, and engineered BTHS 'heart-on-chip' tissues contracted weakly. Gene replacement and genome editing demonstrated that TAZ mutation is necessary and sufficient for these phenotypes. Sarcomere assembly and myocardial contraction abnormalities occurred in the context of normal whole-cell ATP levels. Excess levels of reactive oxygen species mechanistically linked TAZ mutation to impaired cardiomyocyte function. Our study provides new insights into the pathogenesis of Barth syndrome, suggests new treatment strategies and advances iPSC-based in vitro modeling of cardiomyopathy. PMID:24813252

  9. Idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy - perspectives from genetics studies. Is it time to redefine these disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Bahl

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy (IRC is a rare form of heart muscle disease. Genetic studies have revealed that in about half the cases, IRC forms part of the hereditary sarcomeric contractile protein disease spectrum. Mutations in several sarcomere protein encoding genes are detected in 33-66% of cases. Among these, the mutations most commonly involve TNNI3 and MYH7. There is a disproportionately high incidence of TNNI3 mutations in patients with restrictive physiology. De novo mutations are also frequently seen in this group of patients. IRC and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM with restrictive phenotype reflect the same or very similar disorders with different names due to arbitrary cut offs in the left ventricular wall thickness rather than two separate distinct diseases. HCM with restrictive physiology should be considered part of a continuous spectrum with IRC. This is because patients with HCM with restrictive phenotype bear far greater clinical and genetic resemblance to IRC than to rest of the HCM cohort.

  10. Changes in radiocardiohemodynamic data in patients with latent cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is concerned with study of central hemodynamics in patients with congested cardiomyopathy by means of radiocardiography. The data on 26 patients with congested cardiomyopathy and 20 patients of control group are presented. In patients with congested cardiomyopathy exact decrease of cardiac output, increase of general peripheric resistance, radiocardiogram characteristic of cardiomyopathy only are detected. It is concluded that radiocardiography is a simple, reliable, available method giving unbiased presentation of the state of central hemodynamics, which promotes an earlier diagnosis and treatment of congested cardiomyopathy

  11. X-linked cardiomyopathy is heterogeneous

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M.J.; Sillence, D.O.; Mulley, J.C. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Two major loci of X-linked cardiomyopathy have been mapped by linkage analysis. The gene for X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is mapped to the dystrophin locus at Xp21, while Barth syndrome has been localised to distal Xq28. XLCM usually presents in juvenile males with no skeletal disease but decreased dystrophin in cardiac muscle. Barth syndrome most often presents in infants and is characterized by skeletal myopathy, short stature and neutropenia in association with cardiomyopathy of variable severity. Prior to carrier or prenatal diagnosis in a family, delineation of the cardiomyopathy locus involved is essential. We report the linkage mapping of a large kindred in which several male infants have died with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There is a family history of unexplained death of infant males less than 6 months old over 4 generations. Features of Barth syndrome such as short stature, skeletal myopathy and neutropenia have not been observed. Genotyping at 10 marker loci in Xq28 has revealed significant pairwise lod scores with the cardiomyopathy phenotype at DXS52 (Z=2.21 at {theta}=0.0), at markers p26 and p39 near DXS15 (Z=2.30 at {theta}=0.0) and at F8C (Z=2.24 at {theta}=0.0). A recombinant detected with DXS296 defines the proximal limit to the localization. No recombinants were detected at any of the loci distal to DXS296. The most distal marker in Xq28, DXS1108, is within 500 kb of the telomere. As the gene in this family is localized to Xq28, it is possible that this disorder is an allelic variant at the Barth syndrome locus.

  12. Multimodality imaging in apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rosario; Parisi; Francesca; Mirabella; Gioel; Gabrio; Secco; Rossella; Fattori

    2014-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy(AHCM) is a relatively rare morphologic variant of HCM in which the hypertrophy of myocardium is localized to the left ventricular apex. Symptoms of AHCM might vary from none to others mimic coronary artery disease including acute coronary syndrome, thus resulting in inappropriate hospitalization. Transthoracic echocardiography is the firstline imaging technique for the diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathies. However, when the hypertrophy of the myocardium is localized in the ventricular apex might results in missed diagnosis. Aim of this paper is to review the different imaging techniques used for the diagnosis of AHCM and their role in the detection and comprehension of this uncommon disease.

  13. Use of mutations to improve cotton plants as an oil and protein source without affecting the seed cotton yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Egypt, cotton seed is a very important source of oil. In 1988, it accounted for about 35% of the national consumption of edible oil. Cotton seed meal provides a considerable amount of the protein used for feeding non-ruminant animals. Therefore, efforts are being made to improve the oil and protein contents of the seed without affecting the seed cotton yield in order to close the gap between the production and consumption of edible oil as food and protein for animals. Twenty-one lines were selected in the M5 generation after treating the seeds of three local cultivars with up to 150 Gy of gamma rays. The results show that breeders can increase the oil and/or protein content of the seed without any loss in the seed cotton yield and percentage lint. This could be of value in overcoming the deficiency in oil production that exists in many developing countries which cultivate cotton for lint or as a cash crop, and may also be valid for seed protein in cakes or meals for feeding animals. However, further investigations will have to be made on the fibre properties. (author). 6 refs, 1 tab

  14. Long-term outcome in patients treated with combined heart and liver transplantation for familial amyloidotic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Laerke M; Penninga, Luit; Sander, Kaare;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The amyloidogenic transthyretin (ATTR) mutation Leu111Met causes a primarily cardiac amyloidosis: Familial amyloidotic cardiomyopathy (FAC). Combined heart-liver transplantation (CHLTx) is the preferred treatment for patients with heart failure due to familial amyloidosis, but...... information on outcome of patients with Leu111Met mutation is limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of CHLTx in patients with FAC. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between 1998 and 2009, CHLTx was performed in 7 FAC patients (four men). Six patients underwent simultaneous transplantation....... All patients suffered from severe cardiomyopathy. RESULTS: Mean recipient age at transplantation was 48.3 ± 4.2 yr. Mean follow-up was 55 months. No peroperative mortality occured. Two patients died within the first year (infection, multi-organ failure) of transplantation. Cumulative survival at 4...

  15. Diabetic cardiomyopathy:Pathophysiology,diagnostic evaluation and management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph; M; Pappachan; George; I; Varughese; Rajagopalan; Sriraman; Ganesan; Arunagirinathan

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes affects every organ in the body and cardiovascular disease accounts for two-thirds of the mortality in the diabetic population.Diabetes-related heart disease occurs in the form of coronary artery disease(CAD),cardiac autonomic neuropathy or diabetic cardiomyopathy(DbCM).The prevalence of cardiac failure is high in the diabetic population and DbCM is a common but underestimated cause of heart failure in diabetes.The pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy is yet to be clearly defined.Hyperglycemia,dyslipidemia and inflammation are thought to play key roles in the generation of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species which are in turn implicated.The myocardial interstitium undergoes alterations resulting in abnormal contractile function noted in DbCM.In the early stages of the disease diastolic dysfunction is the only abnormality,but systolic dysfunction supervenes in the later stages with impaired left ventricular ejection fraction.Transmitral Doppler echocardiography is usually used to assess diastolic dysfunction,but tissue Doppler Imaging and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging are being increasingly used recently for early detection of DbCM.The management of DbCM involves improvement in lifestyle,control of glucose and lipid abnormalities,and treatment of hypertension and CAD,if present.The role of vasoactive drugs and antioxidants is being explored.This review discusses the pathophysiology,diagnostic evaluation and management options of DbCM.

  16. Impact of New Electrocardiographic Criteria in Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard NW Hauer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC has originally been described as a disorder characterized by fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium, primarily of the right ventricle (RV, and ventricular tachyarrhythmias, sudden death, and at a late stage progressive heart failure. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia or cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C was the previous name of the disease. However, similar histopathologic changes are also found in the left ventricle (LV. AC is also considered a hereditary disease. Recent molecular genetic studies provide accumulating evidence that fibrofatty replacement is preceded by mutation-related desmosomal changes. Desmosomal dysfunction may lead to mechanical en thereafter electrical uncoupling, ultimately resulting in conduction delay. This activation delay and conduction block, provide a substrate for re-entrant mechanisms and thereby ventricular tachycardia (VT. The gold standard for AC diagnosis is demonstration of transmural fibrofatty replacement in cardiac tissue obtained by autopsy or surgery. To facilitate diagnosis in clinical practice, an international Task Force defined in 1994 a set of criteria (TFC based on electrocardiographic, functional and morphologic features, and family history. These criteria have recently been revised. Routine 12-lead electrocardiography is one of the most important tools for AC diagnosis in all stages of the disease. Even in the absence of other markers in the early concealed stage of the disease, in line with early slow conduction and electrical uncoupling ECG analysis may contribute to early diagnosis. Activation delay and site of origin of VT are reflected in various characteristics of the surface 12-lead electrocardiogram. Since the ECG is easy to obtain, this technique is particularly useful, for both diagnosis and follow up of disease progression.

