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Sample records for cardiomyopathy current concepts

  1. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy: A Current Review

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    Katie M. Twomley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM is a rare but potentially lethal complication of pregnancy occurring in approximately 1 : 3,000 live births in the United States although some series report a much higher incidence. African-American women are particularly at risk. Diagnosis requires symptoms of heart failure in the last month of pregnancy or within five months of delivery in the absence of recognized cardiac disease prior to pregnancy as well as objective evidence of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. This paper provides an updated, comprehensive review of PPCM, including emerging insights into the etiology of this disorder as well as current treatment options.

  2. Mechanical aberrations in hypetrophic cardiomyopathy: emerging concepts.

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    Dimitrios eNtelios

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common monogenic disorder in cardiology. Despite important advances in understanding disease pathogenesis, it is not clear how flaws in individual sarcomere components are responsible for the observed phenotype. The aim of this article is to provide a brief interpretative analysis of some currently proposed pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with a special emphasis on alterations in the cardiac mechanical properties.

  3. Current Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Jacob M.; Thomas, Jared; Bedi, Asheesh; Lawton, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the capitellum is a painful condition, which often affects young throwing athletes. Our current understanding regarding the etiology, risks factors, diagnosis, and efficacy of the available treatment options has expanded over recent years, however remains suboptimal. Recent data on patient-reported outcomes following osteochondral autograft transplantation (OAT) for the treatment of large osteochondral lesions of the capitellum have been promising but limited. This review seeks to critically analyze and summarize the available literature on the etiology, diagnosis, and reported outcomes associated with OCD of the capitellum and the use of OAT for its treatment. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted. Unique and customized search strategies were formulated in PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, and CENTRAL. Combinations of keywords and controlled vocabulary terms were utilized in order to cast a broad net. Relevant clinical, biomechanical, anatomic and imaging studies were reviewed along with recent review articles, and case series. Results: Forty-three articles from our initial literature search were found to be relevant for this review. The majority of these articles were either review articles, clinical studies, anatomic or imaging studies or biomechanical studies. Conclusions: Current evidence suggests that OAT may lead to better and more consistent outcomes than previously described methods for treating large OCD lesions of the capitellum. PMID:28149204

  4. Chagas disease cardiomyopathy: current concepts of an old disease Cardiomiopatia chagásica: conceitos atuais de doença antiga

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    Angelina M.B. Bilate

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease continues to be a significant public health problem, as ca. 10 million people are still infected with T. cruzi in Latin America. Decades after primary infection, 30% of individuals can develop a form of chronic inflammatory cardiomyopathy known as Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC. Data from both murine models and human studies support the view that an autoimmune response as well as a parasite-driven immune response involving inflammatory cytokines and chemokines may both play a role in generating the heart lesions leading to CCC. This review aims to summarize recent advances in the understanding of the immunopathogenesis of Chagas disease cardiomyopathy.A doença de Chagas continua sendo importante problema de saúde pública uma vez que cerca de 10 milhões de indivíduos ainda estão infectados pelo T. cruzi. Décadas após a infecção primária, aproximadamente 30% dos indivíduos podem desenvolver uma cardiomiopatia inflamatória crônica, a chamada Cardiomiopatia Chagásica Crônica (CCC. Dados de modelos murinos e de estudos em humanos apóiam a visão de que tanto respostas auto-imunes como as determinadas pelo parasita em conjunto com citocinas e quimiocinas inflamatórias participam da geração das lesões cardíacas típicas da CCC. A presente revisão tem como objetivo sumarizar os recentes avanços no entendimento da imunopatogênese da Cardiomiopatia Chagásica Crônica.

  5. [From arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy(ARVD/ARVC) to a broader concept of ABCDE syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, M; Kinoshita, O

    2000-01-01

    The concept on the presence of a peculiar disease, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, has been widely recognized to be involved in the category of cardiomyopathy. The authors believe this disease entity should be further expanded, and propose the new term "ABCDE Syndrome", abbreviated from Arrhythmogenicity, Brugada syndrome, Competitive sports, Death(especially sudden death) and Electric disturbance type of cardiomyopathy(ECM), be incorporated to encompass all facets of this category.

  6. Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often in middle-aged people and is more likely to affect men. The most common cause is coronary artery disease or heart attack. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This type involves abnormal thickening of ...

  7. Current and future role of echocardiography in arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mast, Thomas P.; Teske, Arco J.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Cramer, Maarten J.

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) is an inherited progressive cardiomyopathy, clinically characterized by ventricular arrhythmias and increased risk of sudden cardiac death. Echocardiography has a role in the diagnosis and prognosis of ARVD/C. However, in the current

  8. [Current concepts on gastroschisis].

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    Castrejón García, J M; Vivar Ferrer, I; Bautista, M L

    1979-01-01

    Present day concepts about history, etiology, embriology, and management of gastroschisis are reviewed and a case is reported; it was treated in two surgical steps. A silastic net was applied and the intestinal loops were gradually introduced until the abdominal defect closed completely. Parenteral feeding was also given.

  9. Pediatric obesity: Current concepts.

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    Greydanus, Donald E; Agana, Marisha; Kamboj, Manmohan K; Shebrain, Saad; Soares, Neelkamal; Eke, Ransome; Patel, Dilip R

    2018-04-01

    This discussion reflects on concepts of obesity in children and adolescents in the early 21st century. It includes reflections on its history, definition, epidemiology, diagnostic perspectives, psychosocial considerations, musculoskeletal complications, endocrine complications and principles of management. In addition to emphasis on diet and exercise, research and clinical applications in the second decade of the 21 st century emphasize the increasing use of pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery for adolescent and adult populations with critical problems of overweight and obesity. We conclude with a discussion of future directions in pediatric obesity management. Copyright © 2018 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Marijuana: Current concepts

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    Donald eGreydanus

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Marijuana (cannabis remains a controversial drug in the 21st century. This paper considers current research on use of Cannabis sativa and its constituents such as the cannabinoids. Topics reviewed include prevalence of cannabis use, other drugs consumed with pot, the endocannabinoid system, use of medicinal marijuana, medical adverse effects of cannabis, and psychiatric adverse effects of cannabis use. Treatment of cannabis withdrawal and dependence is difficult and remains mainly based on psychological therapy; current research on pharmacologic management of problems related to cannabis consumption is also considered. The potential role of specific cannabinoids for medical benefit will be revealed as the 21st century matures. However, potential dangerous adverse effects from smoking marijuana are well known and should be clearly taught to a public often confused by a media-driven, though false message and promise of benign pot consumption.

  11. Andropause: Current concepts

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    Parminder Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Andropause or late-onset hypogonadism is a common disorder which increases in prevalence with advancing age. Diagnosis of late-onset of hypogonadism is based on presence of symptoms suggestive of testosterone deficiency - prominent among them are sexual symptoms like loss of libido, morning penile erection and erectile dysfunction; and demonstration of low testosterone levels. Adequate therapeutic modalities are currently available, but disparate results of clinical trial suggest further evaluation of complex interaction between androgen deficiency and ageing. Before initiating therapy benefits and risk should be discussed with patients and in case of poor response , alternative cause should be investigated.

  12. Transgender youth: current concepts

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    Stephen M. Rosenthal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In many countries throughout the world, increasing numbers of gender nonconforming/transgender youth are seeking medical services to enable the development of physical characteristics consistent with their experienced gender. Such medical services include use of agents to block endogenous puberty at Tanner stage II with subsequent use of cross-sex hormones, and are based on longitudinal studies demonstrating that those individuals who were first identified as gender dysphoric in early or middle childhood and continue to meet the mental health criteria for being transgender at early puberty are likely to be transgender as adults. This review addresses terms and definitions applicable to gender nonconforming youth, studies that shed light on the biologic determinants of gender identity, current clinical practice guidelines for transgender youth, challenges to optimal care, and priorities for research.

  13. Transgender youth: current concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In many countries throughout the world, increasing numbers of gender nonconforming/transgender youth are seeking medical services to enable the development of physical characteristics consistent with their experienced gender. Such medical services include use of agents to block endogenous puberty at Tanner stage II with subsequent use of cross-sex hormones, and are based on longitudinal studies demonstrating that those individuals who were first identified as gender dysphoric in early or middle childhood and continue to meet the mental health criteria for being transgender at early puberty are likely to be transgender as adults. This review addresses terms and definitions applicable to gender nonconforming youth, studies that shed light on the biologic determinants of gender identity, current clinical practice guidelines for transgender youth, challenges to optimal care, and priorities for research. PMID:28164070

  14. Current Indications for Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators in Non-Ischemic Cardiomyopathies and Channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Torrecilla, Esteban; Arenal, Angel; Atienza, Felipe; Datino, Tomás; Bravo, Loreto; Ruiz, Pablo; Ávila, Pablo; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Current indications for implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) in patients with channelopathies and cardiomyopathies of non-ischemic origin are mainly based on non-randomized evidence. In patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM), there is a tendency towards a beneficial effect on total mortality of ICD therapy in patients with significant left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Although an important reduction in sudden cardiac death (SCD) seems to be clearly demonstrated in these patients, a net beneficial effect on total mortality is unclear mostly in cases with good functional status. Risk stratification has been changing over the last two decades in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Its risk profile has been delineated in parallel with the beneficial effect of ICD in high risk patients. Observational results based on "appropriate" ICD interventions do support its usefulness both in primary and secondary SCD prevention in these patients. Novel risk models quantify the rate of sudden cardiac death in these patients on individual basis. Less clear risk stratification is available for cases of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and in other uncommon familiar cardiomyopathies. Main features of risk stratification vary among the different channelopathies (long QT syndrome -LQTS-, Brugada syndrome, etc) with great debate on the management of asymptomatic patients. For most familiar cardiomyopathies, ICD therapy is the only accepted strategy in the prevention of SCD. So far, genetic testing has a limited role in risk evaluation and management of the individual patient. This review aims to summarize these criticisms and to refine the current indications of ICD implantation in patients with cardiomyopathies and major channelopathies.

  15. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN ACL RECONSTRUCTION

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    Freddie H. Fu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Current Concepts in ACL Reconstruction is a complete reference text composed of the most thorough collection of topics on the ACL and its surgical reconstruction compiled, with contributions from some of the world's experts and most experienced ACL surgeons. Various procedures mentioned throughout the text are also demonstrated in an accompanying video CD-ROM. PURPOSE Composing a single, comprehensive and complete information source on ACL including basic sciences, clinical issues, latest concepts and surgical techniques, from evaluation to outcome, from history to future, editors and contributors have targeted to keep the audience pace with the latest concepts and techniques for the evaluation and the treatment of ACL injuries. FEATURES The text is composed of 27 chapters in 6 sections. The first section is mostly about basic sciences, also history of the ACL, imaging, clinical approach to adolescent and pediatric patients are subjected. In the second section, Graft Choices and Arthroscopy Portals for ACL Reconstruction are mentioned. The third section is about the technique and the outcome of the single-bundle ACL reconstruction. The fourth chapter includes the techniques and outcome of the double-bundle ACL reconstruction. In the fifth chapter revision, navigation technology, rehabilitation and the evaluation of the outcome of ACL reconstruction is subjected. The sixth/the last chapter is about the future advances to reach: What We Have Learned and the Future of ACL Reconstruction. AUDIENCE Orthopedic residents, sports traumatology and knee surgery fellows, orthopedic surgeons, also scientists in basic sciences or clinicians who are studying or planning a research on ACL forms the audience group of this book. ASSESSMENT This is the latest, the most complete and comprehensive textbook of ACL reconstruction produced by the editorial work up of two pioneer and masters "Freddie H. Fu MD and Steven B. Cohen MD" with the contribution of world

  16. Current management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: evidence in pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada Mena, Luis Diego

    2013-01-01

    Available literary evidence is reviewed on the current management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The bibliographical search is carried out in physical and online texts, cardiology journals, databases (MEDLINE), original studies, reviews and metaanalysis. Literature in English and Spanish is included from the first descriptions of the disease in the fifties, until the date of the investigation. Clinical management of patients is compared and recommendations published by consensus groups of international associations [es

  17. Current Understanding of Molecular Pathology and Treatment of Cardiomyopathy in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

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    Tirsa L. E. van Westering

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a genetic muscle disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene resulting in the loss of the protein dystrophin. Patients do not only experience skeletal muscle degeneration, but also develop severe cardiomyopathy by their second decade, one of the main causes of death. The absence of dystrophin in the heart renders cardiomyocytes more sensitive to stretch-induced damage. Moreover, it pathologically alters intracellular calcium (Ca2+ concentration, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS localization and mitochondrial function and leads to inflammation and necrosis, all contributing to the development of cardiomyopathy. Current therapies only treat symptoms and therefore the need for targeting the genetic defect is immense. Several preclinical therapies are undergoing development, including utrophin up-regulation, stop codon read-through therapy, viral gene therapy, cell-based therapy and exon skipping. Some of these therapies are undergoing clinical trials, but these have predominantly focused on skeletal muscle correction. However, improving skeletal muscle function without addressing cardiac aspects of the disease may aggravate cardiomyopathy and therefore it is essential that preclinical and clinical focus include improving heart function. This review consolidates what is known regarding molecular pathology of the DMD heart, specifically focusing on intracellular Ca2+, nNOS and mitochondrial dysregulation. It briefly discusses the current treatment options and then elaborates on the preclinical therapeutic approaches currently under development to restore dystrophin thereby improving pathology, with a focus on the heart.

  18. Current concepts of fracture healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulth, A

    1989-12-01

    The current concepts of fracture healing are mainly based on two variables: blood supply and stability. The effect of electricity on delayed union has not been explained. Possible individual differences in the primary osteogenetic activity and the effect of soft-tissue injuries are seldom considered. In recent years, interesting data have revealed how biomechanical forces and electric currents can be translated to biochemical mediators such as prostaglandins (PGE2), morphogens, and growth factors. It is likely that the fracture ends emit osteogenic signal substances (such as bone morphogenetic protein) to the exudate in addition to those mediators (interleukin-1, growth factors) which are released from the blood clot as in wound healing. Movement of the fragments increases the fracture exudate with its migrating cells and sprouting vessels, resulting in exuberant callus. Cartilage is formed in the well-vascularized granulation tissue due to its ability to repel vessels. Rigid fixation minimizes granulation tissue and external callus. Rigid plates may also retard effusion of morphogens and growth factors from bone ends. Reaming of the intramedullary canal and nailing may cause additional bone damage, which may increase the osteogenetic activity. Weight bearing stimulates growth factors and PGE2. The molecular activity of the fracture exudate is the most decisive factor for bone healing. This activity can be impeded by diastasis, infections, and soft-tissue crushing injuries that cause extensive activation of macrophages and activate mediators, disturbing the osteogenesis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Recurrent Direct Current Cardioversion Induced Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy. A Case Report and Literature Review

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    Athanasios Smyrlis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress cardiomyopathy (SCM, also called broken heart syndrome and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is an increasingly reported syndrome generally characterized by transient systolic dysfunction of the apical and or mid segments of the left ventricle that mimics myocardial infarction, in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Typically patients present within a few hours of exposure to physical or emotional stress. However, the mechanism by which these stressors result in myocardial dysfunction is unclear. Proposed factors include catecholamine excess and coronary vasospasm1. We present the case of a 61-year-old female who experienced acute pulmonary edema secondary to stress cardiomyopathy, on two occasions immediately after undergoing elective direct current cardioversion (DCCV for atrial fibrillation (Afib. After an urgent hospitalization for management of acute left ventricular failure, she made a complete clinical and echocardiographic recovery. The incidence, clinical implications and prognosis of DCCV induced SCM is unknown. Given DCCV for Afib is a common outpatient procedure and DCCV induced SCM can lead to acute clinical deterioration it is important that physicians are vigilant about this newly recognized DCCV complication.

  20. Current concepts of severe asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raundhal, Mahesh; Oriss, Timothy B.; Ray, Prabir; Wenzel, Sally E.

    2016-01-01

    The term asthma encompasses a disease spectrum with mild to very severe disease phenotypes whose traditional common characteristic is reversible airflow limitation. Unlike milder disease, severe asthma is poorly controlled by the current standard of care. Ongoing studies using advanced molecular and immunological tools along with improved clinical classification show that severe asthma does not identify a specific patient phenotype, but rather includes patients with constant medical needs, whose pathobiologic and clinical characteristics vary widely. Accordingly, in recent clinical trials, therapies guided by specific patient characteristics have had better outcomes than previous therapies directed to any subject with a diagnosis of severe asthma. However, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of the full scope of this disease that hinder the development of effective treatments for all severe asthmatics. In this Review, we discuss our current state of knowledge regarding severe asthma, highlighting different molecular and immunological pathways that can be targeted for future therapeutic development. PMID:27367183

  1. Current concepts in maxillofacial imaging

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    Boeddinghaus, Rudolf [Perth Radiological Clinic, 127 Hamersley Road, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008 (Australia)], E-mail: rboeddinghaus@perthradclinic.com.au; Whyte, Andy [Perth Radiological Clinic, 127 Hamersley Road, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008 (Australia)], E-mail: awhyte@perthradclinic.com.au

    2008-06-15

    A review of state-of-the-art maxillofacial imaging is presented. Current imaging techniques include intra-oral radiographs, dental panoramic tomography, multidetector helical computed tomography, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The commonest conditions encountered in clinical radiological practice are reviewed, including maxillofacial deformities, complicated dental impactions, maxillofacial trauma, jaw lesions (cysts, neoplasms, fibro-osseous lesions (FOLs) and infections), and temporomandibular joint pathology. Pre-operative assessment for dental implant placement is also briefly reviewed.

  2. Current concepts in maxillofacial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeddinghaus, Rudolf; Whyte, Andy

    2008-01-01

    A review of state-of-the-art maxillofacial imaging is presented. Current imaging techniques include intra-oral radiographs, dental panoramic tomography, multidetector helical computed tomography, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The commonest conditions encountered in clinical radiological practice are reviewed, including maxillofacial deformities, complicated dental impactions, maxillofacial trauma, jaw lesions (cysts, neoplasms, fibro-osseous lesions (FOLs) and infections), and temporomandibular joint pathology. Pre-operative assessment for dental implant placement is also briefly reviewed

  3. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Current Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Eun-Mi; Kittai, Adam; Tabbara, Imad A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common type of leukemia in adults, and while in early, asymptomatic stages treatment is not indicated, the threat to the quality of life and increased mortality of patients posed by more advanced-stage disease necessitate therapeutic intervention. Guidelines of when and how to treat are not well-established because CLL is a disease of the elderly and it is important to balance preservation of functional status and control of the disease. Advances in molecular and genetic profiling has led to the ability to identify sub-groups of patients with CLL whose disease may respond to selected therapy. This review discusses current standard therapies in the major sub-groups of CLL based on age and functional status, in both the front-line and relapsed/refractory settings. It also provides a concise review of novel agents that have shown considerable efficacy in CLL. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. [Current concepts on sudden death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Enrique; Narváez, René; Dorantes, Joel; Oseguera, Jorge; Orea, Arturo; Hernández, PabloR; Rebollar, Verónica; Mont, Lluís; Brugada, Josep

    2005-01-01

    Sudden death is defined as the death occurring less than one hour before the onset of the patient's symptoms. It is a severe condition considered a public health issue in several countries and in ours, it accounts for 33 000 to 53 000 annual deaths mainly related to ischemic heart disease. The main cause of sudden death are severe ventricular arrhythmias, but determining what patients are at risk for such an episode is complex, that is why risk stratification is usually a low cost-effective intervention. In the present study, we describe different sudden death risk-stratification strategies. Different sudden death treatment strategies regarding general population have different success rates in different countries, nevertheless, among select high risk populations; the best therapy currently available is the automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. We also discuss other treatment options. In Mexico it is deemed necessary to do an important effort for the early detection, prevention and treatment of sudden death in order to limit the consequences of this problem.

  5. Burning mouth syndrome: Current concepts

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    Cibele Nasri-Heir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a chronic pain condition. It has been described by the International Headache Society as "an intra-oral burning or dysesthetic sensation, recurring daily for more than 2 h/day for more than 3 months, without clinically evident causative lesions." BMS is frequently seen in women in the peri-menopausal and menopausal age group in an average female/male ratio of 7:1. The site most commonly affected is the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The patient may also report taste alterations and oral dryness along with the burning. The etiopathogenesis is complex and is not well-comprehended. The more accepted theories point toward a neuropathic etiology, but the gustatory system has also been implicated in this condition. BMS is frequently mismanaged, partly because it is not well-known among healthcare providers. Diagnosis of BMS is made after other local and systemic causes of burning have been ruled out as then; the oral burning is the disease itself. The management of BMS still remains a challenge. Benzodiazepines have been used in clinical practice as the first-line medication in the pharmacological management of BMS. Nonpharmacological management includes cognitive behavioral therapy and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. The aim of this review is to familiarize healthcare providers with the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and general characteristics of primary BMS while updating them with the current treatment options to better manage this group of patients.

  6. Current perspectives in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with the focus on patients in the Finnish population: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuusisto, Johanna; Sipola, Petri; Jääskeläinen, Pertti; Naukkarinen, Anita

    2016-11-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited heart disease, with the prevalence of about 1/500. During the last two decades, the knowledge of the etiology, pathogenesis, risk stratification and prevention of sudden death in HCM has substantially advanced. Most often, HCM is familial and caused by mutations in sarcomere genes, inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. In Finland, genetic background of HCM is unique, with a few founder mutations in cardiac sarcomere genes accounting for a considerable proportion of the disease. Pathogenic mechanisms induced by disease-causing mutations are still poorly understood, although alterations in intracellular calcium handling and inefficient generation of contractile force in myocytes are considered key features in triggering the hypertrophic response. Clinical features of the disease are highly variable from no symptoms to the spectrum of exertional dyspnea, angina, palpitations, syncope and sudden death. In the current patient care, implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are successfully used to prevent sudden cardiac death in high risk subjects. Targeted genetic testing is recommended to confirm the diagnosis in patients with HCM and to identify family members with the disease. Future research is needed to elucidate key cellular mechanisms leading to HCM, which may allow specific prevention and treatment of the disease. Key messages Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, most often caused by defects in sarcomere genes, is the most common inherited heart disease, and a common cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in athletes and young subjects. Cardiac imaging, ECG and genetic testing are pivotal in the diagnosis of the disease in patients and first-degree relatives. Implantable cardioverter defibrillators in patients with high risk for SCD and tailored pharmacotherapy are efficient tools in patient care, but so far, exact mechanisms leading to cardiac hypertrophy in HCM are only partially understood, and

  7. Thoracic endometriosis syndrome: Current concept in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Thoracic endometriosis is a rare pathology. The diagnosis is often delayed or missed, however recently, there has been significant advances in the knowledge of this condition and hence, an improvement in the diagnosis and treatment. Objective: To review the current concepts in the pathophysiology and ...

  8. Exercise Rehabilitation in Pediatric Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Somarriba, Gabriel; Extein, Jason; Miller, Tracie L.

    2008-01-01

    Children with cardiomyopathy carry significant risk of morbidity and mortality. New research and technology have brought about significant advancements to the diagnosis and clinical management of children with cardiomyopathy. However, currently heart transplantation remains the standard of care for children with symptomatic and progressive cardiomyopathy. Cardiovascular rehabilitation programs have yielded success in improving cardiac function, overall physical activity, and quality of life i...

  9. Diabetic foot infections: current concept review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberlee B. Hobizal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this manuscript is to provide a current concept review on the diagnosis and management of diabetic foot infections which are among the most serious and frequent complications encountered in patients with diabetes mellitus. A literature review on diabetic foot infections with emphasis on pathophysiology, identifiable risk factors, evaluation including physical examination, laboratory values, treatment strategies and assessing the severity of infection has been performed in detail. Diabetic foot infections are associated with high morbidity and risk factors for failure of treatment and classification systems are also described. Most diabetic foot infections begin with a wound and once an infection occurs, the risk of hospitalization and amputation increases dramatically. Early identification of infection and prompt treatment may optimize the patient's outcome and provide limb salvage.

  10. Current concepts in the pathophysiology of glaucoma

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    Agarwal Renu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is characterized by changes in the optic disc and visual field defects. The elevated intraocular pressure was considered the prime factor responsible for the glaucomatous optic neuropathy involving death of retinal ganglion cells and their axons. Extensive investigations into the pathophysiology of glaucoma now reveal the role of multiple factors in the development of retinal ganglion cell death. A better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy is crucial in the development of better therapeutic options. This review is an effort to summarize the current concepts in the pathophysiology of glaucoma so that newer therapeutic targets can be recognized. The literature available in the National Medical Library and online Pubmed search engine was used for literature review.

  11. (Some) current concepts in antibacterial drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geelen, Lasse; Meier, Dieter; Rehberg, Nidja; Kalscheuer, Rainer

    2018-04-01

    The rise of multidrug resistance in bacteria rendering pathogens unresponsive to many clinical drugs is widely acknowledged and considered a critical global healthcare issue. There is broad consensus that novel antibacterial chemotherapeutic options are extremely urgently needed. However, the development pipeline of new antibacterial drug lead structures is poorly filled and not commensurate with the scale of the problem since the pharmaceutical industry has shown reduced interest in antibiotic development in the past decades due to high economic risks and low profit expectations. Therefore, academic research institutions have a special responsibility in finding novel treatment options for the future. In this mini review, we want to provide a broad overview of the different approaches and concepts that are currently pursued in this research field.

  12. Recent developments and current concepts in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, N U; Mynarek, M; von Hoff, K; Friedrich, C; Resch, A; Rutkowski, S

    2014-04-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. While prognosis has significantly improved in the last decades with multimodal therapy including surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, one third of patients still succumb to their disease. Further research is needed to find more efficient treatment strategies for prognostically unfavorable patient groups and to minimize long-term sequelae of tumor treatment. This review gives a summary of the current state of treatment concepts including an outlook on the near future. We describe recent advances in the understanding of molecular mechanisms, their potential impact on risk stratification in upcoming clinical trials, and perspectives for the clinical implementation of targeted therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Current fusion power plant design concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gore, B.F.; Murphy, E.S.

    1976-09-01

    Nine current U.S. designs for fusion power plants are described in this document. Summary tabulations include a tenth concept, for which the design document was unavailable during preparation of the descriptions. The information contained in the descriptions was used to define an envelope of fusion power plant characteristics which formed the basis for definition of reference first commercial fusion power plant design. A brief prose summary of primary plant features introduces each of the descriptions contained in the body of this document. In addition, summary tables are presented. These tables summarize in side-by-side fashion, plant parameters, processes, combinations of materials used, requirements for construction materials, requirements for replacement materials during operation, and production of wastes.

  14. [Food allergies in paediatrics: Current concepts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza-Martin, Ana María

    2016-07-01

    The concept of allergic reaction currently includes all those where an immunological reaction depends on a reaction mediated by IgE, as well as those that involve other immune mechanisms, such as T-cell regulators. There are many different clinical situations, like the classic immediate reactions (IgE mediated) such as urticaria, angioedema, immediate vomiting, abdominal pain, both upper respiratory (aphonia or rhinitis) and lower (wheezing or dyspnoea) symptom, and cardiovascular symptoms. The reactions that involve more than one organ, such as anaphylaxis, which could be an anaphylactic shock if there is cardiovascular involvement. The clinical signs and symptoms produced by non-IgE mediated reactions are usually more insidious in how they start, such as vomiting hours after the ingestion of food in enterocolitis, diarrhoea after days or weeks from starting food, dermatitis sometime after starting food. In these cases it is more difficult to associate these clinical symptoms directly with food. In this article, we attempt to clarify some concepts such as sensitisation/allergy, allergen/allergenic source, or the relationship of different clinical situations with food allergy, in order to help the paediatrician on the one hand, to prescribe strict diets in case of a suspicion based on the cause/effect relationship with the food, and on the other hand not to introduce unnecessary diets that very often have to last an excessively long time, and could lead to nutritional deficiencies in the children. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Intra-articular calcaneal fractures. Current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M L

    1995-10-01

    Intra-articular fractures of the calcaneus should be treated like any other fractures of major weight-bearing joints. Technology has advanced significantly in the evaluation of such complex pathology. Surgical instrumentation is now available to address any fracture classification. In the past, this had been a problem, as maintenance of the anatomic reduction, rigid internal/dynamic external fixation, and early mobilization may not have been attainable. The two remaining major variables are the mechanism of injury and its force that creates the fracture in combination with a very complex intra-articular anatomical structure. There will always be some morbidity in complex and serious fractures, but at least a more favorable outcome may be attainable with application of the current concepts discussed in this text. Finally, the most crucial factor when dealing with this trauma is the skill of the surgeon, which includes his or her decision-making, preoperative planning, surgical acumen, atraumatic technique, experience, and training and postoperative management of possible complications.

  16. Safety pharmacology — Current and emerging concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdam, Junnat; Sethu, Swaminathan; Smith, Trevor; Alfirevic, Ana; Alhaidari, Mohammad; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Ayala, Mimieveshiofuo; Box, Helen; Cross, Michael; Delaunois, Annie; Dermody, Ailsa; Govindappa, Karthik; Guillon, Jean-Michel; Jenkins, Rosalind; Kenna, Gerry; Lemmer, Björn; Meecham, Ken; Olayanju, Adedamola; Pestel, Sabine; Rothfuss, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Safety pharmacology (SP) is an essential part of the drug development process that aims to identify and predict adverse effects prior to clinical trials. SP studies are described in the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) S7A and S7B guidelines. The core battery and supplemental SP studies evaluate effects of a new chemical entity (NCE) at both anticipated therapeutic and supra-therapeutic exposures on major organ systems, including cardiovascular, central nervous, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal. This review outlines the current practices and emerging concepts in SP studies including frontloading, parallel assessment of core battery studies, use of non-standard species, biomarkers, and combining toxicology and SP assessments. Integration of the newer approaches to routine SP studies may significantly enhance the scope of SP by refining and providing mechanistic insight to potential adverse effects associated with test compounds. - Highlights: • SP — mandatory non-clinical risk assessments performed during drug development. • SP organ system studies ensure the safety of clinical participants in FiH trials. • Frontloading in SP facilitates lead candidate drug selection. • Emerging trends: integrating SP-Toxicological endpoints; combined core battery tests

  17. Safety pharmacology — Current and emerging concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamdam, Junnat; Sethu, Swaminathan; Smith, Trevor; Alfirevic, Ana; Alhaidari, Mohammad [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Atkinson, Jeffrey [Lorraine University Pharmacolor Consultants Nancy PCN (France); Ayala, Mimieveshiofuo; Box, Helen; Cross, Michael [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Delaunois, Annie [UCB Pharma (Belgium); Dermody, Ailsa; Govindappa, Karthik [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Guillon, Jean-Michel [Sanofi-aventis (France); Jenkins, Rosalind [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Kenna, Gerry [Astra-Zeneca (United Kingdom); Lemmer, Björn [Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg (Germany); Meecham, Ken [Huntingdon Life Sciences (United Kingdom); Olayanju, Adedamola [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Pestel, Sabine [Boehringer-Ingelheim (Germany); Rothfuss, Andreas [Roche (Switzerland); and others

    2013-12-01

    Safety pharmacology (SP) is an essential part of the drug development process that aims to identify and predict adverse effects prior to clinical trials. SP studies are described in the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) S7A and S7B guidelines. The core battery and supplemental SP studies evaluate effects of a new chemical entity (NCE) at both anticipated therapeutic and supra-therapeutic exposures on major organ systems, including cardiovascular, central nervous, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal. This review outlines the current practices and emerging concepts in SP studies including frontloading, parallel assessment of core battery studies, use of non-standard species, biomarkers, and combining toxicology and SP assessments. Integration of the newer approaches to routine SP studies may significantly enhance the scope of SP by refining and providing mechanistic insight to potential adverse effects associated with test compounds. - Highlights: • SP — mandatory non-clinical risk assessments performed during drug development. • SP organ system studies ensure the safety of clinical participants in FiH trials. • Frontloading in SP facilitates lead candidate drug selection. • Emerging trends: integrating SP-Toxicological endpoints; combined core battery tests.

  18. Current progress in NIF target concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobby, P.L.; Foreman, L.R.; Thoma, D.J.; Jacobson, L.A.; Hollis, R.V.; Barrera, J.; Mitchell, M.A.; Salazar, M.A.; Salzer, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    Target concepts for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require progress in the art and science of target fabrication. Three distinct issues are addressed: beryllium fuel capsules, foam-buffered direct drive, and high-density gas-filled hohlraums. In all cases experiments on the existing Nova laser at LLNL are either in progress or planned for the near future to test the various concepts. Consequently, target fabrication must be able to deliver targets appropriate for each

  19. Current concepts in blood glucose monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadilkar, Kranti Shreesh; Bandgar, Tushar; Shivane, Vyankatesh; Lila, Anurag; Shah, Nalini

    2013-12-01

    Blood glucose monitoring has evolved over the last century. The concept of adequate glycemic control and minimum glycemic variability requires an ideal, accurate and reliable glucose monitoring system. The search for an ideal blood glucose monitoring system still continues. This review explains the various blood glucose monitoring systems with special focus on the monitoring systems like self- monitored blood glucose (SMBG) and continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS). It also focuses on the newer concepts of blood glucose monitoring and their incorporation in routine clinical management of diabetes mellitus.

  20. Current concepts in blood glucose monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kranti Shreesh Khadilkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood glucose monitoring has evolved over the last century. The concept of adequate glycemic control and minimum glycemic variability requires an ideal, accurate and reliable glucose monitoring system. The search for an ideal blood glucose monitoring system still continues. This review explains the various blood glucose monitoring systems with special focus on the monitoring systems like self- monitored blood glucose (SMBG and continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS. It also focuses on the newer concepts of blood glucose monitoring and their incorporation in routine clinical management of diabetes mellitus.

  1. Exercise in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: A review of current evidence, national guideline recommendations and a proposal for a new direction to fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindieh, Waseem; Adler, Arnon; Weissler-Snir, Adaya; Fourey, Dana; Harris, Sarah; Rakowski, Harry

    2017-04-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a common genetic disorder with a prevalence of 1:500 in the general population. Amongst a varied spectrum of clinical presentations, the most feared complication of this cardiac disorder is sudden cardiac death. Although only a minority of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who suffer sudden cardiac death or resuscitated cardiac arrest do so during exercise, strenuous physical activity is regarded as an important trigger for these tragic outcomes. Furthermore, during exercise, patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may develop augmentation of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, myocardial ischemia, diastolic dysfunction and/or inappropriate vasodilation in non-exercising vascular beds. This in turn may lead to exertional dyspnea, chest pain or syncope. Accordingly, patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are disqualified from competitive sports and in many cases are recommended to avoid strenuous physical activity of any kind. Nevertheless, avoidance of physical activity comes with a price. The positive effects of regular exercise have been extensively reported to convey a wide range of benefits including reduced cardiovascular events, weight reduction and improved wellbeing. Therefore, finding the right exercise level that will offer some of the benefits of physical activity without increasing the risk of sudden cardiac death is of utmost importance. In this review, we discuss the current evidence for and against exercise in this patient population and review national guideline recommendations. We also propose alternative fitness strategies including a novel fitness program implemented by our hypertrophic cardiomyopathy center which may be of particular usefulness for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Small Artery Remodeling: Current Concepts and Questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Akker, Jeroen; Schoorl, Marieke J. C.; Bakker, Erik N. T. P.; VanBavel, Ed

    2010-01-01

    Blood flow regulation by small arteries and arterioles includes adaptation of both vascular tone and structure. It is becoming clear that tone and remodeling of resistance vessels are highly interrelated. Indeed, concepts pointing to continuous resistance artery adaptation and plasticity are

  3. Current concepts in chronic inflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garn, Holger; Bahn, Sabine; Baune, Bernhard T

    2016-01-01

    ) to discuss recent developments in this field. These include a concept of biodiversity; the contribution of urbanization, lifestyle factors, and nutrition (eg, vitamin D); and new mechanisms of metabolic and immune dysregulation, such as extracellular and intracellular RNAs and cellular and mitochondrial...

  4. Current concepts in blood glucose monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Khadilkar, Kranti Shreesh; Bandgar, Tushar; Shivane, Vyankatesh; Lila, Anurag; Shah, Nalini

    2013-01-01

    Blood glucose monitoring has evolved over the last century. The concept of adequate glycemic control and minimum glycemic variability requires an ideal, accurate and reliable glucose monitoring system. The search for an ideal blood glucose monitoring system still continues. This review explains the various blood glucose monitoring systems with special focus on the monitoring systems like self- monitored blood glucose (SMBG) and continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS). It also focuses on t...

  5. Multimedia in the radiology environment: current concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H K; Arenson, R L; Lou, S L; Wong, A W; Andriole, K P; Bazzill, T M; Avrin, D

    1994-01-01

    Multimedia has different meanings according to its context. Here, multimedia in the radiology environment is defined as the integration of multiple radiology and medical information systems to facilitate the practice of radiology. These information systems include the hospital information system, radiology information system, picture archiving and communication systems, voice reporting, library information systems, and electronic mail and file systems. The concept of multimedia within the context of integration of these database systems will be presented. An example is given on how to access these information systems by a radiologist's desktop personal computer.

  6. MYOSITIS OSSIFICANS PROGRESSIVA-CURRENT CONCEPTS

    OpenAIRE

    Rohit; Madhuchandra; Sathish; Devadoss

    2014-01-01

    Myositis ossificans progressiva is a severe disabling disorder occurring as a rare sporadic or autosomal dominant disorder. 1 The incidence is about 1 in 2 million people with no particular predilictions. 2 It presents clinically with characteristic short great toes and heterotopic ossification involving multiple sites. 3 Current research points the defect to a receptor of Bone Morphogenic Protein which induces the ossification. The cumulative effect of the hetero...

  7. [Current concepts of pharmacotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabanova, R M

    2003-01-01

    Although there were essential achievements in understanding the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the mentioned pathologies still remain one of the most complicated problems in practical medicine. Rheumatologists arrived, during the last decade, at a conclusion on a need in an early aggressive therapy, because the destructive changes develop in joints yet during the first 4 months starting from the onset of initial RA clinical signs. The approach towards treatment by non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs changed with respect to the risk factors related with the onset of potential complications and to choosing the safest drugs, which became possible owing to the development of drugs, whose action is aimed at suppression of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COG-2). The group of "disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs" (DMARD) was added two new cytotoxic drugs, i.e. cyclosporin A and leflunomid. A concept of combined therapy by 2 or 3 DMARD was elaborated to ensure an effect in case of tolerance to monotherapy. The feasibility and safety of therapy by glucocorticosteroids both with small daily doses and with pulse therapy in extra aggressive RA variations were proven. The use of biological agents, i.e. of monoclonal antibodies to TNF alpha and IL-4 or of their receptors antagonists, is an absolutely new trend in RA treatment. Treatment safety is in the focus of attention; monitoring methods were designed to ensure such safety.

  8. Trochleoplasty in major trochlear dysplasia: current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaufils Philippe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Trochleoplasty is the theoretical solution to persistent symptoms (pain and/or instability related to trochlear dysplasia where there is not only a trochlear flatness but also a trochlear prominence. The threshold of prominence indicating surgical intervention has as yet not been determined. A bump of 5 mm is generally accepted as the inferior limit. Given the interventional nature of this demanding procedure, it should be proposed in selected cases after considerable discussion with the patient. Trochleoplasty is indicated as a primary procedure for major trochlear dysplasia with a prominence > 5 mm. Stabilization is obtained in most of the cases with the risk of residual mild anterior knee pain. It is also indicated as a salvage procedure when a previous surgery failed. Despite the reputation of the procedure, the published results are encouraging in terms of prevention of re-dislocation, satisfaction index, and radiological outcomes. Post-operative stiffness is the main complication, which may require manipulation under anaesthesia or arthroscopic arthrolysis. There are few other complications reported and to date secondary necrosis of the trochlea has not been reported. Technically speaking, the deepening trochleoplasty is a difficult procedure without reliable landmarks. We propose a recession wedge trochleoplasty which is an easier procedure. It is never undertaken as an isolated procedure, but always in conjunction with other realignment procedures of the extensor apparatus according to the "a la carte" surgery concept.

  9. Stereotactic radiosurgery: basic concepts and current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaur, Maheep Singh

    2016-01-01

    Term Stereotactic Radiosurgery was coined by Prof Lars Leksell in 1951 as concept. Leksell's experimented together with the radiobiologist Borje Larsson in Uppsala, on trying to develop 'stereotactic radiosurgery', aimed at lesioning in the central brain in functional operations such as thalamotomy and capsulotomy. Clinical experiments using a proton beam were initiated at the Gustav Werner Institute in Uppsala, and a few patients had been treated. Experiences from these led Leksell to design a multi-source 'beam knife', which became ready for use in 1967 as the first 'Gamma Knife' and installed at the private hospital Sophiahammet in Stockholm as a clinical research unit. Moving from functional neurosurgery today Gamma knife is used for a wide range on brain tumors, vascular malformations and functional disorders. Introduction of newer technology in navigation and radiation delivery has made it possible to do whole body Radiosurgery. Various technologies, basic principles, radiobiological aspects and applications will be discussed. (author)

  10. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in South African Blacks | Lewis | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has been considered rare among the Black population of southern Africa. We report 7 patients with the disease who presented during a 14-month period. Current concepts in the approach to the diagnosis and treatment of HCM are discussed. It is possible that with greater awareness of ...

  11. Electrical cardiac injuries: current concepts and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Victor; Narayanan, Kumar; Combes, Nicolas; Jost, Daniel; Jouven, Xavier; Marijon, Eloi

    2017-04-20

    Electrical injuries are a commonly encountered hazard in both the home and workplace. However, clinicians are often uncomfortable when faced with the patient who presents with an electric shock due to sparse literature and lack of systematic recommendations on this topic. Electrical injuries can range from minor skin burns to life threatening internal organ damage. A thorough clinical assessment to ascertain the path of current through the body and possible internal injury is essential. The main concern in an apparently stable individual after an electric shock is the potential for delayed occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias which will require monitoring in the intensive care setting. While it may be reasonable to discharge home from the emergency room selected patients with low voltage injuries, absence of syncope and a normal ECG, others may require monitoring for at least 24 h. Public education and increasing workplace as well as home safety measures are key steps in prevention. The present review summarizes current knowledge in pathophysiology, manifestations and management of electrical injuries, with specific focus on cardiac effects. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Bone regeneration: current concepts and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGonagle Dennis

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bone regeneration is a complex, well-orchestrated physiological process of bone formation, which can be seen during normal fracture healing, and is involved in continuous remodelling throughout adult life. However, there are complex clinical conditions in which bone regeneration is required in large quantity, such as for skeletal reconstruction of large bone defects created by trauma, infection, tumour resection and skeletal abnormalities, or cases in which the regenerative process is compromised, including avascular necrosis, atrophic non-unions and osteoporosis. Currently, there is a plethora of different strategies to augment the impaired or 'insufficient' bone-regeneration process, including the 'gold standard' autologous bone graft, free fibula vascularised graft, allograft implantation, and use of growth factors, osteoconductive scaffolds, osteoprogenitor cells and distraction osteogenesis. Improved 'local' strategies in terms of tissue engineering and gene therapy, or even 'systemic' enhancement of bone repair, are under intense investigation, in an effort to overcome the limitations of the current methods, to produce bone-graft substitutes with biomechanical properties that are as identical to normal bone as possible, to accelerate the overall regeneration process, or even to address systemic conditions, such as skeletal disorders and osteoporosis.

  13. Current Concepts in Sports-Related Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Dipal; Frumberg, David B; Mulchandani, Neil B; Eldib, Ahmed M; Xavier, Fred; Barbash, Scott E; Saha, Subrata; Urban, William P

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, specifically concussion, is prevalent in contact sports. In the United States (US) each year, 170 million adults participate in physical recreational activities, and 38 million children and adolescents participate in organized sports. The Centers for Disease Control estimate that in this group ~1.6 to 3.8 million concussions occur annually. Recent class-action lawsuits in the US filed by professional athletes against their respective leagues allege negligence in protecting them from concussions, and this has contributed to the attention received in the popular media. In response, concussion-related publications have increased exponentially during the past several years. Recent studies have challenged earlier assumptions that the effects of concussion are transient. Stronger links between concussion and neurodegenerative processes such as Alzheimer's disease-like conditions, depression, and heightened risk for suicide are being elucidated. In this article, we explore the current knowledge on concussion, including pathophysiology, management, and long-term effects. We conclude that more evidence-based results regarding guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, and return to play (RTP) are needed and should be the focus of future investigations. Attributing the etiology of certain neurodegenerative conditions to a history of concussion has been suggested in the current literature, but additional quantitative data regarding the pathophysiology and causality are needed as well. Bioengineers can have an important role in measuring the dynamic forces encountered during head impacts and their effects on the brain. These results can be effective in designing better helmets as well as improved playing surfaces to reduce the impact of such injuries. At this time, we believe that groups of people with heightened risk for concussion should be followed closely during longer periods of time and compared to matched controls. Such long-term studies are urgently

  14. Current Concepts in Sports Injury Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Himmat; Dhilllon, Sidak; Dhillon, Mandeep S

    2017-01-01

    In the modern era, rehabilitation after sports injury has become a domain for specialists, and its evolution has necessarily brought together the sports physiotherapist, the sports physician, and the orthopedic surgeon. The changing profile of sports related injury, as well as limited availability of facilities for rehabilitation in many areas of India, is a matter of concern. Elite sportspersons have some protection, but the average athlete is often left to fend for himself. Key factors in successful sports injury rehabilitation protocols are the application of modern rehabilitation protocols under appropriate supervision, appropriate and well timed surgical interventions, and judicious and need based use of pharmaceutical agents. Modern rehabilitation protocols emphasize teamwork and proper rehabilitation planning, and the rehabilitation team has to be lead by a trained sports physiotherapist, with an understanding of the protocols and interventions required at various stages. Injury specific rehabilitation protocols are being practiced worldwide but need to be introduced according to the nature of the sport as well as available facilities. Even in India, sports physicians are increasingly joining specialist rehabilitation teams, and they can help with medication, nutritional supplements, and specialized tests that could improve injury understanding. Inputs from surgeons are mandatory if surgical interventions have been performed. What is often missing in the underdeveloped world is psychological support and a clear understanding by the athlete of his/her rehabilitation protocols. World over, the primary aims are safe return to sports and minimizing reinjury on return to sport; this involves rehabilitation in stages, and current methodology clearly demarcates acute and chronic phases of injury. Close coordination with trainers and coaches is mandatory, and all need to understand that the reconditioning phase is crucial; skill assessment before progression has now

  15. Current Concepts in Sports Injury Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Himmat; Dhilllon, Sidak; Dhillon, Mandeep S

    2017-01-01

    In the modern era, rehabilitation after sports injury has become a domain for specialists, and its evolution has necessarily brought together the sports physiotherapist, the sports physician, and the orthopedic surgeon. The changing profile of sports related injury, as well as limited availability of facilities for rehabilitation in many areas of India, is a matter of concern. Elite sportspersons have some protection, but the average athlete is often left to fend for himself. Key factors in successful sports injury rehabilitation protocols are the application of modern rehabilitation protocols under appropriate supervision, appropriate and well timed surgical interventions, and judicious and need based use of pharmaceutical agents. Modern rehabilitation protocols emphasize teamwork and proper rehabilitation planning, and the rehabilitation team has to be lead by a trained sports physiotherapist, with an understanding of the protocols and interventions required at various stages. Injury specific rehabilitation protocols are being practiced worldwide but need to be introduced according to the nature of the sport as well as available facilities. Even in India, sports physicians are increasingly joining specialist rehabilitation teams, and they can help with medication, nutritional supplements, and specialized tests that could improve injury understanding. Inputs from surgeons are mandatory if surgical interventions have been performed. What is often missing in the underdeveloped world is psychological support and a clear understanding by the athlete of his/her rehabilitation protocols. World over, the primary aims are safe return to sports and minimizing reinjury on return to sport; this involves rehabilitation in stages, and current methodology clearly demarcates acute and chronic phases of injury. Close coordination with trainers and coaches is mandatory, and all need to understand that the reconditioning phase is crucial; skill assessment before progression has now

  16. Current concepts in sports injury rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himmat Dhillon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the modern era, rehabilitation after sports injury has become a domain for specialists, and its evolution has necessarily brought together the sports physiotherapist, the sports physician, and the orthopedic surgeon. The changing profile of sports related injury, as well as limited availability of facilities for rehabilitation in many areas of India, is a matter of concern. Elite sportspersons have some protection, but the average athlete is often left to fend for himself. Key factors in successful sports injury rehabilitation protocols are the application of modern rehabilitation protocols under appropriate supervision, appropriate and well timed surgical interventions, and judicious and need based use of pharmaceutical agents. Modern rehabilitation protocols emphasize teamwork and proper rehabilitation planning, and the rehabilitation team has to be lead by a trained sports physiotherapist, with an understanding of the protocols and interventions required at various stages. Injury specific rehabilitation protocols are being practiced worldwide but need to be introduced according to the nature of the sport as well as available facilities. Even in India, sports physicians are increasingly joining specialist rehabilitation teams, and they can help with medication, nutritional supplements, and specialized tests that could improve injury understanding. Inputs from surgeons are mandatory if surgical interventions have been performed. What is often missing in the underdeveloped world is psychological support and a clear understanding by the athlete of his/her rehabilitation protocols. World over, the primary aims are safe return to sports and minimizing reinjury on return to sport; this involves rehabilitation in stages, and current methodology clearly demarcates acute and chronic phases of injury. Close coordination with trainers and coaches is mandatory, and all need to understand that the reconditioning phase is crucial; skill assessment before

  17. Current Concepts on Gastric Carcinoid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George C. Nikou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric carcinoid tumors (GCs are rare lesions representing less than 10% of carcinoid tumors and less than 1% of all stomach neoplasms. There are three distinct types of gastric carcinoids; type I includes the vast majority (70–85% of these neoplasms that are closely linked to chronic atrophic gastritis. Type II which accounts for 5–10 %, is associated with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and often occurs in the context of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. Type III, finally, represents 15–25% of gastric carcinoids and is characterized by a far more aggressive course. The optimal clinical approach to GCs remains to be elucidated, depending upon type, size, and number of carcinoids. While there is universal agreement about the surgical treatment of type III GCs, current options for type I and II include simple surveillance, endoscopic polypectomy, surgical excision associated with or without surgical antrectomy, or total gastrectomy. Moreover, the introduction of somatostatin analogues could represent another therapeutic option.

  18. Dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatore, M.; Cuocolo, A.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclide techniques are easily obtainable, noninvasive examinations that provide useful information in the evaluation, diagnosis and management of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. The gated blood pool scan allows the assessment of ventricular size, configuration, and wall and septal thickness. These data allow the functional class of the cardiomyopathy (congestive, restrictive or hypertrophic) to be defined. Often THallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging adds further information and is particularly useful in distinguishing congestive cardiomyopathy from severe coronary artery disease and in depicting septal abnormalities in hipertrophic cardiomyopathy. Useful as these techniques are, they are not substitutes for conventional approaches to diagnosis. Careful history taking and physical examination, as well as scrutiny of the electrocardiogram, chest X-ray and echocardiogram should be standard practice for the evaluation of patients with suspected cardiomyopathy. Judicious use of noninvasive techniques may obviate the need for cardiac catheterization in many patients

  19. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pregnant women. The pathophysiology is poorly understood. Echocardiography is central to diagnosis of PPCM and effective treatment monitoring in patients of PPCM. The outcome ... Keywords: Cardiomyopathy, Echocardiography, Peripartum, Pregnancy ... complicated by pre‑eclampsia, gestational hypertension,.

  20. Dilated cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Valve replacement or repair For advanced cardiomyopathy: A heart transplant may be recommended if standard treatments have not ... accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health ...

  1. Restrictive Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be mistaken for a condition called constrictive pericarditis. This condition causes the sac-like membrane around ... inflamed and thickened. Surgery can usually correct constrictive pericarditis. On the other hand, restrictive cardiomyopathy cannot be ...

  2. Novel Approach Targeting the Complex Pathophysiology of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: The Impact of Late Sodium Current Inhibition on Exercise Capacity in Subjects with Symptomatic Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (LIBERTY-HCM) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivotto, Iacopo; Hellawell, Jennifer L; Farzaneh-Far, Ramin; Blair, Christiana; Coppini, Raffaele; Myers, Jonathan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Maron, Martin S

    2016-03-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited cardiac disorder, with an overall prevalence of at least 1:500 in the adult population although only a fraction of affected patients come to clinical recognition. It is also the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in young adults and a major cause of morbidity caused by chronic heart failure symptoms. However, more than half a century since the original description of the disease, there is no currently approved therapy for the treatment of patients with HCM, and to date there have been only 5 randomized studies of medical therapies in HCM. As such, unmet medical need in HCM has been highlighted by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) as a research priority. Encouragingly, the infrastructure needed to conduct rigorous clinical trials in HCM has recently emerged because of the heightened awareness and understanding of the disease, development of clinical centers of excellence, and advances in diagnostic imaging. In this article, we will discuss the complex pathophysiology of HCM, review the current therapeutic landscape, describe new mechanistic insights into the central role of the late sodium current in HCM, and introduce the scientific rationale and execution of the Impact of Late Sodium Current Inhibition on Exercise Capacity in Subjects with Symptomatic Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (LIBERTY-HCM) trial, the largest randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial, now underway, designed to evaluate the effect of a novel pharmacological approach in patients with symptomatic HCM. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02291237. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman W. El-Hattab

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform a variety of essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA while more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA. Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs of various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20-40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular noncompaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain (ETC complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial tRNAs, rRNAs, ribosomal proteins, and translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia.

  4. Review of the current status of linear hybrid reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, K.R.

    1977-07-01

    A review was made of the current status of linear fusion-fission hybrid reactor design studies in the USA. The linear hybrid reactor concepts reviewed include the linear theta-pinch hybrid reactor being studied at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, the electron beam-heated solenoid hybrid reactor under development at Physics International Co., the laser-heated solenoid hybrid reactor being investigated at Mathematical Sciences Northwest, Inc., and the linear fusion waste burning reactor being studied at General Atomic Company. The discussion addresses confinement and heating mechanisms for each concept, as well as the hybrid blanket designs. The current state of the four reactor designs is summarized and the performance of the various concepts compared

  5. current concepts in the management of anterior urethral strictures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iam

    Nigerian journal Of Surgical Research. 103. Vol 8 No 3 – 4 ,2006 ;103 -110. Mini Review. Current concepts in the management of anterior urethral strictures. 1. I. A. Mungadi and. 2. N. H. Mbibu. 1Urology Unit Department of Surgery Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto and 2Ahmadu. Bello University ...

  6. Concepts Concerning 'Disease\\' Causation, Control, and the current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is an ethical necessity that doctors understand the complex social, political, environmental and economic dynamics involved in infectious disease outbreaks. This article discusses some important concepts concerning 'disease' causation and control with specific reference to the current cholera outbreak in Zimbabwe ...

  7. Current concepts in the management of anterior urethral strictures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods A review of current concepts in anatomy and the patho-physiologic mechanisms of the anterior stricture has been done. A structured literature search through a MEDLINE search was performed. New urethral substitutes have been compared to other techniques of urethroplasty as seen over the. last decade.

  8. Microfibrillar cardiomyopathy: A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narender Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfibrillar cardiomyopathy is a very rare cause of restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM. The index case was a male patient who presented with shortness of breath and pedal edema. Further clinical investigations favored a clinical diagnosis of RCM. An endomyocardial biopsy revealed subendocardial and interstitial hyaline eosinophillic material resembling amyloid that did not stain with Congo red. An electron microscopic examination showed that this material was composed of twisted linear and bundles of tangled microfibrils. The etiology of the microfibrillar deposition is currently unknown. The pathologists should entertain the diagnosis of microfibrillar cardiomyopathy in suspected cases of amyloidosis that are negative for Congo red.

