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Sample records for cardiology munich germany

  1. The Sustainable Food and Agricultural Movement in Munich, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Schafer, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    The sustainable food and agriculture movement in Munich, Germany is one of the strongest in all of Germany. Germany as a whole is the leading consumer of organic food in Europe and is one of the founders of the organic agriculture philosophy and practice. But in the case of Munich, where does this activism come from in particular? Why is Munich so strong in this movement? This paper discusses the methodology of mapping the actors involved in the sustainable food and agriculture movements foll...

  2. Munich

    OpenAIRE

    MONCIAUD, Didier

    2009-01-01

    Thriller politique et psychologique, ce film de Spielberg aborde un sujet particulièrement sensible. Suite à la sanglante et médiatique prise d’otage d’athlètes israéliens lors des Jeux Olympiques de Munich en septembre 1972, Golda Meir, la Première Ministre israélienne, décide de lancer une opération secrète de représailles contre les responsables de cette attaque. Un groupe d’agent du Mossad est constitué et chargé de tuer à travers le monde les personnes ayant eu à des degrés divers un rap...

  3. 3D stress field simulation for Greater Munich, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Moritz; Heidbach, Oliver; Reinecker, John; Przybycin, Anna Maria; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    Geotechnical applications such as tunneling, storage of waste, wellbore planning, or reservoir engineering requires detailed 3D information on the rock properties and behavior of the continuum. One of the key parameters is the contemporary crustal in-situ stress state. However, generally the availability of stress data on reservoir scale is scarce or no data exists at all. Furthermore, stress data is often limited to the orientation of the maximum horizontal stress. Hence, geomechanical-numerical modelling provides an approximation of a continuous description of the 3D in-situ stress state. We present a model workflow that shows (1) how to calibrate a regional scale model of Greater Munich with stress orientations and magnitudes mainly from borehole data and (2) how to derive from the regional model boundary conditions for a local high-resolution model of a geothermal reservoir site. This approach using two models is an alternative to the required trade-off between resolution, computational cost and a sufficient number of calibration data which is otherwise inevitable for a single model. The incorporated 3D geological models contain the topography from a digital elevation model and 6 stratigraphic units with different elasto-plastic rock properties. The local model mimics the area of a planned reservoir and its resolution is significantly higher than in the regional model and down to 10 m near the planned borehole trajectories using 21×106 tetrahedron finite elements with linear approximation functions. The uncertainties of the calibrated regional model are large since no information on the magnitude of the maximum horizontal stress is available. Even in the entire Greater Munich area only two reliable leak-off tests that deliver the magnitude of the minimum horizontal stress could be used. These uncertainties are transferred also to the local model. Hence we also show how to quantify for the workflow in general the systematic uncertainties and discuss

  4. Economic Und Fiscal Effects of the FIFA World Cup in Germany - the Case of Munich

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, Alina Mihaela; Friedrich, Peter; Wonnemann, Gunther

    2006-01-01

    The authors determine the income effects, employment effects, production effects, migration effects as well as the budget effects and effects concerning social insurances. These effects concern the city of Munich, the hinterland, other municipalities, Bavaria, other states and the federation. The so-called “Taxonomic Localization Approach for Public Offices“ is applied. The model for identifying the effects considers the characteristics of the games and of the Munich region. Direct effect...

  5. Munich`s Baufest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woof, M.

    1998-03-01

    The article previews some of the latest developments in mining machinery to be exhibited at `Bauma `98` in Munich (30 March - 4 April 1998). They include excavation, drilling earthmoving and conveying equipment. 1 fig., 10 photos.

  6. The Role of Vegetation in Mitigating Urban Land Surface Temperatures: A Case Study of Munich, Germany during the Warm Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadroddin Alavipanah

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Urban Heat Island (UHI is the phenomenon of altered increased temperatures in urban areas compared to their rural surroundings. UHIs grow and intensify under extreme hot periods, such as during heat waves, which can affect human health and also increase the demand for energy for cooling. This study applies remote sensing and land use/land cover (LULC data to assess the cooling effect of varying urban vegetation cover, especially during extreme warm periods, in the city of Munich, Germany. To compute the relationship between Land Surface Temperature (LST and Land Use Land Cover (LULC, MODIS eight-day interval LST data for the months of June, July and August from 2002 to 2012 and the Corine Land Cover (CLC database were used. Due to similarities in the behavior of surface temperature of different CLCs, some classes were reclassified and combined to form two major, rather simplified, homogenized classes: one of built-up area and one of urban vegetation. The homogenized map was merged with the MODIS eight-day interval LST data to compute the relationship between them. The results revealed that (i the cooling effect accrued from urban vegetation tended to be non-linear; and (ii a remarkable and stronger cooling effect in terms of LST was identified in regions where the proportion of vegetation cover was between seventy and almost eighty percent per square kilometer. The results also demonstrated that LST within urban vegetation was affected by the temperature of the surrounding built-up and that during the well-known European 2003 heat wave, suburb areas were cooler from the core of the urbanized region. This study concluded that the optimum green space for obtaining the lowest temperature is a non-linear trend. This could support urban planning strategies to facilitate appropriate applications to mitigate heat-stress in urban area.

  7. Paediatrics: messages from Munich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Midulla

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to describe paediatric highlights from the 2014 European Respiratory Society (ERS International Congress in Munich, Germany. Abstracts from the seven groups of the ERS Paediatric Assembly (Respiratory Physiology and Sleep, Asthma and Allergy, Cystic Fibrosis, Respiratory Infection and Immunology, Neonatology and Paediatric Intensive Care, Respiratory Epidemiology, and Bronchology are presented in the context of the current literature.

  8. Psychiatric research and science policy in Germany: the history of the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fur Psychiatrie (German Institute for Psychiatric Research) in Munich from 1917 to 1945).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, M M

    2000-09-01

    The Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fur Psychiatrie (DFA) in Munich, one of the most important research institutes in the field of theoretical and clinical psychiatry, was founded in 1917 by Emil Kraepelin. Its financial existence between the world wars was assured by generous donations from the Jewish American scholar and philanthropist James Loeb. The scientific work done by Walther Spielmeyer (neuropathology), Felix Plaut (serology), Kurt Schneider (clinical psychiatry) and Ernst Rudin (psychiatric genetics) earned the DFA a reputation as an international center for psychiatry and neurology. During the 'Third Reich' Ernst Rudin cooperated with the National Socialist health system. His genetic concepts provided support for eugenic programmes such as forced sterilization of individuals with psychoses. These complex interactions underscore the importance of the DFA in understanding the recent history of medicine in Germany.

  9. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: IFT Institut für Therapieforschung in Munich, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühringer, Gerhard

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the history and current structure of the Institut für Therapieforschung (IFT) [Institute for Therapy Research] in Munich, as well as major research topics and factors which might contribute to a creative structure and atmosphere for innovative research in the addiction field. The institute was founded in 1973 as a non-profit non-governmental organization (NGO) with a focus on applied research. Starting with behaviour therapy-based development and evaluation of programmes for alcohol, illicit drugs and smoking and the evaluation of treatment services, the institute gradually expanded its topics, covering prevention (1985) and epidemiology and policy evaluation (1990), and participated throughout this period in the development of guidelines and screening, diagnostic and clinical instruments. Later, the IFT tried to bridge the gap between basic sciences, applied research, health-care services and health policy, with a network of national and international contacts, including its own university engagements and collaborations with foreign research groups and national and European Union (EU) agencies. Possible creativity-promoting factors on the institutional and individual levels are discussed, e.g. the collaboration of experienced senior researchers with carefully selected innovative doctoral students, considerable in-house and external training of young researchers and the early participation and presentation of their work at international conferences, independence from stakeholders in the field and the refusal of project funds which require external clearance of publications.

  10. Geothermal models on different scales - understanding and geothermal characterization of a fault zone before simulating - a case study from the Munich region (Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussel, Michael; Ortiz, Adrián; Thomas, Rüdiger; Schulz, Rüdiger

    2015-04-01

    A challenging task for geothermal exploration is the geothermal characterization of fault zones, which seems to play an important role for the exploration of the geothermal Malm Aquifer in the Munich region. The results of an actualized regional thermo-hydraulic model of the Munich region as well as flow-, temperature- and stress analysis for a more detailed local THM-model in the realm of a geothermal power plant are presented. Whereas the main focus of the actualized regional model lies in the forecast of potential temperature or hydraulic pressure interferences of geothermal doublet or triplet systems, the more detailed local model contributes to the understanding of flow, temperature distribution and induced microseismicity, which might occur during production or injection. The flow regime was described with the diagnostic plot derived from the analysis of pump tests. The temperature distribution in a well was modeled (Comsol). Joints and faults in a well were investigated to their reactivation potential in the recent stress field (slip-tendency analysis, GMI-software). Unfortunately only scarce data for geomechanical analysis are registered in the standard exploration scheme for geothermal wells in the Munich region, especially for determining the minimum horizontal stress. It is therefore highly recommended to extend the well measuring and logging program in the future.

  11. Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciences (FH) Zittau/Goerlitz; -The Association for Research and Lecturing in Nuclear Engineering in Southwest Germany (2007), consisting of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), the European Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), the Materials Testing Laboratory (MPA) Stuttgart, and the Universities of Karlsruhe, Stuttgart and Heidelberg as well as the Universities of Applied Sciences in Ulm and Furtwangen; -The Nuclear Engineering Forum West (2009), consisting of the Juelich Research Centre (FZJ), the RWTH Aachen University, and the Aachen/Juelich University of Applied Sciences; - The subject-oriented Final Disposal Research Group, consisting of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), the Technical University of Berlin, and the University of Clausthal-Zellerfeld; - The interregional Alliance of Competence in Radiation Research (2007), consisting of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection in Salzgitter (BfS), the Centre for Radiation Protection and Radioecology (ZSR) in Hanover, the German Research Centre for Environmental Health (GSF) in Munich, the Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) Leipzig-Halle, the German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ) in Heidelberg, the Centre for Heavy Ion Research (GSI) in Darmstadt, and the research centres in Juelich, Dresden/Rossendorf, and Karlsruhe. International activities were geared to two initiatives for the promotion of young nuclear scientists, in particular to the: - ENEN (European Nuclear Engineering Network); -WNU (World Nucl ear University). In both organizations, the Technical University of Munich is involved as the German representative of the Alliance of Competence. By the end of January 2010, the ENELA (European Nuclear Energy Leadership Academy) with its headquarters in Munich also joined

  12. Expansion of district heating in Munich; Fernwaermeausbau in Muenchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prein, Thomas [SWM Services GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    For some time the population of Munich (Federal Republic of Germany) is growing. However, the residential areas within the existing boundaries of the city is limited. The demand for living area is very high and results in a compact building construction. In the western region of Munich the new district Freiham is developed for about 20,000 people, commerce and trade. The public utility Munich have decided to realize the heat supply of this new district by means of district heating. This requires not only a new district heating network, but also a new power plant.

  13. Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Döbrich, Peter; Kodron, Christoph

    1992-01-01

    After summing up the competencies of the Federal Government and the States regarding the area of teacher education and the teaching profession in Germany, the author describes the two phases of teacher training and research as well as the "research and inservice education of teachers" (INSET). Furthermore, he analyses the institutional backgrounds of educational research in Germany and the influence of educational research on political parties and parliaments. Finally, "priorities and new tre...

  14. Cardiology Mannequin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Education of medical students in cardiology requires access to patients having a variety of different forms of heart disease. But bringing together student, instructor and patient is a difficult and expensive process that does not benefit the patient. An alternate approach is substitution of a lifelike mannequin capable of simulating many conditions of heart disease. The mannequin pictured below, together with a related information display, is an advanced medical training system whose development benefited from NASA visual display technology and consultative input from NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The mannequin system represents more than 10 years of development effort by Dr. Michael S. Gordon, professor of cardiology at the University of Miami (Florida) School of Medicine.

  15. Development of a geothermal reservoir for Munich; Erschliessung der Geothermie fuer Muenchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pletl, Christian; Frank, Nadine; Henle, Markus; Angerer, Julia [SWM Services GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Munich, the Bavarian capital, is located favourably in the central Bavarian molasse, which is a privileged situation for the utilisation of hydrothermal geothermal energy. The geothermal energy will be distributed via one of Germany's biggest district heating grids. After successful operation of a pilot grid in the new housing area of Munich-Riem, the Munich municipal utility is now working on the systematic development of this energy sources. Apart from the many technical challenges of this innovative technology, its integration in a technically, economically and ecologically optimized power supply concept is the key problem. The next few projects are already in the planning stage.

  16. Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides information on the status of institutional and financial arrangements in Germany for the long term management of HLW and SNF, It includes the following elements: A consistent set of requirements for the technical and legal infrastructure including: funding, liability, institutional control, records management, and research activities; An organizational structure with clearly defined responsibilities; and Provisions for participation by interested parties in decisions and outcomes

  17. Scenarios for the development of electromobility in Munich; Szenarien zur Entwicklung der Elektromobilitaet in Muenchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunnert, Stefan [Hochschule Weihenstephan-Triesdorf (Germany). Studiengang ' ' Management Erneuerbare Energien' '

    2011-07-01

    The change of the individual mobility on environmentally friendly and sustainable approach is not only in Germany an important concern, but also a global challenge. The main reasons for an involvement are dwindling crude oil reserves and the greenhouse effect. Due to the road traffic as one of the largest emitters of CO{sub 2} possibilities are discussed to make mobility more environmentally friendly and energy-politically sustainable. In this context, the electric car is seen as a possible component of the vision for the future of the environment and mobility. The contribution under consideration reports on the possible development of electric vehicles in Munich in 2030 based on three scenarios. The results are based on a fundamental study of the Institute fortiss GmbH (Munich, Federal Republic of Germany) and a recent study by the Research center for Energy Economics (Munich, Federal Republic of Germany) for electric vehicles.

  18. Nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, nuclear medicine techniques are routinely used in cardiological practice. They include procedures for the atraumatic investigation of different physiological processes in the various structures included in the central circulation: pericardium, myocardium, myocardial adrenergic innervation, cardiac chambers and valves, coronary microcirculation, and great vessels. Beside these in-Vivo procedures, they also comprise of in-Vitro methods for the detection and measurement in blood of various biological molecules of significance in the management of cardiac diseases. A common feature in this collection of in-Vivo and in-Vitro techniques is their ability to provide helpful clinical information for the diagnosis, prognosis and management of cardiac diseases. Their simplicity and safety for the patient allow their repeated use in the follow up of the progress of disease and in the assessment of the efficacy of the therapeutic measures

  19. Nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with two topics in nuclear cardiology. In the first, left ventricular wall motion assessment using Fourier transform of local left ventricular time-activity curves in gated blood pool studies is evaluated. In the second, the interpretation of myocardial perfusion scintigrams is assessed which are obtained with thallium-201 or with another radiopharmaceutical with different physical, but identical biological properties. In all these investigations data acquisition and analysis by computer played an essential role. In chapter 1 the desirable properties of a nuclear medicine computer system are given and the computer system used for this work is described. Wall motion analysis of the left ventricle using Fourier transform of local time-activity curves in the left ventricular region in gated blood pool studies is described in chapter 2. In chapter 3 detection of non-perfused lesions in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy with thallium-201 is described. Detection of partly perfused lesions and the influence of scatter and photon energy on myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is described in chapter 4. (Auth.)

  20. Internal and external dynamics of the Munich film and TV industry cluster, and limitations to future growth

    OpenAIRE

    Harald Bathelt; Armin Gräf

    2008-01-01

    This analysis uses the case of a seemingly successful industry cluster (ie the film and TV industry in Munich) to demonstrate that deficits in the structure of social relations can impact a cluster’s growth potential. In the period after World War II, Munich grew into a national centre of media industries in Germany due to the introduction of private/commercial TV, national entry barriers, and a supportive institutional infrastructure. The recent advertising crisis and the dissolution of the ...

  1. GERDA test facilities in Munich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GERDA (Germanium Detector Array) experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge. Germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge will be submerged in pure liquid argon. The cryogenic liquid is used as cooling liquid for the detectors and as shielding against gamma radiation. Several test facilities are currently under construction at the MPI Munich. Prototype Germanium detectors are tested in conditions close to the experimental setup of GERDA. Detector parameters are determined in a specialized vacuum teststand as well as directly in liquid argon. A new vacuum teststand named Galatea is under construction. It will be used to expose germanium detectors to α- and β-particles and study their response to surface events. This yields information about dead layers and the response to surface contaminations. (orig.)

  2. American Society of Nuclear Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... much more! class="box-li"> Journal of Nuclear Cardiology Official publication of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Clinical Guidelines Procedures, Appropriate Use Criteria, Information Statements ...

  3. Pediatric nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear cardiology methods have had less impact upon pediatric cardiology than upon adult cardiology. Most pediatric heart disease results from congenital malformations of the heart and great vessels, which is usually discovered in infancy, and is most often treated definitively in infancy or early childhood. Unfortunately, nuclear medicine techniques are limited in their spatial resolution - structures that overlie each other are separated with difficulty. As a result, nuclear cardiology is usually of limited value in the anatomic characterization of the congenital heart abnormalities. Nevertheless, it has been useful in the detection and quantification of the pathophysiologic consequences of many congenital cardiac malformations. The authors review application of nuclear medicine in pediatric cardiology, and attempt to assess each in terms of its clinical utility

  4. Reporting nuclear cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trägårdh, Elin; Hesse, Birger; Knuuti, Juhani;

    2015-01-01

    are available; therefore, an European position statement on how to report nuclear cardiology might be useful. The current paper combines the limited existing evidence with expert consensus, previously published recommendations as well as current clinical practices. For all the applications discussed......, and conclusion of the report. The statement also discusses recommended terminology in nuclear cardiology, image display, and preliminary reports. It is hoped that this statement may lead to more attention to create well-written and standardized nuclear cardiology reports and eventually lead to improved clinical...

  5. [Perspectives in cardiological research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kübler, W

    2004-08-01

    German cardiological research is confronted with increasing difficulties. Clinical research is restricted by regulations, such as the working hours protecting law, the revised version of the legal articles against corruption and acceptance of advantage as well as by many parts of law for the general frame of the university structures. In addition more and more administrative duties are tranferred to doctors engaged in research. Furthermore cardiology is at a disadvantage as only part of the net profits for cardiological services are tranferred to the responsible clinic. Likewise the facilities for cooperation are increasingly restricted, as basic science institutions originally allocated to cardiological research, are now devoted to other subjects and as many pharmaceutical firms have left the country. Cardiology in our country is practically not supported by private research organizations. Research projects are, therefore, predominantly financed by grants from the Bundeministerium für Bildung und Forschung and by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. The financial resources for research in our country are declining and much smaller compared, e. g., to the USA. As a consequence of the shortage of resources not only are the weak projects turned down; it is feared that also the very innovative projects are likewise excluded for entering unknown territory. In periods of financial restrictions the central office and the experts evaluating the projects have a special responsibility, which cannot be met by technical objections, such as e. g., an "unsufficient impact factor". In order to improve the conditions for cardiological research the net profits for cardiological services should be transferred unrestricted to the responsible clinic. The acceptance rate of cardiologcal projects may be increased by more intensive cooperation. At the end, the principle of help by self-help also applies to cardiological research; the British Heart Foundation has developed into an

  6. Nuclear cardiology in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear cardiology is one of the most active branches of nuclear medicine and plays important role in diagnosis in treatment of CAD patients. Few nuclear cardiology surveys were published in the literature, mostly from developed countries. A nuclear cardiology survey in Iran and analysis of the findings in comparison with other countries may lead to better decision making and improve practice in our country. A questionnaire was sent by mail or e-mail to all nuclear medicine centers in Iran asking for details of nuclear cardiology practice. Also ownership of the centers, number of gamma cameras and number of cardiac studies in each week were recorded. Some centers were studied using telephone interview. From 79 nuclear medicine centers in Iran, 55 centers (69.6%) filled the questionnaire including 28 centers in Tehran and 27 centers in other cities. There was 69 Gamma cameras in these centers, 62.3% with SPECT capability. It is estimated that we may have 100 gamma cameras in Iran. This study showed that about 68287 cardiac studies were done in Iran each year with Myocardial perfusion scan accounting for about 99 2% of the studies. Considering population of the country nuclear cardiology activity will be about 1.05 study/1000/year. Regarding radiotracers used, about 13.5% of studies were done with T I-201, with some centers using only Tc-99m-M I B I

  7. Reactor atómico. Munich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber, Gerhard

    1959-03-01

    Full Text Available Una vez más el espíritu alemán ha quedado definido por su gran capacidad para la iniciación de empresas duras y difíciles con la construcción de esta estación atómica, creada para corresponder a las necesidades del Instituto de Física en la Escuela Superior Técnica de Munich.

  8. Cardiology without borders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Wolk

    2004-01-01

    @@ Cardiovascular disease takes place in a border-free world. The challenge at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and anywhere else in the world is to hold patient care above the artificial barriers raised by geopolitical issues. Fundamentally, the goal of ACC members or of any cardiology societies in the world is to provide excellent patient care. Cardiovascular disease is essentially the same throughout the world. Where there are minor variations among individuals, as clinicians we find priceless opportunity to learn. Expanding- rather contracting -our experience base helps us as individuals to realize our best potential as practitioners.

  9. The genome and cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Henning; Diness, Birgitte Rode; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob;

    2014-01-01

    cardiac diseases. Clinical and genetic cascade family screening of the relatives to patients with inherited cardiac diseases is now organized in a national network of centres of cardiology, sharing pedigrees, clinical and genetic information. This gives unique opportunities for offering focused...

  10. Dynamic analysis of the BMW tower in Munich

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indacochea-Beltran, Joaquin; Elgindy, Pearl; Lee, Elaine; Vignesh, Thiviya; Ansourian, Peter; Tahmasebinia, Faham; Marroquín, Fernando Alonso

    2016-08-01

    In the 1970s, world famous Austrian architect Karl Schwanzer designed an avant-garde suspended skyscraper for the new BMW headquarters. The BMW Tower was envisioned to resemble a four-cylinder motor and become a symbol for the recent flourishing success of BMW. Throughout its four decades, the BMW Tower has become the main architectural feature of modern Munich and a pride for one of the World leading car manufacturers. The structural design of the BMW Tower represented a major challenge to Germany's finest engineers because the suspended 99.5m-high structure had to whitstand not only static loading but large wind dynamic loading while having deflections within appropriate serviceability limits. Strand7 has been used to determine the stresses and deflections the structure is subjected to in order to analyse its behavior under static and dynamic loadings. Ultimately, this analysis helps to understand the nature of suspended structures in relation to the Eurocode building standards. Finally, thermal resistance has also been analysed using Strand7 to simulate a fire scenario and analyse the behaviour of the cable structure, which is the most critical building component.

  11. University cardiology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borozanov, V

    2013-01-01

    In distant 1972, within framework of the Internal Clinic, a cardiologic department was organized which was soon, on 29.XII.1974, transformed into the Cardiology Clinic, later the Institute for Heart Diseases, and in 2008 was renamed the University Cardiology Clinic. The greater part of its foundation was possible owing to Prof. Dimitar Arsov and Prof. Radovan Percinkovski, who was the clinic's first director in the period from 1974 to 1984. In 1985, the Clinic moved into its own new building, and in that way was physically detached from the Internal Clinics. Until its move to the new building, the Clinic functioned in the Internal Clinics building, organized as an outpatient polyclinic and inpatient infirmary department with clinical beds, a coronary intensive care unit and a haemodynamics laboratory equipped with the most modern equipment of that time. Today the Clinic functions through two integral divisions: an inpatient infirmary department which comprises an intensive coronary care unit and fourteen wards which altogether have 139 clinical beds, and the diagnostic centre which comprises an emergency clinic and day hospital, a communal and consultative outpatients' clinic functioning on a daily basis, through which some 300-350 patients pass every day, and diagnostic laboratories with a capacity of nearly 100 non-invasive and 20-30 invasive diagnostic procedures daily. The Clinic is a teaching base, and its doctors are educators of students at the Medical, Dental and Pharmacy Faculties, and also of students at the High School for Nurses and X-ray technicians, but also for those in Internal Medicine and especially Cardiology. The Clinic is also a base for scientific Masters' and post-doctoral studies, and such higher degrees are achieved not only by doctors who work here, but also by doctors from Medical Centres both in the country and abroad. Doctors working in this institution publish widely, not only a great number of books and monographs, but also original

  12. Computers in cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present abstract book contains the abstracts of 90 lectures and 29 posters presented at the conference. They are dealing with the following themes: Echocardiography, databases, ECG interpretation, wall motion, arrhythmia processing systems, electrophysiological models, ECG-mapping, intensive care and hemodynamic monitoring, digital subtraction angiography, clinical electrophysiology, mechanical properties of the cardiovascular system, coronary artery measurements, arrythmia analysis, arrhytmia monitoring techniques, ECG waveform recognition and nuclear cardiology. (MG)

  13. Recent advances in nuclear cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, H.; Petersen, C. Leth; Kjaer, A.;

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is an essential part of functional, non-invasive, cardiac imaging. Significant advances have been made in nuclear cardiology since planar (201)thallium ((201)TI) scintigraphy was introduced for the evaluation of left ventricular (LV) perfusion nearly 40 years ago. The use...... of nuclear cardiology has been steadily increasing over the last 20 years with important steps being the introduction of (99m)technetium- ((99m)Tc)-labelled perfusion radiotracers, the change from only planar to now much more single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography......-coronary cardiac diseases. The advances in nuclear cardiology are discussed under the four headlines of: 1) myocardial perfusion, 2) cardiac performance including LV and right ventricular (RV) function, 3) myocardial metabolism, and 4) experimental nuclear cardiology Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6...

  14. The Munich ion microprobe: Characteristics and prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The newly developed ion microprobe SNAKE (superconducting nanoscope for applied nuclear (Kern-) physics experiments) has gone into routine operation at the Munich 14 MV tandem accelerator. It focuses ion beams, from protons to uranium, with energies that are about 10 times larger than they are available at standard nuclear microprobes. Lateral resolutions of Δx=1.6 μm and Δy=1.2 μm for x- and y-direction at full aperture and as low as Δx=600 nm and Δy=150 nm for a pencil beam have been achieved so far. The latter values are limited by positional drifts and 50 Hz oscillating fields which have become obvious in time resolved measurements. SNAKE opens new possibilities for analysis of microstructured materials as well as materials modifications. The highlights are three dimensional hydrogen analysis using proton proton scattering, high resolution transmission energy loss measurements utilizing a magnetic spectrograph and materials modification with available high energy proton and heavy ion beams. Standard techniques like particle induced X-ray emission, elastic and inelastic scattering are also used for imaging. The paper summarizes some of the prospects using the enlarged range of available ion beams and ion energies

  15. An overview of Smorn V-Munich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the recent fifth Symposium on Reactor Noise (SMORN V), over half the participants represented power utilities, and thirteen out of ninety papers covered practical experience of plant monitoring by noise analysis. In 1986 the Nuclear Energy Agency published a State of the Art Report on Reactor Noise Analysis providing an assessment of the applicability of noise techniques to power reactor operations, which was drawn up by a working group of the NEA Committee on Reactor Physics in the aftermath of the 1984 SMORN IV symposium in Dijon. Since that time, the practical applications of noise analysis techniques to plant surveillance have become more widespread, in particular in the areas of loose part detection and vibration monitoring. Theoretical understanding of the methods has continued to improve. These advances were presented at the SMORN V symposium, held in Munich from 12th - 16th October 1987. The meeting also recommended that the 1986 State of the Art report should be updated, and the present overview is intended, like its predecessor, for a wide audience including national safety authorities and managers in the nuclear industry. The full proceedings of the symposium, to be published in 1988 by Pergamon Press, will include all the papers presented at the meeting. This document was assembled and edited at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from the summaries of each session provided by the session chairmen. Topics which were divided into multiple sessions for the purpose of the conference have been regrouped into single chapters. A complete list of the papers presented at the conference is included in the appendix

  16. Geriatric Cardiology: An Emerging Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, John A; Matlock, Daniel D; Forman, Daniel E

    2016-09-01

    Given changing demographics, patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease in developed countries are now older and more complex than even a decade ago. This trend is expected to continue into the foreseeable future; accordingly, cardiologists are encountering patients with a greater number of comorbid illnesses as well as "geriatric conditions," such as cognitive impairment and frailty, which complicate management and influence outcomes. Simultaneously, technological advances have widened the therapeutic options available for patients, including those with the most advanced CV disease. In the setting of these changes, geriatric cardiology has recently emerged as a discipline that aims to adapt principles from geriatric medicine to everyday cardiology practice. Accordingly, the tasks of a "geriatric cardiologist" may include both traditional evidence-based CV management plus comprehensive geriatric assessment, medication reduction, team-based coordination of care, and explicit incorporation of patient goals into management. Given that the field is still in its relative infancy, the training pathways and structure of clinical programs in geriatric cardiology are still being delineated. In this review, we highlight the rationale behind geriatric cardiology as a discipline, several current approaches by geriatric cardiology programs, and future directions for the field. PMID:27476988

  17. How to Practice Sports Cardiology: A Cardiology Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, Christine E

    2015-07-01

    The rigorous cardiovascular (CV) demands of sport, combined with training-related cardiac adaptations, render the athlete a truly unique CV patient and sports cardiology a truly unique discipline. Cardiologists are advised to adopt a systematic approach to the CV evaluation of athletes, taking into consideration the individual sports culture, sports-specific CV demands, CV adaptations and their appearance on cardiac testing, any existing or potential interaction of the heart with the internal and external sports environment, short- and long-term CV risks, and potential effect of performance-enhancing agents and antidoping regulations. This article outlines the systematic approach, provides a detailed example, and outlines contemporary sports cardiology core competencies.

  18. Sanatorio para la infancia, en Munich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haind, Friedrich F.

    1964-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objects to be met in the design this Children's Building were to provide suitable control and protection of the children, adequate working conditions for the nurses, and develop a pleasant family environment. This clinic is an extension of that run by the Sisters of Saint Benedict in Lechnerstrasse, Munich. It consists of two blocks, of 4 and 5 floor levels. It has a semibasement, housing the services, and some spare rooms and other facilities, described in the enclosed plans. The ground floor provides room for 25 beds, for the older boys. On the second floor there are 30 beds for those recently born, whilst the third floor has space for 30 beds for prematurely born babies. The nurses live in the attic, where there are 15 bedrooms, each with two beds, a kitchen and suitable auxiliary facilities. Much thought has been given to the design of details, the general distribution and circulation system has been planned with much care, and the overall functional efficiency of the building as a children's clinic has been kept a paramount factor. All this makes this building an outstanding one among those of this type.Los objetivos principales perseguidos aquí son: conseguir una eficaz vigilancia y protección de los niños; organizar los puestos de trabajo de las enfermeras para que resulten prácticos y agradables, y crear un ambiente familiar La clínica construida —como ampliación de las instalaciones que las Hermanas de San Benito poseen en la calle Lachner, en Munich— comprende dos cuerpos de edificio unidos, de 4 y 5 plantas de altura, respectivamente, y está distribuida del siguiente modo: el semisótano aloja, además de la zona de servicios, una serie de dependencias, que vienen descritas en la respectiva documentación gráfica. La planta baja alberga 25 camas; está destinada a los niños mayores y colegiales; la planta primera, con 30 camas, a los recién nacidos, y la planta segunda, con 30 camas, a la sección de prematuros

  19. Assessing Competence in Pediatric Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Apul E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In response to the need to assure physician competence, a rating scale was developed at the University of Minnesota Medical School for use in evaluating clinical competence in pediatric cardiology. It was tested on first- and second-year specialists. Development and testing procedures are described. (JT)

  20. Physician Requirements-1990. For Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Octavious; Birchette-Pierce, Cheryl

    Professional requirements for physicians specializing in cardiology were estimated to assist policymakers in developing guidelines for graduate medical education. The determination of physician requirements was based on an adjusted needs rather than a demand or utilization model. For each illness, manpower requirements were modified by the…

  1. Recent Advances in Nuclear Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Woo

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear cardiology is one of the major fields of nuclear medicine practice. Myocardial perfusion studies using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have played a crucial role in the management of coronary artery diseases. Positron emission tomography (PET) has also been considered an important tool for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion. However, the recent development of computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies and growing concerns about the radiation exposure of patients remain serious challenges for nuclear cardiology. In response to these challenges, remarkable achievements and improvements are currently in progress in the field of myocardial perfusion imaging regarding the applicable software and hardware. Additionally, myocardial perfusion positron emission tomography (PET) is receiving increasing attention owing to its unique capability of absolute myocardial blood flow estimation. An F-18-labeled perfusion agent for PET is under clinical trial with promising interim results. The applications of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and F-18 sodium fluoride (NaF) to cardiovascular diseases have revealed details on the basic pathophysiology of ischemic heart diseases. PET/MRI seems to be particularly promising for nuclear cardiology in the future. Restrictive diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis, are effectively evaluated using a variety of nuclear imaging tools. Considering these advances, the current challenges of nuclear cardiology will become opportunities if more collaborative efforts are devoted to this exciting field of nuclear medicine. PMID:27540423

  2. [Problems in cardiology specialty training in Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Armağan

    2012-04-01

    Cardiology Specialty Training in our country should be made in accordance with the law numbered 1219 on the Practice of Medicine and Related Arts, and according to the Medical and Dental Specialist Training Regulation which is published according to the 9th article of this law. The duration of Cardiology Specialist Training has been defined as 4 years in our country. The European Society of Cardiology (ESC), European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), and the European Cardiology Section Foundation (ECSF) define the duration of Cardiology Specialist Training as 6 years. Therefore, insufficient Cardiology residency training occurs in our country due to the shortened length of time. In this report, the problems of the Cardiology Specialist Training in Turkey will be addressed under different headings.

  3. 40 Years MAGLEV Vehicles in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Meisinger, Reinhold; Guangwei, Shu

    2011-01-01

    On May 6th 1971 the worldwide first MAGLEV vehicle was presented by Messerschmitt-Bölkow-Blohm (MBB) in Ottobrunn near Munich, Germany. Till the year 2000 different test and application MAGLEV vehicles followed, but no commercial use in Germany. Since December 31st 2002 the Shang-hai MAGLEV Transportation System is successfully in operation, as the worldwide first and only one commercial used MAGLEV line. The paper in honour of Prof. Dr.-Ing. Eveline Gottzein for her 80th birthday contains in...

  4. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Evandro Tinoco Mesquita; Luana de Decco Marchese; Danielle Warol Dias; Andressa Brasil Barbeito; Jonathan Costa Gomes; Maria Clara Soares Muradas; Pedro Gemal Lanzieri; Ronaldo Altenburg Gismondi

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiolo...

  5. Instituto de bioquímica Munich - Alemania Federal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beckert, -

    1975-05-01

    Full Text Available This building, situated in Martinsried, Munich, was awarded the first prize in an international contest. It consists of 15 departments, basically meant for education and research. The complex occupies a large ground, with extensive green zones and covered passages that connect the different blocks, all of them very low: class rooms, testing rooms, electronic microscopy, library, social centre, restaurant auditorium, housing, etc.Este edificio, situado en Martinsried, Munich, fue seleccionado, con el primer premio, en un concurso internacional convocado al efecto. Comprende 15 departamentos destinados, fundamentalmente, a la enseñanza e investigación. El conjunto ocupa una amplia parcela, con profusión de zonas verdes y pasos cubiertos que enlazan los diferentes bloques, todos ellos de poca altura: clases, salas de ensayos, microscopía electrónica, biblioteca, centro social, restaurante, salón de actos, viviendas, etcétera.

  6. MAFF – The Munich accelerator for fission fragments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L Beck; D Habs; P Reiter; P Thirolf; T Seiber; H Bongers; S Emhofer; H Maier

    2002-12-01

    At the new high flux reactor FRM-II in Munich the accelerator MAFF (Munich accelerator for fission fragments) is under design. In the high neutron flux of 1014 n/cm2 s up to 1014 neutron-rich fission fragments per second are produced in the 1 g U-235 target. Ions with an energy of 30 keV are extracted from the ion source. In the mass seperator two isotopes can be selected. One of the beams is used for low energy experiments, the other one is injected into an ECRIS (or EBIS) for charge breeding to a / ≥ 0.16. A gas filled RFQ cooler is used for emittance improvement. The subsequent LINAC delivers beams with an energy ranging from 3.7 MeV/u to 5.9 MeV/u. New IH structures are being developed at the Munich tandem laboratory. A small storage ring is planned in a further stage to recycle the fission fragments. A thin target foil can be placed into this ring, e.g., for synthesis of super-heavy elements. The through-going beam tube has been installed in the heavy water tank of the reactor. Tests of the target ion source in a special oven to test long term stability and safety tests were in progress.

  7. Screening for mental disorders in cardiology outpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birket-Smith, M.; Rasmussen, A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the frequency of mental disorders in cardiology outpatients to the number of patients with psychological problems identified by cardiologists. In a cardiology outpatient service, 103 consecutive patients were asked to participate in the study. Of these 86......, were frequent in cardiology outpatients. Even in cases where the cardiologists identified psychological problems, the diagnosis had no consequence, as none of the patients was offered relevant treatment Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  8. “Yingli Cup” China-Germany Friendly Football Match Held in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>On the evening of July 24, the "Yingli Cup" China-Germany Friendly Football Match was held in the Workers Stadium in Beijing. The home team was Football Club (FC) Beijing Guo’an and the visit team FC Bayern Munich. The CPAFFC, as the honorary organizer,participated in the preparation for the match, one of a series of activities celebrating the 40th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic ties between China and Germany.Bayern Munich is one of the

  9. Summary of the 4th Annual Scientific Session of Cardiology in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伊丽

    2002-01-01

    @@ The 4th Annual Scientific Session of South China was held from April 5 ~ 8, 2002 in Guangzhou. More than one thousand cardiologists came from Guangzhou,Guangxi, Hunan and Hainan Province participated in the meeting and 143 abstracts were presented. A distinguished faculty from the United States, Canada,Germany, Britain, Honkong, Beijing and Shanghai were invited to join this conference and gave a series of special lectures about the newest advances in cardiology.

  10. [Radiation protection in interventional cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    INTERVENTIONAL: cardiology progress makes each year a greater number of procedures and increasing complexity with a very good success rate. The problem is that this progress brings greater dose of radiation not only for the patient but to occupationally exposed workers as well. Simple methods for reducing or minimizing occupational radiation dose include: minimizing fluoroscopy time and the number of acquired images; using available patient dose reduction technologies; using good imaging-chain geometry; collimating; avoiding high-scatter areas; using protective shielding; using imaging equipment whose performance is controlled through a quality assurance programme; and wearing personal dosimeters so that you know your dose. Effective use of these methods requires both appropriate education and training in radiation protection for all interventional cardiology personnel, and the availability and use of appropriate protective tools and equipment. Regular review and investigation of personnel monitoring results, accompanied as appropriate by changes in how procedures are performed and equipment used, will ensure continual improvement in the practice of radiation protection in the interventional suite. PMID:26169040

  11. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg, E-mail: ronaldo@floralia.com.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  12. Nobel prizes: contributions to cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-08-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize's history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  13. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Tinoco Mesquita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15% studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16% laureates, and two (6% were women. Fourteen (42% were American, 15 (45% Europeans and four (13% were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  14. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Tinoco Mesquita

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15% studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16% laureates, and two (6% were women. Fourteen (42% were American, 15 (45% Europeans and four (13% were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  15. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male

  16. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male. PMID:25945466

  17. Nobel prizes: contributions to cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-08-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize's history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male. PMID:25945466

  18. Optical space communication II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Munich, Germany, June 10, 11, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Juergen

    1991-05-01

    The present conference discusses the European SILEX project for optical space communications (OSP), Japanese activities in OSPs, deep-space OSP, a high data-rate interorbit link based on diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser technology, an electrooptic modulator for high-speed Nd:YAG laser communications, an unobscured mirror telescope for telecommunications, and optical carrier modulation by integrated optical devices in lithium niobate. Also discussed are micromachined scanning mirrors for laser-beam deflection, coherent optical fiber communications, a 90-deg optical hybrid for coherent receivers, economic factors relevant to an OSP, the effect of microaccelerations on an OSP terminal, and a novel fiber-optics-based conical scan-tracking device.

  19. [Direct oral anticoagulants in cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Róbert Gábor

    2016-09-01

    Antithrombotic drug therapy is a main cornerstone - sometimes a fairly uneven cornerstone - of today's clinical practice. Patients treated with antithrombotic drugs appear sometimes unawaited at those of our colleagues, who are not necessarily experts of this narrow field. Furthermore, new and newer molecules of antiplatelet and anticoagulant medicines have come into practice, frequently in combination. This dramatic development has been important to patients; pharmacological - and recently nonpharmacological - antithrombotic treatment has paved the way to improve current modalities in cardiology. Combining elements of the "old four" (heparin, coumadin, aspirin, clopidogrel) have been the basis of any improvement for a long time. Nowadays, there has been an involvement of new drugs, direct oral anticoagulants into practice. It is time now to catch up in using new anticoagulants, regardless of our current speciality in medicine. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(38), 1507-1510. PMID:27640616

  20. The history of veterinary cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, James W

    2013-03-01

    Throughout civilization, animals have played a pivotal role in the advancement of science and medicine. From as early as 400 BC when Hippocrates recognized that diseases had natural causes, the steadfast advances made by biologists, scientists, physicians and scholars were fueled by timely and important facts and information- much of it gained through animal observations that contributed importantly to understanding anatomy, physiology, and pathology. There have been many breakthroughs and historic developments. For example, William Harvey in the 16th and 17th centuries clarified the importance of the circulatory system, aided by observations in dogs and pigs, which helped to clarify and confirm his concepts. The nineteenth century witnessed advances in physical examination techniques including auscultation and percussion. These helped create the basis for enhanced proficiency in clinical cardiology. An explosion of technologic advances that followed in the 20th century have made possible sophisticated, accurate, and non-invasive diagnostics. This permitted rapid patient assessment, effective monitoring, the development of new cardiotonic drugs, clinical trials to assess efficacy, and multi-therapy strategies. The latter 20th century has marshaled a dizzying array of advances in medical genetics and molecular science, expanding the frontiers of etiologies and disease mechanisms in man, with important implications for animal health. Veterinary medicine has evolved during the last half century, from a trade designed to serve agrarian cultures, to a diverse profession supporting an array of career opportunities ranging from private, specialty practice, to highly organized, specialized medicine and subspecialty academic training programs in cardiology and allied disciplines. PMID:23453139

  1. New MWPCs for the Munich Q3D spectrograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A position sensitive detector - for light particles - of about 150 cm length and a resolution of proportional0.5 mm is needed for the Munich Q3D spectrograph. For high resolution this detector must follow the curvature ofthe Q3Dsup(s) focal surface. As a substitute for the MWPC of Glaessel two new detectors, a short one (proportional28 cm) and a long one (2 m) of the same type were constructed. The main features are: wire-spacing 0.5 mm, wire thickness 8 μm, particle detection from each position separately, total energy measurement in a subsequent plastic scintillator and thus ΔE/E particle discrimination. The design of the detectors, the associated electronics and their performance in measurements since spring 1981 (short detector) and spring 1982 (long detector) respectively are reported. (orig.)

  2. Major maintenance of the Munich MP-tandem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenzer, H.; Carli, W.; Hartung, P.; Jakob, H.; Nocker, H.; Rohrer, L.; Schnitter, H.; Assmann, W.; Maier, H.J.; Machlitt, N.

    1988-05-20

    Several measures have been taken to restore the voltage performance of the Munich tandem. 1. All accelerator tubes were reconditioned by sandblasting, new electrodes and diaphragms were inserted and preassembled groups of tubes were baked in high vacuum. 2. All other vacuum components were cleaned, baked in high vacuum and partly pressure leak tested outside the tandem. 3. High voltage tests were performed with tubes. Without portico voltages up to 16 MV were obtained, with portico up to 17.5 MV. 4. Some modifications (e.g. infrared light links) were introduced. The shutdown lasted 6 months. In March 1987 beam operation was resumed at moderate terminal voltages, interrupted by intervals of soft conditioning.

  3. Major maintenance of the Munich MP-tandem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzer, H.; Carli, W.; Hartung, P.; Jakob, H.; Nocker, H.; Rohrer, L.; Schnitter, H.; Assmann, W.; Maier, H. J.; Machlitt, N.; Steffens, H.

    1988-05-01

    Several measures have been taken to restore the voltage performance of the Munich tandem. 1. All accelerator tubes were reconditioned by sandblasting, new electrodes and diaphragms were inserted and preassembled groups of tubes were baked in high vacuum. 2. All other vacuum components were cleaned, baked in high vacuum and partly pressure leak tested outside the tandem. 3. High voltage tests were performed with tubes. Without portico voltages up to 16 MV were obtained, with portico up to 17.5 MV. 4. Some modifications (e.g. infrared light links) were introduced. The shutdown lasted 6 months. In March 1987 beam operation was resumed at moderate terminal voltages, interrupted by intervals of soft conditioning.

  4. Current status of preventive cardiology training among United States cardiology fellowships and comparison to training guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Quinn R; Keteyian, Steven J; McBride, Patrick E; Weaver, W Douglas; Kim, Henry E

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated preventive cardiology education in United States cardiology fellowship programs and their adherence to Core Cardiovascular Training Symposium training guidelines, which recommend 1 month of training, faculty with expertise, and clinical experience in cardiac rehabilitation, lipid disorder management, and diabetes management as a part of the prevention curricula. We sent an anonymous survey to United States cardiology program directors and their chief fellow. The survey assessed the program curricula, rotation structure, faculty expertise, obstacles, and recommended improvements. The results revealed that 24% of surveyed programs met the Core Cardiovascular Training Symposium guidelines with a dedicated 1-month rotation in preventive cardiology, 24% had no formalized training in preventive cardiology, and 30% had no faculty with expertise in preventive cardiology, which correlated with fewer rotations in prevention than those with specialized faculty (p = 0.009). Fellows rotated though the following experiences (% of programs): cardiac rehabilitation, 71%; lipid management, 37%; hypertension, 15%; diabetes, 7%; weight management/obesity, 6%; cardiac nutrition, 6%; and smoking cessation, 5%. The program directors cited "lack of time" as the greatest obstacle to providing preventive cardiology training and the chief fellows reported "lack of a developed curriculum" (p = 0.01). The most recommended improvement was for the American College of Cardiology to develop a web-based curriculum/module. In conclusion, most surveyed United States cardiology training programs currently do not adhere to basic preventive cardiovascular medicine Core Cardiovascular Training Symposium recommendations. Additional attention to developing curricular content and structure, including the creation of an American College of Cardiology on-line knowledge module might improve fellowship training in preventive cardiology.

  5. Cologne Consensus Conference, Management of Conflict of Interest, 12 and 13 September 2014, Cologne, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Simper, Julie

    2015-01-01

    On 12–13 September 2014 the third annual Cologne Consensus Conference (CCC) was held in Cologne, Germany. The two-day educational event was organised by the European Cardiology Section Foundation (ECSF) and the European Board for Accreditation in Cardiology (EBAC), a specialty CME-CPD accreditation board of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS). The conference was planned in cooperation with an impressive group of international organisations and faculty members representing leading...

  6. Weimar Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reckendrees, Alfred

    The Weimar Republic is analysed within the framework of limited and open access orders. Germany had developed into a mature limited access order before World War I, with rule of law and open economic access but only limited access to politics. After the war, Germany developed toward an open access...

  7. Safe sedation in modern cardiological practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furniss, Stephen S; Sneyd, J Robert

    2015-10-01

    Safe sedation is fundamental to many modern cardiological procedures, and following the publication of the report on safe sedation by the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, this report discusses sedation specifically in cardiological practice. The major areas within cardiology that use sedation are cardioversion, catheter ablation particularly of atrial fibrillation, transoesophageal echocardiography, implantable device (cardiovascular implantable electronic device) procedures and other procedures such as transcatheter aortic valve replacement. There is increasing demand for cardiological sedation but there is wide geographical variation in its use and there are also growing data to support non-anaesthetists giving sedation. The use of benzodiazepines, particularly for short procedures, is common, but even here good record-keeping and audit together with an understanding of the continuum of sedation and having appropriately trained staff and the necessary facilities are vital. Nurse administration of propofol may be appropriate for some procedures in cardiology that require at least moderate sedation. Appropriate training is essential and the use of capnography and target controlled infusion pumps for propofol administration is recommended. PMID:26085525

  8. Assessing and Reducing Exposures to Cardiology Staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interventional radiology and interventional cardiology practices represent the highest radiological workload in hospitals and have the potential for high exposures to staff operating near patients. The IAEA has promoted the Information System on Occupational Exposure in Medicine, Industry and Research (ISEMIR) project where the working group on interventional cardiology assessed levels of exposure and methods applied for individual monitoring, and designed an international database of occupational exposures. Worldwide surveys of interventional cardiologists from 32 countries and 81 regulatory bodies from 55 countries provided information on dosimetry practice: only 57% of regulatory bodies define the number and/or position of dosimeters for staff monitoring and less than 40% could provide doses. The survey results proved poor compliance with staff monitoring recommendations in a large fraction of hospitals and the need for staff monitoring harmonization and monitoring technology advancements. Given the new occupational dose limit for the lens of the eye, the existence of high eye doses in interventional cardiology practice and the general lack of knowledge of actual eye doses in interventional cardiology (and other similar interventional practices), ISEMIR recommends improving training in occupational radiation protection and monitoring methods for assessing eye lens doses, and urging hospital management to utilize the international database under development for benchmarking occupational doses in interventional cardiology and, hence, improve optimization of protection. (author)

  9. Measures of Knowledge and Attitude Toward Preventive Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Charlene A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The development and validation of an inventory of preventive cardiology at the University of Virginia is described. The inventory contains two instruments designed to measure medical students' preinstructional and postinstructional knowledge of and attitude toward preventive cardiology. (Author/MLW)

  10. Kak povlijajet prognoz Munich Re na vtoroi shag pensionnoi reformõ?

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2003-01-01

    Maailma suurima kindlustusfirma Munich Re prognoos, et praegused kindlustajad elavad üle 90 aasta vanaks, selle mõjust meie pensionikindlustusele. Arvamust avaldavad Peeter Kreitzberg, Eret Võsa, Jaan Marks, Paavo Põld ja Olari Taal

  11. [Sports cardiology - a general practice oriented update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmied, Christian

    2014-08-01

    As a sub-speciality, Sports Cardiology focuses on sport and physical training interacting with cardiac issues. Particularly, Sports Cardiology deals with the so-called "Sports Paradox", which implicates the fact the on one side regular physical training leads to a multitude of relevant health benefits. But on the other hand, exercise can also be a trigger for sudden cardiac death, particularly in case of an underlying cardiac disease. However, health benefits by regular training outweigh potential risks by far, but only if an adequate cardiac screening and individual recommendations for sports participation have been provided. This review highlights various aspects of Sports Cardiology like strategies to prevent sudden cardiac death in sports and training recommendations in patients with an underlying cardiovascular disease.

  12. Latest version of the Munich pulsed low energy positron system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Further improvements of the Munich pulsed low energy positron system have been performed. A new chopper, configured as a double plate deflection system with an external resonator and a new buncher working like a classical double gap buncher, are implemented. The complete rf-power electronic was redesigned and operates now at an overall master-frequency of 50 MHz for all bunching and chopping components. A new target station with an enlarged Faraday cage is installed. The sample temperature is variable between 30 K and 600 K. Up to ten samples can be stored in a magazine and transferred under vacuum conditions to the measuring position. With a primary source of 30 mCi 22Na a count rate of up to 4 kHz can be achieved with a peak-to-background ratio of 3000:1. This ratio can be further improved by the use of a Wien filter. A beam diameter of about 2 mm was determined. The total time resolution (pulsing plus detector system) is 250 ps (FWHM). (orig.)

  13. The Munich Compact Light Source: initial performance measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggl, Elena; Dierolf, Martin; Achterhold, Klaus; Jud, Christoph; Günther, Benedikt; Braig, Eva; Gleich, Bernhard; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-09-01

    While large-scale synchrotron sources provide a highly brilliant monochromatic X-ray beam, these X-ray sources are expensive in terms of installation and maintenance, and require large amounts of space due to the size of storage rings for GeV electrons. On the other hand, laboratory X-ray tube sources can easily be implemented in laboratories or hospitals with comparatively little cost, but their performance features a lower brilliance and a polychromatic spectrum creates problems with beam hardening artifacts for imaging experiments. Over the last decade, compact synchrotron sources based on inverse Compton scattering have evolved as one of the most promising types of laboratory-scale X-ray sources: they provide a performance and brilliance that lie in between those of large-scale synchrotron sources and X-ray tube sources, with significantly reduced financial and spatial requirements. These sources produce X-rays through the collision of relativistic electrons with infrared laser photons. In this study, an analysis of the performance, such as X-ray flux, source size and spectra, of the first commercially sold compact light source, the Munich Compact Light Source, is presented.

  14. The Munich Compact Light Source: initial performance measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggl, Elena; Dierolf, Martin; Achterhold, Klaus; Jud, Christoph; Günther, Benedikt; Braig, Eva; Gleich, Bernhard; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-09-01

    While large-scale synchrotron sources provide a highly brilliant monochromatic X-ray beam, these X-ray sources are expensive in terms of installation and maintenance, and require large amounts of space due to the size of storage rings for GeV electrons. On the other hand, laboratory X-ray tube sources can easily be implemented in laboratories or hospitals with comparatively little cost, but their performance features a lower brilliance and a polychromatic spectrum creates problems with beam hardening artifacts for imaging experiments. Over the last decade, compact synchrotron sources based on inverse Compton scattering have evolved as one of the most promising types of laboratory-scale X-ray sources: they provide a performance and brilliance that lie in between those of large-scale synchrotron sources and X-ray tube sources, with significantly reduced financial and spatial requirements. These sources produce X-rays through the collision of relativistic electrons with infrared laser photons. In this study, an analysis of the performance, such as X-ray flux, source size and spectra, of the first commercially sold compact light source, the Munich Compact Light Source, is presented. PMID:27577768

  15. Cardiac magnetic resonance in clinical cardiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas; Kumar; Rodrigo; Bagur

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, cardiac magnetic resonance(CMR) has transformed from a research tool to a widely used diagnostic method in clinical cardiology. This method can now make useful, unique contributions to the work-up of patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease. Advantages of CMR, compared to other imaging methods, include very high resolution imaging with a spatial resolution up to 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm in plane, a large array of different imaging sequences to provide in vivo tissue characterization, and radiationfree imaging. The present manuscript highlights the relevance of CMR in the current clinical practice and new perspectives in cardiology.

  16. An Evaluation of a Clerkship In Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, John N.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Evaluation of the clinical clerkship in Cardiology for general practitioners proves there is an urgent need for continuing post graduate medical education for general practitioners. Clerkship was offered jointly by the Long Island College Hospital and the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York. (IR)

  17. Evaluation of Cardiology Training and Manpower Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Forrest H., Ed.; Mendenhall, Robert C., Ed.