  17. [Transthyretin-related amyloidotic cardiomyopathy: looking for the etiological treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Simone; Gagliardi, Christian; Milandri, Agnese; Manuzzi, Lisa; Rapezzi, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    Transthyretin (TTR)-related amyloidosis is a disease caused by the deposition of insoluble fibrils deriving from the misfolding of TTR, a protein mainly produced by the liver. In the hereditary form of the disease (ATTRm), protein misfolding is secondary to a mutation in the TTR gene. ATTRm can manifest with different phenotypes: mainly neurological, mainly cardiac, or mixed. In the senile form of the disease (wild-type TTR or SSA), the deposition of non-mutated TTR occurs and, clinically, cardiomyopathy is predominant. Cardiac amyloidosis is still an underdiagnosed disease and clinical heterogeneity makes the diagnosis challenging. Until recently, no specific pharmacological treatment was available, liver transplantation being the only therapeutic option aimed at slowing disease progression in ATTRm and treatment was based on symptom relief. This review focuses on the emerging pharmacological treatments for TTR-related amyloidosis targeting different steps of the amyloidogenic process (blocking hepatic TTR synthesis, TTR tetramer stabilization and promotion of TTR amyloid fibril clearance). PMID:25002169

  18. Feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: an echocardiographic approach Cardiomiopatía hipertrófica felina: enfoque ecocardiográfico

    OpenAIRE

    AC Silva; RAL Muzzi; G. Oberlender; RB Nogueira; LAL Muzzi

    2013-01-01

    Feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a primary myocardial disease. Feline HCM is a disease of the ventricular myocardium characterised by mild-to-severe primary concentric hypertrophy. The disease has been attributed to hereditary factors in certain breeds and causal mutations have been discovered in the Maine coon and ragdoll breeds. However, the disease is still a challenge for clinicians because of the difficulty of early diagnosis and the risk of the sudden death of the afflicted animals...

  19. Polymorphism in the Alpha Cardiac Muscle Actin 1 Gene Is Associated to Susceptibility to Chronic Inflammatory Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda Farage Frade; Priscila Camilo Teixeira; Barbara Maria Ianni; Cristina Wide Pissetti; Bruno Saba; Lin Hui Tzu Wang; Andréia Kuramoto; Luciana Gabriel Nogueira; Paula Buck; Fabrício Dias; Helene Giniaux; Agnes Llored; Sthefanny Alves; Andre Schmidt; Eduardo Donadi

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic in Latin America, and may lead to a life-threatening inflammatory dilated, chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). One third of T. cruzi-infected individuals progress to CCC while the others remain asymptomatic (ASY). A possible genetic component to disease progression was suggested by familial aggregation of cases and the association of markers of innate and adaptive immunity genes with CCC development. Since mutations i...

  20. AG10 inhibits amyloidogenesis and cellular toxicity of the familial amyloid cardiomyopathy-associated V122I transthyretin

    OpenAIRE

    Penchala, Sravan C; Connelly, Stephen; Wang, Yu; Park, Miki S; Zhao, Lei; Baranczak, Aleksandra; Rappley, Irit; Vogel, Hannes; Liedtke, Michaela; Witteles, Ronald M.; Powers, Evan T.; Reixach, Natàlia; Chan, William K.; Wilson, Ian A.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    The misassembly of soluble proteins into toxic aggregates, including amyloid fibrils, underlies a large number of human degenerative diseases. Cardiac amyloidoses, which are most commonly caused by aggregation of Ig light chains or transthyretin (TTR) in the cardiac interstitium and conducting system, represent an important and often underdiagnosed cause of heart failure. Two types of TTR-associated amyloid cardiomyopathies are clinically important. The Val122Ile (V122I) mutation, which alter...

  1. Genetic variation in angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 gene is associated with extent of left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    van der Merwe, Lize; Cloete, Ruben; Revera, Miriam; Heradien, Marshall; Goosen, Althea; Corfield, Valerie A.; Paul A Brink; Moolman-Smook, Johanna C

    2008-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a common, inherited cardiac muscle disease, is primarily caused by mutations in sarcomeric protein-encoding genes and is characterized by overgrowth of ventricular muscle that is highly variable in extent and location. This variability has been partially attributed to locus and allelic heterogeneity of the disease-causing gene, but other factors, including unknown genetic factors, also modulate the extent of hypertrophy that develops in response to the defective s...

  2. Mutations Affecting the BHLHA9 DNA-Binding Domain Cause MSSD, Mesoaxial Synostotic Syndactyly with Phalangeal Reduction, Malik-Percin Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sajid; Percin, Ferda E.; Bornholdt, Dorothea; Albrecht, Beate; Percesepe, Antonio; Koch, Manuela C.; Landi, Antonio; Fritz, Barbara; Khan, Rizwan; Mumtaz, Sara; Akarsu, Nurten A.; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Mesoaxial synostotic syndactyly, Malik-Percin type (MSSD) (syndactyly type IX) is a rare autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic digit anomaly with only two affected families reported so far. We previously showed that the trait is genetically distinct from other syndactyly types, and through autozygosity mapping we had identified a locus on chromosome 17p13.3 for this unique limb malformation. Here, we extend the number of independent pedigrees from various geographic regions segregating MSSD to a total of six. We demonstrate that three neighboring missense mutations affecting the highly conserved DNA-binding region of the basic helix-loop-helix A9 transcription factor (BHLHA9) are associated with this phenotype. Recombinant BHLHA9 generated by transient gene expression is shown to be located in the cytoplasm and the cell nucleus. Transcription factors 3, 4, and 12, members of the E protein (class I) family of helix-loop-helix transcription factors, are highlighted in yeast two-hybrid analysis as potential dimerization partners for BHLHA9. In the presence of BHLHA9, the potential of these three proteins to activate expression of an E-box-regulated target gene is reduced considerably. BHLHA9 harboring one of the three substitutions detected in MSSD-affected individuals eliminates entirely the transcription activation by these class I bHLH proteins. We conclude that by dimerizing with other bHLH protein monomers, BHLHA9 could fine tune the expression of regulatory factors governing determination of central limb mesenchyme cells, a function made impossible by altering critical amino acids in the DNA binding domain. These findings identify BHLHA9 as an essential player in the regulatory network governing limb morphogenesis in humans. PMID:25466284

  3. Monoamniotic Monochorionic Twins Discordant for Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Dianna; Bouhlal, Yosr; Ursell, Philip C.; Shieh, Joseph T. C.

    2013-01-01

    Occasionally “identical twins” are phenotypically different, raising the question of zygosity and the issue of genetic versus environmental influences during development. We recently noted monochorionic-monoamniotic twins, one of which had an isolated cardiac abnormality, noncompaction cardiomyopathy, a condition characterized by cardiac ventricular hypertrabeculation. We examined the prenatal course and subsequent pathologic correlation since ventricular morphogenesis may depend on early mus...

  4. Celiac disease with pulmonary haemosiderosis and cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Işikay, Sedat; Yilmaz, Kutluhan; Kilinç, Metin

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease or pulmonary haemosiderosis can be associated with several distinguished conditions. Pulmonary haemosiderosis is a rare, severe and fatal disease characterised by recurrent episodes of alveolar haemorrhage, haemoptysis and anaemia. Association of pulmonary haemosiderosis and celiac disease is extremely rare. We describe a case of celiac disease presented with dilated cardiomyopathy and pulmonary haemosiderosis without gastrointestinal symptoms of celiac disease. In addition, vi...

  5. Update in cardiomyopathies and congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Heart Hospital, London, UK and Monaldi Hospital, Naples, Italy

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This abstract book contains four reports and all abstracts presented to the Joint Meeting: Update in cardiomyopathies and congestive heart failure, 22-23 September 2011 - Naples, Italy, endorsed by the Working Group on Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases (WG 21 of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC.

  6. Association of genetic markers with cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karthik

    2015-09-01

    Results: The inter group heterogeneity for ESD and SOD of red cell enzymes and GC system of plasma proteins was found to be a significant value (ESD: and #967;2 =10.2564; d.f. = 2; 0.01>p>0.001; SOD: and #967;2 = 11.1120; d.f. = 2; 0.01>p>0.001; GC: and #967;2 = 15.5044; d.f. = 2; p>0.001, when observed between cardiomyopathy patients and controls. Thus, all the examined groups were deviating from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium indicating a significant association between cardiomyopathy and these red cell enzymes and plasma protein markers. There was a predominant occurrence of Haptoglobin 2 phenotype in patients when compared to controls. Risk estimates show significant association with both ESD and GC systems with an increased risk of 100% and more, indicating that individuals with ESD (2-2 and 2-1 and GC (2-1 phenotypes are more likely to get the disease when compared with the other phenotypes of the ESD and GC systems. Conclusions: Out of seven genetic markers, four markers (ESD, SOD, HP and GC are found to be significant i.e. they show some relation with the cardiomyopathy which influences the disease. Furthermore studies on genetic markers, to be attempted in future, would certainly enlighten us to assess the role of these polymorphic systems in different cardiomyopathies. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(9.000: 2190-2197

  7. Diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapezzi, Claudio; Arbustini, Eloisa; Caforio, Alida L P;

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, The ESC Working Group on Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases proposed an updated classification of cardiomyopathies based on morphological and functional phenotypes and subcategories of familial/genetic and non-familial/non-genetic disease. In this position statement, we propose a...