  9. The concept of electronegativity. The current state of the problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherkasov, Artem R; Galkin, Vladimir I; Zueva, Ekaterina M; Cherkasov, Rafael A

    1998-01-01

    A systematic account is given of the current ideas about atomic and group electronegativities and the trends in the development of the concept of electronegativity are analysed. Attention is concentrated on the latest approaches to the definition of electronegativity - the concept of 'orbital' electronegativities and the density functional theory. A procedure is proposed for the determination of 'inductive' electronegativities, which permits a correct theoretical calculation of the electronegativity of a substituent from the electronegativities of individual atoms and the steric structure. It is shown that the approach developed has a series of important advantages - for example, it makes it possible to calculate the group electronegativities of isomeric substituents avoiding the principle of the equalisation of electronegativities. A survey of literature data and generalisation of the method proposed by the authors have made it possible to formulate the concept of electronegativity as an unchanging fundamental immanent characteristic of a chemical element. The bibliography includes 222 references.

  10. Cardiomyopathy in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Wahbi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    According to the American Heart Association, cardiomyopathies are classified as primary (solely or predominantly confined to heart muscle), secondary (those showing pathological myocardial involvement as part of a neuromuscular disorder) and those in which cardiomyopathy is the first/predominant manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder. Cardiomyopathies may be further classified as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, or unclassified cardiomyopathy (noncompaction, Takotsubo-cardiomyopathy). This review focuses on secondary cardiomyopathies and those in which cardiomyopathy is the predominant manifestation of a myopathy. Any of them may cause neurological disease, and any of them may be a manifestation of a neurological disorder. Neurological disease most frequently caused by cardiomyopathies is ischemic stroke, followed by transitory ischemic attack, syncope, or vertigo. Neurological disease, which most frequently manifests with cardiomyopathies are the neuromuscular disorders. Most commonly associated with cardiomyopathies are muscular dystrophies, myofibrillar myopathies, congenital myopathies and metabolic myopathies. Management of neurological disease caused by cardiomyopathies is not at variance from the same neurological disorders due to other causes. Management of secondary cardiomyopathies is not different from that of cardiomyopathies due to other causes either. Patients with neuromuscular disorders require early cardiologic investigations and close follow-ups, patients with cardiomyopathies require neurological investigation and avoidance of muscle toxic medication if a neuromuscular disorder is diagnosed. Which patients with cardiomyopathy profit most from primary stroke prevention is unsolved and requires further investigations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Current concepts in wound management and wound healing products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Jacqueline R

    2015-05-01

    Current concepts in wound management are summarized. The emphasis is on selection of the contact layer of the bandage to promote a moist wound environment. Selection of an appropriate contact layer is based on the stage of wound healing and the amount of wound exudate. The contact layer can be used to promote autolytic debridement and enhance wound healing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MUSCLE STRETCHING FOR EXERCISE AND REHABILITATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Stretching is a common activity used by athletes, older adults, rehabilitation patients, and anyone participating in a fitness program. While the benefits of stretching are known, controversy remains about the best type of stretching for a particular goal or outcome. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to discuss the current concepts of muscle stretching interventions and summarize the evidence related to stretching as used in both exercise and rehabilitation. PMID:22319684

  13. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MUSCLE STRETCHING FOR EXERCISE AND REHABILITATION

    OpenAIRE

    Page, Phil

    2012-01-01

    Stretching is a common activity used by athletes, older adults, rehabilitation patients, and anyone participating in a fitness program. While the benefits of stretching are known, controversy remains about the best type of stretching for a particular goal or outcome. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to discuss the current concepts of muscle stretching interventions and summarize the evidence related to stretching as used in both exercise and rehabilitation.

  14. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiese, Signe; Hove, Jens D; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Cirrhosis is known to cause alterations in the systemic haemodynamic system. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy designates a cardiac dysfunction that includes impaired cardiac contractility with systolic and diastolic dysfunction, as well as electromechanical abnormalities in the absence of other known...... causes of cardiac disease. This condition is primarily revealed by inducing physical or pharmacological stress, but echocardiography is excellent at revealing diastolic dysfunction and might also be used to detect systolic dysfunction at rest. Furthermore, measurement of circulating levels of cardiac...

  15. Current concepts in the diagnosis and treatment of shoulder impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijayendra Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS is a very common cause of shoulder pain in the young adults. It can cause debilitating pain, dysfunction, and affects the activities of daily living. It represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy which can ultimately lead to degenerative tear of the rotator cuff. Various theories and concepts have been described and it is still a matter of debate. However, most published studies suggest that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors have a role in the development of SIS. The management is controversial as both nonoperative and operative treatments have shown to provide good results. This article aims to provide a comprehensive current concepts review of the pathogenesis, etiologies, clinical diagnosis, appropriate use of investigations, and discussion on the management of SIS.

  16. Current Concepts in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Shoulder Impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bijayendra; Bakti, Nik; Gulihar, Abhinav

    2017-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) is a very common cause of shoulder pain in the young adults. It can cause debilitating pain, dysfunction, and affects the activities of daily living. It represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy which can ultimately lead to degenerative tear of the rotator cuff. Various theories and concepts have been described and it is still a matter of debate. However, most published studies suggest that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors have a role in the development of SIS. The management is controversial as both nonoperative and operative treatments have shown to provide good results. This article aims to provide a comprehensive current concepts review of the pathogenesis, etiologies, clinical diagnosis, appropriate use of investigations, and discussion on the management of SIS.

  17. Current Concepts in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Shoulder Impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bijayendra; Bakti, Nik; Gulihar, Abhinav

    2017-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) is a very common cause of shoulder pain in the young adults. It can cause debilitating pain, dysfunction, and affects the activities of daily living. It represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy which can ultimately lead to degenerative tear of the rotator cuff. Various theories and concepts have been described and it is still a matter of debate. However, most published studies suggest that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors have a role in the development of SIS. The management is controversial as both nonoperative and operative treatments have shown to provide good results. This article aims to provide a comprehensive current concepts review of the pathogenesis, etiologies, clinical diagnosis, appropriate use of investigations, and discussion on the management of SIS. PMID:28966374

  18. Current Concepts in the Management of Meconium Aspiration Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chettri, Subhash; Bhat, B Vishnu; Adhisivam, B

    2016-10-01

    In developing countries, meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among neonates. The concepts of pathophysiology and management of meconium stained amniotic fluid (MSAF) and meconium aspiration syndrome have undergone tremendous change in recent years. Routine intranatal and postnatal endotracheal suctioning of meconium in vigorous infants is no longer recommended. Recent studies have challenged its role even in non-vigorous infants. Supportive therapy like oxygen supplementation, mechanical ventilation and intravenous fluids are the cornerstone in the management of meconium aspiration syndrome. Availability of surfactant, inhaled nitric oxide, high frequency ventilators and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation has made it possible to salvage more infants with meconium aspiration syndrome. In this review the authors have discussed the current concepts in the pathophysiology and management of MAS. Drugs in trials and future therapeutic targets are also discussed briefly.

  19. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: a review of current diagnostic strategies concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Sebastián Frías-Ordoñez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is a state of carbohydrate intolerance that is first recognized during pregnancy. The initial criteria for diagnosis were established more than 50 years ago by O’Sullivan & Mahan, and since then, some modifications have been made. Currently, diagnosis considers two methods: the onestep approach, consisting of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT for 2 hours with 75g of glucose, and the two-step approach, which involves an initial screening test with 50g of glucose and OGTT with 100g of glucose if screening is positive. Both diagnostic approaches have been justified by expert consensus; however, an absolute concept about the method to be applied has not been established yet. To select a method, the clinician must take into account various factors. This paper proposes a historical overview and the presentation of the current status of GDM diagnosis.

  20. Current Concepts in Tissue Engineering: Skin and Wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenhaus, Mayer; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver

    2016-09-01

    Pure regenerative healing with little to no donor morbidity remains an elusive goal for both surgeon and patient. The ability to engineer and promote the development of like tissue holds so much promise, and efforts in this direction are slowly but steadily advancing. Products selected and reviewed reflect historical precedence and importance and focus on current clinically available products in use. Emerging technologies we anticipate will further expand our therapeutic options are introduced. The topic of tissue engineering is incredibly broad in scope, and as such the authors have focused their review on that of constructs specifically designed for skin and wound healing. A review of pertinent and current clinically related literature is included. Products such as biosynthetics, biologics, cellular promoting factors, and commercially available matrices can be routinely found in most modern health care centers. Although to date no complete regenerative or direct identical soft-tissue replacement exists, currently available commercial components have proven beneficial in augmenting and improving some types of wound healing scenarios. Cost, directed specificity, biocompatibility, and bioburden tolerance are just some of the impending challenges to adoption. Quality of life and in fact the ability to sustain life is dependent on our most complex and remarkable organ, skin. Although pure regenerative healing and engineered soft-tissue constructs elude us, surgeons and health care providers are slowly gaining comfort and experience with concepts and strategies to improve the healing of wounds.

  1. OSTEOARTHRITIS: CURRENT CLINICAL CONCEPT AND SOME PROMISING THERAPEUTIC APPROACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a trend toward changing the clinical concept of osteoarthritis (OA. This disease has been considered as an age-related disease and the long-term result of a current pathological process for a very long time. However, many experts are now inclined to consider it necessary to identify the early, pre-X-ray stage of OA, when adequate treatment may not only halt the progression, but also achieve the regression of joint structural changes. This review deals with a number of pathogenetic and clinical aspects of the early stages of OA, which are important for timely diagnosis and pathogenetic therapy choice. It also considers some therapeutic approaches, both a "classic" and recently actively discussed methods for using platelet-rich plasma and autologous chondrocyte transplantation.

  2. Otto Warburg's contributions to current concepts of cancer metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppenol, Willem H; Bounds, Patricia L; Dang, Chi V

    2011-05-01

    Otto Warburg pioneered quantitative investigations of cancer cell metabolism, as well as photosynthesis and respiration. Warburg and co-workers showed in the 1920s that, under aerobic conditions, tumour tissues metabolize approximately tenfold more glucose to lactate in a given time than normal tissues, a phenomenon known as the Warburg effect. However, this increase in aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells is often erroneously thought to occur instead of mitochondrial respiration and has been misinterpreted as evidence for damage to respiration instead of damage to the regulation of glycolysis. In fact, many cancers exhibit the Warburg effect while retaining mitochondrial respiration. We re-examine Warburg's observations in relation to the current concepts of cancer metabolism as being intimately linked to alterations of mitochondrial DNA, oncogenes and tumour suppressors, and thus readily exploitable for cancer therapy.

  3. Current concepts and future approaches to vestibular rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjernström, Fredrik; Zur, Oz; Jahn, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades methods of vestibular rehabilitation to enhance adaptation to vestibular loss, habituation to changing sensory conditions, and sensory reweighting in the compensation process have been developed. However, the use of these techniques still depends to a large part on the educational background of the therapist. Individualized assessment of deficits and specific therapeutic programs for different disorders are sparse. Currently, vestibular rehabilitation is often used in an unspecific way in dizzy patients irrespective of the clinical findings. When predicting the future of vestibular rehabilitation, it is tempting to foretell advances in technology for assessment and treatment only, but the current intense exchange between clinicians and basic scientists also predicts advances in truly understanding the complex interactions between the peripheral senses and central adaptation mechanisms. More research is needed to develop reliable techniques to measure sensory dependence and to learn how this knowledge can be best used--by playing off the patient's sensory strength or working on the weakness. To be able using the emerging concepts, the neuro-otological community must strive to educate physicians, physiotherapists and nurses to perform the correct examinations for assessment of individual deficits and to look for factors that might impede rehabilitation.

  4. Cardiomyopathies and anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Juneja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathy is considered as a heart muscle disease of multiple aetiologies, unlike other cardiac diseases related to a definitive pathophysiology. With more and more research and with the advent of genetic analysis pin pointing the disease causing mutations, causative factors have been defined and classifications and definitions have changed over time. Patients with these conditions present to anaesthesiologists in elective and emergency situations, placement of automated internal cardioverter defibrillator (AICD devices or biventricular pacing but may also be diagnosed at anaesthetic pre-assessment. We describe cardiomyopathies such as dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, post-partum cardiomyopathy and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in brief and their anaesthetic management.

  5. Current concepts on the functional somatic syndromes and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantoni, Francesco; Salvetti, Giovanni; Manfredini, Daniele; Bosco, Mario

    2007-01-01

    The importance of psychosocial factors in the etiopathogenesis of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) has led to the hypothesis that these disorders may be part of a wider group of somatoform disorders, the functional somatic syndromes (FSS). Types of studies reviewed. The present paper is an overview summarizing the current concepts on the TMD-FSS relationship. A non-systematic search in the Medline database identified peer-reviewed papers on the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the complex groups of disorders labelled functional somatic syndromes, focusing on the common features to temporomandibular disorders patients. Literature data suggest that FSS and TMD share many etiopathogenetic and epidemiological features, both groups of disorders having a multifactorial etiopathogenesis and needing a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and treatment. Psychosocial characteristics of patients seem to have many similarities and the prevalence of Axis I psychiatric disorders is elevated. The majority of studies focused on the relationship between TMD and fibromyalgia (FM), due to the high rate of orofacial involvement related to FM. Clinical implications. The presence of common features between TMD and FSS patient may suggest the need for changes in the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to TMD patients, with the introduction of treatment protocols which also address the psychosocial impairment accompanying TMD symptoms, in order to overcome the limits of traditional therapies.

  6. [Current treatment concepts for olecranon and prepatellar bursitis in Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, S F; Michel, M; Wyen, H; Buschmann, C T; Kdolsky, R; Kanz, K-G

    2013-04-01

    The limited evidence available on the diagnosis and treatment of olecranon and prepatellar bursitis indicates nationally varying treatment approaches. Therefore the aim of this study was to survey the current treatment concepts of olecranon and prepatellar bursitis in Austria. An online questionnaire comprising of demographic data, questions regarding diagnostics and differentiation between septic bursitis (SB) and non-septic bursitis (NSB) as well as two case reports for therapy appraisal were sent to members of the Austrian Society of Orthopaedics and Orthopaedic Surgery (ÖGO) and the Austrian Society of Traumatology (ÖGU). The overall response rates were 46 % (ÖGU)/12 % (ÖGO). Differentiation between SB and NSB was predominantly based on medical history/clinical presentation (ÖGU: 100 %/ÖGO: 84 %) and blood sampling (ÖGU: 82 %/ÖGO: 77 %). 64/36 % of surveyed members of ÖGO/OGU performed a bursal aspiration. 95/55 % of Austrian ÖGU opinion leaders favoured a surgical treatment approach in cases of SB/NSB. Conversely, ÖGO members rather favoured a conservative treatment approach (28/27 %). Significant differences were found between ÖGO and ÖGU, with the latter favouring a surgical treatment approach in cases of SB and NSB. However, the international literature argues for a conservative treatment approach. Further high quality research is needed to establish an evidence-based treatment approach. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. The Unstable Elbow: Current Concepts in Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashjian, Robert Z; Wolf, Brian R; van Riet, Roger P; Steinmann, Scott P

    2016-01-01

    Elbow instability is common and may occur after a variety of injuries, including falls or direct blows. Instability can be classified as either acute or chronic. Acute instability is classified as simple (without fracture) or complex (with associated fracture). Chronic instability is classified as a chronically dislocated or recurrently unstable elbow. Recurrent instability commonly presents as isolated medial or lateral collateral ligament insufficiency. A chronically dislocated elbow is often more complex, involving both osseous and ligamentous injuries. The treatment of simple dislocations typically involves closed reduction and nonsurgical management. Chronic recurrent lateral and medial collateral ligament insufficiencies have very different clinical characteristics, but definitive treatment frequently involves ligament reconstruction. Complex instability usually requires surgery, which includes open reduction and internal fixation of coronoid and olecranon fractures, repair or replacement of radial head fractures, and lateral collateral ligament repair. Medial collateral ligament repair and/or external fixation are rarely required to restore stability. It is important for surgeons to understand current concepts in the diagnosis and management of acute and chronic elbow instability as well as the preferred surgical treatments and techniques for the management of these injuries.

  8. Current concepts in the management of shoulder instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Srinivasan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder instability ranges from subtle instability to frank dislocation. Our understanding on the subject is getting better. Patient lifestyle, increased awareness/expectations, better availability of information, improved imaging modalities, and increased awareness about the previously less known concepts in instability all add to the challenges of managing the problem. History and clinical examination without over reliance on imaging remain essential. We used Embase, PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network and Google Scholar search for published literature in English. We used various combinations of the keywords, namely, human shoulder instability, sports injuries, dislocation, surgery, latarjet, glenohumeral, glenoid, and arthroscopy from 1980 to March 2017. The systematic search captured 310 publications. After applying initial exclusion criteria, 41 abstracts were assessed for eligibility. Of these, we selected 20 full-text articles with the majority of focus primarily on surgical management of traumatic shoulder instability. A tailor-made approach for the management of the individual patient is essential and should involve shared decision making. In this article, we have tried to simplify and present the current evidence in the management of traumatic shoulder instability, particularly in sportsperson.

  9. MR imaging in cardiomyopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, S.; Riessen, R.

    2005-01-01

    According to the WHO classification, cardiomyopathies are a group of diseases which are associated with myocardial dysfunction and can be classified either as primary or secondary cardiomyopathies. Genetic disorders have been identified in certain primary cardiomyopathies, however often the etiology remains unknown. The term ''secondary cardiomyopathy'' is used to specify diseases with the clinical indications of a cardiomyopathy, but can be attributed to a certain pathophysiological mechanism such as exposure to toxic substances, metabolic syndromes or systemic diseases. Based on morphological and functional criteria, primary cardiomyopathies are divided into dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). During the last two decades MR imaging has emerged to a well established diagnostic tool for the understanding and treatment of cardiomyopathies. Morphological and functional information can be achieved with a high level of accuracy and reproducibility. Tissue alteration of the myocardium can be detected assessing regional contrast enhancement, T1- and T2-signal intensities and chemical shift phenomena. This article describes characteristic aspects of MR imaging for the diagnosis of primary and secondary cardiomyopathies. (orig.)

  10. Current concepts and controversies on adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Sud

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is the most common spinal deformity encountered by General Orthopaedic Surgeons. Etiology remains unclear and current research focuses on genetic factors that may influence scoliosis development and risk of progression. Delayed diagnosis can result in severe deformities which affect the coronal and sagittal planes, as well as the rib cage, waistline symmetry, and shoulder balance. Patient′s dissatisfaction in terms of physical appearance and mechanical back pain, as well as the risk for curve deterioration are usually the reasons for treatment. Conservative management involves mainly bracing with the aim to stop or slow down scoliosis progression during growth and if possible prevent the need for surgical treatment. This is mainly indicated in young compliant patients with a large amount of remaining growth and progressive curvatures. Scoliosis correction is indicated for severe or progressive curves which produce significant cosmetic deformity, muscular pain, and patient discontent. Posterior spinal arthrodesis with Harrington instrumentation and bone grafting was the first attempt to correct the coronal deformity and replace in situ fusion. This was associated with high pseudarthrosis rates, need for postoperative immobilization, and flattening of sagittal spinal contour. Segmental correction techniques were introduced along with the Luque rods, Harri-Luque, and Wisconsin systems. Correction in both coronal and sagittal planes was not satisfactory and high rates of nonunion persisted until Cotrel and Dubousset introduced the concept of global spinal derotation. Development of pedicle screws provided a powerful tool to correct three-dimensional vertebral deformity and opened a new era in the treatment of scoliosis.

  11. Contralateral testicular biopsy in testis cancer: current concepts and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Axel

    2009-11-01

    Of all patients with unilateral testis cancer, approximately 5% harbour testicular intraepithelial neoplasia (TIN) in their contralateral testicle that will progress into an invasive germ cell tumour over time. The accurate diagnosis of TIN by a random two-site surgical testis biopsy and effective therapy by local radiation has led to the concept of a contralateral screening biopsy in all patients with testis cancer. However, screening and preventive treatment are only indicated if the therapeutic outcome of the screened population is improved, and the physiological function of the affected organ is not impaired. Based on a critical review of previous reports, some drawbacks of this policy have to be considered and question the routine indication for contralateral testis biopsy: (i) all TIN-negative patients still have to undergo meticulous follow-up for metachronous testis cancer due to a false negative biopsy rate of 0.5-1.0%; (ii) local radiation of TIN results in irreversible infertility due to eradication of spermatogenesis; (iii) local radiation of TIN results in an impairment of endocrine Leydig cell function in 25% of the patients; (iv) therapeutic outcome and prognosis will not be improved in irradiated patients as compared to patients on surveillance; (v) local tumour resection for the management of metachronous testicular cancer represents an effective and viable option. Current reports do not support the strategy of contralateral testis biopsy in all patients with unilateral testicular germ cell tumours. According to the recommendations of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group, a testis biopsy might be offered to high-risk patients for contralateral TIN (testicular volume <12 mL, history of cryptorchidism, age <30 years).

  12. Peripartum cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasquez V, Jorge E; Duque R, Mauricio

    2008-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a clinical entity with a variable frequency according to the zone of the study. It is characterized by a systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle and posterior appearance of heart failure symptoms that occur during the last month of pregnancy and the first post-partum months. Its etiology isn't still clear, but different theories are proposed based on inflammatory, infectious and autoimmune processes. Alterations related to oxidative stress that could largely explain this pathology were recently described. Its clinical presentation has a big similitude with all other causes of heart failure although atypical presentations have been described. Its diagnosis requires a high suspicion level and must be considered in any woman with symptoms of heart failure during the peripartum. The conventional treatment of chronic heart failure that includes beta-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and diuretics, in addition to the advances in diagnosis and management of acute heart failure, allowed changing the history of the disease by lowering mortality and recovering systolic function of the left ventricle. Gestations posterior to the development of this entity will depend on the complete recovery of heart function without lowering the risk of recurrence. There still remain many questions to answer in areas like etiology, risk factors, treatment and prognosis markers that may allow to prevent and to manage in an appropriate and safe way both the mother and her son.

  13. Anti-KCNQ1 K⁺ channel autoantibodies increase IKs current and are associated with QT interval shortening in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Seyler, Claudia; Wiedmann, Felix; Schmidt, Constanze; Schweizer, Patrick A; Becker, Rüdiger; Katus, Hugo A; Thomas, Dierk

    2013-06-01

    Autoimmune-associated proarrhythmia in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is poorly understood. Given the significance of KCNQ1 potassium channels in heart rhythm disorders, we hypothesized that circulating anti-KCNQ1 autoantibodies directly modulate cardiac electrophysiology in DCM patients. The purpose of this pilot study was to characterize ion channel autoantibodies in DCM targeting the cardiac repolarizing K(+) current, IKs, and the underlying KCNQ1 potassium channel. One hundred and fifty DCM patients were screened for anti-KCNQ1 autoantibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Autoantibodies targeting the extracellular pore domain of the KCNQ1 channel were detected in 6% of study patients. Seropositive individuals exhibited significantly shorter corrected QT intervals when compared with seronegative patients (371 ± 39.9 ms vs. 408 ± 47.9 ms; P = 0.036). There was no difference in clinical severity of heart failure between groups. The functional significance of anti-KCNQ1 antibodies was determined in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing KCNQ1/KCNE1 using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. IKs recordings demonstrated a 2.7-fold increase in mean current density on exposure to patients' sera containing anti-KCNQ1 antibodies in contrast to seronegative controls (8.74 ± 1.44 pA/pF vs. 3.26 ± 0.36 pA/pF; P = 0.003). IKs enhancement was not associated with increased KCNQ1 protein levels or altered cell surface expression of the channel. Anti-KCNQ1 autoantibodies found in a subgroup of DCM patients are associated with QT interval shortening and increased IKs current.

  14. Medicalization: Current concept and future directions in a Bionic Society

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Maturo

    2012-01-01

    The article illustrates the main features of the concept of medicalization, starting from its theoretical roots. Although it is the process of extending the medical gaze on human conditions, it appears that medicalization cannot be strictly connected to medical imperialism anymore. Other “engines” of medicalization are influential: consumers, biotechnology and managed care. The growth of research and theoretical reflections on medicalization has led to the proposal of other parallel concepts ...

  15. Current and future competitiveness of bioenergy - Conceptions about competitiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, E.; Lundgren, K.; Maartensson, Kjell

    1998-01-01

    It is important to visualize the conceptions that guide the behaviour of the actors within the energy system to be able to, in an efficient manner, increase the share of renewable energy in the energy mix. A major issue is to elucidate explicit and implicit presumptions within judgements on the competitiveness of bioenergy. This study focuses on how conceptions of bioenergy in the form of patterns of thinking, influence whether bioenergy can become competitive. The aim of the study is to develop a framework that will enable an increased understanding of the competitiveness of bioenergy today and in the future. The conceptions that the actors of the energy system uphold are studied and analysed. The conceptions of the actors are seen as key factors for the understanding of the function of the energy system and accordingly also for the understanding of the competitiveness of bioenergy. The over-all method perspective in the study is an actor approach. The actors' conceptions have been identified from interviews with 30 significant actors within the energy system. The material from the interviews has been synthesised into nine ideal types of actors. These nine 'model actors' are seen as representing the whole material and form the basis for the further analysis of the competitiveness of bioenergy as depending on patterns of thinking called logics. Three idealized logics are developed. The three logics developed in the study are production logic, market logic and socio-economic logic. (Upholders of the logics rank energy sources after production cost, profitability, and socio-economic legitimacy, respectively.) The logics co-exist within the different parts of the energy system. A single person can even uphold more than one logic. The three logics have however different weight in different organisations and in different parts of the energy system. Finally, the study proposes an enlarged description of the competitiveness of bioenergy in three dimensions: price

  16. Concepts Concerning 'Disease' Causation, Control, and the current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-12-02

    Dec 2, 2008 ... practice (and thus disease concepts) is attributable to Michael Foucault who, amongst his other insights, recognises that the development of modern medicine has taken the particular route that it has because it simultaneously constructs its own object of enquiry and comes up with ideas to explain and deal ...

  17. Magnetocaloric refrigeration concepts: current state of the art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein

    2014-01-01

    of designs and concepts. In this paper key parts constituting a magnetocaloric refrigeration device are reviewed in terms of how they have been implemented in actual machines. Some of the major design choices are then evaluated and, based on numerical modeling tools, recommendations on how to optimize...

  18. The Concept of Training and Its Current Distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Argues that though there is a clear distinction between the aims of teaching and training, there need be no such distinction between the methods and mental processes involved, and that customary definitions have distorted the concept of training, which should be seen as a particular and worthwhile aspect of education. (WL)

  19. Medicalization: current concept and future directions in a bionic society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The article illustrates the main features of the concept of medicalization, starting from its theoretical roots. Although it is the process of extending the medical gaze on human conditions, it appears that medicalization cannot be strictly connected to medical imperialism anymore. Other "engines" of medicalization are influential: consumers, biotechnology and managed care. The growth of research and theoretical reflections on medicalization has led to the proposal of other parallel concepts like pharmaceuticalization, genetization and biomedicalization. These new theoretical tools could be useful in the analysis of human enhancement. Human enhancement can be considered as the use of biomedical technology to improve performance on a human being who is not in need of a cure: a practice that is increasingly spreading in what might be defined as a "bionic society".

  20. [Health concepts in current science-oriented discourse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Maria Thereza Avila Dantas; Almeida Filho, Naomar de

    2002-01-01

    This article analyzes health as a concept in some science-oriented discourses by representative authors of functional sociology, anthropology and epistemology, by focusing their notions of illness and procedures. In the field of sociology, the ideas of normality, labeling, and deviation from labeling patterns stand out. Additionally, we present the main health models in North American health anthropology and evaluate the proposition of a new perspective that intends to overcome the duality between culture and society - the theory of signal, meaning and practice systems. We also analyze the Canguilhemian difference between normality and health, as well as the notion of health as normative capacity. Finally, we propose the distinctive concepts of primary, secondary and tertiary health as the first step of a theoretical construction that can guide health policies and social procedures based on a positive notion of health.

  1. High current density aluminum stabilized conductor concepts for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, X.; Eyssa, Y.M.; Hilal, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Lightweight conductors are needed for space magnets to achieve values of E/M (energy stored per unit mass) comparable to the or higher than advanced batteries. High purity aluminum stabilized NbTi composite conductors cooled by 1.8 K helium can provide a winding current density up to 15 kA/cm/sup 2/ at fields up to 10 tesla. The conductors are edge cooled with enough surface area to provide recovery following a normalizing disturbance. The conductors are designed so that current diffusion time in the high purity aluminum is smaller than thermal diffusion time in helium. Conductor design, stability and current diffusion are considered in detail

  2. The Ilizarov method of external fixation: current intraoperative concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daniel K; Duong, Elizabeth Thu Anh; Chang, Douglas G

    2010-03-01

    The Ilizarov method of external fixation is used to treat fractures, complex lower extremity deformities, osteomyelitis, and soft tissue contractures and to lengthen limbs. Tremendous improvements in the Ilizarov method have occurred during the past 60 years, improving intraoperative care and limb salvage management concepts. Improved instrumentation has increased the quantity and complexity of the tray systems required for these procedures. Perioperative nurses must be well versed in optimal preparation and function of Ilizarov fixation systems to ensure safe patient care during Ilizarov external fixation procedures. Copyright 2010 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Oral field cancerization: an update on current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Mohan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There always exists a field with genetically altered cells with a high risk of developing premalignant and malignant lesions. It may often happen that an individual stem cell is genetically altered and can cause the formation of a clone or a patch which is likely to turn into a tumor. This explains the higher recurrence rates following tumor resections. It is essential to identify and to treat this field in order to have greater chances to prevent cancer and achieve a better outcome. This article reports concepts, theories and markers for the assessment of field cancerization.

  4. Oral field cancerization: an update on current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Meenakshi; Jagannathan, Nithya

    2014-03-17

    There always exists a field with genetically altered cells with a high risk of developing premalignant and malignant lesions. It may often happen that an individual stem cell is genetically altered and can cause the formation of a clone or a patch which is likely to turn into a tumor. This explains the higher recurrence rates following tumor resections. It is essential to identify and to treat this field in order to have greater chances to prevent cancer and achieve a better outcome. This article reports concepts, theories and markers for the assessment of field cancerization.

  5. Concepts Concerning 'Disease\\' Causation, Control, and the current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 50, No 6 (2008) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. Current concepts on tenogenic differentiation and clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tendon is a tissue that transmits force from muscle to bone. Chronic or acute tendon injuries are very common, and are always accompanied by pain and a limited range of motion in patients. In clinical settings, management of tendon injuries still remains a big challenge. Cell therapies, such as the application of stem cells for tenogenic differentiation, were suggested to be an ideal strategy for clinical translation. However, there is still a lack of specific methods for tenogenic differentiation due to the limited understanding of tendon biology currently. This review focuses on the summary of current published strategies for tenogenic differentiation, such as the application of growth factors, mechanical stimulation, biomaterials, coculture, or induced pluripotent stem cells. Current clinical applications of stem cells for treatment of tendon injuries and their limitations have also been discussed in this review.

  7. Clinical Rehabilitation of Anterior Knee Pain: Current Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Laurie A; Kerslake, Sarah; Arendt, Elizabeth A

    Rehabilitation is the hallmark of the nonoperative treatment of anterior knee pain (AKP). Whether a patient has had appropriate rehabilitation can be assessed in the office with a selection of basic and advanced screening tests. Most important, providing specific instructions in your referral to a therapist skilled in treating patients with AKP can ensure that any identified deficits are appropriately addressed. The etiology of AKP is multifactorial. Whatever its "cause," AKP alters neuromuscular function, and correcting these altered body movement patterns will benefit the patient. Understanding how to assess and guide treatment of neuromuscular deficits in this population is essential for managing care and optimizing outcomes. In this article, factors associated with the diminished neuromuscular control seen in AKP are reviewed, appropriate rehabilitation concepts are discussed, and practical strategies are provided that can aid in identifying neuromuscular deficits and the need for further rehabilitation.

  8. Osteodensitometry and osteoporosis. Current concepts and strategies for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo U, Santiago

    1991-01-01

    The osteoporosis is a disease of universal distribution that affects millions of adults in the whole world, producing a high number of fractures, due to insufficiency that generates a significant morbidity and mortality. This condition is especially frequent in post menopause women. Some concepts about the bone structure, and the principal characteristics of the different methods to quantify the bone mass (conventional radiology, radiogrametry, photo densitometry, single photon absorbitometry, dual photon absorbitometry are reviewed. Finally, the advantages, disadvantages, levels of sensibility, precision, of the different techniques are established. An emphasis is made on the special capacity of the quantitative computed axial tomography to detect as a selective way the alterations of the spongiest bone

  9. Fracture of the pelvis: current concepts of classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J W; Resnik, C S

    1990-12-01

    Historically, pelvic fractures have been classified according to whether there is pelvic stability or instability, although confusion has been caused by the inclusion of many eponyms that mainly reflect the observation of a single author on a particular fracture pattern. Pennal and Tile were the first authors to attempt to classify pelvic fractures according to the force vector causing them. This concept was refined by Young and Burgess, who provided a more detailed classification system, again relating to force vectors. This article focuses on this classification and its significance with regard to pelvic stability, type of pelvic disruption, and hence the type of corrective forces that should be applied in the surgical management. Use of a classification system of pelvic fractures based on force vectors allows the orthopedic surgeon to apply external fixation in the most appropriate manner to correct pelvic deformity and to maximize patients' survival.

  10. Current concepts and recent advances in the athlete's shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silliman, J F; Hawkins, R J

    1991-10-01

    The demands placed on the shoulder girdle during athletics can often exceed its physiologic limits and result in significant injury. The goal of orthopedists, therapists, trainers, and ancillary personnel who care for athletes involved in sports which require extreme demands of the shoulder is to enhance athletic performance, extend their longevity, and prevent injury. With the new concepts available from basic science and clinical research, a clear understanding of normal architecture and biomechanical function of the shoulder girdle is better appreciated. A greater understanding of sporting activities and their physiologic demands on the shoulder are also more clear. The future of all this research seems to be pointing toward maintenance and restoration of normal anatomy and physiology about the shoulder girdle.

  11. Current Concepts in the Neurophysiologic Basis of Sleep; a Review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Information sources consulted included, published works of past researchers, current articles on sleep in conference papers, recent editions of textbooks on neuroscience, articles in seminar papers, reports extracted from newspaper and magazine articles on sleep, reports accessed from the Internet using Google ...

  12. Current concepts in fractures of the distal femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, B-C; Babst, R

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes current treatment strategies of distal femoral fractures as well as their evidence based rationale. The treatment of distal femoral fractures has improved with the evolution of plating and nailing technologies. The commonly selected surgical approaches are outlined and surgical treatment techniques including both internal and external fixation are discussed.

  13. LLNL current meter array--concept and system description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantrom, D.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    A measurement capability using a horizontal array of 10 S4 current meters mounted on a stiff floating structure with 35 m aperture has been developed to support interpretation of radar imaging of surface effects associated with internal waves. This system has been fielded three times and most recently, has collected data alongside the sea-surface footprint of a land-fixed radar imaging ship-generated internal waves. The underlying need for this measurement capability is described. The specifications resulting from this need are presented and the engineering design and deployment procedures of the platform and systems that resulted are described The current meter data are multiplexed along with meteorological and system status data on board the floating platform and are telemetered to a shore station and on to a data acquisition system. The raw data are recorded, and are then processed to form space-time images of current and strain rate (a spatial derivative of the current field). Examples of raw and processed data associated with ship-generated internal waves are presented.

  14. CONCEPTS OF IMPROVING CURRENT PROTECTION OF POWER-GRID LINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Romaniuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The  6–35  kV  power-grid  current  protection  serves  to  protect  the  transmission  lines against phase-to-phase short-circuits. The major disadvantage of it lies in the relatively large time delays of the last stages especially in the main sections of the grid owing to the stepped relay characteristics as well as a large number of the steps. A full-fledged protection of the 6–35 kV lines against inter-phase short circuits can be provided by the two-stage current protection: the first stage being the current cutoff without any time delay and the second stage – the maximum current protection where the time delay is linear contingent on the distance between the protection placement and the fault-point location. The article introduces the rating formulae for the time delays of the second-stage and their exemplary graphic presentation. The authors offer a variant for solving the problem with computation of the second-stage time delays in those instances where several feeders diverge from the bus bars of the substation located in the end of the protected line.Improving current protections for the 6–35 kV transmission lines with one-end power supply against interphase short-circuits can be based on the collective application of the following principles: accounting for the type and location of the short-circuit which provides for the high-performance cutoff zone instantaneous expansion and its independence on the mode of failure and the grid operation mode. It also allows increase of the last stage sensitiveness towards asymmetrical short-circuits; detection of the short-circuit location only on the results of fault currents measurement which simplifies the protection implementation; realization of the last (second protection stage with linear-dependent time delay which ensures potentiality of its operation speed increase.

  15. Heart deformation analysis for automated quantification of cardiac function and regional myocardial motion patterns: A proof of concept study in patients with cardiomyopathy and healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Kai; Collins, Jeremy D.; Chowdhary, Varun; Markl, Michael; Carr, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Heart deformation analysis (HDA) can quantify global and regional cardiac function. • HDA works based on cine CMR images without the needs of operator interaction. • HDA-derived cardiac motion indices are reproducible. - Abstract: Objective: To test the performance of HDA in characterizing left ventricular (LV) function and regional myocardial motion patterns in the context of cardiomyopathy based on cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Materials and methods: Following the approval of the institutional review board (IRB), standard cine images of 45 subjects, including 15 healthy volunteers, 15 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 15 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) were retrospectively analyzed using HDA. The variations of LV ejection fraction (LVEF), LV mass (LVM), and regional myocardial motion indices, including radial (Drr), circumferential (Dcc) displacement, radial (Vrr) and circumferential (Vcc) velocity, radial (Err), circumferential (Ecc) and shear (Ess) strain and radial (SRr) and circumferential (SRc) strain rate, were calculated and compared among subject groups. Inter-study reproducibility of HDA-derived myocardial motion indices were tested on 15 volunteers by using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Results: HDA identified significant differences in cardiac function and motion indices between subject groups. DCM patients had significantly lower LVEF (33.5 ± 9.65%), LVM (105.88 ± 21.93 g), peak Drr (0.29 ± 0.11 cm), Vrr-sys (2.14 ± 0.72 cm/s), Err (0.17 ± 0.08), Ecc (−0.08 ± 0.03), SRr-sys (0.91 ± 0.44s −1 ) and SRc-sys (−0.64 ± 0.27s −1 ) compared to the other two groups. HCM patients demonstrated increased LVM (171.69 ± 34.19) and lower peak Vcc-dia (0.78 ± 0.30 cm/s) than other subjects. Good inter-study reproducibility was found for all HDA-derived myocardial indices in healthy volunteers (ICC = 0.664–0.942, CoV = 15.1%–37

  16. Heart deformation analysis for automated quantification of cardiac function and regional myocardial motion patterns: A proof of concept study in patients with cardiomyopathy and healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Kai, E-mail: kai-lin@northwestern.edu; Collins, Jeremy D.; Chowdhary, Varun; Markl, Michael; Carr, James C.

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Heart deformation analysis (HDA) can quantify global and regional cardiac function. • HDA works based on cine CMR images without the needs of operator interaction. • HDA-derived cardiac motion indices are reproducible. - Abstract: Objective: To test the performance of HDA in characterizing left ventricular (LV) function and regional myocardial motion patterns in the context of cardiomyopathy based on cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Materials and methods: Following the approval of the institutional review board (IRB), standard cine images of 45 subjects, including 15 healthy volunteers, 15 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 15 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) were retrospectively analyzed using HDA. The variations of LV ejection fraction (LVEF), LV mass (LVM), and regional myocardial motion indices, including radial (Drr), circumferential (Dcc) displacement, radial (Vrr) and circumferential (Vcc) velocity, radial (Err), circumferential (Ecc) and shear (Ess) strain and radial (SRr) and circumferential (SRc) strain rate, were calculated and compared among subject groups. Inter-study reproducibility of HDA-derived myocardial motion indices were tested on 15 volunteers by using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Results: HDA identified significant differences in cardiac function and motion indices between subject groups. DCM patients had significantly lower LVEF (33.5 ± 9.65%), LVM (105.88 ± 21.93 g), peak Drr (0.29 ± 0.11 cm), Vrr-sys (2.14 ± 0.72 cm/s), Err (0.17 ± 0.08), Ecc (−0.08 ± 0.03), SRr-sys (0.91 ± 0.44s{sup −1}) and SRc-sys (−0.64 ± 0.27s{sup −1}) compared to the other two groups. HCM patients demonstrated increased LVM (171.69 ± 34.19) and lower peak Vcc-dia (0.78 ± 0.30 cm/s) than other subjects. Good inter-study reproducibility was found for all HDA-derived myocardial indices in healthy volunteers (ICC = 0.664–0.942, CoV = 15.1%–37

  17. Lessons from the masters current concepts in astronomical image processing

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    There are currently thousands of amateur astronomers around the world engaged in astrophotography at increasingly sophisticated levels. Their ranks far outnumber professional astronomers doing the same and their contributions both technically and artistically are the dominant drivers of progress in the field today. This book is a unique collaboration of individuals, all world-renowned in their particular area, and covers in detail each of the major sub-disciplines of astrophotography. This approach offers the reader the greatest opportunity to learn the most current information and the latest techniques directly from the foremost innovators in the field today.   The book as a whole covers all types of astronomical image processing, including processing of eclipses and solar phenomena, extracting detail from deep-sky, planetary, and widefield images, and offers solutions to some of the most challenging and vexing problems in astronomical image processing. Recognized chapter authors include deep sky experts su...

  18. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ravish; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies. PMID:23403618

  19. Current concepts in post-bariatric body contouring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Amy S

    2010-08-01

    The advent of bariatric surgery has led to a new subspecialty in plastic surgery for contouring the skin and fat remaining after massive weight loss. This field is increasingly recognized as a vital component to the multi-disciplinary treatment approach to care for the obese patient. The author sought to review key concepts in patient selection, technical advancements, and post-operative care in body contouring following weight loss surgery. A literature review in PubMed identified articles relevant to the care of massive weight loss patients presenting for plastic surgical contouring. These articles were combined with a retrospective review of the author's personal experience in management of these patients. The best candidates for post-bariatric plastic surgery are those who have achieved weight loss stability with a BMI of 35 or less and who have adequate nutrition to heal the surgical excisions. Truncal deformity is the most common presenting complaint of massive weight loss patients, and the procedure of choice to address this region is a lower body lift. Post-operative care focuses on patient safety prioritizing in DVT prophylaxis and seroma prevention. Bariatric procedures routinely achieve sustained decreases in body mass index; however, the remaining skin in the massive-weight-loss patient serves as a reminder of their previous obese existence. Post-bariatric body contouring aims to correct this deformity and restore a sense of normalcy. By reshaping the body into its ideal proportions, the true success of the weight loss surgery is fully realized.

  20. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Haswani Embong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided.

  1. Current concepts in simulation-based trauma education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Robert A; Ali, Jameel

    2008-11-01

    The use of simulation-based technology in trauma education has focused on providing a safe and effective alternative to the more traditional methods that are used to teach technical skills and critical concepts in trauma resuscitation. Trauma team training using simulation-based technology is also being used to develop skills in leadership, team-information sharing, communication, and decision-making. The integration of simulators into medical student curriculum, residency training, and continuing medical education has been strongly recommended by the American College of Surgeons as an innovative means of enhancing patient safety, reducing medical errors, and performing a systematic evaluation of various competencies. Advanced human patient simulators are increasingly being used in trauma as an evaluation tool to assess clinical performance and to teach and reinforce essential knowledge, skills, and abilities. A number of specialty simulators in trauma and critical care have also been designed to meet these educational objectives. Ongoing educational research is still needed to validate long-term retention of knowledge and skills, provide reliable methods to evaluate teaching effectiveness and performance, and to demonstrate improvement in patient safety and overall quality of care.

  2. Current concepts of pathophysiology, epidemiology and classification of pruritus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Marina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of pruritus-specific mediators and receptors facilitated the neurobiological concept of pruritus: itch-specific (histamine-dependent and histamine-independent C-fibers; itch-specific receptors on cutaneous and spinal neurons; “dialogue“ between the pruritus-specific neurons and cells in the skin; peripheral and central mediation of pruritus; functional “pruritus-specific matrix” in the brain with a role of pruritus center. In 10%-50% of persons without skin diseases, pruritus is considered the manifestation of a systemic disorder. Identification of pruritus within autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in dermatology is based on the clinical picture and nature of the underlying disease, implying the development of pruritus on primarily and/or secondarily inflamed skin. In the internal medicine, pruritus commonly presents on primarily non-inflamed skin., involvement of the skin and gastrointestinal tract are two independent risk factors of pruritus in systemic sclerosis, and of anal/vulvar pruritus. Classification combines etiological and clinical criteria and should be considered the only segment of a comprehensive approach to pruritus of unknown origin. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172058

  3. Concussions in the National Football League: A Current Concepts Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengo-Kahn, Aaron M; Johnson, Daniel J; Zuckerman, Scott L; Solomon, Gary S

    2016-03-01

    Significant attention has been directed toward the immediate and long-term effects of sport-related concussions on athletes participating in contact sports, particularly football. The highest level of football, the National Football League (NFL), has received significant attention and criticism regarding player management and safety after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Several review articles have reported data related to concussion in the NFL, but a succinct review and synthesis of data regarding NFL concussions is currently lacking. To (1) review systematically the published data regarding concussion in the NFL and assess limitations of the studies, (2) elucidate areas where further research is needed, and (3) identify methods to improve future investigations of concussion in the NFL. Systematic review of literature. English-language titles and abstracts published between 1900 and September 2014 were searched systematically across electronic databases, and a review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Peer-reviewed journal articles were included if they contained NFL concussion data with or without additional associated long-term effects. Reviews, editorials, letters to the editor, and comments were not included. Of the 344 records screened for review, 88 articles were assessed for eligibility. There were 31 studies that met the inclusion criteria and formed the basis of the evidence synthesis. Included in the current review were 8 case-control studies (Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine evidence level 3b), 6 descriptive epidemiological studies (level 4), 6 cross-sectional studies (level 4), 6 cohort studies (level 2b), and 5 case series (level 4). The study of concussions in the NFL has been limited by lack of recent empirical data, reliance on self-reported concussion history, and ascertainment bias of brains donated for autopsy studies. The scientific community

  4. Update on ankylosing spondylitis: current concepts in pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is an insidiously progressive and debilitating form of arthritis involving the axial skeleton. The long delay in diagnosis and insufficient response to currently available therapeutics both advocate for a greater understanding of disease pathogenesis. Genome-wide association studies of this highly genetic disease have implicated specific immune pathways, including the interleukin (IL)-17/IL-23 pathway, control of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation, amino acid trimming for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigen presentation, and other genes controlling CD8 and CD4 T cell subsets. The relevance of these pathways has borne out in animal and human subject studies, in particular, the response to novel therapeutic agents. Genetics and the findings of autoantibodies in ankylosing spondylitis revisit the question of autoimmune vs. autoinflammatory etiology. As environmental partners to genetics, recent attention has focused on the roles of microbiota and biomechanical stress in initiating and perpetuating inflammation. Herein, we review these current developments in the investigation of ankylosing spondylitis pathogenesis.

  5. Current concepts in the treatment of sports concussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putukian, Margot; Kutcher, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    The management of patients with sports-related concussion (SRC) is comprehensive and includes preseason planning, education, initial evaluation, postinjury assessment, disposition, return-to-play decisions, and consideration of long-term brain health. Several recent publications have addressed sports concussion management using the best available evidence, and we review them here. The diagnosis and management of sports concussion have evolved over the past several decades, and with a greater understanding of the importance of both short- and long-term sequelae, there has been a clear trend toward recognizing and treating these brain injuries more cautiously and developing a proactive approach to management and return-to-play decision making. Although each of these used different methodologies in their review of the literature, their conclusions are fairly consistent, providing basic guidelines for contemporary approaches to management of SRC. Although many questions remain unanswered, there are several areas of agreement including the importance of education, preseason assessment, the benefit and utility of a standardized multimodal assessment on the sidelines, individualized treatment and return-to-play protocols, and the benefit of a multidisciplinary team in managing complicated injuries. This paper reviews these current sports concussion guidelines and the best available evidence that guides current management of SRC.

  6. Neonatal posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus from prematurity: pathophysiology and current treatment concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Shenandoah

    2013-01-01

    Object Preterm infants are at risk for perinatal complications, including germinal matrix–intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and subsequent posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH). This review summarizes the current understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, management, and outcomes of IVH and PHH in preterm infants. Methods The MEDLINE database was systematically searched using terms related to IVH, PHH, and relevant neurosurgical procedures to identify publications in the English medical literature. To complement information from the systematic search, pertinent articles were selected from the references of articles identifed in the initial search. Results This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the epidemiology and pathophysiology of IVH and PHH, primarily using evidence-based studies. Advances in obstetrics and neonatology over the past few decades have contributed to a marked improvement in the survival of preterm infants, and neurological morbidity is also starting to decrease. The incidence of IVH is declining, and the incidence of PHH will likely follow. Currently, approximately 15% of preterm infants who suffer severe IVH will require permanent CSF diversion. The clinical presentation and surgical management of symptomatic PHH with temporary ventricular reservoirs (ventricular access devices) and ventriculosubgaleal shunts and permanent ventriculoperitoneal shunts are discussed. Preterm infants who develop PHH that requires surgical treatment remain at high risk for other related neurological problems, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and cognitive and behavioral delay. This review highlights numerous opportunities for further study to improve the care of these children. Conclusions A better grasp of the pathophysiology of IVH is beginning to impact the incidence of IVH and PHH. Neonatologists conduct rigorous Class I and II studies to advance the outcomes of preterm infants. The need for well-designed multicenter trials is

  7. Cardiomyopathy in Vici syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solaf M. Elsayed

    2018-01-12

    Jan 12, 2018 ... Cardiomyopathy in Vici syndrome. Dear Editor,. A 7 month old boy was referred to our clinic with provisional diagnosis of Pompe disease because of his Echocardiographic find- ings of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Although the patient had severe hypotonia and increased CPK level characteristics of ...

  8. Current concepts in the management of patellar instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Laidlaw

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patellar instability is a common presenting clinical entity in the field of orthopedics. This not only can occur from baseline morphologic variability within the patellofemoral articulation and alignment, but also from traumatic injury. While conservative management is many times employed early in the treatment course, symptomatic patellar instability can persist. This article reviews the available indexed published literature regarding patellar instability. Given the debilitating nature of this condition and the long term sequelae that can evolve from its lack of adequate recognition and treatment, this article details the most current methods in the evaluation of this entity as well as reviews the most up-to-date surgical treatment regimens that are available to address this condition.

  9. [Asperger syndrome: evolution of the concept and current clinical data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aussilloux, C; Baghdadli, A

    2008-05-01

    Although Asperger syndrome is described by international classifications as a category of pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), its validity as a specific entity distinct from autistic disorders remains controversial. The syndrome, first described by Hans Asperger, could not be distinguished from high functioning autism (onset, symptoms, outcome...). However, international classifications propose a distinction between the two syndromes based on a delayed onset, the absence of speech delay, the presence of motor disorders and a better outcome in Asperger syndrome. This categorical differentiation is not confirmed by current studies and in the absence of biological markers, no clinical, neuropsychological or epidemiological criteria makes it possible to distinguish high functioning autism from Asperger syndrome. From a clinical perspective, it is nevertheless of interest to isolate Asperger syndrome from other autistic disorders to propose specific assessment and therapy.

  10. Stem cells in orthopedics: current concepts and possible future applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagaria, Vaibhav; Patil, Nilesh; Sapre, Vikram; Chadda, Anshul; Singrakia, Manoj

    2006-04-01

    Stem cells are the cells that have the ability to divide for indefinite periods in culture and to give rise to specialized cells. Sources of these cells include embryo, umbilical cord and certain sites in adults such as the central nervous system [CNS] and bone marrow. Its use hold promise of wide spread applications particularly in areas of spinal cord injury, difficult non-unions, critical bone defects, spinal fusions, augmentation of ligament reconstructions, cartilage repair and degenerative disc disorders. This review article contains current information derived from Medline searches on the use in various orthopedic subspecialties. Some issues remain at the forefront of the controversy involving stem cell research - legislation, ethics and public opinion, cost and concentration methods. As is true with any new technology, the enthusiasm for this technology that has potential to influence virtually every orthopedic case management, must be balanced by subjecting it to stringent clinical and basic research investigations.

  11. Primary Pediatric Hypertension: Current Understanding and Emerging Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiu, Andrew C; Bishop, Michael D; Asico, Laureano D; Jose, Pedro A; Villar, Van Anthony M

    2017-09-01

    The rising prevalence of primary pediatric hypertension and its tracking into adult hypertension point to the importance of determining its pathogenesis to gain insights into its current and emerging management. Considering that the intricate control of BP is governed by a myriad of anatomical, molecular biological, biochemical, and physiological systems, multiple genes are likely to influence an individual's BP and susceptibility to develop hypertension. The long-term regulation of BP rests on renal and non-renal mechanisms. One renal mechanism relates to sodium transport. The impaired renal sodium handling in primary hypertension and salt sensitivity may be caused by aberrant counter-regulatory natriuretic and anti-natriuretic pathways. The sympathetic nervous and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems are examples of antinatriuretic pathways. An important counter-regulatory natriuretic pathway is afforded by the renal autocrine/paracrine dopamine system, aberrations of which are involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension, including that associated with obesity. We present updates on the complex interactions of these two systems with dietary salt intake in relation to obesity, insulin resistance, inflammation, and oxidative stress. We review how insults during pregnancy such as maternal and paternal malnutrition, glucocorticoid exposure, infection, placental insufficiency, and treatments during the neonatal period have long-lasting effects in the regulation of renal function and BP. Moreover, these effects have sex differences. There is a need for early diagnosis, frequent monitoring, and timely management due to increasing evidence of premature target organ damage. Large controlled studies are needed to evaluate the long-term consequences of the treatment of elevated BP during childhood, especially to establish the validity of the current definition and treatment of pediatric hypertension.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cardiomyopathy Merck Manual Consumer Version: Cardiomyopathy Merck Manual Consumer Version: Overview of Abnormal Heart Rhythms My46 Trait Profile Orphanet: Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy Orphanet: Familial isolated ...

  13. Bilateral cochlear implantation: current concepts, indications, and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, Gregory J; Eapen, Rose; Buchman, Craig A

    2009-12-01

    The optimal treatment for bilateral hearing loss continues to evolve as cochlear implant (CI) and hearing aid technologies advance, as does our understanding of the central auditory system. Ongoing discussions continue on the validity and feasibility of bilateral CI in terms of performance, justification of need, medical/surgical safety concerns, and economics. The purpose of this review article is to provide an update on the advantages and disadvantages of bilateral CI and to provide a discussion on timing (simultaneous vs. sequential), technology (bimodal vs. binaural) and feasibility. Binaural advantages are found in both adult and pediatric bilateral CI recipients, the greatest being the head shadow effect and improvements in localization and loudness summation. This theoretically offers an advantage over their unilateral implanted counterparts in terms of improved sound localization and enhanced speech perception under noisy conditions. Most investigators agree that bilateral stimulation during critical periods of development is paramount for optimizing auditory functioning in children. Currently, bilateral CI is widely accepted as a safe and effective means of bilateral auditory stimulation.