    Begun in June, 1971 and completed in October 1973, the study had the following specific goals: to define the cardiologist's role; to determine cardiology training program objectives; to determine manpower needs for cardiologists; and to determine the educational needs of cardiologists. The major information was sought from all active cardiologists…

  18. Developing effective invasive cardiology services. Guideline report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, P L; Franc, C W; Lewis, S J

    1988-01-01

    Diseases of the heart are the leading cause of death and the major reason for days stayed in the hospital and discharges from the hospital. Nearly 1 million Americans died last year from cardiac disease, and over 60 million suffer from some form of cardiac disease. Conservatively stated, 300,000 cardiac surgeries and 600,000 cardiac catheterizations are performed annually, and the number is rising. Therefore, heart disease is understandably big business for hospitals and physicians. The organization of cardiac delivery systems is changing dramatically, primarily as the result of advancements made in the nonsurgical treatment of cardiac disease. The balance of power is shifting from cardiac surgery to cardiology, resulting in political and economic consequences for hospitals. Cardiac diagnosis is also undergoing a transformation, as less invasive procedures increase in sophistication. As hospitals consider their options in this market and observe physicians, medical groups, and alternative delivery systems providing competing services, the strategic alternatives become confusing and decidedly difficult. This report is written as a guide to assist hospitals in understanding the technological forces underlying the changing market and the effect these changes will have on the ownership, organization, and structure of delivery systems and, most specifically, on the delivery of cardiovascular services. Because of the tremendous interest in invasive cardiology services and the significance of the financial, organizational, and quality commitment involved in the delivery of invasive cardiology services, this guideline report addresses primarily those services. Noninvasive technologies also are addressed because of their importance to a cardiology program, the magnitude of the technological changes taking place, and their potential impact on the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease. The report begins with a discussion of the general planning issues that provide the

  19. The impact of the social environment on children's mental health in a prosperous city: an analysis with data from the city of Munich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spies Gabriele

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with a low socioeconomic position are more affected by mental difficulties as compared to children with a higher socioeconomic position. This paper explores whether this socioeconomic pattern persists in the prosperous German city of Munich which features high quality of life and coverage of children mental health specialists that lies well above the national average and is among the highest in Europe. Methods 1,265 parents of preschool children participated in a cross-sectional health survey. They were given a self-administered questionnaire (including socioeconomic variables and the 'Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ', a well-established method to identify mental difficulties among children and adolescents. Prevalence estimates for the 'SDQ-Total Difficulties Score' were calculated, with a special focus on differences by parental (resp. household socioeconomic position. The association between parental education, household income, single parenthood, nationality, and parental working status on one hand, and their children's mental health on the other, was explored using multivariable logistic regression models. The coverage of mental health specialists per 100,000 children aged 14 or younger in the city of Munich was also calculated. Results In Munich, the distribution of mental health difficulties among children follows the same socioeconomic pattern as described previously at the national level, but the overall prevalence is about 30% lower. Comparing different indicators of socioeconomic position, low parental education and household income are the strongest independent variables associated with mental difficulties among children (OR = 2.7; CI = 1.6 - 4.4 and OR = 2.8; CI = 1.4 - 5.6, respectively. Conclusions Socioeconomic differences in the prevalence of childhood mental difficulties are very stable. Even in a city such as Munich, which is characterized by high quality of life, high availability of

  20. Vaccination: Developing and implementing a competency-based-curriculum at the Medical Faculty of LMU Munich

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, B.; Reuter, S.; Taverna, M.; Fischer, M. R.; Schelling, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In Germany medical students should gain proficiency and specific skills in the vaccination field. Especially important is the efficient communication of scientific results about vaccinations to the community, in order to give professional counseling with a complete overview about therapeutic options. Aim of the project: The aim of this project is to set up a vaccination-related curriculum in the Medical Faculty at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich. The structure of the curriculum is based on the National catalogue for competency-based learning objectives in the field of vaccination (Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielekatalog Medizin NKLM). Through this curriculum, the students will not only acquire the classical educational skills concerning vaccination in theory and practice, but they will also learn how to become independent in the decision-making process and counseling. Moreover, the students will become aware of consequences of action related to this specific topic. Methods: According to defined guidelines, an analysis was performed on courses, which are currently offered by the university. A separate analysis of the NKLM was carried out. Both analyses identified the active courses related to the topic of vaccination as well as the NKLM learning objectives. The match between the topics taught in current courses and the NKLM learning objectives identified gaps concerning the teaching of specific content. Courses were modified in order to implement the missing NKLM learning objectives. Results: These analyses identified 24 vaccination-related courses, which are currently taught at the University. Meanwhile, 35 learning objectives on vaccination were identified in the NKLM catalogue. Four of which were identified as not yet part of the teaching program. In summary, this interdisciplinary work enabled the development of a new vaccination-related curriculum, including 35 learning objectives, which are now implemented in regular teaching

  1. Vaccination: Developing and implementing a competency-based-curriculum at the Medical Faculty of LMU Munich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogel, B.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Germany medical students should gain proficiency and specific skills in the vaccination field. Especially important is the efficient communication of scientific results about vaccinations to the community, in order to give professional counseling with a complete overview about therapeutic options.Aim of the project: The aim of this project is to set up a vaccination-related curriculum in the Medical Faculty at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich. The structure of the curriculum is based on the National catalogue for competency-based learning objectives in the field of vaccination (Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielekatalog Medizin NKLM. Through this curriculum, the students will not only acquire the classical educational skills concerning vaccination in theory and practice, but they will also learn how to become independent in the decision-making process and counseling. Moreover, the students will become aware of consequences of action related to this specific topic.Methods: According to defined guidelines, an analysis was performed on courses, which are currently offered by the university. A separate analysis of the NKLM was carried out. Both analyses identified the active courses related to the topic of vaccination as well as the NKLM learning objectives. The match between the topics taught in current courses and the NKLM learning objectives identified gaps concerning the teaching of specific content. Courses were modified in order to implement the missing NKLM learning objectives.Results: These analyses identified 24 vaccination-related courses, which are currently taught at the University. Meanwhile, 35 learning objectives on vaccination were identified in the NKLM catalogue. Four of which were identified as not yet part of the teaching program. In summary, this interdisciplinary work enabled the development of a new vaccination-related curriculum, including 35 learning objectives, which are now implemented in

  2. Behavioral cardiology: current advances and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Alan

    2014-07-01

    Growing epidemiological evidence identifies key domains relevant to behavioral cardiology, including health behaviors, emotions, mental mindsets, stress management, social connectedness, and a sense of purpose. Each of these domains exists along a continuum, ranging from positive factors that promote health, to negative factors, which are pathophysiological. To date, there has been relatively little translation of this growing knowledge base into cardiology practice. Four initiatives are proposed to meet this challenge: 1) promulgating greater awareness of the potency of psychosocial risks factors; 2) overcoming a current "artificial divide" between conventional and psychosocial risk factors; 3) developing novel cost-effective interventions using Internet and mobile health applications, group-based counseling, and development of tiered-care behavioral management; and 4) in recognition that "one size does not fit all" with respect to behavioral interventions, developing specialists who can counsel patients in multidisciplinary fashion and use evidence-based approaches for promoting patient motivation and execution of health goals.

  3. Experiences with publicly promoted solar plants in Munich, the capital of Bavaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present study was to prepare, execute, and evaluate a poll among all the operators of solar heating plants promoted by the 'Foerderprogramm Energieeinsparung der Landeshauptstadt Muenchen' (Energy Conservation Promotion Programme for Munich). In the period from 1989 to April 1992 grants of upto 30% of investment costs were accorded by the city administration of Munich for solar heating plants and the technical energy conserving measures, notably high-efficiency boilers and some photovoltaic plants. The principal upper limit for grants was 25,000 DM per one or two-family house plus another 4.000 DM in certain borderline cases. Until early 1992 more than 350 households had made use of the grants offered by the Munich administration through this programme to finance thir solar heating plant. (orig.)

  4. Evaluating the benefits of nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the role of nuclear cardiology in the context of health care evaluation and resource utilisation. Nuclear cardiology procedures are used to detect disease, to define the extent of disease, to predict the outcome of therapy and to monitor the response to treatment. The evaluation of effectiveness will depend on the role for which the tests are being used. The evaluation of diagnostic tests most commonly follows the five level Fineberg classification. I) Technical capacity; II) diagnostic accuracy; III) diagnostic impact; IV) therapeutic impact; V) patient outcome. Tests may succeed or fail at each of these hierarchical levels. In addition to the clinical impact which is evaluated, the appropriate use of health care resources has to be considered , i.e. the cost effectiveness of the investigation. For this the costs of diagnosis and treatment in the resources used, together with the direct cost on the patient and patient carers needs to be considered. In addition to these direct costs to the community and to the patient and the carers the secondary downstream costs and opportunity costs have to be taken into account. The common methods for assessing the costs and benefits include cost minimization, cost effectiveness, cost utility, and cost benefit studies. The advantage and appropriate use of these methods are reviewed. There are seven clinical methods for evaluating diagnostics tests in nuclear cardiology which are: I) Case reports; II) consensus studies; III) databases; IV) management impact studies; V)modeling techniques; VI) management impact studies; VII) randomized control trial. Each of these has a role with advantages and disadvantages which are reviewed. It is no long sufficient to investigate the usefulness of a diagnostic test used in nuclear cardiology in isolation but it as to be within the context of the health care system and the resource used

  5. ICRP PUBLICATION 120: Radiological protection in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, C; Miller, D L; Bernardi, G; Rehani, M M; Schofield, P; Vañó, E; Einstein, A J; Geiger, B; Heintz, P; Padovani, R; Sim, K-H

    2013-02-01

    Cardiac nuclear medicine, cardiac computed tomography (CT), interventional cardiology procedures, and electrophysiology procedures are increasing in number and account for an important share of patient radiation exposure in medicine. Complex percutaneous coronary interventions and cardiac electrophysiology procedures are associated with high radiation doses. These procedures can result in patient skin doses that are high enough to cause radiation injury and an increased risk of cancer. Treatment of congenital heart disease in children is of particular concern. Additionally, staff(1) in cardiac catheterisation laboratories may receive high doses of radiation if radiological protection tools are not used properly. The Commission provided recommendations for radiological protection during fluoroscopically guided interventions in Publication 85, for radiological protection in CT in Publications 87 and 102, and for training in radiological protection in Publication 113 (ICRP, 2000b,c, 2007a, 2009). This report is focused specifically on cardiology, and brings together information relevant to cardiology from the Commission's published documents. There is emphasis on those imaging procedures and interventions specific to cardiology. The material and recommendations in the current document have been updated to reflect the most recent recommendations of the Commission. This report provides guidance to assist the cardiologist with justification procedures and optimisation of protection in cardiac CT studies, cardiac nuclear medicine studies, and fluoroscopically guided cardiac interventions. It includes discussions of the biological effects of radiation, principles of radiological protection, protection of staff during fluoroscopically guided interventions, radiological protection training, and establishment of a quality assurance programme for cardiac imaging and intervention. As tissue injury, principally skin injury, is a risk for fluoroscopically guided interventions

  6. ICRP PUBLICATION 120: Radiological Protection in Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac nuclear medicine, cardiac computed tomography (CT), interventional cardiology procedures, and electrophysiology procedures are increasing in number and account for an important share of patient radiation exposure in medicine. Complex percutaneous coronary interventions and cardiac electrophysiology procedures are associated with high radiation doses. These procedures can result in patient skin doses that are high enough to cause radiation injury and an increased risk of cancer. Treatment of congenital heart disease in children is of particular concern. Additionally, staff in cardiac catheterisation laboratories may receive high doses of radiation if radiological protection tools are not used properly. The Commission provided recommendations for radiological protection during fluoroscopically guided interventions in Publication 85, for radiological protection in CT in Publications 87 and 102, and for training in radiological protection in Publication 113 (ICRP, 2000b,c, 2007a, 2009). This report is focused specifically on cardiology, and brings together information relevant to cardiology from the Commission’s published documents. There is emphasis on those imaging procedures and interventions specific to cardiology. The material and recommendations in the current document have been updated to reflect the most recent recommendations of the Commission. This report provides guidance to assist the cardiologist with justification procedures and optimisation of protection in cardiac CT studies, cardiac nuclear medicine studies, and fluoroscopically guided cardiac interventions. It includes discussions of the biological effects of radiation, principles of radiological protection, protection of staff during fluoroscopically guided interventions, radiological protection training, and establishment of a quality assurance programme for cardiac imaging and intervention. As tissue injury, principally skin injury, is a risk for fluoroscopically guided interventions

  7. Recommendations of the European Board for the Specialty Cardiology (EBSC) for education and training in basic cardiology in Europe. The Executive Committee of the European Board for the Specialty Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The Cardiology Monosection of the UEMS and the European Society of Cardiology have created a European Board for the Specialty of Cardiology whose task is to prove guidelines for training and training institutions. The recommendations are presented here and in summary require at least 3 years education and training in basic cardiology (after at least 2 years of a common trunk of general internal medicine) at an approved institution with adequate exposure to all aspects of adult cardiological practice.

  8. Weimar Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reckendrees, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    developed toward an open access order; open access was not, however, sustainable and collapsed in 1930–31. This case of a failed open access order suggests refining the framework of limited and open access orders in further work. It shows that the political process of “creative destruction” might result...... in dissolution of open access and that the political system needs the capacity of efficiently creating legitimacy in order to sustain openness. The failure of Weimar Germany also indicates that the international political system might work as a destabilizing factor of open access and that the nation...

  9. Innovative heating supply for Munich-Freiham; Innovative Waermeversorgung fuer Muenchen-Freiham

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fieger, Christian; Gruber, Anna; Koell, Lorenz [Forschungsstelle fuer Energiewirtschaft (FfE) e.V., Muenchen (Germany); Mauch, Wolfgang [Forschungsstelle fuer Energiewirtschaft (FfE) e.V., Muenchen (Germany); Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Pletl, Christian [SWM Services GmbH, Muenchen (Germany). Konzeption Erzeugungsanlagen

    2009-07-01

    On the western outskirts of Munich the development of the new centre of settlement Freiham is planned. On approximately 350 hectares a completely new district will be created, making a balance between space for living, working and relaxation. The article compares the heating supply from a low-temperature geothermal system with a decentralized heating supply. (orig.)

  10. 1st Guidelines of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology on processes and skills for education in cardiology in Brazil--executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Marcos Roberto de; Mourilhe-Rocha, Ricardo; Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Köhler, Ilmar; Feitosa, Gilson Soares; Schneider, Jamil Cherem; Feitosa-Filho, Gilson Soares; Nicolau, José Carlos; Ferreira, João Fernando Monteiro; Morais, Nelson Siqueira de

    2012-02-01

    This article summarizes the "1st Guidelines of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology on Processes and Skills for Education in Cardiology in Brazil," which can be found in full at: . The guideline establishes the education time required in Internal Medicine and Cardiology with Specialization through theoretical and practical training. These requirements must be available at the center forming Specialists in Cardiology and the Cardiology contents.

  11. The Year in Cardiology 2013: coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbel, Raimund; Wijns, William

    2014-02-01

    The year 2013 was rich of new developments in cardiology, and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in particular. This overview article will focus on contributions in the following areas: training for PCI, appropriateness and indications; access site selection, risk scores, peri-procedural myocardial infarction; trial results and long-term follow-up; PCI for specific patient and lesion subsets, including acute coronary syndrome and ST-segment myocardial infarction; prevention of ischemic and reperfusion injury; stent thrombosis and new coronary stents and scaffolds.

  12. A case study of technology transfer: Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, G.

    1974-01-01

    Research advancements in cardiology instrumentation and techniques are summarized. Emphasis is placed upon the following techniques: (1) development of electrodes which show good skin compatibility and wearer comfort; (2) contourography - a real time display system for showing the results of EKGs; (3) detection of arteriosclerosis by digital computer processing of X-ray photos; (4) automated, noninvasive systems for blood pressure measurement; (5) ultrasonoscope - a noninvasive device for use in diagnosis of aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valve disease; and (6) rechargable cardiac pacemakers. The formation of a biomedical applications team which is an interdisciplinary team to bridge the gap between the developers and users of technology is described.

  13. Practical application of natriuretic peptides in paediatric cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Julie; Goetze, Jens Peter; B. Andersen, Claus;

    2010-01-01

    It is still uncertain if cardiac natriuretic peptides are useful biomarkers in paediatric cardiology. In this review we identify four clinical scenarios in paediatric cardiology, where clinical decision-making can be difficult, and where we feel the paediatric cardiologists need additional...

  14. Cardiological telemonitoring in rehabilitation and sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainoras, Alfonsas; Marozas, Vaidotas; Korsakas, Stasys; Gargasas, Liudas; Siupsinskas, Laimonas; Miskinis, Vytenis

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the development results of teleconsultative cardiology systems and their application in rehabilitation and sport medicine. The first teleconsultative cardiology (TELECARD) system was developed for outpatient departments in the city of Kaunas, using Internet links. It was based on the CompCardioSignal terminal. One branch of the TELECARD system with a mobile CompCardioSignal terminal was used for functional state evaluation of Lithuanian sportsmen during the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games. The examined results have shown that every sportsman responded differently to acclimatization and the TELECARD system provided support to physicians and coaches for making optimal decisions regarding the sportsmen's adaptation and other situations. The final telemetry system was used for rower monitoring. It was based on the new CompCardioSignal terminal with three EASI ECG leads and synchronously recorded motion signals for evaluation of human reaction to physical load. The developed telemonitoring systems were a useful tool for evaluation of human reaction to physical load in rehabilitation and sports activities. PMID:15718601

  15. [The origins of the Czech Society of Cardiology and of Czech cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widimský, J

    2013-06-01

    The paper presents the origins of the Czech Society of Cardiology on the one hand, and the origins of Czech cardiology on the other. The Czech Society of Cardiology is the third oldest in the world (after the American and German Societies). It was founded in 1929 by Prof. Libenský. As early as in 1933, the Society organised the first international congress of cardiologists in Prague, which was attended by 200 doctors, out of which 50 were from abroad. The most participants came from France and Poland. Other participants came from England, Argentina, Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy, Romania, Spain and Switzerland. The worldwide importance of this congress is apparent from the fact that both the World Society of Cardiology and the European Society of Cardiology (EKS) were founded after World War II in the years 1950 and 1952, i.e. almost 20 years after the first international congress of cardiology in Prague. In 1964, the Fourth Congress of European Society of Cardiology was held in Prague with the participation of 1,500 specialists from 31 countries and chaired by Prof. Pavel Lukl, the later president of EKS (1964- 1968). The paper also presents the work of our specialists in WHO and the history of the international journal Cor et Vasa issued by the Avicenum publishing house in Prague in English and Russian in the years 1958- 1992. An important role in the development of our cardiology was played by certain departments and clinics. In 1951, the Institute for Cardiovascular Research (ÚCHOK) was founded in PrahaKrč, thanks to the initiative of MU Dr. František Kriegl, the Deputy Minister of Health. Its first director was Klement Weber, who published, as early as in 1929, a monograph on arrhythmias -  50 years earlier than arrhythmias started to be at the centre of attention of cardiologists. Klement Weber was one of the doctors of President T. G. Masaryk during his serious disease towards the end of his life. Jan Brod was the deputy of Klement Weber in the

  16. Columbus VIII - Symposium on Space Station Utilization, 8th, Munich, Germany, Mar. 30-Apr. 4, 1992, Selected Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The symposium includes topics on the Columbus Programme and Precursor missions, the user support and ground infrastructure, the scientific requirements for the Columbus payloads, the payload operations, and the Mir missions. Papers are presented on Columbus Precursor Spacelab missions, the role of the APM Centre in the support of Columbus Precursor flights, the refined decentralized concept and development support, the Microgravity Advanced Research and Support (MARS) Center update, and the Columbus payload requirements in human physiology. Attention is also given to the fluid science users requirements, European space science and Space Station Freedom, payload operations for the Precursor Mission E1, and the strategic role of automation and robotics for Columbus utilization. Other papers are on a joint Austro-Soviet space project AUSTROMIR-91; a study of cognitive functions in microgravity, COGIMIR; the influence of microgravity on immune system and genetic information; and the Mir'92 project. (For individual items see A93-26552 to A93-26573)

  17. Administrative Court of Munich, judgement of June 26, 1985 (security of nuclear power plants)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decision of the Administrative Court of Munich is dealing with the protection of the nuclear power station of Isar I in Ohu. The use of shotguns for the protection of objects and persons ouside of private properties is a danger for public security. Consequently shotguns are not qualified for the protection of nuclear power stations (sec. 7 para. 2 No. 5 of the Atomic Energy Act). (CW)

  18. Munich case, some decisions make great stories: Business Model innovation by means of Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Donaire, Silvia; Olivé Tomàs, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this article is to identify how Social Media influences the way the business is managed and/or innovated. To evaluate this Business Model Innovation we have conducted a case study that assesses how strategic choices made by managers, due to the implementation of Social Media, influences Business Model Innovation. The contribution of this article throughout the company’s history, Munich case, allows us to see how Munich’s Business Model has been innovated, and how Social ...

  19. Regional income and employment effects of the 1972 Munich Olympic Summer Games

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmand, Stephanie; Maennig, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Olympic Games may have impacts on income and employment in the host city, but no ex post study has been carried out for European Olympic host cities to date. The present study closes this gap using the 1972 Munich Olympic Games. The data period examined in this study allows for analysis of long-term effects. In addition, the methodology avoids overestimating the significance of the effects. Finally, we report results for all possible combinations of pre- and post-Olympic p...

  20. Paediatric cardiology: the last 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Malcolm E

    2015-01-01

    In the last half-century, the outlook for children with heart disease has changed dramatically. Morphologists have transformed our understanding of heart defects. Improved imaging methods, such as echocardiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have made diagnostic cardiac catheterisation almost redundant. However, interventional catheterisation has flourished as transcatheter procedures have replaced surgery for many lesions. The ability to pharmacologically manipulate the duct has revolutionised the management of the sick neonate with major heart disease. Better surgical techniques, such as deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest, allow repair of lesions in early infancy before irreversible complications develop. Advances in anaesthesia and intensive care have been integral. New sub-disciplines, such as fetal cardiology and electrophysiology, have emerged. The sum of these numerous developments is enormous. Lesions that were previously considered lethal are now routinely treated. Consequently, the great majority of children with major heart disease now reach adulthood in good health.

  1. Future prospects of pediatric cardiology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Hong-fang; DU Jun-bao

    2010-01-01

    @@ In recent years, great progress has been made in the field of pediatric cardiology in China, including the development of diagnostic techniques and patient management and the elucidation of mechanisms responsible for cardiovascular diseases.1 The standardization of key diagnostic skills and patient management pathways, for example, has been continually improved.At the same time, the pathogenesis of pediatric cardiovascular diseases has been studied in depth,resulting in an increasing body of novel research findings with regard to the mechanisms responsible for these diseases. We must be aware, however, that great effort still needs to be made to further explore new diagnostic and treatment strategies and reveal the mysteries of cardiovascular diseases.

  2. Beyond victimhood. The struggle of Munich anatomist Titus von Lanz during National Socialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Mathias; Waschke, Jens; Marckmann, Georg; Steger, Florian

    2015-09-01

    The article analyzes the life and career of the anatomist Titus von Lanz (1897-1967) of Munich focusing on the period of National Socialism (NS). Von Lanz lost his position as an associate professor at the Anatomical Institute of Munich University because of his marriage to a "half-Jewish" woman in 1938. In contrast to most of his colleagues affected by National Socialist measures, von Lanz had opportunities to save his career and made extensive use of them. His story is that of a complicated struggle for the continuation of his work, involving a wide range of supporters from prestigious physicians to high-ranking National Socialist officials as well as the alienation of his colleagues at the Munich department of anatomy. The article tries to clarify these developments through the presentation of his social background, his supporters, his enemies, the research he conducted during NS and von Lanz' own remembrance of these developments from the post-war period. It aims at laying out a critical appreciation of his motives and actions, thereby contributing to the understanding of individual behavior of anatomists under NS. PMID:26208340

  3. Meaningful, entertaining, popular and ‘Bavarian’: art into design in nineteenth century Munich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Muthesius

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Among European regional stereotypes few come across as strongly and consistently as ‘Bavaria’. Its strength is derived from the ways in which it appears to be firmly and comprehensively grounded in its land and its people. This article traces the way in which some of the stereotype’s associated forms and images, principally those related to the domestic environment, were first conceived during the nineteenth century. The principal claim is that it was the nineteenth century artists, architects and designers in the Kunststadt Munich, who, helped by the critics, arrived at very specific valorisations of their designs, which could then be applied in an essentialist way to all artefacts of the region, old or new. The article divides the Munich design activities into two phases. During the 1850s designers aimed for a poetic and ‘volkstümlich / popular’ kind of decoration of common objects, including scenes from Bavarian ‘folk’ poetry. In the second phase, during the 1870s and 1880s, interest turned more directly to the domestic environment of Alpine houses, valorising a plain wooden character. Clearly, an absolute belief in in a primeval and unchanging ‘Bavaria’ cannot be entertained any more. But neither should one classify it all as modern kitsch. The latter attitude must be the reason why the subject has hardly been touched on in the copious art histories of Munich so far.

  4. AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY, AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION AND EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CARDIOLOGY GUIDELINES (2006 FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION (ENDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fuster

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A report of the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines and the European Society of Cardiology Committee for practice guidelines.

  5. AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY, AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION AND EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CARDIOLOGY GUIDELINES (2006 FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION (ENDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fuster

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A report of the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines and the European Society of Cardiology Committee for practice guidelines.

  6. Start from scratch: the prospect of nuclear cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Woo [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The future is always hard to forecast but the prospect of nuclear cardiology has never been more unobtainable than these days. Myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (MPS) has been one of the major nuclear medicine studies for decades, but the annual number of MPS is stagnant or steadily decreasing in Korea and other countries. The challenge from coronary computed tomography (CCT) and the concern of radiation exposure of MPS were the main reasons for the stalemate of nuclear cardiology. Compared to the rapid technological progress of CCT, enabling greater image resolution in conjunction with lower radiation exposure to the patients, development of new radiopharmaceuticals or scintillation imaging techniques has been at a relatively slow pace. Therefore, the future of nuclear cardiology is really dependent on the application of the genuine nuclear medicine principle to patient's management. The review for current update of nuclear cardiology will ensue in the next issue of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  7. Electrocardiographic interpretation skills of cardiology residents: are they competent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, Matthew; Davies, Edward G; Dorian, Paul; Yu, Eric H C

    2014-12-01

    Achieving competency at electrocardiogram (ECG) interpretation among cardiology subspecialty residents has traditionally focused on interpreting a target number of ECGs during training. However, there is little evidence to support this approach. Further, there are no data documenting the competency of ECG interpretation skills among cardiology residents, who become de facto the gold standard in their practice communities. We tested 29 Cardiology residents from all 3 years in a large training program using a set of 20 ECGs collected from a community cardiology practice over a 1-month period. Residents interpreted half of the ECGs using a standard analytic framework, and half using their own approach. Residents were scored on the number of correct and incorrect diagnoses listed. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 58%. Of 6 potentially life-threatening diagnoses, residents missed 36% (123 of 348) including hyperkalemia (81%), long QT (52%), complete heart block (35%), and ventricular tachycardia (19%). Residents provided additional inappropriate diagnoses on 238 ECGs (41%). Diagnostic accuracy was similar between ECGs interpreted using an analytic framework vs ECGs interpreted without an analytic framework (59% vs 58%; F(1,1333) = 0.26; P = 0.61). Cardiology resident proficiency at ECG interpretation is suboptimal. Despite the use of an analytic framework, there remain significant deficiencies in ECG interpretation among Cardiology residents. A more systematic method of addressing these important learning gaps is urgently needed.

  8. Hot topics in cardiology: data from IABP-SHOCK II, TRILOGY-ACS, WOEST, ALTIDUDE, FAME II and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukena, Christian; Böhm, Michael; Schirmer, Stephan H

    2012-11-01

    This summary article provides an update on novel clinical trials in the field of cardiovascular medicine which were presented at the annual meeting of the European Cardiac Society, held in Munich, Germany, in August 2012. The data were presented by leading experts in the field with relevant positions in the trials and registries. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary data as the analysis may change in the final publications. This article provides the reader with comprehensive summaries of the most recent diagnostic and therapeutic developments in cardiovascular medicine as previously reported (Walenta et al. in Clin Res Cardiol 100:955-971, 2011; Schirmer et al. in Clin Res Cardiol 98:691-699, 2009). PMID:23064855

  9. [Guideline for the education of the specialist in cardiology in Spain. Comisión Nacional de la Especialidad de Cardiología].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosín Aguilar, J; Plaza Celemín, L; Martín Durán, R; Zarco Gutiérrez, P; López Merino, V; Cortina Llosa, A; Ferreira Montero, I; García-Cosío Mir, F; Castro Beiras, A; Martínez Monzonís, A

    2000-02-01

    This article presents the program for training in cardiology. The document was elaborated by the National Committee of the Specialty of Cardiology, from the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Education, and describes the theoretical and practical aspects of training in cardiology prevailing at present in Spain.

  10. Recent advances of MIBG imaging in cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sympathetic nervous system plays an important role in the regulation of cardiovascular function both in healthy subjects and in patients with heart disease. Cardiac neurotransmission imaging allows in vivo noninvasive assessment of presynaptic storage, release and reuptake of neurotransmitters. Iodine-123 labeled metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is an analogue of the sympatholytic agent guanethidine and behaves in a manner that is similar to norepinephrine, a neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous system in the heart. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of MIBG uptake and washout kinetics has evaluated alterations of the cardiac sympathetic function in various heart diseases, such as cardiomyopathies, coronary artery disease, diabetic heart and arrhythmias. As reduced MIBG uptake has been related to the clinical indices of severity and prognosis, it can be used to evaluate the therapeutic effects on the cardiac sympathetic dysfunction. For example, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and β-blockers which have been shown to improve functional capacity and prognosis in patients with heart failure, have been demonstrated to increase MIBG uptake and reduce its washout rate in these patients, indicating favorable effects on the sympathetic nervous system. Thus, MIBG imaging has become a promising noninvasive tool and a widely available modality for the assessment of prognosis and effects of medical therapy in various forms of cardiac pathology. The usefulness and recent advances of MIBG imaging in cardiology will be noted in this article. (author)

  11. [Nuclear cardiology: the present functions and future perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xiaoli; Fan, Chengzhong

    2013-02-01

    For the past decade, the diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD) has shifted from the traditional model by evaluating coronary artery stenosis with morphological imaging methods to a novel model by focusing on the detection of ischemia for risk stratification. The myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using stress single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has become the most commonly used stress imaging technique for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with suspected or known CAD. It has got strong supports, including those of the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ACC/AHA/ASNC) and other numerous clinical guidelines. They all stressed that the SPECT MPI is recommended to be used as the "gate keeper" to coronary angiography in order to prevent unnecessary intervention test and save the cost. However, in China the introduction and application of nuclear cardiology was late and highly unbalanced. This leads to the lack of understanding of nuclear cardiology in some clinicians, and there often is misunderstanding on correct selection of coronary angiography, cardiac CT, CT coronary angiography and others for diagnosis and treatment of CAD which results in a trend of over-application of these traditional techniques. In this article, we will focus on the status of nuclear cardiology, including SPECT, positron emission tomography (PET) MPI in the patients with CAD for the diagnosis of ischemia, risk stratification and management decision-making, and also compare it with the traditional morphological imaging techniques. In addition, we will briefly introduce the recent advances in cardiac hybrid imaging and molecular imaging. The aim of this paper is to popularize the knowledge of nuclear cardiology, and promote the rational application of nuclear cardiology in China.

  12. Occupational dose measurement in interventional cardiology, dosimetry comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of cardiology interventional procedures has significantly increased recently. This is due to the reliability of the diagnostic equipment to diagnose many heart disease. In the procedures the x-ray used results in increasing radiation doses to the staff. The cardiologists and other staff members in interventional cardiology are usually working close to the area under examination and receive the dose primarily from scattered radiation from the patient. Therefore workers in interventional cardiology are expected to receive high doses. This study overviews the status of occupational exposure at the three cardiology centers at three different hospitals in Khartoum compared with that received by workers at other medical practices (radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology) in the Institute of Nuclear and Technology (INMO) at El Gezira. The TLD Harshaw 6600 reader was used in the assessment of effective dose for Hp (10). Two TLDs were used by each worker at the three cardiology centres, one worn under a protective apron and the other worn outside and above the apron as specified by the ICRP. Each worker at the other sections was facilitated with one dosimeter to be worn on the chest. The annual doses received by 14 cardiologists, 13 nurses and 9 technologists at the three cardiology centres were in the range: (0.84-4.77), (0.15-2.08), (0.32-1.10) mSv respectively. In the INMO the annual doses received by 7 doctors, 5 nurses and 14 technologists were in the range: (0.12-0.51), (0.11-0.65), (0.03-1.39) mSv respectively. The results showed that the annual doses received by the workers do not exceed 20 mSv. The study also indicated that doses received by workers in interventional cardiology, in particular the cardiologists are high compared to that received at the other medical sections.(Author)

  13. Report of hot-lab activities at the University of Munich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the hot-lab facility of the University of Munich a technological equipment of newest standard enables the production of radioactive targets of highest quality. In the last 2 years targets have been prepared of the following nuclides: 14C, 235U, 238U, 232Th, 242Pu and 99Tc. Thereby, not only have standard target frames with carbon or tantalum backings been used, but also special plunger target assemblies with stretched flat nickel or titanium backing foils. A special task was the preparation of sputter targets in the form of Fe314C pellets

  14. Pediatric Cardiology Boot Camp: Description and Evaluation of a Novel Intensive Training Program for Pediatric Cardiology Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceresnak, Scott R; Axelrod, David M; Motonaga, Kara S; Johnson, Emily R; Krawczeski, Catherine D

    2016-06-01

    The transition from residency to subspecialty fellowship in a procedurally driven field such as pediatric cardiology is challenging for trainees. We describe and assess the educational value of a pediatric cardiology "boot camp" educational tool designed to help prepare trainees for cardiology fellowship. A two-day intensive training program was provided for pediatric cardiology fellows in July 2015 at a large fellowship training program. Hands-on experiences and simulations were provided in: anatomy, auscultation, echocardiography, catheterization, cardiovascular intensive care (CVICU), electrophysiology (EP), heart failure, and cardiac surgery. Knowledge-based exams as well as surveys were completed by each participant pre-training and post-training. Pre- and post-exam results were compared via paired t tests, and survey results were compared via Wilcoxon rank sum. A total of eight participants were included. After boot camp, there was a significant improvement between pre- and post-exam scores (PRE 54 ± 9 % vs. POST 85 ± 8 %; p ≤ 0.001). On pre-training survey, the most common concerns about starting fellowship included: CVICU emergencies, technical aspects of the catheterization/EP labs, using temporary and permanent pacemakers/implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs), and ECG interpretation. Comparing pre- and post-surveys, there was a statistically significant improvement in the participants comfort level in 33 of 36 (92 %) areas of assessment. All participants (8/8, 100 %) strongly agreed that the boot camp was a valuable learning experience and helped to alleviate anxieties about the start of fellowship. A pediatric cardiology boot camp experience at the start of cardiology fellowship can provide a strong foundation and serve as an educational springboard for pediatric cardiology fellows. PMID:26961569

  15. Contributions to the 11. Geoengineering Congress in Munich. Geoengineering and energy; Beitraege zum 11. Geotechnik-Tag in Muenchen. Geotechnik und Energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Norbert (ed.)

    2012-11-01

    Within the eleventh geotechnics conference at 09th March, 2012 in Munich (Federal Republic of Germany), the following lectures were held: (1) New construction of the highway A44 on a new open pit dump (N. Vogt); (2) Soil liquefaction issues at mining dumps in the Lausitz (Wolfram Kudla); (3) Underfloor pumped-storage power plants in facilities of hard coal minings (Eugen Perau); (4) Geothermal energy power plant trademark (H. Haemmerle); (5) Surface settlements during the tunnel heading in the loose rock - prognosis, measurement and impact (J. Fillibeck); (6) Ring wall storages - an essential contribution to geotechnics for energy storage (M. Popp); (7) Storage basins and their geotechnical challenges (S. Messerklinger); (8) Energy from the Andes: The hydroelectric power plant La Confluencia in Chile (M. Mueller); (9) Particularities of geotechnical verifications for flat foundations of offshore wind power plants (U. Hartwig); (10) Dimensioning of piles for the foundation of offshore wind power plants (M. Achmus); (11) Offshore wind power fundaments: Practical experiences from the projects London Array and Dan Tysk (M. Horn); (12) Installation of a mono pile as a foundation structure for a tide turbine (S. Schmitz); (13) Carbon footprint - International comparison of assessment approaches at specialist foundation engineering techniques (A. Zoehrer); (14) Geotechnical assessments of upgrading power transmission lines (A. Smith).

  16. [The best in 2000 on pediatric cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachaner, J

    2001-01-01

    The year 2000 was rich in events, either spectacular news or confirmed improvement of on-going advances, as far as paediatric cardiology is concerned. The selection presented by the authors includes the first percutaneous implantation in a human being of a biological (bovine) valve which was sewn on a stent, compressed into a catheter and inserted against a stenotic and leaking procine bioprosthesis in a right-ventricle to pulmonary-artery conduit. This may be a new way to further valve replacements as alternatives to surgery. Balloon dilation of late postoperative recoarctations is now also improved with the use of stents able to maintain the result and to avoid traumatic injuries, with new coaxial double balloons making the procedure easier and safer. This is probably one of the main elements in reducing this very particular form of hypertension, the anatomic cause of which is often difficult to understand. As for yesterday's daring innovations now becoming near-routine protocols, two examples are developed. First, the rehabilitation of pulmonary arteries in pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect and complex pulmonary blood supply, both by true pulmonary vessels and by collaterals, both being stenotic and/or hypoplastic, anastomosed or not. The anatomic and functional details of such a vascular setting should be accurately understood and treated by early and aggressive surgery and interventional procedures in order to promote antegrade flow, distal angiogenesis, and, finally, active and harmonious vascular growth compatible with complete repair. The second example is Friedreich's ataxia in which, within 3 years of the discovery of the pathogenic mechanism, the deficiency in frataxin and its intra-cellular toxic consequences have been demonstrated, leading to a logical medical therapy which proves to be effective in treating (and maybe in preventing) the severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated to this disease.

  17. Eye lens dose in interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principi, S; Delgado Soler, C; Ginjaume, M; Beltran Vilagrasa, M; Rovira Escutia, J J; Duch, M A

    2015-07-01

    The ICRP has recently recommended reducing the occupational exposure dose limit for the lens of the eye to 20 mSv y(-1), averaged over a period of 5 y, with no year exceeding 50 mSv, instead of the current 150 mSv y(-1). This reduction will have important implications for interventional cardiology and radiology (IC/IR) personnel. In this work, lens dose received by a staff working in IC is studied in order to determine whether eye lens dose monitoring or/and additional radiological protection measures are required. Eye lens dose exposure was monitored in 10 physicians and 6 nurses. The major IC procedures performed were coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. The personnel were provided with two thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs): one calibrated in terms of Hp(3) located close to the left ear of the operator and a whole-body dosemeter calibrated in terms of Hp(10) and Hp(0.07) positioned on the lead apron. The estimated annual eye lens dose for physicians ranged between 8 and 60 mSv, for a workload of 200 procedures y(-1). Lower doses were collected for nurses, with estimated annual Hp(3) between 2 and 4 mSv y(-1). It was observed that for nurses the Hp(0.07) measurement on the lead apron is a good estimate of eye lens dose. This is not the case for physicians, where the influence of both the position and use of protective devices such as the ceiling shield is very important and produces large differences among doses both at the eyes and on the thorax. For physicians, a good correlation between Hp(3) and dose area product is shown. PMID:25809107

  18. Contrast-induced nephropathy in interventional cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarsky D

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Doron Sudarsky, Eugenia NikolskyCardiology Department, Rambam Health Care Campus and Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, IsraelAbstract: Development of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN, ie, a rise in serum creatinine by either ≥0.5 mg/dL or by ≥25% from baseline within the first 2–3 days after contrast administration, is strongly associated with both increased inhospital and late morbidity and mortality after invasive cardiac procedures. The prevention of CIN is critical if long-term outcomes are to be optimized after percutaneous coronary intervention. The prevalence of CIN in patients receiving contrast varies markedly (from <1% to 50%, depending on the presence of well characterized risk factors, the most important of which are baseline chronic renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. Other risk factors include advanced age, anemia, left ventricular dysfunction, dehydration, hypotension, renal transplant, low serum albumin, concomitant use of nephrotoxins, and the volume of contrast agent. The pathophysiology of CIN is likely to be multifactorial, including direct cytotoxicity, apoptosis, disturbances in intrarenal hemodynamics, and immune mechanisms. Few strategies have been shown to be effective to prevent CIN beyond hydration, the goal of which is to establish brisk diuresis prior to contrast administration, and to avoid hypotension. New strategies of controlled hydration and diuresis are promising. Studies are mixed on whether prophylactic oral N-acetylcysteine reduces the incidence of CIN, although its use is generally recommended, given its low cost and favorable side effect profile. Agents which have been shown to be ineffective or harmful, or for which data supporting routine use do not exist, include fenoldopam, theophylline, dopamine, calcium channel blockers, prostaglandin E1, atrial natriuretic peptide, statins, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.Keywords: contrast-induced nephropathy, contrast media

  19. Eye lens dose in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ICRP has recently recommended reducing the occupational exposure dose limit for the lens of the eye to 20 mSv y-1 , averaged over a period of 5 y, with no year exceeding 50 mSv, instead of the current 150 mSv y-1 . This reduction will have important implications for interventional cardiology and radiology (IC/IR) personnel. In this work, lens dose received by a staff working in IC is studied in order to determine whether eye lens dose monitoring or/and additional radiological protection measures are required. Eye lens dose exposure was monitored in 10 physicians and 6 nurses. The major IC procedures performed were coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. The personnel were provided with two thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs): one calibrated in terms of Hp(3) located close to the left ear of the operator and a whole-body dosemeter calibrated in terms of Hp(10) and Hp(0.07) positioned on the lead apron. The estimated annual eye lens dose for physicians ranged between 8 and 60 mSv, for a workload of 200 procedures y-1. Lower doses were collected for nurses, with estimated annual Hp(3) between 2 and 4 mSv y-1. It was observed that for nurses the Hp(0.07) measurement on the lead apron is a good estimate of eye lens dose. This is not the case for physicians, where the influence of both the position and use of protective devices such as the ceiling shield is very important and produces large differences among doses both at the eyes and on the thorax. For physicians, a good correlation between Hp(3) and dose area product is shown. (authors)

  20. Case study on the implementation of deammonification for the process water treatment of Munich WWTPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliges, Rita; Steinle, Eberhard; Böhm, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    The two-staged WWTP 'Gut Grosslappen' has a capacity of 2 mio. PE. It comprises a pre-denitrification in the first stage using recirculation from the nitrifying second stage. A residual post-denitrification in a downstream sand filter is required in order to achieve the effluent standards. Presently the process water from sludge digestion is treated separately by nitrification/denitrification. Due to necessary reconstruction of the biological stages, the process water treatment was included in the future overall process concept of the WWTP. A case study was conducted comparing the processes nitritation/denitrititation and deammonification with nitrification/denitrification including their effect on the operational costs of the planned main flow treatment. Besides the different operating costs the investment costs required for the process water treatment played a significant role. Six cases for the process water treatment were compared. As a result, in Munich deammonification can only be recommended for long-term future developments, due to the high investment costs, compared with the nitritation/denitritation alternative realizable in existing tanks. The savings concerning aeration, sludge disposal and chemicals were not sufficient to compensate for the additional investment costs. Due to the specific circumstances in Munich, for the time being the use of existing tanks for nitritation/denitritation proved to be most economical. PMID:22546808

  1. Implementation of Psychoacoustic model in Audio Compression using Munich and Gammachirp Wavelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Naveen,

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Audio compression is the technology of converting human speech into an efficiently encoded representation that can later be decoded to produce a close approximation of the original signal. This paperpresents an algorithm to compress high quality audio signal and maintaining transparent quality at low bit rates. Most psychoacoustic models for coding applications use a uniform spectral decomposition toapproximate the frequency selectivity of the human auditory system; however the equal filter properties of the uniform subbands do not match the non uniform characteristics of the cochlear filters. For implementing this algorithm a design of psycho-acoustic model was developed following the model used in the standard MPEG-1 audio layer 3. The architecture is based on appropriate wavelet packet decomposition instead of Short Term Fourier Transformation. Wavelet transform can be efficiently used to represent human speechwith less number of bits that can be decoded to produce a close approximation of the original speech signal. The psycho-acoustic model is designed to take advantage of the masking effect in human hearing. They minimize the number of bits required to represent each frame of audio material at a fixed distortion level . This paper compares the performance of Munich and Gammachirp audio coders based on compression ratio. For evaluating the best model five different audio signals are considered and applied for these two coders.This analysis shows that the Gammachirp offers best compression ratio and sound quality in comparison to the Munich coders.

  2. The Munich High Ability Test Battery (MHBT: A multidimensional, multimethod approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHRISTOPH PERLETH

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available After a brief introduction the theoretical basis of the Munich High Ability Test-Battery (MHBT will be outlined in the first part of the article. The MHBT has been developed in the framework of the Munich longitudinal study of giftedness and talent. The MHBT includes not only cognitive predictors measuring several dimensions and types of giftedness concerning intellectual, creative or social abilities etc., but also giftedness-relevant non-cognitive personality and social moderators measuring interests, motivations, learning emotions, self-concepts or family and school climate, educational style, quality of instruction, etc. The MHBT-instruments (different scales and dimensions are described in greater detail.In the second part of the article, after dealing with the objectivity, the reliability, and the validity of the MHBT, the authors discuss the standardization procedure including the development of grade-based T-norms respectively as well as several talent-profiles, e.g. of gifted achievers vs. underachievers, intellectual, creative, social talents or linguistic, math, science talent profiles etc. Finally, examples of talent search for gifted programs and case studies on the basis of MHBT should illustrate multidimensional identification procedures.The MHBT fulfills the most relevant assessment tasks belonging to the gifted educational and counseling practice. The usefulness of the MHBT in the framework of giftedness research as well as of gifted program evaluation studies has also been proven in the last decade. Hence the MHBT offers many opportunities to assessing giftedness and talent.

  3. Cubierta para naves de grandes dimensiones en hormigón, Munich (Alemania Federal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bomhard, H.

    1972-05-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the study, design and building of wide span concrete halls which, at present, are greatly influenced by the advances made in pre-stressed concrete, préfabrication and the development of modern building methods, as well as the new techniques in building with light concrete. The influence which gave origin to these halls is also described. Chosen as an example is the hall, with a span of 150 metres and a maximum hight of 27.30 metres, for the Munich goods station, showing the importance of this type of construction.El artículo describe el estudio, proyecto y construcción de naves de gran luz en hormigón que, en el momento actual, están decisivamente influenciadas por los adelantos en hormigón pretensado, en prefabricación y por el desarrollo de los modernos métodos de construcción, así como por las nuevas técnicas de la construcción en hormigones ligeros. Se detalla igualmente la influencia que originan estas naves de grandes dimensiones. Se toma como ejemplo la nave, de 150 m de luz y 27,30 m de altura máxima, para la estación de mercancías de Munich, haciendo patente su gran importancia en este tipo de construcciones.

  4. Faster regular long-distance DB trains thanks to new infrastructures in Berlin and between Nuremberg and Munich; Schneller Takt im DB-Fernverkehr durch neue Infrastruktur zwischen Nuernberg und Muenchen und in Berlin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trauner, D.M.; Ostwald, J. [DB Fernverkehr AG, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    Noteworthy improvements are being made to passenger services in Germany with the deployment of 28 new ICE-T tilting train sets (originally just a contract option) and the entry into service of three key infrastructure projects: - the North-South Tunnel through Berlin - the upgraded Berlin-Halle/Leipzig line with a maximum speed of 200 km/h, and - the part-upgraded/part-new Nuremberg - Ingolstadt-Munich line. The first travel-time improvements are going to come on 28 May 2006, just in time for the FIFA World Cup in Germany, when some routes and trains will start using the new infrastructure. A big step is scheduled for 10 December 2006, with the introduction of a half-hourly ICE service between Nuremberg and Munich, as one of the elements in a radical rearrangement of long-distance services to and from Bavaria. On 28 May 2006, the first scheduled trains are also going to start running through Berlin's new North-South Tunnel (NST). This is a massive improvement in the infrastructure serving the German capital, since for decades there has been just one north-south railway tunnel and that has carried suburban (S-Bahn) trains only. It represents the end of an era that goes back to the end of the Second World War and the building of the Berlin Wall. It also represents a shift in focus, in that the main effort in the immediate post-1989 years went into improving local rail services. As of now, Berlin is once again going to have excellent rail links in all directions with the territory of the federal state of Brandenburg, which surrounds it, and it is going to be possible to make massive improvements in long-distance train services too. (orig.)

  5. What to Expect From the Evolving Field of Geriatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Susan P; Orr, Nicole M; Dodson, John A; Rich, Michael W; Wenger, Nanette K; Blum, Kay; Harold, John Gordon; Tinetti, Mary E; Maurer, Mathew S; Forman, Daniel E

    2015-09-15

    The population of older adults is expanding rapidly, and aging predisposes to cardiovascular disease. The principle of patient-centered care must respond to the preponderance of cardiac disease that now occurs in combination with the complexities of old age. Geriatric cardiology melds cardiovascular perspectives with multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty, cognitive decline, and other clinical, social, financial, and psychological dimensions of aging. Although some assume that a cardiologist may instinctively cultivate some of these skills over the course of a career, we assert that the volume and complexity of older cardiovascular patients in contemporary practice warrants a more direct approach to achieve suitable training and a more reliable process of care. We present a rationale and vision for geriatric cardiology as a melding of primary cardiovascular and geriatrics skills, thereby infusing cardiology practice with expanded proficiencies in diagnosis, risks, care coordination, communications, end-of-life, and other competences required to best manage older cardiovascular patients.

  6. Pediatric Cardiology in India: Onset of a New Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Bagri, Narendra

    2015-07-01

    Pediatric cardiology is outgrowing from the shadows of adult cardiology and cardiac surgery departments in India. It promises to be an attractive and sought-after subspeciality of Pediatrics, dealing with not only congenital cardiac diseases but also metabolic, rheumatic and host of other cardiac diseases. The new government policy shall provide more training avenues for the budding pediatric cardiologists, pediatric cardiac surgeons, pediatric anesthetists, pediatric cardiac intensivists, neonatologists and a host of supportive workforce. The proactive role of Indian Academy of Pediatrics and Pediatric Cardiac Society of India, towards creating a political will at the highest level for framing policies towards building infrastructure, training of workforce and subsidies for pediatric cardiac surgeries and procedures shall fuel the development of multiple tertiary cardiac centers in the country, making pediatric cardiology services accessible to the needy population.

  7. Methods and clinical applications in nuclear cardiology: a position statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear cardiological procedures have paved the way for non-invasive diagnostics of various partial functions of the heart. Many of these functions cannot be visualised for diagnosis by any other method (e.g. innervation). These techniques supplement morphological diagnosis with regard to treatment planning and monitoring. Furthermore, they possess considerable prognostic relevance, an increasingly important issue in clinical medicine today, not least in view of the cost-benefit ratio. Our current understanding shows that effective, targeted nuclear cardiology diagnosis - in particular for high-risk patients - can contribute toward cost savings while improving the quality of diagnostic and therapeutic measures. In the future, nuclear cardiology will have to withstand mounting competition from other imaging techniques (magnetic resonance imaging, electron beam tomography, multislice computed tomography). The continuing development of these methods increasingly enables measurement of functional aspects of the heart. Nuclear radiology methods will probably develop in the direction of molecular imaging. (orig.)

  8. ["Now I am humble. Indeed." From Germany to Norway in 1934].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hem, E; Børdahl, P E

    2000-12-10

    A huge refugee problem arose when the Nazis came to power in Germany in 1933. The most acute stages were just after 1933 and from the summer of 1938. This refugee drama involved all the western countries, including Norway. This paper describes the fate of the German gynaecologist Hans Saenger (1884-1943), professor in Munich, who in 1933 was dispelled by the Nazis because of his Jewish descent. He fled to Norway in 1934 and settled in Fredrikstad. However, the attitude in Norway to refugees in general and Jews in particular was hostile, mainly because of fear of unemployment. Prejudice and xenophobia were of importance, also in the medical profession. PMID:11215938

  9. Practical application of natriuretic peptides in paediatric cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Julie; Goetze, Jens P; Andersen, Claus B;

    2010-01-01

    conclude that in premature neonates with persistent arterial ducts; in teenagers with tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary regurgitation; and in children with heart transplants and potential allograft rejection cardiac peptides can provide the clinician with additional information, but in children with atrial......It is still uncertain if cardiac natriuretic peptides are useful biomarkers in paediatric cardiology. In this review we identify four clinical scenarios in paediatric cardiology, where clinical decision-making can be difficult, and where we feel the paediatric cardiologists need additional...

  10. Nuclear cardiology core syllabus of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimelli, Alessia; Neglia, Danilo; Schindler, Thomas H; Cosyns, Bernard; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Kitsiou, Anastasia

    2015-04-01

    The European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI) Core Syllabus for Nuclear Cardiology is now available online. The syllabus lists key elements of knowledge in nuclear cardiology. It represents a framework for the development of training curricula and provides expected knowledge-based learning outcomes to the nuclear cardiology trainees.

  11. A new simulation model to evaluate interaction between neighbouring hydro-geothermal installations developing the deep Malm aquifer in the Munich region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, J.; Wenderoth, F.; Fritzer, T.; Huber, B.; Dussel, M.; Lüschen, E.; Thomas, R.; Schulz, R.

    2012-04-01

    Currently, the Molasse basin (Bavaria) is the most dynamically developing "Geothermal region" in Germany. This is particularly relevant considering the cogeneration of heat and power. For a profitable operation very high production and reinjection rates of the geothermal well doublets or triplets are required as the energy source to such installations. This implies drilling targets with excellent structural and facial conditions, i.e. fault zones or reef areas. In turn, this forces special spatial arrangements of neighbouring well doublets which lead to mutual hydraulic influence. Hydraulic interaction is expected to increase because of an increasing number of installations in the nearest future. The new simulation model presented here allows for a quantitative analysis of the current state, for the first time on a scale larger than a single project. The model covers an area of 57 x 47 km around Munich. On the one hand it is based on a detailed revision of the existing structure and hydrogeological models. To initialize the numerical model a simplified, generalized layer structure of the aquifer was derived from all available well data ("standard profile"). On the other hand a 3D-seismic survey was carried out in the core region of the new model SW of Munich (5 x 7 km). Within the context of the revision of existing 2D seismic results in the other parts of the model area layer structure and fault zones were determined from this data. Furthermore, a facies variation map was derived from 3D-seismics and a 2D-seismics reevaluation. It was applied to "overwrite" the hydraulic conductivities of the standard profile within the affect-ed layers. The complex model structure and the achieved quality of model calibration are presented. Already in the stage of model calibration, hydraulic interaction between operating or tested wells was a key feature. Model calibration led to an improvement of the structural and parameter model of the geothermal reservoir in the following

  12. Almanac 2012: interventional cardiology. The national society journals present selected research that has driven recent advances in clinical cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meier Pascal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The field of interventional cardiology continues to progress quickly. The efficacy of percutaneous interventions with newer generation drug-eluting stents has advanced a lot over the last decade. This improvement in stent performance has broadened the level of indication towards more complex interventions such as left main and multivessel PCI. Major improvements continue in the field of medical co-therapy such as antiplatelet therapies (bivalirudin, prasugrel, ticagrelor and this will further improve outcomes of PCI. The same is true for intravascular imaging such as ultrasound IVUS and optical coherence tomography OCT. However, interventional cardiology has become a rather broad field, also including alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, etc. At the moment, the fastest growing area is the structural interventions, especially for aortic valve stenosis (transcatheter aortic valve implantation TAVI and for mitral regurgitation (mitral clipping.This review covers recent advances in all these different fields of interventional cardiology.

  13. Biomass in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides, first, an overview of biomass industry in Germany: energy consumption and renewable energy production, the French and German electricity mix, the 2003-2013 evolution of renewable electricity production and the 2020 forecasts, the biomass power plants, plantations, biofuels production and consumption in Germany. Then, the legal framework of biofuels development in Germany is addressed (financial incentives, tariffs, direct electricity selling). Next, a focus is made on biogas production both in France and in Germany (facilities, resources). Finally, the French-German cooperation in the biomass industry and the research actors are presented

  14. Olympic Summer Games mascots from Munich 1972 to Rio 2016: visual overview of each mascot presented with a description

    OpenAIRE

    IOC Olympic Studies Centre

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by people, animals and even creatures of myth and legend, the mascots are an integral part of the Olympic celebrations. From Waldi, the dachshund who accompanied the 1972 Games in Munich, to Vinicius, the agile mascot of Rio 2016, discover these characters which are also part of the history of the Games.

  15. Weekly Interdisciplinary Colloquy on Cardiology: A Decade of Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrmacher, William H.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    An experimental, continuing, weekly interdisciplinary colloquy on cardiology is described. It is organized between the departments of medicine and physiology of Loyola University Medical Center to promote interaction between basic scientists and practicing physicians in the medical school. (Author/MLW)

  16. Comparison of Two Educational Strategies in Teaching Preventive Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroup-Benham, Christine A.; And Others

    This study assessed the impact of two educational strategies: text only versus text plus small group discussion, among two groups of third-year internal medicine clerkship students in a preventive cardiology course. The course was a required, 12-week Internal Medical clerkship at the University of Texas Medical Branch. The first group reviewed…

  17. Burnout, Perceived Stress, and Depression among Cardiology Residents in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Silvina V.; Diez, Juan Cruz Lopez; Arazi, Hernan Cohen; Linetzky, Bruno; Guinjoan, Salvador; Grancelli, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Because medical residency is a stressful time for training physicians, placing residents at increased risk for psychological distress, the authors studied the prevalence of burnout, perceived stress, and depression in cardiology residents in Argentina and examined the association between sociodemographic characteristics and these…

  18. DIHYDROPYRIDINE CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS. POSITION OF NIFEDIPINE IN MODERN CARDIOLOGY PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Garganeeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Position of nifedipine in modern cardiology practice is highlighted. Nifedipine usage for arterial hypertension therapy , including combined one, stroke prevention, treatment of hypertensive crisis and ischemic heart disease is considered. Advantages of nifedipine innovative formulations are presented. Possible usage of nifedipine in pulmonary hypertension as well as pregnancy is discussed specially.