  8. Clinical and molecular classification of cardiomyopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Cecchi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The term “cardiomyopathies” was used for the first time 55 years ago, in 1957. Since then awareness and knowledge of this important and complex group of heart muscle diseases have improved substantially. Over these past five decades a large number of definitions, nomenclature and schemes, have been advanced by experts and consensus panel, which reflect the fast and continued advance of the scientific understanding in the field. Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of inherited myocardial diseases, which represent an important cause of disability and adverse outcome. Although considered rare diseases, the overall estimated prevalence of all cardiomyopathies is at least 3% in the general population worldwide. Furthermore, their recognition is increasing due to advances in imaging techniques and greater awareness in both the public and medical community. Cardiomyopathies represent an ideal translational model of integration between basic and clinical sciences. A multidisciplinary approach is therefore essential in order to ensure their correct diagnosis and management. In the present work, we aim to provide a concise overview of the historical background, genetic and phenotypic spectrum and evolving concepts leading to the various attempts of cardiomyopathy classifications produced over the decades.

  9. Lamin A/C truncation in dilated cardiomyopathy with conduction disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Jill M

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the gene encoding the nuclear membrane protein lamin A/C have been associated with at least 7 distinct diseases including autosomal dominant dilated cardiomyopathy with conduction system disease, autosomal dominant and recessive Emery Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy, limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 1B, autosomal recessive type 2 Charcot Marie Tooth, mandibuloacral dysplasia, familial partial lipodystrophy and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. Methods We used mutation detection to evaluate the lamin A/C gene in a 45 year-old woman with familial dilated cardiomyopathy and conduction system disease whose family has been well characterized for this phenotype 1. Results DNA from the proband was analyzed, and a novel 2 base-pair deletion c.908_909delCT in LMNA was identified. Conclusions Mutations in the gene encoding lamin A/C can lead to significant cardiac conduction system disease that can be successfully treated with pacemakers and/or defibrillators. Genetic screening can help assess risk for arrhythmia and need for device implantation.

  10. Current Understanding of Molecular Pathology and Treatment of Cardiomyopathy in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirsa L. E. van Westering

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a genetic muscle disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene resulting in the loss of the protein dystrophin. Patients do not only experience skeletal muscle degeneration, but also develop severe cardiomyopathy by their second decade, one of the main causes of death. The absence of dystrophin in the heart renders cardiomyocytes more sensitive to stretch-induced damage. Moreover, it pathologically alters intracellular calcium (Ca2+ concentration, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS localization and mitochondrial function and leads to inflammation and necrosis, all contributing to the development of cardiomyopathy. Current therapies only treat symptoms and therefore the need for targeting the genetic defect is immense. Several preclinical therapies are undergoing development, including utrophin up-regulation, stop codon read-through therapy, viral gene therapy, cell-based therapy and exon skipping. Some of these therapies are undergoing clinical trials, but these have predominantly focused on skeletal muscle correction. However, improving skeletal muscle function without addressing cardiac aspects of the disease may aggravate cardiomyopathy and therefore it is essential that preclinical and clinical focus include improving heart function. This review consolidates what is known regarding molecular pathology of the DMD heart, specifically focusing on intracellular Ca2+, nNOS and mitochondrial dysregulation. It briefly discusses the current treatment options and then elaborates on the preclinical therapeutic approaches currently under development to restore dystrophin thereby improving pathology, with a focus on the heart.

  11. Accelerating restrictive cardiomyopathy after liver transplantation in a patient with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Jason

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hereditary amyloidodis is a rare disease process with a propensity to cause polyneuropathies, autonomic dysfunction, and restrictive cardiomyopathy. It is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner, with disease onset usually in the 20s-40s. The most common hereditary amyloidogenic protein, transthyretin, is synthesized in the liver and lies on Chromosome 18. Over 80 amyloidogenic transthyretin mutations have been described, the majority of which are neuropathic and hence the common name, Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy. Until 1990, the disease was intractable with a 5–15 year survival after diagnosis. The prognosis changed after the implementation of orthotropic liver transplantation as a treatment strategy which halts the synthesis of amyloidogenic transthyretin. This has now has been performed over 1300 times in 67 centers. Case presentation We describe the case of a man of Irish ancestry with Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy and no clinical history of cardiac involvement. Shortly after orthotropic liver transplantation, he developed congestive heart failure. He was subsequently diagnosed with an accelerating post-transplant restrictive cardiomyopathy due to amyloid infiltration. Conclusion A liver transplant induced cardiomyopathy in Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy can be observed in patients without any history of cardiac symptoms. All patients with Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy should be followed after transplantation to assess for a deterioration in cardiac function.

  12. Differentiating cardiomyopathy of coronary artery disease from nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy utilizing positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine if imaging of blood flow (using N-13 ammonia) and glucose metabolism (using F-18 2-deoxyglucose) with positron emission tomography can distinguish cardiomyopathy of coronary artery disease from nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, 21 patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction who were evaluated for cardiac transplantation were studied. The origin of left ventricular dysfunction had been previously determined by coronary angiography to be ischemic (11 patients) or nonischemic (10 patients). Images were visually analyzed by three observers on a graded scale in seven left ventricular segments and revealed fewer defects in dilated cardiomyopathy compared with ischemic cardiomyopathy for N-13 ammonia (2.7 +/- 1.6 versus 5 +/- 0.6; p less than 0.03) and F-18 deoxyglucose (2.8 +/- 2.1 versus 4.6 +/- 1.1; p less than 0.03). An index incorporating extent and severity of defects revealed more homogeneity with fewer and less severe defects in subjects with nonischemic than in those with ischemic cardiomyopathy as assessed by imaging of flow (2.8 +/- 1.8 versus 9.2 +/- 3; p less than 0.001) and metabolism (3.8 +/- 3.3 versus 8.5 +/- 3.6; p less than 0.005). Diagnostic accuracy for distinguishing the two subgroups by visual image analysis was 85%. Using previously published circumferential count profile criteria, patients with dilated cardiomyopathy had fewer ischemic segments (0.4 +/- 0.8 versus 2.5 +/- 2 per patient; p less than 0.01) and infarcted segments (0.1 +/- 0.3 versus 2.4 +/- 1.4 per patient; p less than 0.001) than did patients with cardiomyopathy of coronary artery disease. The sensitivity for differentiating the two clinical subgroups using circumferential profile analysis was 100% and the specificity 80%

  13. Targeted ablation of nesprin 1 and nesprin 2 from murine myocardium results in cardiomyopathy, altered nuclear morphology and inhibition of the biomechanical gene response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indroneal Banerjee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent interest has focused on the importance of the nucleus and associated nucleoskeleton in regulating changes in cardiac gene expression in response to biomechanical load. Mutations in genes encoding proteins of the inner nuclear membrane and nucleoskeleton, which cause cardiomyopathy, also disrupt expression of a biomechanically responsive gene program. Furthermore, mutations in the outer nuclear membrane protein Nesprin 1 and 2 have been implicated in cardiomyopathy. Here, we identify for the first time a role for the outer nuclear membrane proteins, Nesprin 1 and Nesprin 2, in regulating gene expression in response to biomechanical load. Ablation of both Nesprin 1 and 2 in cardiomyocytes, but neither alone, resulted in early onset cardiomyopathy. Mutant cardiomyocytes exhibited altered nuclear positioning, shape, and chromatin positioning. Loss of Nesprin 1 or 2, or both, led to impairment of gene expression changes in response to biomechanical stimuli. These data suggest a model whereby biomechanical signals are communicated from proteins of the outer nuclear membrane, to the inner nuclear membrane and nucleoskeleton, to result in changes in gene expression required for adaptation of the cardiomyocyte to changes in biomechanical load, and give insights into etiologies underlying cardiomyopathy consequent to mutations in Nesprin 1 and 2.