  14. Neural synchrony in cortical networks: history, concept and current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Uhlhaas

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Following the discovery of context-dependent synchronization of oscillatory neuronal responses in the visual system, the role of neural synchrony in cortical networks has been expanded to provide a general mechanism for the coordination of distributed neural activity patterns. In the current paper, we present an update of the status of this hypothesis through summarizing recent results from our laboratory that suggest important new insights regarding the mechanisms, function and relevance of this phenomenon. In the first part, we present recent results derived from animal experiments and mathematical simulations that provide novel explanations and mechanisms for zero and nero-zero phase lag synchronization. In the second part, we shall discuss the role of neural synchrony for expectancy during perceptual organization and its role in conscious experience. This will be followed by evidence that indicates that in addition to supporting conscious cognition, neural synchrony is abnormal in major brain disorders, such as schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders. We conclude this paper with suggestions for further research as well as with critical issues that need to be addressed in future studies.

  15. PET/CT and vascular disease: Current concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcanti Filho, Jose Leite Gondim; Souza Leao Lima, Ronaldo de [CDPI and Multi-Imagem Clinics, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Department of Radiology, Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Souza Machado Neto, Luiz de [CDPI and Multi-Imagem Clinics, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Kayat Bittencourt, Leonardo, E-mail: lkayat@terra.com.br [CDPI and Multi-Imagem Clinics, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Department of Radiology, Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Cortes Domingues, Romeu [CDPI and Multi-Imagem Clinics, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Fonseca, Lea Mirian Barbosa da [CDPI and Multi-Imagem Clinics, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Department of Radiology, Rio de Janeiro Federal University (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    Since its introduction in 2001, positron emission tomography associated to computed tomography (PET/CT) has been established as a standard tool in cancer evaluation. Being a multimodality imaging method, it combines in a single session the sensitivity granted by PET for detection of molecular targets within the picomolar range, with an underlying submilimetric resolution inherent to CT, that can precisely localize the PET findings. In this last decade, there have been new insights regarding the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, particularly about plaque rupture and vascular remodeling. This has increased the interest for research on PET/CT in vascular diseases as a potential new diagnostic tool, since some PET molecular targets could identify diseases before the manifestation of gross anatomic features. In this review, we will describe the current applications of PET/CT in vascular diseases, emphasizing its usefulness in the settings of vasculitis, aneurysms, vascular graft infection, aortic dissection, and atherosclerosis/plaque vulnerability. Although not being properly peripheral vascular conditions, ischemic cardiovascular disease and cerebrovascular disease will be briefly addressed as well, due to their widespread prevalence and importance.

  16. Current concepts for oil decontamination of crush injuries: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimkhani, Chante; Amir, Mahsa; Dellavalle, Robert P; Ipaktchi, Kyros

    2014-01-01

    This anecdotal, non-systematic review serves to explore the principles and methods of effective oil decontamination from cutaneous wounds, particularly crush injuries. The current expansion of the petroleum industry is necessary to meet increasing world demands for oil. Most stages of oil refining and applications involve significant injury risks, particularly for crush injuries that become contaminated with petroleum compounds. A literature review regarding a standard of care for effective cutaneous oil decontamination is lacking. Based on case reports, animal models, and in vitro studies identified in our expert opinion review, standard water and soap cleansing may not be an appropriate approach. Instead, the principle of 'like dissolves like' guides the use of lipophilic, petroleum-derived solvents to attract and subsequently dissolve the petroleum contaminant from the skin injury. Limitations include paucity of and dated literature sources regarding the topic as well as no models specifically addressing crush injuries. Our literature review found that oil decontamination of cutaneous injuries may be best accomplished with oil-based cleansers. Certainly, this topic has significant importance for the potentially carcinogenic petroleum compounds that pervade virtually every aspect of modern human life.

  17. Gastric Antral Vascular Ectasia in Systemic Sclerosis: Current Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Hernando Parrado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE is a rare entity with unique endoscopic appearance described as “watermelon stomach.” It has been associated with systemic sclerosis but the pathophysiological changes leading to GAVE have not been explained and still remain uncertain. Methods. Databases Medline, Scopus, Embase, PubMed, and Cochrane were searched for relevant papers. The main search words were “Gastric antral vascular ectasia,” “Watermelon Stomach,” “GAVE,” “Scleroderma,” and “Systemic Sclerosis.” Fifty-four papers were considered for this review. Results. GAVE is a rare entity in the spectrum of manifestations of systemic sclerosis with unknown pathogenesis. Most patients with systemic sclerosis and GAVE present with asymptomatic anemia, iron deficiency anemia, or heavy acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Symptomatic therapy and endoscopic ablation are the first-line of treatment. Surgical approach may be recommended for patients who do not respond to medical or endoscopic therapies. Conclusion. GAVE can be properly diagnosed and treated. Early diagnosis is key in the management of GAVE because it makes symptomatic therapies and endoscopic approaches feasible. A high index of suspicion is critical. Future studies and a critical review of the current findings about GAVE are needed to understand the role of this condition in systemic sclerosis.

  18. Current concepts in the management of acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautham Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis (AP are based on the Western experience, which may be difficult to extrapolate in India due to socioeconomic constraints. Hence, modifications based on the available resources and referral patterns should be introduced so as to ensure appropriate care. We reviewed the current literature on the management of AP available in English on Medline and proposed guidelines locally applicable. Patients of AP presenting with systemic inflammatory response syndrome are at risk of moderate-severe pancreatitis and hence, should be referred to a tertiary center early. The vast majority of patients with AP have mild disease and can be managed at smaller centers. Early aggressive fluid resuscitation with controlled fluid expansion, early enteral nutrition, and culture-directed antibiotics improve outcomes in AP. Infected pancreatic necrosis should be managed in a tertiary care hospital within a multidisciplinary setup. The “step up” approach involving antibiotics, percutaneous drainage, and minimally invasive necrosectomy instituted sequentially based on clinical response has improved the outcomes in this subgroup of patients.

  19. Testosterone and glucose metabolism in men: current concepts and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Mathis

    2014-03-01

    A wealth of observational studies show that low testosterone is associated with insulin resistance and with an increased risk of diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Experimental studies have identified potential mechanisms by which low testosterone may lead to insulin resistance. Visceral adipose tissue is an important intermediate in this relationship. Actions of testosterone or its metabolite oestradiol on other tissues such as muscle, liver, bone or the brain, and body composition-independent effects may also play a role. However, definitive evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to clarify whether the association of low testosterone with disordered glucose metabolism is causative is currently lacking. It therefore remains possible that this association is due to reverse causation, or simply originates by association with common health and lifestyle factors. RCTs of testosterone therapy in men with or without diabetes consistently show modest metabolically favourable changes in body composition. Despite this, testosterone effects on glucose metabolism have been inconsistent. Recent evidence suggests that the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis suppression in the majority of obese men with metabolic disorders is functional, and may be, at least in part, reversible with weight loss. Until further evidence is available, lifestyle measures with emphasis on weight reduction, treatment of comorbidities and optimisation of diabetic control should remain the first-line treatment in these men. Such measures, if successful, may be sufficient to normalise testosterone levels in men with metabolic disorders, who typically have only modest reductions in circulating testosterone levels.

  20. Current Concepts of Neurodegenerative Mechanisms in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasthuri Bai Magalingam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are hereditary or sporadic conditions that result in the progressive loss of the structure and function of neurons as well as neuronal death. Although a range of diseases lie under this umbrella term, Alzheimer’s disease (AD and Parkinson’s disease (PD are the most common neurodegenerative diseases that affect a large population around the globe. Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the abnormal accumulation of extracellular amyloid-β plaques and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles in brain regions and manifests as a type of dementia in aged individuals that results in memory loss, multiple cognitive abnormalities, and intellectual disabilities that interfere with quality of life. Since the discovery of AD, a wealth of new information has emerged that delineates the causes, mechanisms of disease, and potential therapeutic agents, but an effective remedy to cure the diseases has not been identified yet. This could be because of the complexity of the disease process, as it involves various contributing factors that include environmental factors and genetic predispositions. This review summarizes the current understanding on neurodegenerative mechanisms that lead to the emergence of the pathology of AD.

  1. Cutaneous wound healing: Current concepts and advances in wound care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C Klein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A non-healing wound is defined as showing no measurable signs of healing for at least 30 consecutive treatments with standard wound care. [1] It is a snapshot of a patient′s total health as well as the ongoing battle between noxious factors and the restoration of optimal macro and micro circulation, oxygenation and nutrition. In practice, standard therapies for non-healing cutaneous wounds include application of appropriate dressings, periodic debridement and eliminating causative factors. [2] The vast majority of wounds would heal by such approach with variable degrees of residual morbidity, disability and even mortality. Globally, beyond the above therapies, newer tools of healing are selectively accessible to caregivers, for various logistical or financial reasons. Our review will focus on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT, as used at our institution (CAMC, and some other modalities that are relatively accessible to patients. HBOT is a relatively safe and technologically simpler way to deliver care worldwide. However, the expense for including HBOT as standard of care for recognized indications per UHMS(Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society may vary widely from country to country and payment system. [3] In the USA, CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services approved indications for HBOT vary from that of the UHMS for logistical reasons. [1] We shall also briefly look into other newer therapies per current clinical usage and general acceptance by the medical community. Admittedly, there would be other novel tools with variable success in wound healing worldwide, but it would be difficult to include all in this treatise.

  2. Cutaneous wound healing: Current concepts and advances in wound care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Kenneth C; Guha, Somes Chandra

    2014-01-01

    A non-healing wound is defined as showing no measurable signs of healing for at least 30 consecutive treatments with standard wound care.[1] It is a snapshot of a patient's total health as well as the ongoing battle between noxious factors and the restoration of optimal macro and micro circulation, oxygenation and nutrition. In practice, standard therapies for non-healing cutaneous wounds include application of appropriate dressings, periodic debridement and eliminating causative factors.[2] The vast majority of wounds would heal by such approach with variable degrees of residual morbidity, disability and even mortality. Globally, beyond the above therapies, newer tools of healing are selectively accessible to caregivers, for various logistical or financial reasons. Our review will focus on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), as used at our institution (CAMC), and some other modalities that are relatively accessible to patients. HBOT is a relatively safe and technologically simpler way to deliver care worldwide. However, the expense for including HBOT as standard of care for recognized indications per UHMS(Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society) may vary widely from country to country and payment system.[3] In the USA, CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) approved indications for HBOT vary from that of the UHMS for logistical reasons.[1] We shall also briefly look into other newer therapies per current clinical usage and general acceptance by the medical community. Admittedly, there would be other novel tools with variable success in wound healing worldwide, but it would be difficult to include all in this treatise. PMID:25593414

  3. Current concepts on osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya-Angeler, Joaquin; Gianakos, Arianna L; Villa, Jordan C; Ni, Amelia; Lane, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that 20000 to 30000 new patients are diagnosed with osteonecrosis annually accounting for approximately 10% of the 250000 total hip arthroplasties done annually in the United States. The lack of level 1 evidence in the literature makes it difficult to identify optimal treatment protocols to manage patients with pre-collapse avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and early intervention prior to collapse is critical to successful outcomes in joint preserving procedures. There have been a variety of traumatic and atraumatic factors that have been identified as risk factors for osteonecrosis, but the etiology and pathogenesis still remains unclear. Current osteonecrosis diagnosis is dependent upon plain anteroposterior and frog-leg lateral radiographs of the hip, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Generally, the first radiographic changes seen by radiograph will be cystic and sclerotic changes in the femoral head. Although the diagnosis may be made by radiograph, plain radiographs are generally insufficient for early diagnosis, therefore MRI is considered the most accurate benchmark. Treatment options include pharmacologic agents such as bisphosphonates and statins, biophysical treatments, as well as joint-preserving and joint-replacing surgeries. the surgical treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head can be divided into two major branches: femoral head sparing procedures (FHSP) and femoral head replacement procedures (FHRP). In general, FHSP are indicated at pre-collapse stages with minimal symptoms whereas FHRP are preferred at post-collapse symptomatic stages. It is difficult to know whether any treatment modality changes the natural history of core decompression since the true natural history of core decompression has not been delineated. PMID:26396935

  4. CURRENT CONCEPTS ON SELECTION TECHNIQEUS IN FINANCIAL AUDITING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munteanu Ciprian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The financial auditor's work evolves around the issue of an independent, professional and objective opinion on the compliance of the client's financial statements with the national accounting rules and principles. At the same time, the auditor will have to express an opinion on the ability of the company to continue its activity. An ideal situation would involve auditing all the components of the yearly accounts, but this would take time, effort and a very high cost. Fortunately, the audit team has some very useful tools for acquiring audit evidence in a fast and conclusive way - selection techniques. These techniques may be used in different phases of the audit and auditors have been using them for a long time, in fact no audit program would function without these techniques. They have become quite common as the auditors make important judgments, such as determining what type of technique to apply, whether to use statistical or nonstatistical techniques, appropriate inputs to determine sample size, and evaluation of results, particularly when errors are detected. This paper aims to theoretically present the main selection techniques, indicating how, why and when to use them. There are six selection techniques and we deal with the most frequent four of them. Our purpose is to present the characteristics and set the limits of these techniques, emphasizing sampling as the most common selection technique currently in use. A commonly held misconception about statistical sampling, for example, is that it removes the need for the use of the professional judgement. While it is true that statistical sampling uses statistical methods to determine the sample size and to select and evaluate audit samples, it is the responsibility of the auditor to consider and specify in advance factors such as materiality, the expected error rate or amount, the risk of over-reliance or the risk of incorrect acceptance, audit risk, inherent risk, control risk, standard

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of osteochondral lesions of the ankle: current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Pires Prado

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We conducted a wide-ranging review of the literature regarding osteochondral lesions of the ankle, with the aim of presenting the current concepts, treatment options, trends and future perspectives relating to this topic.

  6. Sex differences in cardiomyopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, Sven; van der Meer, Peter; van Tintelen, J. Peter; van den Berg, Maarten P.

    Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of heart muscle diseases with a variety of specific phenotypes. According to the contemporary European Society of Cardiology classification, they are classified into hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular (ARVC), restrictive

  7. Takotsubo (Stress) Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Takotsubo (Stress) Cardiomyopathy Scott W. Sharkey , John R. Lesser , Barry ... heart contraction has returned to normal. Importance of Stress In 85% of cases, takotsubo is triggered by ...

  8. Radiology and pathology correlation in common infiltrative cardiomyopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varzeshi, Neda; Hansen, Mark; Rezaee, Amir; Slaughter, Richard; Dixon, Natalie; Duhig, Edwina

    2012-01-01

    Infiltrative cardiomyopathies generally pose a diagnostic dilemma as current diagnostic tools are imprecise. Invasive endomyocardial biopsy is considered as the gold standard however it has some limitations. Recently cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is emerging as an excellent technique in diagnosing infiltrative cardiomyopathies and is increasingly being used. Characteristic pathologic and radiologic findings in most common infiltrative cardiomyopathies (amyloid, sarcoid and Fabry's) are discussed and correlated with relative CMR and histologic examples. There is fairly good correlation between the non-invasive radiologic and the invasive histologic findings in common infiltrative cardiomyopathies. Non-invasive CMR with its high sensitivity and specificity has an excellent role in establishing the diagnosis and improving the prognosis of common infiltrative cardiomyopathies.

  9. Current concepts on posterior meniscal root lesion: A treatment algorithm based on the currently available evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Guan-Yang Song; Jin Zhang; Xu Li; Yue Li; Hua Feng

    2014-01-01

    Meniscal root lesion is defined as an avulsion of the tibial insertion of the meniscus or a radial tear close to the meniscal insertion, which is commonly observed at the posterior region in the clinical practice. Although a number of biomechanical and clinical studies have shown the importance of the integrity of the posterior meniscal roots, the appropriate treatment is still controversial. The purposes of this review are to develop a current understanding of how the posterior meniscal root...

  10. Current concepts on posterior meniscal root lesion: A treatment algorithm based on the currently available evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Yang Song

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Meniscal root lesion is defined as an avulsion of the tibial insertion of the meniscus or a radial tear close to the meniscal insertion, which is commonly observed at the posterior region in the clinical practice. Although a number of biomechanical and clinical studies have shown the importance of the integrity of the posterior meniscal roots, the appropriate treatment is still controversial. The purposes of this review are to develop a current understanding of how the posterior meniscal root functions and to review the available treatment options for posterior meniscal root lesion.

  11. New perspectives in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.M. Kofflard (Marcel)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractHypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a primary cardiac disorder with a heterogeneous expression. Although relatively uncommon, the disease has been studied extensively as appears from the numerous studies that have explored specific facets of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This review will focus

  12. Clinical and molecular classification of cardiomyopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Cecchi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The term “cardiomyopathies” was used for the first time 55 years ago, in 1957. Since then awareness and knowledge of this important and complex group of heart muscle diseases have improved substantially. Over these past five decades a large number of definitions, nomenclature and schemes, have been advanced by experts and consensus panel, which reflect the fast and continued advance of the scientific understanding in the field. Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of inherited myocardial diseases, which represent an important cause of disability and adverse outcome. Although considered rare diseases, the overall estimated prevalence of all cardiomyopathies is at least 3% in the general population worldwide. Furthermore, their recognition is increasing due to advances in imaging techniques and greater awareness in both the public and medical community. Cardiomyopathies represent an ideal translational model of integration between basic and clinical sciences. A multidisciplinary approach is therefore essential in order to ensure their correct diagnosis and management. In the present work, we aim to provide a concise overview of the historical background, genetic and phenotypic spectrum and evolving concepts leading to the various attempts of cardiomyopathy classifications produced over the decades.

  13. HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY IN MULTIMORBIDITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Lakhonina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aspects of diagnosis, difficulties in the diagnosis and optimal therapeutic strategies in patient with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and comorbid conditions such as arterial hypertension, ischemic heart disease, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus type 2, stenosis of the left renal artery, obesity are reviewed on the example of clinical case. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy combined with multimorbidity conditions requires a high-quality medical management, where the main goal is to improve the quality and duration of patient's life. This goal is being achieved by optimizing patient's lifestyle and assigning only the minimum amount of medications. Necessity of careful diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, evaluation of the risk of sudden death and search of optimal treatment in patients with multimorbidity pathology are demonstrated in clinical case.

  14. Treatment of Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botoni, Fernando A; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P; Marinho, Carolina Coimbra; Lima, Marcia Maria Oliveira; Nunes, Maria do Carmo Pereira; Rocha, Manoel Otávio C

    2013-01-01

    Chagas' disease (ChD), caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), was discovered and described by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas in 1909. After a century of original description, trypanosomiasis still brings much misery to humanity and is classified as a neglected tropical disease prevalent in underdeveloped countries, particularly in South America. It is an increasing worldwide problem due to the number of cases in endemic areas and the migration of infected subjects to more developed regions, mainly North America and Europe. Despite its importance, chronic chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) pathophysiology is yet poorly understood, and independently of its social, clinical, and epidemiological importance, the therapeutic approach of CCC is still transposed from the knowledge acquired from other cardiomyopathies. Therefore, the objective of this review is to describe the treatment of Chagas cardiomyopathy with emphasis on its peculiarities.

  15. Current concepts in MRI of rectus femoris musculotendinous (myotendinous) and myofascial injuries in elite athletes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassarjian, A., E-mail: Kassarjian@mac.com [Consultant Radiologist, Corades, S. L., Calle Galeon 2, 28220 Majadahonda, Madrid (Spain); Rodrigo, R.M., E-mail: rmrodrigo@resonanciamagneticabilbao.com [Resonancia Magnetica Bilbao, Hospital San Francisco Javier, Gordoniz 12, 40010 Bilbao, Vizcaya, Basque Country (Spain); Santisteban, J.M., E-mail: j.santisteban@athletic-club.net [Medical Services, Athletic Club Bilbao, Basurto Medical Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of the Basque Country, Barrio de Garaioltza 147, 48197 Lezama, Vizcaya, Basque Country (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    Rectus femoris injuries are extremely common in athletes, particularly in soccer players, rugby player, and sprinters. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in diagnosis, prognosis, and rehabilitation of these injuries. The current article discusses current concepts in the diagnosis and treatment of rectus femoris injuries in elite athletes, including a discussion of the less well known myofascial injuries and key prognostic factors as seen at MR imaging.

  16. Current concepts in MRI of rectus femoris musculotendinous (myotendinous) and myofascial injuries in elite athletes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassarjian, A.; Rodrigo, R.M.; Santisteban, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Rectus femoris injuries are extremely common in athletes, particularly in soccer players, rugby player, and sprinters. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in diagnosis, prognosis, and rehabilitation of these injuries. The current article discusses current concepts in the diagnosis and treatment of rectus femoris injuries in elite athletes, including a discussion of the less well known myofascial injuries and key prognostic factors as seen at MR imaging.

  17. Cardiomyopathy induced by anthracycline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiroz, Isabel; Espinoza, Gerson; Poveda, Maria; Flores, Walter

    2002-01-01

    Anthracycline cardiomyopathy is less frequently encountered nowadays, due to the well recognized dose limitations and cardiac monitoring protocols used by chemotherapy centers. However, it is a condition that will persist due to the sensitivity of some patients to these drugs and the necessity for large doses to be used for certain individuals. We have demonstrated the benefit of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor therapy and would consider introducing these compounds at the earliest opportunity. The use of probucol and vitamins as antioxidants capable of preventing the onset of cardiomyopathy in humans appears to require further investigation but may significantly reduce the incidence of this condition in the future. (The author)

  18. The Role of Current Techniques and Concepts in Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Houschyar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with peripheral nerve injuries, especially severe injury, often face poor nerve regeneration and incomplete functional recovery, even after surgical nerve repair. This review summarizes treatment options of peripheral nerve injuries with current techniques and concepts and reviews developments in research and clinical application of these therapies.

  19. The Role of Current Techniques and Concepts in Peripheral Nerve Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Houschyar, K. S.; Momeni, A.; Pyles, M. N.; Cha, J. Y.; Maan, Z. N.; Duscher, D.; Jew, O. S.; Siemers, F.; van Schoonhoven, J.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with peripheral nerve injuries, especially severe injury, often face poor nerve regeneration and incomplete functional recovery, even after surgical nerve repair. This review summarizes treatment options of peripheral nerve injuries with current techniques and concepts and reviews developments in research and clinical application of these therapies.

  20. Cardiomyopathy in Vici syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solaf M. Elsayed

    2018-01-12

    Jan 12, 2018 ... The syndrome was first described in 1988, in two brothers with ACC, bilateral cataracts, ... syndrome with brain anomalies, cardiomyopathy, and severe intellectual disability. Case Reports in Genetics 2011, Volume 2011. [6] Finocchi A, Angelino G, Cantarutti N, Corbari M, Bevivino E, Cascioli S, et al.

  1. Cardiomyopathy Following Latrodectus Envenomation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levine, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Latrodectus envenomations are common throughout the United States and the world. While many envenomations can result in catecholamine release with resultant hypertension and tachycardia, myocarditis is very rare. We describe a case of a 22- year-old male who sustained a Latrodectus envenomation complicated by cardiomyopathy. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(5:521-523.

  2. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be donated to Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association. iGive.com - Online Shopping Joing iGive.com to earn money for the ... it works, check out the iGive website . AmazonSmile - Online Shopping Amazon donates 0.5% of the purchase price ...

  3. Civilian Power Program. Part 1, Summary, Current status of reactor concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Author, Not Given

    1959-09-01

    This study group covered the following: delineation of the specific objectives of the overall US AEC civilian power reactor program, technical objectives of each reactor concept, preparation of a chronological development program for each reactor concept, evaluation of the economic potential of each reactor type, a program to encourage the the development, and yardsticks for measuring the development. Results were used for policy review by AEC, program direction, authorization and appropriation requests, etc. This evaluation encompassed civilian power reactors rated at 25 MW(e) or larger and related experimental facilities and R&D. This Part I summarizes the significant results of the comprehensive effort to determine the current technical and economic status for each reactor concept; it is based on the 8 individual technical status reports (Part III).

  4. Comparing Self-Concept Among Youth Currently Receiving Inpatient Versus Outpatient Mental Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chris; Ferro, Mark A

    2018-01-01

    This study compared levels of self-concept among youth who were currently receiving inpatient versus outpatient mental health services. Forty-seven youth were recruited from the Child & Youth Mental Health Program at McMaster Children's Hospital. Self-concept was measured using the Self-Perception Profile for Children and Adolescents. The mean age was 14.5 years and most participants were female (70.2%). ANOVAs comparing self-concept with population norms showed large significant effects (d = 0.77 to 1.93) indicating compromised self-concept among youth receiving mental health services. Regression analyses controlling for patient age, sex, family income, and diagnoses of major depressive disorder, generalized social phobia, and generalized anxiety showed that the inpatient setting was a significant predictor of lower global self-worth (β=-.26; p=.035). Compared to outpatients, inpatients generally reported lower self-concept, but differences were significant only for global self-worth. Future research replicating this finding and assessing its clinical significance is encouraged.

  5. New Concept for Assessment of Tidal Current Energy in Jiangsu Coast, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Sheng Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tidal current energy has attracted more and more attentions of coastal engineers in recent years, mainly due to its advantages of low environmental impact, long-term predictability, and large energy potential. In this study, a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model is applied to predict the distribution of mean density of tidal current energy and to determine a suitable site for energy exploitation in Jiangsu Coast. The simulation results including water elevation and tidal current (speed and direction were validated with measured data, showing a reasonable agreement. Then, the model was used to evaluate the distribution of mean density of tidal current energy during springtide and neap tide in Jiangsu Coast. Considering the discontinuous performance of tidal current turbine, a new concept for assessing tidal current energy is introduced with three parameters: total operating time, dispersion of operating time, and mean operating time of tidal current turbine. The operating efficiency of tidal current turbine at three locations around radial submarine sand ridges was taken as examples for comparison, determining suitable sites for development of tidal current farm.

  6. Takotsubo (Stress Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin J Hourmozdi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 59-year-old male presented to the emergency department in shock from pneumonia. The patient was initially afebrile, pulse rate 120 beats per minute, blood pressure 117/69 mmHg, respiratory rate 42 breaths per minute, pulse oximetry 94% on a non-rebreather mask and a lactate of 14 mmol/L. He became progressively more hypotensive despite fluid resuscitation and was started on norepinephrine. Shortly after, the patient developed torsades de pointes that was terminated with intravenous push magnesium. His initial ECG had shown sinus tachycardia; however, repeat ECG showed ST-segment elevation in the inferolateral leads and the patient had troponin I elevation that peaked at 16 ng/mL. Significant findings: Bedside echocardiography showed the findings consistent with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Echocardiographic images are shown in subxiphoid (A and apical four chamber (B views. Note the apical ballooning appearance (asterisk of the left ventricle (LV. Discussion: Formal echocardiography confirmed features classic for Takotsubo (stress cardiomyopathy, including globally depressed left ventricle (LV ejection fraction, systolic apical ballooning appearance of the LV, mid and apical segments of LV depression, and hyper kinesis of the basal walls. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a syndrome known to cause ST-segment elevation on ECG, transient LV dysfunction, and dysrhythmia in the absence of acute obstructive coronary disease. There is no consensus on diagnostic criteria; however, these criteria are commonly used: 1 transient hypokinesis, akinesis, or dyskinesis in the LV mid-segments with or without apical involvement; regional wall motion abnormalities that extend beyond a single epicardial vascular distribution; and frequently, but not always, a stressful trigger 2 the absence of acute coronary disease or angiographic evidence of acute plaque rupture 3 new ECG abnormalities (ST-segment elevation and/or T-wave inversion or modest

  7. Reversible ischaemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, H.; Fong, W.; Stafford, W.; Frenneaux, M.

    1995-01-01

    Atypical and typical chest pains are common symptoms in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Some of these chest pains seem to be caused by ischaemia. It is difficult to objectively demonstrate ischaemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The first line treatment for chest pain considered to be ischaemic in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the use of either a beta blocker or calcium blocker. Septal myectomy can be effective in patients with symptoms refractory to conventional t...

  8. Occlusion in implant dentistry. A review of the literature of prosthetic determinants and current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, M D

    2008-06-01

    Today the clinician is faced with widely varying concepts regarding the number, location, distribution and inclination of implants required to support the functional and parafunctional demands of occlusal loading. Primary clinical dilemmas of planning for maximal or minimal numbers of implants, their axial inclination, lengths and required volume and quality of supporting bone remain largely unanswered by adequate clinical outcome research. Planning and executing optimal occlusion schemes is an integral part of implant supported restorations. In its wider sense this includes considerations of multiple inter-relating factors of ensuring adequate bone support, implant location number, length, distribution and inclination, splinting, vertical dimension aesthetics, static and dynamic occlusal schemes and more. Current concepts and research on occlusal loading and overloading are reviewed together with clinical outcome and biomechanical studies and their clinical relevance discussed. A comparison between teeth and implants regarding their proprioceptive properties and mechanisms of supporting functional and parafunctional loading is made and clinical applications made regarding current concepts in restoring the partially edentulous dentition. The relevance of occlusal traumatism and fatigue microdamage alone or in combination with periodontal or peri-implant inflammation is reviewed and applied to clinical considerations regarding splinting of adjacent implants and teeth, posterior support and eccentric guidance schemes. Occlusal restoration of the natural dentition has classically been divided into considerations of planning for sufficient posterior support, occlusal vertical dimension and eccentric guidance to provide comfort and aesthetics. Mutual protection and anterior disclusion have come to be considered as acceptable therapeutic modalities. These concepts have been transferred to the restoration of implant-supported restoration largely by default. However, in

  9. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Houston, Brian A; Stevens, Gerin R

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a global disease with cases reported in all continents, affecting people of both genders and of various racial and ethnic origins. Widely accepted as a monogenic disease caused by a mutation in 1 of 13 or more sarcomeric genes, HCM can present catastrophically with sudden cardiac death (SCD) or ventricular arrhythmias or insidiously with symptoms of heart failure. Given the velocity of progress in both the fields of heart failure and HCM, we present a revi...

  10. MRI of the cardiomyopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Cesare, Ernesto E-mail: ernesto.dicesare@cc.univaq.it

    2001-06-01

    We examined the potentialities of Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of the main cardiomyopathies: hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive and arrhythmogenic right ventricular. The hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is generally adequately investigated by echocardiography, that well defines the myocardial thickening and the obstruction of the left ventricular output. However, by echocardiography we still have difficulties in the evaluation of the apex of the left ventricle and the right ventricle involvement. MRI provides a complete evaluation of the heart with a clear evidence also of the echocardiographic dark zones by means of a clear evidence of the apex of the right ventricle. The dilated form is also well investigated by MRI that provides a clear evaluation of the volumes, mass and ejection fraction by means of the 3D analysis including conditions of the ventricular remodelling. Moreover, this technique helps in the differential diagnosis of acute myocarditis. In the acute phase of myocarditis (first 2 weeks), in fact, the myocardium produces high signal intensity on the T2 weighted sequences due to the presence of oedema. The third form of cardiomyopathy is the restrictive one, characterised by reduced diastolic filling and diastolic volume, normality of the systolic function and parietal thickness, interstitial fibrosis and enlargement of both atria. The mean potentiality of MRI is related to the differential diagnosis with constrictive pericarditis. Only in the former, the pericardium appears irregularly thickened with areas exceeding 4 mm of pericardial thickness. Finally, the right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy represents the main indication to MRI evaluation. With this imaging modality we are can obtain a clear morpho-functional evaluation of the right ventricle and distinguish the intramyocardial adipose substitution characterised by areas of high signal in the myocardium.

  11. MRI of the cardiomyopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Cesare, Ernesto

    2001-01-01

    We examined the potentialities of Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of the main cardiomyopathies: hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive and arrhythmogenic right ventricular. The hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is generally adequately investigated by echocardiography, that well defines the myocardial thickening and the obstruction of the left ventricular output. However, by echocardiography we still have difficulties in the evaluation of the apex of the left ventricle and the right ventricle involvement. MRI provides a complete evaluation of the heart with a clear evidence also of the echocardiographic dark zones by means of a clear evidence of the apex of the right ventricle. The dilated form is also well investigated by MRI that provides a clear evaluation of the volumes, mass and ejection fraction by means of the 3D analysis including conditions of the ventricular remodelling. Moreover, this technique helps in the differential diagnosis of acute myocarditis. In the acute phase of myocarditis (first 2 weeks), in fact, the myocardium produces high signal intensity on the T2 weighted sequences due to the presence of oedema. The third form of cardiomyopathy is the restrictive one, characterised by reduced diastolic filling and diastolic volume, normality of the systolic function and parietal thickness, interstitial fibrosis and enlargement of both atria. The mean potentiality of MRI is related to the differential diagnosis with constrictive pericarditis. Only in the former, the pericardium appears irregularly thickened with areas exceeding 4 mm of pericardial thickness. Finally, the right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy represents the main indication to MRI evaluation. With this imaging modality we are can obtain a clear morpho-functional evaluation of the right ventricle and distinguish the intramyocardial adipose substitution characterised by areas of high signal in the myocardium

  12. Current concepts in the management of inguinal hernia and hydrocele in pediatric patients in laparoscopic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Ciro; Escolino, Maria; Turrà, Francesco; Roberti, Agnese; Cerulo, Mariapina; Farina, Alessandra; Caiazzo, Simona; Cortese, Giuseppe; Servillo, Giuseppe; Settimi, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    The surgical repair of inguinal hernia and hydrocele is one of the most common operations performed in pediatric surgery practice. This article reviews current concepts in the management of inguinal hernia and hydrocele based on the recent literature and the authors׳ experience. We describe the principles of clinical assessment and anesthetic management of children undergoing repair of inguinal hernia, underlining the differences between an inguinal approach and minimally invasive surgery (MIS). Other points discussed include the current management of particular aspects of these pathologies such as bilateral hernias; contralateral patency of the peritoneal processus vaginalis; hernias in premature infants; direct, femoral, and other rare hernias; and the management of incarcerated or recurrent hernias. In addition, the authors discuss the role of laparoscopy in the surgical treatment of an inguinal hernia and hydrocele, emphasizing that the current use of MIS in pediatric patients has completely changed the management of pediatric inguinal hernias. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. New perspectives in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Kofflard, Marcel

    1998-01-01

    textabstractHypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a primary cardiac disorder with a heterogeneous expression. Although relatively uncommon, the disease has been studied extensively as appears from the numerous studies that have explored specific facets of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This review will focus on the anatomic abnormalities, the prevalence, symptoms and clinical outcome, therapeutic interventions and genetic mutations responsible for the disease.

  14. Dhat syndrome: Evolution of concept, current understanding, and need of an integrated approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujita Kumar Kar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dhat syndrome has often been construed as a culture-bound sexual neurosis of the Indian subcontinent. Symptoms similar to that of Dhat syndrome has been described in other cultures across different time periods. The present paper looks at the evolution of the concept of Dhat syndrome in India. The review also takes an overview of the current understanding of this syndrome in terms of nosological status as a distinct entity and its "culture-bound" status. The narrative finally attempts to discuss the integrated approach for the treatment of this disorder.

  15. Cardiomyopathy in the pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric cardiomyopathies are a group of myocardial diseases with complex taxonomies. Cardiomyopathy can occur in children at any age, and it is a common cause of heart failure and heart transplantation in children. The incidence of pediatric cardiomyopathy is increasing with time. They may be associated with variable comorbidities, which are most often arrhythmia, heart failure, and sudden death. Medical imaging technologies, including echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and nuclear cardiology, are helpful in reaching a diagnosis of cardiomyopathy. Nevertheless, endomyocardial biopsy is the final diagnostic method of diagnosis. Patients warrant surgical operations, such as palliative operations, bridging operations, ventricular septal maneuvers, and heart transplantation, if pharmaceutical therapies are ineffective. Individual therapeutic regimens due to pediatric characteristics, genetic factors, and pathogenesis may improve the effects of treatment and patients' survival. Key Words: cardiomyopathy, classification, pediatrics

  16. The current theoretical assumptions of the Bobath concept as determined by the members of BBTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Sue

    2007-01-01

    The Bobath concept is a problem-solving approach to the assessment and treatment of individuals following a lesion of the central nervous system that offers therapists a framework for their clinical practice. The aim of this study was to facilitate a group of experts in determining the current theoretical assumptions underpinning the Bobath concept.A four-round Delphi study was used. The expert sample included all 15 members of the British Bobath Tutors Association. Initial statements were identified from the literature with respondents generating additional statements. Level of agreement was determined by using a five-point Likert scale. Level of consensus was set at 80%. Eighty-five statements were rated from the literature along with 115 generated by the group. Ninety-three statements were identified as representing the theoretical underpinning of the Bobath concept. The Bobath experts agreed that therapists need to be aware of the principles of motor learning such as active participation, opportunities for practice and meaningful goals. They emphasized that therapy is an interactive process between individual, therapist, and the environment and aims to promote efficiency of movement to the individual's maximum potential rather than normal movement. Treatment was identified by the experts as having "change of functional outcome" at its center.

  17. Current Concepts on Diabetic Nephropathy and 2014 Data on Diabetic Renal Failure in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazmino, Patricio A

    2016-07-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States and other developed countries. In 1982, diabetes accounted for 27% of patients with ESRD in the United States and rose to 36% by 1992 and to 47% in 2012. Currently, the number of prevalent cases of ESRD in the country (dialysis and transplant) exceeds more than 636,900. Primary care practitioners (PCP) provide more than 90% of the diabetic care and are well-positioned to identify, prevent, and treat initially DN. PCPs should identify DN with a urine microalbumin test, obtain a serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate, monitor hemoglobin A1c, and treat hypertension and dyslipidemia according to current guidelines. This article reviews basic concepts and goals for DN as well as the 2014 data for diabetic renal failure in the most populous counties in Texas. The Texas counties bordering Mexico show an excessive prevalence of diabetic renal failure.

  18. HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY AS A PART OF INHERITED MALFORMATION SYNDROMES IN INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Tural'chuk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The data of clinical and instrumental examination of two infantile patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in association with marked multisystem involvement as a picture of inherited malformation syndromes are given.Key words: infants, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, LEOPARD syndrome, Noonan syndrome.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2011; 10 (3: 166–169

  19. An Assessment of Current Concepts for Hydrogeological Site Characterization, and Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Y.; Barros, F.

    2007-05-01

    Characterization of the geological and hydrogeological conditions of contaminated sites is a critical element of risk management. Characterization includes data acquisition and interpretation that intends to provide the analytical tools needed for decision making related to transport of contaminants and for remediation. Despite many years of experience, site characterization is still not as well understood and regulated as it should be. The chasm between some of the newer concepts developed by researchers on the one hand, and the technology used in the field by service providers on the other, has never been wider than it is today. Consequently, questions that should be addressed using well-documented rational tools may continue to be addressed based on intuition and experience. Instead of coming up with defensible action plans and implementing them rapidly, such action plans are often a source of contention and end up in the courts. This paper evaluates concepts often used in the practice of hydrogeological site characterization, and tries to distinguish between myth and reality. It explores concepts such as: 1. Accurate descriptions of geological and hydrogeological conditions are attainable; 2. Sound planning and action plans in response to accidents require a large amount of data; 3. Investing in site characterization is a sound investment; 4. Experience gained in decontamination and decommissioning in the field is a sound basis for planning future efforts; 5. If you do not find the contaminants, they do not exist; 6. Numerical models for flow and transport processes in the subsurface are beneficial; 7. Current regulations in the area of hydrogeology are helpful. These concepts, while often invoked in applications, are often wrong and misleading or applied incorrectly, and reflect the many ambiguities prevailing in this area. This paper explores the issues raised above in detail. It also presents the elements of a consistent approach for site characterization

  20. Non-invasive brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease: Current concepts and outlook 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, David H; Hallett, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), the emergence of symptoms refractory to conventional therapy poses a therapeutic challenge. The success of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD have raised interest in non-invasive brain stimulation as an alternative therapeutic tool. The rationale for its use draws from the concept that reversing abnormalities in brain activity and physiology thought to cause the clinical deficits may restore normal functioning. Currently the best evidence in support of this concept comes from DBS, which improves motor deficits, and modulates brain activity and motor cortex physiology, though whether a causal interaction exists remains largely undetermined. Most trials of non-invasive brain stimulation in PD have applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) targeting the primary motor cortex and cortical areas of the motor circuit. Published studies suggest a possible therapeutic potential of rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), but clinical effects so far have been small and negligible regarding functional independence and quality of life. Approaches to potentiate the efficacy of rTMS, including increasing stimulation intensity and novel stimulation parameters, derive their rationale from studies of brain physiology. These novel parameters simulate normal firing patterns or act on the hypothesized role of oscillatory activity in the motor cortex and basal ganglia in motor control. There may also be diagnostic potential of TMS in characterizing individual traits for personalized medicine.

  1. Investigation of students’ intermediate conceptual understanding levels: the case of direct current electricity concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aktan, D Cobanoglu

    2013-01-01

    Conceptual understanding is one of the main topics in science and physics education research. In the majority of conceptual understanding studies, students’ understanding levels were categorized dichotomously, either as alternative or scientific understanding. Although they are invaluable in many ways, namely developing new instructional materials and assessment instruments, students’ alternative understandings alone are not sufficient to describe students’ conceptual understanding in detail. This paper introduces an example of a study in which a method was developed to assess and describe students’ conceptual understanding beyond alternative and scientific understanding levels. In this study, six undergraduate students’ conceptual understanding levels of direct current electricity concepts were assessed and described in detail by using their answers to qualitative problems. In order to do this, conceptual understanding indicators are described based on science and mathematics education literature. The students’ understanding levels were analysed by assertion analysis based on the conceptual understanding indicators. The results indicated that the participants demonstrated three intermediate understanding levels in addition to alternative and scientific understanding. This paper presents the method and its application to direct current electricity concepts. (paper)

  2. ACE I/D polymorphism in Indian patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Taranjit Singh; Dhandapany, Perundurai Subramaniam; Ahluwalia, Tarun Veer Singh

    2008-01-01

    The study was carried to determine the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism with the risk of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM)....

  3. Peripartum cardiomyopathy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersbøll, Anne S; Johansen, Marianne; Damm, Peter

    2017-01-01

    and searched for cardiomyopathy and heart failure ICD-10 diagnoses in a period of nine months before to 12 months after a delivery from 1 January 2005 through 31 December 2014. Diagnoses were validated and additional data were extracted from patient charts. A total of 61 women met the inclusion criteria...... equalling 1 in 10 149 deliveries. The majority recovered left ventricular systolic function within one year, but 14.8% suffered a major adverse event with 3.3% mortality, 8.2% mechanical circulatory support requirement and/or heart transplantation and 4.9% persistent severe heart failure. Half of the women...

  4. Off-Axis Driven Current Effects on ETB and ITB Formations based on Bifurcation Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakdeewanich, J.; Onjun, T.; Chatthong, B.

    2017-09-01

    This research studies plasma performance in fusion Tokamak system by investigating parameters such as plasma pressure in the presence of an edge transport barrier (ETB) and an internal transport barrier (ITB) as the off-axis driven current position is varied. The plasma is modeled based on the bifurcation concept using a suppression function that can result in formation of transport barriers. In this model, thermal and particle transport equations, including both neoclassical and anomalous effects, are solved simultaneously in slab geometry. The neoclassical coefficients are assumed to be constant while the anomalous coefficients depend on gradients of local pressure and density. The suppression function, depending on flow shear and magnetic shear, is assumed to affect only on the anomalous channel. The flow shear can be calculated from the force balance equation, while the magnetic shear is calculated from the given plasma current. It is found that as the position of driven current peak is moved outwards from the plasma center, the central pressure is increased. But at some point it stars to decline, mostly when the driven current peak has reached the outer half of the plasma. The higher pressure value results from the combination of ETB and ITB formations. The drop in central pressure occurs because ITB stats to disappear.

  5. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Nadia; Dietrich, Jennifer; Nyhan, Daniel; Mitter, Nanhi; Yee, May-Sann; Brady, MaryBeth

    2015-03-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a relatively common disorder that anesthesiologists encounter among patients in the perioperative period. Fifty years ago, HCM was thought to be an obscure disease. Today, however, our understanding and ability to diagnose patients with HCM have improved dramatically. Patients with HCM have genotypic and phenotypic variability. Indeed, a subgroup of these patients exhibits the HCM genotype but not the phenotype (left ventricular hypertrophy). There are a number of treatment modalities for these patients, including pharmacotherapy to control symptoms, implantable cardiac defibrillators to manage malignant arrhythmias, and surgical myectomy and septal ablation to decrease the left ventricular outflow obstruction. Accurate diagnosis is vital for the perioperative management of these patients. Diagnosis is most often made using echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular hypertrophy, left ventricular outflow tract gradients, systolic and diastolic function, and mitral valve anatomy and function. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging also has a diagnostic role by determining the extent and location of left ventricular hypertrophy and the anatomic abnormalities of the mitral valve and papillary muscles. In this review on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy for the noncardiac anesthesiologist, we discuss the clinical presentation and genetic mutations associated with HCM, the critical role of echocardiography in the diagnosis and the assessment of surgical interventions, and the perioperative management of patients with HCM undergoing noncardiac surgery and management of the parturient with HCM.

  6. Mental and behavioural disorders in the ICD-11: concepts, methodologies, and current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebel, Wolfgang; Zielasek, Jürgen; Reed, Geoffrey M

    2017-04-30

    This review provides an overview of the concepts, methods and current status of the development of the Eleventh Revision of the Mental and Behavioural Disorders chapter of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-11) by the World Health Organization (WHO). Given the global use of the current version (ICD-10) for a wide range of applications in clinical practice and health statistics, a major aim of the development process for ICD-11 has been to increase the utility of the classification system. Expert working groups with responsibility for specific disorder groupings first suggested a set of revised diagnostic guidelines. Then surveys were performed to obtain suggestions for revisions from practicing health professionals. A completely revised structure for the classification of mental and behavioural disorders was developed and major revisions were suggested, for example, for schizophrenia and other primary psychotic disorders, substance use disorders, affective disorders and personality disorders. A new category of "gaming disorder" has been proposed and conditions related to sexual health and gender identity will be classified separately from mental disorders. An ICD-11 beta draft is freely available on the internet and public comments are invited. Field studies of the revised diagnostic guidelines are in process to obtain additional information about necessary improvements. A tabulated crosswalk from previous ICD-10 to then ICD-11 criteria will be necessary to ascertain the continuity of diagnoses for epidemiological and other statistical purposes. The final version of ICD-11 is currently scheduled for release by the World Health Assembly in 2018.

  7. Implementation of an active instructional design for teaching the concepts of current, voltage and resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlaineta-Agüero, S.; Del Sol-Fernández, S.; Sánchez-Guzmán, D.; García-Salcedo, R.

    2017-01-01

    In the present work we show the implementation of a learning sequence based on an active learning methodology for teaching Physics, this proposal tends to promote a better learning in high school students with the use of a comic book and it combines the use of different low-cost experimental activities for teaching the electrical concepts of Current, Resistance and Voltage. We consider that this kind of strategy can be easily extrapolated to higher-education levels like Engineering-college/university level and other disciplines of Science. To evaluate this proposal, we used some conceptual questions from the Electric Circuits Concept Evaluation survey developed by Sokoloff and the results from this survey was analysed with the Normalized Conceptual Gain proposed by Hake and the Concentration Factor that was proposed by Bao and Redish, to identify the effectiveness of the methodology and the models that the students presented after and before the instruction, respectively. We found that this methodology was more effective than only the implementation of traditional lectures, we consider that these results cannot be generalized but gave us the opportunity to view many important approaches in Physics Education; finally, we will continue to apply the same experiment with more students, in the same and upper levels of education, to confirm and validate the effectiveness of this methodology proposal.

  8. On the concept of e-maintenance: Review and current research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Alexandre [Nancy Research Centre for Automatic Control (CRAN), UMR 7039 CNRS-UHP, INPL, 2, rue Jean Lamour, 54519 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Crespo Marquez, Adolfo [Department of Industrial Management, School of Engineering, University of Seville, Camino de los Descubrimientos, s/n. 41092 Sevilla (Spain)], E-mail: adolfo.crespo@esi.us.es; Iung, Benoit [Nancy Research Centre for Automatic Control (CRAN), UMR 7039 CNRS-UHP, INPL, 2, rue Jean Lamour, 54519 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France)

    2008-08-15

    The importance of the maintenance function has increased because of its role in keeping and improving system availability and safety, as well as product quality. To support this role, the development of the communication and information technologies has allowed the emergence of the concept of e-maintenance. Within the era of e-manufacturing and e-business, e-maintenance provides the opportunity for a new maintenance generation. As we will discuss later in this paper, e-maintenance integrates existing telemaintenance principles, with Web services and modern e-collaboration principles. Collaboration allows to share and exchange not only information but also knowledge and (e)-intelligence. By means of a collaborative environment, pertinent knowledge and intelligence become available and usable at the right place and time, in order to facilitate reaching the best maintenance decisions. This paper outlines the basic ideas within the e-maintenance concept and then provides an overview of the current research and challenges in this emerging field. An underlying objective is to identify the industrial/academic actors involved in the technological, organizational or management issues related to the development of e-maintenance. Today, this heterogeneous community has to be federated in order to bring up e-maintenance as a new scientific discipline.

  9. YARR - A PCIe based Readout Concept for Current and Future ATLAS Pixel Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Timon

    2017-10-01

    The Yet Another Rapid Readout (YARR) system is a DAQ system designed for the readout of current generation ATLAS Pixel FE-I4 and next generation chips. It utilises a commercial-off-the-shelf PCIe FPGA card as a reconfigurable I/O interface, which acts as a simple gateway to pipe all data from the Pixel modules via the high speed PCIe connection into the host system’s memory. Relying on modern CPU architectures, which enables the usage of parallelised processing in threads and commercial high speed interfaces in everyday computers, it is possible to perform all processing on a software level in the host CPU. Although FPGAs are very powerful at parallel signal processing their firmware is hard to maintain and constrained by their connected hardware. Software, on the other hand, is very portable and upgraded frequently with new features coming at no cost. A DAQ concept which does not rely on the underlying hardware for acceleration also eases the transition from prototyping in the laboratory to the full scale implementation in the experiment. The overall concept and data flow will be outlined, as well as the challenges and possible bottlenecks which can be encountered when moving the processing from hardware to software.

  10. On the concept of e-maintenance: Review and current research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, Alexandre; Crespo Marquez, Adolfo; Iung, Benoit

    2008-01-01

    The importance of the maintenance function has increased because of its role in keeping and improving system availability and safety, as well as product quality. To support this role, the development of the communication and information technologies has allowed the emergence of the concept of e-maintenance. Within the era of e-manufacturing and e-business, e-maintenance provides the opportunity for a new maintenance generation. As we will discuss later in this paper, e-maintenance integrates existing telemaintenance principles, with Web services and modern e-collaboration principles. Collaboration allows to share and exchange not only information but also knowledge and (e)-intelligence. By means of a collaborative environment, pertinent knowledge and intelligence become available and usable at the right place and time, in order to facilitate reaching the best maintenance decisions. This paper outlines the basic ideas within the e-maintenance concept and then provides an overview of the current research and challenges in this emerging field. An underlying objective is to identify the industrial/academic actors involved in the technological, organizational or management issues related to the development of e-maintenance. Today, this heterogeneous community has to be federated in order to bring up e-maintenance as a new scientific discipline

  11. Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy in a patient with a rare loss-of-function KCNQ1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qinmei; Cao, Qing; Zhou, Qiongqiong; Xie, Jinyan; Shen, Yang; Wan, Rong; Yu, Jianhua; Yan, Sujuan; Marian, Ali J; Hong, Kui

    2015-01-23

    Ventricular tachycardia (VT) is a common manifestation of advanced cardiomyopathies. In a subset of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, VT is the initial and the cardinal manifestation of the disease. The molecular genetic basis of this subset of dilated cardiomyopathy is largely unknown. We identified 10 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy who presented with VT and sequenced 14 common causal genes for cardiomyopathies and arrhythmias. Functional studies included cellular patch clamp, confocal microscopy, and immunoblotting. We identified nonsynonymous variants in 4 patients, including a rare missense p.R397Q mutation in the KCNQ1 gene in a 60-year-old man who presented with incessant VT and had mild cardiac dysfunction. The p.R397Q mutation was absent in an ethnically matched control group, affected a conserved amino acid, and was predicted by multiple algorithms to be pathogenic. Co-expression of the mutant KCNQ1 with its partner unit KCNE1 was associated with reduced tail current density of slowly activating delayed rectifier K(+) current (IKs). The mutation reduced membrane localization of the protein. Dilated cardiomyopathy with an initial presentation of VT may be a forme fruste of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy caused by mutations in genes encoding the ion channels. The findings implicate KCNQ1 as a possible causal gene for arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  12. Genetics of cardiomyopathies in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Vatta

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathies are diseases of the heart muscle leading to heart failure and/or an increased risk of arrhythmogenic sudden cardiac death. These disorders represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children. In childhood forms of cardiomyopathy, genetic etiologies are frequent, but non-genetic or acquired causes, such viral infection, also play a significant role. In the last twenty years, the genetic causes of cardiomyopathies have been increasingly identified and clinical correlations are beginning to be defined. Here we present an overview of the recent advances in our understanding of the genetics of cardiomyopathies in children and what is known about the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these gene-related forms of disease.

  13. Current Concepts for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Criterion–Based Rehabilitation Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ADAMS, DOUGLAS; LOGERSTEDT, DAVID; HUNTER-GIORDANO, AIRELLE; AXE, MICHAEL J.; SNYDER-MACKLER, LYNN

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The management of patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction should be evidence based. Since our original published guidelines in 1996, successful outcomes have been consistently achieved with the rehabilitation principles of early weight bearing, using a combination of weight-bearing and non–weight-bearing exercise focused on quadriceps and lower extremity strength, and meeting specific objective requirements for return to activity. As rehabilitative evidence and surgical technology and procedures have progressed, the original guidelines should be revisited to ensure that the most up-to-date evidence is guiding rehabilitative care. Emerging evidence on rehabilitative interventions and advancements in concomitant surgeries, including those addressing chondral and meniscal injuries, continues to grow and greatly affect the rehabilitative care of patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The aim of this article is to update previously published rehabilitation guidelines, using the most recent research to reflect the most current evidence for management of patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The focus will be on current concepts in rehabilitation interventions and modifications needed for concomitant surgery and pathology. PMID:22402434

  14. Current concepts of otitis media in adults as a reflux-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Michihiko; Kato, Toshinari; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2013-08-01

    To review the findings of otitis media in adults in relation to supraesophageal reflux of gastrointestinal contents and summarize current concepts. Literature published in English-language journals from 2001 to the present identified by searching electronic databases (MEDLINE and Web of Science). Clinical articles that contained the terms reflux, ear, otitis media, and adult and relevant animal studies. Findings of searchable case reports and results of animal studies were included. Current findings were reviewed for the following points: 1) proposed effect of reflux, 2) prevalence and characteristics, 3) risk factors, and 4) treatment. Published literature concerning reflux and otitis media in adults is limited to clinical case series. Reflux is likely present in a significant number of adult cases with otitis media and may lead to Eustachian tube dysfunction in such subjects. Reflux in adult subjects with otitis media is potentially different from the physiologic events observed in children, but the causal link between them remains unclear. Evaluation of more cases that could be diagnosed as reflux-induced otitis media is necessary for better understanding of the disease entity.

  15. New insights into cirrhotic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Hove, Jens D; Dixen, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy designates a cardiac dysfunction, which includes reduced cardiac contractility with systolic and diastolic dysfunction, and presence of electrophysiological abnormalities in particular prolongation of the QT interval. Several pathophysiological mechanisms including reduced...... beta-receptor function seem involved in the autonomic and cardiac dysfunction. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy can be revealed by tissue Doppler imaging but is best demasked by physical or pharmacological stress. Liver transplantation may revert cardiac dysfunction but surgery and shunt insertion may also...