  19. DIHYDROPYRIDINE CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS. POSITION OF NIFEDIPINE IN MODERN CARDIOLOGY PRACTICE

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Garganeeva

    2016-01-01

    Position of nifedipine in modern cardiology practice is highlighted. Nifedipine usage for arterial hypertension therapy , including combined one, stroke prevention, treatment of hypertensive crisis and ischemic heart disease is considered. Advantages of nifedipine innovative formulations are presented. Possible usage of nifedipine in pulmonary hypertension as well as pregnancy is discussed specially.

  20. Leadership and cooperation at the general medicine department of LMU Munich: Good grades despite difficult conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelling, Jörg; Braun, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    The relevance of general medicine at German universities will increase over the next few years. Consequently, the discussion of teaching content and even more the improvement of the structures within the still small and dependent departments of general medicine are of major importance. The example of our department at LMU Munich shows which challenges for leadership and cooperation result from lack of financial and personnel structure. The project "cooperation culture" that the department has conducted in collaboration with the LMU Center for Leadership and People Management is presented as a means to promote leadership and cooperation. This project can serve as an inspiration for the coordinators of smaller departments of general medicine at other German universities that are also striving to improve their structure and their position within the university.

  1. 17th European photovoltaic solar energy conference and exhibition, Munich 22.-26.10.2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) summarises the photovoltaics (PV) conference and exhibition held in Munich in October 2001 from the Swiss point of view. The contributions made by representatives of Swiss institutions and companies are presented including papers on the progress being made in third generation crystalline and multi-crystalline silicon technology, amorphous and micro-crystalline silicon solar cells, thin film solar cells based on compound semiconductors and thermo-photovoltaics. Further papers deal with PV modules on the market, building-integrated solar power systems and new developments in PV systems technology. The exhibition that accompanied the conference, including the 12 Swiss exhibitors who were present, is reviewed as are international market developments. Contributions concerning the application of photovoltaics in developing countries are also reviewed

  2. Transport of a high brightness proton beam through the Munich tandem accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, M., E-mail: marcus.moser@unibw.de [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Department für Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Greubel, C. [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Department für Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Carli, W. [Beschleunigerlabor MLL, 85478 Garching (Germany); Peeper, K.; Reichart, P.; Urban, B.; Vallentin, T. [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Department für Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Dollinger, G., E-mail: guenther.dollinger@unibw.de [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik LRT2, Department für Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, 85577 Neubiberg (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Basic requirement for ion microprobes with sub-μm beam focus is a high brightness beam to fill the small phase space usually accepted by the ion microprobe with enough ion current for the desired application. We performed beam transport simulations to optimize beam brightness transported through the Munich tandem accelerator. This was done under the constraint of a maximum ion current of 10 μA that is allowed to be injected due to radiation safety regulations and beam power constrains. The main influence of the stripper foil in conjunction with intrinsic astigmatism in the beam transport on beam brightness is discussed. The calculations show possibilities for brightness enhancement by using astigmatism corrections and asymmetric filling of the phase space volume in the x- and y-direction.

  3. First measurements with the Munich 2D-ACAR spectrometer on Cr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Leitner, Michael; Böni, Peter

    2013-06-01

    The Munich 2D-ACAR spectrometer at the Maier-Leibnitz accelerator laboratory in Garching has recently become operational. In the present implementation a 2D-ACAR spectrometer is set up, with a baseline of 16.5 m, a conventional 22Na positron source and two Anger-type gamma-cameras. The positrons are guided onto the sample by a magnetic field generated by a normal conducting electromagnet. The sample can be either cooled by a standard closed-cycle-cryostat to low temperatures or heated by a resistive filament to temperatures up to 500 K. We present the key features of this new 2D-ACAR spectrometer and, in addition, discuss first measurements on the pure metal system Cr. The 2D-ACAR measurements have been performed on Cr at different temperatures: at 5 K and at room temperature in the anti-ferromagnetic phase and at 318K slightly above the paramagnetic phase transition.

  4. First measurements with the Munich 2D-ACAR spectrometer on Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Munich 2D-ACAR spectrometer at the Maier-Leibnitz accelerator laboratory in Garching has recently become operational. In the present implementation a 2D-ACAR spectrometer is set up, with a baseline of 16.5 m, a conventional 22Na positron source and two Anger-type gamma-cameras. The positrons are guided onto the sample by a magnetic field generated by a normal conducting electromagnet. The sample can be either cooled by a standard closed-cycle-cryostat to low temperatures or heated by a resistive filament to temperatures up to 500 K. We present the key features of this new 2D-ACAR spectrometer and, in addition, discuss first measurements on the pure metal system Cr. The 2D-ACAR measurements have been performed on Cr at different temperatures: at 5 K and at room temperature in the anti-ferromagnetic phase and at 318K slightly above the paramagnetic phase transition.

  5. A distributed control system status report of the munich accelerator control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system of computers connected by a local area network (ARCNET) controls the Munich accelerator facility. This includes ion sources, the tandem accelerator, the beam transport system, the gas handling plant, parts of experimental setup and also an ion source test bench. ARCNET is a deterministic multi-master network with arbitrary topology, using coax cables and optical fibers. Crates with single board computers and I/O-boards (analog, parallel or serial digital), dependent on the devices being controlled, are distributed all over the building. Personal computers serve as user interfaces. The LAN communication protocol is a client/server protocol. Communication language and programming language for the single board computers is Forth. The user mode drivers in the personal computers are also written in Forth. The tools for the operators are MS-Windows applications, programmed in Forth, C++ or Visual Basic. Links to MS-Office applications are available, too

  6. Cadastral emission maps for the Munich area. Emissionskataster fuer das Untersuchungsgebiet Muenchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepper, H.; Boellmann, U.; Buchfelder, G.; Hensler, G.; Mair, K.; Renner, K.; Wunderlich, O.

    1992-03-01

    Cadastral emission maps (annual and maximum emissions) were developed for the Munich area as the largest conurbation of Bavaria (822 km[sup 2]) for the following sectors and groups of air pollutants: transportation (CO, NO[sub 2], organic compounds, soot, lead); space heating (CO, SO[sub 2], NO[sub 2], organic compounds, dusts); industrial plants (SO[sub 2], NO[sub 2], organic compounds, dusts); plants and systems which are not subject to licensing (organic compounds with/out F and Cl). In addition, annual emissions of SO[sub 2], NO[sub x], CO, organic compounds and dusts as related to the areas investigated were summarized for the four groups of air pollutants. (BBR).

  7. Effects of extreme spring temperatures on phenology: a case study from Munich and Ingolstadt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochner, Susanne; Menzel, Annette

    2010-05-01

    Extreme events - e.g. warm spells or heavy precipitation events - are likely to increase in the future both in frequency and intensity. Therefore, research on extreme events gains new importance; also in terms of plant development which is mostly triggered by temperatures. An arising question is how plants respond to an extreme warm spell when following an extreme cold winter season. This situation could be studied in spring 2009 in the greater area of Munich and Ingolstadt by phenological observations of flowering and leaf unfolding of birch (Betula pendula L.) and flowering of horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L.). The long chilling period of winter 2008 and spring 2009 was followed by an immediate strong forcing of flowering and leaf unfolding, especially for birch. This extreme weather situation diminished the difference between urban and rural dates of onset. Another important fact that could be observed in the proceeding period of December 2008 to April 2009 was the reduced temperature difference among urban and rural sites (urban heat island effect). Long-term observations (1951-2008) of the phenological network of the German Meteorological Service (DWD) were used to identify years with reduced urban-rural differences between onset times in the greater area of Munich in the past. Statistical analyses were conducted in order to answer the question whether the sequence of extreme warm and cold events leads to a decreased difference in phenological onset times or if this behaviour can be attributed to extreme warm springs themselves or to the decreased urban heat island effect which is mostly affected by general atmospheric circulation patterns.

  8. Nuclear cardiology in the UK: activity and practice 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A questionnaire was sent to 251 nuclear medicine centres asking for details of nuclear medicine activity, and nuclear cardiology activity and practice in 1997. One hundred and seventy-one (68%) centres replied. Nuclear medicine activity was estimated at 11.8 studies/1,000 population/year, and 9.5% of these studies were within cardiology (1.12 studies/1,000/year). Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) studies accounted for 77% and radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) for 22% of all nuclear cardiology. On a national basis this represents activity levels of 0.86 and 0.25 studies/1,000/year for MPI and RNV, respectively. Of the 171 responding centres, 102 (60%) performed MPI studies and 81 (79%) of these reported that activity was increasing. However, MPI activity was unevenly distributed between hospitals. Two centres accounted for 13% of total MPI; others had far lower activity rates, and 51/102 (50%) centres performed less than 200 MPI studies/year. Comparison with previous surveys showed that nuclear medicine activity had almost doubled since 1990 (it was 6.0 studies/1,000 population in 1990, 9.3 studies/1,000 in 1994 and 11.8 studies/1,000 in 1997). Over the same period, nuclear cardiology activity had also risen, the greatest increase being seen for the last 3 years (it was 0.7 studies/1,000 population in 1990, 0.82 studies/1,000 in 1994 and 1.12 studies/1,000 in 1997). Despite these encouraging figures, MPI activity for 1997 remained well below that recommended by the British Cardiac Society in 1994 (2.6 studies/1,000/year) as adequate to serve the needs of patients with cardiac disease in the UK; it was also below the European average activity for the same year (2.2 studies/1,000/year). The anticipated increased workload for nuclear cardiology is encouraging despite the wide and varied practice of nuclear cardiology around the UK. The nuclear medicine community now needs to address the issues that will prevent it keeping up with demand, such as restricted camera

  9. [Anatomical Vitamin C-Research during National Socialism and the Post-war Period: Max Clara's Human Experiments at the Munich Anatomical Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schûtz, Mathias; Schochow, Maximilian; Waschke, Jens; Marckmann, Georg; Steger, Florian

    2014-01-01

    In autumn of 1942, Max Clara (1899-1966) became chairman of the anatomical institute Munich. There, he intensified his research concerning the proof of vitamin C with the bodies of executed prisoners which were delivered by the Munich-Stadelheim prison. This research on human organs was pursued by applying ascorbic acid (Cebion) to prisoners before their execution. The paper investigates this intensified and radicalized anatomical research through human experiments, which Max Clara conducted in Munich and published from Istanbul during the postwar years, as well as its scientific references from the Nazi period.

  10. Generation of a high-brightness pulsed positron beam for the Munich scanning positron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piochacz, Christian

    2009-11-20

    Within the present work the prerequisites for the operation of the Munich scanning positron microscope (SPM) at the high intense neutron induced positron source Munich (NEPOMUC) were established. This was accomplished in two steps: Firstly, a re-moderation device was installed at the positron beam facility NEPOMUC, which enhances the brightness of the positron beam for all connected experiments. The second step was the design, set up and initial operation of the SPM interface for the high efficient conversion of the continuous beam into a bunched beam. The in-pile positron source NEPOMUC creates a positron beam with a diameter of typically 7 mm, a kinetic energy of 1 keV and an energy spread of 50 eV. The NEPOMUC re-moderator generates from this beam a low energy positron beam (20 - 200 eV) with a diameter of less than 2 mm and an energy spread well below 2.5 eV. This was achieved with an excellent total efficiency of 6.55{+-}0.25 %. The re-moderator was not only the rst step to implement the SPM at NEPOMUc, it enables also the operation of the pulsed low energy positron beam system (PLEPS). Within the present work, at this spectrometer rst positron lifetime measurements were performed, which revealed the defect types of an ion irradiated uranium molybdenum alloy. Moreover, the instruments which were already connected to the positron beam facility bene ts considerably of the high brightness enhancement. In the new SPM interface an additional re-moderation stage enhances the brightness of the beam even more and will enable positron lifetime measurements at the SPM with a lateral resolution below 1 {mu}m. The efficiency of the re-moderation process in this second stage was 24.5{+-}4.5 %. In order to convert high efficiently the continuous positron beam into a pulsed beam with a repetition rate of 50 MHz and a pulse duration of less than 50 ps, a sub-harmonic pre-bucher was combined with two sine wave bunchers. Furthermore, the additional re-moderation stage of the

  11. Generation of a high-brightness pulsed positron beam for the Munich scanning positron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the present work the prerequisites for the operation of the Munich scanning positron microscope (SPM) at the high intense neutron induced positron source Munich (NEPOMUC) were established. This was accomplished in two steps: Firstly, a re-moderation device was installed at the positron beam facility NEPOMUC, which enhances the brightness of the positron beam for all connected experiments. The second step was the design, set up and initial operation of the SPM interface for the high efficient conversion of the continuous beam into a bunched beam. The in-pile positron source NEPOMUC creates a positron beam with a diameter of typically 7 mm, a kinetic energy of 1 keV and an energy spread of 50 eV. The NEPOMUC re-moderator generates from this beam a low energy positron beam (20 - 200 eV) with a diameter of less than 2 mm and an energy spread well below 2.5 eV. This was achieved with an excellent total efficiency of 6.55±0.25 %. The re-moderator was not only the rst step to implement the SPM at NEPOMUc, it enables also the operation of the pulsed low energy positron beam system (PLEPS). Within the present work, at this spectrometer rst positron lifetime measurements were performed, which revealed the defect types of an ion irradiated uranium molybdenum alloy. Moreover, the instruments which were already connected to the positron beam facility bene ts considerably of the high brightness enhancement. In the new SPM interface an additional re-moderation stage enhances the brightness of the beam even more and will enable positron lifetime measurements at the SPM with a lateral resolution below 1 μm. The efficiency of the re-moderation process in this second stage was 24.5±4.5 %. In order to convert high efficiently the continuous positron beam into a pulsed beam with a repetition rate of 50 MHz and a pulse duration of less than 50 ps, a sub-harmonic pre-bucher was combined with two sine wave bunchers. Furthermore, the additional re-moderation stage of the SPM

  12. Total Column Greenhouse Gas Monitoring in Central Munich: Automation and Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Heinle, Ludwig; Paetzold, Johannes C.; Le, Long

    2016-04-01

    It is challenging to use in-situ surface measurements of CO2 and CH4 to derive emission fluxes in urban regions. Surface concentrations typically have high variance due to the influence of nearby sources, and they are strongly modulated by mesoscale transport phenomena that are difficult to simulate in atmospheric models. The integrated amount of a tracer through the whole atmosphere is a direct measure of the mass loading of the atmosphere given by emissions. Column measurements are insensitive to vertical redistribution of tracer mass, e.g. due to growth of the planetary boundary layer, and are also less influenced by nearby point sources, whose emissions are concentrated in a thin layer near the surface. Column observations are more compatible with the scale of atmospheric models and hence provide stronger constraints for inverse modeling. In Munich we are aiming at establishing a regional sensor network with differential column measurements, i.e. total column measurements of CO2 and CH4 inside and outside of the city. The inner-city station is equipped with a compact solar-tracking Fourier transform spectrometer (Bruker EM27/SUN) in the campus of Technische Universität München, and our measurements started in Aug. 2015. The measurements over seasons will be shown, as well as preliminary emission studies using these observations. To deploy the compact spectrometers for stationary monitoring of the urban emissions, an automatic protection and control system is mandatory and a challenging task. It will allow solar measurements whenever the sun is out and reliable protection of the instrument when it starts to rain. We have developed a simplified and highly reliable concept for the enclosure, aiming for a fully automated data collection station without the need of local human interactions. Furthermore, we are validating and combining the OCO-2 satellite-based measurements with our ground-based measurements. For this purpose, we have developed a software tool that

  13. Depression Disturbs Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The suicide of Robert Enke,the goalkeeper of the Germany national football team who had battled depression for years,stunned the country and cast depression into the national spotlight as a disturbing disease.

  14. Cologne Consensus Conference, Management of Conflict of Interest, 12 and 13 September 2014, Cologne, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Simper

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available On 12–13 September 2014 the third annual Cologne Consensus Conference (CCC was held in Cologne, Germany. The two-day educational event was organised by the European Cardiology Section Foundation (ECSF and the European Board for Accreditation in Cardiology (EBAC, a specialty CME-CPD accreditation board of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS. The conference was planned in cooperation with an impressive group of international organisations and faculty members representing leading European and North American institutions. Each year, the CCC is organised around a specific topic area. For the conference’s third iteration, the management of conflicts of interest (COI was the focus. The CCC 2014 was an exceptional opportunity for international experts and leadership to gather and learn from one another through both the formal presentations and lively group discussions. This report provides a summary of the presentations and discussions from the educational event.

  15. Hand-held echocardiography: added value in clinical cardiological assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballo Piercarlo

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ultrasonic industry has recently produced echocardiographic Hand Held Devices (miniaturized, compact and battery-equipped echocardiographic systems. Their potential usefulness has been successfully assessed in a wide range of clinical conditions. The aim of the study was to verify if the routine use of a basic model of echocardiographic Hand Held Device (HHD could be an important diagnostic tool during outpatient cardiologic consulting or in non-cardiologic hospital sections. Methods 87 consecutive patients were included in this study; they underwent routine physical examination, resting ECG and echocardiographic evaluation using a basic model of HHD performed by trained echocardiographists; the cardiologist, whenever possible, formulated a diagnosis. The percentage of subjects in whom the findings were judged reasonably adequate for final diagnostic and therapeutic conclusions was used to quantify the "conclusiveness" of HHD evaluation. Successively, all patients underwent a second echocardiographic evaluation, by an examiner with similar echocardiographic experience, performed using a Standard Echo Device (SED. The agreement between the first and the second echocardiographic exam was also assessed. Results Mean examination time was 6.7 ± 1.5 min. using HHD vs. 13.6 ± 2.4 min. using SED. The echocardiographic examination performed using HHD was considered satisfactory in 74/87 patients (85.1% conclusiveness. Among the 74 patients for whom the examination was conclusive, the diagnosis was concordant with that obtained with the SED examination in 62 cases (83.8% agreement. Conclusion HHD may generally allow a reliable cardiologic basic evaluation of outpatient or subjects admitted to non-cardiologic sections, more specifically in particular subgroups of patients, with a gain in terms of time, shortening patient waiting lists and reducing healthy costs.

  16. Hand-held echocardiography: added value in clinical cardiological assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, Giovanna; Mondillo, Sergio; Galderisi, Maurizio; Barbati, Riccardo; Zacà, Valerio; Ballo, Piercarlo; Agricola, Eustachio; Guerrini, Francesco

    2005-01-01

    Background The ultrasonic industry has recently produced echocardiographic Hand Held Devices (miniaturized, compact and battery-equipped echocardiographic systems). Their potential usefulness has been successfully assessed in a wide range of clinical conditions. The aim of the study was to verify if the routine use of a basic model of echocardiographic Hand Held Device (HHD) could be an important diagnostic tool during outpatient cardiologic consulting or in non-cardiologic hospital sections. Methods 87 consecutive patients were included in this study; they underwent routine physical examination, resting ECG and echocardiographic evaluation using a basic model of HHD performed by trained echocardiographists; the cardiologist, whenever possible, formulated a diagnosis. The percentage of subjects in whom the findings were judged reasonably adequate for final diagnostic and therapeutic conclusions was used to quantify the "conclusiveness" of HHD evaluation. Successively, all patients underwent a second echocardiographic evaluation, by an examiner with similar echocardiographic experience, performed using a Standard Echo Device (SED). The agreement between the first and the second echocardiographic exam was also assessed. Results Mean examination time was 6.7 ± 1.5 min. using HHD vs. 13.6 ± 2.4 min. using SED. The echocardiographic examination performed using HHD was considered satisfactory in 74/87 patients (85.1% conclusiveness). Among the 74 patients for whom the examination was conclusive, the diagnosis was concordant with that obtained with the SED examination in 62 cases (83.8% agreement). Conclusion HHD may generally allow a reliable cardiologic basic evaluation of outpatient or subjects admitted to non-cardiologic sections, more specifically in particular subgroups of patients, with a gain in terms of time, shortening patient waiting lists and reducing healthy costs. PMID:15790409

  17. A qualitative model for computer-assisted instruction in cardiology.

    OpenAIRE

    Julen, N.; Siregar, P.; Sinteff, J. P.; Le Beux, P.

    1998-01-01

    CARDIOLAB is an interactive computational framework dedicated to teaching and computer-aided diagnosis in cardiology. The framework embodies models that simulate the heart's electrical activity. They constitute the core of a Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) program intended to teach, in a multimedia environment, the concepts underlying rhythmic disorders and cardiac diseases. The framework includes a qualitative model (QM) which is described in this paper. During simulation using QM, dynam...

  18. Germany at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Eighth Exhibition of German Industry, "Germany at CERN" started this week and offers German companies the opportunity to establish professional contacts with CERN. From left to right in the foreground: Maximilian Metzger (BMBF), Bettinna Schöneseffen (BMBF), Karl-Heinz Kissler (SPL division leader), Horst Wenninger, and Hans Hoffman. Behind and to the right of Karl-Heinz Kissler is His Excellency Mr Walter Lewalter, Ambassador and permanent representative of Germany to the UN office in Geneva.

  19. Germany; an Immigration Country

    OpenAIRE

    Siebert, Horst

    2003-01-01

    Germany has about the same proportion of foreigners in its population as the United States, it is an immigration country. In a way, Germany has let immigration happen, but it did not really have an explicit immigration policy in the past. Now it has to make up its mind on its immigration policy in the future. The paper looks at the experience with immigration in the past, at the integration of foreigners and at the issues of immigration policy.

  20. Banking service in Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余璐

    2014-01-01

    <正>Germany is the prototypical economy country.Banks in Germany’s economic life plays a very important role.Germany has a large number of Banks and very dense network of bank branches.Deutsche Bank is by far the biggest German bank and Commerzbank is the second biggest.But with all the economic turmoil in the world these days,such rankings can change within

  1. Retail fuel price adjustment in Germany: A threshold cointegration approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consumers in Germany often complain that retail fuel prices usually adjust quickly to crude oil price increases than decreases and characterize this pricing pattern as market power exploitation. In this paper, we use both weekly national and daily city-specific (Berlin, Hamburg, Munich and Cologne) data to investigate the extent to which retail fuel prices in Germany adjust to changes in the international crude oil price. At the national level with weekly prices, we find positive asymmetries for both gasoline and diesel within the period 2003–2007, reflecting that retail prices react more swiftly to crude oil price increases than decreases. In contrast, for 2009–2013, we observe symmetric adjustment and negative asymmetry for retail diesel and gasoline prices, respectively. The city level analysis supports our findings in the latter time period. Thus, regulatory measures aimed at the retail fuel market over recent years seem to have been effective, and, contrary to consumers' perception, we find no evidence for excessive market power or collusion. - Highlights: • The paper examines the adjustment of German retail fuel (gasoline and diesel) prices to international crude oil price changes. • An error correction model with threshold cointegration is used to investigate the price dynamics. • The findings generally point to a competitive retail fuel pricing, notwithstanding the oligopolistic market structure

  2. Phase contrast medical imaging with compact X-ray sources at the Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics (MAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coan, P. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics, Munich (Germany)], E-mail: paola.coan@esrf.fr; Gruener, F. [Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics, Munich (Germany); Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Munich, Garching (Germany); Glaser, C.; Schneider, T. [Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics, Munich (Germany); Institut of Clinical Radiology, Klinikum Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Munich (Germany); Bravin, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics, Munich (Germany); Reiser, M. [Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics, Munich (Germany); Institut of Clinical Radiology, Klinikum Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Munich (Germany); Habs, D. [Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics, Munich (Germany); Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Munich, Garching (Germany)

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, the excellence cluster 'Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics' (MAP) is presented. One of the aims of the project is the development of innovative X-ray-based diagnostics imaging techniques to be implemented at an ultra-compact high-energy and high-brilliance X-ray source. The basis of the project and the developments towards the clinical application of phase contrast imaging applied to mammography and cartilage studies will be presented and discussed.

  3. High-sensitivity AMS for heavy nuclides at the Munich Tandem accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Knie, K; Korschinek, G; Rugel, G; Rühm, W; Wallner, C

    2000-01-01

    During the last years we have aimed at utilizing the high energy achievable at the Munich MP Tandem (TV=14 MV) for maximum sensitivity. One of our interests is the measurements of radionuclides around A=60 ( sup 5 sup 3 Mn, sup 6 sup 0 Fe, sup 6 sup 3 Ni) because of their high scientific potentials. However, in this mass region there are usually strong limitations in sensitivity due to a large isobaric background. Its suppression is performed by means of a gas-filled magnet and a multi DELTA E ionization chamber. A Wien filter and a time-of-flight path allow a further suppression of (non-isobaric) background. The optimization of the setup as a whole yielded detection limits of sup 5 sup 3 Mn/Mn approx 2x10 sup - sup 1 sup 4 sup 6 sup 3 Ni/Ni approx 2x10 sup - sup 1 sup 4 and sup 6 sup 0 Fe/Fe approx 2x10 sup - sup 1 sup 6 , which presently cannot be achieved by any other detection method. The overall efficiency (including ion source) is typically 10 sup - sup 5 -10 sup - sup 4. The gas-filled magnet allows an...

  4. Intense positron source at the Munich research reactor FRM-II

    CERN Document Server

    Hugenschmidt, C; Schreckenbach, K; Strasser, B; Koegel, G; Sperr, P; Triftshaeuser, W

    2002-01-01

    The principle and the design of the in-pile positron source at the new Munich research reactor FRM-II are presented. Absorption of high-energy prompt gamma-rays from thermal neutron capture in sup 1 sup 1 sup 3 Cd generates positrons by pair production. For this purpose, a cadmium cap is placed inside the tip of the inclined beam tube SR11 in the neutron field of the reactor, where an undisturbed thermal neutron flux up to 2 x 10 sup 1 sup 4 n cm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 is expected. At this position the flux ratio of thermal to fast neutrons will be better than 10 sup 4. Monte Carlo calculations showed that a mean capture rate in cadmium between 4.5 and 6.0 x 10 sup 1 sup 3 n cm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 can be expected. Inside the cadmium cap a structure of platinum foils is placed for converting gamma-radiation into positron-electron pairs. The heated foils also act as positron moderators to generate monoenergetic positrons. After acceleration to 5 keV a positron beam is formed by electric lenses and guid...

  5. Munich installs provider-neutral building management and control system; Landeshauptstadt Muenchen realisiert firmenneutrale Gebaeudeleittechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, W.

    1998-10-01

    Since April 1995, a pilot project is running in Munich for comprehensive energy management of all 1600 city-owned buildings. There will be a central facility management system which communicates with automation nodes in the individual buildings via the urban telephone network (ISDN-HICOM) or the Telekom ISDN network. In order to be independent of suppliers, an open system (FND) was chosen. Connection of about 600 buildings is envisaged as a medium-term goal. 150 buildings were connected in early 1998. [Deutsch] Seit April 1995 laeuft in Muenchen ein Pilotprojekt zum Aufbau eines umfassenden Energiemanagements fuer die rund 1600 staedtischen Gebaeude der bayerischen Metropole. Basis dieser Entwicklung ist ein uebergeordnetes Gebaeudeleitsystem, das aeber das staedtische Telefonnetz (ISDN-HICOM) bzw. das ISDN-Netz der Telekom mit den sogenannten Gebaeude-Automations-Knoten (GA-Knoten) in den jeweiligen Liegenschaften kommuniziert. Aus Gruenden der Firmenneutralitaet waehlten die Muenchner ein offenes System auf der Basis des firmenneutralen Datenuebertragungssystems (FND). Mittelfristiges Ziel ist die Aufschaltung von rund 600 Liegenschaften, wobei Anfang 1998 bereits 150 Gebaeude fixiert waren. (orig.)

  6. Live cell imaging at the Munich ion microbeam SNAKE – a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion microbeams are important tools in radiobiological research. Still, the worldwide number of ion microbeam facilities where biological experiments can be performed is limited. Even fewer facilities combine ion microirradiation with live-cell imaging to allow microscopic observation of cellular response reactions starting very fast after irradiation and continuing for many hours. At SNAKE, the ion microbeam facility at the Munich 14 MV tandem accelerator, a large variety of biological experiments are performed on a regular basis. Here, recent developments and ongoing research projects at the ion microbeam SNAKE are presented with specific emphasis on live-cell imaging experiments. An overview of the technical details of the setup is given, including examples of suitable biological samples. By ion beam focusing to submicrometer beam spot size and single ion detection it is possible to target subcellular structures with defined numbers of ions. Focusing of high numbers of ions to single spots allows studying the influence of high local damage density on recruitment of damage response proteins. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-015-0350-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  7. Overview of the Munich project for laser-driven X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last years great progress has been achieved within the field of laser-plasma accelerators. Energies on the GeV-scale are reached as well as substantial improvements in stability demonstrated. Our group focuses on applications of such laser-driven electron beams and follows two major paths: the near-future goal is the realization of first X-ray pump-probe experiments that exploit the ultra-short electron-bunch length of few femtoseconds only and the ultimate long-term project is a table-top Free-Electron Laser (FEL). Both goals rely on active control of the electron beam transport. We have started developments of miniature quadrupole lenses and show their impact on laser-driven soft X-ray undulator radiation. On the theoretical side our group contributed work on space-charge induced energy chirps. This talk gives an overview of all activities of the Munich group in the new field of laser-driven X-ray sources.

  8. Opening Speech at the 5th Great Wall International Forum on Geriatric Cardiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiwen WANG

    2006-01-01

    @@ Good morning, ladies and gentlemen, In the golden autumn of Beijing, on behalf of the Organizing Committee of the Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology, and the Institute of Geriatric Cardiology at Chinese PLA General Hospital, I am very delighted to extend my warmest welcome to the representatives, colleagues and distinguished guests, both domestic and abroad, to the 5th International Forum on Geriatric Cardiology.

  9. Position paper: proposal for a core curriculum for a European Sports Cardiology qualification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidbuchel, Hein; Papadakis, Michael; Panhuyzen-Goedkoop, Nicole; Carré, François; Dugmore, Dorian; Mellwig, Klaus-Peter; Rasmusen, Hanne Kruuse; Solberg, Erik E; Borjesson, Mats; Corrado, Domenico; Pelliccia, Antonio; Sharma, Sanjay

    2013-10-01

    Sports cardiology is a new and rapidly evolving subspecialty. It aims to elucidate the cardiovascular effects of regular exercise and delineate its benefits and risks, so that safe guidance can be provided to all individuals engaging in sports and/or physical activity in order to attain the maximum potential benefit at the lowest possible risk. The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) advocates systematic preparticipation cardiovascular screening in an effort to identify competitive athletes at risk of exercise-related cardiovascular events and sudden cardiac death. However, the implementation of preparticipation screening is hindered because of lack of structured training and as a result lack of sufficient expertise in the field of sports cardiology. In 2008 the European Society of Cardiology published a core curriculum for the general cardiologist, in which sports cardiology was incorporated within the topic 'Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology'. However, the exponential rise in knowledge and the growing demand for expertise in the field of sports cardiology dictates the need to systematically structure the knowledge base of sports cardiology into a detailed curriculum. We envisage that the curriculum would facilitate more uniform training and guideline implementation throughout Europe, and safeguard that evaluation and guidance of competitive athletes or individuals who wish to engage in leisure-time sports activities is performed by physicians with expertise in the field. The current manuscript provides a comprehensive curriculum for sports cardiology, which may serve as a framework upon which universities and national and international health authorities will develop the training, evaluation and accreditation in sports cardiology.

  10. Environmental protection in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication consists of two parts: 1. The National Report of the Federal Republic of Germany for the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in June 1992 in Brazil. This report details the development of environment policy in the Federal Republic of Germany since the last UN Conference in 1972 and describes the fundamental principles and objectives of national environment policy; for the first time, an overview is given of the state of the environment in the united Germany. 2. The National Committee's declaration which was presented after the National Report on the Conference and appeals to the industrialised countries to shoulder the particular responsibility they bear and shows what perspectives it sees for future sustainable development on a global scale. (orig./BBR)

  11. Progression or Regression? – Strengths and Weaknesses of the New Munich Nomenclature III for Cervix Cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Z.; Tempfer, C.; Schiermeier, S.; Reinecke, J.; Ruppenkamp, C.; Hilal, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Since 01. 01. 2015 the new Munich nomenclature III for gynaecological diagnostics of the cervix has been in force. The changes have led to controversial scientific discussions. This study reports for the first time on the consequences. Materials and Methods: The present data are based on smear screening results for the year 2014. The data of 63 134 patients were evaluated. Results: 2.27 % of all smears were remarkable. Group IIa was assigned to 0.91 %. Group II-p was somewhat more frequently recorded than group IIID1 (0.59 vs. 0.53 %). Groups IIID1 and IIID2 were found in 0.53 and 0.61 %, respectively, of the cases. Agreement with histology was found in 36.84 and 44.68 %, respectively. Glandular lesions represented the most frequent changes in group III. Histological clarification was obtained for 0.18 % of all remarkable findings. The relative incidence of high-grade precancerous conditions (CIN III) and invasive tumours amounted to 0.1 %. Conclusion: A close communication between gynaecologists and cytologists is mandatory for the correct usage of the new nomenclature. The future annual statistics of the health insurances can now be analysed in more detail. A statistical classification of glandular epithelial changes is now also possible for the first time. The heterogeneous group IIa constitutes an unnecessary uncertainty for patients and physicians. The splitting of the group IIID does not appear to have any advantage for the further clinical management. Further studies are needed to show whether or not the classification can stand up to international comparisons. PMID:26556907

  12. Munich Oktoberfest experience: remarkable impact of sex and age in ethanol intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binner, C; Selinski, S; Barysch, M J; Pölcher, C; Schormann, Wiebke; Hermes, Matthias; Brulport, Marc; Bauer, Alexander; Rudolph, Claudia; Bedawy, Essam; Schug, Markus; Golka, Klaus; Hasenclever, D; Trauer, H; Lessig, R; Bolt, H M; Ickstadt, K; Hengstler, Jan Georg

    2008-12-01

    Approximately 5,000 of 6 million annual visitors of the Oktoberfest in Munich have to undergo medical treatment. Patients with alcohol intoxication without trauma or further complications are all treated in a specialized medical camp. We studied these patients in order to identify risk factors and to assess the relevance of the Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) and of ethanol blood concentrations for patient management. In 2004 totally 405 patients suffering from ethanol intoxication without trauma were treated in the medical camp. A complete set of the following data was obtained from all 405 patients: GCS, ethanol blood concentration, age, sex, blood pressure (mean, systolic and diastolic), body temperature, heart rate, blood sugar, GOT, gamma-GT, and CK. A multivariate logistic regression model was applied to identify risk factors predicting patients at increased risk of hospitalization. Low GCS (8, OR: 4.18, CI: 1.96-8.65) low age (20-29 vs. > or =30 years, OR: 2.35, CI: 1.05-5.65) and male gender (male vs. female, OR: 3.58, CI: 1.36-9.34) independently predicted patients that had to be hospitalized. All other parameters including ethanol blood concentrations were not explanatory. Patients with GCS 8 (P < 0.001), suggesting that this subgroup may require longer recovery periods. Men aged 20-29 years were at highest risk for hospital admission. Increased risk could not be explained by higher ethanol blood concentrations in this subgroup. Importantly, GCS < 6 does not justify endotracheal intubation in ethanol intoxicated patients, when further complications, such as trauma, can be excluded.

  13. A model-based approach to adjust microwave observations for operational applications: results of a campaign at Munich Airport in winter 2011/2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Güldner

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of the project "LuFo iPort VIS" which focuses on the implementation of a site-specific visibility forecast, a field campaign was organised to offer detailed information to a numerical fog model. As part of additional observing activities, a 22-channel microwave radiometer profiler (MWRP was operating at the Munich Airport site in Germany from October 2011 to February 2012 in order to provide vertical temperature and humidity profiles as well as cloud liquid water information. Independently from the model-related aims of the campaign, the MWRP observations were used to study their capabilities to work in operational meteorological networks. Over the past decade a growing quantity of MWRP has been introduced and a user community (MWRnet was established to encourage activities directed at the set up of an operational network. On that account, the comparability of observations from different network sites plays a fundamental role for any applications in climatology and numerical weather forecast. In practice, however, systematic temperature and humidity differences (bias between MWRP retrievals and co-located radiosonde profiles were observed and reported by several authors. This bias can be caused by instrumental offsets and by the absorption model used in the retrieval algorithms as well as by applying a non-representative training data set. At the Lindenberg observatory, besides a neural network provided by the manufacturer, a measurement-based regression method was developed to reduce the bias. These regression operators are calculated on the basis of coincident radiosonde observations and MWRP brightness temperature (TB measurements. However, MWRP applications in a network require comparable results at just any site, even if no radiosondes are available. The motivation of this work is directed to a verification of the suitability of the operational local forecast model COSMO-EU of the Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD for the calculation

  14. Comparison of Urban and Suburban Rail Transport in Germany and in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidenglanz Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rail transport is an environmentally friendly form of passenger transport which can be utilized effectively also in urban and suburban transport systems. The paper describes the urban and suburban rail transport system including comparison of selected Czech (Prague, Brno and Ostrava and German metropolitan regions (Munich, Nuremberg and Dresden. Its aim is to analyze the importance of various factors influencing the differences between the situation in Germany and in the Czech Republic. Therefore, the research question is whether these differences are primarily caused by a different liberalization stage, or whether they are a result of other factors such as available infrastructure, investment level, rail transport services budget, structure and activity of ordering bodies and coordinators or geographical context. The supply of city and suburban rail transport is quite good in Germany and in the Czech Republic, although trains in Munich, Nuremberg and Dresden run more frequently, faster and are better interconnected with car transport. German rail transport sector is at a higher stage of liberalization, and tendering procedures are the preferred selection method for contractor carriers. However, a degree of liberalization of the railway sector is not the key marker indicating a better standard of urban and suburban rail transport in Germany because it is the high standard which is achieved as the consequence of the professional activity of the ordering bodies and train service coordinators in combination with geographical conditions, available financial sources and effective transport infrastructure. On the other hand, the importance of liberalization cannot be totally overlooked as tenders are a tool for the ordering bodies to strongly affect the price and quality of transport services in their area. The supply of better quality and attractive transport to passengers could increase the usage of rail transport in metropolitan regions and could

  15. Metabolomics, a promising approach to translational research in cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martino Deidda

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we will provide a description of metabolomics in comparison with other, better known “omics” disciplines such as genomics and proteomics. In addition, we will review the current rationale for the implementation of metabolomics in cardiology, its basic methodology and the available data from human studies in this discipline. The topics covered will delineate the importance of being able to use the metabolomic information to understand the mechanisms of diseases from the perspective of systems biology, and as a non-invasive approach to the diagnosis, grading and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  16. Benefits of an international working exchange in pediatric cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, John P; Ramsay, James M; Bullock, Andrew; Chen, Robert P; Warren, Andrew E; Wong, Kenny K

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a 1-year exchange between members of two pediatric cardiology centers: one in Canada and one in Australia. Five cardiologists participated in sequence, fully engaging in the activities of the host department. The motivation of the exchange was broadly educational including clinical experience, shared expertise, teaching, and research collaboration. Structured debriefing confirmed the value of the exchange. In addition to the experience of working in a different medical system, eight research papers were developed, with two research projects ongoing as well as subsequent exchanges of nursing and technical personnel. Interchange between two academic departments can add strength to both and allow development of new skills and research activity.

  17. The Paediatric Cardiology Hall of Fame – Donald Nixon Ross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Jane

    2015-10-01

    Donald Nixon Ross, FRCS (4 October 1922 to 7 July 2014) was a South African-born British cardiothoracic surgeon, who developed the pulmonary autograft, known as the Ross procedure, for the treatment of aortic valve disease, and also performed the first heart transplant in the United Kingdom in 1968. This paper, written by Jane Somerville, Professor of Cardiology [Retired], Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom, provides the personal recollections about Donald Ross from Jane Somerville, and thus provides a unique snapshot of cardiac surgical history. PMID:26574617

  18. The Paediatric Cardiology Hall of Fame – Donald Nixon Ross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Jane

    2015-10-01

    Donald Nixon Ross, FRCS (4 October 1922 to 7 July 2014) was a South African-born British cardiothoracic surgeon, who developed the pulmonary autograft, known as the Ross procedure, for the treatment of aortic valve disease, and also performed the first heart transplant in the United Kingdom in 1968. This paper, written by Jane Somerville, Professor of Cardiology [Retired], Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom, provides the personal recollections about Donald Ross from Jane Somerville, and thus provides a unique snapshot of cardiac surgical history.

  19. Summary of the 5th Annual Scientific Session of Cardiology in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伊丽

    2003-01-01

    @@ The 5th Annual Scientific Session of Cardiology inSouth China was held from April 3 -7, 2003 inGuangzhou. A seminar-- "The Frontline Problemsand New Viewpoints in Cardiology in Recent Times"was held at the same time.

  20. Mental disorders and general well-being in cardiology outpatients--6-year survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birket-Smith, Morten; Hansen, Baiba H; Hanash, Jamal A;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Long-term survival in a sample of cardiology outpatients with and without mental disorders and other psychosocial risk factors. METHODS: In a cardiology outpatient setting, 103 consecutive patients were asked to participate in the study. Of these, 86 were included and screened for mental...

  1. Impact of a Preventive Cardiology Curriculum on Knowledge and Attitudes of First-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitia, Marie C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study of 54 first-year Marshall University (West Virginia) medical students found that a preventive cardiology curriculum improved both knowledge of and attitudes about preventive cardiology in general and on all 4 subscales (epidemiological evidence, risk factor characteristics, pathophysiology, primary interventions). (Author/MSE)

  2. Myocardial scintigraphy. Clinical use and consequence in a non-invasive cardiological department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dümcke, Christine Elisabeth; Graff, J; Rasmussen, SPL;

    2006-01-01

    to analyse the clinical use of MPI in a university hospital without invasive cardiological laboratory. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the period 01.01.2002 to 31.12.2003, 259 patients (141 women, 118 men) were referred to MPI from our department of cardiology. RESULTS: Normal MPI was seen in 111 patients (43...

  3. Ceremony for the inaugural issuance of the Journal of Geriatric Cardiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ The Journal of Geriatric Cardiology ( JGC )started publication in September 2004. To announce the publication of its first issue, a ceremony was held at China Grand Hotel in Beijing on October 18th, 2004during the 15th Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology. Many guests were present at the ceremony.

  4. Linux thin-client conversion in a large cardiology practice: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echt, Martin P; Rosen, Jordan

    2004-01-01

    Capital Cardiology Associates (CCA) is a single-specialty cardiology practice with offices in New York and Massachusetts. In 2003, CCA converted its IT system from a Microsoft-based network to a Linux network employing Linux thin-client technology with overall positive outcomes.

  5. Teacher Education in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viebahn, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Applies the concepts of idealism, individualism, and pragmatism from the Association for Teacher Education in Europe's scenario model to Germany's teacher education. Discusses the current German teacher training system's scholarly approach to idealism; notes organizational problems; examines the special psychological demands on students made by…

  6. Optimization and surgical design for applications in pediatric cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Alison; Bernstein, Adam; Taylor, Charles; Feinstein, Jeffrey

    2007-11-01

    The coupling of shape optimization to cardiovascular blood flow simulations has potential to improve the design of current surgeries and to eventually allow for optimization of surgical designs for individual patients. This is particularly true in pediatric cardiology, where geometries vary dramatically between patients, and unusual geometries can lead to unfavorable hemodynamic conditions. Interfacing shape optimization to three-dimensional, time-dependent fluid mechanics problems is particularly challenging because of the large computational cost and the difficulty in computing objective function gradients. In this work a derivative-free optimization algorithm is coupled to a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver that has been tailored for cardiovascular applications. The optimization code employs mesh adaptive direct search in conjunction with a Kriging surrogate. This framework is successfully demonstrated on several geometries representative of cardiovascular surgical applications. We will discuss issues of cost function choice for surgical applications, including energy loss and wall shear stress distribution. In particular, we will discuss the creation of new designs for the Fontan procedure, a surgery done in pediatric cardiology to treat single ventricle heart defects.

  7. A framework for clinical reasoning in adult cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Calzada CS

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Carlos S de la Calzada Department of Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, SpainAbstract: It is well known that an expert clinician formulates a diagnostic hypothesis with little clinical data. In comparison, students have difficulties in doing so. The mental mechanism of diagnostic reasoning is almost unconscious and therefore difficult to teach. The purpose of this essay (devoted to 2nd-year medical students is to present an integrating framework to teach clinical reasoning in cardiology. By analyzing cardiology with a synthetic mind, it becomes apparent that although there are many diseases, the heart, as an organ, reacts to illness with only six basic responses. The clinical manifestations of heart diseases are the direct consequence of these cardiac responses. Considering the six cardiac responses framework, diagnostic reasoning is done in three overlapping steps. With the presented framework, the process of reasoning becomes more visual and needs less clinical data, resembling that of the expert clinician.Keywords: clinical deduction, diagnostic reasoning, education, teaching methods

  8. Simulation based planning of surgical interventions in pediatric cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Alison L.

    2013-10-01

    Hemodynamics plays an essential role in the progression and treatment of cardiovascular disease. However, while medical imaging provides increasingly detailed anatomical information, clinicians often have limited access to hemodynamic data that may be crucial to patient risk assessment and treatment planning. Computational simulations can now provide detailed hemodynamic data to augment clinical knowledge in both adult and pediatric applications. There is a particular need for simulation tools in pediatric cardiology, due to the wide variation in anatomy and physiology in congenital heart disease patients, necessitating individualized treatment plans. Despite great strides in medical imaging, enabling extraction of flow information from magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging, simulations offer predictive capabilities that imaging alone cannot provide. Patient specific simulations can be used for in silico testing of new surgical designs, treatment planning, device testing, and patient risk stratification. Furthermore, simulations can be performed at no direct risk to the patient. In this paper, we outline the current state of the art in methods for cardiovascular blood flow simulation and virtual surgery. We then step through pressing challenges in the field, including multiscale modeling, boundary condition selection, optimization, and uncertainty quantification. Finally, we summarize simulation results of two representative examples from pediatric cardiology: single ventricle physiology, and coronary aneurysms caused by Kawasaki disease. These examples illustrate the potential impact of computational modeling tools in the clinical setting.

  9. Simulation-based planning of surgical interventions in pediatric cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Alison

    2012-11-01

    Hemodynamics plays an essential role in the progression and treatment of cardiovascular disease. This is particularly true in pediatric cardiology, due to the wide variation in anatomy observed in congenital heart disease patients. While medical imaging provides increasingly detailed anatomical information, clinicians currently have limited knowledge of important fluid mechanical parameters. Treatment decisions are therefore often made using anatomical information alone, despite the known links between fluid mechanics and disease progression. Patient-specific simulations now offer the means to provide this missing information, and, more importantly, to perform in-silico testing of new surgical designs at no risk to the patient. In this talk, we will outline the current state of the art in methods for cardiovascular blood flow simulation and virtual surgery. We will then present new methodology for coupling optimization with simulation and uncertainty quantification to customize treatments for individual patients. Finally, we will present examples in pediatric cardiology that illustrate the potential impact of these tools in the clinical setting.

  10. Bionic autonomic neuromodulation revolutionizes cardiology in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    In this invited session, we would like to address the impact of bionic neuromodulation on cardiovascular diseases. It has been well established that cardiovascular dysregulation plays major roles in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. This is the reason why most drugs currently used in cardiology have significant pharmacological effects on the cardiovascular regulatory system. Since the ultimate center for cardiovascular regulation is the brainstem, it is conceivable that autonomic neuromodulation would have significant impacts on cardiovascular diseases. On the basis of this framework, we first developed a bionic, neurally regulated artificial pacemaker. We then substituted the brainstem by CPU and developed a bionic artificial baroreflex system. We further developed a bionic brain that achieved better regulatory conditions than the native brainstem in order to improve survival in animal model with heart failure. We recently developed a bionic neuromodulation system to reduce infarction size following acute myocardial infarction. We believe that the bionic neuromodulation will inspire even more intricate applications in cardiology in the 21(st) century.

  11. [Management control of cardiology: the experience of a departmental unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccanelli, A; Spandonaro, F

    2000-01-01

    In most Italian hospitals, sanitary reform is being applied, while at the same time a new organization of the National Health System is being planned. The director of the medical hospital (head doctor) is becoming more and more involved in management and this aspect has modified his professional attributes. Cardiology is a branch of medicine that, through its scientific preparatory work consisting in debates, management courses, ethics, and production of managerial software, is closer to applying the reform without risking improper administrative aspects. This, obviously, comes about after thoroughly reviewing past work methods and the need to have an administrative organization, which allocates efficient use of manpower and materials, helping to eliminate any sources of inefficiency. The logical procedure foresees an actual analysis in terms of sanitary needs and availability of resources, and so attempting to better balance and harmonize both aspects of the problem. Certainly, the acquisition of theoretical norms and practices, which today are present because of the upsurge in training courses for doctors, is not enough to guarantee the achievement of optimal results. Furthermore, we find that theoretical models need to be validated and adapted to real work situations in the public hospital sector. This paper proposes, therefore, to explain the managerial experiences achieved in actual work situations at the Cardiology Department Unit of the San Giovanni Addolorata Hospital in Rome. In particular, it shows that in order to reach its clinical and economical objectives, it is essential to make available correct informative support for strategic and operational decisions. We can observe that there is a continuing lack of computer support systems being integrated into the present organization of most cardiology units. The use of software distributed to cardiology units from the Associazione Nazionale Medici Cardiologi Ospedalieri (ANMCO) has enabled us to partially

  12. Carbon dioxide and water budget of grazed grassland in Grünschwaige (Munich, Bavaria) measured by EC-method with an open path gas analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, S.; Bernhofer, Ch.; Auerswald, K.

    2009-04-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems like grasslands can act as a sink or source for greenhouse gases (GHG) like carbon dioxide. This is important for scientific and political stakeholders as GHG cause the climate change. The eddy covariance method has become a major tool for quantifying such fluxes. It depends, however, on a number of corrections applied to the measured data. The influence of air density is often considered following the WPL-correction (Webb-Pearman-Leuning), which does not take the heating of the instrument surface into account in contrast to the recently published method by Burba et al. (2008). The aim of the study is the comparison of the influence of the two density correction on the CO2 fluxes. The fluxes of water and carbon dioxide were measured with the eddy covariance method from 2002 to 2008 on a grazed grassland site located in Grünschwaige close to Munich (Bavaria) in the South of Germany. The climate in this area is temperate with an annual precipitation of 800 mm and an annual mean temperature of 9 °C. For eddy covariance measurements an open path CO2/H2O analyzer was used. Wind speed (3D) and temperature were measured by a sonic anemometer. The sensible/latent heat flux and the carbon dioxide flux were calculated and corrected using EdiRe. The application of the two density correction methods resulted in important differences of the carbon dioxide flux. The fluxes corrected according to Burba et al. (2008) indicated small CO2 sinks (= negative net carbon exchange) or even sources while the WPL-correction showed (larger) CO2 sinks. Additionally, with both correction methods the results showed a high sensitivity to weather conditions but the effects were stronger using the correction following Burba et al. (2008). The most important drivers of flux variability were precipitation and temperature. The seasonal pattern of precipitation was important especially during the vegetation period. Drought and heat periods, which lasted at last one month like

  13. 巧筑园林播芬芳--记1983年慕尼黑国际园艺展中国园“芳华园”%Fanghua Garden:China Garden in Munich International Horticultural Exhibition1983

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王缺

    2015-01-01

    In 1983, the Guangzhou Municipal Bureau of Parks represented our country in the international horticultural exhibition in Munich ,Germany. Works of Fanghua Garden design inherite the traditional Lingnan Garden style, dismantle some of the limitations and according to local conditions, rockery and water, use plants and stone, frame garden appropriately with the poetic. It is designed and built in a foreign country as the first open-air gardens.It is the first step towards modern Chinese landscape architecture into the world which has enthusiastic response internationally.%1983年,广州市园林局代表国家参加德国慕尼黑的国际园艺展。作品“芳华园”的设计手法既传承了岭南园林传统风格,也打破了某些局限,因地制宜,叠山理水,巧用植物和石景,构园得体,融入诗情画意。它是我国在国外自行设计建造的第一座露天园林,是近现代中国园林走向世界的第一步,国际上反响热烈。

  14. [Tularemia in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmann, R; Geis, G; Gatermann, S G

    2014-07-01

    The bacterium Francisella tularensis is known for more than 100 years by now as the etiological agent of the disease tularemia, a zoonotic infection with a worldwide distribution in the Northern Hemisphere. The prevalence of tularemia shows a wide geographic variation, being comparably infrequent in Germany. Tularemia can present itself with multiple clinical manifestations including ulceroglandular, glandular, oropharyngeal, oculoglandular, respiratory and typhoidal forms. Due to the low prevalence and the unspecific symptomatology, a rapid diagnosis and early start of an effective therapy are rarely obtained. Thus, in this article we summarize important aspects concerning etiology, ecology and routes of transmission, recent epidemiologic situation, clinical picture, diagnostics and treatment of tularemia, focusing on the situation in Germany.

  15. Germany at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    From left to right: Maximilian Metzger, CERN's Secretary-General, Hermann Schunck, Director at the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, and Robert Aymar, CERN's Director-General, talking to Wolfgang Holler from Butting, one of the companies at the "Germany at CERN" exhibition. Far right : Susanne-Corinna Langer-Greipl from BMBF, delegate to the CERN Finance Committee. For three days, CERN's Main Building was transformed into a showcase for German industry. Twenty-nine companies from sectors related to particle physics (electrical engineering, vacuum and low temperature technology, radiation protection, etc.) were here for the ninth "Germany at CERN" exhibition, organised by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), which gave them the opportunity to meet scientists and administrators from the Laboratory. On 1 March the exhibition was visited by a German delegation headed by Dr Hermann Schunck, Director at BMBF.

  16. Unemployment Accounts for Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Boss, Alfred; Alessio J. G. Brown; Snower, Dennis J.

    2007-01-01

    We present a proposal for reforming unemployment assistance in Germany through the introduction of unemployment accounts (UAs). Instead of paying taxes that finance the unemployment assistance, employed people make ongoing contributions to their UAs and can make withdrawals from these accounts during periods of unemployment. The aim of this policy proposal is to improve employment incentives without significant changes in the current redistribution scheme. We provide a detailed account of how...

  17. Arthroplasty register for Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Hagen, Anja; Gorenoi, Vitali; Schönermark, Matthias P.

    2009-01-01

    Scientific background The annual number of joint replacement operations in Germany is high. The introduction of an arthroplasty register promises an important contribution to the improvement of the quality of patient's care. Research questions The presented report addresses the questions on organization and functioning, benefits and cost-benefits as well as on legal, ethical and social aspects of the arthroplasty registers. Methods A systematic literature search ...

  18. Restructuring in SMEs: Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Mandl, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Based on information derived from 85 case studies across all EU Member States and other sources, the project outlines the features peculiar to SMEs in their anticipation and management of restructuring, explores the main drivers of change and analyses the factors influencing successful restructuring. It offers some insight into how restructuring impacts on workers and the company itself and sets out several policy pointers for future action. This is the country report for Germany.

  19. Cultural Integration in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Constant, Amelie F.; Nottmeyer, Olga; Zimmermann, Klaus F.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter investigates the integration processes of immigrants in Germany by comparing certain immigrant groups to natives differentiating by gender and immigrant generation. Indicators which are supposed to capture cultural integration of immigrants are differences in marital behavior as well as language abilities, ethnic identification and religious distribution. A special feature of the available data is information about overall life satisfaction, risk aversion and political interest. ...

  20. Open source cardiology electronic health record development for DIGICARDIAC implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugarte, Nelson; Medina, Rubén.; Huiracocha, Lourdes; Rojas, Rubén.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the development of a Cardiology Electronic Health Record (CEHR) system. Software consists of a structured algorithm designed under Health Level-7 (HL7) international standards. Novelty of the system is the integration of high resolution ECG (HRECG) signal acquisition and processing tools, patient information management tools and telecardiology tools. Acquisition tools are for management and control of the DIGICARDIAC electrocardiograph functions. Processing tools allow management of HRECG signal analysis searching for indicative patterns of cardiovascular pathologies. Telecardiology tools incorporation allows system communication with other health care centers decreasing access time to the patient information. CEHR system was completely developed using open source software. Preliminary results of process validation showed the system efficiency.