  14. Idiopathic Cardiomyopathy Following Metal-on-Metal Hip Arthroplasty: The New Face of “Beer Drinker’s Cardiomyopathy”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik O’Connell,

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1966, the “beer drinker’s cardiomyopathy” was described in Quebec City, Canada among heavy drinkers following the addition of cobalt by breweries for foam stabilisation. Almost half of those affected died. A similar process has been proposed for cardiovascular periprosthetic metallosis in patients receiving cobalt-containing hip prostheses. This case describes a young man with congenital osteonecrosis treated with cobalt containing prosthetic arthroplasty. Postoperatively, he developed pericardial effusion, dilated cardiomyopathy, polycythemia and lactic acidosis. His serum cobalt level was 156 mcg/L ( normal 0.1 – 0.4 mcg/L. Metal-on-metal hip implants have been associated with arthroprosthetic cobaltisim, a presentation indistinguishable from “beer drinker’s cardiomyopathy.” Up to 35% of hip replacements utilize metal-on-metal bearing surfaces, making this a potentially wide-spread and relatively underappreciated etiology of postoperative idiopathic cardiomyopathy. This clinical vignette emphasizes the importance of considering cobalt cardio- toxicity, or “beer drinker’s cardiomyopathy,” as a differential diagnosis of idiopathic cardiomyopathy following total hip arthroplasty.

  15. Mitochondrial haplogroups modify the risk of developing hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Danish population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M Hagen

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in genes coding for proteins involved in sarcomere function. The disease is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Evolutionarily developed variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, defining mtDNA haplogroups and haplogroup clusters, is associated with functional differences in mitochondrial function and susceptibility to various diseases, including ischemic cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that mtDNA haplogroups, in particular H, J and K, might modify disease susceptibility to HCM. Mitochondrial DNA, isolated from blood, was sequenced and haplogroups identified in 91 probands with HCM. The association with HCM was ascertained using two Danish control populations. Haplogroup H was more prevalent in HCM patients, 60% versus 46% (p = 0.006 and 41% (p = 0.003, in the two control populations. Haplogroup J was less prevalent, 3% vs. 12.4% (p = 0.017 and 9.1%, (p = 0.06. Likewise, the UK haplogroup cluster was less prevalent in HCM, 11% vs. 22.1% (p = 0.02 and 22.8% (p = 0.04. These results indicate that haplogroup H constitutes a susceptibility factor and that haplogroup J and haplogroup cluster UK are protective factors in the development of HCM. Thus, constitutive differences in mitochondrial function may influence the occurrence and clinical presentation of HCM. This could explain some of the phenotypic variability in HCM. The fact that haplogroup H and J are also modifying factors in ischemic cardiomyopathy suggests that mtDNA haplotypes may be of significance in determining whether a physiological hypertrophy develops into myopathy. mtDNA haplotypes may have the potential of becoming significant biomarkers in cardiomyopathy.

  16. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Northern Sweden : with special emphasis on molecular genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Mörner, Stellan

    2004-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a heterogeneous, often familial disease, characterized by cardiac hypertrophy, predominantly affecting the interventricular septum. To date, no study has systematically analysed the genetic and phenotypic aspects of the disease in a Swedish population. The aim of this thesis was to identify the genotypes causing HCM in northern Sweden, to characterize the disease phenotypes and correlate these findings. Forty-six patients were recruited for the genetic stu...

  17. High-Risk Electrocardiographic Parameters are Ubiquitous in Patients with Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Mary G; Al-Zaiti, Salah S.; Canty, John M.; Fallavollita, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) can be used to predict cardiovascular risk; however, like all risk factors with imperfect specificity studies in low risk populations have been plagued by poor predictive accuracy. Although predictive accuracy might be improved among cohorts with a higher likelihood of cardiovascular events, this would also affect the prevalence of abnormal parameters and their exclusions. To determine the magnitude of these changes in a cohort with ischemic cardiomyopathy we analy...

  18. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy hypertrophic obstructive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Raimundo José Almeida de Oliveira; Santos, Adaílton Araújo dos; Azevedo, Mablo de Castro; Meira, Saulo Sacramento

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a rare clinical condition caused by a genetic change that results in the formation of structurally or functionally altered collagen. The clinical manifestations are varied, being the most obvious skin hypermotility and increased joint flexibility, although other systems - such as cardiovascular, respiratory and neurological - may also be affected. This paper presents the report of a patient who sought medical attention with complaints of atypical chest pain. Clinical evaluation enabled hypothetical diagnosis of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Initial electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and 24 hours holter allowed the confirmation of the first hypothesis. A skin biopsy performed later associated clinical data and confirmed the second hypothesis. PMID:26312722

  19. Insights into restrictive cardiomyopathy from clinical and animal studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pierre-Yves Jean-Charles; Yue-Jin Li; Chang-Long Nan; Xu-Pei Huang

    2011-01-01

    Catdiomyopathies are diseases that primarily affect the myocardium,leading to serious cardiac dysfimction and heart failure.Out of the three major categories of candiomyopathies(hypertrophic,dilated and restrictive),restrictive cardiomyopathy(RCM)is less common and also the least studied However,the prognosis for RCM is poor as some patients dying in their childhood The molecular mechanisms behind the disease development and progression are not very clear and the treatment of RCM is very difficult and often ineffective.In this article,we reviewed the recent progress in RCM research from the clinical studies and the translational studies done on diseased transgenic animal models.This will help for a better understanding of tare mechanisms underlying the etiology and development of RCM and for the design of better treatments for the disease.

  20. Ultrastructural myocardial changes in seven cats with spontaneous hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Liselotte Bruun; Prats Gavalda, Clara; Hyttel, Poul;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heart disease in cats and shares clinical and pathological characteristics with human HCM. Little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms underlying development of spontaneous feline HCM. ANIMALS: The study population consisted of...... seven cats diagnosed with HCM and eight age-matched cats with no evidence of cardiac disease. METHODS: Fresh myocardial biopsies taken from the middle of the left ventricular posterior free wall were obtained and examined with transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: Electron microscopic examination...... showed ultrastructural aberrations of the myocardial cytoarchitecture and of the interstitium in the seven cats with HCM. In the most severely affected cats the myofibrils were disorganized and subsarcolemmal mitochondria were depleted. In control cats, contraction band artifacts were commonly seen...

  1. Differential radiosensitivity phenotypes of DNA-PKcs mutations affecting NHEJ and HRR systems following irradiation with gamma-rays or very low fluences of alpha particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Fen Lin

    Full Text Available We have examined cell-cycle dependence of chromosomal aberration induction and cell killing after high or low dose-rate γ irradiation in cells bearing DNA-PKcs mutations in the S2056 cluster, the T2609 cluster, or the kinase domain. We also compared sister chromatid exchanges (SCE production by very low fluences of α-particles in DNA-PKcs mutant cells, and in homologous recombination repair (HRR mutant cells including Rad51C, Rad51D, and Fancg/xrcc9. Generally, chromosomal aberrations and cell killing by γ-rays were similarly affected by mutations in DNA-PKcs, and these mutant cells were more sensitive in G1 than in S/G2 phase. In G1-irradiated DNA-PKcs mutant cells, both chromosome- and chromatid-type breaks and exchanges were in excess than wild-type cells. For cells irradiated in late S/G2 phase, mutant cells showed very high yields of chromatid breaks compared to wild-type cells. Few exchanges were seen in DNA-PKcs-null, Ku80-null, or DNA-PKcs kinase dead mutants, but exchanges in excess were detected in the S2506 or T2609 cluster mutants. SCE induction by very low doses of α-particles is resulted from bystander effects in cells not traversed by α-particles. SCE seen in wild-type cells was completely abolished in Rad51C- or Rad51D-deficient cells, but near normal in Fancg/xrcc9 cells. In marked contrast, very high levels of SCEs were observed in DNA-PKcs-null, DNA-PKcs kinase-dead and Ku80-null mutants. SCE induction was also abolished in T2609 cluster mutant cells, but was only slightly reduced in the S2056 cluster mutant cells. Since both non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and HRR systems utilize initial DNA lesions as a substrate, these results suggest the possibility of a competitive interference phenomenon operating between NHEJ and at least the Rad51C/D components of HRR; the level of interaction between damaged DNA and a particular DNA-PK component may determine the level of interaction of such DNA with a relevant HRR component.

  2. Cardiomyocyte GTP Cyclohydrolase 1 Protects the Heart Against Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiang-En Wu; Shelley L. Baumgardt; Juan Fang; Mark Paterson; Yanan Liu; Jianhai Du; Yang Shi; Shigang Qiao; Bosnjak, Zeljko J.; Warltier, David C.; Kersten, Judy R; Zhi-Dong Ge

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy increases the risk of heart failure and death. At present, there are no effective approaches to preventing its development in the clinic. Here we report that reduction of cardiac GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) degradation by genetic and pharmacological approaches protects the heart against diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetic cardiomyopathy was induced in C57BL/6 wild-type mice and transgenic mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of GCH1 with streptozotocin, and co...