  16. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Roopali; Oade, Yvette

    2011-08-24

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a rare inherited disease of the heart muscle that causes ventricular tachyarrhythmias and sudden death in young people and athletes. It results in fibrofatty replacement of the right ventricle, and the subepicardial region of the left ventricle. It is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in young people after hypertrophic heart disease. Diagnosis can be difficult and at present there is no cure for ARVC. Prevention of sudden death is the most important management strategy. Paediatricians need to be aware of the possibility of ARVC in adolescents and young adults presenting with palpitations, fatigue, syncope or cardiac arrest. The authors present two cases of apparently healthy teenage boys who died suddenly and unexpectedly. Postmortem examination of the myocardium was strongly suggestive of ARVC in both cases.

  17. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karchmer-Krivitzky, S; Espinosa-Fernández, R; Sánchez-Aranda, A; LópezRioja, M J; Monzalbo-Núñez, D

    2016-08-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy also known as cardiomyopathy associated with pregnancy, is rarely a cause of heart failure, it affects pregnant or puerperal women in the first 5 months. Although the first case reported was in 1849, it was recognized until 1930. In 2010 the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on peripartum cardiomyopathy, defined this pathology as an idiopathic cardiomyopathy that affects pregnant women between the third trimester and five months after delivery. Characterized by a left ventricular failure with an ejection fraction of ≤45% and an end-diastolic dimension ≥2.7 cm/m2 , in absence of an identifiable cause of heart failure. We report a case of a 39-year-old patient, diagnosed with a peripartum cardiomyopathy in the early puerperium, characterized by hypertension, tachycardia, dyspnea and oxygen desaturation. The transesophageal echocardiogram reported heart failure, a hypokinetic left ventricle and a ventricular failure with an ejection fraction <40%. We could not identify an other cause to justify heart failure. Multidisciplinary management was administered successfully. The importance of this article relies in the fact that eripartum cardiomyopathy has a high morbidity and mortality. The impact of this pathology is unknow in our country. Here we establish and discuss the multidisciplinary management held in our hospital with this specific patient in order to improve the prognosis on future occasions.

  18. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Leontyeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common form of cardiomyopathy, occurring in childhood, occurring when a gene is mutated that encodes proteins of sarcomeric and non-sarcomeric complexes. The diagnosis of the disease is based on the data of echocardiography, revealing structural changes in the heart muscle according to the type of hypertrophy, while the genesis of these changes remains unclear. The causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in childhood are diverse. Of great importance is the early diagnosis of metabolic forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, so in some cases regress of hypertrophy is possible against the background of enzyme-substitution or other drug therapy. The article presents a clinical (cardiac and extracardiac symptoms and laboratory markers of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with mutations of genes of proteins of the sarcomeric complex, congenital metabolic disorders (glycogenoses, lysosomal pathology, fatty acid metabolism disorders, and mitochondrial diseases, genetic syndromes (Noonan, LEOPARD, Costello, cardio-fascial-cutaneous, neuromuscular diseases. The criteria for differential diagnosis of genetic forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and myocardial hypertrophy in athletes are presented. 

  19. Genetic advances in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Carolyn Y; Charron, Philippe; Richard, Pascale; Girolami, Francesca; Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Pinto, Yigal

    2015-04-01

    Genetic studies in the 1980s and 1990s led to landmark discoveries that sarcomere mutations cause both hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Sarcomere mutations also likely play a role in more complex phenotypes and overlap cardiomyopathies with features of hypertrophy, dilation, diastolic abnormalities, and non-compaction. Identification of the genetic cause of these important conditions provides unique opportunities to interrogate and characterize disease pathogenesis and pathophysiology, starting from the molecular level and expanding from there. With such insights, there is potential for clinical translation that may transform management of patients and families with inherited cardiomyopathies. If key pathways for disease development can be identified, they could potentially serve as targets for novel disease-modifying or disease-preventing therapies. By utilizing gene-based diagnostic testing, we can identify at-risk individuals prior to the onset of clinical disease, allowing for disease-modifying therapy to be initiated early in life, at a time that such treatment may be most successful. In this section, we review the current application of genetics in clinical management, focusing on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as a paradigm; discuss state-of-the-art genetic testing technology; review emerging knowledge of gene expression in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies; and discuss both the prospects, as well as the challenges, of bringing genetics to medicine. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  20. Twenty Years of Alcohol Septal Ablation in Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigopoulos, Angelos G.; Seggewiss, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy is the most common genetic cardiac disease and is generally characterised by asymmetric septal hypertrophy and intraventricular obstruction. Patients with severe obstruction and significant symptoms that persist despite optimal medical treatment are candidates for an invasive septal reduction therapy. Twenty years after its introduction, percutaneous transluminal alcohol septal ablation has been increasingly preferred for septal reduction in patients with drug refractory hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. Myocardial contrast echocardiography and injection of reduced alcohol volumes have increased safety, while efficacy is comparable to the surgical alternative, septal myectomy, which has for decades been regarded as the ‘gold standard’ treatment. Data on medium- and long-term survival show improved prognosis with survival being similar to the general population. Current guidelines have supported its use by experienced operators in centres specialised in the treatment of patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. PMID:25563291

  1. Risk of Cardiomyopathy in Younger Persons With a Family History of Death from Cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranthe, Mattis F; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Øyen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recommendations for presymptomatic screening of relatives of cardiomyopathy patients are based on findings from tertiary centers. Cardiomyopathy inheritance patterns are fairly well understood, but how cardiomyopathy in younger persons (<50 years) aggregates in families at the populat......BACKGROUND: Recommendations for presymptomatic screening of relatives of cardiomyopathy patients are based on findings from tertiary centers. Cardiomyopathy inheritance patterns are fairly well understood, but how cardiomyopathy in younger persons (families...... at the population level is unclear. In a nationwide cohort, we examined the risk of cardiomyopathy by family history of premature death (... ascertained family history of premature (

  2. An Overview of the Mid-Infrared Spectro-Interferometer MATISSE: Science, Concept, and Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, A.; Lopez, B.; Antonelli, P.; Lehmitz, M.; Bettonvil, F.; Beckmann, U.; Lagarde, S.; Jaffe, W.; Petrov, R. G.; Berio, P.; hide

    2016-01-01

    MATISSE is the second-generation mid-infrared spectrograph and imager for the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) at Paranal. This new interferometric instrument will allow significant advances by opening new avenues in various fundamental research fields: studying the planet-forming region of disks around young stellar objects, understanding the surface structures and mass loss phenomena affecting evolved stars, and probing the environments of black holes in active galactic nuclei. As a first breakthrough, MATISSE will enlarge the spectral domain of current optical interferometers by offering the L and M bands in addition to the N band. This will open a wide wavelength domain, ranging from 2.8 to 13 microns, exploring angular scales as small as 3 mas (L band) 10 mas (N band). As a second breakthrough, MATISSE will allow mid-infrared imaging - closure-phase aperture-synthesis imaging - with up to four Unit Telescopes (UT) or Auxiliary Telescopes (AT) of the VLTI. Moreover, MATISSE will offer a spectral resolution range from R approx. 30 to R approx. 5000. Here, we present one of the main science objectives, the study of protoplanetary disks, that has driven the instrument design and motivated several VLTI upgrades (GRA4MAT and NAOMI). We introduce the physical concept of MATISSE including a description of the signal on the detectors and an evaluation of the expected performances. We also discuss the current status of the MATISSE instrument, which is entering its testing phase, and the foreseen schedule for the next two years that will lead to the first light at Paranal.

  3. The Role of Echocardiography in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Ping Sun

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is a common genetic cardiovascular disease and appears in all ethnic groups. HCM is diagnosed on the basis of left ventricular hypertrophy. Echocardiography is a key technique in the diagnosis of HCM, the prognosis of patients with HCM, the management strategy for HCM, and the follow-up of patients with HCM. This review briefly describes and discusses the practical use of established echocardiography techniques and the current and emerging echocardiographic methods that can help physicians in the correct diagnostic and pathophysiological assessment of patients with HCM.

  4. The shaft fractures of the radius and ulna in children: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinikumpu, Juha-Jaakko; Serlo, Willy

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of forearm shaft fractures in children has increased in recent years. They are challenging to treat and they can result in several long-lasting complications. The treatment of children's fractures needs to be individualized to their needs. Nonoperative care will be satisfactory for young, preschool children and it is primarily treatment in stable fractures of children at every age. Injury mechanism must be understood to perform appropriate closed reduction. Immobilization using a long-arm cast needs to be focused against the deforming muscle forces - in particular those that rotate - in the forearm, keeping the bones in alignment until bone healing. Operative stabilization by elastic stable intramedullary nailing is the primarily method of treatment in cases of unstable fractures, in particular, in children between preschool age and adolescence. For older children near to skeletal maturity, a rigid plate and screw fixation will be justified. The most common complication after closed treatment is worsening of the alignment and need for repetitive interventions. elastic stable intramedullary nailing results usually in good outcome, and range of forearm rotation is the main feature determining the clinical result. In this article, we report the current concept of paediatric shaft fractures in the radius and ulna.

  5. Inclusion-body myositis, a multifactorial muscle disease associated with aging: current concepts of pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askanas, Valerie; Engel, W King

    2007-11-01

    Sporadic inclusion-body myositis, the most common muscle disease of older persons, has no known cause or persistently beneficial treatment. The unfolding pathogenesis could lead to new treatment strategies and it is now of growing interest among clinicians and basic scientists. About 100 papers related to the subject were published in 2006 and the first part of 2007 (we cite only articles most relevant to this review). This review focuses on the current concepts of the pathogenesis of sporadic inclusion-body myositis. Both degeneration and mononuclear-cell inflammation are components of the pathology, but how each relates to the pathogenesis remains unclear. We suggest that an intramuscle fiber degenerative component is primary, leading to muscle-fiber destruction, while the lymphocytic inflammatory component may only slightly contribute to sporadic inclusion-body myositis muscle-fiber damage. Intracellular accumulation of amyloid-beta precursor protein, amyloid-beta, and amyloid-beta oligomers in an aging muscle-fiber cellular milieu, and other abnormalities, appear to be key pathogenic factors. We summarize intracellular molecular events and their consequences, and correlate findings in sporadic inclusion-body myositis muscle biopsies with inclusion-body myositis experimental models in tissue culture and in transgenic mice. Treatment of sporadic inclusion-body myositis remains a challenge. Antiinflammatory approaches used so far are without major or enduring benefit. Possible new treatment avenues are suggested.

  6. Current concepts in treatment of fracture-dislocations of the proximal interphalangeal joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Steven C; Chung, Kevin C

    2014-12-01

    Proximal interphalangeal joint fracture-dislocations are common injuries that require expedient and attentive treatment for the best outcomes. Management can range from protective splinting and early mobilization to complex surgery. In this review, the current concepts surrounding the management of these injuries are reviewed. A literature review was performed of all recent articles pertaining to proximal interphalangeal joint fracture-dislocation, with specific focus on middle phalangeal base fractures. Where appropriate, older articles or articles on closely related injury types were included for completeness. The methodology and outcomes of each study were analyzed. When small avulsion fractures are present, good results are routinely obtained with reduction and early mobilization of stable injuries. Strategies for management of the unstable dorsal fracture-dislocation have evolved over time. To provide early stability, a variety of techniques have evolved, including closed, percutaneous, external, and internal fixation methods. Although each of these techniques can be successful in skilled hands, none has been subjected to rigorous, prospective, comparative trials. Volar dislocations fare less well, with significant loss of motion in many studies. Pilon fractures represent the most complicated injuries, and return of normal motion is not expected. The best outcomes can be achieved by (1) establishing enough stability to allow early motion, (2) restoring gliding joint motion rather than noncongruent motion, and (3) restoring the articular surface congruity when possible. Although the majority of literature on this topic consists of expert opinion and retrospective case series, the consensus appears to favor less invasive techniques whenever possible.

  7. Current concepts: tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications in the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, S I; Pereira, H; Silva-Correia, J; Van Dijk, C N; Espregueira-Mendes, J; Oliveira, J M; Reis, R L

    2014-03-06

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) has caused a revolution in present and future trends of medicine and surgery. In different tissues, advanced TERM approaches bring new therapeutic possibilities in general population as well as in young patients and high-level athletes, improving restoration of biological functions and rehabilitation. The mainstream components required to obtain a functional regeneration of tissues may include biodegradable scaffolds, drugs or growth factors and different cell types (either autologous or heterologous) that can be cultured in bioreactor systems (in vitro) prior to implantation into the patient. Particularly in the ankle, which is subject to many different injuries (e.g. acute, chronic, traumatic and degenerative), there is still no definitive and feasible answer to 'conventional' methods. This review aims to provide current concepts of TERM applications to ankle injuries under preclinical and/or clinical research applied to skin, tendon, bone and cartilage problems. A particular attention has been given to biomaterial design and scaffold processing with potential use in osteochondral ankle lesions.

  8. Current Concepts and Occurrence of Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: I. Ameloblastoma and Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Sook

    2013-01-01

    Ameloblastomas and adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs) are common epithelial tumors of odontogenic origin. Ameloblastomas are clinico-pathologically classified into solid/multicystic, unicystic, desmoplastic, and peripheral types, and also divided into follicular, plexiform, acanthomatous, granular types, etc., based on their histological features. Craniopharyngiomas, derived from the remnants of Rathke's pouch or a misplaced enamel organ, are also comparable to the odontogenic tumors. The malignant transformation of ameloblastomas results in the formation of ameloblastic carcinomas and malignant ameloblastomas depending on cytological dysplasia and metastasis, respectively. AOTs are classified into follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral types. Ameloblastomas are common, have an aggressive behavior and recurrent course, and are rarely metastatic, while AOTs are hamartomatous benign lesions derived from the complex system of the dental lamina or its remnants. With advances in the elucidation of molecular signaling mechanisms in cells, the cytodifferentiation of epithelial tumor cells in ameloblastomas and AOTs can be identified using different biomarkers. Therefore, it is suggested that comprehensive pathological observation including molecular genetic information can provide a more reliable differential diagnosis for the propagation and prognosis of ameloblastomas and AOTs. This study aimed to review the current concepts of ameloblastomas and AOTs and to discuss their clinico-pathological features relevant to tumorigenesis and prognosis. PMID:23837011

  9. Current concepts: tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications in the ankle joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, S. I.; Pereira, H.; Silva-Correia, J.; Van Dijk, C. N.; Espregueira-Mendes, J.; Oliveira, J. M.; Reis, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) has caused a revolution in present and future trends of medicine and surgery. In different tissues, advanced TERM approaches bring new therapeutic possibilities in general population as well as in young patients and high-level athletes, improving restoration of biological functions and rehabilitation. The mainstream components required to obtain a functional regeneration of tissues may include biodegradable scaffolds, drugs or growth factors and different cell types (either autologous or heterologous) that can be cultured in bioreactor systems (in vitro) prior to implantation into the patient. Particularly in the ankle, which is subject to many different injuries (e.g. acute, chronic, traumatic and degenerative), there is still no definitive and feasible answer to ‘conventional’ methods. This review aims to provide current concepts of TERM applications to ankle injuries under preclinical and/or clinical research applied to skin, tendon, bone and cartilage problems. A particular attention has been given to biomaterial design and scaffold processing with potential use in osteochondral ankle lesions. PMID:24352667

  10. Current and emerging basic science concepts in bone biology: implications in craniofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, Adam J; Mesa, John; Buchman, Steven R

    2012-01-01

    Ongoing research in bone biology has brought cutting-edge technologies into everyday use in craniofacial surgery. Nonetheless, when osseous defects of the craniomaxillofacial skeleton are encountered, autogenous bone grafting remains the criterion standard for reconstruction. Accordingly, the core principles of bone graft physiology continue to be of paramount importance. Bone grafts, however, are not a panacea; donor site morbidity and operative risk are among the limitations of autologous bone graft harvest. Bone graft survival is impaired when irradiation, contamination, and impaired vascularity are encountered. Although the dura can induce calvarial ossification in children younger than 2 years, the repair of critical-size defects in the pediatric population may be hindered by inadequate bone graft donor volume. The novel and emerging field of bone tissue engineering holds great promise as a limitless source of autogenous bone. Three core constituents of bone tissue engineering have been established: scaffolds, signals, and cells. Blood supply is the sine qua non of these components, which are used both individually and concertedly in regenerative craniofacial surgery. The discerning craniofacial surgeon must determine the proper use for these bone graft alternatives, while understanding their concomitant risks. This article presents a review of contemporary and emerging concepts in bone biology and their implications in craniofacial surgery. Current practices, areas of controversy, and near-term future applications are emphasized.

  11. The renewed concept of the Batista operation for ischemic cardiomyopathy: maximum ventricular reduction O conceito renovado da operação de Batista na cardiomiopatia isquêmica: máxima redução ventricular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter J Gomes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The reconstruction of the left ventricle (LV is effective in the treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy with large akinetic or dyskinetic areas. However, late survival outcomes are related to the remnant left ventricular cavity size, thus eliminating intracavitary patch placement provides additional LV reduction. The aim of this study was to analyze the results with left ventricular reconstruction surgery using the concept of maximum ventricular reduction, with systematic patch abolition. METHODS: Seventy-six consecutive patients with ischemic heart disease (age 30-78 years, mean 57.6 ± 10.1, evolving in functional class III and IV underwent surgical ventricular reconstruction with no use of intracavitary patches or Teflon strips for closing the left ventriculotomy. RESULTS: The left ventricular end-systolic diameter decreased from 52.3 ± 5.4 in the preoperative period to 45.2 ± 6.9 mm in the postoperative period. LV ejection fraction increased from 34.2% ± 10.4% to 45.5% ± 9.4%. Associated CABG was performed in 75/76 patients with a mean of 2.4 grafts per patient. The 30-day mortality was 3/76 (3.9%. At an average follow up of 39 months, the majority of the patients (91.4% remain in functional class I and II. CONCLUSION: The concept of maximizing LV reduction with systematic patchless reconstruction is feasible, safe and effective, the early and late outcomes comparing favorably to previous series reported in the medical literature. Additionally, the concept meets the contemporary pathophysiologic basis of heart failure.OBJETIVO: A cirurgia de reconstrução do ventrículo esquerdo (VE é efetiva no tratamento da cardiomiopatia isquêmica com grandes áreas acinéticas ou discinéticas. Entretanto, resultados de sobrevida tardia estão relacionados ao tamanho da cavidade ventricular esquerda remanescente, portanto eliminar retalhos intracavitários pode proporcionar redução adicional do VE. O objetivo deste trabalho foi

  12. Current concepts in the management of pelvic fracture urethral distraction defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanitharan Manikandan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect (PFUDD may be associated with disabling complications, such as recurrent stricture, urinary incontinence, and erectile dysfunction. In this article we review the current concepts in the evaluation and surgical management of PFUDD, including redo urethroplasty. Materials and Methods : A PubMedTM search was performed using the keywords "pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect, anastomotic urethroplasty, pelvic fracture urethral stricture, pelvic fracture urethral injuries, and redo-urethroplasty." The search was limited to papers published from 1980 to March 2010 with special focus on those published in the last 15 years. The relevant articles were reviewed with regard to etiology, role of imaging, and the techniques of urethroplasty. Results : Pelvic fracture due to accidents was the most common etiology of PFUDD that usually involved the membranous urethra. Modern cross-sectional imaging, such as sonourethrography and magnetic resonance imaging help assess stricture pathology better, but their precise role in PFUDD management remains undefined. Surgical treatment with perineal anastomotic urethroplasty yields a success rate of more than 90% in most studies. The most important complication of surgical reconstruction is restenosis, occurring in less than 10% cases, most of which can be corrected by a redo anastomotic urethroplasty. The most common complication associated with this condition is erectile dysfunction. Urinary incontinence is a much rarer complication of this surgery in the present day. Conclusions : Anastomotic urethroplasty remains the cornerstone in the management of PFUDD, even in previously failed repairs. Newer innovations are needed to address the problem of erectile dysfunction associated with this condition.

  13. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: clinical-biomarker correlations and current concepts in pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandy, Sam; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Mitsis, Effie; Elder, Gregory; Ahlers, Stephen T; Barth, Jeffrey; Stone, James R; DeKosky, Steven T

    2014-09-17

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a recently revived term used to describe a neurodegenerative process that occurs as a long term complication of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). Corsellis provided one of the classic descriptions of CTE in boxers under the name "dementia pugilistica" (DP). Much recent attention has been drawn to the apparent association of CTE with contact sports (football, soccer, hockey) and with frequent battlefield exposure to blast waves generated by improvised explosive devices (IEDs). Recently, a promising serum biomarker has been identified by measurement of serum levels of the neuronal microtubule associated protein tau. New positron emission tomography (PET) ligands (e.g., [18 F] T807) that identify brain tauopathy have been successfully deployed for the in vitro and in vivo detection of presumptive tauopathy in the brains of subjects with clinically probable CTE. Major academic and lay publications on DP/CTE were reviewed beginning with the 1928 paper describing the initial use of the term CTE by Martland. The major current concepts in the neurological, psychiatric, neuropsychological, neuroimaging, and body fluid biomarker science of DP/CTE have been summarized. Newer achievements, such as serum tau and [18 F] T807 tauopathy imaging, are also introduced and their significance has been explained. Recent advances in the science of DP/CTE hold promise for elucidating a long sought accurate determination of the true prevalence of CTE. This information holds potentially important public health implications for estimating the risk of contact sports in inflicting permanent and/or progressive brain damage on children, adolescents, and adults.

  14. Androgen replacement therapy in late-onset hypogonadism: current concepts and controversies - a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Juuso I; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo

    2011-01-01

    Normal testicular function is essential for the maintenance of male physical strength and behaviour irrespective of age. A new term of late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) has been coined for the condition of decreased testosterone (T) and hypogonadal symptoms in ageing men. The most important testicular hormone, T, is responsible for the gender-specific androgenic-anabolic effects in men. Testicular T production remains stable until around the age of 40 years after which it declines by 1-2% annually. Despite this age-related decline, serum T levels in most older men remain within the reference range of younger men. The decreasing androgen levels are paralleled by well-defined objective biological and nonspecific subjective signs and symptoms of ageing. Because these symptoms are similar to those observed in young men with documented hypogonadism, androgen replacement therapy (ART) has been considered a logical way to treat them. A thorough review of the existing literature was performed to evaluate the current concepts and controversies related to ageing men and ART. Although it is intuitively logical that the symptoms of LOH are due to the ageing-related deficiency of T, and that they can be reversed by ART, the evidence for this is still variable and often weak. In particular, evidence-based information about long-term benefits and risks of ART in ageing men is largely missing. Despite widespread use, evidence-based proof for the objective benefits and side effects of ART of elderly men is still scanty, and such treatments should be considered experimental. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Immune evasion in acute myeloid leukemia: current concepts and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, Ryan M; Kline, Justin

    2013-08-27

    Immune responses generated against malignant cells have the potential to inhibit tumor growth, or even eliminate transformed cells before a tumor forms. However, immune tolerance mechanisms that normally protect healthy tissues from autoimmune damage pose a formidable barrier to the development of effective anti-tumor immunity. Because malignant cells are derived from self-tissues, the majority of defined tumor antigens are either shared or aberrantly expressed self-proteins. Eliciting productive T cell responses against such proteins is challenging, as most high-affinity, self-reactive T cells are purged during thymic selection. Some T cells capable of tumor antigen recognition escape thymic deletion, but are functionally inhibited by peripheral tolerance mechanisms which limit their ability to attack a developing malignancy. Alternatively, some tumors express antigens derived from mutated self-proteins, viral proteins or self proteins expressed only during embryonic development. These antigens are recognized by the immune system as foreign and could be recognized by a relatively large number of peripheral T cells. Even in this scenario, tumors evade otherwise effective T cell responses by employing potent immunosuppressive mechanisms within their local environment. In the setting for solid malignancies, such as melanoma, a growing number of putative immune evasion mechanisms have been characterized. However, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a systemic disease, and the pathways it exploits to subvert the host immune response may be quite different than those of a solid tumor. Much remains unknown regarding the immune escape mechanisms promoted by AML, and whether efforts to thwart tolerance may influence the progression of this disease. Here, we review current concepts of immune evasion in AML, and speculate how potentially effective immunotherapeutic strategies might be developed to reverse immune tolerance in leukemia patients in the future.

  16. HYPERTROPHIC OBSTRUCTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Osiev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCMP is a relatively common disease with genetic predisposition, that is widely spread irrespective of gender, race or ethnicity. The cause of this pathology are mutations of genes encoding synthesis of contracting proteins. Degree and type of mutations define clinical manifestation of the disease and its prognosis. HCMP is classified according to four main criteria: depending on morphology, presence of left ventricular outlet obstruction, pressure gradient and hemodynamic parameters. Its prevalence amounts to 1:500, and in the recent years mortality has decreased significantly to 1%. Main symptoms of HCMP include dyspnoea, dizziness, syncope, angina, and heart arrhythmias. HCMP does not manifest obligatorily with all above mentioned signs and symptoms. Presence and severity of any symptoms depend on morphological particulars of the disease. Particular attention should be paid to arrhythmias, with atrial fibrillation among them, that may cause hazardous and occasionally lethal complications. Electrocardiography and echocardiography are recognized as the “golden standard” of HCMP diagnostics, while in the recent years, magnetic resonance imaging has become a highly informative diagnostic tool. Radionuclide diagnostics is used less frequently, while physical examination and assessments have been moving backwards. At present, main strategies in HCMP include medical treatment with β-blockers, calcium antagonists, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and anti-arrhythmics. There are two techniques for surgical treatment, i.e. myectomy by Morrow and alcohol septal ablation that is becoming increasingly popular. The article reviews literature on state-of-the-art diagnostics and treatment of HCMP patients.

  17. Peripartum cardiomyopathy - case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Gowri Sayi; Bhupali, Ashok; Prasad, Sayi; Patil, Ajit N; Deka, Yashodhan

    2014-01-01

    To study the pattern of presentation, course of disease and outcome of pregnancy in Peripartum Cardiomyopathy. A prospective study of sixteen cases of PPCM was conducted at Apple Saraswati Multispecialty Hospital and Dr. D.Y. Patil Medical College and Hospital, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, India from January 2006 to December 2012. Data included age distribution, parity, gestational age, symptoms and risk factors. Medical management and pregnancy outcome were documented. Serial echocardiography data was compiled for a period of one year. In our study 9/16 (56%) were primigravidae, 4/16 (25%) had pre-eclamsia and 6/16 (35%) had co-existing hypertension. The difference in Echocardiography parameters observed between recovered and non-recovered patients was significant: Left Ventricular End diastolic dimension (5.6 cm vs 6.06 cm), Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction (28.7% vs 22.4%) and Left Ventricular fractional shortening (17.5% vs 13.4%). Thirteen out of sixteen patients were followed up for a period of one year out of which 61% (8/13) patients recovered completely. There was one mortality. PPCM is a diagnosis of exclusion. Majority were young primigravidae presenting postnatally. Pre-eclampsia and hypertension were risk factors. ECHO parameters were reliable predictors of recovery. Future pregnancies are better avoided. Copyright © 2014 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Heart transplantation for Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Ana Rita; Prieto, David; Antunes, Pedro; Franco, Fátima; Antunes, Manuel J

    2017-11-01

    Chagas disease is an endemic disease in Latin America that is increasingly found in non-endemic areas all over the world due to the flow of migrants from Central and South America. We present the case of a Brazilian immigrant in Portugal who underwent orthotopic heart transplantation for end-stage Chagas cardiomyopathy. Immunosuppressive therapy included prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus. Twelve months after the procedure she is asymptomatic, with good graft function, and with no evidence of complications such as graft rejection, opportunistic infections, neoplasms or reactivation of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. By reporting the first case in Portugal of heart transplantation for Chagas cardiomyopathy, we aim to increase awareness of Chagas disease as an emerging global problem and of Chagas cardiomyopathy as a serious complication for which heart transplantation is a valuable therapeutic option. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Magnetic Field Due to a Finite Length Current-Carrying Wire Using the Concept of Displacement Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschauer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In undergraduate E&M courses the magnetic field due to a finite length, current-carrying wire can be calculated using the Biot-Savart law. However, to the author's knowledge, no textbook presents the calculation of this field using the Ampere-Maxwell law: ?B [multiplied by] dl = µ[subscript 0] (I + e[subscript 0] dF/dt) [multiplied by] 1

  20. A Study of Second-Year Engineering Students' Alternative Conceptions about Electric Potential, Current Intensity and Ohm's Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periago, M. Cristina; Bohigas, Xavier

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate and analyse second-year industrial engineering and chemical engineering students prior knowledge of conceptual aspects of "circuit theory". Specifically, we focused on the basic concepts of electric potential and current intensity and on the fundamental relationship between them as expressed by Ohm's law.…

  1. Instability of the sternoclavicular joint: current concepts in classification, treatment and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, M D; Al-Hadithy, N; Le Leu, A; Lambert, S M

    2013-06-01

    medial retroclavicular space, as well as an anatomical barrier to unsafe intervention. This review presents current concepts of instability of the SCJ, describes the relevant surgical anatomy, provides a framework for diagnosis and management, including physiotherapy, and discusses the technical challenges of operative intervention.

  2. Late-onset hypogonadism: Current concepts and controversies of pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhtaniemi, Ilpo

    2014-01-01

    - and long-term risks, is not yet available. In this review, we will summarize the current concepts and controversies in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of LOH. PMID:24407185

  3. PVCs, PVC-Induced Cardiomyopathy, and the Role of Catheter Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Esseim; Arunachalam, Karuppiah; Di, Mengyang; Chu, Antony; Maan, Abhishek

    2017-06-01

    Premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) are common arrhythmias noticed in the clinical setting because of premature depolarization of the ventricular myocytes. Although often thought to be reflective of underlying disease rather than intrinsically harmful, PVCs have recently been linked with worse outcomes in patients without significant cardiac disease. Long-term exposure to a high PVC burden can lead to the development of PVC-induced cardiomyopathy. The pathogenesis of this condition is poorly understood at the current time. Many studies have suggested that catheter ablation of these PVCs may result in reversal of the PVC-induced cardiomyopathy. This article will go over the natural history of PVCs and PVC-induced cardiomyopathy, as well as review the current literature on the role of catheter ablation in treating PVC-induced cardiomyopathy.

  4. Concept of loneliness, and perception of their current life moment, among elderly adults from Bello, Colombia, 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo L. Cardona J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the concept of loneliness and perception of the moment experienced by adults 55 and older in the municipality of Bello (Antioquia in 2007. Methodology: A cross-sectional study. Two were open-ended questions were coded and were crossed with socio-demographic variables. The convenience sample was comprised of 180 adults of both sexes, residents in the municipality of Bello (Antioquia and were not institutionalized. Results: The predominant concepts of loneliness were “being alone” (42.7%, “feeling lonely” (23%, followed by “horrible” (13.5% and “isolated” (7.5%, and other concepts (12.5% emphasized that the concept of loneliness is associated with socio-economic stratum and educational level attained. Conclusions: The survey population is predominant in a more objective (alone than subjective (feeling alone of loneliness. The way to perceive the current stage of life has a close relationship with the concept of loneliness, those who perceive it in a positive way choose preferably objectives concepts of loneliness. Despite the major changes experienced by older adults and the crises that must pass through this life cycle, it is generally perceived that they feel comfortable with the moment of their existence.

  5. Current liquid metal cooled fast reactor concepts: use of the dry reprocess fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jee Won; Jeong, C. J.; Yang, M. S

    2003-03-01

    Recent Liquid metal cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) concepts are reviewed for investigating the potential usability of the Dry Reprocess Fuel (DRF). The LFRs have been categorized into two different types: the sodium cooled and the lead cooled systems. In each category, overall design and engineering concepts are collected which includes those of S-PRISM, AFR300, STAR, ENHS and more. Specially, the nuclear fuel types which can be used in these LFRs, have been summarized and their thermal, physical and neutronic characteristics are tabulated. This study does not suggest the best-matching LFR for the DRF, but shows good possibility that the DRF fuel can be used in future LFRs.

  6. Current liquid metal cooled fast reactor concepts: use of the dry reprocess fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jee Won; Jeong, C. J.; Yang, M. S.

    2003-03-01

    Recent Liquid metal cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) concepts are reviewed for investigating the potential usability of the Dry Reprocess Fuel (DRF). The LFRs have been categorized into two different types: the sodium cooled and the lead cooled systems. In each category, overall design and engineering concepts are collected which includes those of S-PRISM, AFR300, STAR, ENHS and more. Specially, the nuclear fuel types which can be used in these LFRs, have been summarized and their thermal, physical and neutronic characteristics are tabulated. This study does not suggest the best-matching LFR for the DRF, but shows good possibility that the DRF fuel can be used in future LFRs

  7. Comparison of three different concepts of high dynamic range and dependability optimised current measurement digitisers for beam loss systems

    CERN Document Server

    Viganò, W; Effinger, E; Venturini, G G; Zamantzas, C

    2012-01-01

    Three Different Concepts of High Dynamic Range and Dependability Optimised Current Measurement Digitisers for Beam Loss Systems will be compared on this paper. The first concept is based on Current to Frequency Conversion, enhanced with an ADC for extending the dynamic range and decreasing the response time. A summary of 3 years’ worth of operational experience with such a system for LHC beam loss monitoring will be given. The second principle is based on an Adaptive Current to Frequency Converter implemented in an ASIC. The basic parameters of the circuit are discussed and compared with measurements. Several measures are taken to harden both circuits against single event effects and to make them tolerant for operation in radioactive environments. The third circuit is based on a Fully Differential Integrator for enhanced dynamic range, where laboratory and test installation measurements will be presented. All circuits are designed to avoid any dead time in the acquisition and have reliability and fail safe...

  8. Animal models of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maass, Alexander; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is an autosomal-dominant disease that is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Disease-causing mutations have been found in eight genes encoding structural components of the thick and thin filament systems of the cardiac myocyte; it has therefore

  9. Improving Outcomes in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Vriesendorp (Pieter)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractImproving outcomes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is focused on the improvement of the therapeutic strategies for patients with HCM. First it demonstrates that individual patient selection in patients with obstructive and symptomatic HCM can lead to near normal life-expectancy;

  10. Cor triatriatum and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellaton, Cyril; O'Mahony, Costas; Ludman, Andrew J; Sekhri, Neha; Mohiddin, Saidi

    2016-12-01

    : Cor triatriatum is a rare congenital anomaly known to be associated with other inherited heart diseases. We present a nonrestrictive cor triatriatum sinistrum associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to illustrate how different multimodality noninvasive imaging techniques complement each other and can help with the diagnosis. To the best of our knowledge, this coexistence has not been previously reported.

  11. Environmental Education in Ecuador: Conceptions and Currents in Quito's Private Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viteri, Fátima; Clarebout, Geraldine; Crauwels, Marion

    2013-01-01

    While key conceptions and the status of environmental education (EE) have been reported at various international, regional, national and local levels, those in play in the schools of Quito (Ecuador) are still relatively unknown. Of particular interest to this study are private schools: they are considerable in number in Ecuador and elsewhere, yet…

  12. Border-wide assessment of intelligent transportation system (ITS) technology : current and future concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this effort was to conduct a border-wide assessment of the use of intelligent transportation systems (ITS) technologies and operational concepts at and near land border crossings between the U.S. and Mexico. The work focused on tolling...

  13. Inflammatory bowel disease. Current concepts of pathogenesis and implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocchi, C

    2002-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) still presents major challenges to the understanding of its cause, mechanisms of inflammation, and therapeutic choices to control the damaged tissue. Both types of IBD, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, have been known and investigated for over half century but neither one is fully understood nor can be satisfactorily managed. While many gaps in our knowledge still exist, the last two decades have witnessed an unprecedented progress not only in the etiology but mainly in the mechanisms underlying the chronic inflammatory response. The pattern of IBD epidemiology has drastically changed since World War II, with an increased frequency in countries that have adopted a ''westernized'' life style. A parallel and important phenomenon is the continuous drop in age of onset in children. Unfortunately, only few epidemiological clues are available, with the exception of smoking and diet. What in smoking alters the course of IBD is still a mystery and which, among thousands of additives, could represent a risk factor will remain unknown for the foreseeable future. The current emphasis on the study of the enteric flora as the source of potential antigens against which the mucosal immune system reacts appear well justified. The data from animal models appears particularly convincing. Thus, after decades of relying almost exclusively on patient-derived information, numerous animal models are generating precious new information on IBD pathogenesis. In experimental IBD the genetic background of the animal markedly influences the course of the disease, and the same is probably true in humans. The identification of NOD2 as the first mutated gene associated with a subgroup of Crohn's disease patients is the first evidence that genetics are pointing to the right direction for understanding how the environment interacts with genes to cause IBD. For many years immunology has been the main source of scientific information on mechanisms of IBD

  14. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy (Takotsubo – broken heart and mind?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redfors B

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Björn Redfors, Yangzhen Shao, Elmir Omerovic Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Abstract: Stress-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC, also known as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, is characterized by severe but potentially reversible regional left ventricular wall motion abnormalities, ie, akinesia, in the absence of explanatory angiographic evidence of a coronary occlusion. The typical pattern is that of an akinetic apex with preserved contractions in the base, but other variants are also common, including basal or midmyocardial akinesia with preserved apical function. The pathophysiology of SIC remains largely unknown but catecholamines are believed to play a pivotal role. The diverse array of triggering events that have been linked to SIC are arbitrarily categorized as either emotional or somatic stressors. These categories can be considered as different elements of a continuous spectrum, linked through the interface of neurology and psychiatry. This paper reviews our current knowledge of SIC, with focus on the intimate relationship between the brain and the heart. Keywords: stress-induced cardiomyopathy, takotsubo cardiomyopathy, catecholamine, cerebral injury, emotional stress, somatic stress

  15. An Upgrade on the Rabbit Model of Anthracycline-Induced Cardiomyopathy: Shorter Protocol, Reduced Mortality, and Higher Incidence of Overt Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, Jesús; Fernández-Del-Palacio, María Josefa; García-Nicolás, Obdulio; Seva, Juan; Brooks, Gavin; Moraleda, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Current protocols of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy in rabbits present with high premature mortality and nephrotoxicity, thus rendering them unsuitable for studies requiring long-term functional evaluation of myocardial function (e.g., stem cell therapy). We compared two previously described protocols to an in-house developed protocol in three groups: Group DOX2 received doxorubicin 2 mg/kg/week (8 weeks); Group DAU3 received daunorubicin 3 mg/kg/week (10 weeks); and Group DAU4 received daunorubicin 4 mg/kg/week (6 weeks). A cohort of rabbits received saline (control). Results of blood tests, cardiac troponin I, echocardiography, and histopathology were analysed. Whilst DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed high premature mortality (50% and 33%, resp.), DAU4 rabbits showed 7.6% premature mortality. None of DOX2 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy; 66% of DAU3 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and quickly progressed to severe congestive heart failure. Interestingly, 92% of DAU4 rabbits showed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and 67% developed congestive heart failure exhibiting stable disease. DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed alterations of renal function, with DAU3 also exhibiting hepatic function compromise. Thus, a shortened protocol of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy as in DAU4 group results in high incidence of overt dilated cardiomyopathy, which insidiously progressed to congestive heart failure, associated to reduced systemic compromise and very low premature mortality. PMID:26788502

  16. [Medical aspects of current flight safety concept of air forces of the Russian Federation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaginin, A A; Lizogub, I N

    2012-12-01

    Issues of medical supply of aviation operations, that is part of general system of flight safety are analyzed in this article. One of the main issues is development of the system of vocational preparation of medical personnel, taking part in organization and carrying flights. This issue consists of several themes: formation of united system of education from primary to post graduate; formation of modern training facility; assurance of high potential in academic and teaching staff and providing of good basic training and high learning motivation of applicants, who wants to become a air medical officer. Fundamental principles of developed concept of medical supply of flight safety are presented. It is shown that the essential condition of good implementation of the given concept is informaltion support of all its structures.

  17. The current status of the psychoanalytic theory of instinctual drives. I: Drive concept, classification, and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, A

    1983-07-01

    The evolution of Freud's theory of instinctual drives, with the accompanying models of a mental apparatus, is remarkable for its tenacious adherence to addressing the fundamental problems of human psychology, here phrased as the problems of body-mind-environment relationships. The concept of instinctual drives continues to be one of the most pervasive concepts of psychoanalysis, weathering considerable attack over the last several decades, although losing some clarity in the process. I have cited and discussed as basic issues of the concept of instinctual drives: the relationship of observational data and theoretical constructs in psychology; whether our construct of drives is or should be or can be purely psychological; the problem of conceptualizing the ontogenetic origin of mind; the issues of the "force-meaning conjunction" and the problem of psychic energy in psychoanalytic constructs; and the relation of our concept of instinctual drives to the concept of instincts in general. It seems that progress with these fundamental issues might be made by utilizing models that are more homologous with present knowledge in related fields than is Freud's reflex arc model of the nervous system, in order to build a better drive construct within the framework of psychoanalysis. The classification of instinctual drives remains a problem. Clinically, aggression seems to be a factor in conflict, very much like sexuality. Despite widespread acceptance of the idea of aggression as simply parallel to sexuality in all respects, there are major discrepancies. Perhaps aggression cannot be viewed as a drive after all; perhaps our drive construct needs to be modified to accommodate aggression. Certainly, controversy in this area has interfered with the production of good clinical studies which could begin to increase our understanding of aggression and its place in the human personality. The psychoanalytic theory of drive development has probably undergone less change in the last

  18. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and infiltrative cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Schofield, R.; Manacho, K.; Castelletti, S.; Moon, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited cardiac disease. Cardiac imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis and management, with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) an important modality. CMR provides a number of different techniques in one examination: structure and function, flow imaging and tissue characterisation particularly with the late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) technique. Other techniques include vasodilator perfusion, mapping (especially T1 mapping and ex...

  19. Systemic sclerosis: Current concepts in pathogenesis and therapeutic aspects of dermatological manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishalakshi Viswanath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is a chronic, multisystem connective tissue disease with protean clinical manifestations. Recent advances in understanding the pathogenic mechanisms have led to development of target-oriented and vasomodulatory drugs which play a pivotal role in treating various dermatological manifestations. An exhaustive literature search was done using Medline, Embase, and Cochrane library to review the recent concepts regarding pathogenesis and evidence-based treatment of salient dermatological manifestations. The concept of shared genetic risk factors for the development of autoimmune diseases is seen in SSc. It is divided into fibroproliferative and inflammatory groups based on genome-wide molecular profiling. Genetic, infectious, and environmental factors play a key role; vascular injury, fibrosis, and immune activation are the chief pathogenic factors. Vitamin D deficiency has been documented in SSc and correlates with the severity of skin involvement. Skin sclerosis, Raynaud′s phenomenon (RP with digital vasculopathies, pigmentation, calcinosis, and leg ulcers affect the patient′s quality of life. Immunosuppressives, biologicals, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are efficacious in skin sclerosis. Endothelin A receptor antagonists, calcium-channel blockers, angiotensin receptor inhibitors, prostacyclin analogs, and phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5 inhibitors are the mainstay in RP and digital vasculopathies. Pigmentation in SSc has been attributed to melanogenic potential of endothelin-1 (ET-1; the role of ET 1 antagonists and vitamin D analogs needs to be investigated. Sexual dysfunction in both male and female patients has been attributed to vasculopathy and fibrosis, wherein PDE-5 inhibitors are found to be useful. The future concepts of treating SSc may be based on the gene expression signature.

  20. Clinical Features and Echocardiographic Findings in Children with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Blesneac

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, one of the most common inherited cardiomyopathies, is a heterogeneous disease resulting from sarcomeric protein mutations, with an incidence in the adult population of 1:500. Current information on the epidemiology and outcomes of this disease in children is limited. Methods: Thirty-four children diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the Pediatric Cardiology Department from Tîrgu Mureș were evaluated concerning familial and personal history, clinical, paraclinical and therapeutic aspects. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was defined by the presence of a hypertrophied, non-dilated ventricle, in the absence of a cardiac or systemic disease that could produce ventricular hypertrophy. Results: The youngest diagnosed child was a neonate, a total of 10 patients being diagnosed until 1 year of age. In 6 cases a positive familial history was found. Noonan syndrome was found in 2 cases. Only 21 patients were symptomatic, the predominant symptoms being shortness of breath on exertion with exercise limitations. Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction was present in 21 cases (61.7%. Twenty-four patients were on β-blocking therapy, while 4 patients underwent septal myectomy. Conclusions: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a heterogeneous disorder in terms of evolution, age of onset, type and extent of hypertrophy, and the risk of sudden death. It can affect children of any age. There is a need for a complex evaluation, including familial and personal anamnesis, clinical examination, electrocardiogram and echocardiography of all patients. It is highly important to develop screening strategies, including genetic testing, for an early diagnosis, especially in asymptomatic patients with a positive familial background

  1. Current quality assurance concepts and considerations for quality control of in-clinic biochemistry testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Sally; Harr, K E; Rishniw, Mark; Pion, Paul

    2013-01-15

    Quality assurance is an implied concept inherent in every consumer's purchase of a product or service. In laboratory testing, quality assurance encompasses preanalytic (sampling, transport, and handling prior to testing), analytic (measurement), and postanalytic (reporting and interpretation) factors. Quality-assurance programs require that procedures are in place to detect errors in all 3 components and that the procedures are characterized by both documentation and correction of errors. There are regulatory bodies that provide mandatory standards for and regulation of human medical laboratories. No such regulations exist for veterinary laboratory testing. The American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASVCP) Quality Assurance and Laboratory Standards Committee was formed in 1996 in response to concerns of ASVCP members about quality assurance and quality control in laboratories performing veterinary testing. Guidelines for veterinary laboratory testing have been developed by the ASVCP. The purpose of this report was to provide an overview of selected quality-assurance concepts and to provide recommendations for quality control for in-clinic biochemistry testing in general veterinary practice.

  2. The Safety of Exercise in Individuals With Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finocchiaro, Gherardo; Sharma, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    The cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of primary myocardial diseases characterized by a propensity to fatal arrhythmias and are the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young athletes. Apart from the underlying pathologic substrate, a combination of neurohormonal, mechanical, and oxidative stressors; dehydration; electrolyte abnormalities; and acid-base disturbances may trigger fatal arrhythmias during intensive exercise. Current consensus-based documents recommend that affected athletes abstain from most competitive sports, with the exception of those involving minimal dynamic or static components, to minimize the risk of sudden cardiac death. This article aims to describe the rationale underlying current recommendations and provides guidance for recreational exercise in many asymptomatic individuals. The article concludes with pragmatic recommendations for symptomatic patients with cardiomyopathy in whom physical activity is associated with beneficial effects on the quality and, possibly, the quantity of life. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiation therapy for nonmalignant diseases in Germany. Current concepts and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich Seegenschmiedt, M.; Micke, O.; Willich, N.

    2004-01-01

    Background: radiotherapy (RT) of nonmalignant diseases has a long-standing tradition in Germany. Over the past decade significant theoretical and clinical progress has been made in this field to be internationally recognized as an important segment of clinical RT. This development is reflected in a national patterns-of-care study (PCS) conducted during the years 2001-2002. Material and methods: in 2001 and 2002, a questionnaire was mailed to all RT facilities in Germany to assess equipment, patient accrual, RT indications, and treatment concepts. 146 of 180 institutions (81%) returned all requested data: 23 university hospitals (UNI), 95 community hospitals (COM), and 28 private institutions (PRIV). The specific diseases treated at each institution and the RT concepts were analyzed for frequencies and ratios between the different institution types. All data were compared to the first PCS in 1994-1996. Results: in 137 institutions (94%) 415 megavoltage units (mean 1.7; range 1-4), and in 78 institutions (53%) 112 orthovoltage units (mean 1.1; range 0-2) were available. A mean of 37,410 patients were treated per year in all institutions: 503 (1.3%) for inflammatory disorders, 23,752 (63.5%) for degenerative, 1,252 (3.3%) for hypertrophic, and 11,051 (29.5%) for functional, other and unspecified disorders. In comparison to the first PCS there was a significant increase of patients per year (from 20,082 to 37,410; +86.3%) in most nonmalignant diseases during the past 7-8 years. Most disorders were treated in accordance with the national consensus guidelines: the prescribed dose concepts (single and total doses) varied much less during the period 2001-2002 in comparison with the previous PCS in 1994-1996. Only five institutions (3.4%) received recommendations to change single or total doses and/or treatment delivery. Univariate analysis detected significant institutional differences in the use of RT for various disorders. Conclusion: RT is increasingly accepted in

  4. The high current bus-bars of the LHC from conception to manufacture

    CERN Document Server

    Belova, L; Perinet-Marquet, J-L; Urpin, C

    2006-01-01

    The main magnets of the LHC are series-connected electrically in different excitation circuits by means of superconducting bus-bars, carrying a maximum current of 13 kA. These superconducting bus-bars consist of a superconducting cable thermally and electrically coupled to a copper section all along length. The function of the copper section is essentially to provide an alternative path for the magnet current in case the superconducting cable loses its superconductivity and returns to normal state because of a transient system disturbance or normal zone propagation coming from the neighboring magnets. When a superconducting bus-bar quenches to normal state its temperature must always stay below a safe values of about 100 ° C while the copper is conducting. With regard to that, a quench signal is initiated, which in turn triggers the ramping down of the current from 13000 A to 0....

  5. Summary and viewgraphs from the Q-121 US/Japan advanced current drive concepts workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonoli, P.; Porkolab, M.; Chan, V.; Pinsker, R.; Politzer, P.; Darrow, D.; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Watari, Tetsuo; Itoh, Satoshi; Nakamura, Yukio; James, R.; Logan, G.; Porter, G.; Thomassen, K.; Lyon, J.; Mau, Tak; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Shigetoshi

    1990-01-01

    With the emphasis placed on current drive by ITER, which requires steady state operation in its engineering phase, it is important to bring theory and experiment in agreement for each of the schemes that could be used in that design. Both neutral beam and lower hybrid (LH) schemes are in excellent shape in that regard. Since the projected efficiency of all schemes is marginal it is also important to continue our search for more efficient processes. This workshop featured experimental and theoretical work in each processes. This workshop featured experimental and theoretical work in each of these areas, that is, validation of theory and the search for better ideas. There were a number of notable results to report, the most striking again (as with last year) the long pulse operation of TRIAM-1M. A low current was sustained for over 1 hour with LH waves, using new hall-effect sensors in the equilibrium field circuit to maintain position control. In JT-60, by sharpening the wave spectrum the current drive efficiency was improved to 0.34 x 10 20 m -2 A/W and 1.5 MA of current was driven entirely by the lower hybrid system. Also in that machine, using two different LH frequencies, the H-mode was entered. Finally, by using the LH system for startup they saved 2.5 resistive volt-sec of flux, which if extrapolated to ITER would save 40 volt-sec there. For the first time, and experiment on ECH current drive showed reasonable agreement with theory. Those experiments are reported here by James (LLNL) on the D3-D machine. Substantially lower ECH current drive than expected theoretically was observed on WT-3, but if differed by being in a low absorption regime. Nonetheless, excellent physics results were achieved in the WT-3 experiments, notably in having careful measurements of the parallel velocity distributions

  6. Thinking Framework Concept: A Decolonial Epistemological Proposal for the Current Latin-American Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Soto Pimentel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The new crisis faced by Latin American governments of counter-hegemonic political projects – which had made important progress towards inclusion – against the (re strengthening of a bloc of countries with neoliberal projects that have tended to aggravate regional social problems raises the question: how to break this return to the myth of Sisyphus? Based on the presuppositions of decolonial thinking, the proposed hypothesis is that this would be - partly due to- the presence of Eurocentric features in the construction of knowledge on social problems and their solution in the political projects that are discussed in the region. This paper proposes a categorization of the concept of a thinking framework in order to identify the presence of these features in the epistemological foundations of Latin American political projects, which would go unnoticed from categories derived from hegemonic forms of knowledge.

  7. Anti-Nuclear antibodies: Current concepts and future direction for diagnosing connective tissue disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gautam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Identification of antinuclear antibodies has been used for the diagnosis of connective tissue diseases for more than fifty years. Indirect immunofluorescence on human epithelial (HEp-2 cells is considered the gold standard screening method for the detection of antinuclear autoantibodies. As the demand of ANA testing increased, the need for automation and standardization has also come forth. A high level of false positive and false negative cases is seen in various populations making it difficult to take clinical decisions. Newer technologies were introduced for the antibody detection to ensure high sensitivity and specificity. This article intends to provide an overview of the concepts on ANA testing, the different diagnostic methods available, the various patterns and clinical utility, the clinical guidelines to be followed, the drawbacks and what lies ahead in the future of ANA testing.Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2015 Vol. 5, 766-773

  8. Semiconductor-metal subwavelength grating VCSELs: new concept of emission mirror enabling vertical current injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyszanowski, Tomasz; Gebski, Marcin; Dems, Maciej; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2017-02-01

    We propose semiconductor-metal subwavelength grating (SMSG) which can be implemented as VCSEL mirror. Such new type of SMSG plays a double role of the electric contact and mirror simultaneously. It facilitates high optical power reflectance, perfectly vertical current injection. Such construction eliminates the inbuilt current confinement and allows scaling of emitted power by simple variation of SMSG spatial dimensions. To give the credibility to proposed design we perform numerical analysis of VCSEL with SMSG using fully vectorial optical model. We discuss properties of the proposed design realized in arsenide-based material configuration.

  9. Determinants of Thyrotoxic Cardiomyopathy Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Oliveros-Ruiz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to evaluate the effect of the disease duration prior to treatment, thyroid hormones level, or both on the reversibility of dilated cardiomyopathy. Between January 2006 and December 2010, a longitudinal study with a 6 months follow-up was carried on. One hundred and seventy patients with hyperthyroidism were referred to the cardiologist, and 127 had a 6 months followup after antithyroid treatment and were evaluated by echocardiography. Dilated cardiomyopathy reversibility criteria were established according to echocardiographic parameters. Complete reversibility existed when all parameters were met, partial reversibility when LVEF was ≥55% plus two or three other parameters, and no reversibility when LVEF was ≤55% regardless of other parameters. The results showed that echocardiography parameters related to the regression of myocardial mass were associated with a disease duration shorter than 10.38 months. This was the main predictive variable for reversal of dilated cardiomyopathy, followed by β-blocker treatment, and the last predictive variable was the serum level of free triiodothyronine. This study showed that the effect on the myocardium related to thyrotoxicosis was associated with the disease duration before treatment.

  10. New IES Scheme for Power Conditioning at Ultra-High Currents: from Concept to MHD Modeling and First Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvatin, Alexandre S.; Rudakov, Leonid I.; Kokshenev, Vladimir A.; Aranchuk, Leonid E.; Huet, Dominique; Gasilov, Vladimir A.; Krukovskii, Alexandre Yu.; Kurmaev, Nikolai E.; Fursov, Fiodor I.

    2002-12-01

    This work introduces an inductive energy storage (IES) scheme which aims pulsed-power conditioning at multi- MJ energies. The key element of the scheme represents an additional plasma volume, where a magnetically accelerated wire array is used for inductive current switching. This plasma acceleration volume is connected in parallel to a microsecond capacitor bank and to a 100-ns current ruse-time useful load. Simple estimates suggest that optimized scheme parameters could be reachable even when operating at ultra-high currents. We describe first proof-of-principle experiments carried out on GIT12 generator [1] at the wire-array current level of 2 MA. The obtained confirmation of the concept consists in generation of a 200 kV voltage directly at an inductive load. This load voltage value can be already sufficient to transfer the available magnetic energy into kinetic energy of a liner at this current level. Two-dimensional modeling with the radiational MHD numerical tool Marple [2] confirms the development of inductive voltage in the system. However, the average voltage increase is accompanied by short-duration voltage drops due to interception of the current by the low-density upstream plasma. Upon our viewpoint, this instability of the current distribution represents the main physical limitation to the scheme performance.