  1. Exploiting expert systems in cardiology: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, George-Peter K; Sourla, Efrosini; Stamatopoulou, Konstantina-Maria; Syrimpeis, Vasileios; Sioutas, Spyros; Tsakalidis, Athanasios; Tzimas, Giannis

    2015-01-01

    An improved Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) in the field of critical cardiovascular diseases is presented. The system stems from an earlier application based only on a Sugeno-type Fuzzy Expert System (FES) with the addition of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) computational structure. Thus, inherent characteristics of ANNs, along with the human-like knowledge representation of fuzzy systems are integrated. The ANFIS has been utilized into building five different sub-systems, distinctly covering Coronary Disease, Hypertension, Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Failure, and Diabetes, hence aiding doctors of medicine (MDs), guide trainees, and encourage medical experts in their diagnoses centering a wide range of Cardiology. The Fuzzy Rules have been trimmed down and the ANNs have been optimized in order to focus into each particular disease and produce results ready-to-be applied to real-world patients.

  2. Optimisation of patient and staff exposure in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Council Directive of the European Community 97/43/Euratom (MED) deals with the health protection of individuals against dangers of ionising radiation in relation to medical exposure, and also focuses attention on some special practices (Art. 9), including interventional radiology, a technique involving high doses to the patient. The paper presents the European approach to optimisation of exposure in interventional cardiology. The DIMOND research consortium (DIMOND: Digital Imaging: Measures for Optimising Radiological Information Content and Dose) is working to develop quality criteria for cineangiographic images, to develop procedures for the classification of complexity of therapeutic and diagnostic procedures and to derive reference levels, related also to procedure complexity. DIMOND project also includes aspects of equipment characteristics and performance and content of training in radiation protection of personnel working in interventional radiology field. (author)

  3. Exploiting expert systems in cardiology: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, George-Peter K; Sourla, Efrosini; Stamatopoulou, Konstantina-Maria; Syrimpeis, Vasileios; Sioutas, Spyros; Tsakalidis, Athanasios; Tzimas, Giannis

    2015-01-01

    An improved Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) in the field of critical cardiovascular diseases is presented. The system stems from an earlier application based only on a Sugeno-type Fuzzy Expert System (FES) with the addition of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) computational structure. Thus, inherent characteristics of ANNs, along with the human-like knowledge representation of fuzzy systems are integrated. The ANFIS has been utilized into building five different sub-systems, distinctly covering Coronary Disease, Hypertension, Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Failure, and Diabetes, hence aiding doctors of medicine (MDs), guide trainees, and encourage medical experts in their diagnoses centering a wide range of Cardiology. The Fuzzy Rules have been trimmed down and the ANNs have been optimized in order to focus into each particular disease and produce results ready-to-be applied to real-world patients. PMID:25417018

  4. The EDP data base as a marketing instrument in the supply industry. Methods and experiences in natural gas customer acquisition of the Munich municipal utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural gas marketing concept of the Munich municipal utilities describes the aims and objectives for the acquisition of new customers beyond the year 2000. One target is to extend the grids into new areas but also activate natural gas clients in densely populated areas. The marketing strategies concentrate on extensive advice and consulting co-ordinated by the customer service representatives with the support of electronic data processing. The following report shows how modern database systems were integrated into marketing activities by the Munich municipal utility company and describes the strategies selected in new areas and areas with a high customer population. (orig.)

  5. Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology Specialist Heart Failure Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDonagh, Theresa A; Gardner, Roy S; Lainscak, Mitja;

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that organized care of heart failure patients, including specialist management by cardiologists, improves patient outcomes. In response to this, other national training bodies (the UK and the USA) have developed heart failure subspecialty curricula within their Cardiology...... Training Curricula. In addition, European Society of Cardiology (ESC) subspecialty curricula exist for Interventional Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Management. The purpose of this heart failure curriculum is to provide a framework which can be used as a blueprint for training across Europe. This blueprint...

  6. Report of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Sessions 2016, Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-25

    The 65(th)Annual Scientific Sessions of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) were held at McCormick Place, Chicago, from April 2-4, 2016. The ACC Scientific Sessions are one of the 2 major scientific cardiology meetings in the USA and one of the major scientific meetings of cardiology in the world. It had an attendance of 18,769 and over 2,000 oral and poster abstracts, including 8 late-breaking clinical trials. This report presents the key presentations and the highlights from the ACC Scientific Sessions 2016 in Chicago. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1308-1313).

  7. Examples of successful architectural integration of PV: Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Germany building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) are developing rapidly, and much progress has been achieved in the past five years. BIPV can be used today in different ways on both existing and new buildings. Architects and designers are discovering BIPV. With the help of custom-made products available on the German market they are beginning to explore the technical limits of an aesthetic and structural integration of PV in buildings. As a result some exciting high-profile building projects with PV have been built, for example, the small service pavilion Meereslauschen in Steinhude or the new headquarters building of the Wood Trade Association in Munich. These projects show that the use of PV is very varied and offers opportunities for creative architects. However non-technical problems still need to be solved to allow a meaningful and widespread application of PV in the built environment. To decrease costs it is essential to develop further standard BIPV components. The aim of such developments should be to replace standard PV modules by products in which PV and structural building elements are melded into one design and structural unit. (author)

  8. Particulate matter in the indoor air of classrooms—exploratory results from Munich and surrounding area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, H.; Twardella, D.; Dietrich, S.; Heitmann, D.; Schierl, R.; Liebl, B.; Rüden, H.

    Numerous epidemiological studies have demonstrated the association between particle mass (PM) concentration in outside air and the occurrence of health related problems and/or diseases. However, much less is known about indoor PM concentrations and associated health risks. In particular, data are needed on air quality in schools, since children are assumed to be more vulnerable to health hazards and spend a large part of their time in classrooms. On this background, we evaluated indoor air quality in 64 schools in the city of Munich and a neighbouring district outside the city boundary. In winter 2004-2005 in 92 classrooms, and in summer 2005 in 75 classrooms, data on indoor air climate parameters (temperature, relative humidity), carbon dioxide (CO 2) and various dust particle fractions (PM 10, PM 2.5) were collected; for the latter both gravimetrical and continuous measurements by laser aerosol spectrometer (LAS) were implemented. In the summer period, the particle number concentration (PNC), was determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). Additionally, data on room and building characteristics were collected by use of a standardized form. Only data collected during teaching hours were considered in analysis. For continuously measured parameters the daily median was used to describe the exposure level in a classroom. The median indoor CO 2 concentration in a classroom was 1603 ppm in winter and 405 ppm in summer. With LAS in winter, median PM concentrations of 19.8 μg m -3 (PM 2.5) and 91.5 μg m -3 (PM 10) were observed, in summer PM concentrations were significantly reduced (median PM 2.5=12.7 μg m -3, median PM 10=64.9 μg m -3). PM 2.5 concentrations determined by the gravimetric method were in general higher (median in winter: 36.7 μg m -3, median in summer: 20.2 μg m -3) but correlated strongly with the LAS-measured results. In explorative analysis, we identified a significant increase of LAS-measured PM 2.5 by 1.7 μg m -3 per increase

  9. On New Spain and Mexican medicinal botany in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli-Serra, Alfredo Alessandro; Izaguirre-Ávila, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    Towards the middle of the XVI century, the empirical physician Martín de la Cruz, in New Spain, compiled a catalogue of the local medicinal herbs and plants, which was translated into Latin by Juan Badiano, professor at the Franciscan college of Tlatelolco. On his side, Dr. Francisco Hernández, the royal physician (protomédico) from 1571 until 1577, performed a systematic study of the flora and fauna in this period. His notes and designs were not published at that time, but two epitomes of Hernández' works appeared, respectively, in 1615 in Mexico and in 1651 in Rome. During the XVIII century, two Spanish scientific expeditions arrived to these lands. They were led, respectively, by the Spanish naturalist Martín Sessé and the Italian seaman, Alessandro Malaspina di Mulazzo, dependent from the Spanish Government. These expeditions collected and carried rich scientific material to Spain. At the end of that century, the Franciscan friar Juan Navarro depicted and described several Mexican medicinal plants in the fifth volume of his botanic work. In the last years of the colonial period, the fundamental works of Humboldt and Bonpland on the geographic distribution of the American plants were published. In the modern age, the first research about the Mexican medicinal botany was performed in the laboratory of the Instituto Médico Nacional [National Medical Institute] under the leadership of Dr. Fernando Altamirano, who started pharmacological studies in this country. Later, trials of cardiovascular pharmacology were performed in the small laboratories of the cardiological unit at the General Hospital of Mexico City, on Dr. Ignacio Chávez' initiative. The Mexican botanical-pharmacological tradition persists alive and vigorous at the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología and other scientific institutions of the country.

  10. On New Spain and Mexican medicinal botany in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli-Serra, Alfredo Alessandro; Izaguirre-Ávila, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    Towards the middle of the XVI century, the empirical physician Martín de la Cruz, in New Spain, compiled a catalogue of the local medicinal herbs and plants, which was translated into Latin by Juan Badiano, professor at the Franciscan college of Tlatelolco. On his side, Dr. Francisco Hernández, the royal physician (protomédico) from 1571 until 1577, performed a systematic study of the flora and fauna in this period. His notes and designs were not published at that time, but two epitomes of Hernández' works appeared, respectively, in 1615 in Mexico and in 1651 in Rome. During the XVIII century, two Spanish scientific expeditions arrived to these lands. They were led, respectively, by the Spanish naturalist Martín Sessé and the Italian seaman, Alessandro Malaspina di Mulazzo, dependent from the Spanish Government. These expeditions collected and carried rich scientific material to Spain. At the end of that century, the Franciscan friar Juan Navarro depicted and described several Mexican medicinal plants in the fifth volume of his botanic work. In the last years of the colonial period, the fundamental works of Humboldt and Bonpland on the geographic distribution of the American plants were published. In the modern age, the first research about the Mexican medicinal botany was performed in the laboratory of the Instituto Médico Nacional [National Medical Institute] under the leadership of Dr. Fernando Altamirano, who started pharmacological studies in this country. Later, trials of cardiovascular pharmacology were performed in the small laboratories of the cardiological unit at the General Hospital of Mexico City, on Dr. Ignacio Chávez' initiative. The Mexican botanical-pharmacological tradition persists alive and vigorous at the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología and other scientific institutions of the country. PMID:24960330

  11. Letter to the Editor in response to "publication performance of women compared to men in German cardiology" by Boehm et al. (2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weismann, Constance G; Colson, Eve R; Shapiro, Eugene D

    2015-03-01

    Based on their review of abstracts submitted to the German Cardiac Society, Boehm et al. (2014) report better success of female vs male cardiologists publishing in journals with an impact factor ≥5. However, only 25% of conference abstracts were submitted by women, perhaps suggesting a paucity of women in academic cardiology. In this 'letter to the editor' we review gender statistics in the medical field using Germany and the US as examples. While women are well represented in early career stages, only fewfull professors are women. This reflects a wasted opportunity to benefit from the best of both genders. Recent gender research has shown that subtle gender bias may play a role. To change the gender statistics in academic medicine a multifaceted approach is necessary. This will ultimately lead to a more equal representation of women in senior roles, and bring science, medical care, and leadership to a new level.

  12. Nuclear power in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I want to give some ideas on the situation of public and utility acceptance of nuclear power in the Federal Republic of Germany and perhaps a little bit on Europe. Let me start with public perception. I think in Germany we have a general trend in the public perception of technology during the last decade that has been investigated in a systematic manner in a recent study. It is clear that the general acceptance of technology decreased substantially during the last twenty years. We can also observe during this time that aspects of the benefits of technology are much less reported in the media, that most reporting by the media now is related to the consequences of technologies, such as negative environmental consequences. hat development has led to a general opposition against new technological projects, in particular unusual and large. That trend is related not only to nuclear power, we see it also for new airports, trains, coal-fired plants. here is almost no new technological project in Germany where there is not very strong opposition against it, at least locally. What is the current public opinion concerning nuclear power? Nuclear power certainly received a big shock after Chernobyl, but actually, about two thirds of the German population wants to keep the operating plants running. Some people want to phase the plants out as they reach the end-of-life, some want to substitute newer nuclear technology, and a smaller part want to increase the use of nuclear power. But only a minority of the German public would really like to abandon nuclear energy

  13. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, Marthin; Held, Klaus; Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the rehabilitation measures provided for cardiac patients in Germany and to outline its legal basis and outcomes. In Germany the cardiac rehabilitation system is different from rehabilitation measures in other European countries. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany since 1885 is based on specific laws and the regulations of insurance providers. Cardiac rehabilitation has predominantly been offered as an inpatient service, but has recently been complemented by outpatient services. A general agreement on the different indications for offering these two services has yet to be reached. Cardiac rehabilitation is mainly offered after an acute cardiac event and bypass surgery. It is also indicated in severe heart failure and special cases of percutaneous coronary intervention. Most patients are men (>65%) and the age at which events occur is increasing. The benefits obtained during the 3-4 weeks after an acute event, and confirmed in numerous studies, are often later lost under 'usual care' conditions. Many attempts have been made by rehabilitation institutions to improve this deficit by providing intensive aftercare. One instrument set up to achieve this is the nationwide institution currently comprising more than 6000 heart groups with approximately 120000 outpatients. After coronary artery bypass grafting or acute coronary syndrome cardiac rehabilitation can usually be started within 10 days. The multidisciplinary rehabilitation team consists of cardiologists, psychologists, exercise therapists, social workers, nutritionists and nurses. The positive effects of cardiac rehabilitation are also important economically, for example, for the improvement of secondary prevention and vocational integration. PMID:17301623

  14. Liver transplantation in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacke, Frank; Kroy, Daniela C; Barreiros, Ana Paula; Neumann, Ulf P

    2016-08-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a well-accepted procedure for end-stage liver disease in Germany. In 2015, 1489 patients were admitted to the waiting list (including 1308 new admissions), with the leading etiologies being fibrosis and cirrhosis (n = 349), alcoholic liver disease (n = 302), and hepatobiliary malignancies (n = 220). Organ allocation in Germany is regulated within the Eurotransplant system based on urgency as expressed by the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. In 2015, only 894 LTs (n = 48 from living donors) were performed at 23 German transplant centers, reflecting a shortage of organs. Several factors may contribute to the low number of organ donations. The German transplant legislation only accepts donation after brain death (not cardiac death), whereas advances in neurosurgery and a more frequently requested "palliative care" approach render fewer patients suitable as potential donors. The legislation further requires the active consent of the donor or first-degree relatives before donation. Ongoing debates within the German transplant field address the optimal management of patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and cholangiocarcinoma and measures to increase living donor transplantations. As a result of irregularities at mainly 4 German transplant centers that were exposed in 2012, guiding principles updated by the German authorities have since implemented strict rules (including internal and external auditing, the 8-eyes principle, mandatory repeated testing for alcohol consumption) to prohibit any manipulations in organ allocation. In conclusion, we will summarize important aspects on the management of LT in Germany, discuss legal and organizational aspects, and highlight challenges mainly related to the relative lack of organ donations, increasing numbers of extended criteria donors, and the peculiarities of the recipient patients. Liver Transplantation 22 1136-1142 2016 AASLD.

  15. Liver transplantation in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacke, Frank; Kroy, Daniela C; Barreiros, Ana Paula; Neumann, Ulf P

    2016-08-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a well-accepted procedure for end-stage liver disease in Germany. In 2015, 1489 patients were admitted to the waiting list (including 1308 new admissions), with the leading etiologies being fibrosis and cirrhosis (n = 349), alcoholic liver disease (n = 302), and hepatobiliary malignancies (n = 220). Organ allocation in Germany is regulated within the Eurotransplant system based on urgency as expressed by the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. In 2015, only 894 LTs (n = 48 from living donors) were performed at 23 German transplant centers, reflecting a shortage of organs. Several factors may contribute to the low number of organ donations. The German transplant legislation only accepts donation after brain death (not cardiac death), whereas advances in neurosurgery and a more frequently requested "palliative care" approach render fewer patients suitable as potential donors. The legislation further requires the active consent of the donor or first-degree relatives before donation. Ongoing debates within the German transplant field address the optimal management of patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and cholangiocarcinoma and measures to increase living donor transplantations. As a result of irregularities at mainly 4 German transplant centers that were exposed in 2012, guiding principles updated by the German authorities have since implemented strict rules (including internal and external auditing, the 8-eyes principle, mandatory repeated testing for alcohol consumption) to prohibit any manipulations in organ allocation. In conclusion, we will summarize important aspects on the management of LT in Germany, discuss legal and organizational aspects, and highlight challenges mainly related to the relative lack of organ donations, increasing numbers of extended criteria donors, and the peculiarities of the recipient patients. Liver Transplantation 22 1136-1142 2016 AASLD. PMID:27082951

  16. Country report: Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic principles for waste management in Germany are established in the Atomic Energy Act and in the waste management concept of the German Government which gives greater substance to the statutory requirements and the principles of the waste management provisions for nuclear power plants. The resolution passed on 28 September 1979 by the heads of the State and Federal Governments confirms the integral waste management concept; it is based in general on onsite and offsite interim storage followed by reprocessing of spent fuel, recovery of radioactive materials, and conditioning for the final disposal of radioactive waste

  17. Seismicity in Northern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Monika; Gestermann, Nicolai; Plenefisch, Thomas; Bönnemann, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Northern Germany is a region of low tectonic activity, where only few and low-magnitude earthquakes occur. The driving tectonic processes are not well-understood up to now. In addition, seismic events during the last decade concentrated at the borders of the natural gas fields. The source depths of these events are shallow and in the depth range of the gas reservoirs. Based on these observations a causal relationship between seismicity near gas fields and the gas production is likely. The strongest of these earthquake had a magnitude of 4.5 and occurred near Rotenburg in 2004. Also smaller seismic events were considerably felt by the public and stimulated the discussion on the underlying processes. The latest seismic event occurred near Langwedel on 22nd November 2012 and had a magnitude of 2.8. Understanding the causes of the seismicity in Northern Germany is crucial for a thorough evaluation. Therefore the Seismological Service of Lower Saxony (NED) was established at the State Office for Mining, Energy and Geology (LBEG) of Lower Saxony in January 2013. Its main task is the monitoring and evaluation of the seismicity in Lower Saxony and adjacent areas. Scientific and technical questions are addressed in close cooperation with the Seismological Central Observatory (SZO) at the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR). The seismological situation of Northern Germany will be presented. Possible causes of seismicity are introduced. Rare seismic events at greater depths are distributed over the whole region and probably are purely tectonic whereas events in the vicinity of natural gas fields are probably related to gas production. Improving the detection threshold of seismic events in Northern Germany is necessary for providing a better statistical basis for further analyses answering these questions. As a first step the existing seismic network will be densified over the next few years. The first borehole station was installed near Rethem by BGR

  18. Medical education in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikendei, Christoph; Weyrich, Peter; Jünger, Jana; Schrauth, Markus

    2009-07-01

    Following the changes made to the medical licensing regulations of 2002, medical education in Germany has been subject to radical modification, especially at undergraduate level. The implementation of the Bologna Process is still a matter of intense political debate, whilst positive movement has occurred in developing the professionalisation of teaching staff through a Masters Degree in Medical Education. In the area of postgraduate medical education, major restructuring of programmes is occurring, whilst the debate in continuing medical education is related to the amount of practical clinical education that is required.

  19. Modelling Turkish Migration to Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Akkoyunlu, Sule; Siliverstovs, Boriss

    2006-01-01

    This study develops a time series model of Turkish migration to Germany for the period 1963-2004 using the cointegration technique. A single cointegrating relation between the migration flow variable and the relative income ratio between Germany and Turkey, the unemployment rates in Germany and Turkey, and the trade variable, that captures intensity of bilateral economic cooperation, is found. By including the trade variable in the empirical migration function we investigate whether trade and...

  20. Highlights of the 12th International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsiou, Anastasia; Dorbala, Sharmila; Scholte, Arthur J H A

    2015-09-01

    The 12th International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT was held from 3 to 5 May 2015 in Madrid, Spain. In this article, the three Congress Program Committee Chairs summarize selected highlights of the presented abstracts.

  1. [The GIPSY-RECPAM model: a versatile approach for integrated evaluation in cardiologic care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinci, F

    2009-01-01

    Tree-structured methodology applied for the GISSI-PSICOLOGIA project, although performed in the framework of earliest GISSI studies, represents a powerful tool to analyze different aspects of cardiologic care. The GISSI-PSICOLOGIA project has delivered a novel methodology based on the joint application of psychometric tools and sophisticated statistical techniques. Its prospective use could allow building effective epidemiological models relevant to the prognosis of the cardiologic patient. The various features of the RECPAM method allow a versatile use in the framework of modern e-health projects. The study used the Cognitive Behavioral Assessment H Form (CBA-H) psychometrics scales. The potential for its future application in the framework of Italian cardiology is relevant and particularly indicated to assist planning of systems for integrated care and routine evaluation of the cardiologic patient.

  2. SFC/SFBMN guidelines update for nuclear cardiology procedures: stress testing in adults and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The guidelines update for nuclear cardiology procedures are studied in this article. We find the minimum technique conditions for the stress testing practice, the recommendations for the different ischemia activation tests, the choice of the stress test. (N.C.)

  3. Forensic entomology in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendt, J; Krettek, R; Niess, C; Zehner, R; Bratzke, H

    2000-09-11

    Forensic entomology (FE) is increasingly gaining international recognition. In Germany, however, the development of FE has been stagnating, mainly because of the lack of cooperation between police, forensic medicine and entomology. In 1997 a co-operative research project 'Forensic Entomology' was started in Frankfurt/Main at the Center of Legal Medicine and the Research Institute Senckenberg. The aim of this project is to establish FE in Germany as a firmly integrated component of the securing of evidence from human cadavers in cases of suspected homicide. For this purpose we developed a forensic insect collecting kit, and policemen are educated for greater acceptance and better application of FE. The scientific programme focuses on the investigation of the insect succession on cadavers in urban and rural habitats. This also includes new indicator groups (e.g. parasitic wasps) for a more precise calculation of the late post mortem interval. Recently a DNA-based reliable and fast identification method especially for the immature stages of necrophagous insects became part of the project. Preliminary results are reported and two case studies presented.

  4. Clinical - cardiologic data of 170 dogs - general aspects of diagnosis and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents an actual continuous cardiologic follow up study on 170 unselected dogs. Each proband underwent a complete cardiologic examination (history, auscultation, ECG, radiologic examination, in some cases also echocardiography). Data were grouped by age, sex, breed, congenital and acquired cardiac diseases, and by therapy. 81 (47.65 percent) of the 170 dogs were suffering from an acquired, 25 (14.70 percent) from a congenital cardiac disease. 64 dogs (37.65 percent) showedno clinical signs of heart disease

  5. A telemedicine network for remote paediatric cardiology services in north-east Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Problem Providing health care for children with congenital heart diseases remains a major challenge in low- and middle-income countries. Approach In October 2011, the Government of Paraíba, Brazil, established a paediatric cardiology network in partnership with the nongovernmental organization Círculo do Coração. A cardiology team supervised all network activities, using the Internet to keep in contact with remote health facilities. The network developed protocols for screening heart...

  6. Munich Re konsultant Gerhard Berz : katastroofid on meie ärile kasulikud / Gerhard Berz ; interv. Ulrich Schnabel, tõlk. Erik Aru

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Berz, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    Intervjuu meteoroloogiga, kes on kolm aastakümmet arvutanud edasikindlustusfirma Munich Re heaks loodusõnnetuste riske ja viibinud ligi viiekümnes katastroofipiirkonnas. Vaatamata sellele, et 2004. aasta oli kõige kulukamate looduskatastroofide aasta, saavutas firma läbi aegade parimad majandustulemused. Lisa: Meeletu kahju

  7. Progress report of the Munich central railway station - airport high-speed maglev line project; Projektstand der Magnetschnellbahn Muenchen Hauptbahnhof - Flughafen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keil, J. [DB Magnetbahn GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The dates for discussing the project of a maglev railway connection from the Munich central railway station to the airport are drawing near. The plans generated so far are proof of the fact that the project is easy on man and environment. (orig.)

  8. [The practical clinical guidelines of the Sociedad Española de Cardiología on interventional cardiology: coronary angioplasty and other technics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplugas, E; Alfonso, F; Alonso, J J; Asín, E; Elizaga, J; Iñiguez, A; Revuelta, J M

    2000-02-01

    Interventional cardiology has had an extraordinary expansion in last years. This clinical guideline is a review of the scientific evidence of the techniques in relation to clinical and anatomic findings. The review includes: 1. Coronary arteriography. 2. Coronary balloon angioplasty. 3. Coronary stents. 4. Other techniques: directional atherectomy, rotational atherectomy, transluminal extraction atherectomy, cutting balloon, laser angioplasty and transmyocardial laser and endovascular radiotherapy. 5. Platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors. 6. New diagnostic techniques: intravascular ultrasound, coronary angioscopy, Doppler and pressure wire. For the recommendations we have used the classification system: class I, IIa, IIb, III like in the guidelines of the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association.

  9. Report on the ESO/MPA/MPE/Excellence Cluster/LMU and TUM Munich Joint Conference ''Discs in Galaxies''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, R.

    2016-09-01

    The annual Munich Joint Astronomy Conference brought together observers and theorists studying the full range of cosmic environments and epochs where discs play a role in shaping the structural assembly history of galaxies. Considerable progress is being made in interpreting the past history of the Milky Way and Andromeda through massive stellar imaging and spectroscopic campaigns. This is being augmented with interferometric studies of gaseous discs in nearby galaxies with exquisite angular resolution. Integral field spectrographs are providing resolved data for star-forming and quiescent galaxies to redshifts of three. This explosion of new data is being interpreted with high resolution numerical simulations in order to understand the physical processes which govern the stability, formation and disruption of early discs, and how star formation is regulated in the context of various feedback processes. Selected highlights of the progress reported at the conference are presented.

  10. Transepithelial water and urea permeabilities of isolated perfused Munich-Wistar rat inner medullary thin limbs of Henle's loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawata, C Michele; Evans, Kristen K; Dantzler, William H; Pannabecker, Thomas L

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the role that water and urea fluxes play in the urine concentrating mechanism, we determined transepithelial osmotic water permeability (Pf) and urea permeability (Purea) in isolated perfused Munich-Wistar rat long-loop descending thin limbs (DTLs) and ascending thin limbs (ATLs). Thin limbs were isolated either from 0.5 to 2.5 mm below the outer medulla (upper inner medulla) or from the terminal 2.5 mm of the inner medulla. Segment types were characterized on the basis of structural features and gene expression levels of the water channel aquaporin 1, which was high in the upper DTL (DTLupper), absent in the lower DTL (DTLlower), and absent in ATLs, and the Cl-(1) channel ClCK1, which was absent in DTLs and high in ATLs. DTLupper Pf was high (3,204.5 ± 450.3 μm/s), whereas DTLlower showed very little or no osmotic Pf (207.8 ± 241.3 μm/s). Munich-Wistar rat ATLs have previously been shown to exhibit no Pf. DTLupper Purea was 40.0 ± 7.3 × 10(-5) cm/s and much higher in DTLlower (203.8 ± 30.3 × 10(-5) cm/s), upper ATL (203.8 ± 35.7 × 10(-5) cm/s), and lower ATL (265.1 ± 49.8 × 10(-5) cm/s). Phloretin (0.25 mM) did not reduce DTLupper Purea, suggesting that Purea is not due to urea transporter UT-A2, which is expressed in short-loop DTLs and short portions of some inner medullary DTLs close to the outer medulla. In summary, Purea is similar in all segments having no osmotic Pf but is significantly lower in DTLupper, a segment having high osmotic Pf. These data are inconsistent with the passive mechanism as originally proposed.

  11. Nuclear cardiology: Its role in cost effective care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    would not otherwise have been achieved if the early disease remained undetected. This publication presents a comprehensive overview of CVDs as a public health problem in developing countries, the relative role of nuclear cardiology methods within a scenario of unprecedented technology advances, and the evidence behind appropriateness recommendations. The potential expanding role of non-invasive functional imaging through the transition from diagnosis of obstructive CAD to defining the global burden of CVDs is also discussed, as well as the need for thorough training, education, and quality in nuclear cardiology practice. This report will be of interest for all medical practitioners involved in the management of CAD, including internists, cardiologists, and nuclear medicine physicians, as well as hospital administrators and health care stakeholders.

  12. AZERBAIJAN-GERMANY: COOPERATION VECTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Zeinalova, Sudaba

    2008-01-01

    This article looks at cooperation between Azerbaijan and Germany in the context of European integration and presents a brief overview of how the political dialog, economic relations, and cultural ties between the Azerbaijan Republic and the Federative Republic of Germany have been developing over the past 15 years.

  13. Mass Media in East Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Antje

    This paper focuses on media politics, guidance and control mechanisms, journalism education, various modes of media in use, and coverage of important news in East Germany. The paper gives special consideration to the influence of West German broadcasting in East Germany. The need for such information is that it will give insight into Eastern bloc…

  14. Germany, Pacifism and Peace Enforcement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard-Nielsen, Anja

    -scale terrorism, and the new US emphasis on pre-emptive strikes. Based on an analysis of Germany's strategic culture, it portrays Germany as a security actor and indicates the conditions and limits of the new German willingness to participate in international military crisis management that developed over...

  15. High prevalence of Babesia microti 'Munich' type in small mammals from an Ixodes persulcatus/Ixodes trianguliceps sympatric area in the Omsk region, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rar, Vera; Yakimenko, Valeriy; Makenov, Marat; Tikunov, Artem; Epikhina, Tamara; Tancev, Aleksey; Bobrova, Oksana; Tikunova, Nina

    2016-09-01

    Babesia microti is a genetically diverse group of protozoan parasites whose life cycle is associated with both small mammals and Ixodes spp. ticks. In this study, the prevalence of different B. microti genetic groups in ticks and small rodents in an area with Ixodes persulcatus and Ixodes trianguliceps occurring in sympatry was examined. A total of 541 small mammals were captured during eight sampling periods between 2013 and 2015 at a site in the Omsk region of Russia and tested for the presence of B. microti using nested PCR with subsequent sequencing of positive samples. B. microti DNA was found in 31.6 % of examined samples, and prevalence rates ranged from 5.3 to 61.6 % in different sampling periods. The sequenced B. microti samples belonged to two genetic groups: enzootic B. microti 'Munich' type and zoonotic B. microti 'US' type. B. microti 'Munich' type was more common across all sampling periods, with greater than 80 % prevalence in infected animals. Despite the high B. microti 'Munich'-type prevalence in voles, B. microti was not found in any of 394 adult I. persulcatus ticks collected by flagging or in the 84 I. persulcatus or 20 I. trianguliceps ticks taken from voles and molted under laboratory conditions. It was demonstrated that B. microti 'Munich'-type DNA can be detected in the blood of naturally infected voles for at least 20 weeks after capture. Thus, the high prevalence of B. microti 'Munich' type in small mammals may be explained by the prolonged persistence of B. microti in the blood of wild voles. PMID:27212463

  16. CAS School in Germany

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS), the Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research GmbH (GSI) and the Technische Universität Darmstadt (TU Darmstadt) jointly organised a course on General Accelerator Physics, at intermediate level, at TU Darmstadt from 27 September to 9 October 2009.   Participants in the CERN Accelerator School in Darmstadt, Germany. The Intermediate-level course followed established practice, with lectures on core topics in the mornings and specialised courses in the afternoons. The latter provided "hands-on" education and experience in the three selected topics: "RF Measurement Techniques", "Beam Instrumentation and Diagnostics" and "Optics Design and Correction". These proved to be highly successful, with participants choosing one course and following the topic throughout the school. Guided studies, tutorials, seminars and a poster session completed the programme. A visit to GSI and the F...

  17. Germany at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Laignel / FI-DI

    2005-01-01

    From 1 to 3 march 2005 Administration Building Bldg 60/61 - ground and 1st floor 09:30 - 17:30 Twenty eight companies will present their latest technology at the "Germany at CERN" exhibition. German industry will exhibit products and technologies which are related to the field of particle physics. The main subjects are: mechanical engineering, particle detectors, electrical engineering, electronics, data processing, radiation protection and vacuum and low temperature techonology. The exhibition is organised by the Federal Minister of Education and Research (BMBF), Bonn. There follows: the list of exhibitors A detailed programme will be available in due course at : your Departemental secretariat, the reception information desk, Building 33, the exhibition. A detailed list of firms is available under the following FI link: http://fi-dep.web.cern.ch/fi-dep/structure/memberstates/exhibitions_visits.htm LIST OF EXHIBITORS ACCEL Instruments GmbH APRA-NORM Elektromechanik GmbH BABCOCK NOELL Nucle...

  18. Germany AT CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    From 1 to 2 March 2005 Administration Building Bldg 60/61 - ground and 1st floor 09:30 - 17:30 Twenty nine companies will present their latest technology at the "Germany at CERN" exhibition. German industry will exhibit products and technologies related to the field of particle physics. The main sectors represented will be: mechanical engineering, particle detectors, electrical engineering, electronics, data processing, radiation protection and vacuum and low temperature techonology. The exhibition is organised by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), Bonn. The exhibitors are listed below. A detailed programme will be available in due course: from your Departemental secretariat, from the reception information desk, Building 33, at the exhibition itself. A detailed list of the participating firms is already available at the following FI link: http://fi-dep.web.cern.ch/fi-dep/structure/memberstates/exhibitions_visits.htm LIST OF EXHIBITORS ACCEL Instruments GmbH APRA-NORM Elekt...

  19. Germany AT CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Laignel / FI-DI

    2005-01-01

    From 1 to 3 march 2005 Administration Building Bldg 60/61 - ground and 1st floor 09:30 - 17:30 Twenty nine companies will present their latest technology at the "Germany at CERN" exhibition. German industry will exhibit products and technologies related to the field of particle physics. The main sectors represented will be: mechanical engineering, particle detectors, electrical engineering, electronics, data processing, radiation protection and vacuum and low temperature techonology. The exhibition is organised by the Federal Minister of Education and Research (BMBF), Bonn. The exhibitors are listed below. A detailed programme will be available in due course: from your Departemental secretariat, from the reception information desk, Building 33, at the exhibition itself. A detailed list of the participating firms is already available at the following FI link: http://fi-dep.web.cern.ch/fi-dep/structure/memberstates/exhibitions_visits.htm LIST OF EXHIBITORS ACCEL Instruments GmbH APRA-NORM Elekt...

  20. Germany: Health system review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Reinhard; Blümel, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    This analysis of the German health system reviews recent developments in organization and governance, health financing, health care provision, health reforms and health system performance. In the German health care system, decision-making powers are traditionally shared between national (federal) and state (Land) levels, with much power delegated to self-governing bodies. It provides universal coverage for a wide range of benefits. Since 2009, health insurance has been mandatory for all citizens and permanent residents, through either statutory or private health insurance. A total of 70 million people or 85% of the population are covered by statutory health insurance in one of 132 sickness funds in early 2014. Another 11% are covered by substitutive private health insurance. Characteristics of the system are free choice of providers and unrestricted access to all care levels. A key feature of the health care delivery system in Germany is the clear institutional separation between public health services, ambulatory care and hospital (inpatient) care. This has increasingly been perceived as a barrier to change and so provisions for integrated care are being introduced with the aim of improving cooperation between ambulatory physicians and hospitals. Germany invests a substantial amount of its resources on health care: 11.4% of gross domestic product in 2012, which is one of the highest levels in the European Union. In international terms, the German health care system has a generous benefit basket, one of the highest levels of capacity as well as relatively low cost-sharing. However, the German health care system still needs improvement in some areas, such as the quality of care. In addition, the division into statutory and private health insurance remains one of the largest challenges for the German health care system, as it leads to inequalities. PMID:25115137

  1. Sample size considerations for clinical research studies in nuclear cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiuzan, Cody; West, Erin A; Duong, Jimmy; Cheung, Ken Y K; Einstein, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Sample size calculation is an important element of research design that investigators need to consider in the planning stage of the study. Funding agencies and research review panels request a power analysis, for example, to determine the minimum number of subjects needed for an experiment to be informative. Calculating the right sample size is crucial to gaining accurate information and ensures that research resources are used efficiently and ethically. The simple question "How many subjects do I need?" does not always have a simple answer. Before calculating the sample size requirements, a researcher must address several aspects, such as purpose of the research (descriptive or comparative), type of samples (one or more groups), and data being collected (continuous or categorical). In this article, we describe some of the most frequent methods for calculating the sample size with examples from nuclear cardiology research, including for t tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), non-parametric tests, correlation, Chi-squared tests, and survival analysis. For the ease of implementation, several examples are also illustrated via user-friendly free statistical software.

  2. [About the origin, evolution and irradiation of Mexican cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The Mexican cardioangiology started in the nineteen century thanks to first endeavors of surgeons and physicians related to local academies and to School of Medicine, established in 1833 by Dr. Valentin Gómez Farías. Dr. Manuel Carpio, the future first head of department of physiology in this school, translated to Spanish language and published, in 1823, the article On pectoriloquo of the French physician Marat and later performed some experiments on the heart' motion. During the Secont Empire (1864-1867), the physician Samuel von Basch performed studies to define the arterial hypertension, called by him "latent atherosclerosis", i.e. the "essential hypertension". Once he had returned to his country, he invented in 1880, a sphygmomanometer of mercury column, that was the model for the instrument constructed by the Italian physician Scipione Riva-Rocci and presented in 1896. In our time, Dr. Demetrio Sodi Pallares systematized a metabolic therapy called "polarizing therapy", i.e. capable of repolarizing the heart's cells partly depolarized due to hypoxia or direct aggressions. These were the first steps in Mexico on the way to a promising medicine starting and the great adventure of Mexican cardiology. PMID:25260577

  3. Tomsk Cardiology Center program on lasers in cardiovascular: first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordov, Eugeni P.; Karpov, Rostislav S.; Dudko, Victor A.; Shipulin, Vladimir M.

    1994-12-01

    Recent progress in biomedical optics resulted in increased activity in this area at a number of different centers. Reported are the first results of the program directed to incorporate at Tomsk Cardiology Center experience gained in Tomsk optical profile research institutions in areas of light-matter interaction, high resolution spectroscopy, laser physics and relevant software and their usage in cardiac therapy, surgery, and diagnostics. To coordinate research work in this direction the special unit-laboratory of laser medicine is organized at the Center. Laboratory activity goes in the following directions: study of spectral properties of vessel walls in norm and atherosclerosis, comparative study of different wavelength laser radiation action on normal and atherosclerotically damaged tissues, novel approach to intravascular imaging, and usage of high sensitive laser spectroscopy for early diagnosis of cardiac diseases. The spectroscopic study of AP and normal tissue is aimed at understanding of differences in internal energy structures and ways of energy migration which are of critical importance for reaching selective laser action on normal and deceased tissues. To compare thermal, mechanical, and photo-chemical variations of tissues caused by laser radiation the XeCl excimer laser with Raman shifting cell and Nd:YAG laser with second, third, and fourth harmonic converters are employed. Fine influence of pulse duration, intensity, and repetition rates on AP removal is considered in laboratory experiments with vessel samples. Preliminary results on theoretical consideration for determination of spectroscopically detectable markers of some cardiac diseases are reported as well.

  4. Radiation doses to the staff of a nuclear cardiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last years, new radiopharmaceuticals are used in a Nuclear Medicine (NM) Department. Nowadays, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a method of routine imaging, a fact that has required increased levels of radioactivity in certain patient examinations. The staff that is more likely to receive the greatest radiation dose in a NM Department is the technologist who deals with performance of patient examination and injection of radioactive material and the nurse who is caring for the patients visiting the Department some of which being totally helpless. The fact that each NM Dept possesses equipment with certain specifications, deals with various kind of patients, has specific design and radiation protection measures which can differ from other NM Depts and uses various examination protocols, makes essential the need to investigate the radiation doses received by each member of the staff, so as to continuously monitor doses and take protective measures if required, control less experienced staff and ensure that radiation dose levels are kept as low as possible at all times. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate radiation dose to the nuclear cardiology department staff by thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) placed on the the skin at thyroid and abdominal region as well as evaluating protection measures taken currently in the Dept

  5. Milestones in pediatric cardiology: making possible the impossible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mormile, Raffaella; Quadrini, Ilaria; Squarcia, Umberto

    2013-02-01

    Pediatric Cardiology as a discipline has been proposed to have been born on August 26, 1938, when Robert Gross at the age of 33 years, successfully ligated a patent ductus arteriosus of a 7 years girl at the Children's Hospital in Boston. In November 1944, Helen Taussig convinced Alfred Blalock to anastomose the left subclavian artery to the left pulmonary artery after Robert Gross had declined to cooperate with her. About the 1950s, at the University of Minneapolis, Clarence Walton Lillehei worked on a controlled "crossed circulation" in which the cardiopulmonary bypass machine was another human, generally one of the patient's parents. In 1966 Williams Rashkind introduced ballon septostomy as a palliative approach to complete transposition of the Great Arteries, followed later by Jean Kan's balloon valvuloplasty to open the pulmonary valve. During the 1960s Giancarlo Rastelli developed a new classification of the Atrio Ventricular Canal defect which allowed to have a strikingly better surgical results. Today, even the hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), at one time a fatal condition, is operable. The completion of the Human Genome Project has been an enormous help in the understanding the genetic causes of cardiac anomalies. However, there are very few approved application for stem cells, and stem cells will not likely replace organ transplantation any time soon. Recently, the protein survivin has been described as a novel player in cardioprotection against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. The science needs to be made with love to warrant the humanity of Research.

  6. Clinical value of thallium 201 in a cardiology service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present the most widely used element in isotopic cardiology is undoubtedly 201Tl. In the few years since its appearance many publication testify to its growing use in the external detection of coronary thrombosis, the discovery of ischemia exertion, the non-traumatic observation of patients after an aortocoronary bridging operation, the diagnosis of coronary deficiency associated with another heart disease (aorta narrowing, mitral prolapsus, obstructive cardiomyopathy) and in combination with two other radioisotopic methods. The present work is intended as a modest contribution, still very recent, to the critical study of this new technique in all its present aspects. Part one presents the various characteristics responsible for the advantages and limits of 201Tl, then describes the techniques and apparatus used. The production, dosimetry, toxicity and biological behaviour of 201Tl are also discussed. A hundred and twenty-five examinations were performed in the Nuclear Medicine Service of the Limoges UHC between May 1977 and October 1978. The results are analysed in part two. This is followed by a discussion which attempts, in the light of our experience, to situate the place occupied by 201Tl in the range of complementary examinations useful in declared or assumed coronary cases. We then propose an examination procedure and precise indications we believe to be justified, accounting for economic problems before considering the future prospects of myocardium scintigraphy

  7. High and low volume sampling of particulate matter at sites with different traffic profiles in the Netherlands and Germany: Results from the HEPMEAP study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Nicole A. H.; Meliefste, Kees; Fuchs, Oliver; Weiland, Stephan K.; Cassee, Flemming; Brunekreef, Bert; Sandstrom, Thomas

    Within the EU project "Health Effects of Particles from Motor Engine Exhaust and Ambient Pollution" (HEPMEAP), ambient particulate matter (PM) was collected at sites, with varying traffic density and sources of PM emissions, in the Netherlands and Munich, Germany. In the Netherlands, measurements were conducted close to four schools which had participated 4 years earlier in a study on respiratory health of children attending schools near motorways. In Munich, measurements were conducted at a high traffic inner city and a suburban background (low traffic) site. Measurements were spaced over a period of approximately 1 year. Collection of PM was conducted using both high volume and low volume impaction methods. In addition to PM mass, PM-absorbance ('soot') and NO 2 were measured as indicators of fossil fuel combustion. PM 2.5 and PM 10 concentrations calculated from the high volume collections were highly correlated with PM 2.5 and PM 10 concentrations measured simultaneously by low volume samplers ( R2 0.87-0.94). Both high and low volume measurements showed little difference in semi annual average PM mass concentrations between sites within each country, with PM concentrations at the highest exposed sites being only about 10-30% higher compared to the lowest exposed sites. Contrasts for PM-absorbance and NO 2 were significantly higher than for PM mass (70-90% in the Netherlands and 90-167% in Germany). This demonstrates a higher impact of traffic on these components compared to PM mass.

  8. Rising Wage Inequality in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Gernandt, Johannes; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the evolution of wages and the recent tendency to rising wage inequality in Germany, based on the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP) for 1984 to 2004. Between 1984 and 1994 the wage distribution was fairly stable. Wage inequality started to increase around 1994 in Germany for all workers and for prime age dependent male workers as well. Rising inequality is not the result of the recent rise in self-employment. In West Germany rising inequality occurred in the lower pa...

  9. An Analysis of Tyutchev’s Poetic Creation during Munich Period from the Kiao-Iological Perspective%侨易学视角下丘特切夫慕尼黑时期诗歌创作

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾思艺

    2016-01-01

    丘特切夫1822—1843年在慕尼黑时期的诗歌创作,属于侨易学中的“驻外现象”。作为俄罗斯民族文化体现者的丘特切夫,身处异国性的文化背景之中,充分利用自己作为外交官的侨易优势,在自己本民族文化心理的基础上,有选择、有突破地创造性地接受了德国文化的影响,同时以自己独特的个性、气质加以融会贯通,使俄罗斯诗心与德意志文化的影响完美地融合起来,从而形成自己在俄罗斯乃至世界诗史上独树一帜的哲理抒情诗,开一代诗风。%Tyutchev’s poetic creation during 1822 and 1834 in Munich can fall into the category of Stationed-abroad Phe-nomenon according to Kiao-Iology.As one of the representatives of Russian culture,Tyutchev exercised his choice flexi-bly and creatively in accepting the German culture when he worked as a diplomat in Germany.His reception of German culture was based on his national cultural psychology,his temperament and the fusion of two cultures.Therefore,he de-veloped his own way of poetic creation in the history of poetic literature in Russia as well as the world.

  10. On Experiences of Teachers Team Construction of Technical University of Munich and Its Enlightenments%慕尼黑工业大学教师队伍建设经验及启示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵亚平; 王梅; 安蓉

    2015-01-01

    As a first-class university in Germany, Technical University of Munich is committed to build the first-class teachers team, which is distinctive in many aspects, such as, the way of teachers employment, the evaluation of teachers promotion, the professional development of teachers, the management of teachers team, the structure of teachers team, etc. With reference to its experiences, Chinese universities can promote the construction and development of teachers team by exploring flexible system of teacher appointment and promotion, practicing the teachers' evaluation mechanism with combination of evaluation and promotion, establishing teachers management model dominated by academic, optimizing the structure of teachers team reasonably.%作为德国一流大学,慕尼黑工业大学致力于建设一流的教师队伍,在教师聘任方式、教师评估晋升、教师专业发展、教师队伍管理、教师队伍结构等方面的做法都极具特色。参照其经验,我国高校可以通过探索灵活的教师聘任与晋升制度、实行评聘结合的教师评估机制、建立以学术权力为主导的管理模式、合理优化教师队伍结构等方式推进教师队伍的建设与发展。

  11. [Stroke management in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritze, J

    2001-12-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality (rank 3) and thus a mass disease. Therefore, immediate access for everybody to stroke treatment services is indispensible. Therapeutic efficacy has been shown for lysis therapy and early rehabilitation in stroke units, respectively. The British-Scandinavian stroke unit concept focusses on immediately starting rehabilitation over 4-6 weeks by a specifically trained and motivated team. Since 1995, so-called stroke units are established in Germany adhering to a specific concept of the German Society for Neurology (DGN). Although referring to the British-Scandinavian concept in terms of efficacy the German concept differs fundamentally by focussing on monitoring as well as lysis therapy and neuroprotection in a short (3-5 days) stay. This is an intensive care unit approach for which scientific evidence is lacking. More essential are reasonable doubts that this concept can ever expand sufficiently to ensure comprehensive care. At least presently, stroke care is provided unevenly, thus contravening legislation (section 70 Social Security Act Vol. V). Acknowledging the restrictions the DGN adapted its concept, now advocating a two-step model comprising intensive care stroke units plus rehabilitative stroke units. PMID:11761782

  12. GERMANY AT CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    13 - 15 November 2001 Administration Building Bldg 60 - ground and 1st floor 09.00 hrs - 17.30 hrs OPENING CEREMONY 10h00 - 13 November GERMANY AT CERN Thirty-three German companies will be demonstrating their supplies and services offered for the construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and other key CERN programmes. The Industrial exhibition will be enriched with a display of objects of contemporary German art. The official German presentation is under the patronage of the Federal Minister of Education and Research (BMBF), Bonn. There follows : the list of exhibitors, the list of lectures to be given at the exhibition. A detailed programme will be available in due course at : your Divisional Secretariat, the Reception information desk, building 33, the exhibition. LIST OF EXHIBITORS Accel Instruments GmbH Representative: 1.1 Accel Instruments GmbH/CH-8754 Netsal apra-norm Elektromechanik GmbH Representative: 2.1 apra-norm s.n.c./F-67500 Haguenau Babcock Noell Nuclear GmbH Balcke-D&u...

  13. A summary of recommendations for occupational radiation protection in interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Ariel; Hian, Sim Kui; Miller, Donald L; Le Heron, John; Padovani, Renato; Vano, Eliseo

    2013-02-01

    The radiation dose received by cardiologists during percutaneous coronary interventions, electrophysiology procedures, and other interventional cardiology procedures can vary by more than an order of magnitude for the same type of procedure and for similar patient doses. There is particular concern regarding occupational dose to the lens of the eye. This document provides recommendations for occupational radiation protection for physicians and other staff in the interventional suite. Simple methods for reducing or minimizing occupational radiation dose include minimizing fluoroscopy time and the number of acquired images; using available patient dose reduction technologies; using good imaging-chain geometry; collimating; avoiding high-scatter areas; using protective shielding; using imaging equipment whose performance is controlled through a quality assurance program; and wearing personal dosimeters so that you know your dose. Effective use of these methods requires both appropriate education and training in radiation protection for all interventional cardiology personnel, and the availability of appropriate protective tools and equipment. Regular review and investigation of personnel monitoring results, accompanied as appropriate by changes in how procedures are performed and equipment used, will ensure continual improvement in the practice of radiation protection in the interventional suite. These recommendations for occupational radiation protection in interventional cardiology and electrophysiology have been endorsed by the Asian Pacific Society of Interventional Cardiology, the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions, the Latin American Society of Interventional Cardiology, and the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions.

  14. A review on the Avicenna's contribution to the field of cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarshenas, Mohammad M; Zargaran, Arman

    2015-03-01

    The cardiology and field of cardiovascular approaches are often mentioned as of the earliest concerns throughout the history of mankind civilization. During the golden ages of Islamic era, 9th to 12th centuries A.D., medical knowledge from various fields including cardiology was flourished by prominent Persian physicians and scholars. Among those outstanding physicians and scientists of the Islamic golden era, Avicenna is known as a famous and pioneer character. To outline the cardiovascular knowledge and contribution of Avicenna, current review compiled all his evidence-based concepts of cardiovascular findings from current medical literatures as well as those mentioned in his important medical encyclopedia, the Canon of Medicine. In this review, Avicenna's findings on cardiovascular anatomy such as his description of Willis circle, capillary circulation and arterial and ventricular contractions in the cardiovascular system have been mentioned. Also, his books and manuscripts on cardiology as well as findings and theories on cardiovascular and allied diseases were discussed. These findings are included in his descriptions on cardiac tamponade, stroke, palpitation, atherosclerosis, hypertension, association of the cardiovascular complications with erection and ejaculation, interaction between the heart and emotions as well as some of his mentioned drugs for cardiological disorders and the early concepts of drug targeting. These results can show Avicenna's great contribution to improve the sciences of cardiology in early medieval era.

  15. The Use of Continuous Electrocardiographic Holter Monitoring in Pediatric Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begic, Zijo; Begic, Edin; Mesihovic-Dinarevic, Senka; Masic, Izet; Pesto, Senad; Halimic, Mirza; Kadic, Almira; Dobraca, Amra

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To show the place and role of continuous electrocardiographic twenty-four-hour ECG monitoring in daily clinical practice of pediatric cardiologists. Methods: According to protocol, 2753 patients underwent dynamic continuous ECG Holter monitoring (data collected from the “Register of ECG Holter monitoring” of Pediatric Clinic, UCC Sarajevo in period April 2003- April 2015). Results: There were 50,5% boys and 49,5% girls, aged from birth to 19 years (1,63% - neonates and infants, 2,6% - toddlers, 9,95% - preschool children, 35,5% - gradeschoolers and 50,3% children in puberty and adolescence). In 68,1% of patients Holter was performed for the first time. Indications for conducting Holter were: arrhythmias in 42,2% cases, precordial pain in 23,5%, suspicion of pre-excitation and/or pre-excitation in 10%, crisis of consciousness in 8%, uncorrected congenital/acquired heart defects in 4,2%, operated heart defects in 3,7%, hypertension in 3,1% cases, control of the pacemaker in 1,63% and other causes in 3,5% cases. Discharge diagnosis after ECG Holter monitoring were: insignificant arrhythmias in 47,1% cases, wandering pacemaker in 21,3%, pre-excitation in 16,2%, benign ventricular premature beats in 6,3%, atrioventricular block in 3%, sinus pause in 2.2% cases and other arrhythmias in 3,5%. In mentioned period 57 cases of Wolf Parkinson White syndrome were registered, in 4,5% of patients antiarrhythmic therapy was administered. Radiofrequent ablation was performed in 23 cases. Conclusion: The development of pediatric cardiac surgery has initiated development of pediatric arrhythmology as imperative segment of pediatric cardiology. Continuous ECG Holter monitoring has become irreplaceable method in everyday diagnostics and therapy of arrhythmias in children. PMID:27708487

  16. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, E.; Ubeda, C.; Leyton, F.; Miranda, P.

    2008-08-01

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 µGy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 µGy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  17. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vano, E [Radiology Department, Medicine School, Complutense University and San Carlos University Hospital, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ubeda, C [Clinical Sciences Department, Faculty of the Science of Health, Tarapaca University, 18 de Septiembre 2222, Arica (Chile); Leyton, F [Institute of Public Health of Chile, Marathon 1000, Nunoa, Santiago (Chile); Miranda, P [Hemodynamic Department, Cardiovascular Service, Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, Avenida Antonio Varas 360, Providencia, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: eliseov@med.ucm.es

    2008-08-07

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 {mu}Gy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 {mu}Gy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  18. MEMS - Munich Energy Management System. FIA Project: Exchange of research information; MEMS - Muenchner Energiemanagement-System. FIA-Projekt - Forschungs-Informations-Austausch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, H.; Fries, W.

    2001-10-01

    The City of Munich developed the project 'Munich Energy-Management-Systems (MEMS)' with financial support from the Federal Ministry of Economy and Technology. The project is based on a system of building automation using as many standard elements of hardware and software as possible. This will guarantee a high degree of independence from suppliers and subcontractors. The project has led to a reliable working base for the evaluation, measuring and control for ca. 150 municipal buildings. (orig.) [German] Mit dem Projekt 'Muenchner Energie-Management-System (MEMS)' erstellte die Landeshauptstadt Muenchen mit finanzieller Unterstuetzung des Bundesministeriums fuer Wirtschaft und Technologie ein auf der Leitzentrale Haustechnik (LZH) basierendes zentrales Energiemanagementsystem. Die Verwendung moeglichst vieler Standards in Hard- und Software ist dabei ein wesentlicher Gesichtspunkt. Dadurch wurde eine weitgehende Unabhaengigkeit von einem einzelnen Hersteller erreicht. Damit wurde ein Erfassungs-, Auswerte- und Steuerungssystem fuer derzeit rund 150 staedtische Gebaeude geschaffen. (orig.)

  19. Development of a thermal hydraulic modelling of ground water of the Malm in the Munich metropolitan area; Entwicklung einer thermisch-hydraulischen Grundwassermodellierung des Malm im Grossraum Muenchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dussel, M.; Lueschen, E.; Thomas, R. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Angewandte Geophysik, Hannover (DE)] (and others)

    2011-10-24

    The mutual potential influence of geothermal duplicates and the scientific investigation of the relationship between seismic and hydraulic parameters are investigated in the joint research project 'Geothermal characterization of fractured karst limestone aquifers in the Munich metropolitan area'. Thirteen doublets and triplets being in production or sunk illustrate the great geothermal potential and provide important data on the development of a thermal-hydraulic modeling of the reservoir. 3D seismic Unterhaching, 3D structural model, hydrogeological model and a high-resolution 3D temperature model form the basis of the numerical modeling. Different seismic signatures, seismic attributes and variations in the interval velocities characterize the ground geophysically, and were interpreted under consideration of geological and hydrogeological background information as well as borehole measurements in terms of hydraulically conductive homogeneous areas. For the Munich metropolitan area, the numerical modeling is a decision aid for the future optimized and sustainable hydrothermal utilization of the Malm aquifer.