  3. Clinical Features and Outcomes of Takotsubo (Stress) Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Templin, Christian; Ghadri, J R; Diekmann, J.; Napp, L C; Seifert, Burkhardt; et al

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The natural history, management, and outcome of takotsubo (stress) cardiomyopathy are incompletely understood. METHODS The International Takotsubo Registry, a consortium of 26 centers in Europe and the United States, was established to investigate clinical features, prognostic predictors, and outcome of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Patients were compared with age- and sex-matched patients who had an acute coronary syndrome. RESULTS Of 1750 patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy, ...

  4. Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy presenting as acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdin, Amr; Eitel, Ingo; de Waha, Suzanne; Thiele, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a rare variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. It is characterized by a local hypertrophy of the apical segments and displays typical electrocardiographic and imaging patterns. The clinical manifestations are variable and range from an asymptomatic course to sudden cardiac death. The most frequent symptom is chest pain and thus apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can mimic the symptoms and repolarization disturbances indicative of acute coronary syndrome. PMID:26628684

  5. Myocardial fibrosis in desmin-related hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Dai Qinyi; Hong Daojun; Zhang Zhaoqi; He Yi; Jiang Tengyong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Desmin-related myopathy (DRM) is known to cause different types of cardiomyopathy. Late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has been shown to identify fibrosis in ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. We present a rare case of desmin-related hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, CMR revealed fibrosis in the lateral wall of the left ventricle. CMR is superior to conventional echocardiography for the detection of myocardial fibrosis in desmin-related cardiomyopa...

  6. Unbreak My Heart: Targeting Mitochondrial Autophagy in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Kubli, Dieter A.; Gustafsson, Åsa B.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Diabetes is strongly associated with increased incidence of heart disease and mortality due to development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Even in the absence of cardiovascular disease, cardiomyopathy frequently arises in diabetic patients. Current treatment options for cardiomyopathy in diabetic patients are the same as for nondiabetic patients and do not address the causes underlying the loss of contractility. Recent Advances: Although there are numerous distinctions between Type ...

  7. A novel mutation in the tRNAIle gene (MTTI) affecting the variable loop in a patient with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO)

    OpenAIRE

    Berardo, Andres; Çoku, Jorida; Kurt, Bulent; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio

    2010-01-01

    We describe a 62-year-old woman with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), multiple lipomas, diabetes mellitus, and a novel mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation at nucleotide 4302 (4302A>G) of the tRNAIle gene (MTTI). This is the first mutation at position 44 in the variable loop (V loop) of any mitochondrial tRNA.

  8. Infant with cardiomyopathy: When to suspect inborn errors of metabolism?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephanie; L; Byers; Can; Ficicioglu

    2014-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism are identified in 5%-26% of infants and children with cardiomyopathy. Although fatty acid oxidation disorders, lysosomal and glycogen storage disorders and organic acidurias are well-known to be associated with cardiomyopathies, emerging reports suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction and congenital disorders of glycosylation may also account for a proportion of cardiomyopathies. This review article clarifies when primary care physicians and cardiologists should suspect inborn errors of metabolism in a patient with cardiomyopathy, and refer the patient to a metabolic specialist for a further metabolic work up, with specific discussions of “red flags” which should prompt additional evaluation.

  9. Assessment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by ECG gated cardiac computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicability of ECG gated cardiac computed tomography (CT) in 12 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was examined. Six of the 12 patients had hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, including one patient with mid-ventricular obstruction. Three of the 12 patients had hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy, and three had apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was confirmed by the angiocardiogram in all patients. Cardiac CT was performed after intravenous administration of contrast media usually given as a bolus injection. The gantry was set with positive 200 tilt angle. In all patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy except for mid-ventricular obstruction, the hypertrophied interventricular septum in the basal and mid portions was observed, and the left ventricular cavity was narrowed in systole. In a patient with mid-ventricular obstruction, the marked hypertrophied interventricular septum and antero-lateral papillary muscle were observed. In diastole, the left ventricular cavity was narrow and divided into two parts. The apical cavity was completely disappeared in systole. In all patients with hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy, the diffuse hypertrophied interventricular septum was observed in diastole. In systole, the apical portion of the left ventricular cavity was markedly narrow and antero-lateral papillary muscle was hypertrophic. In all patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the marked apical hypertrophy of the left ventricular wall was observed in diastole. It is concluded that ECG gated cardiac CT could estimate myocardial wall motion and thickness and differentiate the types of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy each other. (author)

  10. Rituximab responsive immune thrombocytopenic purpura in an adult with underlying autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome due to a splice-site mutation (IVS7+2 T>C) affecting the Fas gene

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Andrew; Cowie, Tiffany

    2007-01-01

    A 36 yr-old man of Israeli descent with a history of childhood splenectomy for severe thrombocytopenia and a family history of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), presented with severe immune thrombocytopenic purpura refractory to standard therapy. He was found to possess a heterozygous mutation in the Fas gene (also termed TNFRSF6, CD95, Apo-1) affecting the donor splice site of intron 7 (IVS7+2 T>C). This frameshift mutation truncates the cytoplasmic domain of the Fas death rece...

  11. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiozaki, Afonso Akio; Parga, Jose Rodrigues; Arteaga, Edmundo; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo [Sao Paulo Univ. (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto do Coracao. Setor de Tomografia Computarizada e Ressonancia Magnetica Cardiovascular]. E-mail: rochitte@incor.usp.br; Kim, Raymond J. [Duke Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Center, Durham, NC (United States); Tassi, Eduardo Marinho [Diagnosticos da America S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Sector of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography

    2007-03-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most frequent genetic cardiac disease that causes sudden death in young people, with an incidence of 1:500 adults. The routinely used criteria for worst prognosis have limited sensitivity and specificity. Thus, the estimated risk of evolving to dilated cardiomyopathy or sudden death is somewhat inaccurate, leading to management uncertainty of HCM patients. Therefore, an accurate noninvasive method for the diagnosis of HCM with prognostic value is of great importance. In the last years, Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) emerged not only as a diagnostic tool, but also as a study with prognostic values, by characterizing myocardial fibrosis with great accuracy in HCM patients. Additionally, CMR identifies the types of hypertrophy, analyses the ventricular function, estimates the intraventricular gradient and allows the determination of differential diagnosis. Moreover, CMR can uniquely access myocardial fibrosis in HCM. (author)

  12. Predictors and prevention of diabetic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Paras

    2013-01-01

    Vishalakshi Chavali, Suresh C Tyagi, Paras K Mishra Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA Abstract: Despite our cognizance that diabetes can enhance the chances of heart failure, causes multiorgan failure,and contributes to morbidity and mortality, it is rapidly increasing menace worldwide. Less attention has been paid to alert prediabetics through determining the comprehensive predictors of diabetic cardiomyopathy (D...

  13. Predictors and prevention of diabetic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Chavali V; Tyagi SC; Mishra PK

    2013-01-01

    Vishalakshi Chavali, Suresh C Tyagi, Paras K Mishra Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA Abstract: Despite our cognizance that diabetes can enhance the chances of heart failure, causes multiorgan failure,and contributes to morbidity and mortality, it is rapidly increasing menace worldwide. Less attention has been paid to alert prediabetics through determining the comprehensive predictors of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DC...

  14. Noncompaction cardiomyopathy associated with hypogenetic lung

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chang-yan; ZHAO Jing; JIANG Teng-yong; HUANG Xiao-yong

    2007-01-01

    @@ Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium is a rare form of congenital cardiomyopathy with a high incidence of cardiovascular complications. It frequently manifests in an isolated form, namely isolated noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium. Not only does noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium associate with other congenital cardiac malformations, but also with other neuromuscular disorders. The purpose of this study was to explore the correlation of hypogenetic lung with myocardial noncompaction in terms of the clinical course of one of our patients.

  15. Diagnosis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Matthew N.; Katz, Morgan J.; Alkadri, Mohi E.

    2012-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is an infrequently diagnosed condition with a high incidence of sudden cardiac death. While the only option for cure is orthotopic cardiac transplantation, the use of an implantable cardiac defibrillator can be life saving. Accordingly, the prompt recognition of ARVC is crucial. Fortunately, a definitive diagnosis of ARVC can often be made by a combination of the clinical history and electrocardiogram alone, as illustrated by the present ...