  11. A novel concept of fault current limiter based on saturable core in high voltage DC transmission system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiaxin; Zhou, Hang; Gan, Pengcheng; Zhong, Yongheng; Gao, Yanhui; Muramatsu, Kazuhiro; Du, Zhiye; Chen, Baichao

    2018-05-01

    To develop mechanical circuit breaker in high voltage direct current (HVDC) system, a fault current limiter is required. Traditional method to limit DC fault current is to use superconducting technology or power electronic devices, which is quite difficult to be brought to practical use under high voltage circumstances. In this paper, a novel concept of high voltage DC transmission system fault current limiter (DCSFCL) based on saturable core was proposed. In the DCSFCL, the permanent magnets (PM) are added on both up and down side of the core to generate reverse magnetic flux that offset the magnetic flux generated by DC current and make the DC winding present a variable inductance to the DC system. In normal state, DCSFCL works as a smoothing reactor and its inductance is within the scope of the design requirements. When a fault occurs, the inductance of DCSFCL rises immediately and limits the steepness of the fault current. Magnetic field simulations were carried out, showing that compared with conventional smoothing reactor, DCSFCL can decrease the high steepness of DC fault current by 17% in less than 10ms, which verifies the feasibility and effectiveness of this method.

  12. Theory of Digital Natives in the Light of Current and Future E-Learning Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodo von der Heiden

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The digital generation has many names: Net Generation, Generation@ or Digital Natives. The meaning behind these terms is, that the current generation of students is digitally and media literate, technology-savvy and are able to use other learning approaches than former generations. But these topics are discussed controversial and even the cause-effect-relationship is not as clear as it seems. Did the digital generation really have other learning approaches, or do they have only the possibility to live other learning modes? Against this background this article tries to shed some light on this debate. Therefore we use current and future projects performed at RWTH Aachen University to illustrate the relevance, value and significance due to the theory of the digital natives.

  13. Current Concepts for Injury Prevention in Athletes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Hewett, Timothy E.; Di Stasi, Stephanie L.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Ligament reconstruction is the current standard of care for active patients with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Although the majority of ACL reconstruction (ACLR) surgeries successfully restore the mechanical stability of the injured knee, postsurgical outcomes remain widely varied. Less than half of athletes who undergo ACLR return to sport within the first year after surgery, and it is estimated that approximately 1 in 4 to 1 in 5 young, active athletes who undergo ACLR will g...

  14. Walled-off pancreatic necrosis and other current concepts in the radiological assessment of acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Elen Freitas de Cerqueira; Rocha, Manoel de Souza; Pereira, Fabio Payao; Blasbalg, Roberto; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition caused by intracellular activation and extravasation of inappropriate proteolytic enzymes determining destruction of pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissues. This is a fairly common clinical condition with two main presentations, namely, endematous pancreatitis - a less severe presentation - and necrotizing pancreatitis - the most severe presentation that affects a significant part of patients. The radiological evaluation, particularly by computed tomography, plays a fundamental role in the definition of the management of severe cases, especially regarding the characterization of local complications with implications in the prognosis and in the definition of the therapeutic approach. New concepts include the subdivision of necrotizing pancreatitis into the following presentations: pancreatic parenchymal necrosis with concomitant peripancreatic tissue necrosis, and necrosis restricted to peripancreatic tissues. Moreover, there was a systematization of the terms acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pseudocyst, post-necrotic pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collections and walled-off pancreatic necrosis. The knowledge about such terms is extremely relevant to standardize the terminology utilized by specialists involved in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. (author)

  15. The current lymphoma classification: new concepts and practical applications triumphs and woes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Nasir; Maghfoor, Irfan

    2012-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of lymphomas updated in 2008 represents an international consensus for diagnosis of lymphoid neoplasms based on the recognition of distinct disease entities by applying a constellation of clinical and laboratory features. The 2008 classification has refined and clarified the definitions of well-recognized diseases, identified new entities and variants, and incorporated emerging concepts in the understanding of lymphoid neoplasms. Rather than being a theoretical scheme this classification has used data from published literature. Recent knowledge of molecular pathways has led to identification and development of new diagnostic tools, like gene expression profiling, which could complement existing technologies. However, some questions remain unresolved, such as the extent to which specific genetic or molecular alterations define certain tumors. In general, practical considerations and economics preclude a heavily molecular and genetic approach. The significance of early or precursor lesions and the identification of certain lymphoid neoplasms is less clear at present, but understanding is evolving. The borderline categories having overlapping features with large B-cell lymphomas, as well as some of the provisional entities, are subject to debate and lack consensus in management. Lastly, the sheer number of entities may be overwhelming, especially, for the diagnosing pathologist, who do not see enough of these on a regular basis.

  16. Current concepts in the classification, diagnosis and treatment of vascular anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernemann, Ulrike, E-mail: ulrike.ernemann@med.uni-tuebingen.d [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Radiological Clinic, University Hospital Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Kramer, Ulrich; Miller, Stephan [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Radiological Clinic, University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany); Bisdas, Sotirios [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Radiological Clinic, University Hospital Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Rebmann, Hans [Department of Paediatrics, Children' s Hospital, University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany); Breuninger, Helmut [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany); Zwick, Christine [Department of Hand, Plastic, Reconstructive and Burns Surgery, BG Trauma Clinic Tuebingen, University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany); Hoffmann, Juergen [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Patients with extended vascular anomalies may suffer from significant aesthetic and functional impairment and represent a challenge to therapeutic planning, which is best met by an interdisciplinary concept. In agreement with the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA), vascular lesions are classified into haemangiomas as proliferating endothelial tumours on the one hand and congenital vascular malformations on the other. According to the preponderant vascular channels and hemodynamic characteristics, malformations are subdivided into low flow (venous, lymphatic and capillary) lesions and high-flow malformations. Diagnostic imaging should be targeted at the specific structural and functional informations required for treatment planning. The imaging modality of choice to provide these informations is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) supplemented by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with high spatial and temporal resolution. Treatment indications for haemangiomas depend on the proliferative behaviour of the lesion and comprise {beta}-blockers in order to induce involution as well as cryotherapy, laser and open surgery. Interventional radiological procedures have evolved as an essential element in an interdisciplinary treatment plan for vascular malformations and include percutaneous sclerotherapy with ethanol and OK-432 for venous and lymphatic malformations and transarterial embolization for high-flow lesions.

  17. Current concepts in the classification, diagnosis and treatment of vascular anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernemann, Ulrike; Kramer, Ulrich; Miller, Stephan; Bisdas, Sotirios; Rebmann, Hans; Breuninger, Helmut; Zwick, Christine; Hoffmann, Juergen

    2010-01-01

    Patients with extended vascular anomalies may suffer from significant aesthetic and functional impairment and represent a challenge to therapeutic planning, which is best met by an interdisciplinary concept. In agreement with the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA), vascular lesions are classified into haemangiomas as proliferating endothelial tumours on the one hand and congenital vascular malformations on the other. According to the preponderant vascular channels and hemodynamic characteristics, malformations are subdivided into low flow (venous, lymphatic and capillary) lesions and high-flow malformations. Diagnostic imaging should be targeted at the specific structural and functional informations required for treatment planning. The imaging modality of choice to provide these informations is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) supplemented by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with high spatial and temporal resolution. Treatment indications for haemangiomas depend on the proliferative behaviour of the lesion and comprise β-blockers in order to induce involution as well as cryotherapy, laser and open surgery. Interventional radiological procedures have evolved as an essential element in an interdisciplinary treatment plan for vascular malformations and include percutaneous sclerotherapy with ethanol and OK-432 for venous and lymphatic malformations and transarterial embolization for high-flow lesions.

  18. Synergetic sustainability enhancement via current biofuel infrastructure: waste-to-energy concept for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eilhann; Yi, Haakrho; Jeon, Young Jae

    2013-03-19

    The concept of waste-to-energy (WtE) with regards to the utilization of byproducts from the bioethanol industry (e.g., distiller's dried grain with solubles: DDGS) was employed to enhance the renewability of biodiesel, which would be an initiative stage of a biorefinery due to the conjunction between bioethanol and biodiesel. For example, DDGS is a strong candidate for use as a biodiesel feedstock due to the tremendous amount that is regularly generated. On the basis of an estimation of possible lipid recovery from DDGS, ∼30% of the biodiesel feedstock demand in 2010 could be supported by the total DDGS generation in the same year. Considering the future expansion of the bioethanol industry up to 2020, the possible lipid recovery from DDGS would provide more than 6 times the biodiesel feedstock demand in 2010. In order to enhance the renewability of biodiesel, the transformation of lipid extracted from DDGS into fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE) via a noncatalytic transesterification reaction under ambient pressure was investigated in this work. The newly introduced method reported here enables the combination of the esterification of free fatty acids (FFAs) and the transesterification of triglycerides into a single step. This was achieved in the presence of a porous material (i.e., charcoal), and the optimal conditions for transformation into biodiesel via this noncatalytic method were assessed at the fundamental level.

  19. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Effects on Athletes’ Cognitive Performance: An Exploratory Proof of Concept Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davimar Borduchi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games unforgettable moments, one could not overlook performances by Phelps and Bolt, which challenge old premises about the maximum extension of individual supremacism in ultracompetitive modalities and the doping scandals. Different media channels resonated these two trends, with an unseen rise on discussions about traits and practices that may set ultrahigh performance athletes apart from the more ordinary ones. Yet, some key issues remain undebated. This paper aims to add to this debate, with a proof of concept trial, which investigates whether tDCS may serve as an aid for professional athletes. Ten professional athletes of three different modalities of (judo, N=4 athletes, swimming, N=3 athletes and rhythmic gymnastics, N=3 athletes received anodal stimulation (2mA for 20 minutes on the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for ten consecutive weekdays. We observed a positive effect of tDCS in their cognitive performance, including a significant improvement in alternated, sustained and divided attention and in memory scores. We also observed a decrease in Beck Depression Inventory scores (4.50 points in this non-clinical population. These preliminary results suggest that tDCS sessions may translate into competitive advantages for professional athletes and recommend the deepening of the discussion on its ethical use in sports, which is ultimately tied to the wider debate around the risks and opportunities that neuromodulation brings to the table.

  20. Current concepts on the pathophysiology of idiopathic chronic adult hydrocephalus: Are we facing another neurodegenerative disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Láez, R; Valle-San Román, N; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, E M; Marco-de Lucas, E; Berciano Blanco, J A; Vázquez-Barquero, A

    2016-06-10

    Since its description five decades ago, the pathophysiology of idiopathic chronic adult hydrocephalus (iCAH) has been traditionally related to the effect that ventricular dilatation exerts on the structures surrounding the ventricular system. However, altered cerebral blood flow, especially a reduction in the CSF turnover rate, are starting to be considered the main pathophysiological elements of this disease. Compression of the pyramidal tract, the frontostriatal and frontoreticular circuits, and the paraventricular fibres of the superior longitudinal fasciculus have all been reported in iCAH. At the level of the corpus callosum, gliosis replaces a number of commissural tracts. Cerebral blood flow is also altered, showing a periventricular watershed region limited by the subependymal arteries and the perforating branches of the major arteries of the anterior cerebral circulation. The CSF turnover rate is decreased by 75%, leading to the reduced clearance of neurotoxins and the interruption of neuroendocrine and paracrine signalling in the CSF. iCAH presents as a complex nosological entity, in which the effects of subcortical microangiopathy and reduced CSF turnover play a key role. According to its pathophysiology, it is simpler to think of iCAH more as a neurodegenerative disease, such as Alzheimer disease or Binswanger disease than as the classical concept of hydrocephalus. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Walled-off pancreatic necrosis and other current concepts in the radiological assessment of acute pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Elen Freitas de Cerqueira [Image Memorial/DASA and Diagnoson Medicina Diagnostica, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Rocha, Manoel de Souza; Pereira, Fabio Payao; Blasbalg, Roberto; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USPU), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2014-05-15

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition caused by intracellular activation and extravasation of inappropriate proteolytic enzymes determining destruction of pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissues. This is a fairly common clinical condition with two main presentations, namely, endematous pancreatitis - a less severe presentation - and necrotizing pancreatitis - the most severe presentation that affects a significant part of patients. The radiological evaluation, particularly by computed tomography, plays a fundamental role in the definition of the management of severe cases, especially regarding the characterization of local complications with implications in the prognosis and in the definition of the therapeutic approach. New concepts include the subdivision of necrotizing pancreatitis into the following presentations: pancreatic parenchymal necrosis with concomitant peripancreatic tissue necrosis, and necrosis restricted to peripancreatic tissues. Moreover, there was a systematization of the terms acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pseudocyst, post-necrotic pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collections and walled-off pancreatic necrosis. The knowledge about such terms is extremely relevant to standardize the terminology utilized by specialists involved in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. (author)

  2. Injuries to the finger flexor pulley system in rock climbers: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöffl, Volker Rainer; Schöffl, Isabelle

    2006-04-01

    Closed traumatic ruptures of finger flexor tendon pulleys began to be recognized specifically over the past several decades. This injury, although rare in the general population, is seen more commonly in rock climbers. This article analyzes this type of injury and the current diagnostic and therapeutic criteria. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are used to differentiate between a pulley strain, partial rupture, complete rupture, or multiple ruptures. Grade I to III injuries (strains, partial rupture, single ruptures) are treated conservatively with initial immobilization and early functional therapy under pulley protection. Grade IV injuries (multiple ruptures) require surgical repair.

  3. Current concepts in the management of bacterial skin infections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palit Aparna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial skin infections in children vary widely clinically, starting from mild superficial folliculitis to deep necrotizing fasciitis. The causative organisms are mostly Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus, with occasional involvement of Gram-negative organisms. Treatment of even the milder forms of bacterial skin infections is of importance because of the long-term morbidity associated with them. However, because of global emergence of resistant strains of bacteria, treatment of these conditions is becoming increasingly difficult. The current antibacterial resistance patterns in organisms causing skin and soft tissue infections and the problems encountered in their management in children have been discussed.

  4. Comparative investigation of the economics of seawater desalting based on current and advanced distillation concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glueckstern, P.; Reed, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    A reassessment of desalting plant design and product water cost based on current technology and energy and equipment costs has been made. Plant sizes in the range of 1 to 200 Mgd utilizing the multistage flash (MSF) and the vertical tube evaporator (VTE) were investigated. Process steam was assumed to be supplied by large nuclear dual-purpose plants or from fossil-fired low-pressure boilers. Plants applying the pH control method versus the threshold pretreatment method were compared. The potential benefits of applying low cost aluminum tubing in low-temperature VTE plants were also investigated

  5. Current and future competitiveness of renewable energy carriers - Conceptions about competitiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, K.

    1998-01-01

    The dissertation draws attention to the fact that in the world today 80% of the resources that are used are limited - non renewable energy carriers - and because of the long time between planning and doing (carrying out) within the energy sector, it is worthwhile from the long-term perspective to steer early on towards more sustainable solutions, such as renewable energy carriers. The State and the market have begun to adjust to concepts such as 'competitiveness', which can be viewed as containing both feasibility and legitimacy aspects - the state through different regulations and environmental taxes and environmental fees, and actors on the market that marginally produce/choose renewable energy carriers. The overlying methodology in the dissertation is an actor's viewpoint. This viewpoint brings forth, in turn, two different views, the analytical and the interpretative. The dissertation presents different stances within the energy sector: commercial production logic, commercial sustainability logic, and the socio-economic sustainability logic. By drawing one's attention to how one has the possibility to create (enact) his own reality, it is possible to highlight how organisations can increase their competitiveness by being conscious of their own view and others, logic, which in turn forms their views about competitiveness, which in turn determines which projects will materialize. Enterprises and individuals create a description of reality together through a dialectic process, i.e. by developing an environmental management system that contains elements of environmental auditing, environmental performance indicators, and environmental labelling, which 'reveal' the production conditions that lie behind the actualization of the final product. An example is the product, 'green' electricity, which, in spite of the fact that the final product - electricity - is identical irrespective of the production method, just at the moment can be sold at different prices according

  6. Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mimicking Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lütfü Bekar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a rare form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and it can be mistaken for coronary artery disease due to the symptoms and electrocardiography findings. In this report, we aimed to present a patient referred to our clinic with complaints of chest pain and electrocardiography findings who had been misdiagnosed as non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome.

  7. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy: Euro Observational Research Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F. Hoes; I.M. van Hagen (Iris); F. Russo; D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); M.P. van den Berg (Maarten); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien); K.Y. van Spaendonck-Zwarts (Karin); P. van der Meer (Peter)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPeripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare but potentially life-threatening form of heart failure affecting women late in pregnancy or in the first months after delivery. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is difficult to diagnose and its onset and progression are variable between individuals. The

  8. Peripartum cardiomyopathy : Euro Observational Research Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoes, M. F.; van Hagen, I.; Russo, F.; Van Veldhuisen, D. J.; Van den Berg, M. P.; Roos-Hesselink, J.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, K. Y.; van der Meer, P.

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare but potentially life-threatening form of heart failure affecting women late in pregnancy or in the first months after delivery. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is difficult to diagnose and its onset and progression are variable between individuals. The pathophysiology

  9. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: Euro Observational Research Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoes, M. F.; van Hagen, I.; Russo, F.; van Veldhuisen, D. J.; van den Berg, M. P.; Roos-Hesselink, J.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, K. Y.; van der Meer, P.

    2014-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare but potentially life-threatening form of heart failure affecting women late in pregnancy or in the first months after delivery. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is difficult to diagnose and its onset and progression are variable between individuals. The pathophysiology

  10. Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy after a quarrel.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: We report a case of Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy after a quarrel, implicating that severe emotional or physical stress could trigger myocardial stunning. Keywords: Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy, ocular trauma, blindness, postmenopause. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ahs.v15i4.39. Cite as: Jiang D-M, Sun Z-W, Han ...

  11. Current concepts of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, T.J.; Bunn, P.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) was projected to account for 20%-25% of the greater than 140,000 newly diagnosed lung cancers in 1985. If considered a separate disease entity, it would be the fourth leading cause of death by cancer. Previous studies have demonstrated distinct clinical and biologic features of small cell lung cancer, and early therapeutic trial results have demonstrated a high sensitivity to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. More recent results demonstrated a marked survival improvement with the use of combination chemotherapy, which potentially cured a small minority of patients. Unfortunately, in most patients, drug resistance usually develops, as do chronic, often debilitating toxicities in the few long-term survivors. Although therapeutic advances have plateaued, new and important insights into the basic biology of the disease made the last several years offer the possibility of exciting new treatment approaches within the next decade. This chapter addresses our current understanding of therapy for small cell lung cancer, the current therapy questions under investigation, and potential future directions in clinical research

  12. Sleep and memory in the making. Are current concepts sufficient in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peigneux, P

    2014-01-01

    Memory consolidation is an active process wired in brain plasticity. How plasticity mechanisms develop and are modulated after learning is at the core of current models of sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Nowadays, two main classes of sleep-related memory consolidation theories are proposed, namely system consolidation and synaptic homeostasis. However, novel models of consolidation emerge, that might better account for the highly dynamic and interactive processes of encoding and memory consolidation. Processing steps can take place at various temporal phases and be modulated by interactions with prior experiences and ongoing events. In this perspective, sleep might support (or not) memory consolidation processes under specific neurophysiological and environmental circumstances leading to enduring representations in long-term memory stores. We outline here a discussion about how current and emergent models account for the complexity and apparent inconsistency of empirical data. Additionally, models aimed at understanding neurophysiological and/or cognitive processes should not only provide a satisfactory explanation for the phenomena at stake, but also account for their ontogeny and the conditions that disrupt their organisation. Looking at the available literature, this developmental condition appears to remain unfulfilled when trying to understand the relationships between sleep, learning and memory consolidation processes, both in healthy children and in children with pathological conditions.

  13. Current concepts in the recognition and classification of pain with special emphasis on orofacial pain: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriithi, A W; Chindia, M L

    1993-11-01

    Despite extensive investigation, pain cannot always be adequately diagnosed or cured. Subsequently, the management of pain can be daunting. The diagnosis of pain, however, is crucial to its effective management because of the grave influence that pain has on the quality of life. The biggest drawback in the management of pain is the lack of understanding, on the part of the practitioner, of the peripheral and central modulation of pain. The objective of this paper is to briefly review the current concepts in the recognition of and classification of pain, with emphasis on orofacial pain.

  14. Augmented Reality in Neurosurgery: A Review of Current Concepts and Emerging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Daipayan; Alotaibi, Naif M; Nguyen, Nhu; Gupta, Shaurya; McFaul, Christopher; Yang, Victor X D

    2017-05-01

    Augmented reality (AR) superimposes computer-generated virtual objects onto the user's view of the real world. Among medical disciplines, neurosurgery has long been at the forefront of image-guided surgery, and it continues to push the frontiers of AR technology in the operating room. In this systematic review, we explore the history of AR in neurosurgery and examine the literature on current neurosurgical applications of AR. Significant challenges to surgical AR exist, including compounded sources of registration error, impaired depth perception, visual and tactile temporal asynchrony, and operator inattentional blindness. Nevertheless, the ability to accurately display multiple three-dimensional datasets congruently over the area where they are most useful, coupled with future advances in imaging, registration, display technology, and robotic actuation, portend a promising role for AR in the neurosurgical operating room.

  15. Genetics of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Current Concepts, Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Margaret M.; Silveira, Alexandra C.; Carr, Elizabeth A.; Kim, Ivana K.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive degenerative disease which leads to blindness, affecting the quality of life of millions of Americans. More than 1.75 million individuals in the United States are affected by the advanced form of AMD. The etiological pathway of AMD is not yet fully understood, but there is a clear genetic influence on disease risk. To date, the 1q32 (CFH) and 10q26 (PLEKHA1/ARMS2/HTRA1) loci are the most strongly associated with disease; however, the variation in these genomic regions alone is unable to predict disease development with high accuracy. Therefore, current genetic studies are aimed at identifying new genes associated with AMD and their modifiers, with the goal of discovering diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. Moreover, these studies provide the foundation for further investigation into the pathophysiology of AMD by utilizing a systems-biology-based approach to elucidate underlying mechanistic pathways. PMID:21609220

  16. The abdominal aortic aneurysm and intraluminal thrombus: current concepts of development and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra ePiechota-Polańczyk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA shows several hallmarks of atherosclerotic and atherothrombotic disease, but comprises an additional, predominant feature of proteolysis resulting in the degradation and destabilization of the aortic wall. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge on AAA development, involving the accumulation of neutrophils in the intraluminal thrombus and their central role in creating an oxidative and proteolytic environment. Particular focus is placed on the controversial role of heme oxygenase 1/carbon monoxide and nitric oxide synthase/peroxynitrite which may exert both protective and damaging effects in the development of the aneurysm. Treatment indications as well as surgical and pharmacological options for AAA therapy are discussed in light of recent reports.

  17. Towards an ankle neuroprosthesis for hybrid robotics: Concepts and current sources for functional electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casco, S; Fuster, I; Galeano, R; Moreno, J C; Pons, J L; Brunetti, F

    2017-07-01

    Hybrid rehabilitation robotics combine neuro-prosthetic devices (close-loop functional electrical stimulation systems) and traditional robotic structures and actuators to explore better therapies and promote a more efficient motor function recovery or compensation. Although hybrid robotics and ankle neuroprostheses (NPs) have been widely developed over the last years, there are just few studies on the use of NPs to electrically control both ankle flexion and extension to promote ankle recovery and improved gait patterns in paretic limbs. The aim of this work is to develop an ankle NP specifically designed to work in the field of hybrid robotics. This article presents early steps towards this goal and makes a brief review about motor NPs and Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) principles and most common devices used to aid the ankle functioning during the gait cycle. It also shows a current sources analysis done in this framework, in order to choose the best one for this intended application.

  18. Current Concepts in Pediatric Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (Ph+ ALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin M. Bernt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The t(9;22(q34;q11 or Philadelphia chromosome that creates a BCR-ABL1 fusion gene encoding for a chimeric BCR-ABL1 protein is present in 3-4% of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL, and about 25% of adult ALL cases. Prior to the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI, Ph+ ALL was associated with a very poor prognosis despite use of intensive chemotherapy and frequently hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT in first remission. The development of TKIs revolutionized the therapy of Ph+ ALL. Addition of the first generation ABL1 class TKI imatinib to intensive chemotherapy dramatically increased survival for children with Ph+ ALL and established that many patients can be cured without HSCT. In parallel, the mechanistic understanding of Ph+ ALL expanded exponentially through careful mapping of pathways downstream of BCR-ABL1, the discovery of mutations in master regulators of B-cell development such as IKZF1 (Ikaros, PAX5 and EBF, the recognition of the complex clonal architecture of Ph+ ALL, and the delineation of genomic, epigenetic and signaling abnormalities contributing to relapse and resistance. Still, many important basic and clinical questions remain unanswered. Current clinical trials are testing second generation TKIs in patients with newly diagnosed Ph+ ALL. Neither the optimal duration of therapy nor the optimal chemotherapy backbone are currently defined. The role of HSCT in first remission and post-transplant TKI therapy also require further study. In addition, it will be crucial to continue to dig deeper into understanding Ph+ ALL at a mechanistic level, and translate findings into complementary targeted approaches. Expanding targeted therapies holds great promise to decrease toxicity and improve survival in this high risk disease, which provides a paradigm for how targeted therapies can be incorporated into treatment of other high risk leukemias.

  19. Combotherapy and current concepts as well as future strategies for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan LY

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ling-Yun Fan,1,2 Ming-Jang Chiu2–4 1Department of Neurology, En Chu Kong Hospital, 2Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Graduate Institute of Brain and Mind Sciences, 3Graduate Institute of Psychology, 4Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: It has been estimated that 35.6 million people globally had dementia in 2010 and the prevalence of dementia has been predicted to double every 20 years. Thus, 115.4 million people may be living with dementia in 2050. Alzheimer's disease (AD is the leading cause of dementia and is present in 60%–70% of people with dementia. Unfortunately, there are few approved drugs that can alleviate the cognitive or behavioral symptoms of AD dementia. Recent studies have revealed that pathophysiological changes related to AD occur decades before the appearance of clinical symptoms of dementia. This extended preclinical phase of AD provides a critical chance for disease-modifying agents to halt or delay the relentless process of AD. Although several trials targeting various pathological processes are ongoing, the examination of the combined use of different approaches to combat AD seems warranted. In this article, we will review current therapies, future strategies, and ongoing clinical trials for the treatment of AD with a special focus on combination therapies. Furthermore, preventive strategies for cognitively normal subjects in the presymptomatic stages of AD will also be addressed. In this review, we discuss current hypotheses of the disease process. In the decades since the approval of cholinesterase inhibitors, no new drug has ultimately demonstrated clear success in clinical trials. Given the difficulties that have been encountered in attempts to identify a single drug that can treat AD, we must pursue effective multi-target strategies, ie, combination therapies. The combination of cholinesterase inhibitors and

  20. Advances and Current Concepts in the Medical Management of Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystallenia I. Alexandraki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs are rare and heterogeneous group of tumors presenting as localised or metastatic disease and in a subset with distinct clinical syndromes. Treatment is aimed at controlling the functional syndrome, eradicating the tumor, and/or preventing further tumor growth. Surgery is the treatment of choice in removing the primary tumor and/or reducing tumor burden but cannot be applied to all patients. Somatostatin analogs (SS-analogs obtain control of functional syndromes in the majority of GEP-neuroendocrine tumors (NETs; phase III trials have shown that SS-analogs can be used as first-line antiproliferative treatment in patients with slow-growing GEP-NETs. The role of the recently approved serotonin inhibitor, telotristat ethyl, and gastrin receptor antagonist, netazepide, is evolving. Streptozotocin-based chemotherapy has been used for inoperable or progressing pancreatic NENs but the orally administered combination of capecitabine/temozolomide is becoming more popular due to its better tolerability and potential effect in other GEP-NENs. Phase III trials have shown efficacy of molecular targeted therapies in GEP-NETs and of radionuclide treatment in patients with midgut carcinoid tumors expressing somatostatin receptors. Most patients will develop disease progression necessitating further therapeutic options. A combination of currently available treatments along with the molecular signature of each tumor will guide future treatment.

  1. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part II: Open Reduction Versus Closed Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Young Choi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of mandibular condyle fracture, conservative treatment using closed reduction or surgical treatment using open reduction can be used. Management of mandibular condylar fractures remains a source of ongoing controversy in oral and maxillofacial trauma. For each type of condylar fracture,the treatment method must be chosen taking into consideration the presence of teeth, fracture height, patient'sadaptation, patient's masticatory system, disturbance of occlusal function, and deviation of the mandible. In the past, closed reduction with concomitant active physical therapy conducted after intermaxillary fixation during the recovery period had been mainly used, but in recent years, open treatment of condylar fractures with rigid internal fixation has become more common. The objective of this review was to evaluate the main variables that determine the choice of an open or closed method for treatment of condylar fractures, identifying their indications, advantages, and disadvantages, and to appraise the current evidence regarding the effectiveness of interventions that are used in the management of fractures of the mandibular condyle.

  2. Current Concepts in the Mandibular Condyle Fracture Management Part II: Open Reduction Versus Closed Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Young Choi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of mandibular condyle fracture, conservative treatment using closedreduction or surgical treatment using open reduction can be used. Management of mandibularcondylar fractures remains a source of ongoing controversy in oral and maxillofacial trauma.For each type of condylar fracture,the treatment method must be chosen taking intoconsideration the presence of teeth, fracture height, patient’sadaptation, patient’s masticatorysystem, disturbance of occlusal function, and deviation of the mandible. In the past, closedreduction with concomitant active physical therapy conducted after intermaxillary fixationduring the recovery period had been mainly used, but in recent years, open treatment ofcondylar fractures with rigid internal fixation has become more common. The objectiveof this review was to evaluate the main variables that determine the choice of an open orclosed method for treatment of condylar fractures, identifying their indications, advantages,and disadvantages, and to appraise the current evidence regarding the effectiveness ofinterventions that are used in the management of fractures of the mandibular condyle.

  3. De Quervain’s thyroiditis: current concepts and a report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Boni

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: De Quervain’s subacute thyroiditis is a self-limiting granulomatous inflammatory disorder, which is thought to be virally induced in genetically predisposed individuals. It is characterized by thyroid pain and thyrotoxicosis, as well as by systemic symptoms like fever, hepatic cytolysis, and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. It is often mistaken for an upper respiratory tract infection. Materials and methods: The authors review recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of De Quervain’s subacute thyroiditis; risk factors for complications, with emphasis on relapses and end-stage hypothyroidism; differential diagnosis and the exclusion of other subtypes of thyroiditis; and current treatment options. Four cases of De Quervain’s thyroiditis are then analyzed and compared with cases in the literature. Discussion: In three of the patients, onset occurred in June and was probably related to a small, seasonal epidemic cluster. These cases were quite different from the fourth one, which occurred in October, suggesting that two distinct viruses might be involved. One of the patients presented a very rare complication, vocal-cord paralysis, which responded well to glucocorticoid therapy. Another presented with an even rarer post-partum form of painful thyroiditis.

  4. Review of past research and current concepts on the etiology of moyamoya disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houkin, Kiyohiro; Ito, Masaki; Sugiyama, Taku; Shichinohe, Hideo; Nakayama, Naoki; Kazumata, Ken; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Research on moyamoya disease has progressed remarkably in the past several decades. Indeed, many new facts concerning the epidemiology of the disease have been revealed and surgical treatments have been drastically improved. However, despite extensive research, the mechanism of moyamoya disease is still unknown. Consequently, the cardinal treatment of this disease has not yet been developed. For further clarification of its etiology, innovative studies are therefore indispensable. The aim of this paper is to review research on the pathogenesis of moyamoya disease to identify milestones in the direction of its true solution. Many hypotheses of the pathogenesis of moyamoya disease have been proposed in the past half century, including infection (viral and bacterial), autoimmune disorders, proteins abnormality, and gene abnormality. Some of these are now considered to be historical achievements. Others, however, can be still subjected to contemporary research. Currently, several genetic abnormalities are considered to offer the most probable hypothesis. In addition, interesting papers have been presented on the role of the endothelial progenitor cell on the pathogenesis of moyamoya disease. Intuitively, however, it appears that a single theory cannot always explain the pathogenesis of this disease adequately. In other words, the complex mechanism of several factors may comprehensively explain the formation of moyamoya disease. The "double hit hypothesis" is probably the best explanation for the complicated pathology and epidemiology of this disease.

  5. Review of Past Reports and Current Concepts of Surgical Management for Craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyutoku, Shigeo; Inagaki, Takayuki

    2017-05-15

    The purposes of surgery for craniosynostosis are to release increased intracranial pressure and to normalize cranial shape. The procedure was developed from a simple strip craniectomy in practice which ranged from the removal of the fused suture before the 1960s to total calvarial remodeling after 1970s and later methods of the 1990s, such as distraction and its modifications. According to its history, craniofacial surgeons might be changing their procedures with more effective, than less invasive ways. Since the late 1990s, when the distraction was applied to the craniofacial surgery, the gradual expansion, in particular of the anterior cranium, common in Japan, has long been controversial until the Caucasians accepted its use for the posterior cranium. Currently, the method may revert to the old procedure because a more sophisticated and better morphological result can be obtained depending on the types of deformity, even if a little more invasive maneuver is required. In other words, if treatment can be performed in optimal time, the procedures that were developed in the last half a century should be altered to each condition.

  6. Ab initio molecular dynamics: basic concepts, current trends and novel applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuckerman, Mark E

    2002-01-01

    The field of ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD), in which finite temperature molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories are generated with forces obtained from accurate 'on the fly' electronic structure calculations, is a rapidly evolving and growing technology that allows chemical processes in condensed phases to be studied in an accurate and unbiased way. This article is intended to present the basics of the AIMD method as well as to provide a broad survey of the state of the art of the field and showcase some of its capabilities. Beginning with a derivation of the method from the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, issues including the density functional representation of electronic structure, basis sets, calculation of observables and the Car-Parrinello extended Lagrangian algorithm are discussed. A number of example applications, including liquid structure and dynamics and aqueous proton transport, are presented in order to highlight some of the current capabilities of the approach. Finally, advanced topics such as inclusion of nuclear quantum effects, excited states and scaling issues are addressed. (topical review)

  7. Lactogenic immunity and vaccines for porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV): Historical and current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langel, Stephanie N; Paim, Francine Chimelo; Lager, Kelly M; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Saif, Linda J

    2016-12-02

    Morbidity, mortality, and loss of productivity from enteric diseases in neonatal piglets cost swine producers millions of dollars annually. In 2013-2014, the porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) outbreak led to $900 million to $1.8 billion in annual losses to US swine producers. Passive lactogenic immunity remains the most promising and effective way to protect neonatal suckling piglets from enteric diseases like PEDV. Protecting suckling piglets through lactogenic immunity is dependent on trafficking of pathogen-specific IgA plasmablasts to the mammary gland and accumulation of secretory IgA (sIgA) antibodies in milk, defined as the gut-mammary-sIgA axis. Due to an impermeable placenta, piglets are born agammaglobulinic, and are highly susceptible to a plethora of infectious agents. They rely solely on colostrum and milk antibodies for maternal lactogenic immunity. Previous advances in the development of live and attenuated vaccines for another devastating diarrheal virus of pigs, transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), provide insights into the mechanisms of maternal immunity and piglet protection. In this chapter, we will review previous research on TGEV-induced lactogenic immunity to provide a historical perspective on current efforts for PEDV control and vaccines in the swine industry. Identifying factors that influence lactogenic immunity and the gut-mammary-sIgA axis may lead to improved vaccine regimens for PEDV and other enteric pathogens in gestating swine and improved overall herd immunity, swine health and industry productivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. An insight into current concepts and techniques in resin bonding to high strength ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, R; Kaur, P

    2016-06-01

    Reliable bonding between high strength ceramics and resin composite cement is difficult to achieve because of their chemical inertness and lack of silica content. The aim of this review was to assess the current literature describing methods for resin bonding to ceramics with high flexural strength such as glass-infiltrated alumina and zirconia, densely sintered alumina and yttria-partially stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline ceramic (Y-TZP) with respect to bond strength and bond durability. Suitable peer reviewed publications in the English language were identified through searches performed in PubMed, Google Search and handsearches. The keywords or phrases used were 'resin-ceramic bond', 'silane coupling agents', 'air particle abrasion', 'zirconia ceramic' and 'resin composite cements'. Studies from January 1989 to June 2015 were included. The literature demonstrated that there are multiple techniques available for surface treatments but bond strength testing under different investigations have produced conflicting results. Within the scope of this review, there is no evidence to support a universal technique of ceramic surface treatment for adhesive cementation. A combination of chemical and mechanical treatments might be the recommended solution. The hydrolytic stability of the resin ceramic bond should be enhanced. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  9. Current and future concepts of the design of the intraocular lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, N S

    1985-01-01

    Anterior chamber lenses are currently much less popular than posterior chamber lenses. They are mainly used in conjunction with intracapsular cataract extraction, as a secondary lens implant, and as a back up lens in case of intraoperative complications of extracapsular cataract extraction. A major disadvantage of anterior chamber lenses is improper sizing. Rigid lenses cause the greatest ocular tenderness and present serious problems with errors in sizing but they are the easiest to explant. Semiflexible and flexible lenses show a greater tendency to develop peripheral anterior synechiae. This makes explanation a very difficult procedure. Posterior chamber lenses are the most popular today. There is a trend toward all-PMMA lenses because of concern over the biocompatibility of polypropylene. The use of a laser ridge may inhibit posterior capsule opacification and facilitate YAG laser posterior capsulectomy. Ultraviolet blockers are being incorporated as a copolymer of a mechanical additive. There is a major trend towards capsular bag fixation of posterior chamber lenses as a result of complications associated with sulcus-fixated lenses. These include: disruption of the blood-aqueous barrier due to loop penetration of the ciliary body; chafing of the posterior surface of the iris leading to transillumination defects, microhyphaemas, and pigment dispersion glaucoma. It is predicted that the number of cataract extractions and the percentage of intraocular lens implantations will continue to increase due to demographic factors. Budgetary allocations for research and development will increase because of the involvement of some of the giants of medical industry. This will lead to new implant materials and new surgical techniques.

  10. Current Concepts and Unresolved Questions in Dietary Protein Requirements and Supplements in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart M. Phillips

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein needs for otherwise healthy individuals older than 19 years are defined by the recommended dietary allowance (RDA at 0.80 g protein/kg/day. There is no recommendation in the current RDA for subpopulations of older adults or people in various pathological situations. Despite the lack of a separate recommendation, there exists a growing body of evidence that is strongly suggestive of an increased need and/or benefit for protein in older persons. That is, intakes beyond the RDA are, in older persons, associated with benefits. In addition, a number of catabolic states including critical illness also result in a sharp elevation in the needs for protein and amino acids. An underappreciated issue in protein nutrition is the impact of protein quality on clinically relevant outcomes. The introduction of a new protein scoring system—the digestible indispensable amino acid score (DIAAS—for protein quality has raised a forgotten awareness of protein quality. The DIAAS, which replaces the protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS, is based on ileal digestibility of protein and a different test protein than PDCAAS and has values greater than 1.0. The aim of this article is a brief review and summary recommendations for protein nutrition and protein requirements in populations who would benefit from more protein than the RDA. The emphasis of the review is on muscle protein turnover, and there is a discussion of the impact of protein quality, particularly as it applies to commercially available protein sources. The evidence for more optimal protein intakes is considered in light of the potential health risks of consumption of protein at levels greater than the RDA.

  11. Current Concepts and Unresolved Questions in Dietary Protein Requirements and Supplements in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Stuart M

    2017-01-01

    Protein needs for otherwise healthy individuals older than 19 years are defined by the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) at 0.80 g protein/kg/day. There is no recommendation in the current RDA for subpopulations of older adults or people in various pathological situations. Despite the lack of a separate recommendation, there exists a growing body of evidence that is strongly suggestive of an increased need and/or benefit for protein in older persons. That is, intakes beyond the RDA are, in older persons, associated with benefits. In addition, a number of catabolic states including critical illness also result in a sharp elevation in the needs for protein and amino acids. An underappreciated issue in protein nutrition is the impact of protein quality on clinically relevant outcomes. The introduction of a new protein scoring system-the digestible indispensable amino acid score (DIAAS)-for protein quality has raised a forgotten awareness of protein quality. The DIAAS, which replaces the protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS), is based on ileal digestibility of protein and a different test protein than PDCAAS and has values greater than 1.0. The aim of this article is a brief review and summary recommendations for protein nutrition and protein requirements in populations who would benefit from more protein than the RDA. The emphasis of the review is on muscle protein turnover, and there is a discussion of the impact of protein quality, particularly as it applies to commercially available protein sources. The evidence for more optimal protein intakes is considered in light of the potential health risks of consumption of protein at levels greater than the RDA.

  12. Rapid assessment of health needs in mass emergencies: review of current concepts and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha-Sapir, D

    1991-01-01

    The increase in the number of natural disasters and their impact on population is of growing concern to countries at risk and agencies involved in health and humanitarian action. The numbers of persons killed or disabled as a result of earthquakes, cyclones, floods and famines have reached record levels in the last decade. Population density, rampant urbanization and climatic changes have brought about risk patterns that are exposing larger and larger sections of populations in developing countries to life-threatening natural disasters. Despite substantial spending on emergency relief, the approaches to relief remain largely ad hoc and amateurish, resulting generally in inappropriate and/or delayed action. In recent years, mass emergencies of the kind experienced in Bangladesh or the Sahelian countries have highlighted the importance of rapid assessment of health needs for better allocation of resources and relief management. As a result, the development of techniques for rapid assessment of health needs has been identified as a priority for effective emergency action. This article sketches the health context of disasters in terms of mortality and morbidity patterns; it describes initial assessment techniques currently used and their methodological biases and constraints; it also discusses assessment needs which vary between different types of disasters and the time frame within which assessments are undertaken. Earthquakes, cyclones, famines, epidemics or refugees all have specific risk profiles and emergency conditions which differ for each situation. Vulnerability to mortality changes according to age and occupation, for earthquakes and famines. These risk factors then have significant implications for the design of rapid assessment protocols and checklists. Experiences from the field in rapid survey techniques and estimation of death rates are discussed, with emphasis on the need for a reliable denominator even for the roughest assessment. Finally, the

  13. Current concepts of team training in surgical residency: a survey of North American program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedy, Nicolas J; Zevin, Boris; Bonrath, Esther M; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present survey was to (1) establish the prevalence of Crew Resource Management (CRM)- and team-training interventions among general surgery residency programs of the United States and Canada; (2) to characterize current approaches to training and assessment of nontechnical skills; and (3) to inquire about program directors' (PDs') recommendations for future curricula in graduate medical education. An online questionnaire was developed by the authors and distributed via email to the directors of all accredited general surgery residency programs across the United States and Canada. After 3 email reminders, paper versions were sent to all nonresponders. PDs of accredited general surgery residency programs in the United States and Canada. One hundred twenty (47%) PDs from the United States and 9 (53%) from Canada responded to the survey. Of all respondents, 32% (n = 40) indicated conducting designated team-training interventions for residents. Three main instructional strategies were identified: combined approaches using simulation and didactic methods (42%, n = 16); predominantly simulation-based approaches (37%, n = 14); and didactic approaches (21%, n = 8). Correspondingly, 83% (n = 93) of respondents recommended a combination of didactic methods and opportunities for practice for future curricula. A high agreement between responding PDs was shown regarding learning objectives for a proposed team-based training curriculum (α = 0.95). The self-reported prevalence of designated CRM- and team-training interventions among responding surgical residency programs was low. For the design of future curricula, the vast majority of responding PDs advocated for the combination of interactive didactic methods and opportunities for practice. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Sandeep; Prasad, Heramba; Kozman, Hani

    2007-01-01

    A 57-year-old Caucasian woman presented to the emergency department with chest discomfort after testifying in a child custody battle in court. Electrocardiography (ECG) revealed ST-segment elevation in the lateral leads, and T-wave inversions in the inferior and lateral leads. The creatine kinase, creatine kinase-MB, and troponin I concentrations were elevated on presentation. Despite the ECG changes and elevated cardiac markers, coronary angiography demonstrated normal arteries. Left ventricular angiogram revealed an aneurysm at the apex. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy was diagnosed on the basis of these characteristic findings. The patient was discharged on her third hospital day without any complications from the coronary angiography.

  15. Cardiomyopathy due to ingestion of Adderall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Donald H

    2008-01-01

    A patient is described who developed cardiomyopathy after receiving a therapeutic course of dextroamphetamine/amphetamine. The patient's cardiac function deteriorated to the point of heart failure, necessitating a heart transplantation. Cardiomyopathy associated with amphetamine use is a serious and potentially lethal condition. With early diagnosis, identification of the cause, and treatment, cardiomyopathy may be reversible. The dangers of therapeutic use of amphetamines are discussed, as well as problems and assumptions associated with U.S. Food and Drug Administration monitoring and removal from the market of harmful substances.

  16. Does Body Mass Index Predict Premature Cardiomyopathy Onset for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKane, Meghann; Soslow, Jonathan H; Xu, Meng; Saville, Benjamin R; Slaughter, James C; Burnette, W Bryan; Markham, Larry W

    2017-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy leads to cardiomyopathy. The objective of this study was to estimate the association of body mass index with cardiomyopathy onset. Cardiomyopathy was defined as left ventricular ejection fraction Duchenne muscular dystrophy subjects and age of cardiomyopathy onset.

  17. Restrictive cardiomyopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy overlap: the importance of the phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Kaski

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM is defined on the basis of the haemodynamic finding of restrictive ventricular physiology. However, restrictive ventricular pathophysiology is also a feature of other subtypes of cardiomyopathy, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM. Clinically and aetiologically, there is an overlap between RCM and HCM with restrictive physiology. However, the clinical distinction between these two entities can be an important pointer towards the underlying aetiology. This review highlights the importance of the recognition of the clinical phenotype as the first step in the classification of cardiomyopathies.

  18. Moored current meter and wind recorder measurement near Point Conception, California: The 1983 OPUS Observations, from 1983-04-01 to 1983-07-29 (NODC Accession 8600041)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The OPUS (Organization of Persistent Upwelling Structures) program deployed two current meter (VMCM) moorings near Point Conception, California, during April - July...

  19. [Supernumerary teeth in the maxilla and mandible-an interdisciplinary challenge. Part 2: diagnostic pathways and current therapeutic concepts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossaz, Jessica; Suter, Valerie G A; Katsaros, Christos; Bornstein, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    Proper localization of supernumerary teeth is very important for the diagnosis, treatment planning, and prior to any surgical intervention. Traditionally, supernumerary teeth were diagnosed and located using two-dimensional (2D) radiographic methods such as panoramic views, cephalometric imaging, and also intraoral (also often occlusal) radiographs. With the introduction of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in dental medicine, this three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique is now more and more used for the exact localisation of supernumerary teeth and the diagnosis of root resorption of adjacent teeth. Treatment planning depends on various factors such as the time of diagnosis, the age of the patient, the position of the supernumerary tooth and possible complications. In the present second part of this review article on supernumerary teeth in the maxilla and mandible, the diagnostic workflow and current treatment concepts will be presented and critically discussed.

  20. Is tissue an issue? Current practice and opinion in Western Australia for routine histopathology on products of conception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Shui-Jean; Watts, Jared C; Faithfull, Tiffany J; Wong, Sabrina Z; Wylde, Kate L; McGurgan, Paul M

    2014-10-01

    An anonymous questionnaire-based survey was used to determine current practices and opinions of senior health professionals working in Western Australian (WA) hospitals performing gynaecological procedures, regarding the routine use of histopathology for products of conception (POC) obtained either from the surgical management of miscarriage or termination of pregnancy. Sixty-one senior health professionals completed the survey. Tissue histopathology on POC was routinely requested for miscarriage and termination of pregnancy (TOP) by 87 and 59% of respondents, respectively. Respondents listed the main reasons for requesting routine histopathology as avoidance of misdiagnosis, medico-legal and quality assurance. There were inconsistent practices among WA health professionals regarding sending POC for histopathology; 63% of gynaecology head of departments recommend the introduction of state or national guidelines for the use of histopathology in the surgical management of miscarriages or terminations of pregnancy. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  1. Current and future regenerative medicine - principles, concepts, and therapeutic use of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering in equine medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Betts, Dean H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a bird's-eye perspective of the general principles of stem-cell therapy and tissue engineering; it relates comparative knowledge in this area to the current and future status of equine regenerative medicine.The understanding of equine stem cell biology, biofactors, and scaffolds...... factors, and biomaterials - are increasingly being applied in equine medicine, fuelled by better scaffolds and increased understanding of individual biofactors and cell sources.The effectiveness of stem cell-based therapies and most tissue engineering concepts has not been demonstrated sufficiently...... in controlled clinical trials in equine patients to be regarded as evidence-based medicine. In the meantime, the medical mantra "do no harm" should prevail, and the application of stem cell-based therapies in the horse should be done critically and cautiously, and treatment outcomes (good and bad) should...

  2. Amide proton transfer imaging in clinics: Basic concepts and current and future use in brain tumors and stoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Eun [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jahng, Geon Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Ha Kyu [Philips Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Amide proton transfer (APT) imaging is gaining attention as a relatively new in vivo molecular imaging technique that has higher sensitivity and spatial resolution than magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging. APT imaging is a subset of the chemical exchange saturation transfer mechanism, which can offer unique image contrast by selectively saturating protons in target molecules that get exchanged with protons in bulk water. In this review, we describe the basic concepts of APT imaging, particularly with regard to the benefit in clinics from the current literature. Clinical applications of APT imaging are described from two perspectives: in the diagnosis and monitoring of the treatment response in brain glioma by reflecting endogenous mobile proteins and peptides, and in the potential for stroke imaging with respect to tissue acidity.

  3. Neuropathic pain - Current concepts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Neuropathic pain (NP) represents a common and diverse group of disorders with peripheral and/or central nervous system damage or dysfunction. ... It is estimated that as many as one in five adults with chronic pain will have ... in daily activities and an association with depression and sleep disturbances.16,18 In a.

  4. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy: Current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio C Vicentini

    2009-01-01

    Although the evolution of the technique in the last 20 years, urologists must continue to improve their skills and develop new technologies to offer to the patients more and more a safe and effective option to treat large renal stones.

  5. Laparoscopic splenectomy: Current concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiakos, Evangelos P; Bagias, George; Liakakos, Theodore; Machairas, Anastasios

    2017-01-01

    Since early 1990’s, when it was inaugurally introduced, laparoscopic splenectomy has been performed with excellent results in terms of intraoperative and postoperative complications. Nowadays laparoscopic splenectomy is the approach of choice for both benign and malignant diseases of the spleen. However some contraindications still apply. The evolution of the technology has allowed though, cases which were considered to be absolute contraindications for performing a minimal invasive procedure to be treated with modified laparoscopic approaches. Moreover, the introduction of advanced laparoscopic tools for ligation resulted in less intraoperative complications. Today, laparoscopic splenectomy is considered safe, with better outcomes in comparison to open splenectomy, and the increased experience of surgeons allows operative times comparable to those of an open splenectomy. In this review we discuss the indications and the contraindications of laparoscopic splenectomy. Moreover we analyze the standard and modified surgical approaches, and we evaluate the short-term and long-term outcomes. PMID:28979707

  6. Use of cone beam computed tomography in implant dentistry: current concepts, indications and limitations for clinical practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Michael M; Horner, Keith; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2017-02-01

    Diagnostic radiology is an essential component of treatment planning in the field of implant dentistry. This narrative review will present current concepts for the use of cone beam computed tomography imaging, before and after implant placement, in daily clinical practice and research. Guidelines for the selection of three-dimensional imaging will be discussed, and limitations will be highlighted. Current concepts of radiation dose optimization, including novel imaging modalities using low-dose protocols, will be presented. For preoperative cross-sectional imaging, data are still not available which demonstrate that cone beam computed tomography results in fewer intraoperative complications such as nerve damage or bleeding incidents, or that implants inserted using preoperative cone beam computed tomography data sets for planning purposes will exhibit higher survival or success rates. The use of cone beam computed tomography following the insertion of dental implants should be restricted to specific postoperative complications, such as damage of neurovascular structures or postoperative infections in relation to the maxillary sinus. Regarding peri-implantitis, the diagnosis and severity of the disease should be evaluated primarily based on clinical parameters and on radiological findings based on periapical radiographs (two dimensional). The use of cone beam computed tomography scans in clinical research might not yield any evident beneficial effect for the patient included. As many of the cone beam computed tomography scans performed for research have no direct therapeutic consequence, dose optimization measures should be implemented by using appropriate exposure parameters and by reducing the field of view to the actual region of interest. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Modeling, design, and testing of a proof-of-concept prototype damper with friction and eddy current damping effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjadian, Mohsen; Agrawal, Anil K.

    2018-01-01

    Friction is considered as one of the most reliable mechanisms of energy dissipation that has been utilized extensively in passive damping devices to mitigate vibration of civil engineering structures subjected to extreme natural hazards such as earthquakes and windstorms. However, passive friction dampers are well-known for having a highly nonlinear hysteretic behavior caused by stick-slip motion at low velocities, a phenomenon that is inherent in friction and increases the acceleration response of the structure under control unfavorably. The authors have recently proposed the theoretical concept of a new type of damping device termed as "Passive Electromagnetic Eddy Current Friction Damper" (PEMECFD) in which an eddy current damping mechanism was utilized not only to decrease the undesirable effects of stick-slip motion, but also to increase the energy dissipation capacity of the damping device as a whole. That study was focused on demonstration of the theoretical performance of the proposed damping device through numerical simulations. This paper further investigates the influence of eddy current damping on energy dissipation due to friction through modeling, design, and testing of a proof-of-concept prototype damper. The design of this damper has been improved over the design in the previous study. The normal force in this damper is produced by the repulsive magnetic force between two cuboidal permanent magnets (PMs) magnetized in the direction normal to the direction of the motion. The eddy current damping force is generated because of the motion of the two PMs and two additional PMs relative to a copper plate in their vicinity. The dynamic models for the force-displacement relationship of the prototype damper are based on LuGre friction model, electromagnetic theory, and inertial effects of the prototype damper. The parameters of the dynamic models have been identified through a series of characterization tests on the prototype damper under harmonic

  8. [Ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients with cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, K.; Christensen, A.H.; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to determine the number and distribution of cardiomyopathies as the aetiology of ventricular tachyarrhythmias among patients discharged from the Department of Cardiology, Rigshospitalet. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was a retrospective review......), 57 (45%) patients had arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and 13 (10%) had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The average age was 44 years for HCM, 41 years for ARVC and 58 years for DCM. The majority of the patients were male. ICD treatment was used in 95% of the patients...... cardiology department. Implantation of an ICD device has a central position in the treatment of patients with cardiomyopathy and ventricular tachyarrythmias and is primarily used as a prophylactic treatment Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/16...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: familial dilated cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... familial dilated cardiomyopathy can include an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia), shortness of breath (dyspnea), extreme tiredness (fatigue), fainting ... Celebrates Its 15th Anniversary National DNA Day 2018 Newborn Screening Saves Lives Act Turns 10 All Bulletins ...

  10. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy screening in young athletes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rappoport, W.J. [Arizona Heart Inst., Phoenix, AZ (United States); Steingard, P.M. [Phoenix Suns, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of sudden death during vigorous exercise. Early identification of this abnormality by ECG screening of high-school athletes before they participate in competitive sports helps save lives. (orig.)