  20. Present and future of nuclear cardiology. Where we come from and where we are going

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present of nuclear cardiology techniques with gated-SPECT, positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance, cardiac mIBG scintigraphy and anatomical and functional images of three-dimensional SPECT-CT fusion may be the future for some centers, a future more or less distant for others. The prediction of the ways that will be followed by the different radioisotope scans in the field of cardiology is to some extent uncertain and depends on the development of other noninvasive techniques and on the possibility of reducing the dose of irradiation, decreasing the undesirable effects of ischemia-inducing drugs, but also on the evolution of macroeconomics in different countries, and of course on the level of experience and excellence in nuclear cardiology laboratories and the confidence generated on clinical cardiologists. (author)

  1. [National and international impact factor of Revista Española de Cardiología].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleixandre Benavent, Rafael; Valderrama Zurián, Juan C; Castellano Gómez, Miguel; Miguel-Dasit, Alberto; Simó Meléndez, Raquel; Navarro Molina, Carolina

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the bibliometric indicators for Revista Española de Cardiologíathat were obtained from the "Potential impact factor of Spanish medical journals in 2001" study financed by the Spanish Ministerio de Educacion, Cultura y Deporte. Citations to Revista Española de Cardiología, its national and international impact factor, and its immediacy index were calculated with methods similar to those used by the Institute for Scientific Information. National indicators were based only on citations from 87 Spanish journals considered source journals, whereas international indicators were calculated on the basis of citations from both national journals and foreign source journals in the Science Citation Index. Revista Española de Cardiologíaobtained a national impact factor of 0.719 and an international impact factor of 0.837, placing it at the head of the ranking of Spanish medical journals.

  2. The Brugada syndrome: a complex cardiological problem in the experience of the specialist in internal medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Frabetti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Brugada syndrome, a disease burdened by elevated risk of sudden unexpected cardiac death, often affects young aged subjects that have structurally healthy heart. The diagnostic itinerary is complex: anamnesis, ECG, pharmacological test and electrophysiological study. Its phenotypes are three. METHOD We have identified 13 cases (10 men and 3 women, 12 estimated at the Cardiological Outpatients’ Department and 1 at the First-aid Station. RESULTS 2 cases belonged to phenotype 1, 4 cases to phenotype 2 and 7 cases to phenotype 3. CONCLUSIONS Our work of specialists in internal medicine, toward this syndrome, is: an accurate anamnesis, a correct interpretation of ECG, fast sending of high risk cases to advanced level cardiological competences, a selection of cases to submit to pharmacological test, to address middle risk patients to cardiological competences, offering our cooperation in the follow-up.

  3. Changed vegetation composition in coniferous forests near to motorways in Southern Germany: The effects of traffic-born pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To estimate the effect of traffic emissions on the vegetation composition of coniferous forests near to motorways, three transects of 520 m length were studied by analysing vegetation composition, soil parameters and deposition data in the Munich-area, Southern Germany. The detected patterns suggest that motorways have an impact on the vegetation composition in the neighbourhood of roads. Depending on the wind direction, the influences of the motorways reaches up to 230 m on downwind side and up to 80 m on upwind side. The vegetation is mainly affected by the deposition of nitrogen deriving from fuel combustion and by basic substances added to road salt. By monitoring vegetation changes near to motorways, it is possible to estimate the areas where harmful alterations of the ecosystem can be expected. - Vegetation near motorways was strongly influenced by traffic-borne nitrogen

  4. Design and Operation of Public Transport in Munich%慕尼黑公共交通的设计与运营

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guenter Pedall

    2007-01-01

    @@ Introduction of Public Transport in Munich Underground System The new generation of underground trains travel at a top speed of 80 km/h and are equipped with cutting-edge technology. Current projects rolling stock are equipped with Onboard Fire-Detection and Extinction of fire, viedo-surveillance-system with data communication in parking facilities, on board-TV(passenger information and entertainment) and passenger counting system.

  5. Cardiology in the young : where we have been. Where we are. Where we are going.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2014-12-01

    Cardiology in the Young is devoted to cardiovascular issues affecting the young, and older patients with congenital heart disease, or with other cardiac diseases acquired during childhood. The journal serves the interests of all professionals concerned with these topics. By design, the journal is international and multidisciplinary in its approach, and members of the editorial board take an active role in its mission, helping to make it an indispensable reference for paediatric and congenital cardiac care. All aspects of paediatric and congenital cardiac care are covered within the journal. The content includes original articles, brief reports, editorials, reviews, and papers devoted to continuing professional development. High-quality colour figures are published on a regular basis, and without charge to the authors. Regular supplements are published containing the abstracts of the annual meetings of the Association for European Paediatric and Congenital Cardiology, along with other occasional supplements. These supplements are supplied free to subscribers. The vision of Cardiology in the Young is to use print and electronic media to improve paediatric and congenital cardiac care. The mission of Cardiology in the Young is to be a premier global journal for paediatric and congenital cardiac care - an essential journal that spans the domains of patient care, research, education, and advocacy, and also spans geographical, temporal, and subspeciality boundaries. Cardiology in the Young was officially launched in December, 1990. The late Lucio Parenzan was Editor-in-Chief from 1990 through Volume 4, Number 1, January 1994. Professor Robert Anderson and Giancarlo Crupi then shared the Editor-in-Chief position until the end of 1995. Then, from 1995 through 2007, Professor Robert Anderson served as the sole Editor-in-Chief of Cardiology in the Young . Edward Baker, MD, FRCP, FRCPCH, served as Editor-in-Chief of Cardiology in the Young from 2007 to 2013. In January, 2014

  6. Clinical and scientific progress related to the interface between cardiology and psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdman, R A M; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2011-01-01

    In November 1975, as the first in the Netherlands, a full-time psychologist was employed at the Department of Cardiology of the Thoraxcenter of the Erasmus Medical Center. This innovative decision was consistent with a view to treat the patient as a whole rather than the heart as a single body part...... in need of repair, combined with the understanding that the heart and mind interact to affect health. The present selective review addresses the broad range of contributions of 35 years of psychology to clinical cardiology and cardiovascular research with a focus on research, teaching, psychological...

  7. Pediatric cardiology. Clinical and practical experiences with heart diseases of children, juveniles and young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book on pediatric cardiology covers the following chapters: (I) Fundamentals and diagnostics: pediatric cardiologic anamnesis, electrocardiograms, thorax X-radiography, MRT and CT of the heart, nuclear medical diagnostics, exercise tests, heart catheter examination, electrophysiological tests. (II) Leading symptoms: Cyanosis, cardiac murmur, thorax pain, palpitation, syncopes. (III) Disease pictures: congenital heart defects, acquired heart defects, cardiomyopathies, heart rhythm disturbances, heart insufficiency, arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, other heart involving syndromes. (IV) Therapy: Catheter interventional therapy, post-surgical pediatric cardiac therapy, surgery involving the life-support machine, mechanical cardiovascular support systems, initial treatment of newborns with critical heart defects, heart transplantation, vaccination of children with heart diseases, medicinal therapy.

  8. Report of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Sessions 2015, San Diego.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murohara, Toyoaki

    2015-01-01

    The 64th Annual Scientific Sessions and Exposition of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) were held at the San Diego Convention Center from March 14-16, 2015. The ACC Scientific Sessions are 1 of 2 major scientific cardiology meetings in the United States, with nearly 20,000 attendees, including 15,000 cardiovascular professionals. There were over 2,100 oral and poster abstracts, and more than 15 late-breaking clinical trials (LBCTs) abstructs. This report presents the highlights and several key presentations, especially the LBCTs, from the ACC Scientific Sessions 2015. I hope this review will help cardiologists update to the latest information.

  9. Radiation-induced noncancer risks in interventional cardiology: optimisation of procedures and staff and patient dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhonghua; AbAziz, Aini; Yusof, Ahmad Khairuddin Md

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about ionizing radiation during interventional cardiology have been increased in recent years as a result of rapid growth in interventional procedure volumes and the high radiation doses associated with some procedures. Noncancer radiation risks to cardiologists and medical staff in terms of radiation-induced cataracts and skin injuries for patients appear clear potential consequences of interventional cardiology procedures, while radiation-induced potential risk of developing cardiovascular effects remains less clear. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of concerns about noncancer risks of radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Strategies commonly undertaken to reduce radiation doses to both medical staff and patients during interventional cardiology procedures are discussed; optimisation of interventional cardiology procedures is highlighted.

  10. Arthroplasty register for Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen, Anja

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: The annual number of joint replacement operations in Germany is high. The introduction of an arthroplasty register promises an important contribution to the improvement of the quality of patient’s care. Research questions: The presented report addresses the questions on organization and functioning, benefits and cost-benefits as well as on legal, ethical and social aspects of the arthroplasty registers. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in September 2008 in the medical databases MEDLINE, EMBASE etc. and was complemented with a hand search. Documents describing arthroplasty registers and/or their relevance as well as papers on legal, ethical and social aspects of such registers were included in the evaluation. The most important information was extracted and analysed. Results: Data concerning 30 arthroplasty registers in 19 countries as well as one international arthroplasty register were identified. Most of the arthroplasty registers are maintained by national orthopedic societies, others by health authorities or by their cooperation. Mostly, registries are financially supported by governments and rarely by other sources.The participation of the orthopedists in the data collection process of the arthroplasty registry is voluntary in most countries. The consent of the patients is usually required. The unique patient identification is ensured in nearly all registers.Each data set consists of patient and clinic identification numbers, data on diagnosis, the performed intervention, the operation date and implanted prostheses. The use of clinical scores, patient-reported questionnaires and radiological documentation is rare. Methods for data documentation and transfer are paper form, electronic entry as well as scanning of the data using bar codes. The data are mostly being checked for their completeness and validity. Most registers offer results of the data evaluation to the treating orthopedists and

  11. [The clinical management guidelines of the Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Nuclear cardiology: the technical bases and clinical applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candell Riera, J; Castell Conesa, J; Jurado López, J A; López de Sá, E; Nuño de la Rosa, J A; Ortigosa Aso, F J; Valle Tudela, V

    1999-11-01

    Although the role of nuclear cardiology is currently well consolidated, the addition of new radiotracers and modern techniques prompt us to permanently update the requirements, equipment and clinical applications of these isotopic tests. Radioisotopic drugs, instrumentation and characteristics of radionuclide tests that are presently used are explained in the first part of this text. In the second part, diagnostic and prognostic indications of these tests are presented in detail.

  12. [Informed consent in cardiology. The Committee on Informed Consent of the Commission on Professional Matters of the Sociedad Española de Cardiología].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de los Reyes López, M; Iñíguez Romo, A; Goicolea de Oro, A; Funes López, B; Castro Beiras, A

    1998-10-01

    In the last thirty years, the clinical relationship between physicians and patients has been rather modified. There are several factors that have contributed to this change: a) New ways to execute medical practises, specially referred to the development of new techniques; b) Cultural changes in our western society, mainly in the mediterranean area, where there has been progress in the recognition of patients' autonomy to decide about their own lives, health and their own bodies; c) The increasing number of lawsuits, complaints and judgements about the problems that clinical information involves, particularly the informed consent in clinical practise. We consider it necessary to make an extensive and deep discussion from all of the areas in Medicine and Law, to analyze the different ethical and legal parts of the informed consent. For that reason the Spanish Society of Cardiology offers their members a basic document in order to reflect about these facts, developing arguments, justifications and supports. This document has also considered models, conditions to their applicability according to Spanish law, and the experience we have had. Finally, there is a list of diagnostic procedures and interventional practises in cardiology that might be preceded by a written informed consent document. We considered them by the name of Spanish Society of Cardiology recommendations.

  13. Nuclear cardiology practice and associated radiation doses in Europe: results of the IAEA Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Study (INCAPS) for the 27 European countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Oliver; Burchert, Wolfgang [University Hospital of the Ruhr University, Institute of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Heart and Diabetes Center North Rhine-Westphalia Bochum, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Pascual, Thomas N.B.; Kashyap, Ravi; Dondi, Maurizio; Paez, Diana [International Atomic Energy Agency, Section of Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Human Health, Vienna (Austria); Mercuri, Mathew [Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Acampa, Wanda [National Council of Research, Institute of Biostructures and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); Flotats, Albert [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Kitsiou, Anastasia [Sismanoglio Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Athens (Greece); Knuuti, Juhani [University of Turku, and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Underwood, S.R. [Imperial College London, National Heart and Lung Institute, London (United Kingdom); Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospitals, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Vitola, Joao V. [Quanta Diagnostico and Terapia, Curitiba (Brazil); Mahmarian, John J. [Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, Department of Cardiology, Houston, TX (United States); Karthikeyan, Ganesan [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Cardiology, New Delhi (India); Better, Nathan [Royal Melbourne Hospital and University of Melbourne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Melbourne (Australia); Rehani, Madan M. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Radiation Protection of Patients Unit, Vienna (Austria); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Einstein, Andrew J. [Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Collaboration: for the INCAPS Investigators Group

    2016-04-15

    Nuclear cardiology is widely used to diagnose coronary artery disease and to guide patient management, but data on current practices, radiation dose-related best practices, and radiation doses are scarce. To address these issues, the IAEA conducted a worldwide study of nuclear cardiology practice. We present the European subanalysis. In March 2013, the IAEA invited laboratories across the world to document all SPECT and PET studies performed in one week. The data included age, gender, weight, radiopharmaceuticals, injected activities, camera type, positioning, hardware and software. Radiation effective dose was calculated for each patient. A quality score was defined for each laboratory as the number followed of eight predefined best practices with a bearing on radiation exposure (range of quality score 0 - 8). The participating European countries were assigned to regions (North, East, South, and West). Comparisons were performed between the four European regions and between Europe and the rest-of-the-world (RoW). Data on 2,381 European patients undergoing nuclear cardiology procedures in 102 laboratories in 27 countries were collected. A cardiac SPECT study was performed in 97.9 % of the patients, and a PET study in 2.1 %. The average effective dose of SPECT was 8.0 ± 3.4 mSv (RoW 11.4 ± 4.3 mSv; P < 0.001) and of PET was 2.6 ± 1.5 mSv (RoW 3.8 ± 2.5 mSv; P < 0.001). The mean effective doses of SPECT and PET differed between European regions (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). The mean quality score was 6.2 ± 1.2, which was higher than the RoW score (5.0 ± 1.1; P < 0.001). Adherence to best practices did not differ significantly among the European regions (range 6 to 6.4; P = 0.73). Of the best practices, stress-only imaging and weight-adjusted dosing were the least commonly used. In Europe, the mean effective dose from nuclear cardiology is lower and the average quality score is higher than in the RoW. There is regional variation in effective dose in

  14. Attaining New Heights With Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The launch of inter-governmental consultation ushers in a new era for Sino-German relations During his recent visit to Germany,Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao,together with German Chancellor Angela Merkel,inaugurated an inter-governmental cons ultation mechanism to enhance cooperation between the two countries.The two cochaired the first round of consultation in Berlin on June 28.This is a milestone in Sino-German relations since Germany is the first country to establish this kind of mecha-

  15. [Farmer's lung antigens in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennekamp, J; Joest, M; Sander, I; Engelhart, S; Raulf-Heimsoth, M

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that besides the long-known farmer's lung antigen sources Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula (Micropolyspora faeni), Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, and Aspergillus fumigatus, additionally the mold Absidia (Lichtheimia) corymbifera as well as the bacteria Erwinia herbicola (Pantoea agglomerans) and Streptomyces albus may cause farmer's lung in Germany. In this study the sera of 64 farmers with a suspicion of farmer's lung were examined for the following further antigens: Wallemia sebi, Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Eurotium amstelodami. Our results indicate that these molds are not frequent causes of farmer's lung in Germany. PMID:22477566

  16. Position paper: proposal for a core curriculum for a European Sports Cardiology qualification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidbuchel, H.; Papadakis, M.; Panhuyzen-Goedkoop, N.M.; Carre, F.; Dugmore, D.; Mellwig, K.P.; Rasmusen, H.K.; Solberg, E.E.; Borjesson, M.; Corrado, D.; Pelliccia, A.; Sharma, S.

    2013-01-01

    Sports cardiology is a new and rapidly evolving subspecialty. It aims to elucidate the cardiovascular effects of regular exercise and delineate its benefits and risks, so that safe guidance can be provided to all individuals engaging in sports and/or physical activity in order to attain the maximum

  17. Test of a Cardiology Patient Simulator with Students in Fourth-Year Electives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewy, Gordon A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Students at five medical schools participated in an evaluation of a cardiology patient simulator (CPS), a life-size mannequin capable of simulating a wide variety of cardiovascular conditions. The CPS enhances learning both the knowledge and the skills necessary to perform a bedside cardiovascular evaluation. (Author/MLW)

  18. The establishment of local diagnostic reference levels for paediatric interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: There is a paucity of information worldwide on radiation exposure in paediatric interventional cardiology. At present Nationally established Diagnostic Reference Levels exist for adult interventional cardiology procedures in the UK but little data is available for paediatrics. In addition, interventional cardiology has been identified as one the highest contributors to medical exposure to ionising radiation and children are more radiosensitive than adults. Objective: This study sought to determine current radiation dose levels in paediatric interventional cardiology (IC) with a view to establishing local diagnostic reference levels (LDRL). Methods: Radiation dose and examination details were recorded for 354 paediatric patients examined by IC in a specialised paediatric centre in Europe. Radiation doses were recorded using a Dose Area Product meter along with examination details. Procedures were categorised as either diagnostic (A) or therapeutic (B). Data was further sub-divided into five age ranges; (1) newborn <1 year (2) 1 <5 years (3) 5 <10 years (4) 10 <15 years (5) 15 years and over. Proposed LDRL were calculated from the mean dose area product readings. Results: The mean patient age was 2.6 years (range 0.0 days–16 years) and weight was 14.9 kg (range 2.4–112 kg). LDRL for the five age groupings were calculated as 190, 421, 582, 1289 and 1776 cGycm² respectively. Conclusion: Local dose reference levels have been proposed for paediatric IC and can be used as a benchmark for other hospitals to compare against their own radiation doses

  19. Evaluation of a hand carried cardiac ultrasound device in an outpatient cardiology clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C. Vourvouri (Eleni); D. Poldermans (Don); G.E. Parharidis; J.R.T.C. Roelandt (Jos); J.W. Deckers (Jaap)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To determine the diagnostic potential of a hand carried cardiac ultrasound (HCU) device (OptiGo, Philips Medical Systems) in a cardiology outpatient clinic and to compare the HCU diagnosis with the clinical diagnosis and diagnosis with a full featured standar

  20. European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Association Standards for delivering heart failure care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDonagh, Theresa A.; Blue, Lynda; Clark, Andrew L.; Dahlstroem, Ulf; Ekman, Inger; Lainscak, Mitja; McDonald, Kenneth; Ryder, Mary; Stroemberg, Anna; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2011-01-01

    The management of heart failure (HF) is complex. As a consequence, most cardiology society guidelines now state that HF care should be delivered in a multiprofessional manner. The evidence base for this approach now means that the establishment of HF management programmes is a priority. This documen

  1. The World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery: "The Olympics of our profession".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo-Hamman, Christopher; Jacobs, Jeffery Phillip

    2012-12-01

    The first World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology was held in London, United Kingdom, in 1980, organised by Dr. Jane Somerville and Prof. Fergus Macartney. The idea was that of Jane Somerville, who worked with enormous energy and enthusiasm to bring together paediatric cardiologists and surgeons from around the world. The 2nd World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology took place in New York in 1985, organised by Bill Rashkind, Mary Ellen Engle, and Eugene Doyle. The 3rd World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology was held in Bangkok, Thailand, in 1989, organised by Chompol Vongraprateep. Although cardiac surgeons were heavily involved in these early meetings, a separate World Congress of Paediatric Cardiac Surgery was held in Bergamo, Italy, in 1988, organised by Lucio Parenzan. Thereafter, it was recognised that surgeons and cardiologists working on the same problems and driven by a desire to help children should really rather meet together. A momentous decision was taken to initiate a Joint World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery. A steering committee was established with membership comprising the main organisers of the four separate previous Congresses, and additional members were recruited in an effort to achieve numerical equality of cardiologists and surgeons and a broad geographical representation. The historic 1st "World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery" took place in Paris in June, 1993, organised by Jean Kachaner. The next was to be held in Japan, but the catastrophic Kobe earthquake in 1995 forced relocation to Hawaii in 1997. Then followed Toronto, Canada (2001, organised by Bill Williams and Lee Benson), Buenos Aires, Argentina (2005, organised by Horatio Capelli and Guillermo Kreutzer), and most recently Cairns, Australia (2009, organised by Jim Wilkinson). Having visited Europe (1993), Asia-Pacific (1997), North America (2001), South America (2005), and Australia (2009), and reflecting the "African Renaissance", the

  2. New Adenovirus in Bats, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Sonntag, Michael; Mühldorfer, Kristin; Speck, Stephanie; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Kurth, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    We tested 55 deceased vespertilionid bats of 12 species from southern Germany for virus infections. A new adenovirus was isolated from tissue samples of 2 Pipistrellus pipistrellus bats, which represents the only chiropteran virus isolate found in Europe besides lyssavirus (rabies virus). Evidence was found for adenovirus transmission between bats.

  3. Schooling in Germany : Structural Deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiiver, H.

    2010-01-01

    The German educational system is battling with a range of challenges exposed by the PISA studies and other publications such as the OECD's "Education at a glance". This dissertation discusses four distinct topics, using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel Data. In Germany, the socio-economic b

  4. The changing consumer in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Grunert, Suzanne C.; Glatzer, Wolfgang;

    1995-01-01

    Changes in economic, demographic, and cultural factors in West Germany during the past decades are briefly described, as well as changes in consumption patterns and the way the major marketing variables have been used and implemented. Special atte is paid to the upheavals caused by the German reu...... reunification. Implications for marketing management are drawn by proposing nine bipolar constructs....

  5. Current status of nuclear cardiology in Japan: Ongoing efforts to improve clinical standards and to establish evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Tamaki, Nagara

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear cardiology imaging tests are widely performed in Japan as clinical practice. The Japanese nuclear cardiology community has developed new diagnostic imaging tests using (123)I-beta-methyl-p-iodophenyl-pentadecanoic acid, (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine, and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET for detecting cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis. These tests have become popular worldwide. The Japanese Circulation Society and the Japanese Society of Nuclear Cardiology have published clinical imaging guidelines showing indications and standards for the new imaging tests. JSNC is currently striving to improve the standard of clinical practice and is promoting research activities.

  6. Press trip of Magic Cities Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>Germany is the first European country which becomes the legal travel destination for the Chinese. Our reporter has joined a press trip of Magic Cities Germany and harvested amazing impressions of the magic sites of Germany Cities: Hannover, Frankfurt and Stuttgart.

  7. Report on the 3'rd scientific meeting of the "Verein zur Förderung des Wissenschaftlichen Nachwuchses in der Neurologie" (NEUROWIND e.V. held in Motzen, Germany, Nov. 4'th - Nov. 6'th, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleinschnitz Christoph

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract From November 4th- 6th 2011, the 3rd NEUROWIND e.V. meeting was held in Motzen, Brandenburg, Germany. Like in the previous years, the meeting provided an excellent platform for scientific exchange and the presentation of innovative projects for young colleagues in the fields of neurovascular research, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. As kick-off to the scientific sessions, Reinhard Hohlfeld, Head of the Institute for Clinical Neuroimmunology in Munich, gave an illustrious overview on the many fascinations of neuroimmunologic research. A particular highlight on the second day of the meeting was the award of the 1'st NEUROWIND e.V. prize for young academics in the field of experimental neurology. This award is posted for young colleagues under the age of 35 with a significant achievement in the field of neurovascular research, neuroinflammation or neurodegeneration and comprises an amount of 20.000 Euro, founded by Merck Serono GmbH, Darmstadt. Germany. The first prize was awarded to Ivana Nikic from Martin Kerschensteiner's group in Munich for her brilliant work on a reversible form of axon damage in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis, published in Nature Medicine in 2011. This first prize award ceremony was a great incentive for the next call for proposals now upcoming in 2012.

  8. Reanálisis del diagnóstico de alcoholismo en Perú: el test de alcoholismo Munich (malt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus-Dieter Gorené

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available El Test de Alcoholismo Munich (MALT fue traducido al español y aplicado a una muestra constituida por 145 probandos peruanos, de los cuales 94 eran alcohólicos. El MALT consta de dos partes: la primera está conformada por siete preguntas que son contestadas por el médico y la segunda sección está formada por 24 preguntas y son contestadas por el paciente. Tanto el coeficiente de validación para toda la prueba (r=0.87 como el coeficiente de confiabilidad de la parte autoadministrable (r=0.93 fueron elevados.

  9. Manual of recommendations for the diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of patients with Breast Cancer of the Tumor Center Munich - a regional hands-on publication

    OpenAIRE

    Janni, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The revised 11th edition of the Manual of Recommendations for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Follow-Up of Patients with Breast Cancer of the publications series of the Tumor Center Munich (Tumorzentrum München, TZM) is an excellent example of a regional hands-on publication which, while based on national and international guidelines, does not replace these. By virtue of countless additions and revisions in the course of 10 editions, the ‘blue tumor manual for breast cancer’ has matured into a ha...

  10. Advertisement for solar energy. Munich fairground buildings with the world`s biggest PV system; Werbung fuer Solarenergie. Messe Muenchen realisiert groesste Photovoltaikanlage der Welt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, W.

    1998-03-01

    On 19 November 1997, the 1 MW solar system of the new Munich fairground was commissioned on a bright and sunny day. According to the Bayernwerk AG, it is the world`s biggest roof-mounted photovoltaic system. It was constructed in only 10 months at a cost of DM 15 million. (orig.) [Deutsch] Bei strahlendem Sonnenschein wurde am 19. November 1997 auf dem Gelaende der Neuen Messe Muenchen die Ein-Megawatt-Solaranlage in Betrieb genommen. Nach Aussagen der Bayernwerk AG ist sie `die groesste Photovoltaik-Dachanlage der Welt`. Sie wurde in nur zehn Monaten Bauzeit auf den Hallendaechern installiert. Die Kosten beliefen sich auf 15 Mio DM. (orig.)

  11. Activity and practice of nuclear cardiology in the Czech Republic, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has been on the rise in Europe and the USA. Details on nuclear cardiology in the Czech Republic are not available as yet, as it is impossible to obtain comprehensive data from official registers owing to different methods of reporting and data evaluation. A questionnaire concerning nuclear cardiology activity and practice in 2001 was sent to all nuclear medicine departments in the Czech Republic. All 48 departments completed the questionnaire. In 2001, 50 planar and 54 tomographic (SPET) scintillation cameras were used. The average age of the SPET cameras was 5 years (13% of SPET cameras were >8 years old). Out of the 48 centres, 39 (81%) provided a nuclear cardiology service; the total number of cardiological studies was 15,740 in 2001 (1.5 studies/1,000 population/year). The most frequently employed method was MPI (81.7%), the frequency of which had increased by 10% compared with 2000; 26 of the 39 (67%) departments reported that MPI activity was increasing. Nevertheless, the Czech Republic nuclear cardiology activity remained below the European average (2.2/1,000 population in 1994) and, particularly, below activity in the USA (15/1,000 in 1997). The activity was rather unevenly spread. Whereas two centres with >1,000 studies/year accounted for 20% of the total MPI studies, 16 of 39 (41%) departments exhibited low activity (99mTc-MIBI (60% of total MPI), followed by 201Tl (21%) and 99mTc-tetrofosmin (19%). ECG-gated SPET was employed by 20/39 (51%) centres, of which 11 (28%) performed it as a standard examination; 39% of the total MPI studies included this technique. Thirteen percent (5/39) of the departments used attenuation correction, and 69% (27/39) of the departments used a prone projection. Equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography, with 2,317 examinations (14.7%), ranked second among all nuclear cardiology methods, followed by first-pass angiocardiography (406 studies, 2.6%) and 18F-FDG (163 studies, 1

  12. Japanese version of the Munich Parasomnia Screening: translation and linguistic validation of a screening instrument for parasomnias and nocturnal behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komada Y

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Yoko Komada,1 Raoul Breugelmans,2 Stephany Fulda,3 Sae Nakano,4 Aya Watanabe,4,5 Chieri Noda,4,6 Shingo Nishida,1 Yuichi Inoue1 1Department of Somnology, 2Department of Medical Education, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan; 3Sleep and Epilepsy Center, Neurocenter of Southern Switzerland, Civic Hospital (EOC of Lugano, Lugano, Switzerland; 4Department of International Medical Communications, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, 5Language Center, University of Fukui, Fukui, Japan; 6Department of Applied Linguistics and Communication, Birkbeck, University of London, London, UK Objective: There is no broad screening instrument that can comprehensively assess parasomnias and sleep-related movement disorders listed in the International Classification of Sleep Disorders. The aim of this study was to develop the Japanese version of the Munich Parasomnia Screening (MUPS, a screening instrument for parasomnias and nocturnal behaviors, which was developed and validated at the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry. Methods: A multi-step translation methodology consisting of forward translation, back translation, expert review, and cognitive debriefing interviews was performed between June and November 2011. Results: The English version of the MUPS was translated into Japanese, and the original author performed an expert review on the basis of a detailed report on the forward and back translation steps. The cognitive debriefing was carried out in five patients with parasomnia. The mean time to fill out the questionnaire was 8 minutes (ranging from 2 to 17 minutes. The authors reviewed and discussed the results of the cognitive debriefing interviews and modified the Japanese version. The final Japanese version was confirmed to be conceptually equivalent to the original English version. Conclusion: The Japanese version of the MUPS is an easy-to-use self-rating instrument for parasomnia and nocturnal behavior screening, consistent with the original version. The

  13. Germany: energy transition or revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germany has decided to phase out nuclear power by 2022 but it wants also to get rid of fossil energies by 2050. Those ambitious goals imply to be able to cut by half the demand for primary energy by 2050 which will be only possible if the need for building heating is cut by 80%, the constraint on transport is less important: one million of electrical vehicles will have to be on the road by 2020 and 3 millions 10 years later. In 2012 the production of electricity was made mainly from coal (44.7%), renewable energies (21.9%), nuclear energy (16%), natural gas (11.3%) and other energies (fuel...) (6.1%). Today the renewable energy sector is a major industrial sector in Germany, it represents about 382000 jobs directly or indirectly, it means more than the sector of conventional energies. (A.C.)

  14. A comparison of the quality of the information available on the internet on interventional radiology, vascular surgery, and cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Alsafi, A.; Kaya, G.; Patel, H; M S Hamady

    2013-01-01

    Context and Aims: Internet use is rapidly expanding and increasingly plays a substantial role in patient education. We sought to evaluate and compare the quality of information available to patients online on three closely linked specialties: Interventional radiology (IR), cardiology, and vascular surgery. Materials and Methods: We searched the leading three search engines for the terms: "Interventional Radiology", "cardiology," and "vascular surgery," collating the top 50 hits from each sear...

  15. Law And Economics In Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Kirstein, Roland

    1997-01-01

    Law and economics in Germany was dominated by regulation, competition, and ?German Ordnungspolitik? until the early 1970s. Since then, German scholars have published a broad body of work in German and in the English language, covering fields like contract law, environmental law, labor law, public law, bankruptcy law, constitutional economics and legal procedure. Also in the 1970s, teaching activities were started at German universities. In addition to this, several (bi)annual conferences on l...

  16. Undergraduate medical education in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenot, Jean-François

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to give international readers an overview of the organisation, structure and curriculum, together with important advances and problems, of undergraduate medical education in Germany. Interest in medical education in Germany has been relatively low but has gained momentum with the new "Regulation of the Licensing of Doctors" which came into effect in 2003. Medical education had required substantial reform, particularly with respect to improving the links between theoretical and clinical teaching and the extension of interdisciplinary and topic-related instruction. It takes six years and three months to complete the curriculum and training is divided into three sections: basic science (2 years, clinical science (3 years and final clinical year. While the reorganisation of graduate medical education required by the new "Regulation of the Licensing of Doctors" has stimulated multiple excellent teaching projects, there is evidence that some of the stipulated changes have not been implemented. Indeed, whether the medical schools have complied with this regulation and its overall success remains to be assessed systematically. Mandatory external accreditation and periodic reaccreditation of medical faculties need to be established in Germany.

  17. [The beginning of Mexican cardiology in the springtime of the Mexican National Academy of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    The National Academy of Medicine was founded 141 years ago during the French intervention. Under the sponsorship of this brand-new medical association, Mexican cardioangiology took its first steps in the medical and surgical field as well. After the falling of the second empire, the medical and surgical advances of this discipline continued. The corresponding publications appeared in different volumes of the "Gaceta Médica de México"; at present journal of the Academy still published in our time. These steps permitted the development of the true cardiologic speciality during 40s of the twentieth century, due to the vision of Professor Ignacio Chávez, father of Mexican cardiology. Some examples of application are the epistemologic criteria in cardiologycal domains such as the conception of Riva-Rocci's sphygmomanometer in Italy in the nineteenth century and the so-called cardiac metabolic therapy in Mexico of our time, are included. PMID:26549154

  18. Myocardial scintigraphy. Clinical use and consequence in a non-invasive cardiological department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dümcke, Christine Elisabeth; Graff, J; Rasmussen, SPL;

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is increasingly used for the diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease. The method is particularly applied as a gate keeper before coronary angiography (CAG) in patients with intermediate probability for ischaemic heart disease. This study aimed to...... analyse the clinical use of MPI in a university hospital without invasive cardiological laboratory. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the period 01.01.2002 to 31.12.2003, 259 patients (141 women, 118 men) were referred to MPI from our department of cardiology. RESULTS: Normal MPI was seen in 111 patients (43......%), whereas reversible ischaemia was seen in 88 patients (34%) and led to referral of 52 patients (59%) to CAG. 17 patients (19%) continued clinical control, and 19 cases (22%) were closed. Correlating results between MPI and all performed CAGs were found in 42 patients (61%), and divergent results were seen...

  19. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in Germany. Results of the 2005 query and current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The working group Cardiovascular Nuclear Medicine of the German Society of Nuclear Medicine (DGN), in cooperation with the working group Nuclear Cardiology of the German Cardiac Society (DGK), decided to conduct a national survey on myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). Method: a questionnaire to evaluate MPS for the year 2005 was sent. Results: 346 completed questionnaires had been returned (213 private practices, 99 hospitals and 33 university hospitals). MPS of 112 707 patients were reported with 110 747 stress and 95 878 rest studies. The majority (> 75%) was performed with 99mTc-MIBI or tetrofosmin. 201Tl stress-redistribution was used in 22 637 patients (20%). The types of stress were exercise in 78%, vasodilation with adenosine or dipyridamol in 21% and dobutamine in 1%. 99.97% of all MPS were SPECT studies. Gated SPECT was performed in 36% of the stress and in 32% of the rest studies. An attenuation correction was used in 21%. 29 institutions (8%) performed gated SPECT (stress and rest) and attenuation correction. 47% of all MPS were requested by ambulatory care cardiologists, 17% by internists, 12% by primary care physicians, 21% by hospital departments and 2% by others. Conclusion: in Germany, MPS is predominantly performed with 99mTc-perfusion agents. The common type of stress is ergometry. Gated SPECT and attenuation correction do not yet represent standards of MPS practice in Germany, which indicates some potential of optimization. (orig.)

  20. NORMAN HOLTER AND HIS METHOD OF REMOTE CARDIOLOGIC MONITORING. CASE HISTORY

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Rassadina; S. A. Tarakanov; V I Kuznetsov

    2013-01-01

    This publication is devoted to the personality and creative designs of uncommon American scientist, the engineer and the inventor – Norman Jefferis «Jeff» Holter. Norman Jefferis Holter introduced the terminology of «nuclear medicine» for the name of the new at that time area which associated with employment of the achievements of the nuclear physics in the medical goals. Also he is the author of ambulatory cardiological monitoring.

  1. Position paper on the importance of psychosocial factors in cardiology: Update 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Lederbogen, Florian; Albus, Christian; Angermann, Christiane; Borggrefe, Martin; Fischer, Denise; Fritzsche, Kurt; Haass, Markus; Jordan, Jochen; Jünger, Jana; Kindermann, Ingrid; Köllner, Volker; Kuhn, Bernhard; Scherer, Martin; Seyfarth, Melchior

    2014-01-01

    [english] Background: The rapid progress of psychosomatic research in cardiology and also the increasing impact of psychosocial issues in the clinical daily routine have prompted the Clinical Commission of the German Heart Society (DGK) to agree to an update of the first state of the art paper on this issue which was originally released in 2008.Methods: The circle of experts was increased, general aspects were implemented and the state of the art was updated. Particular emphasis was dedicated...

  2. Impact of cardiology referral: clinical outcomes and factors associated with physicians' adherence to recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André C. Marques

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Cardiology referral is common for patients admitted for non-cardiac diseases. Recommendations from cardiologists may involve complex and aggressive treatments that could be ignored or denied by other physicians. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of patients who were given recommendations during cardiology referrals and to examine the clinical outcomes of patients who did not follow the recommendations. METHODS: We enrolled 589 consecutive patients who received in-hospital cardiology consultations. Data on recommendations, implementation of suggestions and outcomes were collected. RESULTS: Regarding adherence of the referring service to the recommendations, 77% of patients were classified in the adherence group and 23% were classified in the non-adherence group. Membership in the non-adherence group (p<0.001; odds ratio: 10.25; 95% CI: 4.45-23.62 and advanced age (p = 0.017; OR: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.01-1.07 were associated with unfavorable outcomes. Multivariate analysis identified four independent predictors of adherence to recommendations: follow-up notes in the medical chart (p<0.001; OR: 2.43; 95% CI: 1.48-4.01; verbal reinforcement (p = 0.001; OR: 1.86; 95% CI: 1.23-2.81; a small number of recommendation (p = 0.001; OR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.80-0.94; and a younger patient age (p = 0.002; OR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.96-0.99. CONCLUSIONS: Poor adherence to cardiology referral recommendations was associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes. Follow-up notes in the medical chart, verbal reinforcement, a limited number of recommendations and a patient age were associated with greater adherence to recommendations.

  3. Imaging skills for transthoracic echocardiography in cardiology fellows: The value of motion metrics

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Montealegre-Gallegos; Feroze Mahmood; Han Kim; Remco Bergman; Mitchell, John D.; Ruma Bose; Hawthorne, Katie M.; T David O′Halloran; Vanessa Wong; Hess, Philip E.; Robina Matyal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Proficiency in transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) requires an integration of cognitive knowledge and psychomotor skills. Whereas cognitive knowledge can be quantified, psychomotor skills are implied after repetitive task performance. We applied motion analyses to evaluate psychomotor skill acquisition during simulator-based TTE training. Methods and Results: During the first month of their fellowship training, 16 cardiology fellows underwent a multimodal TTE training program for...

  4. Prescription pattern of fixed dose drug combination in cardiology department in a tertiary care hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Pramod Kumar Manjhi; Lalit Mohan; Manish Kumar; Harihar Dikshit; Singh, B. P.; Anuj Kumar Pathak; Sanjeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: A cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the most common causes of mortality and morbidity globally. The drastic change in the lifestyle of population during 21st century has had a great impact on health especially cardiovascular diseases. Objective of this study was to assess the prescription pattern of fixed dose drug combinations (FDCs) in the department of cardiology in a tertiary care hospital. Methods: The prescriptions of 210 patients suffered by cardiovascular disorders...

  5. NORMAN HOLTER AND HIS METHOD OF REMOTE CARDIOLOGIC MONITORING. CASE HISTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Rassadina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This publication is devoted to the personality and creative designs of uncommon American scientist, the engineer and the inventor – Norman Jefferis «Jeff» Holter. Norman Jefferis Holter introduced the terminology of «nuclear medicine» for the name of the new at that time area which associated with employment of the achievements of the nuclear physics in the medical goals. Also he is the author of ambulatory cardiological monitoring.

  6. Improved cardiovascular diagnostic accuracy by pocket size imaging device in non-cardiologic outpatients: the NaUSiCa (Naples Ultrasound Stethoscope in Cardiology study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiattarella Pier

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Miniaturization has evolved in the creation of a pocket-size imaging device which can be utilized as an ultrasound stethoscope. This study assessed the additional diagnostic power of pocket size device by both experts operators and trainees in comparison with physical examination and its appropriateness of use in comparison with standard echo machine in a non-cardiologic population. Three hundred four consecutive non cardiologic outpatients underwent a sequential assessment including physical examination, pocket size imaging device and standard Doppler-echo exam. Pocket size device was used by both expert operators and trainees (who received specific training before the beginning of the study. All the operators were requested to give only visual, qualitative insights on specific issues. All standard Doppler-echo exams were performed by expert operators. One hundred two pocket size device exams were performed by experts and two hundred two by trainees. The time duration of the pocket size device exam was 304 ± 117 sec. Diagnosis of cardiac abnormalities was made in 38.2% of cases by physical examination and in 69.7% of cases by physical examination + pocket size device (additional diagnostic power = 31.5%, p In conclusion, pocket size device showed a relevant additional diagnostic value in comparison with physical examination. Sensitivity and specificity were good in experts and suboptimal in trainees. Specificity was particularly influenced by the level of experience. Training programs are needed for pocket size device users.

  7. Wind power report Germany 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Record year 2014. In Germany, the expansion figures attained were so high on land and at sea that the overall new installation figure of 5,188 MW surpassed the previous maximum (from 2002) by more than 60%. With an overall capacity of 39,259 MW, for the first time, wind energy in Germany covers 9.7% of gross power consumption. On the global scale a capacity of more than 51,000 MW has been added - another record high for wind energy installations. Power mix. At 161 TWh, renewable energies in Germany covered 27.8% of gross power consumption and provided for the first time more energy than any other energy source. Coming into force of the new REA in August 2014, modified support schemes caused the expansion of biogas plants and large-scale PV installations to falter. The record expansion seen for wind energy can be interpreted as a pull-forward effect due to the tender procedures coming into force in 2017. Grid integration. Loss of production caused by feed-in management measures rose by 44% to 555 GWh as compared to 2012. Wind turbines were affected in 87% of cases but the impact on PV installations is increasing. Power generation must be more flexible and grids expanded to limit loss of production. Of the 23 expansion projects (1,887 km) in the Electricity Grid Expansion Act, just a quarter of them had been realized by the end of 2014 (463 km). In the preliminary analysis results for the 2014 grid development plan, the extent of grid upgrading and conversion was 3050 km. Offshore, the HelWin 1 grid link with a capacity of 580 MW went online. SylWin 1 and BorWin 2, with a total capacity of 1660 MW, are currently being tested in a trial. In the preliminary analysis results for the 2014 offshore grid development plan, grid connections having an overall capacity of 10.3 GW are planned. Onshore. 2014 saw a total of 44 different turbine types installed in Germany. For the first time, virtually the same number of turbines were added in the 3-4 MW class, as in the 2-3 MW

  8. Assessment and Utility of Frailty Measures in Critical Illness, Cardiology, and Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabali, Naheed; Rolfson, Darryl; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2016-09-01

    Frailty is a clearly emerging theme in acute care medicine, with obvious prognostic and health resource implications. "Frailty" is a term used to describe a multidimensional syndrome of loss of homeostatic reserves that gives rise to a vulnerability to adverse outcomes after relatively minor stressor events. This is conceptually simple, yet there has been little consensus on the operational definition. The gold standard method to diagnose frailty remains a comprehensive geriatric assessment; however, a variety of validated physical performance measures, judgement-based tools, and multidimensional scales are being applied in critical care, cardiology, and cardiac surgery settings, including open cardiac surgery and transcatheter aortic value replacement. Frailty is common among patients admitted to the intensive care unit and correlates with an increased risk for adverse events, increased resource use, and less favourable patient-centred outcomes. Analogous findings have been described across selected acute cardiology and cardiac surgical settings, in particular those that commonly intersect with critical care services. The optimal methods for screening and diagnosing frailty across these settings remains an active area of investigation. Routine assessment for frailty conceivably has numerous purported benefits for patients, families, health care providers, and health administrators through better informed decision-making regarding treatments or goals of care, prognosis for survival, expectations for recovery, risk of complications, and expected resource use. In this review, we discuss the measurement of frailty and its utility in patients with critical illness and in cardiology and cardiac surgery settings. PMID:27476983

  9. Sports cardiology: lessons from the past and perspectives for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leischik, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of myocardial damage as a result of endurance sport has been known about since ancient times. According to a leg-end, a soldier named Pheidippides (more likely Philippides) dropped dead after run-ning from war-torn Marathon to Athens with the news of victory. Millennia later, we do not know whether he was a soldier or a courier, or whether he really ran the entire 240 km from Athens to Sparta and then back from Marathon to Athens. What is clear however, is that his death went down in history as the first documented exercise-related death and provides a tangible starting-point for the discipline of sport cardiology. Sports cardiology today covers a broad range of areas; from patients with cardiomyopathies, coronary disease and metabolic syndrome through to fitness fans, high-performance athletes and those with physically demanding professions. The following editorial introduces the primary topics for discussion to be included in the F1000Research channel Sports cardiology with the hope that this will evoke open, controversial and broad discourse in the form of reviews and original research papers in this important field. PMID:26097692

  10. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices.

  11. Heart failure association of the European society of cardiology specialist heart failure curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, Theresa A; Gardner, Roy S; Lainscak, Mitja; Nielsen, Olav W; Parissis, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Anker, Stefan D

    2014-02-01

    It is well established that organized care of heart failure patients, including specialist management by cardiologists, improves patient outcomes. In response to this, other national training bodies (the UK and the USA) have developed heart failure subspecialty curricula within their Cardiology Training Curricula. In addition, European Society of Cardiology (ESC) subspecialty curricula exist for Interventional Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Management. The purpose of this heart failure curriculum is to provide a framework which can be used as a blueprint for training across Europe. This blueprint mirrors other ESC curricula. Each section has three components: the knowledge required, the skills which are necessary, and the professionalism (attitudes and behaviours) which should be attained. The programme is designed to last 2 years. The first year is devoted to the specialist heart failure module. The second year allows completion of the optional modules of advanced imaging, device therapy for implanters, cardiac transplantation, and mechanical circulatory support. The second year can also be devoted to continuation of specialist heart failure training and/or research for those not wishing to continue with the advanced modules.

  12. Dose to patients and professionals in cardiology interventional: Progress of multicenter group Doccaci; Dosis a pacientes y a profesionales en cardiologia intervencionista: Avances del grupo multicentrico DOCCACI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, R. M.; Vano, E.; Fernandez, J. M.; Goicolea Ruigomez, J.; Pifarre, X.; Escaned, J.; Rovira, J. J.; Garcia del Blanco, B.; Carrera, F.; Diaz, J. F.; Ordiales, J. M.; Nogales, J. M.; Hernandez, J.; Bosa, F.; Rosales, F.; Saez, J. R.; Soler, M. M.; Romero, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    The multidisciplinary group and multicenter DOCCACI (dosimetry and quality assurance in interventional cardiology), sponsored by the section of haemodynamics of the Spanish society of Cardiology, is intended to propose reference levels to doses received by patients in interventional cardiology procedures such as recommended by the International Commission on radiological protection It also investigates the doses received by professionals, in particular dose in Crystallyne whose recommended limit dose has been reduced recently from 150 to 20 mSv/year. (Author)

  13. Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Koelman, Jos

    2001-01-01

    The German system of higher education is a binary system that consists of a university and a non-university sector. The institutions of higher education in these two sectors include all institutions (public and private) as defined in the higher education laws of the Länder. Each Land has its own ministry responsible for higher education. At the federal level the Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung is responsible for the implementation of the federal law on higher education (Hochschulr...

  14. Electricity Market Design for Germany

    OpenAIRE

    REES, Ray; Scholz, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Germany has two ambitious goals: It wants to generate 20% of its electricity from renewable sources by 2020; and it wants to reach its nuclear phase-out target by 2021, according to the Atomic Energy Law of 2002. To be successful, it needs a strong transmission network that connects the offshore wind parks at the North and Baltic Sea with regions of high population and industry densities. At the same time it has to be keeping its generation capacity at a high enough level. This paper describe...

  15. Perspectives for Germany's Energy Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Kemfert; Jochen Diekmann

    2006-01-01

    For various reasons, the policies governing the energy sector have a central role to play in Germany. Thus, for example, competition on the electricity and gas markets will have to be increased considerably in the course of the market's liberalization. At the same time, a secure supply of energy must also be ensured, in other words, the matters of preventing short-term power outages while ensuring the long-term availability of energy resources must be dealt with. Last but not least, the envir...

  16. The visual arts influence in Nazi Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Bie Yanan

    2016-01-01

    This article will discuss the influence of visual art in Nazi Germany from two parts of visual arts, which are political photography and poster propaganda, analyzing the unique social and historical stage of Nazi Germany. And it emphasizes the ideology of the Nazis, which in Nazi Germany inflamed the political sentiment of the masses and took the visual art as their important instrument of political propaganda, while Nazi party used visual art on anti-society and war which is worth warning an...

  17. Wage Mobility in East and West Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Regina T. Riphahn; Schnitzlein, Daniel D.

    2011-01-01

    This article studies the long run patterns and explanations of wage mobility as a characteristic of regional labor markets. Using German administrative data we describe wage mobility since 1975 in West and since 1992 in East Germany. Wage mobility declined substantially in East Germany in the 1990s and moderately in East and West Germany since the late 1990s. Therefore, wage mobility does not balance recent increases in cross-sectional wage inequality. We apply RIF (recentered influence funct...

  18. Equality of opportunity: East vs. West Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Peichl, Andreas; Ungerer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The case of German reunification has been subject to extensive research on earnings inequality and labor market integration. however, little is known about the development of equality of opportunity (EOp) in East and West Germany after 1990.Using German micro data, we empirically analyze how circumstances beyond the sphere of individual control explain inequality in East and West Germany. Our results suggest that equal opportunities in Germany have grown since reunification. Interestingly, EO...

  19. Business environment and enterprise behaviour in East Germany compared to West Germany and central Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Libor Krkoska; Katrin Robeck

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines institutional differences between the former East and West Germany and four central European transition countries (the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and the Slovak Republic). Using enterprise survey data we show that the quality of both formal and informal institutions in East Germany still differs from West Germany. In addition, central European transition countries are shown to have closed the gap in institutional quality with East Germany in many areas. We also show t...

  20. Recycling of plastics in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article deals with the waste management of post-consumer plastics in Germany and its potential to save fossil fuels and reduce CO2 emissions. Since most experience is available for packaging, the paper first gives an overview of the legislative background and the material flows for this sector. Then recycling and recovery processes for plastics waste from all sectors are assessed in terms of their contribution to energy saving and CO2 abatement. Practically all the options studied show a better performance than waste treatment in an average incinerator which has been chosen as the reference case. High ecological benefits can be achieved by mechanical recycling if virgin polymers are substituted. The paper then presents different scenarios for managing plastic waste in Germany in 1995: considerable savings can be made by strongly enhancing the efficiency of waste incinerators. Under these conditions the distribution of plastics waste among mechanical recycling, feedstock recycling and energy recovery has a comparatively mall impact on the overall results. The maximum savings amount to 74 PJ of energy, i.e, 9% of the chemical sector energy demand in 1995 and 7.0 Mt CO2, representing 13% of the sector's emissions. The assessment does not support a general recommendation of energy recovery due to the large difference between the German average and the best available municipal waste-to-energy facilities and also due to new technological developments in the field of mechanical recycling

  1. Mathematical Performance of Students with Special Needs in Secondary Schools. An Exploratory Study of the Fifth to the Ninth Grade in Munich Special Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Gebhardt

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The major goal of the Test was to determine mathematical skills of students with special educational needs (SEN from fifth to ninth grade. Based on a sample of 124 students with special educational needs (SEN of three special schools in Munich it is shown, that the skills are within a very heterogeneous range. As a general rule basic mathematical skills, such as quantity-number competencies and knowledge of mathematical conventions and rules, were not applied properly by most of the students. Although in average the math skills improve in higher grades, school performance by grade level and age were no significant in the regression models. There is a significant connection between "necessary support" and the "state after the regular curriculum" mathematics performance.

  2. The 17{sup th} European photovoltaic solar energy conference and exhibition in Munich from a Swiss point of view; Die 17. europaeische Photovoltaikkonferenz in Muenchen aus Schweizer Sicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, S.

    2002-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) summarises the photovoltaics (PV) conference and exhibition held in Munich in October 2001 from the Swiss point of view. The contributions made by representatives of Swiss institutions and companies are presented including papers on the progress being made in third generation crystalline and multi-crystalline silicon technology, amorphous and micro-crystalline silicon solar cells, thin film solar cells based on compound semiconductors and thermo-photovoltaics. Further papers deal with PV modules on the market, building-integrated solar power systems and new developments in PV systems technology. The exhibition that accompanied the conference, including the 12 Swiss exhibitors who were present, is reviewed as are international market developments. Contributions concerning the application of photovoltaics in developing countries are also reviewed.

  3. Optimization of a partially non-magnetic primary radiation shielding for the triple-axis spectrometer PANDA at the Munich high-flux reactor FRM-II

    CERN Document Server

    Pyka, N M; Rogov, A

    2002-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been used to optimize the monochromator shielding of the polarized cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer PANDA at the Munich high-flux reactor FRM-II. By using the Monte Carlo program MCNP-4B, the density of the total spectrum of incoming neutrons and gamma radiation from the beam tube SR-2 has been determined during the three-dimensional diffusion process in different types of heavy concrete and other absorbing material. Special attention has been paid to build a compact and highly efficient shielding, partially non-magnetic, with a total biological radiation dose of less than 10 mu Sv/h at its outsides. Especially considered was the construction of an albedo reducer, which serves to reduce the background in the experiment outside the shielding. (orig.)

  4. History of anesthesia in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawersik, J

    1991-01-01

    The first ether anesthetic was administered in Germany by J.F. Heyfelder (1798-1869) at the Erlangen University Hospital on January 24, 1847. Thereafter, famous discoveries occurred in the field of pharmacology. Albert Niemann isolated cocaine from the coca shrub in 1860; Emil Fischer synthesized the first barbiturate, Veronal, in 1902; and Helmut Weese promoted the first ultra-short-acting barbiturate, hexobarbital (Evipan), in 1932. The local anesthetic effect of cocaine was reported by Koller at the Congress of the German Society for Ophthalmology on September 15, 1884, in Heidelberg. Many new techniques were tried first in German hospitals. Friedrich Trendelenburg carried out, by tracheotomy, the first operation with endotracheal intubation in 1869, and Franz Kuhn promoted and clinically practiced endotracheal intubation in Heidelberg beginning in 1900. August Bier performed the first operation under spinal anesthesia at the Kiel University Hospital on August 16, 1898. Carl Ludwig Schleich (1859-1922) standardized the methods of infiltration anesthesia by using a cocaine solution in sufficient dilution. The development of anesthesia machines was greatly influenced by Heinrich Dräger (1847-1917) and his son Bernhard Dräger (1870-1928). The Dräger Company in Lübeck built the first anesthesia machine with a carbon dioxide (CO2) absorber and circle system in 1925. Paul Sudeck and Helmut Schmidt worked with this system at the Hamburg University Hospital and reported their results in 1926. The first Dräger anesthesia machine was produced in 1902 and introduced into clinical use by Otto Roth (1863-1944) in Lübeck. Before the Second World War, three universities in Germany carried out research in the field of anesthesia: the University of Freiburg with H. Killian, the University of Hamburg with P. Sudeck and H. Schmidt, and the University of Würzburg with C.G. Gauss. Killian and Gauss established the first journals, Der Schmerz and Narkose und Anaesthesie, in

  5. CPAFFC Agricultural Delegation Visits Germany and Austria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Germany-China Friendship Association-Stuttgart (GCFA-Stuttgart) and the Austrian-Chinese Friendship Association (ACFA),a delegation for studying agriculture composed of members from localities organized and sent by the CPAFFC paid a visit to Germany and Austria from June 11 to 23. The delegation visited farms and

  6. Recent facts about photovoltaics in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Harry (comp.)

    2015-10-16

    Germany is leaving the age of fossil fuel behind. In building a sustainable energy future, photovoltaics is going to have an important role. The following summary consists of the most recent facts, figures and findings and shall assist in forming an overall assessment of the photovoltaic expansion in Germany.

  7. Transforming Higher Education in East Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rudder, Helmut

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of higher education in the former German Democratic Republic looks at the common historical roots of central European universities, the different directions higher education took in East and West Germany after 1945, and the current turbulent transformation of higher education in East Germany during German unification. (Author/MSE)

  8. Mental health of Turkish women in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bromand, Z; Temur-Erman, S; Yesil, R;

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the protective and risk factors of mental distress among Turkish women living in Germany.......The purpose of the present study was to examine the protective and risk factors of mental distress among Turkish women living in Germany....