  16. Mitochondrial citrate synthase crystals: novel finding in Sengers syndrome caused by acylglycerol kinase (AGK) mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardena, Komudi; Mackay, Nevena; Levandovskiy, Valeriy; Blaser, Susan; Raiman, Julian; Kantor, Paul F; Ackerley, Cameron; Robinson, Brian H; Schulze, Andreas; Cameron, Jessie M

    2013-01-01

    We report on two families with Sengers syndrome and mutations in the acylglycerol kinase gene (AGK). In the first family, two brothers presented with vascular strokes, lactic acidosis, cardiomyopathy and cataracts, abnormal muscle cell histopathology and mitochondrial function. One proband had very abnormal mitochondria with citrate synthase crystals visible in electron micrographs, associated with markedly high citrate synthase activity. Exome sequencing was used to identify mutations in the AGK gene in the index patient. Targeted sequencing confirmed the same homozygous mutation (c.3G>A, p.M1I) in the brother. The second family had four affected members, of which we examined two. They also presented with similar clinical symptoms, but no strokes. Postmortem heart and skeletal muscle tissues showed low complex I, III and IV activities in the heart, but normal in the muscle. Skin fibroblasts showed elevated lactate/pyruvate ratios and low complex I+III activity. Targeted sequencing led to identification of a homozygous c.979A>T, p.K327* mutation. AGK is located in the mitochondria and phosphorylates monoacylglycerol and diacylglycerol to lysophosphatidic acid and phosphatidic acid. Disruption of these signaling molecules affects the mitochondria's response to superoxide radicals, resulting in oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA, lipids and proteins, and stimulation of cellular detoxification pathways. High levels of manganese superoxide dismutase protein were detected in all four affected individuals, consistent with increased free radical damage. Phosphatidic acid is also involved in the synthesis of phospholipids and its loss will result in changes to the lipid composition of the inner mitochondrial membrane. These effects manifest as cataract formation in the eye, respiratory chain dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy in heart tissue. These two pedigrees confirm that mutation of AGK is responsible for the severe neonatal presentation of Sengers syndrome. The

  17. Bovine Model of Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo R. Bartoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs constitute a recent advance in heart failure (HF therapeutics. As the rigorous experimental assessment of LVADs in HF requires large animal models, our objective was to develop a bovine model of cardiomyopathy. Male calves (n=8 were used. Four animals received 1.2 mg/kg intravenous doxorubicin weekly for seven weeks and four separate animals were studied as controls. Doxorubicin-treated animals were followed with weekly echocardiography. Target LV dysfunction was defined as an ejection fraction ≤35%. Sixty days after initiating doxorubicin, a terminal study was performed to determine hemodynamic, histological, biochemical, and molecular parameters. All four doxorubicin-treated animals exhibited significant (P<0.05 contractile dysfunction, with target LV dysfunction achieved in three animals. Doxorubicin-treated hearts exhibited significantly reduced coronary blood flow and interstitial fibrosis and significantly increased apoptosis and myocyte size. Gene expression of atrial natriuretic factor increased more than 3-fold. Plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine levels were significantly increased early and late during the development of cardiomyopathy, respectively. We conclude that sequential administration of intravenous doxorubicin in calves induces a cardiomyopathy with many phenotypic hallmarks of the failing human heart. This clinically-relevant model may be useful for testing pathophysiologic responses to LVADs in the context of HF.

  18. Comprehensive evaluation of radionuclide techniques in differentiating dilated cardiomyopathy and ischemic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study analyzed significance of radionuclide technique in differentiating dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) from ischemic cardiomyopathy (CAD-CM). The patients with DCM usually show mild perfusion abnormalities and do not have perfusion defects. Perfusion imaging and metabolic imaging is concordant in most patients and reduced wall motion is typically diffuse in DCM. The majority of patients with CAD-CM have perfusion defects and distributed as segmental. The perfusion imaging and metabolic imaging of patients with CAD-CM generally show mismatch and the wall motion abnormality is segmental

  19. Apical ballooning with mid-ventricular obstruction: the many faces of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadotto, Veronica; Elmaghawry, Mohamed; Zorzi, Alessandro; Migliore, Federico; Marra, Martina Perazzolo

    2013-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is a transient left ventricular dysfunction due to akinesia of the left-ventricular (LV) mid-apical segments (apical ballooning), which can cause severe reduction in LV systolic function. The typical clinical picture of TTC include chest pain, electrocardiographic changes consisting of mild ST-segment elevation followed by diffuse deep T-wave inversion, QTc interval prolongation and mild troponin release in the absence of significant coronary stenoses. The syndrome often affects post-menopausal women and is triggered by sympathetic overstimulation, like intense physical or emotional stress, so that it is called the "broken heart syndrome". Although left-ventricular systolic dysfunction usually fully recovers within few days, heart failure can still complicate the early phase. We report a case of stress-induced cardiomyopathy that had full recovery after 4 weeks of follow up. The main electrocardiographic, angiographic and imaging features are discussed. PMID:24689016

  20. Cardiomyopathy in 12-year-old girl with Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of a 12 year old girl with Hodgkin's disease is described. In the course of her illness congestive cardiomyopathy developed. The authors discuss many possible etiologies of congestive cardiomyopathy in this case with special referral to the car diotoxicity of antineoplastic drugs. (author)

  1. Radiology and pathology correlation in common infiltrative cardiomyopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infiltrative cardiomyopathies generally pose a diagnostic dilemma as current diagnostic tools are imprecise. Invasive endomyocardial biopsy is considered as the gold standard however it has some limitations. Recently cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is emerging as an excellent technique in diagnosing infiltrative cardiomyopathies and is increasingly being used. Characteristic pathologic and radiologic findings in most common infiltrative cardiomyopathies (amyloid, sarcoid and Fabry's) are discussed and correlated with relative CMR and histologic examples. There is fairly good correlation between the non-invasive radiologic and the invasive histologic findings in common infiltrative cardiomyopathies. Non-invasive CMR with its high sensitivity and specificity has an excellent role in establishing the diagnosis and improving the prognosis of common infiltrative cardiomyopathies.

  2. Patient with Eating Disorder, Carnitine Deficiency and Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotino, A Domnica; Sherma, A

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by a dilated and poorly functioning left ventricle and can result from several different etiologies including ischemic, infectious, metabolic, toxins, autoimmune processes or nutritional deficiencies. Carnitine deficiency-induced cardiomyopathy (CDIM) is an uncommon cause of dilated cardiomyopathy that can go untreated if not considered. Here, we describe a 30-year-old woman with an eating disorder and recent percutaneous endoscopic gastrotomy (PEG) tube placement for weight loss admitted to the hospital for possible PEG tube infection. Carnitine level was found to be low. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed ejection fraction 15%. Her hospital course was complicated by sepsis from a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). She was discharged on a beta-blocker and carnitine supplementation. One month later her cardiac function had normalized. Carnitine deficiency-induced myopathy is an unusual cause of cardiomyopathy and should be considered in adults with decreased oral intake or malabsorption who present with cardiomyopathy. PMID:27159507

  3. The phenotypic spectrum of neutral lipid storage myopathy due to mutations in the PNPLA2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilich, Peter; Horvath, Rita; Krause, Sabine; Schramm, Nicolai; Turnbull, Doug M; Trenell, Michael; Hollingsworth, Kieren G; Gorman, Grainne S; Hans, Volkmar H; Reimann, Jens; MacMillan, Andrée; Turner, Lesley; Schollen, Annette; Witte, Gregor; Czermin, Birgit; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Walter, Maggie C; Schoser, Benedikt; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2011-11-01

    Neutral lipid storage disease is caused by mutations in the CGI-58 or the PNPLA2 genes. Lipid storage can be detected in various cell types including blood granulocytes. While CGI-58 mutations are associated with Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome, a condition characterized by lipid storage and skin involvement (ichthyosis), mutations in the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 2 gene (PNPLA2) were reported with skeletal and cardiac muscle disease only. We describe clinical, myopathological, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and genetic findings of six patients carrying different recessive PNPLA2 mutations. Pulse-chase labeling of control and patient cells with supplementation of clenbuterol, salmeterol, and dexamethasone was performed in vitro. The patients share a recognizable phenotype with prominent shoulder girdle weakness and mild pelvic girdle and distal muscle weakness, with highly elevated creatine kinase (CK) and cardiomyopathy developing at later stages. Muscle histology invariably reveals massive accumulation of lipid droplets. New muscle or whole-body MRI techniques may assist diagnosis and may become a useful tool to quantify intramuscular lipid storage. Four novel and two previously reported mutations were detected, affecting different parts of the PNPLA2 gene. Activation of hormone-sensitive lipase by beta-adrenergic substances such as clenbuterol appears to bypass the enzymatic block in PNPLA2-deficient patient cells in vitro. PNPLA2 deficiency is a slowly progressive myopathy with onset around the third decade. Cardiac involvement is relatively common at a later stage. Muscle MRI may detect increased lipid in a characteristic distribution, which could be used for monitoring disease progression. Beta-adrenergic agents may be beneficial in improving triacylglycerol breakdown in patients with PNPLA2 mutations. PMID:21544567

  4. 影响果蝇心脏发育的基因突变%Mutations of Genes Affecting Heart Development of Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冬玲; 戴琦; 袁婺洲; 吴秀山; 李敏

    2001-01-01

    最近的研究表明,果蝇与脊椎动物及人的心脏早期发育具有极为相似的基因控制机理,果蝇已成为研究人体心脏早期发育基因控制的理想模式动物。利用化学诱变剂甲磺酸乙酯大规模地诱变影响果蝇心脏发育的基因,利用心脏特异性抗体染色进行筛选,获得了112个有心脏突变表型的致死系,其中32个致死系的心脏畸变表型有别于目前已知心脏发育基因的突变表型。细胞遗传学定位研究表明在多线染色体的13个带纹区内的某些隐性致死突变基因是目前未知的,其功能可能与心脏发育有关的基因。%Recent studies suggest that the basic molecular control mechanisms of early heart development are remarkably conserved in Drosophila, vertebrate and human being.Drosophila can be used as a prototype to explore the genetic basis of cardiogenesis in human being. Here, mutations of genes affecting heart development of Drosophila are produced by chemical mutagen methanesulfonicaeid ethyl. With staining of antibody expressed in heart precussor cells of Drosophila, 112 lethal lines were observed to show mutant phenotypes in pericardial cells. Of them, 32 lines differ in their mutant phenotypes from those of known genes. Analysis of cytogenetic mapping shows that they are located in 13 chromosomal regions without known heart-related genes, which implies that these loci contain genes probably involved in the heart development.