  11. Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy after a quarrel.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    com. Tel: +86571 85519933;. Fax:+8657187236569. It was first recognized in Japan ... coronary artery disease on cardiac catheterization8. The pathophysiological mechanism associated with. Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy is higher prevalence in.

  12. Molecular and cellular biology of cerebral arteriovenous malformations: a review of current concepts and future trends in treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo; Russin, Jonathan J; Martinez-Del-Campo, Eduardo; Soriano-Baron, Hector; Spetzler, Robert F; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are classically described as congenital static lesions. However, in addition to rupturing, AVMs can undergo growth, remodeling, and regression. These phenomena are directly related to cellular, molecular, and physiological processes. Understanding these relationships is essential to direct future diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The authors performed a search of the contemporary literature to review current information regarding the molecular and cellular biology of AVMs and how this biology will impact their potential future management. A PubMed search was performed using the key words "genetic," "molecular," "brain," "cerebral," "arteriovenous," "malformation," "rupture," "management," "embolization," and "radiosurgery." Only English-language papers were considered. The reference lists of all papers selected for full-text assessment were reviewed. Current concepts in genetic polymorphisms, growth factors, angiopoietins, apoptosis, endothelial cells, pathophysiology, clinical syndromes, medical treatment (including tetracycline and microRNA-18a), radiation therapy, endovascular embolization, and surgical treatment as they apply to AVMs are discussed. Understanding the complex cellular biology, physiology, hemodynamics, and flow-related phenomena of AVMs is critical for defining and predicting their behavior, developing novel drug treatments, and improving endovascular and surgical therapies.

  13. RATIONAL PHARMACOTHERAPY IN TAKOTSUBO CARDIOMYOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marchev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rational pharmacotherapy in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is based on clinical picture and data of functional and laboratory investigations of concrete patient. In patients with hypotension and moderate-to-severe left ventricle outflow tract obstruction inotropic agents must not to be used because they can worsen the degree of obstruction. In these patients beta blockers can improve hemodynamics by causing resolution of the obstruction. If intraventricular thrombus is detected, anticoagulation for at least 3 months is recommended. The duration of anticoagulant therapy may be modified depending on the extent of cardiac function recovery and thrombus resolution. For patients without thrombus but with severe left ventricular dysfunction, anticoagulation is recommended until the akinesis or dyskinesis has resolved but not more than 3 months.

  14. Stimulant-related Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Mike; Riguzzi, Christine; Frenkel, Oron; Nagdev, Arun

    2015-03-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is a rare but increasingly recognized mimic of acute coronary syndrome. Patients present with angina,ST-segment changes on electrocardiogram (both elevations and depressions),and rapid rises in cardiac biomarkers. Many kinds of stressful events have been associated with TC, but only a handful of drug-related cases have previously been reported. We describe the case of a 58-year-old woman who developed TC 2 days after crack cocaine use, a diagnosis first suggested as bedside echocardiography in the emergency department.Recognition of the classic echocardiographic appearance of TC—apical hypokinesis causing “ballooning” of the left ventricle during systole—may greatly assist providers in the early identification of this condition.

  15. Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: An Immunometabolic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paras K. Mishra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The heart possesses a remarkable inherent capability to adapt itself to a wide array of genetic and extrinsic factors to maintain contractile function. Failure to sustain its compensatory responses results in cardiac dysfunction, leading to cardiomyopathy. Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and reduced diastolic function, with or without concurrent systolic dysfunction in the absence of hypertension and coronary artery disease. Changes in substrate metabolism, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, formation of extracellular matrix proteins, and advanced glycation end products constitute the early stage in DCM. These early events are followed by steatosis (accumulation of lipid droplets in cardiomyocytes, which is followed by apoptosis, changes in immune responses with a consequent increase in fibrosis, remodeling of cardiomyocytes, and the resultant decrease in cardiac function. The heart is an omnivore, metabolically flexible, and consumes the highest amount of ATP in the body. Altered myocardial substrate and energy metabolism initiate the development of DCM. Diabetic hearts shift away from the utilization of glucose, rely almost completely on fatty acids (FAs as the energy source, and become metabolically inflexible. Oxidation of FAs is metabolically inefficient as it consumes more energy. In addition to metabolic inflexibility and energy inefficiency, the diabetic heart suffers from impaired calcium handling with consequent alteration of relaxation–contraction dynamics leading to diastolic and systolic dysfunction. Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR plays a key role in excitation–contraction coupling as Ca2+ is transported into the SR by the SERCA2a (sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase 2a during cardiac relaxation. Diabetic cardiomyocytes display decreased SERCA2a activity and leaky Ca2+ release channel resulting in reduced SR calcium load. The diabetic heart also suffers from

  16. A Systemic View of the Learning and Differentiation of Scientific Concepts: The Case of Electric Current and Voltage Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Ismo T.; Kokkonen, Tommi

    2014-01-01

    In learning conceptual knowledge in physics, a common problem is the incompleteness of a learning process, where students' personal, often undifferentiated concepts take on more scientific and differentiated form. With regard to such concept learning and differentiation, this study proposes a systemic view in which concepts are considered as…

  17. Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diagnosis & treatment Doctors & departments Care at Mayo Clinic Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  18. Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... flow to the damaged or weakened heart muscle Heart transplant that may be tried when all other treatments ... accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health ...

  19. Effect of Institutional Experience on Outcomes of Alcohol Septal Ablation for Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veselka, Josef; Faber, Lothar; Jensen, Morten Kvistholm

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The current American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association guidelines on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy state that institutional experience is a key determinant of successful outcomes and lower complication rates of alcohol septal ablation (ASA). The aim of this study...... was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ASA according to institutional experience with the procedure. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated 1310 patients with symptomatic obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who underwent ASA and were divided into 2 groups. The first-50 group consisted of the first...

  20. The Use of a Novel Heart Failure Agent in the Treatment of Pregnancy-Associated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamsi C. Gaddipati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripartum cardiomyopathy is an uncommon, pregnancy-related form of dilated cardiomyopathy that is associated with development of new-onset left ventricular dysfunction. Its etiology is presently unknown, but current standard of care involves the use of typical drug therapy for the treatment of heart failure. Pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy (PACM is a similar condition that refers to patients who develop such symptoms prior to the last month of pregnancy. We report the case of a nulliparous Caucasian female who develops early, severe PACM during her first pregnancy with postpartum persistence of New York Heart Association class II-III symptoms despite medical therapy. The use of the novel heart failure agent, sacubitril/valsartan (Entresto, is initiated with near-complete resolution of her symptoms.

  1. Telomere shortening and telomerase activity in ischaemic cardiomyopathy patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawhney, V; Campbell, N G; Brouilette, S W

    2016-01-01

    associated with incidence of ICD therapy (p=0.02, p=0.02). ROC analyses demonstrated that the sensitivity and specificity of these telomere dynamics in predicting potentially-fatal VA was higher than the current gold-standard - left ventricular ejection fraction (AUC 0.82 versus 0.47). CONCLUSION: The load......-of-short telomeres and telomerase activity had a significant association with ICD therapy (for VA) in ischaemic cardiomyopathy patients. These biomarkers should be tested in prospective studies to assess their clinical utility in predicting VA after myocardial infarction and guiding primary prevention ICD...

  2. Regenerative healing, scar-free healing and scar formation across the species: current concepts and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ud-Din, Sara; Volk, Susan W; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2014-09-01

    All species have evolved mechanisms of repair to restore tissue function following injury. Skin scarring is an inevitable and permanent endpoint for many postnatal organisms except for non-amniote vertebrates such as amphibians, which are capable of tissue regeneration. Furthermore, mammalian foetuses through mid-gestation are capable of rapid wound repair in the absence of scar formation. Notably, excessive cutaneous scar formation, such as hypertrophic and keloid scars, is a species limited clinical entity as it occurs only in humans, although wounds on the distal limbs of horses are also prone to heal with fibroproliferative pathology known as equine exuberant granulation tissue. Currently, there are no reliable treatment options to eradicate or prevent scarring in humans and vertebrates. The limited number of vertebrate models for either hypertrophic or keloid scarring has been an impediment to mechanistic studies of these diseases and the development of therapies. In this viewpoint essay, we highlight the current concepts of regenerative, scar-free and scar-forming healing compared across a number of species and speculate on areas for future research. Furthermore, in-depth investigative research into the mechanisms of scarless repair may allow for the development of improved animal models and novel targets for scar prevention. As the ability to heal in both a scarless manner and propensity for healing with excessive scar formation is highly species dependent, understanding similarities and differences in healing across species as it relates to the regenerative process may hold the key to improve scarring and guide translational wound-healing studies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Athlete's heart or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauschke, Jörg; Maisch, Bernhard

    2009-02-01

    Intensive endurance training is able to cause a distinct pattern of functional and structural changes of the cardiovascular system. In an unknown proportion of athletes a so called "athlete's heart" develops. There is an overlap between this type of physiologic cardiac hypertrophy and mild forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common genetic disorder of the cardiovascular system with a prevalence of 0.2%. HCM is caused by mutations in 14 genes coding for sarcomere proteins. In the literature up to 50% of cases of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in younger sportsmen were connected to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. It is therefore the most common cause of SCD in highly trained young athletes. Because of this data a great interest in distinguishing these two diagnoses exists. Apart from clinical examination and some non-specific ECG-changes, Echocardiography is the method of choice. The athlete's heart shows an eccentric biventricular hypertrophy with wall thicknesses under 15 mm and a moderately dilated left ventricle (LVEDD up to 58 mm). HCM is commonly characterized by asymmetric left ventricular hypertrophy with a reduced LV-diameter. In up to 70% of cases left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is evident during stress echocardiography. Systolic function is normal in highly trained athletes and the majority of HCM patients as well. There are important differences regarding diastolic filling patterns. Physiological hypertrophy is consistent with a normal diastolic function with even increased early diastolic filling. In case of HCM diastolic dysfunction (mostly relaxation disturbances) occurs in the majority of patients and is therefore inconsistent with an athlete's heart. If the diagnosis could not be stated using echocardiography, methods like cardiac-MRI, metabolic exercise testing, histological studies of endomyocardial biopsies and genetic testing can provide further information. A correct diagnosis may on the one hand prevent some athletes from

  4. MR imaging in cardiomyopathies; MR-tomographische Diagnostik von Kardiomyopathien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen (Germany); Riessen, R. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik

    2005-11-15

    According to the WHO classification, cardiomyopathies are a group of diseases which are associated with myocardial dysfunction and can be classified either as primary or secondary cardiomyopathies. Genetic disorders have been identified in certain primary cardiomyopathies, however often the etiology remains unknown. The term ''secondary cardiomyopathy'' is used to specify diseases with the clinical indications of a cardiomyopathy, but can be attributed to a certain pathophysiological mechanism such as exposure to toxic substances, metabolic syndromes or systemic diseases. Based on morphological and functional criteria, primary cardiomyopathies are divided into dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). During the last two decades MR imaging has emerged to a well established diagnostic tool for the understanding and treatment of cardiomyopathies. Morphological and functional information can be achieved with a high level of accuracy and reproducibility. Tissue alteration of the myocardium can be detected assessing regional contrast enhancement, T1- and T2-signal intensities and chemical shift phenomena. This article describes characteristic aspects of MR imaging for the diagnosis of primary and secondary cardiomyopathies. (orig.)

  5. Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Association with PulmonaryArtery Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Peighambari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy is an uncommon condition constituting 1% -2% of the cases with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM diagnosis. We interestingly report two patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in association with significant pulmonary artery hypertension without any other underlying reason for pulmonary hypertension. The patients were assessed by echocardiography, cardiac catheterization and pulmonary function parameters study.

  6. [Diagnosis and therapy of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Rigato, Ilaria; Migliore, Federico; Perazzolo Marra, Martina; Basso, Cristina; Thiene, Gaetano; Bauce, Barbara; Corrado, Domenico

    2014-11-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is an inherited heart muscle disease that predisposes to the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death, particularly in the young and athlete. The classic variant of the disease predominantly affects the right ventricle, but phenotypic variants with early and prevalent left ventricular involvement ("left-dominant" ARVC) have also been described, supporting the concept that arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy is a disease of both ventricles. The diagnosis is multiparametric and is based on a series of criteria, including ECG abnormalities, arrhythmic manifestations, morpho-functional abnormalities and genetic defects. The main goal of therapy is sudden death prevention. Implant of a cardioverter-defibrillator is the most effective strategy for prevention of sudden death, but it should be reserved to selected patients after accurate risk stratification, in view of the high complication rate over a long-term follow-up, the costs and the significant psychological impact of such therapy, especially in the young individual. The other therapies (either pharmacological or not) are palliative and aimed at relieving symptoms and preventing disease progression. The definitive cure of ARVC will be based on the discovery of the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the etiology and pathogenesis of the disease.

  7. Metabolic imaging of patients with cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geltman, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    The cardiomyopathies comprise a diverse group of illnesses that can be characterized functionally by several techniques. However, the delineation of derangements of regional perfusion and metabolism have been accomplished only relatively recently with positron emission tomography (PET). Regional myocardial accumulation and clearance of 11C-palmitate, the primary myocardial substrate under most conditions, demonstrate marked spatial heterogeneity when studied under fasting conditions or with glucose loading. PET with 11C-palmitate permits the noninvasive differentiation of patients with nonischemic from ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, since patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy demonstrate large zones of intensely depressed accumulation of 11C-palmitate, probably reflecting prior infarction. Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy demonstrate relatively unique patterns of myocardial abnormalities of perfusion and metabolism. The availability of new tracers and techniques for the evaluation of myocardial metabolism (11C-acetate), perfusion (H2(15)O), and autonomic tone (11-C-hydroxyephedrine) should facilitate further understanding of the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathies

  8. A brief overview of current relationships of geography, statistics, and taxonomy with the classical integrated control concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    A classic paper on the integrated control concept appeared in the later part of the 1950’s, led by Vernon Stern, Ray Smith, Robert van den Bosch, and Kenneth Hagen. Numerous concepts and definitions were formulated at that time. In this presentation, a short philosophical summary will be presented...

  9. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Singh Gulati, G., E-mail: gulatigurpreet@rediffmail.com [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Seth, S. [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Sharma, S. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India)

    2012-02-15

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  10. Peripartum cardiomyopathy – case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Gowri Sayi; Bhupali, Ashok; Prasad, Sayi; Patil, Ajit N.; Deka, Yashodhan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To study the pattern of presentation, course of disease and outcome of pregnancy in Peripartum Cardiomyopathy. Methods A prospective study of sixteen cases of PPCM was conducted at Apple Saraswati Multispecialty Hospital and Dr. D.Y. Patil Medical College and Hospital, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, India from January 2006 to December 2012. Data included age distribution, parity, gestational age, symptoms and risk factors. Medical management and pregnancy outcome were documented. Serial echocardiography data was compiled for a period of one year. Results In our study 9/16 (56%) were primigravidae, 4/16 (25%) had pre-eclamsia and 6/16 (35%) had co-existing hypertension. The difference in Echocardiography parameters observed between recovered and non-recovered patients was significant: Left Ventricular End diastolic dimension (5.6 cm vs 6.06 cm), Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction (28.7% vs 22.4%) and Left Ventricular fractional shortening (17.5% vs 13.4%). Thirteen out of sixteen patients were followed up for a period of one year out of which 61% (8/13) patients recovered completely. There was one mortality. Conclusion PPCM is a diagnosis of exclusion. Majority were young primigravidae presenting postnatally. Pre-eclampsia and hypertension were risk factors. ECHO parameters were reliable predictors of recovery. Future pregnancies are better avoided. PMID:24814122

  11. Tafazzin gene mutations are uncommon causes of dilated cardiomyopathy in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Taylor

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Barth syndrome is an X-linked genetic condition featuring neutropenia, skeletal myopathy, and dilated cardiomyopathy in boys due to tafazzin (TAZ mutations. Pure dilated cardiomyopathy without other features of Barth syndrome may also result from TAZ mutations and survival into adulthood has been described. Although TAZ testing is routinely included in dilated cardiomyopathy panels in adults, the prevalence of TAZ mutations in the adult population, including women who may be at risk to develop later onset disease due to TAZ mutations, has not been measured. We screened 292 families with dilated cardiomyopathy (209 male and 83 female probands for TAZ mutations using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and sequence analysis. Putative mutations were evaluated based on standard criteria including screening available relatives and healthy controls and for effects on splicing efficiency in the case of one intronic variant. Two variants suspicious for being pathogenic were found in two unrelated families (c.387T>C, Phe128Ser and c.507C>T, Leu169Leu. The Phe128Ser variant had been previously reported as a pathogenic mutation; however we determined that this variant is instead a rare polymorphism restricted to African Americans. The Leu169Leu variant was detected in a male patient and altered RNA processing in our minigene assay supporting a pathogenic role. No mutations in female subjects were detected. Tafazzin mutations were rare in our population of adults with dilated cardiomyopathy and none were found in females. Our findings indicate that genetic testing for tafazzin should not be routinely performed in dilated cardiomyopathy as suggested by current guidelines. Furthermore, the Phe128Ser variant is not pathogenic, but likely represents a benign polymorphism in persons of African American ancestry.

  12. New concepts of nuclear reactors and fuel cycles: performing agile technometric studies to understand the promises and the current reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis Junior, Jose S.B.; Barroso, Antonio C.O.

    2013-01-01

    The progress of previous projects pointed out the need to face some problems of software for detecting emerging research and development trends from databases of scientific publication. Given the lack of efficient computing applications dedicated to this purpose that we consider to be an artifact of great usefulness to better planning R and D programs in institutions, which are obliged to manage and develop, with limited resources and within the realm of complex and multidisciplinary technology fields as is the case of the Brazilian nuclear sector. We performed a review of the currently available software in such a way that we could clearly delineate the opportunity to develop new tools. As a result, we developed a software called Cite snake, which was especially designed to help the detection and study of emerging trends from the analysis of networks of various types extracted from the scientific databases. Using this powerful and stable computational tool, we performed preliminary analyzes of emerging research and development trends in a few thematic fields. The case that concerns this paper is the one devoted to the eld of Generation IV Nuclear Power Generation Systems. We analyzed the productivity of authors, co-authorship networks, co-citation networks, development structure and emerging sub-areas of research. The idea was to nd what reactors and fuel cycles have evolved more over the past ten years, in such a way to compare the what from the most promising concepts selected from the Generation Four Initiative have better evolved to fulfill some of their promises. (author)

  13. Cardiac sarcoid: a chameleon masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy in the same patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Anushree; Sulemanjee, Nasir Z; Cheema, Omar; Downey, Francis X; Tajik, A Jamil

    2014-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem, granulomatous disease of unknown etiology often seen in young adults, with cardiac involvement in more than one-quarter of sarcoid patients. The clinical presentation of cardiac sarcoid depends upon the location and extent of myocardium involved. Although cardiac sarcoid may produce asymmetrical septal hypertrophy, it is most commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. The hypertrophic stage of cardiac sarcoid is rarely seen. We describe a case of cardiac sarcoid in a young patient wherein a distinctive appearance of the cardiac sarcoid spectrum from "hypertrophic" stage to thinned/scarred stage, masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy followed by dilated cardiomyopathy, is demonstrated. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A new current line division concept for the determination of the current distribution in electrochemical cells. Part I. Theoretical background of the “corner weakness” effect in electroforming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. STEVANOVIC

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to the determination of the current distribution in electrochemical cells, the current line division concept, is introduced. The new concept, based on the basic equations of electrics and electrochemical kinetics, was employed for a theoretical explanation of the phenomenon known in electroforming as “corner weakness”. It was shown that this phenomenon depends on the kind of control of the deposition process, being the largest in the case of pure ohmic control and disappearing in the case of pure activation control.

  15. Recurrent Syncope, a Clue in Amyloid Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian A. Marin-Acevedo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Infiltrative cardiomyopathies include a variety of disorders that lead to myocardial thickening resulting in a constellation of clinical manifestations and eventually heart failure that could be the first clue to reach the diagnosis. Among the more described infiltrative diseases of the heart is amyloid cardiomyopathy. The disease usually presents with subtle, nonspecific symptoms. Herein, we illustrate a case of recurrent syncope as the initial presenting symptom for systemic amyloid with polyneuropathy and cardiomyopathy as a cause of syncope. The article illustrates the role of advanced cardiac imaging in the diagnosis of the disease with a focused literature review. We also highlight the role of early, shared decision-making between patient, family, and medical team in the management of cardiac amyloidosis.

  16. Cardiomyopathie hypertrophique neonatale de diagnostic etiologique difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania Hammami

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La cardiomyopathie hypertrophique neonatale est une entite rare, heterogene regroupant plusieurs formes cliniques et donc de diagnostic etiologique difficile. Nous rapportons l�observation d�un nouveau ne issu d�une grossesse gemellaire, ayant presente a la naissance un tableau d�insuffisance cardiaque, l�echocardiographie avait conclut a une cardiomyopathie hypertrophique obstructive. Le bilan etiologique etait negatif notamment une mere non diabetique. L�evolution etait favorable avec regression de l�hypertrophie 2 semaines apres la naissance. L�etiologie finalement suggeree etait une cardiomyopathie secondaire a l�injection antenatale de corticoides dans le but d�accelerer la maturation pulmonaire. L�etablissement par les societes savantes d�un consensus de bilan etiologique minimal standard selon une chronologie bien determinee serait d�un grand apport dans la prise en charge de cette anomalie.

  17. Diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapezzi, Claudio; Arbustini, Eloisa; Caforio, Alida L P

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, The ESC Working Group on Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases proposed an updated classification of cardiomyopathies based on morphological and functional phenotypes and subcategories of familial/genetic and non-familial/non-genetic disease. In this position statement, we propose a framew...... conventional cardiological assessment with non-cardiac and molecular parameters increases diagnostic accuracy and thus improves advice and treatment for patients and families....... a framework for the clinical approach to diagnosis in cardiomyopathies based on the recognition of diagnostic 'red flags' that can be used to guide rational selection of specialized tests including genetic analysis. The basic premise is that the adoption of a cardiomyopathy-specific mindset which combines...

  18. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and infiltrative cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Schofield

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is the most common inherited cardiac disease. Cardiac imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis and management, with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR an important modality. CMR provides a number of different techniques in one examination: structure and function, flow imaging and tissue characterisation particularly with the late gadolinium enhancement (LGE technique. Other techniques include vasodilator perfusion, mapping (especially T1 mapping and extracellular volume quantification [ECV] and diffusion-weighted imaging with its potential to detect disarray. Clinically, the uses of CMR are diverse. The imaging must be considered within the context of work-up, particularly the personal and family history, Electrocardiogram (ECG and echocardiogram findings. Subtle markers of possible HCM can be identified in genotype positive left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH-negative subjects. CMR has particular advantages for assessment of the left ventricle (LV apex and is able to detect both missed LVH (apical and basal antero-septum, when the echocardiography is normal but the ECG abnormal. CMR is important in distinguishing HCM from both common phenocopies (hypertensive heart disease, athletic adaptation, ageing related changes and rarer pheno and/or genocopies such as Fabry disease and amyloidosis. For these, in particular the LGE technique and T1 mapping are very useful with a low T1 in Fabry’s, and high T1 and very high ECV in amyloidosis. Moreover, the tissue characterisation that is possible using CMR offers a potential role in patient risk stratification, as scar is a very strong predictor of future heart failure. Scar may also play a role in the prediction of sudden death. CMR is helpful in follow-up assessment, especially after septal alcohol ablation and myomectomy.

  19. X-linked cardiomyopathy is heterogeneous

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M.J.; Sillence, D.O.; Mulley, J.C. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Two major loci of X-linked cardiomyopathy have been mapped by linkage analysis. The gene for X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is mapped to the dystrophin locus at Xp21, while Barth syndrome has been localised to distal Xq28. XLCM usually presents in juvenile males with no skeletal disease but decreased dystrophin in cardiac muscle. Barth syndrome most often presents in infants and is characterized by skeletal myopathy, short stature and neutropenia in association with cardiomyopathy of variable severity. Prior to carrier or prenatal diagnosis in a family, delineation of the cardiomyopathy locus involved is essential. We report the linkage mapping of a large kindred in which several male infants have died with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There is a family history of unexplained death of infant males less than 6 months old over 4 generations. Features of Barth syndrome such as short stature, skeletal myopathy and neutropenia have not been observed. Genotyping at 10 marker loci in Xq28 has revealed significant pairwise lod scores with the cardiomyopathy phenotype at DXS52 (Z=2.21 at {theta}=0.0), at markers p26 and p39 near DXS15 (Z=2.30 at {theta}=0.0) and at F8C (Z=2.24 at {theta}=0.0). A recombinant detected with DXS296 defines the proximal limit to the localization. No recombinants were detected at any of the loci distal to DXS296. The most distal marker in Xq28, DXS1108, is within 500 kb of the telomere. As the gene in this family is localized to Xq28, it is possible that this disorder is an allelic variant at the Barth syndrome locus.

  20. Rachitic hypocalcemic cardiomyopathy in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelwahab T.H. Elidrissy

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathy in infants is characterized by heart failure in apparently normal children without previous organic cardiac lesions. Cardiomyopathy has been found to comprise four types. Rickets is common in Saudi Arabia, that is why I reviewed this subject. Recently this case with classical features of rickets being admitted in a serious state we thought of publishing it. The infant responded well to treatment and full recovery was achieved. Follow up biochemistry, radiology cardiac function completely recovered and bony abnormalities showed evidence of healing. This case might have been missed as respiratory infection. We recommend meticulous look for biochemical features of rickets in infants admitted with respiratory symptoms.

  1. Multimodality imaging in apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Rosario; Mirabella, Francesca; Secco, Gioel Gabrio; Fattori, Rossella

    2014-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (AHCM) is a relatively rare morphologic variant of HCM in which the hypertrophy of myocardium is localized to the left ventricular apex. Symptoms of AHCM might vary from none to others mimic coronary artery disease including acute coronary syndrome, thus resulting in inappropriate hospitalization. Transthoracic echocardiography is the first-line imaging technique for the diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathies. However, when the hypertrophy of the myocardium is localized in the ventricular apex might results in missed diagnosis. Aim of this paper is to review the different imaging techniques used for the diagnosis of AHCM and their role in the detection and comprehension of this uncommon disease. PMID:25276293

  2. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathy Presenting as Dilated Phase of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Diagnosed with Histological and Genetic Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Kuno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case with 46-year-old man diagnosed with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy in the dilated phase of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Since cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, beta-methyl-p-I123-iodophenyl-pentadecanoic myocardial scintigraphy, and positron emission tomography/computed tomography revealed no remarkable findings, we performed electron microscopic examination, which aided in diagnosing mitochondrial cardiomyopathy. Muscle biopsy was also compatible with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes and DNA analysis also concluded it. Since muscle biopsy is less invasive for patients compared to endomyocardial biopsy, cardiologists need to consider it. The diagnosis of mitochondrial cardiomyopathy is helpful because it is a genetic condition and also for consideration of device therapy, as well as management for acute crisis.

  3. Frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 3 (FTD-3)--current concepts and the detection of a previously unknown branch of the Danish FTD-3 family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, S.G.; Braedgaard, H.; Svenstrup, K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among patients with onset of dementia below the age of 65 years, frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second most prevalent cause, secondary only to Alzheimer's disease. Recent advances in understanding the heterogeneous genetic background for different clinical and neuropathological...... discuss recent advances and current concepts in the understanding of CHMP2B-related dementia Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  4. Fabry Disease in Families With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adalsteinsdottir, Berglind; Palsson, Runolfur; Desnick, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The screening of Icelandic patients clinically diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy resulted in identification of 8 individuals from 2 families with X-linked Fabry disease (FD) caused by GLA(α-galactosidase A gene) mutations encoding p.D322E (family A) or p.I232T (family B...

  5. Contractile Dysfunction in Sarcomeric Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIver, David H; Clark, Andrew L

    2016-09-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the clinical phenotype of sarcomeric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are controversial. The development of cardiac hypertrophy in hypertension and aortic stenosis is usually described as a compensatory mechanism that normalizes wall stress. We suggest that an important abnormality in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is reduced contractile stress (the force per unit area) generated by myocardial tissue secondary to abnormalities such as cardiomyocyte disarray. In turn, a progressive deterioration in contractile stress provokes worsening hypertrophy and disarray. A maintained or even exaggerated ejection fraction is explained by the increased end-diastolic wall thickness producing augmented thickening. We propose that the nature of the hemodynamic load in an individual with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy could determine its phenotype. Hypertensive patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are more likely to develop exaggerated concentric hypertrophy; athletic individuals an asymmetric pattern; and inactive individuals a more apical hypertrophy. The development of a left ventricular outflow tract gradient and mitral regurgitation may be explained by differential regional strain resulting in mitral annular rotation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Update on Prognosis and Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. van der Lee (Christiaan)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractHypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an intriguing disease due to its heterogeneity in genetic, morphologic, and clinical spectrum. The insights in the prognosis and natural history of HCM have evolved tremendously over the past 40 years. The fi rst studies, which contained data

  7. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Athletes: Catching a Killer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Barry J.

    1993-01-01

    A leading cause of sudden death among young athletes, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) does not always present cardiac signs and symptoms. Echocardiography offers the most effective means for diagnosis. Some patients require pharmaceutical or surgical intervention. Patients with HCM should not engage in organized competitive sports or…

  8. Functional effects of losartan in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Anna Karin Irene; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels G.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is a lack of disease-modifying treatments in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The aim of this randomised, placebo-controlled study was to assess if losartan could improve or ameliorate deterioration of cardiac function and exercise capacity. METHODS: Echocardiography, exercise...

  9. Pregnancy in women with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, P. G.; Walker, F.

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is increasingly being diagnosed in pregnant women. Women with HCM generally tolerate pregnancy well. The risk is however higher in women who are symptomatic before pregnancy or in those with severe left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. The incidence of

  10. The Portuguese Registry of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Overall results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardim, Nuno; Brito, Dulce; Rocha Lopes, Luís; Freitas, António; Araújo, Carla; Belo, Adriana; Gonçalves, Lino; Mimoso, Jorge; Olivotto, Iacopo; Elliott, Perry; Madeira, Hugo

    2018-01-01

    We report the results of the Portuguese Registry of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, an initiative that reflects the current spectrum of cardiology centers throughout the territory of Portugal. A direct invitation to participate was sent to cardiology departments. Baseline and outcome data were collected. A total of 29 centers participated and 1042 patients were recruited. Four centers recruited 49% of the patients, of whom 59% were male, and mean age at diagnosis was 53±16 years. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was identified as familial in 33%. The major reason for diagnosis was symptoms (53%). HCM was obstructive in 35% of cases and genetic testing was performed in 51%. Invasive septal reduction therapy was offered to 8% (23% of obstructive patients). Most patients (84%) had an estimated five-year risk of sudden death of Portugal is characterized by relatively advanced age at diagnosis, and a high proportion of invasive treatment of obstructive forms. Long-term mortality is low; heart failure is the most common cause of death followed by sudden cardiac death. However, the burden of morbidity remains considerable, emphasizing the need for disease-specific treatments that impact the natural history of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Developing a New Teaching Approach for the Chemical Bonding Concept Aligned with Current Scientific and Pedagogical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum, Tami Levy; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi; Krajcik, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The traditional pedagogical approach for teaching chemical bonding is often overly simplistic and not aligned with the most up-to-date scientific models. As a result, high-school students around the world lack fundamental understanding of chemical bonding. In order to improve students' understanding of this concept, it was essential to propose a…

  12. A Systematic Review of Phenotypic Features Associated With Cardiac Troponin I Mutations in Hereditary Cardiomyopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jens; Hey, Thomas; Lambrecht, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic investigations have established that mutations in proteins of the contractile unit of the myocardium, known as the sarcomere, may be associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). It has become clinical...

  13. Evaluation of left ventricular torsion in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Christian; Faber, Lothar; Horstkotte, Dieter; Körperich, Hermann; Moysich, Axel; Haas, Nikolaus; Kececioglu, Deniz; Thorsten Laser, Kai

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the role of torsion in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in children. A total of 88 children with idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 24) and concentric hypertrophy (n = 20) were investigated with speckle-tracking echocardiography and compared with age- and gender-matched healthy controls (n = 44). In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, we found increased torsion (2.8 ± 1.6 versus 1.9 ± 1.0°/cm [controls], p Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients demonstrated a negative correlation between left ventricular muscle mass and torsion (r = -0.7, p hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is characterised by predominantly enhanced systolic basal clockwise rotation. Diastolic untwisting is delayed in both groups. Torsion may be an interesting marker to guide patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  14. Cushing's syndrome in pregnancy and neonatal hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, L; Masson, P; Millet, V; Simeoni, U

    2004-10-01

    Cushing's syndrome is rare in pregnancy but can cause spontaneous abortion, stillbirth or premature birth. We report a case of transient hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in a newborn whose mother had hypercortisolism due to a primary adrenal lesion. There was no family history of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. Follow-up revealed complete resolution of the cardiac abnormalities in the infant. Cushing's syndrome in the mother resolved after delivery. Although maternal hypercortisolism seldom results in symptomatic hypercortisolism in the newborn, hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy can occur.

  15. Genome wide association study (GWAS) of Chagas cardiomyopathy in Trypanosoma cruzi seropositive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xutao; Sabino, Ester C; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Ribeiro, Antonio L; Ianni, Barbara; Mady, Charles; Busch, Michael P; Seielstad, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Familial aggregation of Chagas cardiac disease in T. cruzi-infected persons suggests that human genetic variation may be an important determinant of disease progression. To perform a GWAS using a well-characterized cohort to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genes associated with cardiac outcomes. A retrospective cohort study was developed by the NHLBI REDS-II program in Brazil. Samples were collected from 499 T. cruzi seropositive blood donors who had donated between 1996 and 2002, and 101 patients with clinically diagnosed Chagas cardiomyopathy. In 2008-2010, all subjects underwent a complete medical examination. After genotype calling, quality control filtering with exclusion of 20 cases, and imputation of 1,000 genomes variants; association analysis was performed for 7 cardiac and parasite related traits, adjusting for population stratification. The cohort showed a wide range of African, European, and modest Native American admixture proportions, consistent with the recent history of Brazil. No SNPs were found to be highly (P<10(-8)) associated with cardiomyopathy. The two mostly highly associated SNPs for cardiomyopathy (rs4149018 and rs12582717; P-values <10(-6)) are located on Chromosome 12p12.2 in the SLCO1B1 gene, a solute carrier family member. We identified 44 additional genic SNPs associated with six traits at P-value <10(-6): Ejection Fraction, PR, QRS, QT intervals, antibody levels by EIA, and parasitemia by PCR. This GWAS identified suggestive SNPs that may impact the risk of progression to cardiomyopathy. Although this Chagas cohort is the largest examined by GWAS to date, (580 subjects), moderate sample size may explain in part the limited number of significant SNP variants. Enlarging the current sample through expanded cohorts and meta-analyses, and targeted studies of candidate genes, will be required to confirm and extend the results reported here. Future studies should also include exposed seronegative controls to investigate

  16. Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis: a review of current concepts and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Gunar

    2014-06-01

    Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis are recent global health issues, which makes tuberculosis - after the success of short course treatment during the second half of the last century - a major health challenge. Globalisation, health inequalities, competing economic interests and political instability contribute substantially to the spread of drug-resistant strains, which are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Issues such as increasing transmission of drug-resistant strains, poor diagnostic coverage and a lengthy, toxic treatment need to be overcome by innovative approaches to tuberculosis control, prevention, diagnostics and treatment. This review addresses recent developments and future concepts. © 2014 Royal College of Physicians.

  17. Progress with genetic cardiomyopathies: Screening, counseling, and testing in dilated, hypertrophic and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Ray E.; Cowan, Jason; Morales, Ana; Siegfried, Jill D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary This review focuses on the genetic cardiomyopathies: principally dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), with salient features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C), regarding genetic etiology, genetic testing, and genetic counseling. Enormous progress has recently been made in identifying genetic causes for each cardiomyopathy, and key phenotype and genotype information is reviewed. Clinical genetic testing is rapidly emerging with a principal rationale of identifying at-risk asymptomatic or disease-free relatives. Knowledge of a disease-causing mutation can guide clinical surveillance for disease onset, thereby enhancing preventive and treatment interventions. Genetic counseling is also indicated for patients and their family members regarding the symptoms of their cardiomyopathy, its inheritance pattern, family screening recommendations, and genetic testing options and possible results. PMID:19808347

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichida, Fukiko; Hamamichi, Yuuji; Hashimoto, Ikuo; Tsubata, Shinichi; Miyazaki, Ayumi; Okada, Toshio; Futatsuya, Ryuusuke; Okada, Eikichi (Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan))

    1994-02-01

    To evaluate the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the anatomical diagnosis and tissue characterization, 8 children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were studied comparing with echocardiography and [sup 201]Tl myocardial imaging. The severity and distribution of hypertrophy were comparable on echocardiography and MRI. MRI was superior to echocardiography to demonstrate the apical hypertrophy. In 4 patients with severe hypertrophy, heterogenous high signal intensity was demonstrated in the site of hypertrophy, which was enhanced by T[sub 2] weighted imaging. In the patient with decreased cardiac performance and progressed cardiac failure, the heterogeneity and high signal intensity progressed in one year interval. Simultaneously performed [sup 201]Tl myocardial imaging showed patchy perfusion defect. Histological findings of the left ventricle demonstrated hypertrophy, degeneration and marked dysarray of the myocytes and fibrosis. MRI has the potential ability for the evaluation and sequential monitoring of myocardial tissue characterization as well as cardiac anatomy in childhood hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (author).

  19. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiozaki, Afonso Akio; Parga, Jose Rodrigues; Arteaga, Edmundo; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo [Sao Paulo Univ. (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto do Coracao. Setor de Tomografia Computarizada e Ressonancia Magnetica Cardiovascular]. E-mail: rochitte@incor.usp.br; Kim, Raymond J. [Duke Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Center, Durham, NC (United States); Tassi, Eduardo Marinho [Diagnosticos da America S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Sector of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography

    2007-03-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most frequent genetic cardiac disease that causes sudden death in young people, with an incidence of 1:500 adults. The routinely used criteria for worst prognosis have limited sensitivity and specificity. Thus, the estimated risk of evolving to dilated cardiomyopathy or sudden death is somewhat inaccurate, leading to management uncertainty of HCM patients. Therefore, an accurate noninvasive method for the diagnosis of HCM with prognostic value is of great importance. In the last years, Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) emerged not only as a diagnostic tool, but also as a study with prognostic values, by characterizing myocardial fibrosis with great accuracy in HCM patients. Additionally, CMR identifies the types of hypertrophy, analyses the ventricular function, estimates the intraventricular gradient and allows the determination of differential diagnosis. Moreover, CMR can uniquely access myocardial fibrosis in HCM. (author)

  20. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozaki, Afonso Akio; Parga, Jose Rodrigues; Arteaga, Edmundo; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo; Tassi, Eduardo Marinho

    2007-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most frequent genetic cardiac disease that causes sudden death in young people, with an incidence of 1:500 adults. The routinely used criteria for worst prognosis have limited sensitivity and specificity. Thus, the estimated risk of evolving to dilated cardiomyopathy or sudden death is somewhat inaccurate, leading to management uncertainty of HCM patients. Therefore, an accurate noninvasive method for the diagnosis of HCM with prognostic value is of great importance. In the last years, Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) emerged not only as a diagnostic tool, but also as a study with prognostic values, by characterizing myocardial fibrosis with great accuracy in HCM patients. Additionally, CMR identifies the types of hypertrophy, analyses the ventricular function, estimates the intraventricular gradient and allows the determination of differential diagnosis. Moreover, CMR can uniquely access myocardial fibrosis in HCM. (author)

  1. Developments in the management of Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanowitz, Herbert B; Machado, Fabiana S; Spray, David C; Friedman, Joel M; Weiss, Oren S; Lora, Jose N; Nagajyothi, Jyothi; Moraes, Diego N; Garg, Nisha Jain; Nunes, Maria Carmo P; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P

    2015-12-01

    Over 100 years have elapsed since the discovery of Chagas disease and there is still much to learn regarding pathogenesis and treatment. Although there are antiparasitic drugs available, such as benznidazole and nifurtimox, they are not totally reliable and often toxic. A recently released negative clinical trial with benznidazole in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy further reinforces the concerns regarding its effectiveness. New drugs and new delivery systems, including those based on nanotechnology, are being sought. Although vaccine development is still in its infancy, the reality of a therapeutic vaccine remains a challenge. New ECG methods may help to recognize patients prone to developing malignant ventricular arrhythmias. The management of heart failure, stroke and arrhythmias also remains a challenge. Although animal experiments have suggested that stem cell based therapy may be therapeutic in the management of heart failure in Chagas cardiomyopathy, clinical trials have not been promising.

  2. Electrolyte Disorders as Triggers for Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Andreozzi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A 56-year-old woman presented with cognitive impairment, confusion and slowed speech, muscle cramps and peripheral paraesthesia preceded by vomiting. Blood tests revealed severe hypokalaemia, hyponatremia, hypomagnesemia and hypocalcaemia. Following a diagnosis of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy based on ultrasonography, the patient was treated with electrolyte supplementation and recovered within 48h. When heart failure is suspected, electrolyte abnormalities should be carefully ruled out as they can affect cardiac function.

  3. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Capel; Elisabet Tasa-Vinyals; Albert Cano-Palomares; Irene Bergés-Raso; Lara Albert; Mercedes Rigla; Assumpta Caixàs

    2017-01-01

    Summary Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is an atypical, severe but reversible form of acute heart insufficiency. It typically presents with left ventricular failure, transient apical and mid-segments hypokinesis, absence of significant coronary stenosis and new electrographic abnormalities and/or elevation in serum cardiac enzymes. Although TC (?broken heart syndrome?) has classically been associated with emotional trauma, evidence suggests that other precipitants might exist, including iatroge...

  4. Cardiovascular genetics: technological advancements and applicability for dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummeling, G J M; Baas, A F; Harakalova, M; van der Smagt, J J; Asselbergs, F W

    2015-07-01

    Genetics plays an important role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases, and is increasingly being integrated into clinical practice. Since 2008, both capacity and cost-efficiency of mutation screening of DNA have been increased magnificently due to the technological advancement obtained by next-generation sequencing. Hence, the discovery rate of genetic defects in cardiovascular genetics has grown rapidly and the financial threshold for gene diagnostics has been lowered, making large-scale DNA sequencing broadly accessible. In this review, the genetic variants, mutations and inheritance models are briefly introduced, after which an overview is provided of current clinical and technological applications in gene diagnostics and research for cardiovascular disease and in particular, dilated cardiomyopathy. Finally, a reflection on the future perspectives in cardiogenetics is given.

  5. Two different cardiomyopathies in a single patient : hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunbul, M; Ozben, B; Mutlu, B

    2013-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a complex and relatively common genetic disorder characterized by left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, usually associated with a nondilated and hyperdynamic chamber with heterogeneous phenotypic expression and clinical course. On the other hand, LV noncompaction is an uncommon cardiomyopathy characterized by the persistence of fetal myocardium with a pattern of prominent trabecular meshwork and deep intertrabecular recesses, systolic dysfunction, and LV dilatation. We report a 29-year-old man with these two different inherent conditions. Our case raises the possibility of a genetic mutation common to these two clinical entities or different gene mutations existing in the same individual.

  6. Shared Genetic Predisposition in Peripartum and Dilated Cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, James S; Li, Jian; Mazaika, Erica; Yasso, Christopher M; DeSouza, Tiffany; Cappola, Thomas P; Tsai, Emily J; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Kamiya, Chizuko A; Mazzarotto, Francesco; Cook, Stuart A; Halder, Indrani; Prasad, Sanjay K; Pisarcik, Jessica; Hanley-Yanez, Karen; Alharethi, Rami; Damp, Julie; Hsich, Eileen; Elkayam, Uri; Sheppard, Richard; Kealey, Angela; Alexis, Jeffrey; Ramani, Gautam; Safirstein, Jordan; Boehmer, John; Pauly, Daniel F; Wittstein, Ilan S; Thohan, Vinay; Zucker, Mark J; Liu, Peter; Gorcsan, John; McNamara, Dennis M; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Arany, Zoltan

    2016-01-21

    Background Peripartum cardiomyopathy shares some clinical features with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a disorder caused by mutations in more than 40 genes, including TTN, which encodes the sarcomere protein titin. Methods In 172 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, we sequenced 43 genes with variants that have been associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. We compared the prevalence of different variant types (nonsense, frameshift, and splicing) in these women with the prevalence of such variants in persons with dilated cardiomyopathy and with population controls. Results We identified 26 distinct, rare truncating variants in eight genes among women with peripartum cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of truncating variants (26 in 172 [15%]) was significantly higher than that in a reference population of 60,706 persons (4.7%, P=1.3×10(-7)) but was similar to that in a cohort of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (55 of 332 patients [17%], P=0.81). Two thirds of identified truncating variants were in TTN, as seen in 10% of the patients and in 1.4% of the reference population (P=2.7×10(-10)); almost all TTN variants were located in the titin A-band. Seven of the TTN truncating variants were previously reported in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. In a clinically well-characterized cohort of 83 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, the presence of TTN truncating variants was significantly correlated with a lower ejection fraction at 1-year follow-up (P=0.005). Conclusions The distribution of truncating variants in a large series of women with peripartum cardiomyopathy was remarkably similar to that found in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. TTN truncating variants were the most prevalent genetic predisposition in each disorder.

  7. Applying the fWLR concept to Stress induced leakage current in non-volatile memory processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, Guoqiao; Scarpa, Andrea; van Marwijk, Leo; van Dijk, Kitty; Kuper, F.G.

    A fast wafer level reliability structure and evaluation method has been developed for stress induced leakage current (SILC) in non-volatile memory processes. The structure is based on parallel floating gate cell arrays. The evaluation method is straightforward, and not time-consuming. The

  8. Randomized Trial of Benznidazole for Chronic Chagas' Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillo, Carlos A; Marin-Neto, Jose Antonio; Avezum, Alvaro; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Rassi, Anis; Rosas, Fernando; Villena, Erick; Quiroz, Roberto; Bonilla, Rina; Britto, Constança; Guhl, Felipe; Velazquez, Elsa; Bonilla, Laura; Meeks, Brandi; Rao-Melacini, Purnima; Pogue, Janice; Mattos, Antonio; Lazdins, Janis; Rassi, Anis; Connolly, Stuart J; Yusuf, Salim

    2015-10-01

    established Chagas' cardiomyopathy significantly reduced serum parasite detection but did not significantly reduce cardiac clinical deterioration through 5 years of follow-up. (Funded by the Population Health Research Institute and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00123916; Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN13967269.).

  9. Current concepts of Harm-Benefit Analysis of Animal Experiments - Report from the AALAS-FELASA Working Group on Harm-Benefit Analysis - Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brønstad, Aurora; Newcomer, Christian E; Decelle, Thierry; Everitt, Jeffrey I; Guillen, Javier; Laber, Kathy

    2016-06-01

    International regulations and guidelines strongly suggest that the use of animal models in scientific research should be initiated only after the authority responsible for the review of animal studies has concluded a well-thought-out harm-benefit analysis (HBA) and deemed the project to be appropriate. Although the process for conducting HBAs may not be new, the relevant factors and algorithms used in conducting them during the review process are deemed to be poorly defined or lacking by committees in many institutions. This paper presents the current concept of HBAs based on a literature review. References on cost or risk benefit from clinical trials and other industries are also included. Several approaches to HBA have been discovered including algorithms, graphic presentations and generic processes. The aim of this study is to better aid and harmonize understanding of the concepts of 'harm', 'benefit' and 'harm-benefit analysis'. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. A Projection Quality-Driven Tube Current Modulation Method in Cone-Beam CT for IGRT: Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Kuo; Dai, Jianrong

    2017-12-01

    To develop a projection quality-driven tube current modulation method in cone-beam computed tomography for image-guided radiotherapy based on the prior attenuation information obtained by the planning computed tomography and then evaluate its effect on a reduction in the imaging dose. The QCKV-1 phantom with different thicknesses (0-400 mm) of solid water upon it was used to simulate different attenuation (μ). Projections were acquired with a series of tube current-exposure time product (mAs) settings, and a 2-dimensional contrast to noise ratio was analyzed for each projection to create a lookup table of mAs versus 2-dimensional contrast to noise ratio, μ. Before a patient underwent computed tomography, the maximum attenuation [Formula: see text] within the 95% range of each projection angle (θ) was estimated according to the planning computed tomography images. Then, a desired 2-dimensional contrast to noise ratio value was selected, and the mAs setting at θ was calculated with the lookup table of mAs versus 2-dimensional contrast to noise ratio,[Formula: see text]. Three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography images were reconstructed using the projections acquired with the selected mAs. The imaging dose was evaluated with a polymethyl methacrylate dosimetry phantom in terms of volume computed tomography dose index. Image quality was analyzed using a Catphan 503 phantom with an oval body annulus and a pelvis phantom. For the Catphan 503 phantom, the cone-beam computed tomography image obtained by the projection quality-driven tube current modulation method had a similar quality to that of conventional cone-beam computed tomography . However, the proposed method could reduce the imaging dose by 16% to 33% to achieve an equivalent contrast to noise ratio value. For the pelvis phantom, the structural similarity index was 0.992 with a dose reduction of 39.7% for the projection quality-driven tube current modulation method. The proposed method could reduce the

  11. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a snake bite victim: a case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy occurs in patients with severe emotional or physiologic stress. The prognosis is usually favorable, and the left ventricular wall motion dyskinesis normalizes within days to weeks. In this paper we report a case of snake bite complicated by takotsubo cardiomyopathy. We advise physicians to ...

  12. Multivessel myocardial bridging in a patient with spiral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Fritz, Timothy; Abdallah, Wissam; McNamara, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial bridging is commonly observed in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, usually confined to the left anterior descending (LAD), and correlates to the hypertrophic septum. We present a patient with unique spiral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and compression of all three coronary arteries corresponding to this hypertrophy pattern.

  13. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy presenting with 3rd-degree atrioventricular block.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosen, K L; Cameron, R W; Bigham, P J; Neish, S R

    1997-01-01

    A 15-year-old boy presented with exercise intolerance and near syncope. Electrocardiography showed 3rd-degree atrioventricular block. He was treated emergently with temporary transvenous ventricular pacing. Two-dimensional echocardiography revealed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Subsequently, a permanent, transvenous, dual-chamber pacemaker was implanted. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy rarely causes complete atrioventricular block. It is particularly unusual for the presenting symptoms of hypertro...

  14. Septal alcoholization in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: about 11 cases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outcomes of septal alcoholization in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy are not enough studied in all centers. The purpose of this study was to determine the outcomes of septal alcoholization in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in our hospital. A retrospective and prospective descriptive study focused on all ...

  15. Current and future competitiveness of renewable energy carriers - Conceptions about competitiveness; Foernyelsebara energibaerares nuvarande och framtida konkurrenskraft - foerestaellningar om konkurrenskraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundgren, K.

    1998-05-01

    The dissertation draws attention to the fact that in the world today 80% of the resources that are used are limited - non renewable energy carriers - and because of the long time between planning and doing (carrying out) within the energy sector, it is worthwhile from the long-term perspective to steer early on towards more sustainable solutions, such as renewable energy carriers. The State and the market have begun to adjust to concepts such as `competitiveness`, which can be viewed as containing both feasibility and legitimacy aspects - the state through different regulations and environmental taxes and environmental fees, and actors on the market that marginally produce/choose renewable energy carriers. The overlying methodology in the dissertation is an actor`s viewpoint. This viewpoint brings forth, in turn, two different views, the analytical and the interpretative. The dissertation presents different stances within the energy sector: commercial production logic, commercial sustainability logic, and the socio-economic sustainability logic. By drawing one`s attention to how one has the possibility to create (enact) his own reality, it is possible to highlight how organisations can increase their competitiveness by being conscious of their own view and others, logic, which in turn forms their views about competitiveness, which in turn determines which projects will materialize. Enterprises and individuals create a description of reality together through a dialectic process, i.e. by developing an environmental management system that contains elements of environmental auditing, environmental performance indicators, and environmental labelling, which `reveal` the production conditions that lie behind the actualization of the final product. An example is the product, `green` electricity, which, in spite of the fact that the final product - electricity - is identical irrespective of the production method, just at the moment can be sold at different prices according

  16. Concepts for risk-based surveillance in the field of veterinary medicine and veterinary public health: Review of current approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knopf Lea

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emerging animal and zoonotic diseases and increasing international trade have resulted in an increased demand for veterinary surveillance systems. However, human and financial resources available to support government veterinary services are becoming more and more limited in many countries world-wide. Intuitively, issues that present higher risks merit higher priority for surveillance resources as investments will yield higher benefit-cost ratios. The rapid rate of acceptance of this core concept of risk-based surveillance has outpaced the development of its theoretical and practical bases. Discussion The principal objectives of risk-based veterinary surveillance are to identify surveillance needs to protect the health of livestock and consumers, to set priorities, and to allocate resources effectively and efficiently. An important goal is to achieve a higher benefit-cost ratio with existing or reduced resources. We propose to define risk-based surveillance systems as those that apply risk assessment methods in different steps of traditional surveillance design for early detection and management of diseases or hazards. In risk-based designs, public health, economic and trade consequences of diseases play an important role in selection of diseases or hazards. Furthermore, certain strata of the population of interest have a higher probability to be sampled for detection of diseases or hazards. Evaluation of risk-based surveillance systems shall prove that the efficacy of risk-based systems is equal or higher than traditional systems; however, the efficiency (benefit-cost ratio shall be higher in risk-based surveillance systems. Summary Risk-based surveillance considerations are useful to support both strategic and operational decision making. This article highlights applications of risk-based surveillance systems in the veterinary field including food safety. Examples are provided for risk-based hazard selection, risk

  17. The Brazilian equipment for photovoltaic systems industry: current concepts; A industria brasileira de equipamentos para sistemas fotovoltaicos: panorama atual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varella, Fabiana Karla de Oliveira Martins; Cavaliero, Carla Kazue Nakao [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (DE/FEM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Energia], e-mail: fkv@fem.unicamp.br, e-mail: cavaliero@fem.unicamp.br; Silva, Ennio Peres da [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (DFA/IFGW/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica Gleb Wataghin. Dept. de Fisica Aplicada], e-mail: lh2ennio@ifi.unicamp.br

    2008-07-01

    The use of renewable alternative sources of energy in the world has been growing in the last few decades due to concerns about dependence on fossil sources and to environmental reasons, related to climatic change and its effects on mankind. Tax and/or financial incentives have been instituted for the population, to have access to renewable source technologies, and for the local equipment industry, to develop more quickly. In Brazil, the PV (photovoltaic) equipment to convert solar into electricity is more often used in low income rural communities, located distant from the grid network. However, since there is no currently specific regulatory incentive mechanism for this source in the country, the Brazilian PV equipment industry has not made great advances and the market is largely dominated by multinationals. Against this background, this work has as objective to analyze the current PV equipment industry in Brazil, in such way that the obtained information can aid in a future elaboration of a national program development to promote the use of this technology, stimulating the domestic industry and reducing the dependence on imported equipment. (author)

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy (ARVC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Jorge; Grushko, Michael; Briceño, David F; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2017-09-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a heritable form of cardiomyopathy, typically with autosomal dominant transmission, shown to be a defect in the cardiac desmosomes, with distinct regional and histopathological features. Clinically, this can ultimately result in bi-ventricular failure and/or malignant ventricular tachycardia (VT) via reentrant circuits created by patchy scar formation. We sought to review the current treatment for ventricular arrhythmias in the setting of ARVC, with particular attention to radiofrequency (RF) ablation and its varied techniques, along with potential therapies in the ablation spectrum. There is underwhelming data on the effectiveness of medical therapy for ARVC-related VT, including beta-blockers and antiarrhythmic medication. Primary and secondary prophylactic implantable-cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation in higher-risk patients is recommended. More recently, RF ablation has been used for ARVC-related VT. Endocardial VT ablation in this setting can produce acute success, though recurrence rate is quite high, which may be explained by the more epicardial and patchy nature of the disease. Combined endocardial-epicardial ablation has since been shown to be feasible, safe, and with significantly better acute and long-term success, particularly when combined with scar dechanneling or homogenization of the scar. However, recurrence rates are not insignificant, and ablation does not eliminate the need for ICD placement. Medical therapy for ARVC-related VT is suboptimal. RF ablation techniques including endocardial and epicardial approaches appear to have the highest success rates for ARVC-related VT. Catheter ablation of VT in ARVC patients should be considered a potentially effective strategy for eliminating frequent VT episodes and ICD shocks rather than a curative therapeutic approach, until long-term efficacy has been consistently documented. Research into the optimal mapping and ablation techniques

  19. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 1: Biologics Overview, Ligament Injury, Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPrade, Robert F; Geeslin, Andrew G; Murray, Iain R; Musahl, Volker; Zlotnicki, Jason P; Petrigliano, Frank; Mann, Barton J

    2016-12-01

    Biologic therapies, including stem cells, platelet-rich plasma, growth factors, and other biologically active adjuncts, have recently received increased attention in the basic science and clinical literature. At the 2015 AOSSM Biologics II Think Tank held in Colorado Springs, Colorado, a group of orthopaedic surgeons, basic scientists, veterinarians, and other investigators gathered to review the state of the science for biologics and barriers to implementation of biologics for the treatment of sports medicine injuries. This series of current concepts reviews reports the summary of the scientific presentations, roundtable discussions, and recommendations from this think tank. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Heart transplantation in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy - Experience from the Nordic ARVC Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilljam, Thomas; Haugaa, Kristina H; Jensen, Henrik K

    2018-01-01

    -transplanted probands with Definite ARVC according to 2010 Task Force Criteria from the same registry. RESULTS: The HTx patients were younger at presentation, median 31 vs. 38years (p=0.001). There was no difference in arrhythmia-related events. The indication for HTx was heart failure in 28 patients (90...... in patients with ARVC is performed predominantly due to heart failure. This suggests that current 2016 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation heart transplant listing recommendations for other cardiomyopathies could be applicable in many cases when taking into account the haemodynamic......OBJECTIVE: There is a paucity of data on heart transplantation (HTx) in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), and specific recommendations on indications for listing ARVC patients for HTx are lacking. In order to delineate features pertinent to HTx assessment, we...