  9. Utility of hand-held echocardiography in outpatient pediatric cardiology management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Alan; Sable, Craig; Prasad, Aparna; Spurney, Christopher; Harahsheh, Ashraf; Clauss, Sarah; Colyer, Jessica; Gierdalski, Marcin; Johnson, Ashley; Pearson, Gail D; Rosenthal, Joanna

    2014-12-01

    Adult patient series have shown hand-held echocardiography (echo) units (HHE) to be accurate for rapid diagnosis and triage. This is the first study to evaluate the ability of HHE to inform decision making in outpatient pediatric cardiology. New pediatric cardiology patients in outpatient clinics staffed by six pediatric cardiologists (experience 1-17 years) were prospectively enrolled if an echocardiogram (echo) was ordered during their initial visit. After history and physical examination and before a standard echo, the cardiologists performed a bedside HHE examination (GE Vscan 1.7-3.8 MHz), documented findings, and made a clinical decision. Diagnoses and decisions based on HHE were compared with final management after the standard echo. The study enrolled 101 subjects (ages 9 days to 19 years). The cardiologists considered HHE imaging adequate for decision making for 80 of the 101 subjects. For 77 of the 80 subjects with acceptable HHE imaging (68/68 normal and 9/12 abnormal standard echoes), the HHE-based primary diagnoses and decisions agreed with the final management. The sensitivity of HHE was 75 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 43-94 %) and the positive predictive value 100 % (95 % CI 66-100 %) for pediatric heart disease. The agreement between standard echocardiography and HHE imaging was substantial (κ = 0.82). Excluding one of the least experienced cardiologists, HHE provided the basis for correct cardiac diagnoses and management for all the subjects with acceptable HHE imaging (58/58 normal and 9/9 abnormal echoes). In outpatient pediatric cardiology, HHE has potential as a tool to complement physical examination. Further investigation is needed to evaluate how value improves with clinical experience.

  10. Development of pediatric cardiology in latin america: accomplishments and remaining challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Horacio; Kreutzer, Christian; Kreutzer, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    Until the first quarter of the 20th century, most physicians were more than happy to differentiate congenital heart lesions from rheumatic heart disease, which then was rampant. As early as 1932, Dr Rodolfo Kreutzer, from Buenos Aires, Argentina, was already involved in the study of congenital heart defects. He started off assessing children with a stethoscope and with Einthoven electrocardiography equipment. The cardiac unit at the Buenos Aires Children's Hospital was created in 1936. It established the onset of pediatric cardiology in Argentina and fueled its development in South America. Nearly at the same time, Agustin Castellanos from Cuba also became a pioneer in the assessment of congenital heart disease. He described the clinical applications of intravenous angiocardiography in 1937. Meanwhile in Mexico, Dr Ignacio Chavez founded the National Institute of Cardiology in 1944 in Mexico City. It was the first center in the world to be exclusively devoted to cardiology. From this center, Victor Rubio and Hugo Limon performed the first therapeutic cardiac catheterization in 1953. Meanwhile, Professor Euriclydes Zerbini from Sao Paulo, Brazil, built the largest and most important school of cardiac surgeons in South America. In Santiago, Chile, the Calvo Makenna Hospital was the center where Helmut Jaegger operated on the first infant with extracorporeal circulation in Latin America in 1956. The patient was a 1-month-old baby, with complete transposition of the great arteries, who underwent an Albert procedure. Currently, there are many fully equipped centers all over the region, capable of dealing with most lesions and of providing excellent medical, interventional, and surgical treatment. Outcomes have improved substantially over the last 20 years. These achievements have gone beyond our pioneers' dreams. However, many neonates and young infants die prior to surgery because referral centers are overburdened and have long surgical waiting lists. Clearly, we still

  11. Protection against ionizing radiation by leaded glass googles during interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: It is not known whether leaded glass goggles with 0.25 mm Pb equivalency, used in interventional cardiology procedures, attenuate radiation below the levels established by the latest recommendation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Aim: To assess if the degree of attenuation of the secondary ionizing radiation achieved by the use of 0.25 mm Pb leaded glass goggles, in occupationally exposed workers in interventional cardiology procedures, meets the latest ICRP recommendations. Material and Methods : A prospective investigation was carried out to compare the eye exposure to secondary ionizing radiation received by occupationally exposed personnel in a 9 months period. A set of two thermo luminescent dosimeters was arranged in the front and back of leaded glass goggles in a cohort of seven members of an interventional cardiology service, exposed to 1057 consecutive procedures. Results:The monthly dose equivalent measurement performed in front of the goggles ranged between 1.1 and 6.5 mSv,for paramedics and interventional cardiologists. The radiation measured in the back of the glass varied between 0.66 and 2.75 mSv,respectively.The degree of attenuation of the dose at eye level ranged from 40% to 57.7%,respectively. The projected annual exposure would reach 33 mSv for the interventional cardiologist. Conclusions: With a similar load of work and wearing 0.25 mm Pb equivalent glass goggles, interventional cardiologists will exceed the crystalline equivalent dose limit recommended by the ICRP (20 mSv/year averaged over the past 5 years)

  12. Waste management strategy in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Federal Republic of Germany intends to dispose of all types of radioactive waste in deep geological formations. The Federal Government made a pronounced change in energy policy since 1998, the most important feature of which is phasing out of nuclear energy, finally set in force by the April 2002 amendment of the Atomic Energy Act. According to the new approach to waste management and disposal, further sites in various host rocks shall be investigated for their suitability based on repository site selection criteria and respective procedures developed by a special expert group. The objective of the site selection procedure is to identify with public participation potential disposal sites in a comprehensible and reliable way. (author)

  13. Biomarkers in Cardiology - Part 2: In Coronary Heart Disease, Valve Disease and Special Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are the main causes of mortality and morbidity in Brazil. Their primary and secondary preventions are a priority for the health system and require multiple approaches for increased effectiveness. Biomarkers are tools used to identify with greater accuracy high-risk individuals, establish a faster diagnosis, guide treatment, and determine prognosis. This review aims to highlight the importance of biomarkers in clinical cardiology practice and raise relevant points regarding their application and perspectives for the next few years. This document was divided into two parts. This second part addresses the application of biomarkers in coronary heart disease, valvular diseases, cardio-oncology, pulmonary embolism, and cardiorenal syndrome.

  14. [Quality system in cardiology: practical example to develop an organizational model for management certification without bureaucracy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonna, Paolo; Pasini, Evasio; Pitocchi, Oreste; Bovenzi, Francesco; Sorino, Margherita; de Luca, Italo

    2003-04-01

    It is a difficult task to define practical guidelines and a pragmatic achievement for the new document of the Italian Ministry of Health for structures of the national health system obtaining a quality system according to the ISO 9000 standard. The present article illustrates the different steps to accomplish the quality management in our cardiology department, recently internationally certified, and it gives several practical examples of the path followed in the different sections of the department to obtain the best management of all the Operative Units, identifying customer requests and measuring customer satisfaction. PMID:12784767

  15. THE ROLE OF P-GLYCOPROTEIN IN RATIONAL PHARMACOTHERAPY IN CARDIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Shulkin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the analysis of published data the role of P-glycoprotein, carrier protein, in rational pharmacotherapy in cardiology was shown on the example of its substrates – digoxin, antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants. Determination of C3435T polymorphism of multidrug resistance gene (MDR1, encoding P-glycoprotein, in pharmacotherapy with digoxin, antiplatelet drugs (clopidogrel tikagrelol, prasugrel and anticoagulants (dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, edoxaban is not feasible in routine practice. Drug in- teractions have clinical implications for the efficacy and safety of pharmacotherapy in coadministration of these drugs with P-glycoprotein substrates, inducers and inhibitors.

  16. THE ROLE OF P-GLYCOPROTEIN IN RATIONAL PHARMACOTHERAPY IN CARDIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Shulkin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the analysis of published data the role of P-glycoprotein, carrier protein, in rational pharmacotherapy in cardiology was shown on the example of its substrates – digoxin, antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants. Determination of C3435T polymorphism of multidrug resistance gene (MDR1, encoding P-glycoprotein, in pharmacotherapy with digoxin, antiplatelet drugs (clopidogrel tikagrelol, prasugrel and anticoagulants (dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, edoxaban is not feasible in routine practice. Drug in- teractions have clinical implications for the efficacy and safety of pharmacotherapy in coadministration of these drugs with P-glycoprotein substrates, inducers and inhibitors.

  17. Nuclear cardiological investigations in patients classified as physically disabled following myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    110 patients classified as physically disabled as a consequence of myocardial infarction were reinvestigated by means of nuclear cardiological methods. Resting 201Tl perfusion scintigraphy showed a normal distribution of radioactivity, while radionuclide ventriculography revealed a normal left ventricular ejection fraction and a normokinetic left ventricle in 20 patients. The investigation of a further 19 patients demonstrated only minimal pathological changes. The results in 34 patients revealed severe myocardial damage, and in a further 19 cases the development of left ventricular aneurysm. The results clearly show the value of 201Tl scintigraphy and radionuclide ventriculography in assessments of the degree of physical disability after myocardial infarction. (author) 15 refs.; 3 tabs

  18. Clinical applications of exercise nuclear cardiology studies in the era of healthcare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, D S; Kiat, H; Friedman, J D; Diamond, G

    1995-04-13

    The challenge for nuclear cardiology is to demonstrate that it can provide more information than competitive modalities at comparable or lower cost. In considering patients for nuclear cardiology procedures, presentations can be divided into 9 subsets: within each subset, nuclear cardiology tests should be employed where incremental information is provided over the information available without performing the test. (1) Patients with no known coronary artery disease (CAD); for diagnosis, nuclear imaging is useful in patients with intermediate probability of CAD. For prognosis, assessment is based on extent of ischemia, where we have shown that nuclear testing provides incremental information, especially in patients with a high likelihood of CAD, such as those with typical angina. In the remaining categories (2-9), nuclear cardiology studies are predominantly used for purposes of risk stratification. Here the greatest value is in patients deemed to be at intermediate risk before nuclear testing. (2) Postmyocardial infarction: stress nuclear imaging provides an alternative to angiography for risk assessment of clinically uncomplicated patients. (3) Poor ventricular function: Nuclear testing is particularly useful for differentiating patients with hibernating myocardium (the defect is reversible), with stunned myocardium (no defect is present), or with myocardial infarction (the defect is persistent). (4) Unstable angina: Following current federal guidelines, nuclear imaging in medically stabilized low-to-intermediate risk patients with unstable angina is likely to increase. (5) Postcatheterization patients: Nuclear imaging is useful when there is uncertainty regarding the choice of medical management or revascularization. (6) Pre-noncardiac surgery patients: Nuclear imaging is clearly helpful in patients with intermediate clinical risk and may provide useful information in clinically high-risk patients. (7) Post-PTCA patients: Due to the intermediate likelihood of

  19. [Quality system in cardiology: practical example to develop an organizational model for management certification without bureaucracy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonna, Paolo; Pasini, Evasio; Pitocchi, Oreste; Bovenzi, Francesco; Sorino, Margherita; de Luca, Italo

    2003-04-01

    It is a difficult task to define practical guidelines and a pragmatic achievement for the new document of the Italian Ministry of Health for structures of the national health system obtaining a quality system according to the ISO 9000 standard. The present article illustrates the different steps to accomplish the quality management in our cardiology department, recently internationally certified, and it gives several practical examples of the path followed in the different sections of the department to obtain the best management of all the Operative Units, identifying customer requests and measuring customer satisfaction.

  20. [Pay for performance approach and its possible future influence on revenues in German interventional cardiology units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljak, Tomislav; Rupp, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Pay-for-performance in German health care system is still uncommon but--in view of scheduled legislative projects--could gain more influence in future. Beside others, risc adjusted in-hospital mortality and the door-to-ballon-time inpatients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction could become quality- and performance indicators in interventional cardiology units. As a result, process optimization based on these indicators could have an impact on both patient value (as already today) and revenues (from 2017 onwards). PMID:26800075

  1. [Glycaemic management in type 1 and 2 diabetes patients undergoing interventional cardiology procedures. Heart and Diabetes Working Group. Sociedad Espan˜ola de Cardiologı´a. Sociedad Espan˜ola de Diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-García, Angeles; Moreno Gómez, Raúl; Miranda Guardiola, Faustino; Artola-Menéndez, Sara; Lisbona-Gil, Arturo

    2012-03-01

    Despite the growing number of therapeutic alternatives available as well as general reviews and treatment guidelines for the treatment of diabetes, physicians are often left without a clear pathway of therapy to follow in specific clinical contexts such as interventional cardiology. The present document proposes a consensus treatment algorithm, based both on a critical appraisal of evidence from recent clinical trials and on value judgements supported by the authors' collective clinical knowledge and experience, in an attempt to guide practitioners when choosing the most appropriate alternatives in the context of glycemic management in type 1 and 2 diabetic patients scheduled to undergo interventional cardiology procedures in a haemodynamic laboratory.

  2. [Advance in diagnosis and treatment of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease with traditional Chinese medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Rong; Wang, Jiel; Liu, Wei

    2015-02-01

    To discuss the etiology, pathogenesis, therapies and prescriptions of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease. According to the advance in modern diagnosis and treatment, the authors believed that psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease is closely related with mental stresses, like anxiety, depression and insomnia. It is mostly caused by emotional injury and expressed in heart, liver, spleen and kidney. The pathogenesis is heart-liver hyperactivity, yin deficiency in heart and kidney, and insufficiency in heart and spleen. The full recognition of etiology and pathogenesis of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease and the combined treatment of disease and syndromes are of great significance to reduce mental stress and other risk factors, prevent and treat coronary heart disease and improve prognosis.

  3. The role of psychology in a pediatric outpatient cardiology setting: preliminary results from a new clinical program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosig, Cheryl; Yang, Kai; Hoffmann, Raymond G; Dasgupta, Mahua; Mussatto, Kathleen

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a descriptive analysis of a new clinical program integrating psychology services within a pediatric outpatient cardiology clinic. Patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) (n = 79) were referred for psychological services by their pediatric cardiologist. Parents completed the child behavior checklist, and the pediatric quality of life inventory generic core scales (PedsQL parent report). Teachers completed the teacher report form. Reasons for referral included: emotional problems (29%); attention problems (25%); learning problems (22%); behavior problems (16%); and developmental delay (8%). Parents and teachers reported higher rates of behavior problems and lower quality of life scores than the general population. Psychological evaluation suggested that incorporating a psychologist within a pediatric cardiology clinic may be beneficial for children with CHD in order to optimize their psychosocial functioning. Practice implications for implementing psychology services within a pediatric outpatient cardiology program are discussed.

  4. Improving Access to Pediatric Cardiology in Cape Verde via a Collaborative International Telemedicine Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapão, Luís Velez; Correia, Artur

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the role of international telemedicine services in supporting the evacuation procedures from Cape Verde to Portugal, enabling better quality and cost reductions in the management of the global health system. The Cape Verde, as other African countries, health system lacks many medical specialists, like pediatric cardiologists, neurosurgery, etc. In this study, tele-cardiology shows good results as diagnostic support to the evacuation decision. Telemedicine services show benefits while monitoring patients in post-evacuation, helping to address the lack of responsive care in some specialties whose actual use will help save resources both in provision and in management of the evacuation procedures. Additionally, with tele-cardiology collaborative service many evacuations can be avoided whereas many cases will be treated and followed locally in Cape Verde with remote technical support from Portugal. This international telemedicine service enabled more efficient evacuations, by reducing expenses in travel and housing, and therefore contributed to the health system's improvement. This study provides some evidence of how important telemedicine really is to cope with both the geography and the shortage of physicians. PMID:25980705

  5. Anticoagulation control in atrial fibrillation patients present to outpatient clinic of cardiology versus anticoagulant clinics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Xin; MA Chang-sheng; LIU Xiao-hui; DONG Jian-zeng; WANG Jun-nan; CHENG Xiao-jing

    2005-01-01

    @@ Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice, which if untreated results in a doubling of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. AF is an independent predictor of stroke, with an annual risk 5 to 6 times higher than patients in sinus rhythm.1 During recent years, several randomised clinical trials conducted by investigators around the world involving 13 843 participants with NVAF have demonstrated convincingly the value of warfarin therapies for stroke prevention in high risk patients.2-8 However, the dose response of warfarin is complex and its activity is easily altered by concurrent medications, food interactions, alcohol and illnesses. Adherence to medical advice and routine monitoring of the international normalized ratio (INR) is important, because low anticoagulant intensity predisposes the patients to thromboembolic complications and high intensity to haemorrhage. Studies suggested that anticoagulant clinics could improve the quality of anticoagulation control,9 and anticoagulant clinics are common in western countries. However, in China, most AF patients taking warfarin usually attend the outpatient clinic of cardiology, while the quality of anticoagulation control is never investigated. We therefore assessed anticoagulation control in the outpatient clinic of cardiology, and the quality of anticoagulation control since the establishment of anticoagulant clinics.

  6. Pulse waveform analysis as a bridge between pulse examination in Chinese medicine and cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá Ferreira, Arthur; Lopes, Agnaldo José

    2013-04-01

    Pulse examination was probably the earliest attempt to distinguish between health and illnesses. Starting at the pre-Hippocratic era, Chinese medicine practitioners developed techniques for pulse examination and defined pulse images based on their perceptions of pulse waveforms at the radial artery. Pulse images were described using basic variables (frequency, rhythm, wideness, length, deepness, and qualities) developed under philosophical trends such as Taoism and Confucianism. Recent advances in biomedical instrumentation applied to cardiology opened possibilities to research on pulse examination based on ancient Chinese medical theories: the pulse wave analysis. Although strongly influenced by philosophy, some characteristics used to describe a pulse image are interpretable as parameters obtained by pulse waveform analysis such as pulse wave velocity and augmentation index. Those clinical parameters reflect concepts unique to Chinese medicine - such as yinyang - while are based on wave reflection and resonance theories of fluids mechanics. Major limitations for integration of Chinese and Western pulse examination are related to quantitative description of pulse images and pattern differentiation based on pulse examination. Recent evidence suggests that wave reflection and resonance phenomena may bridge Chinese medicine and cardiology to provide a more evidence-based medical practice. PMID:23546634

  7. Therapeutic approach to patients complaining of high blood pressure in a cardiological emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gus

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the management of patients complaining of high blood pressure (BP in a cardiological emergency room. METHODS: Patients referred to the cardiological emergency room with the main complaint of high blood pressure were consecutively selected. The prescriptions and the choice of antihypertensive drugs were assessed. The classification of these patients as hypertensive emergencies or pseudoemergencies, according to the physician who provided initial care, was recorded. RESULTS: From a total of 858 patients presenting to the emergency room, 80 (9.3% complained of high BP, and 61 (76.3% received antihypertensive drugs. Sublingual nifedipine was the most commonly used drug (59%. One patient received intravenous medication, one patient was hospitalized and 6 patients (7.5% were classified as hypertensive emergencies or pseudoemergencies. CONCLUSION: High BP could seldom be classified as a hypertensive emergency or pseudoemergency, even though it was a frequent complaint (9.3% of visits. Currently, the therapeutic approach is not recommended, even in specialized clinics.

  8. Evaluation of doses to staff involved in interventional cardiology in two Khartoum hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In interventional cardiac procedures, staff operates near the patient in a non-uniformly scattered radiation field. Consequently, workers may receive, over a period of time, relatively high radiation doses. The measurement of individual doses to personnel becomes critical due to the use of protective devices and, as a consequence of the large number of methods proposed to assess the effective dose, In this study, staff doses were measured in two cardiac centers: Ahmed Gasim Hospital and Cardiac Center, Khartoum. The objective was to measure personal dose equivalent and accordingly estimate the effective dose which is received by staff in interventional cardiology. Measurements were performed using electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) worn over lead apron during the examination and were read immediately following each examination. A total number of 40 radiation worker were monitored for a period of two weeks. The highest doses received by the cardiologist followed by nurses and then X-ray technicians. Staff received mean effective doses that ranged from 24 to 110 μSv estimated for four weeks. Recommendations on how to reduce staff doses in interventional cardiology are presented. (Author)

  9. Influence of dosemeter position for the assessment of eye lens dose during interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equivalent dose limit for the eye lens for occupational exposure recommended by the ICRP has been reduced to 20 mSv y-1 averaged over defined periods of 5 y, with no single year exceeding 50 mSv. The compliance with this new requirement could not be easy in some workplace such as interventional radiology and cardiology. The aim of this study is to evaluate different possible approaches in order to have a good estimate of the eye lens dose during interventional procedures. Measurements were performed with an X-ray system Philips Allura FD-10, using a PMMA phantom to simulate the patient scattered radiation and a Rando phantom to simulate the cardiologist. Thermoluminescence (TL) whole-body and TL eye lens dosemeters together with Philips DoseAware active dosemeters were located on different positions of the Rando phantom to estimate the eye lens dose in typical cardiology procedures. The results show that, for the studied conditions, any of the analysed dosemeter positions are suitable for eye lens dose assessment. However, the centre of the thyroid collar and the left ear position provide a better estimate. Furthermore, in practice, improper use of the ceiling-suspended screen can produce partial protection of some parts of the body, and thus large differences between the measured doses and the actual exposure of the eye could arise if the dosemeter is not situated close to the eye. (authors)

  10. Paediatric interventional cardiology: flat detector versus image intensifier using a test object

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vano, E [Radiology Department, Medicine School, Complutense University and San Carlos University Hospital, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ubeda, C [Clinical Sciences Department, Faculty of the Science of Health and CIHDE, Tarapaca University, 18 de Septiembre 2222, Arica (Chile); Martinez, L C [Medical Physics and Radiation Protection Service, 12 de Octubre University Hospital, Madrid (Spain); Leyton, F [Institute of Public Health of Chile, Marathon 1000, Nunoa, Santiago (Chile); Miranda, P, E-mail: eliseov@med.ucm.e [Hemodynamic Department, Cardiovascular Service, Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, Avenida Antonio Varaas 360, Providencia, Santiago (Chile)

    2010-12-07

    Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) values and image quality parameters were measured and compared for two biplane angiography x-ray systems dedicated to paediatric interventional cardiology, one equipped with image intensifiers (II) and the other one with dynamic flat detectors (FDs). Polymethyl methacrylate phantoms of different thicknesses, ranging from 8 to 16 cm, and a Leeds TOR 18-FG test object were used. The parameters of the image quality evaluated were noise, signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SdNR), high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) and three figures of merit combining entrance doses and signal-to-noise ratios or HCSR. The comparisons showed a better behaviour of the II-based system in the low contrast region over the whole interval of thicknesses. The FD-based system showed a better performance in HCSR. The FD system evaluated would need around two times more dose than the II system evaluated to reach a given value of SdNR; moreover, a better spatial resolution was measured (and perceived in conventional monitors) for the system equipped with flat detectors. According to the results of this paper, the use of dynamic FD systems does not lead to an automatic reduction in ESAK or to an automatic improvement in image quality by comparison with II systems. Any improvement also depends on the setting of the x-ray systems and it should still be possible to refine these settings for some of the dynamic FDs used in paediatric cardiology.

  11. Bionic cardiology: exploration into a wealth of controllable body parts in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimachi, Masaru; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Bionic cardiology is the medical science of exploring electronic control of the body, usually via the neural system. Mimicking or modifying biological regulation is a strategy used to combat diseases. Control of ventricular rate during atrial fibrillation by selective vagal stimulation, suppression of ischemia-related ventricular fibrillation by vagal stimulation, and reproduction of neurally commanded heart rate are some examples of bionic treatment for arrhythmia. Implantable radio-frequency-coupled on-demand carotid sinus stimulators succeeded in interrupting or preventing anginal attacks but were replaced later by coronary revascularization. Similar but fixed-intensity carotid sinus stimulators were used for hypertension but were also replaced by drugs. Recently, however, a self-powered implantable device has been reappraised for the treatment of drug-resistant hypertension. Closed-loop spinal cord stimulation has successfully treated severe orthostatic hypotension in a limited number of patients. Vagal nerve stimulation is effective in treating heart failure in animals, and a small-size clinical trial has just started. Simultaneous corrections of multiple hemodynamic abnormalities in an acute decompensated state are accomplished simply by quantifying fundamental cardiovascular parameters and controlling these parameters. Bionic cardiology will continue to promote the development of more sophisticated device-based therapies for otherwise untreatable diseases and will inspire more intricate applications in the twenty-first century.

  12. Gender, Migration, Remittances: Evidence from Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Holst, Elke; Schäfer, Andrea; Schrooten, Mechthild

    2008-01-01

    Gender-specific determinants of remittances are the subject of this study based on German SOEP data (2001-2006). In 2007, about 7.3 million foreigners were living in Germany. While the total number of foreigners has decreased over the last decade, female migration to Germany has increased. A feminization of migration is observable all over the world, and is changing gender roles in the households of origin as well. Today, women constitute 48.6% of migratory flows to Germany, although the prop...

  13. The visual arts influence in Nazi Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bie Yanan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article will discuss the influence of visual art in Nazi Germany from two parts of visual arts, which are political photography and poster propaganda, analyzing the unique social and historical stage of Nazi Germany. And it emphasizes the ideology of the Nazis, which in Nazi Germany inflamed the political sentiment of the masses and took the visual art as their important instrument of political propaganda, while Nazi party used visual art on anti-society and war which is worth warning and criticizing for later generation.

  14. Management of plasmapheresis in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, N

    1996-05-01

    In Germany, plasmapheresis is carried out for many years in a "mixed" system by private and non-profit organisation. Most of the institutions and blood transfusion service, active in the field of plasmapheresis are members of the "Association for the Establishment, Co-ordination and Working Methods of the Plasmapheresis Centres". All centres are authorized by governmental bodies for manufacturing of pharmaceutical products with regulatory controls regarding licensing and accreditation of blood collection establishment. All parties concerned agree that self-sufficiency of plasma has to be achieved. For this purpose there is a shortage of about 400,000 1 of plasma. In 1994, about 240,000 1 of plasma were collected by plasmapheresis, 91% for fractionation and 8.7% for direct clinical uses. In addition about 970,000 1 of plasma were derived from whole blood donations. The dualism of non-profit making and commercial organisations should be regarded as a chance for diversification in the collection and processing of plasma. A long term increase in plasmapheresis plasma can be achieved by initiating plasmapheresis programmes and co-operation using the existing infrastructures and supports the aim for self-sufficiency.

  15. Cardiology; Cardiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manrique, A.; Agostini, D.; Py, M.; Guillo, P.; Weinmann, P.; Benabib, C.; Toussaint, J.F.; Eder, V.; Alibelli, M.J.; Franken, P. [Societe Fran ise de Medecine Nucleaire et Imagerie Moleculaire, 75 - Paris (France); Valli, N.; Garrigue, S.; Gatta, B.; Vialard, M.J.; Hossini, M.; Clementy, J.; Haissaguerre, M.; Ducassous, D.; Barat, J.L. [Hopital du Haut Leveque Univ. Victor Segalen, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Tran, N.; Groubatch, F.; Poussier, S.; Villemot, J.P.; Maskali, F.; Laurens, M.H.; Karcher, G.; Py, M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 54 - Nancy (France); Franken, P.R.; Vanhove, C. [AZ-VUB Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2005-11-15

    Medical examinations such SPECT or scintigraphy are used to establish a diagnosis, to provide the follow up in the case of cardiac diseases. three examples are detailed, monitoring of myocardium viability under SPECT, evaluation of patients reached by a Brugada syndrome with scintigraphy at Mibg {sup 123}I, analysis of transplant of mesenchyme cells with pinhole-SPECT among rats having a chronic myocardium infarction. (N.C.)

  16. Fetal cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doppler echocardiography makes it possible to diagnose congenital heart disease in early pregnancy. It allows us to study the anatomical configuration of the fetal heart, and additionally, to evaluate the physiological conditions of the fetus. Evaluation of the direction, velocity, wave form pattern, and quantification of blood flow at the various sites in the fetal heart helps us to assess the characteristics of the fetal circulation and condition of the fetal heart. In order to use this technique in pathological situations, an initial study of the developing normal human fetal circulation was necessary. The authors studied 34 uncomplicated pregnancies by serial Doppler echocardiography. The studies were performed every 4 weeks from 16-weeks gestation to term. The pulsed Doppler sector scanner provided cardiac cross-sectional images, mitral and tricuspid blood velocities were obtained from apical four-chamber views. Angle corrected maximal and mean temporal velocities were calculated by digitizing the Doppler frequency shift recording on a graphic tablet computed with a minicomputer. The angle between the Doppler interrogation beam and the direction of blood flow was kept as small as possible in order to minimize the error

  17. Has East Germany overtaken West Germany? : Recent trends in order-specific fertility

    OpenAIRE

    Kreyenfeld, Michaela; Goldstein, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Some 20 years after reunification, the contrast between East and West Germany offers a natural experiment for studying the degree of persistence of Communist-era family patterns, the effects of economic change, and fertility postponement. After reunification, period fertility rates plummeted in the former East Germany to record low levels. Since the mid-1990s, however, period fertility rates have been rising in East Germany, in contrast to the nearly constant rates seen in the West. By 2008, ...

  18. Management of Spent Fuel in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation gives an overview on the inventory of radioactive waste and spent fuel in Germany, the state of commissioning of the on-site storages for spent fuel and the balance of reprocessing of spent fuel. (author)

  19. The Munich Crisis and Pacificate of U. S.A. to Nazis of Germany%慕尼黑危机与美国对纳粹德国的绥靖

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程文进

    2003-01-01

    1938年9月慕尼黑危机期间,美国对纳粹德国奉行绥靖政策.它支持满足纳粹德国吞并苏台德区的愿望,企图以牺牲捷克斯洛伐克的利益来换取欧洲和平.罗斯福总统在危机期间虽有一些斥责绥靖政策的言行,但那只是一种策略.

  20. No cardiac damage after endurance exercise in cardiologists cycling to the European Society of Cardiology meeting in Barcelona

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appelman, Yolande; van der Borgh, Roger; van Dantzig, Jan Melle; Mosterd, Arend; Daniels, Marcel; Doevendans, Pieter A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims There are variable results reported for athletes and potential cardiac damage during exercise. In 2009 a group of cardiologists went by bicycle from the Netherlands to the European Society of Cardiology meeting in Barcelona and collected functional and biochemical parameters during this trip in

  1. The best of nuclear cardiology and MRI in 2004; Essentiel de 2004 en cardiologie nucleaire et IRM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daou, D. [Hopital Lariboisiere, Groupe de Cardiologie Nucleaire et IRM, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-05-15

    In this review, we limit ourselves to original studies based on scintigraphic or MRI techniques performed in man. During the year 2004 we have learned several lessons from various interesting studies reported below, regarding different areas of cardiology including myocardial ischemia, myocarditis, myocardial infarction and myocardial viability. (author)

  2. Features of investment between Ukraine and Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pylypchuk N. Yu.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the research of development investment between Ukraine and Germany. Based on the analysis of the dynamics of investment, revealed factors that negatively and positive impact on the investment relations and foreign investments moving from Germany to Ukraine and vice versa. Grounded recommendations and prospects for improving cooperation and improving the investment climate in Ukraine. Implementation of these measures will help to attract investment, increase production and profitability of enterprises.

  3. The Immigrant Wage Gap in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Thomsen, Stephan L.; Gernandt, Johannes; Aldashev, Alisher

    2008-01-01

    Immigrants consist of foreigners and citizens with migration background. We analyze the wage gap between natives and these two groups in Germany. The estimates show a substantial gap for both groups with respect to natives. Discarding immigrants who completed education abroad reduces much of the immigrants' wage gap. This implies educational attainment in Germany is an important component of economic integration and degrees obtained abroad are valued less.

  4. Germany - no country for old workers?

    OpenAIRE

    Dietz, Martin; Walwei, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    "The employment situation of older workers in Germany used to be poor. However, in recent years it has improved considerably. Germany has shifted its policies to strengthen the labor market performance of older workers. Policy has focused on less early exits of older workers and far-reaching institutional changes concerning public pension schemes and unemployment benefit systems. A better overall development of the labor market and an increased labor force participation of women contributed t...

  5. Peritoneal tuberculosis. Also important in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of the increase in the number of foreigners living in Germany and in the number of patients with AIDS, there will also be an increase in the incidence of abdominal tuberculosis in Germany. The following report describes the case of a 24-year-old female patient with peritoneal tuberculosis, the most common manifestation of abdominal tuberculosis. Computed tomography showed typical pathological alterations; the diagnosis was confirmed by intralaparascopic biopsy. (orig.)

  6. Immigration, Trade and Wages in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Yaya, Mehmet-Erdem

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of several macroeconomic variables such as GDP, imports, unemployment, immigration and emigration on the real wages and salaries of German laborers. Annual data for 49 years has been used to estimate twelve different regressions, trying to capture the effect of these variables on the real wages and salaries in Germany while considering the unification of West-East Germany with a dummy variable. The results are intriguing, and contradicting with most of the e...

  7. The plan. Germany is renewable. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Greenpeace brochure ''Germany is renewable'' covers the following issues: Vision 1, Germany is renewable; the plan - comments -sources; phase 1: 2011-15, the nuclear phase-out; phase 2: 2016-2030 - end of the large coal-fired power plants; phase 3: 2031-2040 - complete coal phase-out; phase 4: 2041-2050 - gas phase-out, complete electricity supply from renewable energies; vision 2.

  8. Shifting paradigms: Reflecting Germanys European policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Staeck

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Germany's presidency of the European Council in the first half of 1999 has focused the attention of schlolars on Germany's attitude towards the EU. Germany's European policy has been guided from the beginning by a pro-European vision of 'the house of Europe'. The hypothesis of the article is that this paradigm of German European policy is in flux. Via a constructivist approach it is argued that we are observing a paradigm shift away from a visionary towards a pragmatic European policy which is oriented around efficiency criteria and national interest. Evidence is given by analysing the following propositions: (1 the advocates of a European vision have vanished in Germany, and the broad coalition in society towards Europe is crumbling; (2 at the same time the discussion on Europe has become highly politicised; (3 in addition, important German institutions such as the Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht are reluctant to (re-strengthen the European idea; and (4 the fit between Germany's and the EU's institutional setting supports the change in paradigm. In conclusion it is argued that Germany is on its way to changing its role from that of a supporting participant to that of a self-confident active player.

  9. Positron emission tomography 2008 in Germany. Results of the query and current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The working group on positron emission tomography (PET) of the DGN (German Society of Nuclear Medicine) initiated this first survey to collect and analyse information on the practise of PET in Germany in the year 2008. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to PET performing facilities (medical practices, hospitals, university hospitals and others) for retrospective data acquisition. Details regarding the equipment and examination procedures were examined as well as indications and number of studies. In addition, the role of PET within the diagnostic process was evaluated. Results: Responses from 65 sites were analysed. Their technical equipment consisted of 77 PET scanners (40 of them were combined PET/CT devices). About 63 500 PET studies had been performed with 86% in the field of oncology, 8% in neurology and 3% in cardiology. The radiotracers were labelled with 18F in 91% of the studies, whereas 68Ga was used in 4% and 11C in 3%. The analyses revealed lung tumours as the most investigated tumour entity, followed by malignant lymphoma, tumours of the gastro-intestinal tract and prostate cancer (about 14 000, 6000, 5000 and 2000). Corresponding to the new scanners and software procedures, the number of studies with attenuation correction by CT was high (68%) and nearly all studies were reconstructed iteratively (99%). The PET images were analysed quantitatively in the majority of cases (91%). The clinical reports, which included image documentation for the greater part, were posted regularly within 3 days. However, in 70% of the sites electronic transfer possibilities were used additionally to speed up the diagnostic process. The high standard of quality was demonstrated by the fact, that 40 facilities were engaged in a tumour board. Further on, one third of the physicians had gained a PET certification awarded by the DGN. Conclusion: Relative to the high general standard of diagnostic instrumentation in Germany, PET is less established, in particular when

  10. Patient risk factors for developing a drug-related problem in a cardiology ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbina O

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Olatz Urbina,1 Olivia Ferrández,1 Sònia Luque,1 Santiago Grau,1,2 Sergi Mojal,3 Rosa Pellicer,1 Marta Riu,4 Esther Salas,1 Josep Comin-Colet5 1Pharmacy Department, Hospital Universitari del Mar, Barcelona, Spain; 2Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 3Department of Statistics, Institut Hospital del Mar d’Investigacions Mèdiques, Barcelona, Spain; 4Department of Epidemiology and Health Services Evaluation, CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP, Hospital Universitari del Mar, Barcelona, Spain; 5Heart Failure Unit, Cardiology Department, Hospital Universitari del Mar, Barcelona, Spain Background: Because of the high incidence of drug-related problems (DRPs among hospitalized patients with cardiovascular diseases and their potential impact on morbidity and mortality, it is important to identify the most susceptible patients, who therefore require closer monitoring of drug therapy.Purpose: To identify the profile of patients at higher risk of developing at least one DRP during hospitalization in a cardiology ward.Method: We consecutively included all patients hospitalized in the cardiology ward of a teaching hospital in 2009. DRPs were identified through a computerized warning system designed by the pharmacy department and integrated into the electronic medical record.Results: A total of 964 admissions were included, and at least one DRP was detected in 29.8%. The variables associated with a higher risk of these events were polypharmacy (odds ratio [OR]=1.228; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.153–1.308, female sex (OR=1.496; 95% CI=1.026–2.180, and first admission (OR=1.494; 95% CI=1.005–2.221.Conclusion: Monitoring patients through a computerized warning system allowed the detection of at least one DRP in one-third of the patients. Knowledge of the risk factors for developing these problems in patients admitted to hospital for cardiovascular problems helps in identifying the most susceptible patients. Keywords

  11. European Energy Report Profiles - Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-21

    Although the country has a long history of protest against nuclear power, the broader environmental awareness of the ordinary German in the street is now beginning to drive political decisions related to other energy forms and not only in Germany. The Brent Spar episode, where protest by the German public played a not insignificant role in stopping Shell UK from dumping an oil storage platform in the Atlantic Ocean, showed that public opinion counts. Deutsche Shell has had to resort to full page adverts in over 100 major newspapers costing over DM3m in an attempt to win back customers and its shredded image. German brown coal production ash has come under fire. It is no surprise to find the Green party objecting to a perpetuation of brown coal use through the opening up of a new opencast mine in 2006: after all brown coal is the fossil fuel with the highest specific CO{sub 2} emissions. However, resistance is also growing strongly amongst the population faced with the prospect of resettlement when they lose their homes to the brown coal excavators. The use of natural gas, most from Russia with an increasing proportion from Norway, is growing. It is particularly popular for coking and space heating, as it is perceived as being a clean fuel. Another, more involved `clean energy` affair is being played out in the electricity sector, this time over use of renewables. The utilities have attempted to undermine the electricity feed law (EFL), which requires them to purchase renewables-generated electricity at a premium price. Three utilities have refused to pay the full EFL price, hoping to provoke a legal battle which would eventually have the EFL declared unconstitutional. However, their flouting of the law caused political uproar the utilities have beaten a retreat.

  12. Sports and exercise cardiology in the United States: cardiovascular specialists as members of the athlete healthcare team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, Christine E; Olshansky, Brian; Washington, Reginald L; Baggish, Aaron L; Daniels, Curt J; Lawrence, Silvana M; Sullivan, Renee M; Kovacs, Richard J; Bove, Alfred A

    2014-04-22

    In recent years, athletic participation has more than doubled in all major demographic groups, while simultaneously, children and adults with established heart disease desire participation in sports and exercise. Despite conferring favorable long-term effects on well-being and survival, exercise can be associated with risk of adverse events in the short term. Complex individual cardiovascular (CV) demands and adaptations imposed by exercise present distinct challenges to the cardiologist asked to evaluate athletes. Here, we describe the evolution of sports and exercise cardiology as a unique discipline within the continuum of CV specialties, provide the rationale for tailoring of CV care to athletes and exercising individuals, define the role of the CV specialist within the athlete care team, and lay the foundation for the development of Sports and Exercise Cardiology in the United States. In 2011, the American College of Cardiology launched the Section of Sports and Exercise Cardiology. Membership has grown from 150 to over 4,000 members in just 2 short years, indicating marked interest from the CV community to advance the integration of sports and exercise cardiology into mainstream CV care. Although the current athlete CV care model has distinct limitations, here, we have outlined a new paradigm of care for the American athlete and exercising individual. By practicing and promoting this new paradigm, we believe we will enhance the CV care of athletes of all ages, and serve the greater athletic community and our nation as a whole, by allowing safest participation in sports and physical activity for all individuals who seek this lifestyle.

  13. In-Hospital Cardiology Consultation and Evidence-Based Care for Nursing Home Residents with Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronow, Wilbert S.; Rich, Michael W.; Goodlin, Sarah J.; Birkner, Thomas; Zhang, Yan; Feller, Margaret A.; Aban, Inmaculada B.; Jones, Linda G.; Bearden, Donna M.; Allman, Richard M.; Ahmed, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the association between cardiology consultation and evidence-based care for nursing home (NH) residents with heart failure (HF). Participants Hospitalized NH residents (n= 646) discharged from 106 Alabama hospitals with a primary discharge diagnosis of HF during 1998–2001. Design Observational. Measurements of Evidence-Based Care Pre-admission estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) for patients with known HF (n=494), in-hospital LVEF estimation for HF patients without known LVEF (n=452), and discharge prescriptions of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ACEIs-or-ARBs) to systolic HF (LVEF 100 mm Hg. Results Pre-admission LVEF was estimated in 38% and 12% of patients receiving and not receiving cardiology consultation, respectively (adjusted odds ratio {AOR}, 3.49; 95% CI, 2.16–5.66; p <0.001). In-hospital LVEF was estimated in 71% and 28% of patients receiving and not receiving cardiology consultation, respectively (AOR, 6.01; 95% CI, 3.69–9.79; p <0.001). ACEIs-or-ARBs were prescribed to 62% and 82% of patients receiving and not receiving cardiology consultation, respectively (AOR, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.07–0.81; p=0.022). Conclusion In-hospital cardiology consultation was associated with significantly higher odds of LVEF estimation among NH residents with HF. However, it did not translate into higher odds of discharge prescriptions for ACEIs-or-ARBs to NH resident with systolic HF who were eligible for the receipt of these drugs. PMID:21982687

  14. Neuropathological research at the "Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Psychiatrie" (German Institute for Psychiatric Research) in Munich (Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institute). Scientific utilization of children's organs from the "Kinderfachabteilungen" (Children's Special Departments) at Bavarian State Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Florian

    2006-09-01

    During National Socialism, the politically motivated interest in psychiatric genetic research lead to the founding of research departments specialized in pathological-anatomical brain research, the two Kaiser Wilhelm-Institutes (KWI) in Berlin and Munich. The latter was indirectly provided with brain material by Bavarian State Hospitals, to three of which "Kinderfachabteilungen" (Special Pediatric Units) were affiliated. As children became victims of the systematically conducted child "euthanasia" in these Special Pediatric Units, this paper will address the question whether and to which extent the organs from victims of child "euthanasia" were used for (neuro-) pathological research at the KWI in Munich. By means of case studies and medical histories (with focus on the situation in Kaufbeuren-Irsee), I will argue that pediatric departments on a regular base delivered slide preparations, that the child "euthanasia" conduced in these departments systematically contributed to neuropathological research and that slide preparations from victims of child "euthanasia" were used in scientific publications after 1945.

  15. Tools for assessing quality of life in cardiology and cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierlaszyńska, Karolina; Pudlo, Robert; Jaworska, Izabela; Byrczek-Godula, Kamila; Gąsior, Mariusz

    2016-03-01

    The holistic concept of health, popularization of knowledge, as well as social and economic factors have contributed to the growing interest in research concerning quality of life in cardiovascular diseases. The value of direct measurements of the patient's well-being and the extent of their functioning in everyday life (i.e., health-related quality of life; HRQoL) has gained appreciation. Questionnaires are the most popular method of measuring quality of life. On the basis of the literature, we can conclude that the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire is one of the most widely used tools measuring the quality of life of patients undergoing cardiological treatment and cardiac surgery. PMID:27212988

  16. Missing links in cardiology: long non-coding RNAs enter the arena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Tim; Schroen, Blanche

    2014-06-01

    Heart failure as a consequence of ischemic, hypertensive, infectious, or hereditary heart disease is a major challenge in cardiology and topic of intense research. Recently, new players appeared in this field and promise deeper insights into cardiac development, function, and disease. Long non-coding RNAs are a novel class of transcripts that can regulate gene expression and may have many more functions inside the cell. Here, we present examples on long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) function in cardiac development and give suggestions on how lncRNAs may be involved in cardiomyocyte dysfunction, myocardial fibrosis, and inflammation, three hallmarks of the failing heart. Above that, we point out opportunities as well as challenges that should be considered in the endeavor to investigate cardiac lncRNAs. PMID:24619481

  17. Diagnostic radiology and nuclear cardiology. Their use in assessment of equine cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblik, P D; Hornof, W J

    1985-08-01

    Survey thoracic radiography, although limited by physical considerations in the adult horse, can supply clinically useful information about changes in cardiac size and function. The radiographic features of cardiomegaly, altered pulmonary circulation, pulmonary edema, and pleural effusion as manifested in the horse are discussed. Nuclear cardiology can be performed in the standing horse. The initial transit of a radioactive tracer through the central circulation provides information about cardiac chamber size, efficiency of ventricular contraction, valvular competence, and presence of intracardiac or extracardiac shunts. Computer analysis of similar studies allows quantitation of several useful cardiac parameters including ventricular ejection fraction and shunt size (QP/QS). Gated blood pool nuclear studies are better suited to evaluate cardiac response to stress but are difficult to perform in the conscious horse with standard imaging equipment. PMID:2934115

  18. Assessment of the occupational exposure in real time during interventional cardiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interventional cardiology (IC) procedures can be complex, requiring the operators to work near the patient, during long exposure times. Owing to scattered radiation in the patient and the fluoroscopic equipment, the medical staff are exposed to a nonuniform radiation field and can receive high radiation doses. In this study, it is proposed to analyse staff doses obtained in real time, during IC procedures. A system for occupational dosimetry in real time was used. In order to identify some parameters that may affect the staff doses, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, using MCNPX v.2.7.0 code and voxel phantoms, were performed. The data obtained from measurements, together with MC simulations, allowed the identification of actions and behaviours of the medical staff that could be considered a risk under routine working conditions. The implementation of this monitoring system for exposure of personnel may have a positive effect on optimisation of radiological protection in fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures. (authors)

  19. Assessment of the occupational exposure in real time during interventional cardiology procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, M; Figueira, C; Teles, P; Cardoso, G; Zankl, M; Vaz, P

    2015-07-01

    Interventional cardiology (IC) procedures can be complex, requiring the operators to work near the patient, during long exposure times. Owing to scattered radiation in the patient and the fluoroscopic equipment, the medical staff are exposed to a non-uniform radiation field and can receive high radiation doses. In this study, it is proposed to analyse staff doses obtained in real time, during IC procedures. A system for occupational dosimetry in real time was used. In order to identify some parameters that may affect the staff doses, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, using MCNPX v.2.7.0 code and voxel phantoms, were performed. The data obtained from measurements, together with MC simulations, allowed the identification of actions and behaviours of the medical staff that could be considered a risk under routine working conditions. The implementation of this monitoring system for exposure of personnel may have a positive effect on optimisation of radiological protection in fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures. PMID:25848113

  20. Patient dosimetry in interventional cardiology at the University Hospital of Osijek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faj, Dario; Steiner, Robert; Trifunovic, Dejan; Faj, Zlatan; Kasabasic, Mladen; Kubelka, Dragan; Brnic, Zoran

    2008-01-01

    The interventional cardiology was recently implemented at the University Hospital of Osijek. Patients' absorbed doses during coronary angiography (CA) and the percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) procedures were measured and compared with published data and international standards. All patients undergoing CA or PTCA procedures during a 1-month period were included in the study. Patients' doses are expressed in terms of dose area product (DAP) per procedure. The patients' DAPs ranged from 2.6 to 210 Gy cm2 (average of 59 Gy cm2) during CAs, and from 61 to 220 Gy cm2 (average of 120 Gy cm2) during PTCAs. Patients' doses during CAs and PTCAs at the University Hospital of Osijek are in good agreement with the published ones. In complex cases, the radiochromic dosimetry films were used to show possible dose distributions across patient's skin. The film dosimetry showed a limitation of using only DAP values for the estimation of skin injuries risk.

  1. The importance of pre-clinical animal testing in interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoriyasu; Yeung, Alan C; Ikeno, Fumiaki

    2008-11-01

    The treatment of cardiovascular disease has changed dramatically over the past 2 decades, allowing patients to live longer and better quality lives. The introduction of new therapies has contributed much to this success. Nowhere has this been more evident than in interventional cardiology, where percutaneous cardiovascular intervention has evolved in the past 2 decades from a quirky experimental procedure to a therapeutic cornerstone for patients with symptomatic cardiovascular disease. The development of these technologies from the earliest stages requires preclinical experiments using animal models. Once introduced into the clinical arena, an understanding of therapeutic mechanisms of these devices can be ascertained through comparisons of animal model research findings with clinical pathological specimens. This review provides an overview of the emerging role, results of preclinical studies and development, and evaluation of animal models for percutaneous cardiovascular intervention technologies for patients with symptomatic cardiovascular disease. PMID:19142381

  2. Performance of several active personal dosemeters in interventional radiology and cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Active personal dosemeters (APDs) are very useful instruments for optimizing radiation protection of workers and for increasing worker’s awareness of unexpected exposures. The challenge of monitoring personal equivalent doses with APDs in interventional fluoroscopy is that they must be sensitive to low energy photon beams and be able to record high dose rates. The aim of this work is to verify both the performance and the reliability of four active personal dosemeters (APDs) and one direct ion storage (DIS) dosemeter in typical X-ray radiation fields used during interventional radiology and cardiology (IR/IC) procedures. The values of the personal dose equivalent at a depth of 10 mm measured by the APDs are compared with the response of a whole body thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) as a reference dosemeter. The response is found to be satisfactory in the tested situations.

  3. Measurements of eye lens doses in interventional cardiology using OSL and electronic dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to test the appropriateness of OSL and electronic dosemeters to estimate eye lens doses at interventional cardiology environment. Using TLD as reference detectors, personal dose equivalent was measured in phantoms and during clinical procedures. For phantom measurements, OSL dose values resulted in an average difference of 215 % vs. TLD. Tests carried out with other electronic dosemeters revealed differences up to ±20 % versus TLD. With dosemeters positioned outside the goggles and when TLD doses were >20 μSv, the average difference OSL vs. TLD was 29 %. Eye lens doses of almost 700 μSv per procedure were measured in two cases out of a sample of 33 measurements in individual clinical procedures, thus showing the risk of high exposure to the lenses of the eye when protection rules are not followed. The differences found between OSL and TLD are acceptable for the purpose and range of doses measured in the survey (authors)

  4. [Return to work of the cardiac patient: work fitness evaluation in Occupational Medicine Division including an Occupational Cardiology Unit and Work-Physiology Lab in Bergamo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borleri, D; Seghizzi, P; Manfredini, F; Mosconi, G

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease in working age still represent a major cause of morbidity and account for a number of fitness to work certificates expressing several limitations and prescriptions. To present the medical assessment conducted in an Occupational Medicine Division including an Occupational Cardiology Unit and work-physiology lab. It is described the history and the structure of the Occupational Cardiology Unit. Our almost forty years long-lasting experience allow us to point out the precious contribution of the Occupational Cardiology Unit to the Occupational Medicine Division, due to a highly specialised and qualified assessment of cardiac patients.

  5. End-of-life care in a cardiology department: have we improved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Garcia, Juan; Diez-Villanueva, Pablo; Ayesta, Ana; Bruña, Vanessa; Figueiras-Graillet, Lourdes M; Gallego-Parra, Laura; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background End-of-life care is not usually a priority in cardiology departments. We sought to evaluate the changes in end-of-life care after the introduction of a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order protocol. Methods & Results Retrospective analysis of all deaths in a cardiology department in two periods, before and after the introduction of the protocol. Comparison of demographic characteristics, use of DNR orders, and end-of-life care issues between both periods, according to the presence in the second period of the new DNR sheet (Group A), a conventional DNR order (Group B) or the absence of any DNR order (Group C). The number of deaths was similar in both periods (n = 198 vs. n = 197). The rate of patients dying with a DNR order increased significantly (57.1% vs. 68.5%; P = 0.02). Only 4% of patients in both periods were aware of the decision taken about cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Patients in Group A received the DNR order one day earlier, and 24.5% received it within the first 24 h of admission (vs. 2.6% in the first period; P < 0.001). All patients in Group A with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) had shock therapies deactivated (vs. 25.0% in the first period; P = 0.02). Conclusions The introduction of a DNR order protocol may improve end-of-life care in cardiac patients by increasing the use and shortening the time of registration of DNR orders. It may also contribute to increase ICD deactivation in patients with these orders in place. However, the introduction of the sheet in late stages of the disease failed to improve patient participation. PMID:27605939

  6. TERAPIA ELÉCTRICA EN CARDIOLOGÍA Electrical Therapy in cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Mora Pabón

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available La terapia eléctrica en cardiología está encaminada a transferir electrones al miocardio, su mayor utilidad está dada en la cardioversión y desfibrilación. La terapia eléctrica cumple las leyes de la electricidad y el mayor factor a vencer es la impedancia o resistencia al flujo de electrones. Para mejorar la efectividad de la terapia eléctrica se han ideado diferentes formas en la onda de choque, en la duración y la polaridad. La terapia eléctrica ha logrado consolidarse como el tratamiento de elección del paro cardiorrespiratorio secundario a fibrilación ventricular y taquicardia ventricular sin pulso. Es igualmente el tratamiento de elección en taquiarritmias con compromiso hemodinámico. Pese a sus grandes ventajas tiene efectos secundarios que se deben conocer adecuadamente para dar un tratamiento oportuno.Electrical shock in cardiology are pursuid transfer of electrons to the myocardium. Its main indications are`s cardioversion and defibrillation. The electrical shock therapy follows laws of electricity laws and consequently, its main difficulty is the impedance or resistance of electrons flow. To make better the effectiveness of this therapy, a number of improvements have been made on the shock wave, its duration, and polarity. The electric shock therapy has become the preferred treatment when dealing with cardiorespiratory arrest secondary, ventricular fibrillation and pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Similarly, it is the preferred treatment for ventricular tachyarrhythmia associated with hemodynamic compromise. Despite its significant advantages, this treatment causes secondary effects, which should adequately be known in order to provide a timely treatment.

  7. Provision of Transition Education and Referral Patterns from Pediatric Cardiology to Adult Cardiac Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbison, Anna L; Grady, Stafford; Chi, Kevin; Fernandes, Susan M

    2016-02-01

    ACC/AHA guidelines recommend a structured preparation for and transfer to adult-oriented cardiac care for adult survivors of pediatric onset heart disease (POHD). Given this, we sought to describe the transition and transfer practices for a cohort of young adults with POHD and to determine factors associated with successful transfer to adult-oriented cardiac care. We performed a single-center, retrospective chart review on patients ≥18 years of age, with POHD likely to require lifelong cardiac care, who were seen in outpatient pediatric cardiology (PC) between 2008 and 2011. Successful transfer was defined as the subsequent attendance at adult cardiology (AC) within 2 years of PC visit. We identified 118 patients who met study criteria. Mean age 22.4 ± 2.0 years, 59 % male, 64 % white and 40 % Hispanic. Mean transition education topics noted was 3.3 ± 1.8 out of 20 and covered the underlying cardiac disease (89 %), follow-up and current medications (56 %) and exercise limitations (34 %). Recommendations for follow-up were AC (57 %) and PC (33 %). Of those told to transfer to AC, 79 % successfully transferred. Characteristics of successful transfer included: prior cardiac surgery (p = 0.008), cardiac medication use (p = 0.006) and frequency of follow-up ≤1 year (p = 0.037). One-quarter of all subjects did not follow-up within at least 2 years. Despite published guidelines, transition education appears lacking and the approach to transfer to adult cardiac care is not consistent. Given the increased risk of morbidity and mortality in this patient population, standardization of transition education and transfer processes appear warranted. PMID:26385471

  8. Realisation of the guidelines for faculty-internal exams at the Department of General Medicine at the University of Munich: Pushing medical exams one step ahead with IMSm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeder, Niklas; Holzer, Matthias; Schelling, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Graded exams are prerequisites for the admission to the medical state examination. Accordingly the exams must be of good quality in order to allow benchmarking with the faculty and between different universities. Criteria for good quality need to be considered - namely objectivity, validity and reliability. The guidelines for the processing of exams published by the GMA are supposed to help maintaining those criteria. In 2008 the Department of General Medicine at the University of Munich fulfils only 14 of 18 items. A review process, appropriate training of the staff and the introduction of the IMSm software were the main changes that helped to improve the 'GMA-score' to 30 fulfilled items. We see the introduction of the IMSm system as our biggest challenge ahead. IMSm helps to streamline the necessary workflow and improves their quality (e.g. by the detection of cueing, item analysis). Overall, we evaluate the steps to improve the exam process as very positive. We plan to engage co-workers outside the department to assist in the various review processes in the future. Furthermore we think it might be of value to get into contact with other departments and faculties to benefit from each other's question pools.