  5. Estudo de mutações causadoras de cardiomiopatia hipertrófica em um grupo de pacientes no Espírito Santo, Brasil Estudio de mutaciones causadoras de cardiomiopatía hipertrófica en un grupo de pacientes en Espírito Santo, Brasil Study of mutations causing hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a group of patients from Espirito Santo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Daher Carneiro Marsiglia

    2010-01-01

    un grupo de pacientes en el estado de Espírito Santo, Brasil. MÉTODOS: Usando la técnica SSCP, se estudiaron 12 exones de los tres principales genes involucrados con la CH: exones 15, 20, 21, 22 y 23 del gen de la cadena pesada de la β-miosina (MYH7, exones 7, 16, 18, 22 y 24 del gen de la proteína C unida a la miosina (MYBPC3 y exones 8 y 9 del gen de la troponina T (TNNT2. RESULTADOS: Se encontraron 16 alteraciones, incluyendo dos mutaciones, una de ellas posiblemente patogénica en el gen MYBPC3 gen (p. Glu441Lys y otra patogénica ya descrita en el gen TNNT2 (p. Arg92Trp; 8 variaciones de secuencia raras y 6 variaciones de secuencia con frecuencia alélica mayor que el 1% (polimorfismos. CONCLUSIONES: Con estos datos, es posible concluir que el genotipaje de los pacientes es factible en nuestro medio. Es posible que la variante p.Glu441Lys en el exón 16 del gen MYBPC3 sea patogénica, resultando en un fenotipo más leve que el encontrado en asociación con otras mutaciones. La variante p.Arg92Trp en el exón 9 del gen TNNT2 no resulta en un fenotipo tan homogéneo como el descrito anteriormente y puede llevar a hipertrofia grave.BACKGROUND: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC is the most frequent cardiac hereditary disease, caused by mutations in sarcomere protein coding genes. Although more than 430 mutations have been identified in several continents and countries, there have been no reports of mutations in Brazil. OBJECTIVE: To carry out a genetic study to identify genetic mutations that cause HC in a group of patients in Espirito Santo, Brazil. METHODS: Using the SSCP technique, 12 exons from the three main genes involved in HC were studied: exons 15, 20, 21, 22 and 23 of the β-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7, exons 7, 16, 18, 22 and 24 of the myosin binding protein C gene (MYBPC3 and exons 8 and 9 of troponin T gene (TNNT2. RESULTS: 16 alterations were found, including two mutations, one of them possibly pathogenic in the MYBPC3 gene (p. Glu441Lys and

  6. 5 ' splice site mutations in tau associated with the inherited dementia FTDP-17 affect a stem-loop structure that regulates alternative splicing of exon 10

    OpenAIRE

    Grover, A.; Houlden, H; Baker, M.; Adamson, J.; J. Lewis; Prihar, G.; Pickering-Brown, S.; Duff, K; Hutton, M.

    1999-01-01

    Missense and splice site mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau gene were recently found associated with fronto-temporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (Poorkaj et al. (1998) Ann. Neurol. 43, 815-825; Hutton et al. (1998) Nature 393, 702-705; Spillantini et al. (1998) Proc. Natl Acad Sci. U.S.A 95, 7737-7741). The mutations in the 5' splice site of exon 10 were shown to increase the ratio of tau mRNAs containing exon 10 and thus the proportion of Tau protein is...

  7. A novel mutation affecting the arginine-137 residue of AVPR2 in dizygous twins leads to nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and attenuated urine exosome aquaporin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichs, Gitte R; Hansen, Louise H; Nielsen, Maria R;

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor gene AVPR2 may cause X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus by defective apical insertion of aquaporin-2 in the renal collecting duct principal cell. Substitution mutations with exchange of arginine at codon 137 can cause nephrogenic syndrome of inappropr...... administration. While a similar urine exosome release rate was shown between probands and controls by western blotting for the marker ALIX, there was a selective decrease in exosome aquaporin-2 versus aquaporin-1 protein in probands compared to controls....

  8. The two mutations, Q204X and nt821, of the myostatin gene affect carcass and meat quality in young heterozygous bulls of French beef breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Levéziel, Hubert; Payet-Duprat, Nathalie; Hocquette, Jean-François; Lepetit, Jacques; Rousset, Sylvie; Denoyelle, Christophe; Bernard-Capel, Carine; Journaux, L.; Bonnot, Aline; Renand, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    The availability of genetic tests to detect different mutations in the myostatin gene allows the identification of heterozygous animals and would warrant the superiority of these animals for slaughter performance if this superiority is confirmed. Thus, 2 mutations of this gene, Q204X and nt821, were studied in 3 French beef breeds in the program Qualvigène. This work was done with 1,114 Charolais, 1,254 Limousin, and 981 Blonde d’Aquitaine young bulls from, respectively, 48, 36, and 30 sires ...

  9. Genetic study of a membrane protein: DNA sequence alterations due to 17 lamB point mutations affecting adsorption of phage lambda.

    OpenAIRE

    Clément, J M; Lepouce, E; Marchal, C.; Hofnung, M

    1983-01-01

    Gene lamB encodes the outer membrane receptor for phage lambda in Escherichia coli K12. We have determined the DNA sequence alterations of 17 lamB point mutations which result in resistance to phage lambda h+. The mutations correspond to four phenotypic classes according to the pattern of growth of three phages which use the lambda receptor: lambda h (a one-step host-range derivative of lambda h+), lambda hh* (a two-step host-range derivative of lambda h+) and K10 (another lambdoid phage). Fo...

  10. General method for fine mapping of the Escherichia coli K-12 lamB gene: localization of missense mutations affecting bacteriophage lambda adsorption.

    OpenAIRE

    Hofnung, M; Lepouce, E; Braun-Breton, C

    1981-01-01

    lamB is the structural gene for the bacteriophage lambda receptor, a multifunctional protein located in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli K-12. We present a method for deletion mapping of any lamB mutations with a recognizable pheno-type. This method involves a transducing phage constructed by in vitro recombination which can also be used for complementation, deoxyribonucleic acid sequence, and in vitro protein synthesis studies with the mutated lamB gene. Using this method, we mapped 18...

  11. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy precipitated by delirium tremens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agu, Chidozie Charles; Bakhit, Ahmed; Basunia, Md; Bhattarai, Bikash; Oke, Vikram; Salhan, Divya; Schmidt, Frances

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with alcohol withdrawal symptoms, which later progressed to delirium tremens. During hospitalization, she developed respiratory distress with acute pulmonary edema. Electrocardiogram (ECG) showed diffuse ST elevation with elevated cardiac enzymes. Echocardiogram showed estimated ejection fraction of 20-25% with characteristic apical ballooning. After several days of supportive care, the patient showed significant clinical improvement with normalization of ECG, cardiac enzymes, and echocardiographic findings. Coronary angiogram revealed no coronary abnormalities. Although Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has been associated with diverse forms of physical or emotional stress, only a few cases have been described with delirium tremens in the medical literature. PMID:26653700

  12. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy precipitated by delirium tremens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidozie Charles Agu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 57-year-old woman presented with alcohol withdrawal symptoms, which later progressed to delirium tremens. During hospitalization, she developed respiratory distress with acute pulmonary edema. Electrocardiogram (ECG showed diffuse ST elevation with elevated cardiac enzymes. Echocardiogram showed estimated ejection fraction of 20–25% with characteristic apical ballooning. After several days of supportive care, the patient showed significant clinical improvement with normalization of ECG, cardiac enzymes, and echocardiographic findings. Coronary angiogram revealed no coronary abnormalities. Although Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has been associated with diverse forms of physical or emotional stress, only a few cases have been described with delirium tremens in the medical literature.