  1. Basal wall hypercontraction of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a patient who had been diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Noboru; Fujita, Shuichi; Kanzaki, Yumiko; Fujisaka, Tomohiro; Ozeki, Michishige; Ishizaka, Nobukazu

    2017-12-12

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is characterized by the basal hypercontractility and apical ballooning of the left ventriculum and T-wave inversion in the electrocardiogram. It has been suggested that Takotsubo cardiomyopathy might underlie the pathogenesis of persistent cardiac dysfunction; however, few reports are present demonstrating the advent of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in patients with idiopathic cardiomyopathy. A 64-year-old women was admitted due to dyspnea on effort and lower extremity edema. She had been diagnosed with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy 2.5 years before owing to the reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (24%), normal coronary artery, and interstitial fibrosis of the myocardial samples. On admission, her electrocardiogram showed giant negative T wave in II, III, aVF, and precordial leads. Echocardiography showed dyskinesis of the left ventricular apex and hypercontraction of the basal wall, which had not been observed in the previous examinations. Coronary angiography showed normal coronary arteries, and apical ballooning and basal hypercontractility was confirmed by left ventriculography. On day 15 of admission, contraction of apical wall was recovered, and basal hypercontraction was disappeared. The present case is the first report demonstrating appearance the transient basal wall hypercontraction along with the advent of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a patient diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy. Whether such findings are indicative of fair prognosis and have the utility of understanding the pathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathy needs further investigation.

  2. Low-level radioactive waste disposal in the United States: An overview of current commercial regulations and concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1993-08-01

    Commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal in the United States is regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) under 10 CFR 61 (1991). This regulation was issued in 1981 after a lengthy and thorough development process that considered the radionuclide concentrations and characteristics associated with commercial low-level radioactive waste streams; alternatives for waste classification; alternative technologies for low-level radioactive waste disposal; and data, modeling, and scenario analyses. The development process also included the publication of both draft and final environmental impact statements. The final regulation describes the general provisions; licenses; performance objectives; technical requirements for land disposal; financial assurances; participation by state governments and Indian tribes; and records, reports, tests, and inspections. This paper provides an overview of, and tutorial on, current commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal regulations in the United States

  3. Concept - or no concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Uffe

    1999-01-01

    Discussion about concept in industrial companies. A method for mapping of managerial concept in specific area is shown......Discussion about concept in industrial companies. A method for mapping of managerial concept in specific area is shown...

  4. Conceitos atuais e relevantes sobre artrite psoriásica Current and relevant concepts in psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Goldenstein-Schainberg

    2012-02-01

    changes in about 20%. Thus, the prognosis of PsA remains unclear, especially if diagnosis and treatment are delayed. Based on extensive literature review (PubMed and Lilacs and experience of our services, new concepts of immunogenetics, pathophysiology, and clinical and therapeutic aspects are discussed. Factors that reduce the quality of life and life expectancy of patients, as well as new guidelines for treatment, will be emphasized. Control of inflammation, especially in enthesitis and axial forms of PsA, was made possible due to the introduction of anti-TNF biologics. Finally, the role of GRAPPA (Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis should be emphasized, since it promotes meetings and joint studies between rheumatologists and dermatologists to provide scientific evidence for the sweeping changes in clinical management and treatment of patients with PsA

  5. Current Concepts and Future Directions for the Assessment of Autoantibodies to Cellular Antigens Referred to as Anti-Nuclear Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mahler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of autoantibodies that target intracellular antigens, commonly termed anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA, is a serological hallmark in the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD. Different methods are available for detection of ANA and all bearing their own advantages and limitations. Most laboratories use the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF assay based on HEp-2 cell substrates. Due to the subjectivity of this diagnostic platform, automated digital reading systems have been developed during the last decade. In addition, solid phase immunoassays using well characterized antigens have gained widespread adoption in high throughput laboratories due to their ease of use and open automation. Despite all the advances in the field of ANA detection and its contribution to the diagnosis of SARD, significant challenges persist. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the current status on ANA testing including automated IIF reading systems and solid phase assays and suggests an approach to interpretation of results and discusses meeting the problems of assay standardization and other persistent challenges.

  6. Current concepts and future directions for the assessment of autoantibodies to cellular antigens referred to as anti-nuclear antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Michael; Meroni, Pier-Luigi; Bossuyt, Xavier; Fritzler, Marvin J

    2014-01-01

    The detection of autoantibodies that target intracellular antigens, commonly termed anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), is a serological hallmark in the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD). Different methods are available for detection of ANA and all bearing their own advantages and limitations. Most laboratories use the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assay based on HEp-2 cell substrates. Due to the subjectivity of this diagnostic platform, automated digital reading systems have been developed during the last decade. In addition, solid phase immunoassays using well characterized antigens have gained widespread adoption in high throughput laboratories due to their ease of use and open automation. Despite all the advances in the field of ANA detection and its contribution to the diagnosis of SARD, significant challenges persist. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the current status on ANA testing including automated IIF reading systems and solid phase assays and suggests an approach to interpretation of results and discusses meeting the problems of assay standardization and other persistent challenges.

  7. Current concept in neural regeneration research: NSCs isolation, characterization and transplantation in various neurodegenerative diseases and stroke: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep K. Vishwakarma

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Since last few years, an impressive amount of data has been generated regarding the basic in vitro and in vivo biology of neural stem cells (NSCs and there is much far hope for the success in cell replacement therapies for several human neurodegenerative diseases and stroke. The discovery of adult neurogenesis (the endogenous production of new neurons in the mammalian brain more than 40 years ago has resulted in a wealth of knowledge about stem cells biology in neuroscience research. Various studies have done in search of a suitable source for NSCs which could be used in animal models to understand the basic and transplantation biology before treating to human. The difficulties in isolating pure population of NSCs limit the study of neural stem behavior and factors that regulate them. Several studies on human fetal brain and spinal cord derived NSCs in animal models have shown some interesting results for cell replacement therapies in many neurodegenerative diseases and stroke models. Also the methods and conditions used for in vitro culture of these cells provide an important base for their applicability and specificity in a definite target of the disease. Various important developments and modifications have been made in stem cells research which is needed to be more specified and enrolment in clinical studies using advanced approaches. This review explains about the current perspectives and suitable sources for NSCs isolation, characterization, in vitro proliferation and their use in cell replacement therapies for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases and strokes.

  8. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation as first-line treatment in myeloma: a global perspective of current concepts and future possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catriona Elizabeth Mactier

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell transplantation forms an integral part of the treatment for multiple myeloma. This paper reviews the current role of transplantation and the progress that has been made in order to optimize the success of this therapy. Effective induction chemotherapy is important and a combination regimen incorporating the novel agent bortezomib is now favorable. Adequate induction is a crucial adjunct to stem cell transplantation and in some cases may potentially postpone the need for transplant. Different conditioning agents prior to transplantation have been explored: high-dose melphalan is most commonly used and bortezomib is a promising additional agent. There is no well-defined superior transplantation protocol but single or tandem autologous stem cell transplantations are those most commonly used, with allogeneic transplantation only used in clinical trials. The appropriate timing of transplantation in the treatment plan is a matter of debate. Consolidation and maintenance chemotherapies, particularly thalidomide and bortezomib, aim to improve and prolong disease response to transplantation and delay recurrence. Prognostic factors for the outcome of stem cell transplant in myeloma have been highlighted. Despite good responses to chemotherapy and transplantation, the problem of disease recurrence persists. Thus, there is still much room for improvement. Treatments which harness the graft-versus-myeloma effect may offer a potential cure for this disease. Trials of novel agents are underway, including targeted therapies for specific antigens such as vaccines and monoclonal antibodies.

  9. Cardiomyopathy Associated with Celiac Disease in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Boskovic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is predominantly a disease of the small intestine characterized by chronic malabsorption in genetically susceptible individuals who ingest grains containing gluten, such as wheat, barley, and rye. Although previously believed to be uncommon, celiac disease may be present in up to 1% of the adult and children population. Celiac disease is associated frequently with iron-deficiency anemia, dermatitis herpetiformis, selective IgA deficiency, thyroid disorders, diabetes mellitus, and various connective tissue disorders but is rarely associated with cardiomyopathy.

  10. Dilated cardiomyopathy following use of xenadrine EFX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccioni, Graziano; Speziale, Giuseppe; Scotti, Luca; Bucciarelli, Valentina; Cappetti, Silvia; Nasso, Giuseppe; Gallina, Sabina; Bucciarelli, Tonino

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of a 35-year-old man presented at the emergency room of our institution with acute onset of dyspnea and dizziness. He was a body builder and had been using Xenadrine EFX for weight loss reduction. The laboratory analyses were normal. A chest radiograph showed an enlarged cardiac silhouette with clear lung fields. Transtoracic two-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography revealed a diffuse hypokinesia with a marked decreased in systolic function and a high teledyastolic diameter. This case document the possible relation to use of Xenadrine EFX for weight loss and the recurrence of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:26680256

  11. The role of interpolation in PVC-induced cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgun, Hilal; Yokokawa, Miki; Baman, Timir; Kim, Hyungjin Myra; Armstrong, William; Good, Eric; Chugh, Aman; Pelosi, Frank; Crawford, Thomas; Oral, Hakan; Morady, Fred; Bogun, Frank

    2011-07-01

    Frequent premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) can cause cardiomyopathy. The mechanism is not known and may be multifactorial. This study assessed the role of PVC interpolation in PVC-induced cardiomyopathy. In 51 consecutive patients (14 women, age 49 ± 15 years, ejection fraction (EF) 0.49 ± 0.14) with frequent PVCs, 24-hour Holter recordings were performed. The amount of interpolation was determined and correlated with the presence of PVC-induced cardiomyopathy. In addition, parameters measured during an electrophysiology study were correlated with the Holter findings. Fourteen of the 21 patients (67%) with cardiomyopathy had interpolated PVCs, compared with only 6 of 30 patients (20%) without PVC-induced cardiomyopathy (P PVC burden than patients without interpolation (28% ± 12% vs. 15% ± 15%; P = .002). The burden of interpolated PVCs correlated with the presence of PVC cardiomyopathy (21% ± 30% vs. 4% ± 13%; P = .008). Both PVC burden and interpolation independently predicted PVC-induced cardiomyopathy (odds ratio 1.07, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.13, P = .02; and odds ratio 4.43, 95% confidence interval 1.06 to 18.48, P = .04, respectively). The presence of ventriculoatrial block at a ventricular pacing cycle length of 600 ms correlated with the presence of interpolation (P = .004). Patients with interpolation had a longer mean ventriculoatrial block cycle length than patients without interpolated PVCs (520 ± 110 ms vs. 394 ± 92 ms; P = .01). The presence of interpolated PVCs was predictive of the presence of PVC cardiomyopathy. Interpolation may play an important role in the generation of PVC-induced cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2011 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Homozygous Desmocollin-2 Mutations and Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzon, Alessandra; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Rigato, Ilaria; Vazza, Giovanni; De Bortoli, Marzia; Calore, Martina; Occhi, Gianluca; Carturan, Elisa; Lazzarini, Elisabetta; Cason, Marco; Mazzotti, Elisa; Poloni, Giulia; Mostacciuolo, Maria Luisa; Daliento, Luciano; Thiene, Gaetano; Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina; Bauce, Barbara; Rampazzo, Alessandra

    2015-10-15

    Dominant mutations in desmocollin-2 (DSC2) gene cause arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM), a progressive heart muscle disease characterized by ventricular tachyarrhythmias, heart failure, and risk of juvenile sudden death. Recessive mutations are rare and are associated with a cardiac or cardiocutaneous phenotype. Here, we evaluated the impact of a homozygous founder DSC2 mutation on clinical expression of ACM. An exon-by-exon analysis of the DSC2 coding region was performed in 94 ACM index patients. The c.536A>G (p.D179G) mutation was identified in 5 patients (5.3%), 4 of which resulted to be homozygous carriers. The 5 subjects shared a conserved haplotype, strongly indicating a common founder. Genetic and clinical investigation of probands' families revealed that p.D179G homozygous carriers displayed severe forms of biventricular cardiomyopathy without hair or skin abnormalities. The only heterozygous proband, who carried an additional variant of unknown significance in αT-catenin gene, showed a mild form of ACM without left ventricular involvement. All heterozygous family members were clinically asymptomatic. In conclusion, this is the first homozygous founder mutation in DSC2 gene identified among Italian ACM probands. Our findings provide further evidence of the occurrence of recessive DSC2 mutations in patients with ACM predominantly presenting with biventricular forms of the disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in Intensive Care Unit: Prevention, Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy has substantial prognostic implications in an intensive care unit, given its increased mortality risk and association with life-threatening complications. This report seeks to discuss diagnostic modalities that can be useful in accurately differentiating Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy from Acute Coronary Syndrome, and also briefly discuss prevention and management of this cardiomyopathy in an intensive care unit. For critically ill Takotsubo patients, intensive clinicians can consider establishment of diagnosis by specific electrocardiograph changes, distinctive marked release of cardiac enzymes, characteristic echocardiograph findings, as well as invasive coronary angiography or noninvasive cardiac magnetic imaging.

  14. Life threatening causes of syncope: channelopathies and cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Adam; Bennett, Matthew T; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Chakrabarti, Santabahnu; Krahn, Andrew D

    2014-09-01

    Syncope is common, has a high recurrence rate and carries a risk of morbidity and, dependent on the cause, mortality. Although the majority of patients with syncope have a benign prognosis, syncope as a result of cardiomyopathy or channelopathy carries a poor prognosis. In addition, the identification of these disorders allows for the institution of treatments, which are effective at reducing the risk of both syncope and mortality. It is for these reasons that the identification of a cardiomyopathy or channelopathy in patients with syncope is crucial. This review article will describe the characteristics of common cardiomyopathies and channelopathies and their investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Reversible catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy due to pheochromocytoma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satendra, Milan; de Jesus, Cláudia; Bordalo e Sá, Armando L; Rosário, Luís; Rocha, José; Bicha Castelo, Henrique; Correia, Maria José; Nunes Diogo, António

    2014-03-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor originating from chromaffin tissue. It commonly presents with symptoms and signs of catecholamine excess, such as hypertension, tachycardia, headache and sweating. Cardiovascular manifestations include catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, which may present as severe left ventricular dysfunction and congestive heart failure. We report a case of pheochromocytoma which was diagnosed following investigation of dilated cardiomyopathy. We highlight the dramatic symptomatic improvement and reversal of cardiomyopathy, with recovery of left ventricular function after treatment. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Stem Cell-Based Therapies in Chagasic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Campos; Carvalho, Adriana Bastos

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and can lead to a dilated cardiomyopathy decades after the prime infection by the parasite. As with other dilated cardiomyopathies, conventional pharmacologic therapies are not always effective and as heart failure progresses patients need heart transplantation. Therefore alternative therapies are highly desirable and cell-based therapies have been investigated in preclinical and clinical studies. In this paper we review the main findings of such studies and discuss future directions for stem cell-based therapies in chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy.

  17. Acute peritonitis as the first presentation of valvular cardiomyopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Higgins, Nikki

    2012-02-01

    Valvular cardiomyopathy can present a diagnostic challenge in the absence of overt cardiac symptoms. This report describes the case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with acute peritonitis associated with vomiting and abdominal distension. Subsequent abdominal computed tomography and ultrasound revealed bibasal pleural effusions, ascites, and normal ovaries. An echocardiogram revealed that all cardiac chambers were dilated with a global decrease in contractility and severe mitral, tricuspid, and aortic regurgitation. A diagnosis of cardiomyopathy with acute heart failure, secondary to valvular heart disease, was secured. Acute peritonitis as the presenting feature of valvular cardiomyopathy is a rare clinical entity.

  18. Acute peritonitis as the first presentation of valvular cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Nikki; Burke, John P; McCreery, Charles J

    2012-01-01

    Valvular cardiomyopathy can present a diagnostic challenge in the absence of overt cardiac symptoms. This report describes the case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with acute peritonitis associated with vomiting and abdominal distension. Subsequent abdominal computed tomography and ultrasound revealed bibasal pleural effusions, ascites, and normal ovaries. An echocardiogram revealed that all cardiac chambers were dilated with a global decrease in contractility and severe mitral, tricuspid, and aortic regurgitation. A diagnosis of cardiomyopathy with acute heart failure, secondary to valvular heart disease, was secured. Acute peritonitis as the presenting feature of valvular cardiomyopathy is a rare clinical entity.

  19. Current concepts on integrative safety assessment of active substances of botanical, mineral or chemical origin in homeopathic medicinal products within the European regulatory framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholzer, Marie-Luise; Werner, Christine; Knoess, Werner

    2014-03-01

    For active substances of botanical, mineral or chemical origin processed in homeopathic medicinal products for human use, the adequate safety principles as with other human medicinal products are applied in line with the European regulatory framework. In homeopathy, nonclinical safety assessment is facing a particular challenge because of a multitude and diversity of source materials used and due to rarely available toxicological data. Thus, current concepts applied by the national regulatory authority in Germany (BfArM) on integrative safety assessment of raw materials used in homeopathic medicinal products involve several evaluation approaches like the use of the Lowest Human Recommended Dose (LHRD), toxicological limit values, Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC), data from food regulation or the consideration of unavoidable environmental or dietary background exposure. This publication is intended to further develop and clarify the practical use of these assessment routes by exemplary application on selected homeopathic preparations. In conclusion, the different approaches are considered a very useful scientific and simultaneously pragmatic procedure in differentiated risk assessment of homeopathic medicinal products. Overall, this paper aims to increase the visibility of the safety issues in homeopathy and to stimulate scientific discussion of worldwide existing regulatory concepts on homeopathic medicinal products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of imaging in the diagnosis and management of thoracolumbar burst fractures: current concepts and a review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saifuddin, A.; Noordeen, H.; Taylor, B.A.; Bayley, I.

    1996-01-01

    The burst fracture of the spine was first described by Holdsworth in 1963 and redefined by Denis in 1983 as being a fracture of the anterior and middle columns of the spine with or without an associated posterior column fracture. This injury has received much attention in the literature as regards its radiological diagnosis and also its clinical managment. The purpose of this article is to review the way that imaging has been used both to diagnose the injury and to guide management. Current concepts of the stability of this fracture are presented and our experience in the use of magnetic resonance imaging in deciding treatment options is discussed. (orig.). With 18 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Current Concepts in Filler Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Amir; Watson, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    When evaluating the face in thirds, the upper face, midface, and lower face, one may assume the lateral the temple, midface, and lateral mandible as the pillars of these subdivisions. Many of our facial aesthetic procedures address these regions, including the lateral brow lift, midface lift, and lateral face lift. As the use of facial fillers has advanced, more emphasis is placed on the correction of the temples, midlateral face, and lateral jaw line. This article is dedicated to these facial aesthetic pillars. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Current concepts in neuroendocrine disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Olea, Martha; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Orlando, Edward F; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Rosenfeld, Cheryl; Wolstenholme, Jennifer; Trudeau, Vance L

    2014-07-01

    In the last few years, it has become clear that a wide variety of environmental contaminants have specific effects on neuroendocrine systems in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. While it is beyond the scope of this review to provide a comprehensive examination of all of these neuroendocrine disruptors, we will focus on select representative examples. Organochlorine pesticides bioaccumulate in neuroendocrine areas of the brain that directly regulate GnRH neurons, thereby altering the expression of genes downstream of GnRH signaling. Organochlorine pesticides can also agonize or antagonize hormone receptors, adversely affecting crosstalk between neurotransmitter systems. The impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls are varied and in many cases subtle. This is particularly true for neuroedocrine and behavioral effects of exposure. These effects impact sexual differentiation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and other neuroendocrine systems regulating the thyroid, metabolic, and stress axes and their physiological responses. Weakly estrogenic and anti-androgenic pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, phytochemicals, and the fungicide vinclozolin can lead to severe and widespread neuroendocrine disruptions in discrete brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus, resulting in behavioral changes in a wide range of species. Behavioral features that have been shown to be affected by one or more these chemicals include cognitive deficits, heightened anxiety or anxiety-like, sociosexual, locomotor, and appetitive behaviors. Neuroactive pharmaceuticals are now widely detected in aquatic environments and water supplies through the release of wastewater treatment plant effluents. The antidepressant fluoxetine is one such pharmaceutical neuroendocrine disruptor. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that can affect multiple neuroendocrine pathways and behavioral circuits, including disruptive effects on reproduction and feeding in fish. There is growing evidence for the association between environmental contaminant exposures and diseases with strong neuroendocrine components, for example decreased fecundity, neurodegeneration, and cardiac disease. It is critical to consider the timing of exposures of neuroendocrine disruptors because embryonic stages of central nervous system development are exquisitely sensitive to adverse effects. There is also evidence for epigenetic and transgenerational neuroendocrine disrupting effects of some pollutants. We must now consider the impacts of neuroendocrine disruptors on reproduction, development, growth and behaviors, and the population consequences for evolutionary change in an increasingly contaminated world. This review examines the evidence to date that various so-called neuroendocrine disruptors can induce such effects often at environmentally-relevant concentrations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pediatric tibia fractures: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setter, Kevin J; Palomino, Kathryn E

    2006-02-01

    Fracture of the tibia is a common occurrence in children. The operative treatment of pediatric tibia fractures has undergone a recent change. However, there is no clear consensus regarding the superiority of one treatment option. The literature clearly supports the fact that the vast majority of pediatric tibia fractures can and should be managed nonoperatively. This is secondary to their inherent stability. A variety of factors including fracture type, location, severity and patient age determine the best treatment options for a particular fracture. A thorough understanding of these factors and how they affect outcome, help the clinician formulate the proper plan of treatment. A randomized prospective controlled trial will be necessary to establish which surgical options are superior for which type of pediatric tibia fracture. Until then, recent studies have indicated that flexible intramedullary nails may lead to a shorter time to union and a decreased rate of refracture when compared with external fixation of unstable tibial shaft fractures. What remains unclear are the specific indications and contraindication for the use of flexible nails. External fixation still remains a successful treatment option for unstable tibial shaft fractures.

  4. Current concepts of snail control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Sturrock

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis control was impossible without effective tools. Synthetic molluscicides developed in the 1950s spearheaded community level control. Snail eradication proved impossible but repeated mollusciciding to manage natural snail populations could eliminate transmission. Escalating costs, logistical complexity, its labour-intensive nature and possible environmental effects caused some concern. The arrival of safe, effective, single-dose drugs in the 1970s offered an apparently better alternative but experience revealed the need for repeated treatments to minimise reinfection in programmes relying on drugs alone. Combining treatment with mollusciciding was more successful, but broke down if mollusciciding was withdrawn to save money. The provision of sanitation and safe water to prevent transmission is too expensive in poor rural areas where schistosomiasis is endemic; rendering ineffective public health education linked to primary health care. In the tropics, moreover, children (the key group in maintaining transmission will always play in water. Large scale destruction of natural snail habitats remains impossibly expensive (although proper design could render many new man-made habitats unsuitable for snails. Neither biological control agents nor plant molluscicides have proved satisfactory alternatives to synthetic molluscicides. Biologists can develop effective strategies for using synthetic molluscicides in different epidemiological situations if only, like drugs, their price can be reduced.

  5. Hairy cell leukemia: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Timothy; Mobarek, Dalia; Wegge, Julia; Tabbara, Imad A

    2008-10-01

    Hairy cell Leukemia (HCL) is a chronic lymphoproliferative disorder that was characterized in the late 1950s. HCL is defined, according to the WHO classification, as a mature (peripheral) B-cell neoplasm (1). HCL accounts for between 2-3% of all leukemia cases, with about 600 new cases diagnosed in the U.S. each year (1). HCL occurs more commonly in males, with an overall male to female ratio of approximately 4:1. The median age of onset is 52 years. This disease is seen more commonly in Caucasians and appears to be especially frequent in Ashkenazi Jewish males, with rare occurrence in persons of Asian and African descents (1). Hairy cells are distinct, clonal B cells arrested at a late stage of maturation. They are small B lymphoid cells that possess oval nuclei and abundant cytoplasm with characteristic micro-filamentous ("hairy") projections. They strongly express CD103, CD22, and CD11c (2). These cells typically infiltrate the bone marrow, the spleen, and to a lesser extent the liver, lymph nodes, and skin. Many patients present with splenomegaly and pancytopenia. Other clinical manifestations include recurrent opportunistic infections and vasculitis. Historically, HCL was considered uniformly fatal (2). However, recent treatment advances, using purine analogues such as Cladribine and Pentostatin, led to a significant improvement in prognosis with achievement of high response rates and durable remissions (2).

  6. Schizophrenia : Current concepts in aetiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is perhaps the most devastating neuropsychiatric illness. Worldwide, its prevalence rate is about 1%. Schizophrenia is considered a neurodevelopmental disorder involving the interplay of susceptibility genes and environmental factors. There is a wide range of pathologic findings, but there is no specific or diagnostic laboratory abnormality. Till date, the aetiology, neuropathology, and pathophysiology of schizophrenia remain elusive. Over the last forty years, the dopaminergic model has been the leading neurochemical hypothesis of schizophrenia. Yet it remains unlikely that dopaminergic dysfunction, on its own. Glutamatergic models provide an alternate approach for conceptualizing the brain abnormalities associated with schizophrenia. New pharmacological and behavioral approaches aimed at potentiating glutamatergic neurotransmission, offer new hopeforfuture clinical development

  7. CURRENT CONCEPTS OF PLYOMETRIC EXERCISE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, George; Riemann, Bryan L; Manske, Robert

    2015-11-01

    As knowledge regarding rehabilitation science continues to increase, exercise programs following musculoskeletal athletic injury continue to evolve. Rehabilitation programs have drastically changed, especially in the terminal phases of rehabilitation, which include performance enhancement, development of power, and a safe return to activity. Plyometric exercise has become an integral component of late phase rehabilitation as the patient nears return to activity. Among the numerous types of available exercises, plyometrics assist in the development of power, a foundation from which the athlete can refine the skills of their sport. Therefore, the purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide an overview of plyometrics including: definition, phases, the physiological, mechanical and neurophysiological basis of plyometrics, and to describe clinical guidelines and contraindications for implementing plyometric programs.

  8. Current Concepts in Neuroendocrine Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years, it has become clear that a wide variety of environmental contaminants have specific effects on neuroendocrine systems in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. While it is beyond the scope of this review to provide a comprehensive examination of all of these neuroendocrine disruptors, we will focus on select representative examples. Organochlorine pesticides bioaccumulate in neuroendocrine areas of the brain that directly regulate GnRH neurons, thereby altering the expression of genes downstream of GnRH signaling. Organochlorine pesticides can also agonize or antagonize hormone receptors, adversely affecting crosstalk between neurotransmitter systems. The impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls are varied and in many cases subtle. This is particularly true for neuroedocrine and behavioral effects of exposure. These effects impact sexual differentiation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and other neuroendocrine systems regulating the thyroid, metabolic, and stress axes and their physiological responses. Weakly estrogenic and anti-androgenic pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, phytochemicals, and the fungicide vinclozolin can lead to severe and widespread neuroendocrine disruptions in discrete brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus, resulting in behavioral changes in a wide range of species. Behavioral features that have been shown to be affected by one or more these chemicals include cognitive deficits, heightened anxiety or anxiety-like, sociosexual, locomotor, and appetitive behaviors. Neuroactive pharmaceuticals are now widely detected in aquatic environments and water supplies through the release of wastewater treatment plant effluents. The antidepressant fluoxetine is one such pharmaceutical neuroendocrine disruptor. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that can affect multiple neuroendocrine pathways and behavioral circuits, including disruptive effects on reproduction and feeding in fish. There is growing evidence for the association between environmental contaminant exposures and diseases with strong neuroendocrine components, for example decreased fecundity, neurodegeneration, and cardiac disease. It is critical to consider the timing of exposures of neuroendocrine disruptors because embryonic stages of central nervous system development are exquisitely sensitive to adverse effects. There is also evidence for epigenetic and transgenerational neuroendocrine disrupting effects of some pollutants. We must now consider the impacts of neuroendocrine disruptors on reproduction, development, growth and behaviors, and the population consequences for evolutionary change in an increasingly contaminated world. This review examines the evidence to date that various so-called neuroendocrine disruptors can induce such effects often at environmentally-relevant concentrations. PMID:24530523

  9. Fournier's gangrene--current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróblewska, Marta; Kuzaka, Bolesław; Borkowski, Tomasz; Kuzaka, Piotr; Kawecki, Dariusz; Radziszewski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Fournier's gangrene (FG) is a rapidly progressive form of infective necrotising fasciitis of the perineal, genital, or perianal regions, leading to thrombosis of the small subcutaneous vessels and necrosis of the overlying skin. It is believed that the occurrence of the disease in women is underreported and may be unrecognised by some clinicians. Fournier's gangrene is a life-threatening condition, constituting an urological emergency. Many patients with Fournier's gangrene have medical or surgical conditions, which are predisposing factors to this disease or its more severe or fatal course. These comprise diabetes mellitus, hypertension, alcoholism and advanced age. Recent reports in the literature point to changes in the epidemiology of FG, comprising an increasing age of patients. Several authors reported that the mean age of FG patients is at present 53-55 years. Prognosis in FG patients is based on FGSI (Fournier's gangrene severity index) score. Despite the progress in medical care for FG patients, the mortality rate reported in the literature remains high--most often 20-40%, but ranges from 4% to 80%. The most common isolates cultured from FG lesions are both Gram-positive and Gram-negative, as well as strictly anaerobic bacteria. Recently community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has emerged as an etiological agent of FG with severe clinical course and even fulminant sepsis. Rarely FG may have a fungal etiology, being caused by yeast-like fungi Candida spp. or by moulds. Antibiotics should be administered parenterally and in doses high enough to reach an effective concentration in the infected tissues.

  10. Craniosynostosis: current conceptions and misconceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Sá Roriz Fonteles

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cranial bones articulate in areas called sutures that must remain patent until skull growth is complete. Craniosynostosis is the condition that results from premature closure of one or more of the cranial vault sutures, generating facial deformities and more importantly, skull growth restrictions with the ability to severely affect brain growth. Typically, craniosynostosis can be expressed as an isolated event, or as part of syndromic phenotypes. Multiple signaling mechanisms interact during developmental stages to ensure proper and timely suture fusion. Clinical outcome is often a product of craniosynostosis subtypes, number of affected sutures and timing of premature suture fusion. The present work aimed to review the different aspects involved in the establishment of craniosynostosis, providing a close view of the cellular, molecular and genetic background of these malformations.

  11. RARE CASES OF HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY: VARIANTS AND CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Zimina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy belongs to a group of hereditary diseases due to sarcomere gene mutation. This abnormality is characterized by the development of symmetric or asymmetric hypertrophy of left ventricular myocardium with its normal contractile function or hypercontractility. Authors provide a brief overview of variants of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and phenocopies of this disease, when structural changes in the heart are not the result of classic sarcomere gene mutation. In patients with some phenocopies concentric left ventricular hypertrophy can transform into its dilatation with reduced contractility. Such variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is presented in the first clinical observation. The second case shows that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be one of the symptoms of the disease with other reasons for poor outcome.

  12. RARE CASES OF HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY: VARIANTS AND CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Zimina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy belongs to a group of hereditary diseases due to sarcomere gene mutation. This abnormality is characterized by the development of symmetric or asymmetric hypertrophy of left ventricular myocardium with its normal contractile function or hypercontractility. Authors provide a brief overview of variants of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and phenocopies of this disease, when structural changes in the heart are not the result of classic sarcomere gene mutation. In patients with some phenocopies concentric left ventricular hypertrophy can transform into its dilatation with reduced contractility. Such variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is presented in the first clinical observation. The second case shows that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be one of the symptoms of the disease with other reasons for poor outcome.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usual to recharge between beats . The irregular heartbeats (arrhythmia) can lead to fainting (syncope) or cardiac arrest ... Topic: Cardiomyopathy Health Topic: Movement Disorders Health Topic: Newborn Screening Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 ...

  14. Advanced quantitative echocardiography in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Hastrup Svendsen, Jesper; Sogaard, Peter

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Arrhythmogenic right ventricular (RV) cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a regional disease of the RV myocardium with variable degrees of left ventricular involvement. Three-dimensional echocardiography and Doppler tissue imaging (DTI) are new echocardiographic modalities for the evaluation of ...

  15. Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif Ali Eltawansy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 53-year-old female presenting with a new-onset heart failure that was contributed secondary to noncompaction cardiomyopathy. The diagnosis was made by echocardiogram and confirmed by cardiac MRI. Noncompaction cardiomyopathy (also known as ventricular hypertrabeculation is a newly discovered disease. It is considered to be congenital (genetic cardiomyopathy. It is usually associated with genetic disorders and that could explain the genetic pathogenesis of the non-compaction cardiomyopathy. Our case had a history of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. There is a high incidence of arrhythmia and embolic complications. The treatment usually consists of the medical management, defibrillator placement, and lifelong anticoagulation. Heart transplantation will be the last resort.

  16. Dynamic electrocardiographic changes in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quarta, Giovanni

    2010-04-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities of depolarisation and repolarisation contribute to the diagnostic criteria for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). The development of diagnostic ECG features were investigated in a genotyped cohort with ARVC to provide more sensitive markers of early disease.

  17. Psychological distress and personality factors in takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeijers, L; Szabó, B M; Kop, W J

    2016-01-01

    Background Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCC) is a transient condition characterised by severe left ventricular dysfunction combined with symptoms and signs mimicking myocardial infarction. Emotional triggers are common, but little is known about the psychological background characteristics of TCC. This

  18. Atypical aortic coarctation as a cause of a cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Alsemgeest, F.; Kamp, O.; Marcu, C.B.

    2015-01-01

    Atypical locations for aortic coarctation have been previously described. However, to our knowledge, no case has been described of a rapidly progressive dilated cardiomyopathy caused by an atypical coarctation, with a rapid normalisation of ventricular function after treatment.

  19. Trace elements in diabetic cardiomyopathy: An electrophysiological overview

    OpenAIRE

    Ozturk, Nihal; Olgar, Yusuf; Ozdemir, Semir

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that Diabetes Mellitus leads to a specific cardiomyopathy apart from vascular disease and bring about high morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Recent clinical and experimental studies have extensively demonstrated that this cardiomyopathy causes impaired cardiac performance manifested by early diastolic and late systolic dysfunction. This impaired cardiac performance most probably have emerged upon the expression and activity of regulatory protein...

  20. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with mid-ventricular obstruction and apical aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.D. Oryshchyn

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A case report of apical left ventricular aneurysm in patient with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with mid-ventricular obstruction (diagnosis and surgical treatment is presented. We revealed apical aneurysm and mid-ventricular obstruction during echocardiography and specified anatomical characteristics of aneurysm during computer tomography. There was no evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease during coronary angiography. Taking into consideration multiple cerebral infarcts, aneurysm resection and left ventricular plastics was performed. Electronic microscopy of myocardium confirmed the diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  1. MT-CYB mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Havndrup, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a characteristic of heart failure. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA, particularly in MT-CYB coding for cytochrome B in complex III (CIII), have been associated with isolated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We hypothesized that MT-CYB mutations might play an important...... and m.15482T>C; p.S246P were identified. Modeling showed that the p.C93Y mutation leads to disruption of the tertiary structure of Cytb by helix displacement, interfering with protein-heme interaction. The p.S246P mutation induces a diproline structure, which alters local secondary structure and induces...... of HCM patients. We propose that further patients with HCM should be examined for mutations in MT-CYB in order to clarify the role of these variants....

  2. Dilated cardiomyopathy in cats - A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jeyaraja

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Two cats were brought to Madras Veterinary College Teaching Hospital with the history and clinical signs suggestive of congestive heart failure ie, coughing, exercise intolerance, dyspnea, abdominal distension etc. There was history of feeding the cat with home made diet in one case and in other with commercial dog food. Based on electrocardiographic, radiographic and echocardiographic findings, the diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy was done in both the cases. The cases were managed with enalapril maleate, furosemide, dietary taurine supplementation and other supportive therapy. Among these two cases, one cat died on 2nd day of treatment and the other showed recovery after 8 days of treatment. [Vet World 2013; 6(4.000: 226-227

  3. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Capel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC is an atypical, severe but reversible form of acute heart insufficiency. It typically presents with left ventricular failure, transient apical and mid-segments hypokinesis, absence of significant coronary stenosis and new electrographic abnormalities and/or elevation in serum cardiac enzymes. Although TC (‘broken heart syndrome’ has classically been associated with emotional trauma, evidence suggests that other precipitants might exist, including iatrogenic and thyroid-mediated forms. Thyroid disease is a relatively common comorbidity in TC patients. We report a case of TC in a postmenopausal female with no history of emotional trauma or other potential precipitant factors who was diagnosed with amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism during her hospital stay. Though some case reports of thyroidrelated TC exist, we are not aware of any other reported case of TC precipitated by amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism.

  4. A Case Report of Reversible Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Singhai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is mostly an idiopathic disease with a progressive and irreversible course. It carries poor prognosis and outcome. Rarely, a reversible metabolic etiology that is amenable to specific therapy is identified. Alteration in thyroid status can lead to changes in systolic and diastolic function of left ventricle. Heart is sensitive to thyroid hormone changes, and cardiac disorders are commonly associated with both hyper and hypothyroidism. Diastolic dysfunction is the most common abnormality reported in hypothyroidism. In systolic function, prolonged systolic time interval or normal cardiac function has been reported by most workers. DCM is a rare presentation of hypothyroidism. Here, we report a case of 40-year-old female diagnosed with DCM due to hypothyroidism

  5. Sepsis-Induced Cardiomyopathy: Mechanisms and Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Cun Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a lethal syndrome with a high incidence and a weighty economy burden. The pathophysiology of sepsis includes inflammation, immune dysfunction, and dysfunction of coagulation, while sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC, defined as a global but reversible dysfunction of both sides of the heart induced by sepsis, plays a significant role in all of the aspects above in the pathogenesis of sepsis. The complex pathogenesis of SIC involves a combination of dysregulation of inflammatory mediators, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, disorder of calcium regulation, autonomic nervous system dysregulation, and endothelial dysfunction. The treatments for SIC include the signal pathway intervention, Chinese traditional medicine, and other specific therapy. Here, we reviewed the latest literatures on the mechanisms and treatments of SIC and hope to provide further insights to researchers and create a new road for the therapy of sepsis.

  6. Danon’s disease as a cause of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Leontyeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common inherited disease of the myocardium. The causes of the disease are heterogeneous; its primary form results from mutations in the genes encoding cardiac sarcomeric proteins; its secondary (metabolic and syndromic forms develop due to mutations in the genes encoding non-sarcomeric proteins. Glycogenosis is the most common cause of the metabolic ones of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Danon’s disease (lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2-cardiomyopathy is a form of glycogenosis and it is characterized by a typical triad: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, mental retardation, and skeletal myopathy. The disease occurs with mutations in the LAMP2 gene; X-linked dominant inheritance. LAMP2-cardiomyopathy does not virtually differ in its clinical manifestations from the severe form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which results from mutations in the sarcomeric protein genes. The disease is characterized by a poor progressive course with the high probability of causing sudden death or with the progression of severe heart failure. Implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator is a main method to prevent sudden cardiac death. 

  7. Pediatric cardiomyopathy: importance of genetic and metabolic evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindel, Steven J.; Miller, Erin M.; Gupta, Resmi; Cripe, Linda H.; Hinton, Robert B.; Spicer, Robert L.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Ware, Stephanie M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cardiomyopathy is a heterogeneous disease with a strong genetic component. A research-based pediatric cardiomyopathy registry (PCMR) identified familial, syndromic, or metabolic causes in 30% of children. However, these results pre-dated clinical genetic testing. Methods and Results We determined the prevalence of familial, syndromic, or metabolic causes in eighty-three consecutive unrelated patients referred for genetic evaluation of cardiomyopathy from 2006–2009. Seventy-six percent of probands (n=63) were categorized as familial, syndromic, or metabolic. Forty-three percent (n=18) of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients had mutations in sarcomeric genes, with MYH7 and MYBPC3 mutations predominating. Syndromic (17%, n=7) and metabolic (26%, n=11) causes were frequently identified in HCM patients. The metabolic subgroup was differentiated by decreased endocardial shortening fraction on echocardiography. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) patients had similar rates of syndromic (20%, n=5) and metabolic (16%, n=4) causes, but fewer familial cases (24%, n=6) than HCM patients. Conclusions The cause of cardiomyopathy is identifiable in a majority of affected children. An underlying metabolic or syndromic cause is identified in greater than 35% of children with HCM or DCM. Identification of etiology is important for management, family based risk assessment, and screening. PMID:22555271

  8. Metabolic remodeling associated with subchronic doxorubicin cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Rui A.; Sousa, Rui P.B.; Cadete, Virgilio J.J.; Lopaschuk, Gary D.; Palmeira, Carlos M.M.; Bjork, James A.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2010-01-01

    Doxorubicin (Adriamycin ® ) is a potent and broad-spectrum antineoplastic agent, the clinical utility of which is restricted by a cumulative and progressive cardiomyopathy that develops with repeated dosing. Fundamental to the cardiac failure is an interference with mitochondrial respiration and inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. Global gene expression arrays in cardiac tissue indicate that inhibition of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation by doxorubicin (DOX) is accompanied by a decreased expression of genes related to aerobic fatty acid oxidation and a corresponding increase in expression of genes involved in anaerobic glycolysis, possibly as an alternate source for ATP production. The aim of this investigation was to determine whether this is also manifest at the metabonomic level as a switch in metabolic flux in cardiac tissue, and whether this can be averted by co-administering the cardioprotective drug, dexrazoxane (DZR). 13 C-isotopomer analysis of isolated perfused hearts from male Sprague-Dawley rats receiving 6 weekly s.c. injections of 2 mg/kg DOX demonstrated a shift from the preferential oxidation of fatty acids to enhanced oxidation of glucose and lactate plus pyruvate, indicative of a compensatory shift towards increased pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. Substrate-selective isotopomer analysis combined with western blots indicate an inhibition of long-chain fatty acid oxidation and not MCAD activity or fatty acyl-carnitine transport. Co-administering DZR averted many treatment-related changes in cardiac substrate metabolism, consistent with DZR being an effective cardioprotective agent against DOX-induced cardiomyopathy. This switch in substrate metabolism resembles that described for other models of cardiac failure; accordingly, this change in metabolic flux may represent a general compensatory response of cardiac tissue to imbalances in bioenergetic demand and supply, and not a characteristic unique to DOX-induced cardiac failure itself.

  9. Adderall induced inverted-Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsidawi, Said; Muth, James; Wilkin, James

    2011-11-15

    Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy (TTC), also known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy, was initially described in Japan in 1990. Both illicit and prescription drugs have added to the growing list of insulting stressors. We describe an interesting case of atypical TTC triggered by adderall overdose. A 19-year-old female was brought to the Emergency Department after ingesting 30 Adderall tablets. She was complaining of pressure like chest pain and shortness of breath. Her cardiac enzymes were elevated but the electrocardiogram was unremarkable. Echocardiography identified an ejection fraction (EF) of 25-30% with severe hypokinesis of the base and a preserved apex. Cardiac angiography demonstrated normal coronary arteries with an EF of 35%, hyperkinetic apex and akinetic base consistent with the diagnosis of inverted-TTC. Her symptoms resolved in 24 hrs. Repeat echocardiogram performed 3 days later showed an EF of 60% with no regional wall motion abnormalities. TTC can be identified as a rapid development of severe and reversible left ventricular dysfunction extending beyond the territory of a single epicardial coronary artery in the absence of coronary artery disease or pheochromocytoma. Clinical presentation can be challenging and very hard to distinguish from acute myocardial infarction. Medication induced-TTC has been reported. In our case, the patient overdosed on Adderall which is a sympathomimetic medication. Cardiac imaging identified wall motion abnormalities consistent with inverted type TTC. Restoration of left ventricular function within days confirms the diagnosis of TTC. In conclusion, this case offers an interesting insight into the pathophysiology of TTC. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Comparação do desfecho entre a cardiopatia chagásica e a miocardiopatia dilatada idiopática Comparison of outcome between Chagas cardiomyopathy and idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Pires Barbosa

    2011-12-01

    (Hazard Ratio=3.29; 95% Confidence Interval 1.89 to 5.73; p<0.005 were positively associated with mortality, whereas Beta-Blocker therapy (Hazard Ratio=0.39; 95% Confidence Interval 0.26 to 0.56; p<0.005 was negatively associated with mortality. Survival probability for patients with Chagas cardiomyopathy at 8, 24, and 49 months was 83%, 61%, and 41%, respectively, and for patients with Idiopathic Dilated cardiomyopathy 97%, 92%, and 82%, respectively (p<0.005. CONCLUSION: In the current era of heart failure therapy, patients with Chagas cardiomyopathy have a poorer outcome in comparison to patients with Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

  11. Epidemiology of cardiomyopathy – A Clinical and Genetic Study of Restrictive Cardiomyopathy: The EPOCH-R Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitali Kapoor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM is characterized by diastolic dysfunction, biatrial enlargement, and normal or near-normal systolic function. RCM is the rarest kind among cardiomyopathies with a severe outcome. Methods: Here, we present the clinical outcomes of thirty RCM patients recruited from a tertiary care unit of India, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. For clinical assessment, patients underwent electrocardiogram, echocardiography, and cardiac catheterization, and endomyocardial biopsy whenever required. Results: Out of 190 patients with cardiomyopathy, 100 had dilated cardiomyopathy, 60 had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and 30 had idiopathic RCM and were recruited for the study. Out of these thirty patients, 63.3% were males. A maximum number of patients were diagnosed in their second to third decade of life. Atrial fibrillation (73.3% and ST-T abnormalities (76.6% were common. Most of the patients showed the early age of onset with symptoms emerging in the first and second decades of life. Shortness of breath and fatigue were found to be common symptoms. No familial cases were found. Conclusion: RCM in India is a sporadic disease, rare, and occurs in the young. Prognosis of RCM is still worse than any other cardiomyopathy.

  12. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy and Connective Tissue Dysplasia Syndrome: Comorbidity Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. N. Belenkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the structure of co-morbidities, especially connective tissue undifferentiated dysplasia syndrome (CTDS, in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM to develop an algorithm of complex examination of patients.Material and methods. Patients with HCM (n=186; 88 men and 78 women were examined. The diagnosis of HCM was based on current guidelines; molecular genetic study was performed in the absence of phenotypic manifestations. Echocardiography and standard examination of cardiac patient were performed in all patients to identify comorbidities. Genotyping of polymorphisms of 12 modifying genes was performed in 61 patients and 61 people in the control group.Results. HCM was most often associated with uterine myoma (52%, cardiac and extracardiac congenital malformations (50%, and thyroid diseases (37%. Combination of HCM with different variants of connective tissue dysplasia was found in 17% of patients (mitral valve prolapse – 6.3%, tricuspid valve prolapse – 2.7%, supplemental chords – 4.5%, bivalve aortic disease – 1.8%, increased left ventricular trabeculation – 3.6%, atrial septal aneurysm – 3.6%, membranous ventricular septal defect – 1.8%.Conclusion. CTDS is one of the most often associated disorders in patients with HCM. The study of the association of CTDS and HCM, the nature of their genetic structure and similarity of pathogenesis require further study.

  13. Volume 42, Issue5 (May 2005)Articles in the Current Issue:Developmental growth in students' concept of energy: Analysis of selected items from the TIMSS database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiufeng; McKeough, Anne

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a model of students' energy concept development. Applying Case's (1985, 1992) structural theory of cognitive development, we hypothesized that students' concept of energy undergoes a series of transitions, corresponding to systematic increases in working memory capacity. The US national sample from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) database was used to test our hypothesis. Items relevant to the energy concept in the TIMSS test booklets for three populations were identified. Item difficulty from Rasch modeling was used to test the hypothesized developmental sequence, and percentage of students' correct responses was used to test the correspondence between students' age/grade level and level of the energy concepts. The analysis supported our hypothesized sequence of energy concept development and suggested mixed effects of maturation and schooling on energy concept development. Further, the results suggest that curriculum and instruction design take into consideration the developmental progression of students' concept of energy.

  14. Towards Early Detection and Risk Stratification of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia/Cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riele, A.S.J.M. te

    2016-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia/Cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) is an inherited cardiomyopathy characterized by frequent ventricular arrhythmias and usually slowly progressive ventricular dysfunction. Since its initial description in 1982, sudden cardiac death (SCD) occurring in young and usually

  15. Subtle abnormalities in contractile function are an early manifestation of sarcomere mutations in dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakdawala, Neal K; Thune, Jens J; Colan, Steven D

    2012-01-01

    Sarcomere mutations cause both dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM); however, the steps leading from mutation to disease are not well described. By studying mutation carriers before a clinical diagnosis develops, we characterize the early manifestations of sarcomere...

  16. THE ROLE OF PARVOVIRUS B19 IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF INFLAMMATORY CARDIOMYOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Shchedrina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of inflammatory cardiomyopathy is discussed. The etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory cardiomyopathy are considered with focus on the role of parvovirus B19.

  17. HYPERTROPHIC OBSTRUCTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY AS A SIDE-EFFECT OF DEXAMETHASONE TREATMENT FOR BRONCHOPULMONARY DYSPLASIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRAND, PLP; VANLINGEN, RA; BRUS, F; TALSMA, MD; ELZENGA, NJ

    1993-01-01

    We report three infants who developed hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy during dexamethasone treatment for bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In all three infants, echocardiography had ruled out cardiac abnormalities prior to the dexamethasone course. The hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with abnormal thallium perfusion and cardiac enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Nagata, Seiki; Sakakibara, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    Gated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 6 patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with abnormal thallium perfusion, and 12 patients with ordinary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The patients with ordinary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and abnormal thickening of the septal wall and normal left ventricular dimensions, while the patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy had focal wall thinning (usually involving the apical-septal wall) and dilated left ventricle in addition to hypertrophied heart. The quantitative measurement for cardiac dimensions using MRI was similar to that found on echocardiography in all cases. In addition, inhomogeneous signal intensities at left ventricular wall were observed in 3 cases of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which may suggest the existence of myocardial fibrosis. Gated MRI should be performed for early detection and follow-up of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, since some patients will progress from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to dilated cardiomyopathy. (author)

  19. Recurrent and founder mutations in the Netherlands: cardiac Troponin I (TNNI3) gene mutations as a cause of severe forms of hypertrophic and restrictive cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Wijngaard, A.; Volders, P.; van Tintelen, J. P.; Jongbloed, J. D. H.; van den Berg, M. P.; Lekanne Deprez, R. H.; Mannens, M. M. A. M.; Hofmann, N.; Slegtenhorst, M.; Dooijes, D.; Michels, M.; Arens, Y.; Jongbloed, R.; Smeets, B. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background About 2-7% of familial cardiomyopathy cases are caused by a mutation in the gene encoding cardiac troponin 1 (TNNI3). The related clinical phenotype is usually severe with early onset. Here we report on all currently known mutations in the Dutch population and compared these with those

  20. Dobutamine Stress Echocardiography in Patients with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloradovic Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A clear distinction between two of the most common forms of dilated cardiomyopathy is very important due to their different prediction and therapeutic approaches. Dobutamine stress echocardiography appears to be a noninvasive selection method due to its clear differentiation potential. Major factors influence test interpretation, resulting in a wide interval of diagnostic accuracy for this test. Fraction flow reserve (FFR is a novel invasive method for estimating coronary artery stenosis responsible for myocardium ischaemia. Decisions about lesion significance in coronary blood vessels have thus far been based on angiographic estimations, but this approach is being replaced by FFR measurements, which serve as a new gold standard and involve a noninvasive test. The goal of this study was to clearly differentiate two forms of dilated cardiomyopathies through analysis of the segmented mobility of the left ventricular wall. Fifty patients were analysed: 20 with ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy, which was confirmed not only through coronary angiography but also functionally through FFR measurement, and 30 patients with nonischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy, which was confirmed by coronary angiography. A standard dobutamine stress echocardiography protocol was implemented. A positive dobutamine stress echocardiography test was defined as the presence of emerging incidents in segment contractility or worsening of existing incidents in at least one segment. Statistically relevant diff erences in the movement dynamics of a number of differently characterised segments during the observed time intervals (ANOVA p=0.000 was noted in both groups of patients, as was variation in the index value of the summarized mobility of the left chamber wall. In patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathies, regional contractility worsened at the maximum dose of dobutamine; in contrast, this feature slightly improved in nonischaemic cardiomyopathy patients. The results indicate

  1. Characterization and Long-Term Prognosis of Postmyocarditic Dilated Cardiomyopathy Compared With Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Marco; Anzini, Marco; Bussani, Rossana; Artico, Jessica; Barbati, Giulia; Stolfo, Davide; Gigli, Marta; Muça, Matilda; Naso, Paola; Ramani, Federica; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Pinamonti, Bruno; Sinagra, Gianfranco

    2016-09-15

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DC) is the final common pathway of different pathogenetic processes and presents a significant prognostic heterogeneity, possibly related to its etiologic variety. The characterization and long-term prognosis of postmyocarditic dilated cardiomyopathy (PM-DC) remain unknown. This study assesses the clinical-instrumental evolution and long-term prognosis of a large cohort of patients with PM-DC. We analyzed 175 patients affected with DC consecutively enrolled from 1993 to 2008 with endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) data available. PM-DC was defined in the presence of borderline myocarditis at EMB or persistent left ventricular dysfunction 1 year after diagnosis of active myocarditis at EMB. Other patients were defined as affected by idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC). Analysis of follow-up evaluations was performed at 24, 60, and 120 months. We found 72 PM-DC of 175 enrolled patients (41%). Compared with IDC, patients with PM-DC were more frequently females and less frequently presented a familial history of DC. No other baseline significant differences were found. During the long-term follow-up (median 154, first to third interquartile range 78 to 220 months), patients with PM-DC showed a trend toward slower disease progression. Globally, 18 patients with PM-DC (25%) versus 49 with IDC (48%) experienced death/heart transplantation (p = 0.045). The prognostic advantage for patients with PM-DC became significant beyond 40 months of follow-up. At multivariable time-dependent Cox analysis, PM-DC was confirmed to have a global independent protective role (hazard ratio 0.53, 95% confidence interval 0.28 to 0.97, p = 0.04). In conclusion, PM-DC is characterized by better long-term prognosis compared with IDC. An exhaustive etiologic characterization appears relevant in the prognostic assessment of DC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Implementation workshop of WHO guidelines on evaluation of malaria vaccines: Current regulatory concepts and issues related to vaccine quality, Pretoria, South Africa 07 Nov 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Mei Mei; Baca-Estrada, Maria; Conrad, Christoph; Karikari-Boateng, Eric; Kang, Hye-Na

    2015-08-26

    The current World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on the quality, safety and efficacy of recombinant malaria vaccines targeting the pre-erythrocytic and blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum were adopted by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization in 2012 to provide guidance on the quality, nonclinical and clinical aspects of recombinant malaria vaccines. A WHO workshop was organised to facilitate implementation into African (national/regional) regulatory practices, of the regulatory evaluation principles outlined in the guidelines regarding quality aspects. The workshop was used also to share knowledge and experience on regulatory topics of chemistry, manufacturing and control with a focus on vaccines through presentations and an interactive discussion using a case study approach. The basic principles and concepts of vaccine quality including consistency of production, quality control and manufacturing process were presented and discussed in the meeting. By reviewing and practicing a case study, better understanding on the relationship between consistency of production and batch release tests of an adjuvanted pre-erythrocytic recombinant malaria vaccine was reached. The case study exercise was considered very useful to understand regulatory evaluation principles of vaccines and a suggestion was made to WHO to provide such practices also through its Global Learning Opportunities for Vaccine Quality programme. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An unusual ST-segment elevation: apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy shows the ace up its sleeve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santis, Francesco; Pergolini, Amedeo; Zampi, Giordano; Pero, Gaetano; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Minardi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is part of the broad clinical and morphologic spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We report a patient with electrocardiographic abnormalities in whom acute coronary syndrome was excluded and apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was demonstrated by careful differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Patients May Be Predisposed to Various Cardiomyopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad T. Chebib

    2017-09-01

    Discussion: Coexistence of ADPKD and cardiomyopathy in our tertiary referral center cohort appears to be higher than expected by chance. We suggest that PKD1 and PKD2 mutations may predispose to primary cardiomyopathies and that genetic interactions may account for the observed coexistence of ADPKD and cardiomyopathies.