  9. Paving the Road for Modern Particle Therapy – What can we Learn from the experience gained with Fast Neutron Therapy in Munich?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanno Martin Specht

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available While neutron therapy was a highly topical subject in the 70’s and 80’s, today there are only a few remaining facilities offering fast neutron therapy. Nevertheless, up to today more than 30,000 patients were treated with neutron therapy. For some indications like salivary gland tumors and malignant melanoma there is clinical evidence that the addition of Fast Neutron Therapy (FNT leads to superior local control compared to photon treatment alone. FNT was available in Munich from 1985 until 2000 at the RENT facility (Reactor Neutron Therapy. Patient treatment continued at the new research reactor FRM II in 2007 under improved treatment conditions and today it can still be offered to selected patients as an individual treatment option. As there is a growing interest in high-linear energy transfer (LET therapy with new hadron therapy centers emerging around the globe, the clinical data generated by neutron therapy might help to develop biologically driven treatment planning algorithms. Also FNT might experience its resurgence as a combinational partner of modern immunotherapies.

  10. Cohabiting unions in France and West Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares the non-marital birth pattern in France and West Germany. Since the beginning of the eighties, France witnessed a steady increase in non-marital birth rates, while in West Germany non-marital birth rates have remained at a relatively low level. We attribute these differences to the institutional and legal constraints from both sides of the Rhine which hamper or foster childbearing in cohabiting unions. Using data from the French and German Family and Fertility Survey, we apply event history modeling to the transition to marriage and first birth. Our results indicate a polarization of family forms in both countries. In West Germany, we find a polarization in a "family sector" and a "non-family sector" while in France there is a polarization in a "marriage sector" and a "cohabiting sector".

  11. Provisions for containment venting in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, J.G.

    1997-08-01

    In this short paper an overlook is given of the systems developed in Germany for filtered containment venting and their implementation in nuclear power plants. More information on the development can be found in the Proceedings of the DOE/NRC Aircleaning Conferences. In Germany, 28.8 % of the electric energy is produced by 19 nuclear power reactors. No new power reactor is expected to be built at least within the next ten years, but France and Germany cooperate in the development of a future European Power Reactor (ERP). This reactor type will be fitted with a core catcher and passive cooling in order to avoid serious consequences of a hypothetical core meltdown accident so that provisions for containment venting are not required. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Privacy Laws and Biobanking in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Nils

    2016-03-01

    While the possibility of enacting a sui generis Biobank Act has been debated in Germany at great length, as of yet the country has not implemented any biobankspecific legislation. Instead, oversight is available via a network of research and privacy laws, including those of the European Union. The Nationale Kohorte, Germany's large-scale, population-based epidemiological research biobank, is funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, and there are currently 108 registered bio-banks throughout Germany. The current system, including the structure and study design of the Nationale Kohorte, privileges the protection of personal information even at the cost of socially desirable research; it remains to be seen if forthcoming legislation will shift this balance. PMID:27256122

  13. Eine studentische Wiki-Bibliothek für unterrichtsbegleitende Materialien: Konzeption, Implementierung und Evaluation für das Medizinische Curriculum München (MeCuM [A student-driven wiki-library for educational materials: Concept, implementation, and evaluation for the Medical Curriculum Munich (MeCuM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger, Michael

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] Problem: The new study regulation for medical licensing in Germany has caused significant reform of the medical curricula. At Munich University (LMU, the Medical Curriculum Munich (MeCuM was introduced in 2004. More individual responsibility of the students regarding their academic goals as well as a problem-oriented thought process are essential features of the new curriculum. Through our project, an open web based platform for the design of curriculum-specific teaching and study material has become accessible to students and faculty of the MeCuM. Methods: Students created an online library in harmony with the curricular structure of the MeCuM. The technical implementation was carried out with the MediaWiki-Open-Source software. Contents can be edited from all students or faculty of the MeCuM in an anonymous or personalized manner. An online questionnaire was carried out to evaluate the project. Results: Our online library as a wiki is the first solution of this kind in medical education in Germany. The concept was implemented without technical difficulties and is linked to the official websites of LMU Munich. The website’s contents were visited 417,808 times from December 2005 through June 2007. Online-based evaluation showed that the project is positively recognized, and students are motivated to contribute actively. Discussion: The project closely reflects the academic curriculum of the MeCuM and creates additional opportunities for interaction between students and teachers. The design as an open source project allows easy handling as well as frequent control and ability to update the contents, but integrity and accuracy of the data content require further effort. Additional evaluation will be essential for improvements. The integration of faculty as reviewers and tutors is planned. Sustainability of the project is dependent upon continued student leadership. The concept of the project has been transferred to another medical

  14. Greenhouse gas neutral Germany in 2050

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to answer the question how a greenhouse gas neutral Germany would look like an interdisciplinary process was started by the Federal Environmental Agency. It was clear from the beginning of this work that a sustainable regenerative energy supply could not be sufficient. Therefore all relevant emission sources were included into the studies: traffic, industry, waste and waste water, agriculture, land usage, land usage changes and forestry. The necessary transformation paths to reach the aim of a greenhouse gas neutral Germany in 2050, economic considerations and political instruments were not part of this study.

  15. [Migration in Germany: 1945-1996].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munz, R; Ulrich, R

    1998-01-01

    "The authors examine how the immigrant population of Germany has risen despite the fact that the German government has sought to restrict it. They analyze six major streams of migration: refugees and expellees who came immediately after World War II, German resettlers from Eastern Europe (¿Aussiedler'), emigration of (West) Germans, migration between East- and West Germany, foreign labor migrants and asylum seekers. The dynamics of immigration, the chances on the labor market, and the opportunities for social integration were remarkably different for each of these groups. As far as absorption and integration are concerned the authors argue that different groups of immigrants should be treated more equally." (EXCERPT) PMID:12348943

  16. [The Sociedad Española de Cardiología on the Internet: current resources and future prospects. The Internet Committee of the Sociedad Española de Cardiología].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas, F; Elízaga, J; Bosch, X

    1998-10-01

    The Internet can help physicians to identify needed clinical information quickly providing continued medical education. Internet also improves medical information of the non-medical population. Researchers have quick access to library catalogs, Medline and other important databases from the most recognized research centers. Furthermore, it can put physicians in ready contact with other specialists for communication and consultation, facilitates administrative procedures of multicenter studies and accelerates editorial processes of biomedical journals. Since its creation, the website of the Spanish Society of Cardiology has evolved rapidly to the present model, providing different kinds of services to its members including faster communication, information from national and international societies and congresses, earlier access to the full content of Revista Española de Cardiología and to a variety of graphic resources and of continuing education. Nowadays, the website of the Spanish Society of Cardiology is consulted by one thousand visitors a week, even at weekends. The degree of activity increases from 3 h P.M. with a peak from 11 h P.M. to 1 h A.M. In the near future, our website will incorporate its own courses of continuing medical education with on-line evaluation and credit granting, will give support to multicenter studies and will initiate the publication and discussion of clinical cases of interest.

  17. [Historic account of infirmary at the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología "Ignacio Chávez"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loredo Díaz, Luz Pérez

    2007-01-01

    The historical process of the infirmary has had great evolution in Mexico its beginnings, in the professional order, have taken to a great height to the National Institute of Cardiology; in the year of 1944, the Dr. Ignacio Chávez had great vision and assertivity when considering to religious nurses to direct different services to it; they have been and are at the moment an essential piece to continue the evolution of infirmary in the National Institute of Cardiology. It is possible to mention that the historical way of the infirmary must to the effort of the group of nuns who have known to guide and to lead to the team of nurses of the Institute, promoting at any moment the quality of attention provided to the patients with cardiovascular affections.

  18. How changes to the Medicare Benefits Schedule could improve the practice of cardiology and save taxpayer money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Richard W; Nasis, Arthur; Sundararajan, Vijaya

    2015-09-21

    Rising health care costs above inflation are placing serious strains on the sustainability of the Australian Medicare system in its current structure. The Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS), which lists rebates payable to patients for private medical services provided on a fee-for-service basis, is the cornerstone of the Australian health care system. Introduced in the 1980s, the MBS has changed little despite major advances in the evidence base for the practice of cardiology. We outline how we believe sensible changes to the MBS listings for four cardiac services--invasive coronary angiography, computed tomography coronary angiography, stress testing and percutaneous coronary intervention--would improve the clinical practice of cardiology and save substantial amounts of taxpayer money.

  19. How changes to the Medicare Benefits Schedule could improve the practice of cardiology and save taxpayer money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Richard W; Nasis, Arthur; Sundararajan, Vijaya

    2015-09-21

    Rising health care costs above inflation are placing serious strains on the sustainability of the Australian Medicare system in its current structure. The Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS), which lists rebates payable to patients for private medical services provided on a fee-for-service basis, is the cornerstone of the Australian health care system. Introduced in the 1980s, the MBS has changed little despite major advances in the evidence base for the practice of cardiology. We outline how we believe sensible changes to the MBS listings for four cardiac services--invasive coronary angiography, computed tomography coronary angiography, stress testing and percutaneous coronary intervention--would improve the clinical practice of cardiology and save substantial amounts of taxpayer money. PMID:26377292

  20. Giovanni Battista Morgagni in the murals of Diego Rivera at the National Institute of Cardiology of Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estañol, Bruno; Delgado, Guillermo R

    2014-07-01

    The Italian physician Giovanni Battista Morgagni was the founder of the clinico-anatomical method. His masterpiece De sedibus, et causis morborum per anatomen indagatis represented a major breakthrough in the history of medicine. In the murals of Diego Rivera at the National Institute of Cardiology, Morgagni appears at the center of the fresco. With his left index finger points to the chest of a dying patient with a bulging pulsating aortic aneurysm below the left clavicle, and with his right hand, that holds a scalpel, shows the aneurysm found at the autopsy table. With this striking image the clinico-anatomical method is succinctly depicted. Professor Ignacio Chávez, the founder of the National Institute of Cardiology, gave the artist the elements to draw Morgagni, but the disposition and the importance of Morgagni in the fresco were due to the talent of Rivera.

  1. Staff eye lens and extremity exposure in interventional cardiology: Results of the ORAMED project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the ORAMED project a coordinated measurement program for occupationally exposed medical staff was performed in different hospitals in Europe. The main objectives of ORAMED were to obtain a set of standardized data on doses for staff in interventional cardiology and radiology and to optimize staff protection. Doses were measured with thermoluminescent dosemeters on the ring finger and wrist of both hands, on legs and at the level of the eyes of the main operator performing interventional procedures. In this paper an overview of the doses per procedure measured during 646 interventional cardiology procedures is given for cardiac angiographies and angioplasties (CA/PTCA), radiofrequency ablations (RFA) and pacemaker and defibrillator implantations (PM/ICD). 31% of the monitored procedures were associated with no collective protective equipment, whereas 44% involved a ceiling screen and a table curtain. Although associated with the smallest air kerma – area product (KAP), PM/ICD procedures led to the highest doses. As expected, KAP and doses values exhibited a very large variability. The left side of the operator, most frequently the closest to the X-ray scattering region, was more exposed than his right side. An analysis of the effect of parameters influencing the doses, namely collective protective equipment, X-ray tube configuration and catheter access route, was performed on the doses normalized to KAP. Ceiling screen and table curtain were observed to reduce normalized doses by atmost a factor 4, much smaller than theoretical attenuation factors typical for such protections, i.e. from 10 to 100. This observation was understood as their inappropriate use by the operators and their non-optimized design. Configurations with tube above the patient led to higher normalized doses to the operator than tube below, but the effect of using a biplane X-ray suite was more complex to analyze. For CA/PTCA procedures, the upper part of the operator’s body received

  2. Bridging the Gap, Facing the Challenge-the 26(th) Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology (GW-ICC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingmei; Ren, Jun

    2016-02-01

    The joint venue of the 26(th) Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology (GW-ICC) & Asia Pacific Heart Congress 2015 (APHC 2015) & International Congress Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation 2015 (ICCPR 2015) were held from October 29 to November 01, 2015 at the China National Convention Center (CNCC), Beijing, China. This year's conference focused on cardiovascular disease prevention, health promotion, education and training, as well as disease management and rehabilitation.

  3. Class attendance and cardiology examination performance: a study in problem-based medical curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamuhair SS

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Samira S Bamuhair,1 Ali I Al Farhan,1,2 Alaa Althubaiti,1 Saeed ur Rahman,1,2 Hanan M Al-Kadri1,3 1College of Medicine, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, 2Department of Family Medicine and Primary Health Care, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Background and aims: Information on the effect of students' class attendance on examination performance in a problem-based learning medical curriculum is limited. This study investigates the impact of different educational activities on students' academic performance in a problem-based learning curriculum. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study conducted on the cardiology block at the College of Medicine, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All students who undertook the cardiology block during the academic year 2011–2012 were included. The students' attendance was measured using their overall attendance percentage. This percentage is a product of their attendance of many activities throughout the block. The students' performance was assessed by the final mark obtained, which is a product of many assessment elements. Statistical correlation between students' attendance and performance was established. Results: A total of 127 students were included. The average lecture attendance rate for the medical students in this study was found to be 86%. A significant positive correlation was noted between the overall attendance and the accumulated students' block mark (r=0.52; P<0.001. Students' attendance to different education activities was correlated to their final mark. Lecture attendance was the most significant predictor (P<0.001, that is, 1.0% increase in lecture attendance has predicted a 0.27 increase in students' final block mark. Conclusion: Class attendance has a positive effect on students' academic performance with stronger effect for lecture attendance compared to

  4. Impact of scribes on patient interaction, productivity, and revenue in a cardiology clinic: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenney WO

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Alan J Bank,1 Christopher Obetz,2 Ann Konrardy,2 Akbar Khan,1 Kamalesh M Pillai,1 Benjamin J McKinley,1 Ryan M Gage,1 Mark A Turnbull,1 William O Kenney1 1United Heart and Vascular Clinic, St Paul, MN, USA; 2Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Minneapolis, MN, USA Objective: Scribes have been used in the emergency department to improve physician productivity and patient interaction. There are no controlled, prospective studies of scribe use in the clinic setting. Methods: A prospective controlled study compared standard visits (20 minute follow-up and 40 minute new patient to a scribe system (15 minute follow-up and 30 minute new patient in a cardiology clinic. Physician productivity, patient satisfaction, physician–patient interaction, and revenue were measured. Results: Four physicians saw 129 patients using standard care and 210 patients with scribes during 65 clinic hours each. Patients seen per hour increased (P < 0.001 from 2.2 ± 0.3 to 3.5 ± 0.4 (59% increase and work relative value units (wRVU per hour increased (P < 0.001 from 3.5 ± 1.3 to 5.5 ± 1.3 (57% increase. Patient satisfaction was high at baseline and unchanged with scribes. In a substudy, direct patient contact time was lower (9.1 ± 2.0 versus 12.9 ± 3.4 minutes; P < 0.01 for scribe visits, but time of patient interaction (without computer was greater (6.7 ± 2.1 versus 1.5 ± 1.9 minutes; P < 0.01. Subjective assessment of physician–patient interaction (1–10 was higher (P < 0.01 on scribe visits (9.1 ± 0.9 versus 7.9 ± 1.1. Direct and indirect (downstream revenue per patient seen was $142 and $2,398, with $205,740 additional revenue generated from the 81 additional patients seen with scribes. Conclusion: Using scribes in a cardiology clinic is feasible, produces improvements in physician–patient interaction, and results in large increases in physician productivity and system cardiovascular revenue. Keywords: physician productivity, medical economics, patient

  5. Position paper on the importance of psychosocial factors in cardiology: Update 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladwig, Karl-Heinz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: The rapid progress of psychosomatic research in cardiology and also the increasing impact of psychosocial issues in the clinical daily routine have prompted the Clinical Commission of the German Heart Society (DGK to agree to an update of the first state of the art paper on this issue which was originally released in 2008.Methods: The circle of experts was increased, general aspects were implemented and the state of the art was updated. Particular emphasis was dedicated to coronary heart diseases (CHD, heart rhythm diseases and heart failure because to date the evidence-based clinical knowledge is most advanced in these particular areas. Differences between men and women and over the life span were considered in the recommendations as were influences of cognitive capability and the interactive and synergistic impact of classical somatic risk factors on the affective comorbidity in heart disease patients.Results: A IA recommendation (recommendation grade I and evidence grade A was given for the need to consider psychosocial risk factors in the estimation of coronary risks as etiological and prognostic risk factors. Furthermore, for the recommendation to routinely integrate psychosocial patient management into the care of heart surgery patients because in these patients, comorbid affective disorders (e.g. depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder are highly prevalent and often have a malignant prognosis. A IB recommendation was given for the treatment of psychosocial risk factors aiming to prevent the onset of CHD, particularly if the psychosocial risk factor is harmful in itself (e.g. depression or constrains the treatment of the somatic risk factors. Patients with acute and chronic CHD should be offered anti-depressive medication if these patients suffer from medium to severe states of depression and in this case medication with selective reuptake inhibitors should be given. In the long-term course of treatment

  6. Portuguese Society of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery/Portuguese Society of Cardiology recommendations for waiting times for cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, José; Pereira, Hélder; Sousa Uva, Miguel; Gavina, Cristina; Leite Moreira, Adelino; Loureiro, Maria José

    2015-11-01

    Appointed jointly by the Portuguese Society of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery (SPCCTV) and the Portuguese Society of Cardiology (SPC), the Working Group on Waiting Times for Cardiac Surgery was established with the aim of developing practical recommendations for clinically acceptable waiting times for the three critical phases of the care of adults with heart disease who require surgery or other cardiological intervention: cardiology appointments; the diagnostic process; and invasive treatment. Cardiac surgery has specific characteristics that are not comparable to other surgical specialties. It is important to reduce maximum waiting times and to increase the efficacy of systems for patient monitoring and tracking. The information in this document is mainly based on available clinical information. The methodology used to establish the criteria was based on studies on the natural history of heart disease, clinical studies comparing medical treatment with intervention, retrospective and prospective analyses of patients on waiting lists, and the opinions of experts and working groups. Following the first step, represented by publication of this document, the SPCCTV and SPC, as the bodies best suited to oversee this process, are committed to working together to define operational strategies that will reconcile the clinical evidence with the actual situation and with available resources.

  7. Challenging the holy grail of hospital accreditation: A cross sectional study of inpatient satisfaction in the field of cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Subjective parameters such as quality of life or patient satisfaction gain importance as outcome parameters and benchmarks in health care. In many countries hospitals are now undergoing accreditation as mandatory or voluntary measures. It is believed but unproven that accreditations positively influence quality of care and patient satisfaction. The present study aims to assess in a defined specialty (cardiology) the relationship between patient satisfaction (as measured by the recommendation rate) and accreditation status. Methods Consecutive patients discharged from 25 cardiology units received a validated patient satisfaction questionnaire. Data from 3,037 patients (response rate > 55%) became available for analysis. Recommendation rate was used as primary endpoint. Different control variables such as staffing level were considered. Results The 15 accredited units did not differ significantly from the 10 non-accredited units regarding main hospital (i.e. staffing levels, no. of beds) and patient (age, gender) characteristics. The primary endpoint "recommendation rate of a given hospital" for accredited hospitals (65.6%, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 63.4 - 67.8%) and hospitals without accreditation (65.8%, 95% CI 63.1 - 68.5%) was not significantly different. Conclusion Our results support the notion that - at least in the field of cardiology - successful accreditation is not linked with measurable better quality of care as perceived by the patient and reflected by the recommendation rate of a given institution. Hospital accreditation may represent a step towards quality management, but does not seem to improve overall patient satisfaction. PMID:20459873

  8. Can diagnostic and procedural skills required to practice cardiology as a specialist be mastered in 3 years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Eric H C; Nair, Parvathy; Sibbald, Matthew G; Lee, Douglas S; Dorian, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive and procedural skills required of cardiologists have increased in the past 10 years. What is unknown is whether residents consistently meet recommended volumes during training and what their own subjective assessments of their competency are after training. The purpose of this study was to (1) determine whether current training provides residents with opportunities to develop skills to function independently and (2) identify whether residents perceive gaps in their skills. We surveyed current and recent graduates of adult cardiology programs in Canada. One hundred ten responses from 425 surveys were received. Procedural and diagnostic test interpretation volumes were recorded, as were the optimum number the respondents believed were important to complete to function independently. These volumes were compared with the 2008 American College of Cardiology Core Cardiology Training Symposium (COCATS 3) and the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) recommendations for training. The proportion of residents meeting recommended volumes for diagnostic test interpretation ranged from 7% (Holter monitors) to 91% (echocardiograms). For procedures, the range was from 71% (echocardiography) to 100% (cardioversion). The ratio of residents' perceived minimum numbers believed to be required for proficiency for diagnostic test interpretation to those recommended ranged from 14% (electrocardiograms) to 116% (echocardiograms), and for procedures, the ratio was 66% (temporary pacemaker placement) to 116% (echocardiography). Recent graduates' perception of minimum required numbers to achieve competency is underestimated compared with COCATS 3 and CCS recommendations. Few graduates achieved the recommended volume targets suggested for diagnostic test interpretation.

  9. Cardiology in Brazilian scientific journals: an overview Cardiologia em revistas científicas brasileiras: um panorama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Kirankumar Patel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiology has been and is a very significant fraction of the Brazilian contribution to science. In older days, the most significant part of this work was directed to foreign periodicals, but the quasi-simultaneous emergence of SciELO and PUBMED has ordained a redirection of much of this work to Brazilian periodicals. We here survey some of this more recent contribution for the benefit of readers of Revista Brasileira de Cirurgia Cardiovascular. This is offered as an update. Articles on the general themes of Cardiology and Pneumology published by four ISI Indexed Brazilian journals not specializing in cardiology are re-visited, after a search through 10 journals.A Cardiologia foi, e continua sendo, responsável por uma fracção muito significativa da contribuição brasileira para a ciência. No passado, os trabalhos mais importantes eram direcionados para periódicos estrangeiros, mas o surgimento quase simultâneo do SciELO e PUBMED facilitou um redirecionamento de grande parte desses trabalhos a periódicos brasileiros. Neste artigo, examinamos algumas das contribuições mais recentes em benefício aos leitores da Revista Brasileira de Cirurgia Cardiovascular. Esta discussão é oferecida como uma atualização. Artigos sobre os temas gerais da cardiologia e pneumologia publicados por quatro revistas brasileiras indexadas no ISI - não especializadas em cardiologia - são revistos.

  10. Challenging the holy grail of hospital accreditation: A cross sectional study of inpatient satisfaction in the field of cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erbel Raimund

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subjective parameters such as quality of life or patient satisfaction gain importance as outcome parameters and benchmarks in health care. In many countries hospitals are now undergoing accreditation as mandatory or voluntary measures. It is believed but unproven that accreditations positively influence quality of care and patient satisfaction. The present study aims to assess in a defined specialty (cardiology the relationship between patient satisfaction (as measured by the recommendation rate and accreditation status. Methods Consecutive patients discharged from 25 cardiology units received a validated patient satisfaction questionnaire. Data from 3,037 patients (response rate > 55% became available for analysis. Recommendation rate was used as primary endpoint. Different control variables such as staffing level were considered. Results The 15 accredited units did not differ significantly from the 10 non-accredited units regarding main hospital (i.e. staffing levels, no. of beds and patient (age, gender characteristics. The primary endpoint "recommendation rate of a given hospital" for accredited hospitals (65.6%, 95% Confidence Interval (CI 63.4 - 67.8% and hospitals without accreditation (65.8%, 95% CI 63.1 - 68.5% was not significantly different. Conclusion Our results support the notion that - at least in the field of cardiology - successful accreditation is not linked with measurable better quality of care as perceived by the patient and reflected by the recommendation rate of a given institution. Hospital accreditation may represent a step towards quality management, but does not seem to improve overall patient satisfaction.

  11. Germany Enjoys Splendid Trade Partnership with China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Yongjian

    2005-01-01

    @@ "China and Germany are longterm trade partners, The volume of our bilateral trade has reached more than $54 Million in 2004, Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao and German Chancellor Gerhard Schroder have agreed to double our bilateral trade volume by the year 2010." Dr. Volker Stanzel,German Ambassador gave an active appraise on the bilateral trade relations when interviewed by China's Foreign Trade.

  12. The IMEMME 1992 travelling scholarship to Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, J.A. (British Coal Corporation (United Kingdom). Littleton Colliery)

    1993-04-01

    The author describes a visit to Germany funded by the Institution of Mining Electrical and Mining Mechanical Engineers' 1992 Travelling Scholarship. Details are given of visits to the Walsum, Niederberg and Lohberg collieries, Rheinberg shaft. Borth salt mine, Mulheim an der Ruhr Stadtbahn, Emscher Aufbereitung coal pulverization plant and various mining equipment manufacturers. 8 figs.

  13. Fluoroquinolone Resistance and Clostridium difficile, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Zaiß, Henning; Witte, Wolfgang; Nübel, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    We characterized 670 Clostridium diffi cile isolates collected from patients in 84 hospitals in Germany in 2008. PCR ribotyping showed high prevalence of ribotype 001 and restricted dissemination of ribotype 027 strains. Fluoroquinolone resistance and associated gyrase mutations were frequent in various ribotypes, but no resistance to metronidazole or vancomycin was noted.

  14. Agro-environmental policies in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agricultural activities always have impacts on the environment. Whereas soil erosion is a minor problem in Germany water pollution due to modern and intensive agriculture is of major concern. At first the paper discusses to what extent agriculture contributes to environmental pollution in Germany, in particular to the pollution of surface waters (as well as hydroelectric power constructions on the Danube) and groundwater by nutrients and pesticides. Agro-environmental policy in Germany is dominated by command-and-control-measures. Hence, in the second section, recent developments of the most important legal and institutional settings concerning water conservation policies are surveyed with special emphasis on the Federal Water Act and the Implementation of the Nitrate Directive into German legislation by the Fertilizer Ordinance. Thirdly, impacts of alternative water conservation policies are investigated using a regionalized agricultural sector model. Information obtained by this model analysis cover the development of N-balances, potential nitrate concentrations in the recharged groundwater, costs potentially effected by this and resulting agricultural incomes on the country level of the former Federal Republic Germany. The last section focuses on programs promoting environmentally sound farming practices, which gained increasing importance in the Common Agricultural Policy of the European Union in the last years. It is argued that this development will also continue in the future. (author)

  15. Recollections of a jewish mathematician in Germany

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Abraham A. Fraenkel was a world-renowned mathematician in pre–Second World War Germany, whose work on set theory was fundamental to the development of modern mathematics. A friend of Albert Einstein, he knew many of the era’s acclaimed mathematicians personally. He moved to Israel (then Palestine under the British Mandate) in the early 1930s. In his autobiography Fraenkel describes his early years growing up as an Orthodox Jew in Germany and his development as a mathematician at the beginning of the twentieth century. This memoir, originally written in German in the 1960s, has now been translated into English, with an additional chapter covering the period from 1933 until his death in 1965 written by the editor, Jiska Cohen-Mansfield. Fraenkel describes the world of mathematics in Germany in the first half of the twentieth century, its origins and development, the systems influencing it, and its demise. He also paints a unique picture of the complex struggles within the world of Orthodox Jewry in Germany....

  16. France, Germany drop out of ITER race

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The list of countries willing to host a multi-billion dollar fusion facility got much shorter when France and Germany effectively took themselves out of the competition, making Japan the odd-on favorite as the site for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) if it is built. This article describes the history and the possible future for the ITER

  17. Mapping Music Education Research in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhn, Wilfried

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a very general survey of tracks and trends in music education research in Germany and its roots in the 19th century, where the beginning of empirical music psychology can be traced back to "Tonpsychologie" and perception research of scholars such as Helmholtz, Stumpf, Wundt, and Wellek. Focus areas that are addressed in the…

  18. Perspectives of Financing Higher Education in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frackmann, Edgar

    1991-01-01

    The general structure of higher education finance in Germany and current and possible future developments in German higher education financing are analyzed. A shift from input budgeting to a more output-oriented steering of higher education is identified. Methods of dealing with the problems introduced by new mechanisms of decision making and fund…

  19. Thuringia (Germany): uranium makes Cat radiant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In eastern Germany, near Chemnitz, the closure in 1991 of the huge surface and underground uranium mines has left important contaminated surfaces which have to be rehabilitated. This paper gives a general overview of the remedial action in progress in this region and of the equipments required. (J.S.)

  20. Monetary transmission and bank lending in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kakes, Jan; Sturm, Jan-Egbert; Philipp Maier, [No Value

    1999-01-01

    This paper analyses the role of bank lending in the monetary transmission process in Germany. We follow a sectoral approach by distinguishing corporate lending and household lending. We find that banks respond to a monetary contraction by adjusting their securities holdings, rather than reducing the

  1. Notes from Visit to Norway and Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DuanXiumin; ChangJiuqing

    2004-01-01

    At the invitation of Norway Moral Rearmament (MRA) and German Friedrich-Ebert Foundation (FES), CAFIU delegation headed by Mr. Zhu Dacheng, Vice-President of CAFIU visited Norway and Germany in the middle of May. As a member ofthe delegation,

  2. Germany forms alliance for terascale physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Feder, Toni

    2007-01-01

    "Germany's high-energy particle physicists have formed a network to increase their international visibility and competitiveness as their field gears up for the start next ear of the Large Hadron Collide (LHC) at CERN and, eventually, the International Linear Collider." (1 page)

  3. Macroeconomic trends and reforms in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Sabbatini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces the main macroeconomic developments in the German economy from national unification. Its performance is compared with that of the rest of the euro area and its largest economies. The study documents as GermanyÕs modest growth in the later 1990s was due to the restrictive impact on domestic demand coming from the deep restructuring and modernization of the production system, followed by sweeping reforms after the turn of the century. Rapid productivity increases and prolonged wage moderation, especially in industry, fuelled a large and mounting current account surplus in Germany, that compares with the deficits registered in most European countries. The study retraces the recent debate on how to correct those imbalances, recalling the arguments for and against the thesis that the countries with a current payments surplus, above all Germany, must also play an active role in fostering the adjustment of the deficit countries. A possible synthesis is proposed, based on an analysis of the formation of national income and the use of resources according to the national accounts system. The implication is that Germany may contribute to the correction of imbalances within the euro area not so much by altering the wage formation mechanism as by creating incentives for domestic investment, hence fostering employment creation, in the service sectors that are currently lagging behind the extraordinary perfomance of a number of core activities in the industry.

  4. Successful overwintering of Aedes albopictus in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluskota, Björn; Jöst, Artur; Augsten, Xenia; Stelzner, Lilith; Ferstl, Ina; Becker, Norbert

    2016-08-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) is of great concern to public health authorities due to its vector competence and rapid spread across the globe. In 2015, two large local breeding populations of Ae. albopictus were discovered in southwest Germany. In spring 2016, we were able to demonstrate the first evidence of a successful overwintering in Germany of this originally tropical mosquito species in different research projects. Particularly noteworthy is the successful hatching of diapause eggs of an Italian strain (Calabria), which overwintered successfully in the field in St. Georgen im Schwarzwald (Baden-Wuerttemberg) at 820 m above sea level. Furthermore, within the scope of a larvae monitoring, the first larvae that hatched in the field were detected on the April 09, 2016 in a rain barrel within the Heidelberg population. Our first results show that self-extinction due to an unsuccessful overwintering cannot be assumed for populations of the Asian tiger mosquito which settled in Germany in previous years. The evidence of a successful overwintering of a large number of diapause eggs and the hatching of the first larvae in field conditions opens the control year against Ae. albopictus in southwest Germany. PMID:27112761

  5. The Scope of Sexual Victimization in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kury, Helmut; Chouaf, Silvia; Obergfell-Fuchs, Joachim; Woessner, Gunda

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the sexual victimization of 309 female students in Germany. The results indicate that the majority of the subjects have been victims of minor offenses and that a minority of subjects was severely victimized. As to the relation of victim and perpetrator, the milder offenses are more likely to be committed by strangers. In…

  6. Football business models: Why did Germany win the World Cup?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortsen, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    This article looks into the managerial aspects related to why and how Germany won the 2014 FIFA World Cup.......This article looks into the managerial aspects related to why and how Germany won the 2014 FIFA World Cup....

  7. Is Germany a model for managers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wever, K S; Allen, C S

    1992-01-01

    Most American managers have a hard time making sense of Germany. The country has a fraction of the resources and less than one-third the population of the United States. Labor costs are substantially higher, paid vacations are at least three times as long, and strong unions are deeply involved at all levels of business, from the local plant to the corporate boardroom. Yet German companies manage to produce internationally competitive products in key manufacturing sectors, making Germany the greatest competitive threat to the United States after Japan. The seemingly paradoxical nature of the German economy typically evokes one of two diametrically opposed responses. The first is to celebrate the German economy as a "model" worth emulating--indeed, as the answer to declining U.S. competitiveness. The alternative, more skeptical response is to question Germany's staying power in a new, more competitive global economy. According to Kirsten Wever and Christopher Allen, the problem with both points of view is that they miss the forest for the trees. Observers are so preoccupied with praising--or blaming--individual components of the German economy that they fail to see the dynamic logic that ties these components together into a coherent system. In their review of recent research on the German business system, Wever and Allen argue that managers can learn an important lesson from Germany. In the global economy, competition isn't just between companies but between entire socioeconomic systems. Germany's ability to design a cohesive economic and social system that adapts continuously to changing requirements goes a long way toward explaining that country's competitive success. PMID:10121315

  8. The outlook for natural gas in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a generally stagnant energy market, gas will be the energy with the highest growth rate in Germany, especially because of its steadily rising shares in the residential and commercial sector. In western Germany there is to be accepted that the demand forecasts, which were raised from one conference to the next, have passed their zenith. Great uncertainty exists as regards the future use of gas for power generation. In the absence of any significant expansion of this market sector, which is considered rather improbable in western Germany, it can be stated that anticipated gas demand up to the year 2005 is already covered by existing import contracts and scheduled domestic production. The picture is completely different in eastern Germany, where a doubling of consumption is quite feasible. To achieve the requisite diversification of supplies, substantial additional imports from western sources will have to be contracted. Russia can and should remain eastern Germany's main supplier in the long run, but Russian deliveries must be placed on a reliable, long-term contractual basis. As far as new gas projects are concerned, deliveries from Norway, to a limited extent from the United Kingdom and above all as part of the new Russian export initiative are under discussion. Generally speaking, transit will be an increasingly significant issue, especially for additional supplies from Russia. The efficiency and reliability of gas marketing companies will become far more important in an environment characterised by growing uncertainties. The reliable customer offering a dependable market outlet will be increasingly sought. With energy prices likely to increase only slightly, the management of uncertainties and the safeguarding of economic driving forces will be the main challenge facing our supply projects. 15 figs

  9. East Germany: Transition With Unification - Experiments and Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Strauch, Rolf; von Hagen, Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    East Germany remains unique among the transition economies. Soon after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, it became part of the Federal Republic of Germany. German Union meant the transplantation of West Germany's legal, administrative and economic infrastructure to the five new Länder. The paper traces the economic changes since 1989 and assesses the convergence between West and East Germany during the last decade. We reach three main conclusions: First, there has been significant converge...

  10. East Germany overtakes West Germany: recent trends in order-specific fertility dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua R. Goldstein; Michaela Kreyenfeld

    2010-01-01

    Some 20 years after unification, the contrast between East and West Germany provides a unique natural experiment for studying the persistence of communist-era family patterns, the effects of economic change, and the complexities of the process of fertility postponement. After unification, fertility rates plummeted in the former East Germany to record low levels. The number of births per year fell 60 percent. The period total fertility rate (TFR) reached a low of 0.8. Since the middle of the 1...

  11. General cost analysis for scholarly communication in Germany : results of the "Houghton Report" for Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Houghton, John W.; Dugall, Berndt; Bernius, Steffen; Krönung, Julia; König, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Management Summary: Conducted within the project “Economic Implications of New Models for Information Supply for Science and Research in Germany”, the Houghton Report for Germany provides a general cost and benefit analysis for scientific communication in Germany comparing different scenarios according to their specific costs and explicitly including the German National License Program (NLP). Basing on the scholarly lifecycle process model outlined by Björk (2007), the study compared the f...

  12. Hmong of Germany: Preliminary Report on the Resettlement of Lao Hmong Refugees in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tou T. Yang

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper briefly describes the resettlement of Lao Hmong refugees in Germany since the fall of Laos in 1975. Data for this paper were collected during my two visits to the Hmong community of Gammertingen in southern Germany. Although, it has been known that there are Lao Hmong refugees living in Germany, literature about their resettlement in academic journals and the western media has been nonexistent. Therefore, information about their population, social, educational and economic status has not been available. While serving in the U.S. Army, I was fortunate to be stationed in Germany and had several opportunities to visits and interact with this isolate Hmong community. Therefore, I would like to share what little information I have gathered about this forgotten Hmong community. This paper provides a preliminary report on the resettlement process, population, social, educational and economic status of this community. Data were collected primarily through informal direct interviews with the head of household from four families of the original five families that resettled in Germany. As of the writing of this paper, there is no other known Hmong community in Germany other than this Gammertingen Hmong community.

  13. 48 CFR 252.246-7002 - Warranty of construction (Germany).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (Germany). 252.246-7002 Section 252.246-7002 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... of Provisions And Clauses 252.246-7002 Warranty of construction (Germany). As prescribed in 246.710(4), use the following clause: Warranty of Construction (Germany) (JUN 1997) (a) In addition to any...

  14. Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology heart failure nurse curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jillian P; Astin, Felicity; Crespo-Leiro, Marisa G; Deaton, Christi M; Kienhorst, Jens; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; McDonagh, Theresa A; Rushton, Claire A; Stromberg, Anna; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Anker, Stefan D

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in care and management of heart failure have improved outcome, largely as a result of the developing evidence basis for medications, implantable devices and the organization of heart failure follow-up. Such developments have also increased the complexity of delivering and coordinating care. This has led to a change to the way in which heart failure services are organized and to the traditional role of the heart failure nurse. Nurses in many countries now provide a range of services that include providing care for patients with acute and with chronic heart failure, working in and across different sectors of care (inpatient, outpatient, community care, the home and remotely), organising care services around the face-to-face and the remote collection of patient data, and liaising with a wide variety of health-care providers and professionals. To support such advances the nurse requires a skill set that goes beyond that of their initial education and training. The range of nurses' roles across Europe is varied. So too is the nature of their educational preparation. This heart failure nurse curriculum aims to provide a framework for use in countries of the European Society of Cardiology. Its modular approach enables the key knowledge, skills, and behaviours for the nurse working in different care settings to be outlined and so facilitate nursing staff to play a fuller role within the heart failure team. PMID:27220672

  15. [Assessment of renal function, iatrogenic hyperkalemia and acute renal dysfunction in cardiology. Contrast-induced nephropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górriz Teruel, José Luis; Beltrán Catalán, Sandra

    2011-12-01

    Renal impairment influences the prognosis of patients with cardiovascular disease and increases cardiovascular risk. Renal dysfunction is a marker of lesions in other parts of the vascular tree and detection facilitates early identification of individuals at high risk of cardiovascular events. In patients with cardiovascular disease, renal function is assessed by measuring albuminuria in a spot urine sample and by estimating the glomerular filtration rate using creatinine-derived predictive formulas or equations. We recommend the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration or the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formulas. The Cockcroft-Gault formula is a possible alternative. The administration of drugs that block the angiotensin-renin system can, on occasion, be associated with acute renal dysfunction or hyperkalemia. We need to know when risk of these complications exists so as to provide the best possible treatment: prevention. Given the growing number of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the field of cardiology that use intravenous contrast media, contrast-induced nephrotoxicity represents a significant problem. We should identify the risk factors and patients at greatest risk, and prevent it from appearing.

  16. Management of stable angina: A commentary on the European Society of Cardiology guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Komajda, Michel; Mugelli, Alessandro; Lopez-Sendón, José; Tamargo, Juan; Camm, John

    2016-09-01

    In 2013 the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) released new guidelines on the management of stable coronary artery disease. These guidelines update and replace the previous ESC guidelines on the management of stable angina pectoris, issued in 2006. There are several new aspects in the 2013 ESC guidelines compared with the 2006 version. This opinion paper provides an in-depth interpretation of the ESC guidelines with regard to these issues, to help physicians in making evidence-based therapeutic choices in their routine clinical practice. The first new element is the definition of stable coronary artery disease itself, which has now broadened from a 'simple' symptom, angina pectoris, to a more complex disease that can even be asymptomatic. In the first-line setting, the major changes in the new guidelines are the upgrading of calcium channel blockers, the distinction between dihydropyridines and non-dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers, and the presence of important statements regarding the combination of calcium channel blockers with beta-blockers. In the second-line setting, the 2013 ESC guidelines recommend the addition of long-acting nitrates, ivabradine, nicorandil or ranolazine to first-line agents. Trimetazidine may also be considered. However, no clear distinction is made among different second-line drugs, despite different quality of evidence in favour of these agents. For example, the use of ranolazine is supported by strong and recent evidence, while data supporting the use of the traditional agents appear relatively scanty. PMID:27222385

  17. Multiple procedures and cumulative individual radiation exposure in interventional cardiology: A long-term retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weltermann, Birgitta M.; Rock, Thomas; Berndt, Peter; Viehmann, Anja; Reinders, Sabrina; Gesenhues, Stefan [University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute for General Medicine, University Hospital, Essen (Germany); Brix, Gunnar; Schegerer, Alexander [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Radiation Protection and Health, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Various studies address discrepancies between guideline recommendations for coronary angiographies and clinical practice. While the issue of the appropriateness of recurrent angiographies was studied focusing on the role of the cardiologist, little is known about individual patients' histories and the associated radiation exposures. We analyzed all patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) in an academic teaching practice who underwent at least one angiography with or without intervention between 2004 and 2009. All performed angiographies in these patients were analyzed and rated by three physicians for appropriateness levels according to cardiology guidelines. Typical exposure data from the medical literature were used to estimate individual radiation exposure. In the cohort of 147 patients, a total of 441 procedures were analyzed: between 1981 and 2009, three procedures were performed per patient (range 1-19) on average. Appropriateness ratings were 'high/intermediate' in 71 %, 'low/no' in 27.6 % and data were insufficient for ratings in 1.4 %. Procedures with 'low/no' ratings were associated with potentially avoidable exposures of up to 186 mSv for single patients. Using retrospective data, we exemplify the potential benefit of guideline adherence to decrease patients' radiation exposures. (orig.)

  18. CardioSmart365: Artificial Intelligence in the Service of Cardiologic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrosini Sourla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial intelligence has significantly contributed in the evolution of medical informatics and biomedicine, providing a variety of tools available to be exploited, from rule-based expert systems and fuzzy logic to neural networks and genetic algorithms. Moreover, familiarizing people with smartphones and the constantly growing use of medical-related mobile applications enables complete and systematic monitoring of a series of chronic diseases both by health professionals and patients. In this work, we propose an integrated system for monitoring and early notification for patients suffering from heart diseases. CardioSmart365 consists of web applications, smartphone native applications, decision support systems, and web services that allow interaction and communication among end users: cardiologists, patients, and general doctors. The key features of the proposed solution are (a recording and management of patients' measurements of vital signs performed at home on regular basis (blood pressure, blood glucose, oxygen saturation, weight, and height, (b management of patients' EMRs, (c cardiologic patient modules for the most common heart diseases, (d decision support systems based on fuzzy logic, (e integrated message management module for optimal communication between end users and instant notifications, and (f interconnection to Microsoft HealthVault platform. CardioSmart365 contributes to the effort for optimal patient monitoring at home and early response in cases of emergency.

  19. 3D-Printing in Congenital Cardiology: From Flatland to Spaceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Deferm

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging has changed to a great extent over the past few decades. It has been revolutionized by three-dimensional (3D imaging techniques. Despite much of modern medicine relying on 3D imaging, which can be obtained accurately, we keep on being limited by visualization of the 3D content on two-dimensional flat screens. 3D-printing of graspable models could become a feasible technique to overcome this gap. Therefore, we printed pre- and postoperative 3D-models of a complex congenital heart defect. With this example, we intend to illustrate that these models hold value in preoperative planning, postoperative evaluation of a complex procedure, communication with the patient, and education of trainees. At this moment, 3D printing only leaves a small footprint, but makes already a big impression in the domain of cardiology and cardiovascular surgery. Further studies including more patients and more validated applications are needed to streamline 3D printing in the clinical setting of daily practice.

  20. 3D-Printing in Congenital Cardiology: From Flatland to Spaceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deferm, Sébastien; Meyns, Bart; Vlasselaers, Dirk; Budts, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Medical imaging has changed to a great extent over the past few decades. It has been revolutionized by three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques. Despite much of modern medicine relying on 3D imaging, which can be obtained accurately, we keep on being limited by visualization of the 3D content on two-dimensional flat screens. 3D-printing of graspable models could become a feasible technique to overcome this gap. Therefore, we printed pre- and postoperative 3D-models of a complex congenital heart defect. With this example, we intend to illustrate that these models hold value in preoperative planning, postoperative evaluation of a complex procedure, communication with the patient, and education of trainees. At this moment, 3D printing only leaves a small footprint, but makes already a big impression in the domain of cardiology and cardiovascular surgery. Further studies including more patients and more validated applications are needed to streamline 3D printing in the clinical setting of daily practice. PMID:27195174

  1. Combined cardiological and neurological abnormalities due to filamin A gene mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Marie Claire Y.; de Coo, Irenaeus F. M.; Lequin, Maarten H.; Halley, Dicky J. J.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiac defects can be the presenting symptom in patients with mutations in the X-linked gene FLNA. Dysfunction of this gene is associated with cardiac abnormalities, especially in the left ventricular outflow tract, but can also cause a congenital malformation of the cerebral cortex. We noticed that some patients diagnosed at the neurogenetics clinic had first presented to a cardiologist, suggesting that earlier recognition may be possible if the diagnosis is suspected. Methods and results From the Erasmus MC cerebral malformations database 24 patients were identified with cerebral bilateral periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) without other cerebral cortical malformations. In six of these patients, a pathogenic mutation in FLNA was present. In five a cardiac defect was also found in the outflow tract. Four had presented to a cardiologist before the cerebral abnormalities were diagnosed. Conclusions The cardiological phenotype typically consists of aortic or mitral regurgitation, coarctation of the aorta or other left-sided cardiac malformations. Most patients in this category will not have a FLNA mutation, but the presence of neurological complaints, hyperlaxity of the skin or joints and/or a family history with similar cardiac or neurological problems in a possibly X-linked pattern may alert the clinician to the possibility of a FLNA mutation. PMID:20730588

  2. 3D-Printing in Congenital Cardiology: From Flatland to Spaceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deferm, Sébastien; Meyns, Bart; Vlasselaers, Dirk; Budts, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Medical imaging has changed to a great extent over the past few decades. It has been revolutionized by three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques. Despite much of modern medicine relying on 3D imaging, which can be obtained accurately, we keep on being limited by visualization of the 3D content on two-dimensional flat screens. 3D-printing of graspable models could become a feasible technique to overcome this gap. Therefore, we printed pre- and postoperative 3D-models of a complex congenital heart defect. With this example, we intend to illustrate that these models hold value in preoperative planning, postoperative evaluation of a complex procedure, communication with the patient, and education of trainees. At this moment, 3D printing only leaves a small footprint, but makes already a big impression in the domain of cardiology and cardiovascular surgery. Further studies including more patients and more validated applications are needed to streamline 3D printing in the clinical setting of daily practice.

  3. Contributions of nuclear cardiology to prognosis and risk stratification in coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease and stable symptoms enables not only accurate diagnosis of disease but also entails prognostic value. Myocardial perfusion SPECT contributes to assessment of future cardiac events independently of other clinical parameters. A normal stress myocardial perfusion scan is associated with a favorable prognosis in all pre-test risk subsets similar to that of the general population independent of history, symptoms, and exercise electrocardiography test variables. Cardiac risk and benefit from invasive therapeutic strategies increase in relation to the severity of the abnormality of perfusion and function assessed by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Thus, stress myocardial perfusion imaging may serve as a gatekeeper for referral to coronary angiography enabling effective risk stratification in patients with suspected or documented coronary artery disease. In severe coronary artery disease accompanied by left ventricular dysfunction preoperative prediction of reversibility of functional impairment and improvement in survival after revascularization can be achieved by viability testing using nuclear cardiology. Absence of viability is associated with no significant difference in functional and survival outcomes, irrespective of treatment strategy. Therefore, unnecessary revascularization can be avoided in cases with absent evidence of viability. (orig.)

  4. The billing process at a teaching hospital specialized in cardiology and pulmonology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Favaro Faria Guerrer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this exploratory study was to describe and map out the billing process in a public tertiary-level university hospital specialized in cardiology and pulmonology. In the period between May and June of 2012, we identified and documented the steps in the process validated by the professionals involved in the hospital bill audit service. We found that during billing pre-analysis, auditors make corrections to justify the billing of procedures and to avoid unwarranted billing and loss of revenue. Mapping out the process allowed us to propose strategies to minimize the time for presenting bills to payment sources. By bringing visibility to this process, which is fundamental for the economic-financial balance of the studied hospital, we bring such knowledge to the public domain. Thus, it is accessible to other health organizations that wish to increment their revenue and reduce divergences between patient charts and the patient’s hospital bill. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i3.23487.

  5. Dante and cardiology: Physiopathology and clinical features of cardiovascular diseases in the Middle Ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, M A; Cambioli, L; Castagna, F; Cianci, N; Varrenti, M; Giannattasio, C; Cesana, G

    2015-02-15

    Ancient non-medical texts can unexpectedly provide useful information on the development of knowledge about the heart and its diseases throughout history. The 750th anniversary of the birth of the Italian poet Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) provides a timely opportunity to analyze medical references in his works, in particular, focusing on literary descriptions that may be attributed to cardiovascular disorders. Dante's high level of medical knowledge, probably derived from his academic studies, is testified by his affiliation to the Florentine Guild of physicians and pharmacists. In all his works, the poet shows a deep interest for the heart. However, his anatomical and physiological knowledge of the circulatory system appears to be poor, probably due to it being based on theories and concepts brought forth by Aristotle and Galen, which were taught in medieval universities. Despite this, accurate descriptions of some symptoms (emotional syncope, orthopnea, dyspnea on exertion) and signs (ascites, paleness), which may be attributed to cardiovascular disorders, can be easily found in Dante's works, particularly in his masterpiece, the Divine Comedy. The literary and historical analysis of cardiovascular signs and symptoms allows us to assume that clinical features due to alterations of heart function were probably known by medieval physicians, but their etiology and pathophysiological mechanisms were not completely understood in that period. Historians of cardiology and clinicians should consider analysis of non-medical texts (including poetry) as an opportunity to better investigate the evolution of their discipline throughout the ages. PMID:25544198

  6. Length of Hospital Stay Prediction at the Admission Stage for Cardiology Patients Using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Fang (Jennifer Tsai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For hospitals’ admission management, the ability to predict length of stay (LOS as early as in the preadmission stage might be helpful to monitor the quality of inpatient care. This study is to develop artificial neural network (ANN models to predict LOS for inpatients with one of the three primary diagnoses: coronary atherosclerosis (CAS, heart failure (HF, and acute myocardial infarction (AMI in a cardiovascular unit in a Christian hospital in Taipei, Taiwan. A total of 2,377 cardiology patients discharged between October 1, 2010, and December 31, 2011, were analyzed. Using ANN or linear regression model was able to predict correctly for 88.07% to 89.95% CAS patients at the predischarge stage and for 88.31% to 91.53% at the preadmission stage. For AMI or HF patients, the accuracy ranged from 64.12% to 66.78% at the predischarge stage and 63.69% to 67.47% at the preadmission stage when a tolerance of 2 days was allowed.

  7. Estimation of staff lens doses during interventional procedures. Comparing cardiology, neuroradiology and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this article is to estimate lens doses using over apron active personal dosemeters in interventional catheterisation laboratories (cardiology IC, neuroradiology IN and radiology IR) and to investigate correlations between occupational lens doses and patient doses. Active electronic personal dosemeters placed over the lead apron were used on a sample of 204 IC procedures, 274 IN and 220 IR (all performed at the same university hospital). Patient dose values (kerma area product) were also recorded to evaluate correlations with occupational doses. Operators used the ceiling-suspended screen in most cases. The median and third quartile values of equivalent dose Hp(10) per procedure measured over the apron for IC, IN and IR resulted, respectively, in 21/67, 19/44 and 24/54 μSv. Patient dose values (median/third quartile) were 75/128, 83/176 and 61/159 Gy cm2, respectively. The median ratios for dosemeters worn over the apron by operators ( protected by the ceiling-suspended screen) and patient doses were 0.36; 0.21 and 0.46 μSv Gy-1 cm-2, respectively. With the conservative approach used (lens doses estimated from the over apron chest dosemeter) we came to the conclusion that more than 800 procedures y-1 and per operator were necessary to reach the new lens dose limit for the three interventional specialties. (authors)

  8. [The cardiology community and health reform. Some reflections to open a debate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, C

    2000-01-01

    A recently introduced health care reform in Italy will modify substantially the scenario in which all physicians and also the cardiac specialists working in and out of the hospitals will operate. Therefore it is important that the cardiological community, who manages a large proportion of human and financial resources of the Italian National Health Service, knows the reform and interacts with the national and local authorities for the best implementation of the basic principles on which the reform has been founded. These principles are the following: the Italian health service will guarantee all citizens the so-called "essential levels of care" identified in accordance with four distinctive features. They must: 1) safeguard real needs of care (i.e. cosmetic surgery is not considered), 2) be evidence based, 3) be appropriate for individual patients, 4) be cost-effective. In a context of scarce resources and rapidly increasing demand of care this basic strategy seems to be the only one suitable for a National Health Service, but the application of this principle in the real world of care seems a very difficult task, and the role of medical associations is obviously crucial for a good outcome. This report illustrates some articles of the law that deal with the medical profession: guidelines and appropriateness of the criteria; accreditation, clinical competence and quality control; continuing medical education. PMID:10832116

  9. The foundation and launch of the Melbourne Interventional Group: a collaborative interventional cardiology project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajani, A E; Szto, G; Duffy, S J; Eccleston, D; Clark, D J; Lefkovits, J; Chew, D P; Warren, R; Black, A; New, G; Walton, A; Lew, R; Shaw, J; Horrigan, M; Sebastian, M; Yan, B P; Brennan, A; Meehan, A; Reid, C; Krum, H

    2006-02-01

    The Melbourne Interventional Group (MIG) is a voluntary collaborative venture of interventional cardiologists practicing at 12 major public and private hospitals in Victoria, designed to record data pertaining to percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) and perform long-term follow-up. The potential advantages of collaboration involve large-scale analysis of current interventional strategies (e.g. drug-eluting stents, evaluation of new technologies and cost-effective analysis), provide a basis for multi-centred clinical trials and allow comparison of clinical outcomes with cardiac surgery. The established registry documents demographic, clinical and procedural characteristics of consecutive patients undergoing PCI and permits analysis of those characteristics at 30 days and 12 months. The registry is co-ordinated by the Centre of Clinical Research Excellence (CCRE), a research body within the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine (Monash University, Melbourne). The eventual goal of MIG is to provide a contemporary appraisal of Australian interventional cardiology practice, with opportunities to improve in-hospital and long-term outcomes of patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:16473790

  10. Cardiovascular imaging in the diagnosis and monitoring of cardiotoxicity: cardiovascular magnetic resonance and nuclear cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Alessia; Pizzino, Fausto; Gargiulo, Paola; Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale; Cadeddu, Christian; Mele, Donato; Monte, Ines; Novo, Giuseppina; Zito, Concetta; Di Bella, Gianluca

    2016-05-01

    Chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity (CTX) is a determining factor for the quality of life and mortality of patients administered potentially cardiotoxic drugs and in long-term cancer survivors. Therefore, prevention and early detection of CTX are highly desirable, as is the exploration of alternative therapeutic strategies and/or the proposal of potentially cardioprotective treatments. In recent years, cardiovascular imaging has acquired a pivotal role in this setting. Although echocardiography remains the diagnostic method most used to monitor cancer patients, the need for more reliable, reproducible and accurate detection of early chemotherapy-induced CTX has encouraged the introduction of second-line advanced imaging modalities, such as cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and nuclear techniques, into the clinical setting. This review of the Working Group on Drug Cardiotoxicity and Cardioprotection of the Italian Society of Cardiology aims to afford an overview of the most important findings from the literature about the role of CMR and nuclear techniques in the management of chemotherapy-treated patients, describe conventional and new parameters for detecting CTX from both diagnostic and prognostic perspectives and provide integrated insight into the role of CMR and nuclear techniques compared with other imaging tools and versus the positions of the most important international societies.