  13. Identification of risk factors and demographic features of patients with peri partum cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To describe and identify the demographic features and risk factors for peri partum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). Design: A prospective study: The study was conducted at the department of Adult Cardiology, National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases (NICVD), Karachi, Pakistan from December 1999 to August 2001. Subjects and Methods: A total of 35 consecutive patients diagnosed to have peri partum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) on echocardiogram were enrolled. Proforma containing demographic characteristics and established risk factors for PPCM was established and filled carefully. The data gathered was analyzed statistically. Results: The mean age at the time of diagnosis was 30.8-6.74 years. Urdu speaking (Mohajir) population was found to be more affected ethnic group (42.9%) Majority of the patients was from lower socio-economic group with poor nutritional status (77%) and multiparous (77.14%). 25.7% had past history of PPCM and 71.4% presented during postpartum period. Mortality at six months was 22.8% while 42.9% had persistent disease and only 34.3% recovered completely. Conclusion: Advanced age, lower economic group with poor nutritional status, multi parity and past history of peri partum cardiomyopathy were identified as risk factors for the development of PPCM, especially among Mohajir population. There was no statistically significant difference between the clinical features and outcome of patients presented first time or with recurrent PPCM. We identified advanced age (>30 years), high LVEDD, and low ejection fraction (EF) at initial presentation as poor prognostic factors. (author)

  14. Peripartum cardiomyopathy coexistent with human immunodeficiency virus: A substantial obstetric jeopardy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasmita Mandal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM is a rare cause of pregnancy-related heart failure, which affects a woman during the last months of pregnancy or first months of parturition. Its etiopathogenesis is still unclear. Coexistence of PPCM with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV has been scarcely analyzed. A low CD4 count is proposed to be one of the predictors of dilated cardiomyopathy in HIV. Here, a pregnant woman with HIV presented with signs of congestive heart failure for the first time during her last trimester. Echocardiography revealed a dilated cardiomyopathy with ejection fraction of 34% which proved the diagnosis of PPCM. She underwent cesarean section for impending previous scar rupture. Her status deteriorated subsequently in spite of all efforts and she succumbed due to ventricular tachycardia. This case necessitates an awareness regarding coexistence of HIV with PPCM and dreaded clinical sequences. Patients suffering from HIV should be treated well and their CD4 count should be improved before conception to avoid such complications in pregnancy.

  15. Variable clinical expression of an identical mutation in the ATP7A gene for Menkes disease/occipital horn syndrome in three affected males in a single family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borm, Bettina; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Hausser, Ingrid; Emeis, Michael; Baerlocher, Kurt; Horn, Nina; Rossi, Rainer

    2004-07-01

    Two maternal half-brothers presented with huge cephalic hematoma, fatal in one. Skin morphology disclosed lack of elastic fibres. Their maternal uncle is moderately mentally handicapped and has extensive connective tissue disorders. In all these patients, an identical missense mutation in the ATP7A gene was found and confirmed Menkes' disease. PMID:15238919

  16. Silent exonic mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene that cause familial hypercholesterolemia by affecting mRNA splicing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Defesche, J.C.; Schuurman, E.J.M.; Klaaijsen, L.N.; Khoo, K.L.; Wiegman, A.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2008-01-01

    In a large group of patients with the clinical phenotype of familial hypercholesterolemia, such as elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and premature atherosclerosis, but without functional mutations in the genes coding for the LDL receptor and apolipoprotein B, we examined the effect

  17. Role of hepatitis C virus in myocarditis and cardiomyopathies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Matsumori

    2004-01-01

    Recent nationwide clinico-epidemiological surveys in Japan showed that the occurrence of cardiomyopathies was most frequently seen in the age of sixties, and that cardiomyopathies are important causes of heart failure in the elderly. Viral infection was conventionally considered to cause myocarditis, which resulted in the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. Recent studies suggest that hepatitis C virus (HCV) is involved in the development of dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in addition to myocarditis. Furthermore, left ventricular aneurysm represents the same morbid state not only after myocardial infarction but also after myocarditis. There were wide variations in the frequency of detection of HCV genomes in cardiomyopathy in different regions and in different populations. Major histocompatibility complex class Ⅱ genes may play a role in the susceptibility to HCV infection, and may influence the development of different phenotypes of cardiomyopathy. If in fact the myocardial damage is caused by HCV, it might be expected that interferon (IFN) administration would be useful for its treatment. Hepatitis patients receiving IFN treatment for hepatitis were screened by thallium myocardial scintigraphy, and an abnormality was discovered in half of the patients. Treatment with IFN resulted in a disappearance of the image abnormality. It has thus been suggested that mild myocarditis and myocardial damage may be cured with IFN. We have recently found that high concentrations of circulating cardiac troponin T are a specific marker of cardiac involvement in HCV infection. By measuring cardiac troponin T in patients with HCV infection, the prevalence of cardiac involvement in HCV infection will be clarified. We are proposing a collaborative work on a global network on myocarditis/cardiomyopathies due to HCV infection. (J Geriatr Cardiol 2004;1(2):83-89. )

  18. Acute peritonitis as the first presentation of valvular cardiomyopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Higgins, Nikki

    2012-02-01

    Valvular cardiomyopathy can present a diagnostic challenge in the absence of overt cardiac symptoms. This report describes the case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with acute peritonitis associated with vomiting and abdominal distension. Subsequent abdominal computed tomography and ultrasound revealed bibasal pleural effusions, ascites, and normal ovaries. An echocardiogram revealed that all cardiac chambers were dilated with a global decrease in contractility and severe mitral, tricuspid, and aortic regurgitation. A diagnosis of cardiomyopathy with acute heart failure, secondary to valvular heart disease, was secured. Acute peritonitis as the presenting feature of valvular cardiomyopathy is a rare clinical entity.

  19. The two mutations, Q204X and nt821, of the myostatin gene affect carcass and meat quality in young heterozygous bulls of French beef breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allais, S; Levéziel, H; Payet-Duprat, N; Hocquette, J F; Lepetit, J; Rousset, S; Denoyelle, C; Bernard-Capel, C; Journaux, L; Bonnot, A; Renand, G

    2010-02-01

    The availability of genetic tests to detect different mutations in the myostatin gene allows the identification of heterozygous animals and would warrant the superiority of these animals for slaughter performance if this superiority is confirmed. Thus, 2 mutations of this gene, Q204X and nt821, were studied in 3 French beef breeds in the program Qualvigène. This work was done with 1,114 Charolais, 1,254 Limousin, and 981 Blonde d'Aquitaine young bulls from, respectively, 48, 36, and 30 sires and slaughtered from 2004 to 2006. In addition to the usual carcass traits recorded at slaughter (e.g., carcass yield, muscle score), carcass composition was estimated by weighing internal fat and dissecting the 6th rib. The muscle characteristic traits analyzed were lipid and collagen contents, muscle fiber section area, and pH. Regarding meat quality, sensory qualities of meat samples were evaluated by a taste panel, and Warner-Bratzler shear force was measured. Deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted from the blood samples of all calves, the blood samples of 78% of the dams, and the blood or semen samples of all the sires. Genotypes were determined for 2 disruptive mutations, Q204X and nt821. Analyses were conducted by breed. The superiority of carcass traits of calves carrying one copy of the mutated allele (Q204X or nt821) over noncarrier animals was approximately +1 SD in the Charolais and Limousin breeds but was not significant in the Blonde d'Aquitaine. In the Charolais breed, for which the frequency was the greatest (7%), young bulls carrying the Q204X mutation presented a carcass with less fat, less intramuscular fat and collagen contents, and a clearer and more tender meat than those of homozygous-normal cattle. The meat of these animals also had slightly less flavor. Also in the Charolais breed, 13 of 48 sires were heterozygous. For each sire, the substitution effect of the wild allele by the mutant allele was approximately +1 SD for carcass conformation and yield

  20. Heterozygous Lmna(delK32) mice develop dilated cardiomyopathy through a combined pathomechanism of haploinsufficiency and peptide toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cattin, M. E.; Bertrand, A. T.; Schlossarek, S.;

    2013-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) associates left ventricular (LV) dilatation and systolic dysfunction and is a major cause of heart failure and cardiac transplantation. LMNA gene encodes lamins A/C, proteins of the nuclear envelope. LMNA mutations cause DCM with conduction and/or rhythm defects. The...... pathomechanisms linking mutations to DCM remain to be elucidated. We investigated the phenotype and associated pathomechanisms of heterozygous Lmna(K32/) (Het) knock-in mice, which carry a human mutation. Het mice developed a cardiac-specific phenotype. Two phases, with two different pathomechanisms, could be...... observed that lead to the development of cardiac dysfunction, DCM and death between 35 and 70 weeks of age. In young Het hearts, there was a clear reduction in lamin A/C level, mainly due to the degradation of toxic K32-lamin. As a side effect, lamin A/C haploinsufficiency probably triggers the cardiac...