  5. Differentiation of infiltrative cardiomyopathy from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Toru; Baba, Yuichi; Hirota, Takayoshi; Tanioka, Katsutoshi; Yamasaki, Naohito; Yamanaka, Shigeo; Iiyama, Tatsuo; Kumagai, Naoko; Furuno, Takashi; Sugiura, Tetsuro; Kitaoka, Hiroaki

    2015-06-16

    Because infiltrative cardiomyopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) share clinical and hemodynamic features of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and abnormal diastolic function, it is often difficult to distinguish these entities. We investigated the potential role of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) for differentiation of infiltrative cardiomyopathy from HCM. The study group consisted of 46 consecutive patients with infiltrative cardiomyopathies or HCM in whom sarcomere protein gene mutations were identified at Kochi Medical School Hospital; of these, there were 11 patients with infiltrative cardiomyopathy (cardiac amyloidosis in 8 patients and Fabry disease in 3 patients) and 35 HCM patients. Serum hs-cTnT level was significantly higher in patients who had infiltrative cardiomyopathy than in those who had HCM (0.083 ± 0.057 ng/ml versus 0.027 ± 0.034 ng/ml, p  40 years at age), hs-cTnT level, maximum LV wall thickness, posterior wall thickness, peak early (E) transmitral filling velocity, peak early diastolic (Ea) velocity of tissue Doppler imaging at the lateral corner and E/Ea ratios at both the septal and lateral corners were significantly different between the two groups. As for diagnostic accuracy to differentiate the two groups by using receiver operating characteristic analysis, hs-cTnT was the highest value of area under the curve (0.939) and E/Ea (lateral) was second highest value (0.914). Serum hs-cTnT is a helpful diagnostic indicator for accurate differentiation between infiltrative cardiomyopathy and HCM.

  6. Atrial Cardiomyopathy: A Useful Notion in Cardiac Disease Management or a Passing Fad?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichard, Jean-Baptiste; Nattel, Stanley

    2017-08-08

    The term atrial cardiomyopathy, which has been used sporadically in the medical literature, was recently the subject of a detailed Consensus Document prepared by representatives of the European Heart Rhythm Association, Heart Rhythm Society, Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society, and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardiaca y Electrofisiología. They discussed aspects of the definition, histopathology, atrial-specific physiology, atrial pathology, impact on arrhythmia occurrence, imaging, mapping, and ablation. Here, the authors consider critically the added clinical value of this concept and its meaningfulness. They review evidence implicating atrial cardiomyopathy as an independent contributor to the risk of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation and as a determinant of arrhythmia progression. The issue of classification is considered and the authors discuss how atrial cardiomyopathic properties might guide stroke prevention, rhythm maintenance, and rate control in atrial fibrillation. Carefully designed clinical trials are needed to evaluate these potential applications, and will ultimately define the value of this terminology. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute myocardial infarction and stress cardiomyopathy following the Christchurch earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Christina; Elliott, John; Troughton, Richard; Frampton, Christopher; Smyth, David; Crozier, Ian; Bridgman, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Christchurch, New Zealand, was struck by 2 major earthquakes at 4:36 am on 4 September 2010, magnitude 7.1 and at 12:51 pm on 22 February 2011, magnitude 6.3. Both events caused widespread destruction. Christchurch Hospital was the region's only acute care hospital. It remained functional following both earthquakes. We were able to examine the effects of the 2 earthquakes on acute cardiac presentations. Patients admitted under Cardiology in Christchurch Hospital 3 week prior to and 5 weeks following both earthquakes were analysed, with corresponding control periods in September 2009 and February 2010. Patients were categorised based on diagnosis: ST elevation myocardial infarction, Non ST elevation myocardial infarction, stress cardiomyopathy, unstable angina, stable angina, non cardiac chest pain, arrhythmia and others. There was a significant increase in overall admissions (pearthquake. This pattern was not seen after the early afternoon February earthquake. Instead, there was a very large number of stress cardiomyopathy admissions with 21 cases (95% CI 2.6-6.4) in 4 days. There had been 6 stress cardiomyopathy cases after the first earthquake (95% CI 0.44-2.62). Statistical analysis showed this to be a significant difference between the earthquakes (pearthquake triggered a large increase in ST elevation myocardial infarction and a few stress cardiomyopathy cases. The early afternoon February earthquake caused significantly more stress cardiomyopathy. Two major earthquakes occurring at different times of day differed in their effect on acute cardiac events.

  8. Oxidative Stress in Dilated Cardiomyopathy Caused by MYBPC3 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Lynch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathies can result from mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins including MYBPC3, which encodes cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C. However, whether oxidative stress is augmented due to contractile dysfunction and cardiomyocyte damage in MYBPC3-mutated cardiomyopathies has not been elucidated. To determine whether oxidative stress markers were elevated in MYBPC3-mutated cardiomyopathies, a previously characterized 3-month-old mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM expressing a homozygous MYBPC3 mutation (cMyBP-C(t/t was used, compared to wild-type (WT mice. Echocardiography confirmed decreased percentage of fractional shortening in DCM versus WT hearts. Histopathological analysis indicated a significant increase in myocardial disarray and fibrosis while the second harmonic generation imaging revealed disorganized sarcomeric structure and myocyte damage in DCM hearts when compared to WT hearts. Intriguingly, DCM mouse heart homogenates had decreased glutathione (GSH/GSSG ratio and increased protein carbonyl and lipid malondialdehyde content compared to WT heart homogenates, consistent with elevated oxidative stress. Importantly, a similar result was observed in human cardiomyopathy heart homogenate samples. These results were further supported by reduced signals for mitochondrial semiquinone radicals and Fe-S clusters in DCM mouse hearts measured using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In conclusion, we demonstrate elevated oxidative stress in MYPBC3-mutated DCM mice, which may exacerbate the development of heart failure.

  9. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy after a dancing session: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaballo, Mohammed A; Yousif, Abdelazim; Abdelrazig, Awadalla M; Ibrahim, Ammar A; Hennessy, Terence G

    2011-10-31

    Stress-induced (Takotsubo) cardiomyopathy is a rare form of cardiomyopathy which presents in a manner similar to that of acute coronary syndrome. This sometimes leads to unnecessary thrombolysis therapy. The pathogenesis of this disease is still poorly understood. We believe that reporting all cases of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy will contribute to a better understanding of this disease. Here, we report a patient who, in the absence of any recent stressful events in her life, developed the disease after a session of dancing. A 69-year-old Caucasian woman presented with features suggestive of acute coronary syndrome shortly after a session of dancing. Echocardiography and a coronary angiogram showed typical features of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and our patient was treated accordingly. Eight weeks later, her condition resolved completely and the results of echocardiography were totally normal. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, though transient, is a rare and serious condition. Although it is commonly precipitated by stressful life events, these are not necessarily present. Our patient was enjoying one of her hobbies (that is, dancing) when she developed the disease. This case has particular interest in medicine, especially for the specialties of cardiology and emergency medicine. We hope that it will add more information to the literature about this rare condition.

  10. Syncope in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Leontyeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventy children aged 7 to 17 years with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM were examined; among them there were 11 syncope patients and 5 presyncope patients. The screening program included standard electrocardiography (ECG, Doppler echocardiogra-phy, 24-hour Holter ECG monitoring, and an incremental exercise testing (Bruce treadmill test. The markers of myocardial electrical instability were determined. In the children with HCM, syncope was established to be heterogeneous; it had an arrhythmogenic origin and, in most cases, occurred in the presence of tachyarrhythmia (44% or bradyarrythmia (25%; its vasovagal genesis was probable in one third of the examinees. The children with syncope were typified by the asymmetric, obstructive form of HCM, at the same tone there was most commonly left ventricular hypertrophy concurrent with left atrial enlargement. 24-hour Holter monitoring showed that bradycardia was prevalent in the patients, 3 patients were found to have more than 2-second cardiac rhythm pauses caused by second-degree atrioventricular block in 1 case or by sick sinus syndrome in 2. Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia was noted in two patients. The children with syncope were typified by the signs of myocardial electrical instability as a reduction in the early phase of heart rate turbulence and by impaired QT/RR interval adaptation as hyperadaptation. The paper presents the developed management tactics for children with syncope and indications for the implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator, a pacemaker, or an ECG loop recorder.

  11. Genetic bases of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Rampazzo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC is a heart muscle disease in which the pathological substrate is a fibro-fatty replacement of the right ventricular myocardium. The major clinical features are different types of arrhythmias with a left branch block pattern. ARVC shows autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Recessive forms were also described, although in association with skin disorders. Ten genetic loci have been discovered so far and mutations were reported in five different genes. ARVD1 was associated with regulatory mutations of transforming growth factor beta-3 (TGFβ3, whereas ARVD2, characterized by effort-induced polymorphic arrhythmias, was associated with mutations in cardiac ryanodine receptor-2 (RYR2. All other mutations identified to date have been detected in genes encoding desmosomal proteins: plakoglobin (JUP which causes Naxos disease (a recessive form of ARVC associated with palmoplantar keratosis and woolly hair; desmoplakin (DSP which causes the autosomal dominant ARVD8 and plakophilin-2 (PKP2 involved in ARVD9. Desmosomes are important cell-to-cell adhesion junctions predominantly found in epidermis and heart; they are believed to couple cytoskeletal elements to plasma membrane in cell-to-cell or cell-to-substrate adhesions.

  12. A One Health Approach to Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yu; Stern, Joshua A

    2017-09-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited cardiac disease in humans and results in significant morbidity and mortality. Research over the past 25 years has contributed enormous insight into this inherited disease particularly in the areas of genetics, molecular mechanisms, and pathophysiology. Our understanding continues to be limited by the heterogeneity of clinical presentations with various genetic mutations associated with HCM. Transgenic mouse models have been utilized especially studying the genotypic and phenotypic interactions. However, mice possess intrinsic cardiac and hemodynamic differences compared to humans and have limitations preventing their direct translation. Other animal models of HCM have been studied or generated in part to overcome these limitations. HCM in cats shows strikingly similar molecular, histopathological, and genetic similarities to human HCM, and offers an important translational opportunity for the study of this disease. Recently, inherited left ventricular hypertrophy in rhesus macaques was identified and collaborative investigations have been conducted to begin to develop a non-human primate HCM model. These naturally-occurring large-animal models may aid in advancing our understanding of HCM and developing novel therapeutic approaches to this disease. This review will highlight the features of HCM in humans and the relevant available and developing animal models of this condition.

  13. [Recurrent postpartum pyoderma gangrenosum and fatal cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naciri, I; Meziane, M; Benzekri, L; Ghaouti, M; Senouci, K; Hassam, B

    2017-12-06

    We report a case of recurrent post-partum pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) complicated by post-partum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). A 23-year-old woman presented with a previous medical history of aseptic abscess of the left breast in her fourth pregnancy, which developed after surgical drainage of an inflammatory ulceration treated by atraumatic topical care. During her fifth pregnancy, the patient presented a large and painful ulceration in relation to the scar of the Caesarean section, despite the introduction of broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Bacteriological samples were negative. Histological examination militated in favor of PG. One week after initiation of corticosteroid therapy, the patient suddenly showed signs of heart failure. Based on trans-thoracic echocardiography PPCM was diagnosed, and the outcome was fatal. This observation raises the question of the relationship between PG and pregnancy and describes the association of PG and PPCM. PG occurs rarely during pregnancy and it may be induced by the rise in G-CSF levels found in pregnant women. The association with PPCM seen in our patient could have been due to the development of an anti-angiogenic climate at the end of pregnancy, together with inflammatory myocardial aggression linked to the PG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Significance of myocardial scintigraphy in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emoto, Tsugumichi; Shimizu, Yoshimi; Yuo, Hiroyuki (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1994-02-01

    The study investigated the relationship between the occurrence incidence of abnormal findings on exercice Tl-201 myocardial scintigraphy and pathophysiology in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Fifty HCM patients underwent exercise Tl-201 scintigraphy. Simultaneously, 12-lead ECG was recorded during exercise. In addition, 17 patients, who were randomly selected from the 50 patients, underwent I-123 BMIPP myocardial scintigraphy. Abnormal findings were observed in 23 of the 50 patients (46%) on Tl images. Among these patients, 19 patients (38%) had redistribution on 3 hr images (the group of reversible defects (R)), and 4 (8%) had no redistribution (the group of fixed defects (F)). Regarding the occurrence incidence of ischemic ST changes and exercise tolerance ability, there was no difference between the group of normal findings and the group of R. In the group of F, however, ST changes were seen in all patients, although there was no difference in exercise tolerance ability. Of 17 patients who underwent I-123 BMIPP scintigraphy, 7 had normal findings on Tl images. Of these 7, 4 had abnormal findings on BMIPP images and decreased exercise tolerance ability as well. These findings suggest the necessity for careful follow-up even in HCM patients who had no abnormal findings on Tl images. (N.K.).

  15. Cardiomyopathy in Patients With Hereditary Bullous Epidermolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalla, A; Vicente, A; Bartrons, J; Prada, F; Fortuny, C; González-Enseñat, M A

    In recent decades, an association has been reported between epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DC). DC is typically in an advanced phase when detected, leading to a poorer prognosis. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of DC in patients with EB seen in Hospital San Joan de Déu in Barcelona, Spain, between May 1986 and April 2015. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional chart-review study in which we recorded the type and main subtypes of EB and the presence or absence of DC. Fifty-seven patients with EB were found, 19 with EB simplex, 10 with junctional EB, 27 with dystrophic EB (14 dominant dystrophic and 13 recessive dystrophic), and just 1 with Kindler syndrome. DC was detected in only 2 patients with recessive dystrophic EB. Twenty-three patients had presented factors that could have had a causal relationship with the potential onset of DC. DC is a possible complication of EB, particularly in recessive dystrophic EB. Periodic follow-up should be performed to make an early diagnosis and start treatment. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Prooxidant Mechanisms in Iron Overload Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Feng Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron overload cardiomyopathy (IOC, defined as the presence of systolic or diastolic cardiac dysfunction secondary to increased deposition of iron, is emerging as an important cause of heart failure due to the increased incidence of this disorder seen in thalassemic patients and in patients of primary hemochromatosis. At present, although palliative treatment by regular iron chelation was recommended; whereas IOC is still the major cause for mortality in patient with chronic heart failure induced by iron-overloading. Because iron is a prooxidant and the associated mechanism seen in iron-overload heart is still unclear; therefore, we intend to delineate the multiple signaling pathways involved in IOC. These pathways may include organelles such as calcium channels, mitochondria; paracrine effects from both macrophages and fibroblast, and novel mediators such as thromboxane A2 and adiponectin; with increased oxidative stress and inflammation found commonly in these signaling pathways. With further understanding on these complex and inter-related molecular mechanisms, we can propose potential therapeutic strategies to ameliorate the cardiac toxicity induced by iron-overloading.

  17. EBCT in diagnosis on primary cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiangmin; Zhou Xuhui; Meng Quanfei; Li Weiduo; Peng Qian; Tan Zhiyu

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of electron beam CT (EBCT) in primary cardiomyopathy (PCM). Methods: EBCT including coronary scanning and heart movie study was performed in 15 patients. The diagnosis of PCM was established by clinical and imaging findings or/and pathologic examination. Results: BECT findings related to the classification of PCM drawn up by WHO/ISFC were as follows: (1) dilated PCM (8 cases): dilated left ventricle (LV) was found in 7 of 8 cases and dilated right ventricle (RV) in the remaining one. Hypokinetic contraction of the LV wall with (250 ± 101) ml LVEDV and (18.9 ±6.6)% LVEF presented in the patients with dilated LV. (2) Hypertrophic PCM (5 cases): Hypertrophic ventricular septum (16.5 ± 2.3) mm was demonstrated in all cases, hypertrophy of the LV wall or the apex in 3 of 5 cases, and stenosis of the LV outflow tract in 2 cases. (3) Restrictive PCM (2 cases): Thickening of endocardium with lower density than cardiac muscle, reduced RV, obliteration of apex, hypokinetic contraction of the RV wall, and dilatation of right atrium (RA) with parietal thrombus formation of RA was identified in one patient. Both the LV and the RV were involved, with enlargement of atrium. Conclusion: The findings of PCM on EBCT seem to reflect pathologic and functional changes of PCM, and may be useful for diagnosis and classification of PCM

  18. THE ROLE OF MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES IN PROCESSES OF HEART RE-MODELING IN CHILDREN WITH RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY

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    T.V. Bershova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCMP is heart disorder with unclear etiology; it can be characterized as disease with disorder of diastolic myocardium function of left ventricle, conditioned by restriction. The chronic heart failure as a syndrome of RCMP can develop as a result of disbalance in system of complex biochemical, structural, and geometrical mechanisms of myocardium re-modeling. Extra cellular matrix play significant role in heart structure and geometry breaking. The destruction of heart is realized by matrix metalloproteinases (MMP. The activity of MMP, in its turn, is controlled by its tissue inhibitors. The present study analyzed the role of MMP in process of collagen’s synthesis and catabolism deregulation, myocardium fibrosis, change of heart chambers, and development of diastolic dysfunction in children with RCMP.Key words: children, chronic heart failure, restrictive cardiomyopathy, matrix metalloproteinases.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(5:36-39

  19. Imbalances in the Development of Muscle and Tendon as Risk Factor for Tendinopathies in Youth Athletes: A Review of Current Evidence and Concepts of Prevention

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    Falk Mersmann

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tendons feature the crucial role to transmit the forces exerted by the muscles to the skeleton. Thus, an increase of the force generating capacity of a muscle needs to go in line with a corresponding modulation of the mechanical properties of the associated tendon to avoid potential harm to the integrity of the tendinous tissue. However, as summarized in the present narrative review, muscle and tendon differ with regard to both the time course of adaptation to mechanical loading as well as the responsiveness to certain types of mechanical stimulation. Plyometric loading, for example, seems to be a more potent stimulus for muscle compared to tendon adaptation. In growing athletes, the increased levels of circulating sex hormones might additionally augment an imbalanced development of muscle strength and tendon mechanical properties, which could potentially relate to the increasing incidence of tendon overload injuries that has been indicated for adolescence. In fact, increased tendon stress and strain due to a non-uniform musculotendinous development has been observed recently in adolescent volleyball athletes, a high-risk group for tendinopathy. These findings highlight the importance to deepen the current understanding of the interaction of loading and maturation and demonstrate the need for the development of preventive strategies. Therefore, this review concludes with an evidence-based concept for a specific loading program for increasing tendon stiffness, which could be implemented in the training regimen of young athletes at risk for tendinopathy. This program incorporates five sets of four contractions with an intensity of 85–90% of the isometric voluntary maximum and a movement/contraction duration that provides 3 s of high magnitude tendon strain.

  20. Imbalances in the Development of Muscle and Tendon as Risk Factor for Tendinopathies in Youth Athletes: A Review of Current Evidence and Concepts of Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersmann, Falk; Bohm, Sebastian; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2017-01-01

    Tendons feature the crucial role to transmit the forces exerted by the muscles to the skeleton. Thus, an increase of the force generating capacity of a muscle needs to go in line with a corresponding modulation of the mechanical properties of the associated tendon to avoid potential harm to the integrity of the tendinous tissue. However, as summarized in the present narrative review, muscle and tendon differ with regard to both the time course of adaptation to mechanical loading as well as the responsiveness to certain types of mechanical stimulation. Plyometric loading, for example, seems to be a more potent stimulus for muscle compared to tendon adaptation. In growing athletes, the increased levels of circulating sex hormones might additionally augment an imbalanced development of muscle strength and tendon mechanical properties, which could potentially relate to the increasing incidence of tendon overload injuries that has been indicated for adolescence. In fact, increased tendon stress and strain due to a non-uniform musculotendinous development has been observed recently in adolescent volleyball athletes, a high-risk group for tendinopathy. These findings highlight the importance to deepen the current understanding of the interaction of loading and maturation and demonstrate the need for the development of preventive strategies. Therefore, this review concludes with an evidence-based concept for a specific loading program for increasing tendon stiffness, which could be implemented in the training regimen of young athletes at risk for tendinopathy. This program incorporates five sets of four contractions with an intensity of 85–90% of the isometric voluntary maximum and a movement/contraction duration that provides 3 s of high magnitude tendon strain. PMID:29249987

  1. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

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    Teng J. Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 mg of midazolam and within minutes had resolution of catatonic symptoms. Careful history revealed that she had omitted her daily dose of lorazepam for 3 days prior to admission. To our knowledge, the case presented herein is the first report of simultaneous catatonia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The pathogenesis of both conditions is poorly understood but may be indirectly related to the sudden decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA signaling during benzodiazepine withdrawal.

  2. Arrhythmia-Induced Cardiomyopathy: Prevalent, Under-recognized, Reversible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Rahul; Gopinathannair, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    Arrhythmia-induced cardiomyopathy (AIC) is a clinical condition in which a persistent tachyarrhythmia or frequent ectopy contribute to ventricular dysfunction leading to systolic heart failure. AIC can be partially or completely corrected with adequate treatment of the culprit arrhythmia. Several molecular and cellular alterations by which tachyarrhythmias lead to cardiomyopathy have been identified. AIC can affect children and adults, can be clinically silent in the form of asymptomatic tachycardia with cardiomyopathy, or can present with manifest heart failure. A high index of suspicion for AIC and aggressive treatment of the culprit arrhythmia can result in resolution of heart failure symptoms and improvement in cardiac function. Recurrent arrhythmia, following recovery from the index episode, can hasten the left ventricular dysfunction and result in HF, suggesting persistent adverse remodeling despite recovery of left ventricular function. Several aspects of AIC, such as predisposing factors, early diagnosis, preventive measures to avoid adverse remodeling, and long-term prognosis, remain unclear, and need further research.

  3. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection associated with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuncer, M.; Gumrukcuoglu, H.A.; Ekim, H.; Gunes, Y.; Simsek, H.

    2010-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a relatively uncommon inherited disease. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is also uncommonly observed, which often occurs in pregnant or post partum women but is rare in men. This report describes a 38 years old man with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who developed SCAD leading to acute inferior myocardial infarction. After emergent appendectomy operation at another hospital, he was immediately transferred to the Cardiology Department of our hospital due to acute myocardial infarction. He emergently underwent coronary angiography which showed a long dissection involving the right coronary. He underwent an emergent CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and he was discharged. According to our knowledge, no case of spontaneous coronary artery dissection associated with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy unrelated to postpartum period or oral contraceptive use has been reported so far. (author)

  4. DKA-Induced Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in Patient with Known HOCM

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    Ayla Gordon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The first published case of Diabetic Ketoacidosis-induced Takotsubo cardiomyopathy was in 2009. Our patient is the 1st reported case of Diabetic Ketoacidosis- (DKA- induced Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC in a patient with known hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HOCM in the United States. In the literature, there are only two examples linking DKA to TC; however, this report focuses on the biochemical and physiological causes of TC in a patient with known HOCM and new-onset DKA. TC in previously diagnosed HOCM poses particular complications. With the above patient’s baseline outflow tract obstruction due to septal hypertrophy, the acute reduction in EF due to TC resulted in transient drop in brain perfusion and, therefore, syncope.

  5. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in myasthaenia gravis crisis confirmed by cardiac MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, I B; Levoir, H; Bucciarelli-Ducci, C; Ramcharitar, S

    2015-09-28

    Myasthaenia gravis crisis and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy are rare conditions that can be precipitated by emotional or physical stress. Myasthaenia gravis has a variety of cardiac manifestations but Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, particularly in male patients, has rarely been reported. We describe a unique case of a 70-year-old man who developed Takotsubo cardiomyopathy during his first presentation with a myasthaenia gravis crisis. He had not received plasmapharesis or immunoglobulin therapy. Striking ECG traces and cardiac MRI helped to confirm the diagnosis. Cardiac manifestations of myasthaenia gravis and myasthaenia gravis itself have overlapping symptoms; the importance of cardiac monitoring and clinical vigilance in such cases is discussed. The utility of cardiac MRI in assessing cardiac manifestations of myasthaenia gravis is also highlighted. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. Reversible Stress Cardiomyopathy Presenting as Acute Coronary Syndrome with Elevated Troponin in the Absence of Regional Wall Motion Abnormalities: A Forme Fruste of Stress Cardiomyopathy?

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    Mahesh Anantha Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of reversible stress cardiomyopathy in a surgical patient, described here as a forme fruste due to its atypical features. It is important to recognize such unusual presentation of stress cardiomyopathy that mimics acute coronary syndrome. Stress cardiomyopathy commonly presents as acute coronary syndrome and is characterized by typical or atypical variants of regional wall motion abnormalities. We report a 60-year-old Caucasian male with reversible stress cardiomyopathy following a sternal fracture fixation. Although the patient had several typical features of stress cardiomyopathy including physical stress, ST-segment elevation, elevated cardiac biomarkers and normal epicardial coronaries, there were few features that were atypical, including unusual age, gender, absence of regional wall motion abnormalities, high lateral ST elevation, and high troponin-ejection fraction product. In conclusion, this could represent a forme fruste of stress cardiomyopathy.

  7. Examining the Psychosocial Impact of Genetic Testing for Cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Julia; Holland, David T; Duong, Jimmy; Ahimaz, Priyanka; Chung, Wendy K

    2017-12-15

    Inherited cardiomyopathies, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), are the most common monogenic cause of cardiac disease and can rarely lead to sudden cardiac death (SCD). They are characterized by incomplete and age-dependent penetrance and are usually initially symptomatic in adulthood yet can present in childhood as well. Over 20 genes have been identified to cause HCM, and more than 40 genes are known to cause DCM. Genetic testing for these genes has been integrated into medical care; however, the psychological impact of genetic testing and the impact of the uncertainty that comes with receiving these results have not been well studied. This study surveyed 90 adult probands and relatives with a personal or family history of cardiomyopathy from a single hospital-based cardiac genetic program to determine the psychosocial impact of genetic testing for cardiomyopathies. Standardized psychological instruments including an adapted Multidimensional Impact of Cancer Risk Assessment (aMICRA), Impact of Event Scale (IES), and Satisfaction with Decision (SWD) scales were utilized. Patients with positive genetic test results had higher scores for intrusive thoughts, avoidance, and distress when compared to those with negative genetic test results and were also more likely to make or plan to make life changes because of the results of their genetic testing. Satisfaction with the decision to undergo genetic testing was similar regardless of genetic test results. The results of this study provide insight into the patient experience of genetic testing for cardiomyopathies and how these experiences are associated with genetic test results and cardiac history.

  8. Inferior ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction Associated with Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

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    Oliver Koeth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM is usually characterized by transient left ventricular apical ballooning. Due to the clinical symptoms which include chest pain, electrocardiographic changes, and elevated myocardial markers, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is frequently mimicking ST-elevation myocardial infarction in the absence of a significant coronary artery disease. Otherwise an acute occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery can produce a typical Takotsubo contraction pattern. ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI is frequently associated with emotional stress, but to date no cases of STEMI triggering TCM have been reported. We describe a case of a female patient with inferior ST-elevation myocardial infarction complicated by TCM.

  9. [Congestive cardiomyopathy in addiction to clobenzorex, an anorexigenic drug].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaert, P; Camblin, J; Graux, P; Anaye, B; Dutoit, A; Croccel, L

    1986-04-01

    Cardiac failure caused by high doses of amphetamine-like drugs is rare. We report a case of decompensated congestive cardiomyopathy occurring in a 29 year old woman addicted to clobenzorex (Dinintel). This patient had been taking 5 to 7 capsules per day for 5 years. No other cause of cardiac failure was detected. A rapid improvement was obtained by digitalis and diuretic therapy; no further episodes of cardiac failure were observed after one year. However, the drug could not be completely withdrawn and echocardiography has shown increasing left ventricular dilatation. The possible mechanisms of amphetamine induced myocardial toxicity are discussed and the analogy with the group of adrenergic cardiomyopathies is underlined.

  10. A Rare Occurance with Epidermolysis Bullosa Disease: Dilated Cardiomyopathy

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    Derya Cimen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa is a congenital and herediter vesiculobullous disease. Dystrophic form of this disease is characterized by severe malnutrition, failure to thrive, adhesions at fingers, joint contractures related with the formation of scar tissues, carcinoma of the skin, anemia, hipoalbuminemia, wound enfections and sepsis. Rarely, mortal dilated cardiomyopathy may occur in patients. In this report we present a 13 year-old pediatric patient with dilated cardiomyopathy, clinically diagnosed with Epidermolysis bullosa as well as a review of recent related literature.

  11. Repair of Mybpc3 mRNA by 5′-trans-splicing in a Mouse Model of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

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    Giulia Mearini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA trans-splicing has been explored as a therapeutic option for a variety of genetic diseases, but not for cardiac genetic disease. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is an autosomal-dominant disease, characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH and diastolic dysfunction. MYBPC3, encoding cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C is frequently mutated. We evaluated the 5′-trans-splicing strategy in a mouse model of HCM carrying a Mybpc3 mutation. 5′-trans-splicing was induced between two independently transcribed molecules, the mutant endogenous Mypbc3 pre-mRNA and an engineered pre-trans-splicing molecule (PTM carrying a FLAG-tagged wild-type (WT Mybpc3 cDNA sequence. PTMs were packaged into adeno-associated virus (AAV for transduction of cultured cardiac myocytes and the heart in vivo. Full-length repaired Mybpc3 mRNA represented up to 66% of total Mybpc3 transcripts in cardiac myocytes and 0.14% in the heart. Repaired cMyBP-C protein was detected by immunoprecipitation in cells and in vivo and exhibited correct incorporation into the sarcomere in cardiac myocytes. This study provides (i the first evidence of successful 5′-trans-splicing in vivo and (ii proof-of-concept of mRNA repair in the most prevalent cardiac genetic disease. Since current therapeutic options for HCM only alleviate symptoms, these findings open new horizons for causal therapy of the severe forms of the disease.

  12. Treatment of inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy and (peri)myocarditis with immunosuppression and i.v. immunoglobulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisch, Bernhard; Hufnagel, Günther; Kölsch, Susanne; Funck, Rainer; Richter, Annette; Rupp, Heinz; Herzum, Matthias; Pankuweit, Sabine

    2004-09-01

    under conventional heart failure treatment cannot be ruled out completely as the main cause for amelioration. ESETCID (European Study on the Epidemiology and Treatment of Cardiac Inflammatory Disease) is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controled three-armed trial with prednisolone and azathioprine for autoreactive (virus negative) DCMi, interferon alpha for enterovirus positive DCMi, high-dose immunoglobulin for cytomegalovirus and intermediate dose for adeno- and Parvo B19 DCMi. It has now randomized more than 120 patients to the different treatment arms. Its final result has still to be awaited.-Patients not willing to randomize in the trial were included in a registry follow-up, which shows improvement of hemodynamic parameters and elimination of the inflammation in the majority of patients. This is in concordance with several non-randomized trials. Since evidence is conflicting (level of evidence C, indication class IIb; if negative viral etiology is taken into consideration class IIa) treatment with immunosuppression cannot be generally recommended but should be further evaluated in doubleblind randomized clinical trials or at least in controlled trials and registries. This also applies to treatment with interferon for enteroviral or other viral infections in the heart. : The elimination of anticardiac antibodies, which have been associated with DCMi, is a currently discussed concept, which is supported by published registry data and a few very small controlled investigations but not by a randomized double-blind trial with clinical endpoints of relevance. In some studies immunoglobulins have been substituted, so that an additional immunomodulatory effect has to be taken into account. The current proof of concept can be ranked level of evidence C, indication class IIa only. An even more challenging and still more attractive hypothesis is that cardiac inflammation caused by specific circulating beta-adrenoceptor antibodies can be eradicated with the elimination

  13. Evolution and current situation of the quality and industrial safety. Concepts, laws and regulations; Evolucion y situacion actual de la calidad y seguridad industrial. Conceptos, leyes y reglamentos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, A.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this article is to show the difference between the concepts of quality and industrial safety and how in the legislation of products and industrial installation there is a very close relationship between both concepts. So, that Spanish companies could place in the market not only safe products but also reliable ones that meet the society's demand regarding quality. (Author)

  14. Intraventricular vortex properties in nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Yolanda; Alhama, Marta; Yotti, Raquel; Martínez-Legazpi, Pablo; del Villar, Candelas Pérez; Pérez-David, Esther; González-Mansilla, Ana; Santa-Marta, Cristina; Barrio, Alicia; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Vortices may have a role in optimizing the mechanical efficiency and blood mixing of the left ventricle (LV). We aimed to characterize the size, position, circulation, and kinetic energy (KE) of LV main vortex cores in patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) and analyze their physiological correlates. We used digital processing of color-Doppler images to study flow evolution in 61 patients with NIDCM and 61 age-matched control subjects. Vortex features showed a characteristic biphasic temporal course during diastole. Because late filling contributed significantly to flow entrainment, vortex KE reached its maximum at the time of the peak A wave, storing 26 ± 20% of total KE delivered by inflow (range: 1–74%). Patients with NIDCM showed larger and stronger vortices than control subjects (circulation: 0.008 ± 0.007 vs. 0.006 ± 0.005 m2/s, respectively, P = 0.02; KE: 7 ± 8 vs. 5 ± 5 mJ/m, P = 0.04), even when corrected for LV size. This helped confining the filling jet in the dilated ventricle. The vortex Reynolds number was also higher in the NIDCM group. By multivariate analysis, vortex KE was related to the KE generated by inflow and to chamber short-axis diameter. In 21 patients studied head to head, Doppler measurements of circulation and KE closely correlated with phase-contract magnetic resonance values (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.82 and 0.76, respectively). Thus, the biphasic nature of filling determines normal vortex physiology. Vortex formation is exaggerated in patients with NIDCM due to chamber remodeling, and enlarged vortices are helpful for ameliorating convective pressure losses and facilitating transport. These findings can be accurately studied using ultrasound. PMID:24414062

  15. "Repaired" tetralogy of fallot mimicking arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (another phenocopy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Betsy Ann; Ko, Jong Mi; Lensing, Forrester Dubus; Kuiper, Johannes Jacob; Roberts, William Clifford

    2011-07-15

    Described is a 41-year-old man who at age 6 had partial resection of an obstructed right ventricular outflow tract with insertion of a patch and closure of a ventricular septal defect (tetralogy of Fallot). At age 41, cardiac transplantation was performed because of right ventricular outflow patch aneurysm, numerous episodes of ventricular tachycardia, and chronic heart failure, all features of the familial form of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Additionally, the patient had bundle branch block and epsilon waves on electrocardiogram, other features of ARVC. The case is described to introduce the concept of acquired ARVC, because the patient had many of the clinically recognized features of familial ARVC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Distinguishing ventricular septal bulge versus hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canepa, Marco; Pozios, Iraklis; Vianello, Pier Filippo; Ameri, Pietro; Brunelli, Claudio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Abraham, Theodore P

    2016-07-15

    The burgeoning evidence of patients diagnosed with sigmoidal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) later in life has revived the quest for distinctive features that may help discriminate it from more benign forms of isolated septal hypertrophy often labelled ventricular septal bulge (VSB). HCM is diagnosed less frequently than VSB at older ages, with a reversed female predominance. Most patients diagnosed with HCM at older ages suffer from hypertension, similar to those with VSB. A positive family history of HCM and/or sudden cardiac death and the presence of exertional symptoms usually support HCM, though they are less likely in older patients with HCM, and poorly investigated in individuals with VSB. A more severe hypertrophy and the presence of left ventricular outflow obstruction are considered diagnostic of HCM, though stress echocardiography has not been consistently used in VSB. Mitral annulus calcification is very prevalent in both conditions, whereas a restrictive filling pattern is found in a minority of older patients with HCM. Genetic testing has low applicability in this differential diagnosis at the current time, given that a causative mutation is found in less than 10% of elderly patients with suspected HCM. Emerging imaging modalities that allow non-invasive detection of myocardial fibrosis and disarray may help, but have not been fully investigated. Nonetheless, there remains a considerable morphological overlap between the two conditions. Comprehensive studies, particularly imaging based, are warranted to offer a more evidence-based approach to elderly patients with focal septal thickening. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Epigenetics and obesity cardiomyopathy: From pathophysiology to prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingmei; Ren, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Uncorrected obesity has been associated with cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction. Several mechanisms for this cardiomyopathy have been identified, including oxidative stress, autophagy, adrenergic and renin-angiotensin aldosterone overflow. Another process that may regulate effects of obesity is epigenetics, which refers to the heritable alterations in gene expression or cellular phenotype that are not encoded on the DNA sequence. Advances in epigenome profiling have greatly improved the understanding of the epigenome in obesity, where environmental exposures during early life result in an increased health risk later on in life. Several mechanisms, including histone modification, DNA methylation and non-coding RNAs, have been reported in obesity and can cause transcriptional suppression or activation, depending on the location within the gene, contributing to obesity-induced complications. Through epigenetic modifications, the fetus may be prone to detrimental insults, leading to cardiac sequelae later in life. Important links between epigenetics and obesity include nutrition, exercise, adiposity, inflammation, insulin sensitivity and hepatic steatosis. Genome-wide studies have identified altered DNA methylation patterns in pancreatic islets, skeletal muscle and adipose tissues from obese subjects compared with non-obese controls. In addition, aging and intrauterine environment are associated with differential DNA methylation. Given the intense research on the molecular mechanisms of the etiology of obesity and its complications, this review will provide insights into the current understanding of epigenetics and pharmacological and non-pharmacological (such as exercise) interventions targeting epigenetics as they relate to treatment of obesity and its complications. Particular focus will be on DNA methylation, histone modification and non-coding RNAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic Testing for Dilated Cardiomyopathy in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakdawala, Neal K.; Funke, Birgit H.; Baxter, Samantha; Cirino, Allison L.; Roberts, Amy E.; Judge, Daniel P.; Johnson, Nicole; Mendelsohn, Nancy J.; Morel, Chantal; Care, Melanie; Chung, Wendy K.; Jones, Carolyn; Psychogios, Apostolos; Duffy, Elizabeth; Rehm, Heidi L.; White, Emily; Seidman, J.G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Ho, Carolyn Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background Familial involvement is common in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and >40 genes have been implicated in causing disease. However, the role of genetic testing in clinical practice is not well defined. We examined the experience of clinical genetic testing in a diverse DCM population to characterize the prevalence and predictors of gene mutations. Methods and Results We studied 264 unrelated adult and pediatric DCM index patients referred to 1 reference lab for clinical genetic testing. Up to 10 genes were analyzed (MYH7, TNNT2, TNNI3, TPM1, MYBPC3, ACTC, LMNA, PLN, TAZ, and LDB3), and 70% of patients were tested for all genes. The mean age was 26.6 ± 21.3 years, and 52% had a family history of DCM. Rigorous criteria were used to classify DNA variants as clinically relevant (mutations), variants of unknown clinical significance (VUS), or presumed benign. Mutations were found in 17.4% of patients, commonly involving MYH7, LMNA, or TNNT2 (78%). An additional 10.6% of patients had VUS. Genetic testing was rarely positive in older patients without a family history of DCM. Conversely in pediatric patients, family history did not increase the sensitivity of genetic testing. Conclusions Using rigorous criteria for classifying DNA variants, mutations were identified in 17% of a diverse group of DCM index patients referred for clinical genetic testing. The low sensitivity of genetic testing in DCM reflects limitations in both current methodology and knowledge of DCM-associated genes. However, if mutations are identified, genetic testing can help guide family management. PMID:22464770

  19. "Where There Is a Will, There Is an A": Examining the Roles of Self-Efficacy and Self-Concept in College Students' Current Educational Attainment and Career Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenning, Breanne E.; May, Laura Negel

    2013-01-01

    As previous research indicates self-efficacy and self-concept have similar effects on achievement outcomes, the current study investigated the differential effects of both constructs on academic performance and career path certainty in college freshmen. Results indicated high school GPA was best predicted by general self-efficacy, whereas current…

  20. Emotional stress triggers symptoms in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a survey of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, Rachel; Salberg, Lisa; Burg, Matthew

    2010-09-01

    Symptoms are among the most important factors impacting quality of life (QOL) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients, and reflect a poor prognosis. Whether emotional stress can trigger symptoms of chest pain, dyspnea, palpitations, and lightheadedness has not been described. Members of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association (HCMA) received an electronic link via e-mail to an ongoing online survey, also accessed via links on the HCMA message-board and homepage. Between May 2007 and November 2008, there were 1,297 respondents. The survey queried demographic and self-reported clinical information, and types and triggers of symptoms. Respondents reported physical and emotional QOL on a 1-10 Likert scale. Symptoms reported included chest pain (49%), dyspnea (70%), palpitations (61%), and syncope/lightheadedness (59%). The most common symptom trigger was exertion, 64% describing symptoms while climbing stairs or hills. Forty-nine percent described experiencing symptoms during emotional stress. Those reporting chest pain were more likely to report emotion triggering (60%) than those reporting palpitations, syncope/lightheadedness, or dyspnea (50-54% each). Both physical and emotional QOL were significantly decreased in those describing emotion-triggered symptoms. Women were more likely than men to report symptoms overall, as well as emotion-triggered symptoms (50% vs 35%, P symptoms (79% vs 58%, P symptoms, both emotion- and exertion-triggered symptoms remained significantly more common in women. Triggering of symptoms by emotion is common in individuals with HCM. Further studies will determine pathways linking emotional stressors with chest pain, dyspnea, palpitations, and lightheadedness in these patients. ©2010, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Application of radionuclide techniques in evaluation of dilated cardiomyopathy and ischemic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yueqin; Liu Xiujie; Shi Rongfang

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical significance of radionuclide techniques in differentiating dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) from ischemic cardiomyopathy (CAD-CM). Methods: 28 patients (pts) with DCM and 55 pts with CAD-CM were studied. All pts underwent 99 Tc m -MIBI myocardial perfusion SPECT and 18 F-FDG myocardial metabolic PET. 73 pts had 99 Tc m -RBC radionuclide ventriculography and 68 pts had coronary angiography. Results: 23 pts (82%) with DCM showed perfusion abnormalities with mild and not segmental distribution. 52 pts (95%) with CAD-CM showed perfusion abnormalities that distributed along the coronary vessel territories. Perfusion defects were found in 4 pts (14%) with DCM and 45 pts (82%) with CAD-CM (P<0.01). The average perfusion score was 4.5 +- 2.6 in DCM and 9.5 +- 2.9 in CAD-CM, the area of perfusion diminished uptake was significantly smaller in DCM than in CAD-CM (P < 0.001). 2 pts with DCM and 18 pts with CAD-CM had metabolic defect. The patterns of perfusion/metabolic imaging showed mismatch in most pts with CAD-CM but match in pts with DCM. The LVEF in pts with DCM and CAD-CM was decreased but no significant difference between DCM and CAD-CM was observed. The RVEF in pts with DCM was significantly lower than that in pts with CAD-CM (32.4% +- 13.9% vs 40.9% +- 15.4%, P < 0.05). Conclusions: The radionuclide techniques showed to be helpful for distinguishing DCM from CAD-CM. The discriminate analysis revealed that segmental perfusion abnormality and RVEF were the most important factors for differentiation of DCM from CAD-CM

  2. Exposure to Amphetamines Leads to Development of Amphetamine Type Stimulants Associated Cardiomyopathy (ATSAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari Giv, Mahsa

    2017-01-01

    With rapidly rising prevalence of exposure to Amphetamine Type Stimulants (ATS), novel insights into cardiotoxic effects of this substance are being presented in the literature and remarkably ATS Associated Cardiomyopathy (ATSAC) is emerging as a novel cardiovascular condition with its distinctive pathogenesis, risk factors, clinical features and prognosis. A comprehensive systematic review was performed to explore and analyze the current evidence on the association between ATS exposure and development of cardiomyopathy, biological mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of ATSAC, risk factors, clinical features and course of patients with ATSAC. Several animal studies, case reports, case series and case-control studies support the association between ATS exposure and ATSAC. Oxidative stress, accelerated apoptosis, increased p53 activity, cardiomyocyte necrosis, perfusion defects, fatty acid toxicity, altered gene expression, abnormal cardiac protein synthesis and function in addition to defects in intracellular calcium hemostasis present themselves as likely mechanisms of cardiotoxicity in ATSAC. Majority of patients with ATSAC were found to be male, young and presented late with severe dilated cardiomyopathy. Female ATS users predominantly develop Takotsubo type of ATSAC and in particular its atypical basal variant. Overall, cessation of ATS exposure seems to be associated with some degree of reversibility and recovery in ATSAC sufferers.

  3. Penetrance of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Children Who Are Mutation Positive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, Alexa M. C.; Clur, Sally-Ann B.; Blom, Nico A.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Christiaans, Imke

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the presence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) at first cardiac evaluation and during follow-up and cardiac events in predictively tested children who are mutation positive. Study design The study included 119 predictively tested children who were mutation positive, with

  4. The KCNE genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a candidate gene study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Haundrup, Ole; Andersen, Paal S

    2011-01-01

    as well as the T-tubules of the sarcolemma. It has been suggested that minK forms part of an "electro-mechanical feed-back" which links cardiomyocyte stretching to changes in ion channel function. We examined whether mutations in KCNE genes were associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic...

  5. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy: is there any correlation between the stage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rania Hammami

    2017-02-28

    Feb 28, 2017 ... To cite this article: Rania Hammami, Mouna Boudabbous, Jihen Jdidi, Fatma Trabelsi, Fakher. Mroua, Rahma Kallel, Ali Amouri, Dorra Abid, Nabil Tahri, Leila Abid & Samir Kammoun. (2017) Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy: is there any correlation between the stage of cardiac impairment and the severity of liver ...

  6. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in a Middle Aged Man - A Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disease of the myocardium with autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. It is characterized by inappropriate hypertrophy involving either the interventricular septum, apex or left ventricular free wall in isolation or combined. The disease is often asymptomatic and may ...

  7. Prognosis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy observed in a large clinic population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.M. Kofflard (Marcel); D.J. Waldstein; J. Vos (Jeroen); F.J. ten Cate (Folkert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractOverall annual cardiac mortality in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) has been reported to be between 2 and 4%, although these numbers are primarily from retrospective studies of patients referred to large research institutions. A clinic population of 113 patients with HC was

  8. Peripheral vascular structure and function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rowley, N.J.; Green, D.J.; George, K.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Oxborough, D.; Sharma, S.; Somauroo, J.D.; Jones, J.; Sheikh, N.; Whyte, G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterised by idiopathic cardiac enlargement and represents the most frequent cause of sudden cardiac death in athletes under the age of 35 years. Differentiation between physiological (ie, exercise-related) and pathological (ie, HCM-related)

  9. Cardiogenic shock in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a focus on management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Katie M; Labinaz, Marino X; Beauchesne, Luc M; Burwash, Ian G

    2015-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has become a well recognized mimicker of acute coronary syndrome. Patients generally do well, although a minority can develop life-threatening complications. We present a case of 1 such patient in a branched self-assessment format designed to challenge the reader's clinical management skills. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. CARDIOMYOPATHIE DU POSTPARTUM: A propos de cinq cas au ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main presenting symptom was congestive heart failure with acute pulmonary edema. In all cases, the chest x-ray showed ... The treatment administered to these patients included bed rest, salt restriction, digitalics, ... The main issues concerning the management of postpartum cardiomyopathy are raised in this article.

  11. Atrioventricular conduction after alcohol septal ablation for obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Anna; Weibring, Kristina; Havndrup, Ole

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Lesion of the atrioventricular conduction system is a well known adverse effect of alcohol septal ablation (ASA) in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We assessed the atrioventricular conduction at long-term follow-up after ASA. METHODS: In patients with a pacemaker...

  12. Symmetric Dimethylarginine in Cats with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy and Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhorn, R.; Kieler, I. N.; Koch, J.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) has been increasingly used as a marker of early chronic kidney disease (CKD) in cats, but little is known about the influence of comorbidities on SDMA in this species. Hypothesis: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and diabetes mellitus (DM), independe...... controls, a finding that needs further investigation and should be kept in mind when evaluating renal function of cats with this endocrinopathy....

  13. Thallium scintigraphy for the prognosis of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabe, Toshikazu; Furuno, Takashi; Kitaoka, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Yoshihisa; Yamasaki, Naohito; Doi, Yoshinori

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated the significance of perfusion defects demonstrated by thallium-201 and age in the prognosis of patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. Seventy-four dilated cardiomyopathy patients underwent thallium scintigraphy as well as clinical and hemodynamic examination. Abnormal perfusion defects were present in 23 of 38 patients aged <60 years (61%) and in 26 of 36 elderly patients aged ≥60 years (72%; NS). Univariate analysis showed that such perfusion defects were a significant predictor of cardiac death only in patients aged <60 years (p=0.015). Stepwise discriminant analysis also revealed that perfusion defects were a significant predictor in patients aged <60 years (Wilks' lambda 0.499, chi-square test 20.2, p=0.003). Perfusion defects were not more important than the history of syncope or stroke in elderly dilated cardiomyopathy patients. Twenty-one patients died of disease-related causes during 58±43 months. The five-year survival rate was better in patients aged <60 years without than in those with perfusion defects (100% vs 58.4%, respectively), but not affected in patients aged ≥60 years (66.7% vs 62.2%). Thallium scintigraphy is valuable for the prognosis of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy aged <60 years who are usually candidates for heart transplantation. Absence of thallium perfusion defects may indicate good long-term prognosis. (author)

  14. Private mitochondrial DNA variants in danish patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Havndrup, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic cardiac disease primarily caused by mutations in genes coding for sarcomeric proteins. A molecular-genetic etiology can be established in ~60% of cases. Evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups are susceptibility factors for HCM...

  15. Penetrance of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Children and Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten K; Havndrup, Ole; Christiansen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The penetrance of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) during childhood and adolescence has been only sparsely described. We studied the penetrance of HCM and the short- and long-term outcomes of clinical screening and predictive genetic testing of child relatives of patients with HCM....

  16. Cardiac symptoms before sudden cardiac death caused by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Thomas Hadberg; Risgaard, Bjarke; Jabbari, Reza

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a frequent cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD) among the young (SCDY). The aim of this study was to characterize symptoms before SCDY due to HCM. METHODS AND RESULTS: Through review of all death certificates, we identified all SCDs in Danes aged 1-35 years...

  17. Stress Cardiomyopathy in the Setting of COPD Exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Landefeld

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Stress cardiomyopathy, or takotsubo cardiomyopathy, is an acute, reversible left ventricular dysfunction usually initiated by a psychological or physical stress. We report this case of stress cardiomyopathy following a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation and the subsequent treatment. Case Description. A 49-year-old white female with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presented to the emergency room via emergency medical services with worsening severe shortness of breath and productive cough for 2 weeks but denied any chest pain on arrival. On presentation, she was noted to be tachypneic, using her accessory muscles and with bilateral coarse expiratory wheezing on lung auscultation. Initial electrocardiogram demonstrated sinus tachycardia. She was treated with multiple albuterol treatments. Soon afterwards, the course was complicated by hypoxic respiratory failure eventually requiring intubation. Her repeat electrocardiogram showed acute changes consistent with myocardial infarction, and an echocardiograph demonstrated apical akinesia with an ejection fraction of 25% to 30%. The patient was urgently taken for cardiac catheterization, which showed no angiographic evidence of coronary artery disease. Three days after initial presentation, a repeat transthoracic echocardiogram showed overall left ventricular systolic function improvement. Discussion. This case provided a unique look at the difficulty of balancing catecholamines in a patient with bronchospasm and stress cardiomyopathy.

  18. Atrioventricular conduction after alcohol septal ablation for obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Anna; Weibring, Kristina; Havndrup, Ole

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Lesion of the atrioventricular conduction system is a well known adverse effect of alcohol septal ablation (ASA) in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We assessed the atrioventricular conduction at long-term follow-up after ASA. METHODS: In patients with a pacemake...

  19. ALCOHOLIC CARDIOMYOPATHY: BASIC ASPECTS OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, PATHOGENESIS AND PHARMACOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Yusupova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Data on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACMP are presented. Special aspects of clinical manifestations as well as management of these patients are considered. Psychotropic therapy aimed at reduction in motivation to alcohol consumption in patients with ACMP is discussed separately.

  20. Early molecular events in the development of the diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monkemann, H.; Vriese, A.S. de; Blom, H.J.; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Heil, S.G.; Schild, H.H.; Golubnitschaja, O.

    2002-01-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA has been well documented in cardiac cells isolated from diabetic patients and rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus (DM). This study evaluates possible molecular mechanisms for early events in the development of DM-induced cardiomyopathy. Methods: To analyze the