  11. Recommendations to reduce extremity and eye lens doses in interventional radiology and cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of the Work Package 1 (WP1) of the ORAMED project, Collaborative Project (2008–2011), supported by the European Commission within its 7th Framework Programme, was to obtain a set of standardized data on extremity and eye lens doses for staff in interventional radiology and cardiology (IR/IC) workplaces and to recommend a series of guidelines on radiation protection in order to both guarantee and optimize staff protection. Within the project, coordinated measurements were performed in 34 hospitals in 6 European countries. Furthermore, simulations of the most representative workplaces in IR and IC were performed to determine the main parameters that influence the extremity and eye lens doses. The work presented in this paper shows the recommendations that were formulated by the results obtained from both measurements and simulations. The presented guidelines are directed to operators, assistant personnel, radiation protection officers and medical physics experts. They concern radiation protection issues, such as the use of room protective equipment, as well as the positioning of the extremity and eye lens dosemeters for routine monitoring.

  12. [Cardiology writings in New Spain and in the first century of the Independent period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The first writings on cardioangiology found in public and private libraries of New Spain from the xvi century to the first century of the Independent period in Mexico are mentioned. These go from the truly incunabular ones, books printed until the year 1500, to the physiology treatises published by European authors in the xvii and xviii centuries, as well as the cardiology texts from French authors of the first half of the xix century. The writings were depicted in the catalogs of the University library, founded in 1762, as well as in the library of a master builder of the Metropolitan Cathedral of the xvii century and that of a physician of the xviii century, Dr. José Ignacio Bartolache. The latter, in turn, edited for a brief period, from October 1772 to February 1773, a scientific-medical journal, «Mercurio Volante», which was the first scientific-hebdomadary publication in the Americas. Likewise, in the libraries of New Spain, several European scientific journals could be found, such as the one edited by the abbot Rozier, in which the initial writings of Lavoisier appeared. The exchange of ideas and knowledge, pointed out herein, attests to the always enthused interest of given individuals from New Spain on the boundless and passionate domains of cardioangiology.

  13. CHANGES OF INTERCELLULAR COOPERATION IN PERIPHERAL BLOOD IN TREATED PATIENTS WITH CARDIOLOGIC DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Korichkina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study changes of intercellular cooperation in peripheral blood induced by treatment in patients with arterial hypertension (HT, ischemic heart disease (IHD and chronic heart failure (CHF.Material and methods. 610 patients were involved into the study, including 250 patients with HT of stages I-III (50 untreated patients, 150 patients with IHD and 210 patients with CHF of stages I-III. All patients were treated except 50 hypertensive ones. 80 healthy patients (40 men, 40 women were included into control group. Blood smears of patients were evaluated (Romanovsky's stain. A number of leukocyte, autorosettes and autorosettes with erythrocyte lysis was calculated. The cellular association consisting of a neutrophil, monocyte or eosinocyte with 3 or more erythrocytes skintight to their surface defined as autorosettes. Erythrocytes number and hemoglobin level determined in peripheral blood.Results. Single autorosettes in peripheral blood were observed in patients of control group and in untreated patients with HT. Treated patients with HT, IHD and CHF had increased number of autorossets and autorosettes with erythrocytes lysis. This phenomenon resulted in reduction of erythrocytes number and hemoglobin level in peripheral blood.Conclusion. Treated patients with cardiologic diseases had changes in intercellular cooperation. It should be considered at intensive and long term therapy.

  14. Application of a visualization method of image data base in nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical imaging is undoubtedly one of the medical branches which benefited at most by the offsprings of computer science development. We present here a visualization software of image data base, making use of the last innovations in the field of multimedia application. The objective of such a software is to provide a reference tool for a given medical specialty offering at the same time, a high quality iconography, a rigorous content of the comments and the matching of graphical interfaces. Applied to nuclear cardiology and implanted on CD ROM, it contains a given number of clinical cases (around 150) which sweep quasi-exhaustively the subject. Each case centered around scintigraphic examination (myocardial tomographs, ventriculographs, SPECT, etc) makes available 'static' pictures (series of cross sections, planispheric images, ECG), animated cartoons (synchronized series, 3D visualization, etc) and also the clinical history of the patient and the records of complementary examinations (coronary-graphic, for instance). Being independent of the image data base which it visualizes, our software is easily applicable to other nuclear medicine specialties (neurology, renal exploration) and also to other modalities. It is multilingual already (French and English) and soon will be supplemented by a code dedicated to knowledge assessment intended to be an efficient tool in education and continuous formation. A Macintosh version will be soon obtainable and a demonstration diskette is free available on request

  15. Forecasting of Corrosion Properties of Steel Wires for Production of Guide Wires for Cardiological Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Przondziono

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study presents evaluation of the influence of strain in drawing process and of surface modification on resistance to electrochemical corrosion of wires made of stainless steel for production of guide wires used in invasive cardiology. The results of static tensile test enabled us to determine the course of flow curve of wires made of X10CrNi 18-8 steel as well as mathematical form of flow stress function. Resistance to electrochemical corrosion was evaluated on the ground of registered anodic polarisation curves by means of potentiodynamic method. The tests were performed in solution simulating human blood on samples that were electrolytically polished and samples that were polished and then chemically passivated. Exemplary anodic polarisation curves were given. It was proved that with the applied strain, corrosion properties decrease. It was found that chemical passivation improves wire corrosion characteristics. Statistical analysis showed that there is a significant dependence between corrosion properties (polarisation resistance Rp and strain ε applied in drawing process. Functions that present the change Rp=f(ε were selected. The issue is of importance to guide wire manufacturers because application of the suggested methodology will enable us to forecast corrosion characteristics of wire with the required strength drawn with the applied strain.

  16. Eye dosimetry in interventional radiology and cardiology: current challenges and practical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interventional radiology and cardiology are areas with high potential for risk to eye lens. Accurate assessment of eye dose is one of the most important aspects of correlating doses with observed lens opacities among workers in interventional suites and ascertaining compliance with regulatory limits. The purpose of this paper is to review current approaches and opportunities in eye dosimetry and assess challenges in particular in accuracy and practicality. The possible approaches include practical dosimetry using passive dosemeters or active dosemeters with obvious advantage of active dosimetry. When neither of these is available, other approaches are based on either retrospective dose assessment using scatter radiation dose levels or correlations between patient dose indices and eye doses to the operators. In spite of all uncertainties and variations, estimation of eye dose from patient dose can be accepted as a compromise. Future challenges include development of practical methods for regular monitoring of individual eye doses and development of better techniques to estimate eye dose from measurements at some reference points. (authors)

  17. Staff lens doses in interventional urology. A comparison with interventional radiology, cardiology and vascular surgery values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, E; Fernandez, J M; Resel, L E; Moreno, J; Sanchez, R M

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate radiation doses to the lens of urologists during interventional procedures and to compare them with values measured during interventional radiology, cardiology and vascular surgery. The measurements were carried out in a surgical theatre using a mobile C-arm system and electronic occupational dosimeters (worn over the lead apron). Patient and staff dose measurements were collected in a sample of 34 urology interventions (nephrolithotomies). The same dosimetry system was used in other medical specialties for comparison purposes. Median and 3rd quartile values for urology procedures were: patient doses 30 and 40 Gy cm(2); personal dose equivalent Hp(10) over the apron (μSv/procedure): 393 and 848 (for urologists); 21 and 39 (for nurses). Median values of over apron dose per procedure for urologists resulted 18.7 times higher than those measured for radiologists and cardiologists working with proper protection (using ceiling suspended screens) in catheterisation laboratories, and 4.2 times higher than the values measured for vascular surgeons at the same hospital. Comparison with passive dosimeters worn near the eyes suggests that dosimeters worn over the apron could be a reasonable conservative estimate for ocular doses for interventional urology. Authors recommend that at least the main surgeon uses protective eyewear during interventional urology procedures. PMID:26583458

  18. Characterization of a team biplane digital x-ray in the pediatric cardiology department; Caracterizacion de un equipo biplano de rayos x digital en el servicio de cardiologia pediatrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez Marquez, J.; Huertas Martinez, C.; Corredora Silva, E.; Vano Carruana, E.; Luquero LLopis, N.; Huerga Cabrerizo, C.; Plaza Aparicio, R.; Tellez-Cepeda Ruiz, M.

    2011-07-01

    In cardiology, new digital technologies, are replacing fluoroscopy with image intensifier and television systems. There has been a characterization of the equipment prior to commissioning for clinical use.

  19. Psychiatric disorders and urbanization in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koelen Jurrijn

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological studies over the last decade have supplied growing evidence of an association between urbanization and the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. Our aim was to examine the link between levels of urbanization and 12-month prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders in a nationwide German population study, controlling for other known risk factors such as gender, social class, marital status and the interaction variables of these factors with urbanization. Methods The Munich Composite International Diagnostic Interview (M-CIDI was used to assess the prevalence of mental disorders (DSM-IV in a representative sample of the German population (N = 4181, age: 18–65. The sample contains five levels of urbanization based on residence location. The epidemiological study was commissioned by the German Ministry of Research, Education and Science (BMBF and approved by the relevant Institutional Review Board and ethics committee. Written informed consent was obtained for both surveys (core survey and Mental Health Supplement. Subjects did not get any financial compensation for their study participation. Results Higher levels of urbanization were linked to higher 12-month prevalence rates for almost all major psychiatric disorders (with the exception of substance abuse and psychotic disorders. The weighted prevalence percentages were highest in the most urbanized category. Alongside urbanization, female gender, lower social class and being unmarried were generally found to be associated with higher levels of psychopathology. The impact of urbanization on mental health was about equal (for almost all major psychiatric disorders in young people and elderly people, men and women, and in married and single people. Only people from a low social class in the most urbanized settings had more somatoform disorders, and unmarried people in the most urbanized settings had more anxiety disorders. Conclusion Psychiatric disorders are more

  20. Baron von Zach's business relations with the Munich entrepreneur Joseph von Utzschneider (German Title: Geschäftsbeziehungen des Barons von Zach zu dem Münchner Unternehmer Joseph von Utzschneider)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ivo

    The relationship between the astronomer von Zach on the one side and the entrepreneur Joseph von Utzschneider and his partner Georg von Reichenbach on the other dates presumably from the year 1807 when Zach spent two months in Munich. Already in the same year Zach had ordered an instrument for himself and began to solicit business for the institute of Reichenbach, Utzschneider, and Liebherr, which was founded in 1804. One of the clients canvassed by Zach was the director of the observatory in Naples Zuccari. Zuccari had ordered the whole equipment for the new observatory from this institute in 1813. The instruments for Naples, which were completed in 1814, were sent accompanied by Reichenbach by land and sea to their destination where Reichenbach supervised their setup. At that time Reichenbach had separated from Utzschneider who kept the optical institute in Benediktbeuern with his new partner Joseph von Fraunhofer whereas Reichenbach became owner of the mathematical-mechanical institute in Munich. For personal and economical reasons Utzschneider began soon after to produce not only optical glass but also optical devices similar to those offered by Reichenbach. As soon as two institutes in Munich competed against each other on the market for sophisticated geodetical and astronomical instruments Zach sided with Utzschneider. Zach's main professional argument for this decision was that both competitors got the optical glass for their instruments from Utzschneider's optical institute in Benediktbeuern. This meant that Utzschneider had first choice and so the optical part of his instruments could be considered as better than that of Reichenbach`s instruments. Zach's role as an agent in Italy and France for the sale of products coming from Utzschneider's manufactories is highlighted by three of Zach's letters to Utzschneider from 1817 and 1818, two of which are reproduced here for the first time.

  1. Stations for an innovative transport system. The halts on the Munich central station - airport Maglev link; Innovative Stationen fuer ein innovatives Verkehrssystem. Die 'Bahnhoefe' der Magnetschnellbahn Muenchen Hauptbahnhof - Flughafen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marscholek-Uecker, K. [DB Magnetbahn GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The maglev system in Munich calls for the creation of superior kinds of station and station environment. To that end, a design and service concept together with requirements for the DB AG specifications and naturally also the necessary planning and approval procedures have been put together. What stands out in the project, however, is the all-encompassing design concept for rolling stock and stations, aimed at creating a coherent product for the customer. The objective is for the journey to be one single harmonious experience form end to end, encompassing the rolling stock, stations and surroundings. (orig.)

  2. Iglesia de San Bernardo, Munich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haindl, Friederich F.

    1963-06-01

    Full Text Available In plan form this church has the shape of an irregular pentagon. The external walls are in brick and are crowned by a reinforced encircling concrete polygonal hoop. The surfaces of the walls are faced both on the outside and internally. The roof consists of metal girders resting at the convergence of the walls on the concrete encircling girder. Timber trellice joists join these girders. Inside, the maximum height of the ceiling is 25 ms, and the continuity of the walls is broken by prefabricated panels carrying glazing, which provides suitable daylight illumination. The roof structure is lined with wood, to give it an interior shape reminiscent of a large tent. The benches for the congregation are arranged in four groups round the altar. The vicarage is older than the church structure, and is built on the same level. There is also a large church hall, suitable for a variety of functions allied to the chapel. Slightly linked with the church body is a 37 ms high tower. The whole design is outstanding because of its clear organic relationship of forms and volumes.La iglesia es una construcción central, cuya planta adopta la forma de un pentágono irregular Los muros exteriores son de fábrica de ladrillo y están coronados por un zuncho de atado de hormigón armado. Sus paramentos van enfoscados tanto por dentro como por fuera. La cubierta está constituida a base de vigas metálicas que se entregan en las esquinas —sobre el zuncho de hormigón—, entre las que se acoplan vigas de celosía, de madera. El interior, cuya máxima altura de techo es 25 m, nos muestra sus paredes interrumpidas por paneles prefabricados de hormigón, acristalados, coa objeto de conseguir una adecuada iluminación. El techo va revestido con madera formando como tienda de campaña. Los bancos están colocados en cuatro grupos alrededor del altar. Más antigua, y al mismo nivel de la iglesia, se halla la casa parroquial, y un gran salón para diferentes actividades; unida ligeramente a éste, se levanta la torre de 37 m de altura. Destaca el conjunto por su clara ordenación y acertado juego de volúmenes.

  3. Year 2 of Germany's Energy Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a decade characterised by the take-off of renewable energies, Germany decided in 2010 to make them the top priority. At the same time, it decided to make exemplary efforts in terms of energy efficiency and the reduction of greenhouse gases. The audacious nature of this policy was strengthened by the 'turn' taken in 2011 to give up nuclear energy in the wake of the Fukushima accident. Given the initial results for 2012, Germany seems to be on target for reaching its national objective, of 18% renewable energy within total consumption by 2020. Germany is also well placed to reduce its planned cut in electricity consumption of 10%. The country will also meet its commitments, both international and European, concerning greenhouse gas emissions. In contrast, recent trends suggest it will be increasingly difficult for Germany to meet its own, domestic goal of cutting emissions by 40%, by 2020. Furthermore, it is hard to see how Germany will be able to bring down total energy consumption by 20% by 2020 (from 2008 levels), or increase the share of renewables in electricity production above 35%. Success with this latter objective is largely dependent on reinforcing networks, both for transmission over long distances and for local distribution. It is not sure that the delays accumulated in both areas will be made up for by 2020, despite the rapid legislative adjustments that have already been made. By favouring intermittent energy sources - wind and solar power - Germany also faces problems of managing frequent production fluctuations. The long term solution to this lies in storing electricity. However, despite the considerable efforts in research and development, the technologies necessary for this will doubtless not be available on a large scale before the end of the present decade. These efforts could nevertheless provide German industry with interesting advantages in sectors of high potential, such as electric vehicles. Measures to promote renewable energies are

  4. [The reception of Heinz Kohut in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milch, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    First the discussion of Kohut's new ideas in the United States is sketched as a background. The response to these ideas was divided: on the one hand they were hailed as important innovations of psychoanalytic theory, and a circle of colleagues formed around their author; on the other hand they were violently rejected, and old friends distanced themselves from him. In Germany Kuhut's ideas were initially well received. His visits, lectures and supervisions resulted in a lively exchange and a number of friendships. When the differences between Kohutian and classical theory became evident this led increasingly to disillusionment and retreat. De-emphasizing drive and ego psychology had considerable consequences for psychoanalytic technique as well as for the analyst's Menschenbild, his relationship to the patient and his critical self-reflection. In Germany, too, a circle of colleagues emerged, following and elaborating the ideas of Kohut. PMID:27281981

  5. Leptospirosis in Germany, 1962-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Andreas; Schöneberg, Irene; Frank, Christina; Alpers, Katharina; Schneider, Thomas; Stark, Klaus

    2005-07-01

    Epidemiologic trends of human leptospirosis in Germany were investigated by analyzing national surveillance data from 1962 to 2003 and by conducting a questionnaire-based survey from 1997 to 2000. After a steady decrease of leptospirosis incidence from 1962 to 1997, surveillance data indicate an increase in disease incidence to 0.06 per 100,000 (1998-2003). Of 102 laboratory-confirmed cases in humans from 1997 to 2000, 30% were related to occupational exposures. Recreational exposures were reported in 30% (including traveling abroad in 16%), whereas residential exposure accounted for 37% of the cases. Direct contact with animals, mostly rats and dogs, was observed in 31% of the cases. We conclude that recent changes in transmission patterns of leptospirosis, partially caused by an expanding rat population and the resurgence of canine leptospirosis, may facilitate the spread of the disease in temperate countries like Germany. Preventive measures should be adapted to the changing epidemiology of leptospirosis. PMID:16022779

  6. Safe Operation of Research Reactors in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Germany, experience was gained in the field of safe operation of research reactors during the last five decades. In this time, in total 46 research reactors were built and operated safely. Concerning the design, there is, or has been, a very broad range of different types of research reactors. The variety of facilities includes large pool or tank reactors with a thermal power of several tens of megawatt as well as small educational reactors with a negligible thermal power and critical assemblies. At present, 8 research reactors are still in operation. The other facilities are permanently shutdown, in decommissioning or have already been dismantled completely and released from regulatory control. In this paper, four selected facilities still being operated are presented as examples for safe operation of research reactors in Germany, including especially a description of the safety reviews and safety upgrades for the older facilities. (author)

  7. Patterns of unemployment dynamics in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Nordmeier, Daniela; Weber, Enzo

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the patterns of unemployment dynamics in Germany. To provide a deeper insight into the margins of unemployment adjustment, we employ a structural VAR model and identify the effects of a technology shock as well as two policy shocks. We find that the worker reallocation process varies substantially with the identified shocks. The job finding rate plays a larger role following a technology shock and a monetary policy shock, while the separation rate appears as the dominant ma...

  8. Conditional Patterns of Unemployment Dynamics in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Nordmeier, Daniela; Weber, Enzo

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the conditional patterns of unemployment dynamics in Germany. We employ a structural VAR model and identify a technology shock and two policy shocks by using standard restrictions. Interestingly, the worker reallocation process varies substantially with the identified shocks. The job finding rate plays a larger role after a technology shock and a monetary policy shock, while the separation rate appears as the dominant margin after a fiscal policy shock. Technology shocks ar...

  9. Germany Enjoys Splendid Trade Partnership with China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun; Yongjian

    2005-01-01

      "China and Germany are longterm trade partners, The volume of our bilateral trade has reached more than $54 Million in 2004, Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao and German Chancellor Gerhard Schroder have agreed to double our bilateral trade volume by the year 2010." Dr. Volker Stanzel,German Ambassador gave an active appraise on the bilateral trade relations when interviewed by China's Foreign Trade.……

  10. Organisation of scientific research in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Berezhnaya G. S.

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the structure of research system in Germany. It describes the federal and state levels of research management. The Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) bears primary responsibility for science and technology policy at the federal level. At the state level, this responsible is shared by the Ministry of Education and Science and the Ministry of Economy. The author emphasizes the role of the National Academy of Sciences “Leopoldina”, whose principal objective ...

  11. Pension Systems in Europe. Case of Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Poteraj

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an insight into the old age pensionsystem in Germany. The authors goal was to present both, past and present solutions employed by the Germans pension system, in search for ideas worth consideration in international comparisons. In the summary, the author highlights as a particular German approach, on the background of other countries, the fact of implementing in the German reality the special smart card system for pensioners.

  12. Business services in Germany: bridges for innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Czarnitzki, Dirk; Spielkamp, Alfred

    2000-01-01

    During the last 20 years, R&D and innovation activities in the service sector have clearly increased. Especially business services are believed to be one of the main drivers of technical changes and economic progress. Looking at the labour indices calculated over the period from 1982 to 1996 one notices a remarkable increase of over 70 percent for the business services. About 8 percent of total employment in West Germany is in business services. In particular, by taking advantage of informati...

  13. Gender and Remittances: Evidence from Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Holst, Elke; Schäfer, Andrea; Schrooten, Mechthild

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on gender-specific determinants of remittances in Germany. The conceptual approach considers gender roles and naturalization to be crucial in the immigrant's decision to remit. For the empirical investigation, the authors use data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) study for the years 2001-6. The findings show, first, that individual income differences in the country of residence cannot sufficiently explain why foreign national women remit less than men in absolute...

  14. The Societal Integration of Immigrants in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Fertig, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates whether and to what extent immigrants in Germany are integrated into German society by utilizing a variety of qualitative information and subjective data collected in the 1999 wave of the German Socio- Economic Panel (GSOEP).To this end, leisure-time activities and attitudes of native Germans, ethnic Germans and foreign immigrants of different generations are compared. The empirical results suggest that conditional on observable characteristics the activities and attit...

  15. Economic Effects of VAT Reform in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Boeters, Stefan; Böhringer, Christoph; Büttner, Thiess; Kraus, Margit

    2006-01-01

    In the tax policy debate, differentiation of value-added taxes is often justified by distributional concerns. Our quantitative analysis for Germany indicates that such concerns are misplaced. We find that the abolition of VAT differentiation has only negligible redistributive effects. Instead, reduced VAT are found to act as industry-specific subsidies. Whereas the overall welfare effects of pure VAT reforms are very small, a revenue-neutral introduction of a harmonised VAT combined with redu...

  16. Environmental medicine in Germany--a review.

    OpenAIRE

    Seidel, Hans Joachim

    2002-01-01

    In this review I describe the development of environmental medicine as a specialized field of clinical medicine in Germany. New scientific societies were founded, based on traditions of public hygiene and occupational medicine, as a reaction to environmental issues concerning human health. Environmental medicine issues were also addressed by independent "critical" physicians. The first institutions to accept patients were centers for environmental medicine affiliated with research institution...

  17. Experience with the SE in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochem Reichert

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A rather significant proportion of the Societas Europaeas (the European Company, or SE formed to date have had German roots. German corporate law has been enriched by an interesting alternative which meanwhile seems to have gained momentum. This contribution focuses on SEs incorporated by German entrepreneurs and provides an interesting account concerning the use of SEs in Germany in practice, such as Allianz, Fresenius, BASF and Porsche. Has the SE been used to circumvent rigid company law provisions or is it a more flexible and effective tool, perhaps, for company mobility? The practical motives behind setting up this company form are also reflected upon. These include: the facilitation of cross-border mergers; transfer of the registered office; the ‘European’ image; a more flexible form of co-determination in large companies (reduction of the number of supervisory board members; avoidance and freezing of co-determination for medium-sized enterprises; the appeal of the one-tier system and its endangerment by German co-determination; and flat and uniform structures for company groups. The author also briefly discusses some of the problems arising from the formation of SEs in Germany. He ultimately concludes that practice has shown that it is possible to work with the legal regime of the SE in Germany, which adds a new company form to those available in that Member State.

  18. Propagation characteristics of thunderstorms in southern Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, M.; Bartenschlager, B.; Finke, U.

    1998-05-01

    The propagation of thunderstorms in southern Germany was investigated. The thunderstorms were observed by a lightning position system during the summer months of the years 1992 to 1996. On average every second day thunderstorms were observed anywhere in southern Germany. In general thunderstorms approach from westerly and south-westerly directions. The average speed is 13 m/s. No significant relation between the occurrence of thunderstorms and the large scale synoptic pattern described by the Grosswetterlagen (large scale weather pattern) was found. Thunderstorms were observed during almost all Grosswetterlagen. The reduction to 8 weather pattern based on the low-level flow in southern Germany showed that thunderstorms are likely when the flow has westerly directions (43%) or easterly directions (20%). Three distinct groups of different lightning patterns could be identified; stationary, moving thunderstorms and thunderstorm lines. The convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the wind shear were retrieved from the radio soundings from Muenchen and Stuttgart. On average CAPE was 583 J/kg for stationary, 701 J/kg for moving thunderstorms, and 876 J/kg for thunderstorm lines. The average bulk Richardson numbers are 152, 80 and 52 for stationary, moving thunderstorms and thunderstorm lines, respectively. The steering level was found to be at about 3 and 6 km m.s.l. However, it should be noted, that in most cases the soundings do not completely describe the local environment of thunderstorms, since radio soundings are only available twice a day. (orig.)

  19. Germany sees profits collapse as doldrums persist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditionally the strongman of Europe, Germany's chemical sector had a miserable time in 1992, as profits skidded 30%. Further declines in production and sales for the first half of 1993 are predicted by industry association VCI (Frankfurt). Output, usually spurred after the summer break, dropped drastically in the fourth quarter. Developments are alarming, says Wolfgang Hilger, president of the VCI and chairman of Hoechst (Frankfurt). Production in the 11 western states rose 1% in 1992, but chemical industry sales fell. In the second half of the year, the high value of the Germany mark - against the US dollar, sterling, lira, and peseta - compounded difficulties already experienced as a result of overcapacity and lower prices. Hilger says overall prices declined 2% last year. Meanwhile, costs for labor and environmental protection continued to increase. VCI figures show a decline in many sectors. In western Germany, organic base chemical production was down 4%, and, while organic chemical production rose 3%, prices were 8% lower, giving unsatisfactory results. Similarly, plastics production was up 0.5% at midyear, but weak prices hurt earnings

  20. Deep Geothermal Energy Production in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Agemar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Germany uses its low enthalpy hydrothermal resources predominantly for balneological applications, space and district heating, but also for power production. The German Federal government supports the development of geothermal energy in terms of project funding, market incentives and credit offers, as well as a feed-in tariff for geothermal electricity. Although new projects for district heating take on average six years, geothermal energy utilisation is growing rapidly, especially in southern Germany. From 2003 to 2013, the annual production of geothermal district heating stations increased from 60 GWh to 530 GWh. In the same time, the annual power production increased from 0 GWh to 36 GWh. Currently, almost 200 geothermal facilities are in operation or under construction in Germany. A feasibility study including detailed geological site assessment is still essential when planning a new geothermal facility. As part of this assessment, a lot of geological data, hydraulic data, and subsurface temperatures can be retrieved from the geothermal information system GeotIS, which can be accessed online [1].

  1. Transport regulations for radioactive material in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport of radioactive material in Germany is regulated by the dangerous goods transport regulations and the regulations of the Atomic Energy Act and the Radiation Protection Ordinance. For radioactive material shipments by road, rail, sea and air the modal regulations on the transport of dangerous goods for class 7 of the ADR, RID, ADNR, IMO and ICAO are implemented in Germany and have to be complied with. In parallel with this the Atomic Energy Act requirements and the provisions of the Radiation Protection Ordinance concerning the transport of radioactive material have to be met. They contain provisions regarding the reliability of transport organisations and persons, training of persons involved in transport nuclear liability insurance, physical protection and public interest in addition to the need to fulfil the dangerous goods transport regulations. According to these requirements shipment approvals which are presented in the paper, are necessary for nuclear material, large sources and other radioactive materials. Based on this some practical implications for radioactive material shipments will be discussed as well as some aspects of the future developments. The paper also gives an overview of the responsibilities for approval and inspection of radioactive material shipments in Germany. (author)

  2. Peculiarities of transformation processes in East Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Dathe

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The process of socio-economic transformation of East German lands after the German reunification in 1990 is analyzed, the term "transformation" in frames of planned and market economies is defined. The author studies the historical determinants of the transformation process in Germany. German economic and industrial history in context of the driving forces and their social values, as well as the properties of the planning and economic systems that underlie the transformation of East German mentality, are considered. Further analysis is connected with economic, social and political components of the East German transformation process, "the dominance of the West", the collapse of the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance, privatization etc. Finally, the outcome of already traversed path of transformation of East Germany is considered. It is concluded, that the transformation process is not only historically conditioned situations of both the merging parties in the case of Germany, but also the positive or negative perception of its results and the motivation for its further implementation.

  3. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy 2008 in Germany. Results of the fourth query

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The working group Cardiovascular Nuclear Medicine of the German Society of Nuclear Medicine in cooperation with the working group Nuclear Cardiology of the German Cardiac Society herewith present the results of the 4th survey on myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) of the year 2008. Method: 310 questionnaires (191 private practices (PP), 93 hospitals (HO), 31 university hospitals (UH)) were evaluated. Results: MPS of 98 947 patients were reported. 15% of them were younger than 50 y, 57% between 50 and 70 y and 28% older than 70 y. 88% [2007: 83%] of all were studied with Tc-99m perfusion tracers. The patient radiation exposure of a stress and rest protocol considering German standard recommended doses was 8.5 mSv, of a stress-only protocol 1.9 mSv. 77% [2007: 76%] of the MPS were performed in PP, 15% [2007: 15%] in HO and 8% [2007: 9%] in UH. From 2005 to 2008 there was a mild increase in the MPS numbers by 1.2% (PP +7.1%, HO -5.5%, UH -31.4%). The type of stress was pharmacological in 30% [2007: 27%]; 68% adenosine (of these 22% with exercise), 29% dipyridamole (of these 64% with exercise), and <1% dobutamine. Gated SPECT was performed in 46% [2007: 47%] of all rest and in 42% [2007: 44%] of all stress MPS. 62% [2007: 61%] of all institutions did not use perfusion scores. Conclusion: The MPS numbers from 2005 to 2008 in Germany can be regarded as stable. However, there are considerable shifts from HO and UH to PP. The well known potential of MPS considering risk stratification and functional analysis has not been tapped so far. Both gated SPECT and a quantitative perfusion analysis should be performed routinely in every patient.

  4. Imaging skills for transthoracic echocardiography in cardiology fellows: The value of motion metrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Montealegre-Gallegos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proficiency in transthoracic echocardiography (TTE requires an integration of cognitive knowledge and psychomotor skills. Whereas cognitive knowledge can be quantified, psychomotor skills are implied after repetitive task performance. We applied motion analyses to evaluate psychomotor skill acquisition during simulator-based TTE training. Methods and Results: During the first month of their fellowship training, 16 cardiology fellows underwent a multimodal TTE training program for 4 weeks (8 sessions. The program consisted of online and live didactics as well as simulator training. Kinematic metrics (path length, time, probe accelerations were obtained at the start and end of the course for 8 standard TTE views using a simulator. At the end of the course TTE image acquisition skills were tested on human models. After completion of the training program the trainees reported improved self-perceived comfort with TTE imaging. There was also an increase of 8.7% in post-test knowledge scores. There was a reduction in the number of probe accelerations [median decrease 49.5, 95% CI = 29-73, adjusted P < 0.01], total time [median decrease 10.6 s, 95% CI = 6.6-15.5, adjusted P < 0.01] and path length [median decrease 8.8 cm, 95% CI = 2.2-17.7, adjusted P < 0.01] from the start to the end of the course. During evaluation on human models, the trainees were able to obtain all the required TTE views without instructor assistance. Conclusion: Simulator-derived motion analyses can be used to objectively quantify acquisition of psychomotor skills during TTE training. Such an approach could be used to assess readiness for clinical practice of TTE.

  5. Prognostic stratification of pulmonary embolism: what does it change from 2014 European Society of Cardiology guidelines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Prognostic stratification is of utmost importance for clinical management of acute pulmonary embolism (PE. Clinical presentation, echocardiography and biomarkers represented the key points on which recommendations of European Society of Cardiology (ESC released in 2008 were based. In fact, in 2008 the ESC prognostic model suggested to divide acute PE in high risk, heamodynamically unstable, based on presentation with shock or hypotension, and non high risk, haemodynamically stable. The non high risk PE was divided in intermediate rand low risk PE based on echocardiographicand biomarkers signs of right heart dysfunction (RHD and myocardial damage. This approach was not an academic speculation but permitted to define the early mortality risk (>15% in high risk, 3-15% in intermediate risk, <1% in low risk and bring the most appropriate treatment. Over the years it became clear that co-morbidity influenced the early mortality risk and may define better the low mortality risk. Practical clinical scores, such as the Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index, PESI, in its original or simplified version, demonstrated to have high prognostic power to identify high (early mortality risk over 10% and low risk (early mortality risk ≤ 1% patients. Furthermore, it has become clear that the combination of ESC prognostic model, based on haemodynamics, and clinical prognostic scores may improve the prognostic stratification of acute PE, especially for patients with intermediate risk in whom the range of early mortality risk is wide The latest version of ESC recommendations on management of acute PE released in August 2014 go toward this direction and suggest to divide the non high risk PE in low or intermediate risk taking in account the PESI score. In this review we describe the prognostic strategy of acute PE suggested from the latest version of ESC recommendations.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v5i4.952

  6. Considering Cost-Effectiveness in Cardiology Clinical Guidelines: Progress and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlatky, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1980s, when the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) established a joint task force to examine the use of cardiovascular procedures and therapies, cardiologists have been leaders in the development of clinical practice guidelines. The ACC/AHA guidelines development process has evolved considerably over the last 30 or more years. Guidelines now focus on clinical conditions, such as angina, instead of procedures, such as bypass surgery. There is a formal organizational structure, with dedicated staff, a standing committee on practice guidelines, and specific panels of volunteer experts on each topic. This process tightly manages conflicts of interest and strives for evidence-based, as opposed to opinion-based, guidelines, with a clear citation of the supporting evidence. Traditional clinical guidelines consider only what is best for the individual patient, and have explicitly not considered the cost to society. Nevertheless, in many guidelines development meetings, high cost was implicitly considered: if a procedure was extremely costly, the evidence needed to be very strong. The Guidelines Committee recognized that cost considerations ought to be made more transparent, and that the evidence on economic value should be explicitly cited when available. These considerations were formalized by a recent white paper on incorporating economic considerations into ACC/AHA guidelines. In considering value, it is necessary to assess the quality of the evidence as well as to define levels of value. The next ACC/AHA guideline will incorporate value as a part of its recommendations. This will be an evidence-based process in which published economic assessments relating to key questions will be reviewed.

  7. Fetal cardiology: changing the definition of critical heart disease in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słodki, M; Respondek-Liberska, M; Pruetz, J D; Donofrio, M T

    2016-08-01

    Infants born with congenital heart disease (CHD) may require emergent treatment in the newborn period. These infants are likely to benefit the most from a prenatal diagnosis, which allows for optimal perinatal planning. Several cardiac centers have created guidelines for the management of these high-risk patients with CHD. This paper will review and compare several prenatal CHD classification systems with a particular focus on the most critical forms of CHD in the fetus and newborn. A contemporary definition of critical CHD is one which requires urgent intervention in the first 24 h of life to prevent death. Such cardiac interventions may be not only life saving for the infant but also decrease subsequent morbidity. Critical CHD cases may require delivery at specialized centers that can provide perinatal, obstetric, cardiology and cardiothoracic surgery care. Fetuses diagnosed in mid-gestation require detailed fetal diagnostics and serial monitoring during the prenatal period, in order to assess for ongoing changes and identify progression to a more severe cardiac status. Critical CHD may progress in utero and there is still much to be learned about how to best predict those who will require urgent neonatal interventions. Despite improved therapeutic capabilities, newborns with critical CHD continue to have significant morbidity and mortality due to compromise that begins in the delivery room. Fetal echocardiography is the best way to predict the need for specialized care at birth to improve outcome. Once the diagnosis is made of critical CHD, delivery at the proper time and in appropriate institution with specific care protocols should be initiated. More work needs to be done to better delineate the risk factors for progression of critical CHD and to determine which newborns will require specialized care. The most frequently described forms of critical CHD requiring immediate intervention include hypoplastic left heart syndrome with intact or severely restricted

  8. Patient radiation doses in the most common interventional cardiology procedures in Croatia: first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brnić, Z; Krpan, T; Faj, D; Kubelka, D; Ramac, J Popić; Posedel, D; Steiner, R; Vidjak, V; Brnić, V; Visković, K; Baraban, V

    2010-02-01

    Apart from its benefits, the interventional cardiology (IC) is known to generate high radiation doses to patients and medical staff involved. The European Union Medical Exposures Directive 97/43/Euroatom strongly recommend patient dosimetry in interventional radiology, including IC. IC patient radiation doses in four representative IC rooms in Croatia were investigated. Setting reference levels for these procedures have difficulties due to the large difference in procedure complexity. Nevertheless, it is important that some guideline values are available as a benchmark to guide the operators during these potentially high-dose procedures. Local and national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were proposed as a guidance. A total of 138 diagnostic (coronary angiography, CA) and 151 therapeutic (PTCA, stenting) procedures were included. Patient irradiation was measured in terms of kerma-area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (FT) and number of cine-frames (F). KAP was recorded using calibrated KAP-meters. DRLs of KAP, FT and F were calculated as third quartile values rounded up to the integer. Skin doses were assessed on a selected sample of high skin dose procedures, using radiochromic films, and peak skin doses (PSD) were presented. A relative large range of doses in IC was detected. National DRLs were proposed as follows: 32 Gy cm(2), 6.6 min and 610 frames for CA and 72 Gy cm(2), 19 min and 1270 frames for PTCA. PSD 2 Gy in 8 % of selected patients. Measuring the patient doses in radiological procedures is required by law, but rarely implemented in Croatia. The doses recorded in the study are acceptable when compared with the literature, but optimisation is possible. The preliminary DRL values proposed may be used as a guideline for local departments, and should be a basis for radiation reduction measures and quality assurance programmes in IC in Croatia.

  9. Implementation of a four-year multimedia computer curriculum in cardiology at six medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrusa, E R; Issenberg, S B; Mayer, J W; Felner, J M; Brown, D D; Waugh, R A; Kondos, G T; Gessner, I H; McGaghie, W C

    1999-02-01

    The pressures of a changing health care system are making inroads on the commitment and effort that both basic science and clinical faculty can give to medical education. A tool that has the potential to compensate for decreased faculty time and thereby to improve medical education is multimedia computer instruction that is applicable at all levels of medical education, developed according to instructional design principles, and supported by evidence of effectiveness. The authors describe the experiences of six medical schools in implementing a comprehensive computer-based four-year curriculum in bedside cardiology developed by a consortium of university cardiologists and educational professionals. The curriculum consisted of ten interactive, patient-centered, case-based modules focused on the history, physical examination, laboratory data, diagnosis, and treatment. While an optimal implementation plan was recommended, each institution determined its own strategy. Major goals of the project, which took place from July 1996 to June 1997, were to identify and solve problems of implementation and to assess learners' and instructors' acceptance of the system and their views of its value. A total of 1,586 students used individual modules of the curriculum 6,131 times. Over 80% of students rated all aspects of the system highly, especially its clarity and educational value compared with traditional lectures. The authors discuss the aspects of the curriculum that worked, problems that occurred (such as difficulties in scheduling use of the modules in the third year), barriers to change and ways to overcome them (such as the type of team needed to win acceptance for and oversee implementation of this type of curriculum), and the need in succeeding years to formally assess the educational effectiveness of this and similar kinds of computer-based curricula.

  10. The conceptual basis of mathematics in cardiology IV: statistics and model fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Jason H T; Sobel, Burton E

    2003-06-01

    This is the fourth in a series of four articles developed for the readers of Coronary Artery Disease. Without language ideas cannot be articulated. What may not be so immediately obvious is that they cannot be formulated either. One of the essential languages of cardiology is mathematics. Unfortunately, medical education does not emphasize, and in fact, often neglects empowering physicians to think mathematically. Reference to statistics, conditional probability, multicompartmental modeling, algebra, calculus and transforms is common but often without provision of genuine conceptual understanding. At the University of Vermont College of Medicine, Professor Bates developed a course designed to address these deficiencies. The course covered mathematical principles pertinent to clinical cardiovascular and pulmonary medicine and research. It focused on fundamental concepts to facilitate formulation and grasp of ideas. This series of four articles was developed to make the material available for a wider audience. The articles will be published sequentially in Coronary Artery Disease. Beginning with fundamental axioms and basic algebraic manipulations they address algebra, function and graph theory, real and complex numbers, calculus and differential equations, mathematical modeling, linear system theory and integral transforms and statistical theory. The principles and concepts they address provide the foundation needed for in-depth study of any of these topics. Perhaps of even more importance, they should empower cardiologists and cardiovascular researchers to utilize the language of mathematics in assessing the phenomena of immediate pertinence to diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutics. The presentations are interposed with queries (by Coronary Artery Disease abbreviated as CAD) simulating the nature of interactions that occurred during the course itself. Each article concludes with one or more examples illustrating application of the concepts covered to

  11. The conceptual basis of mathematics in cardiology: (I) algebra, functions and graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Jason H T; Sobel, Burton E

    2003-02-01

    This is the first in a series of four articles developed for the readers of. Without language ideas cannot be articulated. What may not be so immediately obvious is that they cannot be formulated either. One of the essential languages of cardiology is mathematics. Unfortunately, medical education does not emphasize, and in fact, often neglects empowering physicians to think mathematically. Reference to statistics, conditional probability, multicompartmental modeling, algebra, calculus and transforms is common but often without provision of genuine conceptual understanding. At the University of Vermont College of Medicine, Professor Bates developed a course designed to address these deficiencies. The course covered mathematical principles pertinent to clinical cardiovascular and pulmonary medicine and research. It focused on fundamental concepts to facilitate formulation and grasp of ideas. This series of four articles was developed to make the material available for a wider audience. The articles will be published sequentially in Coronary Artery Disease. Beginning with fundamental axioms and basic algebraic manipulations they address algebra, function and graph theory, real and complex numbers, calculus and differential equations, mathematical modeling, linear system theory and integral transforms and statistical theory. The principles and concepts they address provide the foundation needed for in-depth study of any of these topics. Perhaps of even more importance, they should empower cardiologists and cardiovascular researchers to utilize the language of mathematics in assessing the phenomena of immediate pertinence to diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutics. The presentations are interposed with queries (by Coronary Artery Disease, abbreviated as CAD) simulating the nature of interactions that occurred during the course itself. Each article concludes with one or more examples illustrating application of the concepts covered to cardiovascular medicine and

  12. The conceptual basis of mathematics in cardiology III: linear systems theory and integral transforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Jason H T; Sobel, Burton E

    2003-05-01

    This is the third in a series of four articles developed for the readers of Coronary Artery Disease. Without language ideas cannot be articulated. What may not be so immediately obvious is that they cannot be formulated either. One of the essential languages of cardiology is mathematics. Unfortunately, medical education does not emphasize, and in fact, often neglects empowering physicians to think mathematically. Reference to statistics, conditional probability, multicompartmental modeling, algebra, calculus and transforms is common but often without provision of genuine conceptual understanding. At the University of Vermont College of Medicine, Professor Bates developed a course designed to address these deficiencies. The course covered mathematical principles pertinent to clinical cardiovascular and pulmonary medicine and research. It focused on fundamental concepts to facilitate formulation and grasp of ideas.This series of four articles was developed to make the material available for a wider audience. The articles will be published sequentially in Coronary Artery Disease. Beginning with fundamental axioms and basic algebraic manipulations they address algebra, function and graph theory, real and complex numbers, calculus and differential equations, mathematical modeling, linear system theory and integral transforms and statistical theory. The principles and concepts they address provide the foundation needed for in-depth study of any of these topics. Perhaps of even more importance, they should empower cardiologists and cardiovascular researchers to utilize the language of mathematics in assessing the phenomena of immediate pertinence to diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutics. The presentations are interposed with queries (by Coronary Artery Disease abbreviated as CAD) simulating the nature of interactions that occurred during the course itself. Each article concludes with one or more examples illustrating application of the concepts covered to

  13. The conceptual basis of mathematics in cardiology: (II). Calculus and differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Jason H T; Sobel, Burton E

    2003-04-01

    This is the second in a series of four articles developed for the readers of Coronary Artery Disease. Without language ideas cannot be articulated. What may not be so immediately obvious is that they cannot be formulated either. One of the essential languages of cardiology is mathematics. Unfortunately, medical education does not emphasize, and in fact, often neglects empowering physicians to think mathematically. Reference to statistics, conditional probability, multicompartmental modeling, algebra, calculus and transforms is common but often without provision of genuine conceptual understanding. At the University of Vermont College of Medicine, Professor Bates developed a course designed to address these deficiencies. The course covered mathematical principles pertinent to clinical cardiovascular and pulmonary medicine and research. It focused on fundamental concepts to facilitate formulation and grasp of ideas. This series of four articles was developed to make the material available for a wider audience. The articles will be published sequentially in Coronary Artery Disease. Beginning with fundamental axioms and basic algebraic manipulations they address algebra, function and graph theory, real and complex numbers, calculus and differential equations, mathematical modeling, linear system theory and integral transforms and statistical theory. The principles and concepts they address provide the foundation needed for in-depth study of any of these topics. Perhaps of even more importance, they should empower cardiologists and cardiovascular researchers to utilize the language of mathematics in assessing the phenomena of immediate pertinence to diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutics. The presentations are interposed with queries (by Coronary Artery Disease abbreviated as CAD) simulating the nature of interactions that occurred during the course itself. Each article concludes with one or more examples illustrating application of the concepts covered to

  14. Imaging skills for transthoracic echocardiography in cardiology fellows: The value of motion metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montealegre-Gallegos, Mario; Mahmood, Feroze; Kim, Han; Bergman, Remco; Mitchell, John D.; Bose, Ruma; Hawthorne, Katie M.; O’Halloran, T. David; Wong, Vanessa; Hess, Philip E.; Matyal, Robina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Proficiency in transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) requires an integration of cognitive knowledge and psychomotor skills. Whereas cognitive knowledge can be quantified, psychomotor skills are implied after repetitive task performance. We applied motion analyses to evaluate psychomotor skill acquisition during simulator-based TTE training. Methods and Results: During the first month of their fellowship training, 16 cardiology fellows underwent a multimodal TTE training program for 4 weeks (8 sessions). The program consisted of online and live didactics as well as simulator training. Kinematic metrics (path length, time, probe accelerations) were obtained at the start and end of the course for 8 standard TTE views using a simulator. At the end of the course TTE image acquisition skills were tested on human models. After completion of the training program the trainees reported improved self-perceived comfort with TTE imaging. There was also an increase of 8.7% in post-test knowledge scores. There was a reduction in the number of probe accelerations [median decrease 49.5, 95% CI = 29-73, adjusted P < 0.01], total time [median decrease 10.6 s, 95% CI = 6.6-15.5, adjusted P < 0.01] and path length [median decrease 8.8 cm, 95% CI = 2.2-17.7, adjusted P < 0.01] from the start to the end of the course. During evaluation on human models, the trainees were able to obtain all the required TTE views without instructor assistance. Conclusion: Simulator-derived motion analyses can be used to objectively quantify acquisition of psychomotor skills during TTE training. Such an approach could be used to assess readiness for clinical practice of TTE. PMID:27052064

  15. Radiation doses in flat detector digital systems in Interventional Cardiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to investigate patient radiation doses in flat detector (FD) digital X-ray systems in Interventional Cardiology procedures in three of the busiest haemodynamic departments in Greece and compare the results with the corresponding reference levels (RLs). Material and method: 569 Coronary Angiography (CA) and 571 Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasties (PTCA) were investigated since these two procedures are the most frequently performed in haemodynamic units. Patient data collected were: sex, age, weight, height, Dose Area Product (DAP), fluoroscopy time (T) and total number of frames (F). Results: Median values of DAP and F in CA were: 31.0 Gycm2 and 752 in Hospital A, 35.3 Gycm2 and 487 in Hospital B and 21.1 Gycm2 and 461 in Hospital C. Median values of DAP and F in PTCA were: 63.2 Gycm2 and 1274 in Hospital A, 90.3 Gycm2 and 974 in Hospital B and 35.6 Gycm2 and 582 in Hospital C. Concerning T, the timer in Hospital C malfunctioned, whereas in hospitals A and B examination time was 4.7 and 3.6 min for CA and 10.3 and 12.7 min for PTCA, respectively. The results reveal a noted variability between hospitals especially in PTCA. However, patient dose values are lower than RLs (45 and 85 Gycm2 in CA and PTCA respectively). Conclusions: Large variations between patient dose values and main technical parameters were revealed when using FD digital systems in Greece. Dose optimization can be greatly achieved through continuous staff education in radiation protection issues. Moreover, the standardization of IC procedures in digital flat panel systems will definitely decrease patient and staff doses. (author)

  16. Management of hypertension in the elderly patient at abidjan cardiology institute (ivory coast).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramoh, K E; Aké-Traboulsi, E; Konin, C; N'goran, Y; Coulibaly, I; Adoubi, A; Koffi, J; Anzouan-Kacou, J B; Guikahue, M

    2012-01-01

    Background. Since the treatment of hypertension is beneficial for the elderly, we have undertaken this study that aims to evaluate the management of hypertension in elderly patient in Côte d'Ivoire. Methods. A retrospective study was conducted among 854 hypertensive elderly patients of Abidjan Cardiology Institute who were followed for a minimum of one year, between January 2000 and December 2009. Results. The patients mean age was 73.1 ± 5.3 years, and 59% were women. At the first presentation, it was mostly systolic-diastolic hypertension (51.8%) and isolated systolic hypertension (38.5%). Mean blood pressure was 169.4 ± 28.4 mmHg for systolic, 95.3 ± 15.7 mmHg for diastolic, and 74.1 ± 22.8 mmHg for pulse pressure. Pulse pressure was ≥60 mmHg in 80.4%. According to the European Guidelines stratification of the cardiovascular risk-excess attributable to high blood pressure, 82.1% of the sample had a very high added risk. The pharmacological therapy was prescribed in 93.5%. More than 66% of patients were receiving ≥2 antihypertensive drugs including fixed-dose combination drugs. The most common agents used were diuretics (63.5%) followed by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers in 61.3%. The most common agents used for monotherapy were calcium antagonists. When ≥2 drugs were used, diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers were the most common. Blood pressure control was achieved in 42.6%. Conclusion. The control of elderly hypertension can be effective in Sub-Saharan Africa. He required at least two antihypertensive drugs to meet the recommended blood pressure target.

  17. Management of Hypertension in the Elderly Patient at Abidjan Cardiology Institute (Ivory Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Kramoh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Since the treatment of hypertension is beneficial for the elderly, we have undertaken this study that aims to evaluate the management of hypertension in elderly patient in Côte d'Ivoire. Methods. A retrospective study was conducted among 854 hypertensive elderly patients of Abidjan Cardiology Institute who were followed for a minimum of one year, between January 2000 and December 2009. Results. The patients mean age was 73.1±5.3 years, and 59% were women. At the first presentation, it was mostly systolic-diastolic hypertension (51.8% and isolated systolic hypertension (38.5%. Mean blood pressure was 169.4±28.4 mmHg for systolic, 95.3±15.7 mmHg for diastolic, and 74.1±22.8 mmHg for pulse pressure. Pulse pressure was ≥60 mmHg in 80.4%. According to the European Guidelines stratification of the cardiovascular risk-excess attributable to high blood pressure, 82.1% of the sample had a very high added risk. The pharmacological therapy was prescribed in 93.5%. More than 66% of patients were receiving ≥2 antihypertensive drugs including fixed-dose combination drugs. The most common agents used were diuretics (63.5% followed by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers in 61.3%. The most common agents used for monotherapy were calcium antagonists. When ≥2 drugs were used, diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers were the most common. Blood pressure control was achieved in 42.6%. Conclusion. The control of elderly hypertension can be effective in Sub-Saharan Africa. He required at least two antihypertensive drugs to meet the recommended blood pressure target.

  18. How electricity was discovered and how it is related to cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli-Serra, Alfredo; Iturralde-Torres, Pedro; Izaguirre-Ávila, Raúl

    2012-01-01

    We relate the fundamental stages of the long road leading to the discovery of electricity and its uses in cardiology. The first observations on the electromagnetic phenomena were registered in ancient texts; many Greek and Roman writers referred to them, although they provided no explanations. The first extant treatise dates back to the XIII century and was written by Pierre de Maricourt during the siege of Lucera, Italy, by the army of Charles of Anjou, French king of Naples. There were no significant advances in the field of magnetism between the appearance of this treatise and the publication of the study De magnete magneticisque corporibus (1600) by the English physician William Gilbert. Scientists became increasingly interested in electromagnetic phenomena occurring in certain fish, i.e., the so-called electric ray that lived in the South American seas and the Torpedo fish that roamed the Mediterranean Sea. This interest increased in the 18th century, when condenser devices such as the Leyden jar were explored. It was subsequently demonstrated that the discharges produced by "electric fish" were of the same nature as those produced in this device. The famous "controversy" relating to animal electricity or electricity inherent to an animal's body also arose in the second half of the 18th century. The school of thought of the physicist Volta sustained the principle of a single electrical action generated by metallic contact. This led Volta to invent his electric pile, considered as the first wet cell battery. Toward the middle of the XIX century, the disciples of the physiologist Galvani were able to demonstrate the existence of animal electricity through experiments exploring the so-called current of injury. On the path of Volta's approach, many characteristics of electricity were detailed, which ultimately led to their usage in the industrial field. The route followed by Galvani-Nobili-Matteucci led to the successes of Waller, Einthoven, etcetera, enabling the

  19. Fetal cardiology: changing the definition of critical heart disease in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słodki, M; Respondek-Liberska, M; Pruetz, J D; Donofrio, M T

    2016-08-01

    Infants born with congenital heart disease (CHD) may require emergent treatment in the newborn period. These infants are likely to benefit the most from a prenatal diagnosis, which allows for optimal perinatal planning. Several cardiac centers have created guidelines for the management of these high-risk patients with CHD. This paper will review and compare several prenatal CHD classification systems with a particular focus on the most critical forms of CHD in the fetus and newborn. A contemporary definition of critical CHD is one which requires urgent intervention in the first 24 h of life to prevent death. Such cardiac interventions may be not only life saving for the infant but also decrease subsequent morbidity. Critical CHD cases may require delivery at specialized centers that can provide perinatal, obstetric, cardiology and cardiothoracic surgery care. Fetuses diagnosed in mid-gestation require detailed fetal diagnostics and serial monitoring during the prenatal period, in order to assess for ongoing changes and identify progression to a more severe cardiac status. Critical CHD may progress in utero and there is still much to be learned about how to best predict those who will require urgent neonatal interventions. Despite improved therapeutic capabilities, newborns with critical CHD continue to have significant morbidity and mortality due to compromise that begins in the delivery room. Fetal echocardiography is the best way to predict the need for specialized care at birth to improve outcome. Once the diagnosis is made of critical CHD, delivery at the proper time and in appropriate institution with specific care protocols should be initiated. More work needs to be done to better delineate the risk factors for progression of critical CHD and to determine which newborns will require specialized care. The most frequently described forms of critical CHD requiring immediate intervention include hypoplastic left heart syndrome with intact or severely restricted

  20. Management of diabetes by a healthcare team in a cardiology unit: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antonieta P. de Moraes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of healthcare team guidance in the implementation of a glycemic control protocol in the non-intensive care unit of a cardiology hospital. METHODS: This was a randomized clinical trial comparing 9 months of intensive guidance by a healthcare team on a protocol for diabetes care (Intervention Group, n = 95 with 9 months of standard care (Control Group, n = 87. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01154413. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 61.7±10 years, and the mean glycated hemoglobin level was 71±23 mmol/mol (8.7±2.1%. The mean capillary glycemia during hospitalization was similar between the groups (9.8±2.9 and 9.1±2.4 mmol/l for the Intervention Group and Control Group, respectively, p = 0.078. The number of hypoglycemic episodes (p = 0.77, hyperglycemic episodes (47 vs. 50 in the Intervention Group and Control Group, p = 0.35, respectively, and the length of stay in the hospital were similar between the groups (p = 0.64. The amount of regular insulin administered was 0 (0-10 IU in the Intervention Group and 28 (7-56 IU in the Control Group (p<0.001, and the amount of NPH insulin administered was similar between the groups (p = 0.16. CONCLUSIONS: While guidance on a glycemic control protocol given by a healthcare team resulted in a modification of the therapeutic strategy, no changes in glycemic control, frequency of episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, or hospitalization duration were observed.