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Sample records for cardio metabolic risk

  1. Prevalence and associated factors of cardio-metabolic risk factors in Iranian seafarers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baygi, Fereshteh; Jensen, Olaf C; Qorbani, Mostafa;

    2016-01-01

    S was 14.9%. The common cardio-metabolic risk factors were excess weight (51.1%), abdominal obesity (38.5%), and smoking (27.8%) among Iranian seafarers. In multivariate analysis, age (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01-1.09) and body mass index (OR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01-1.27) were associated with the increase in......BACKGROUND: Since Iran's economy is based on the sale of petroleum products, seafaring is considered a crucial job. Little research has been done on issues related to seafarers' health in Iranian maritime industry. The present study investigated the prevalence and associated factors of cardio-metabolic...... (of elevated total cholesterol, elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and elevated very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol) and general obesity were included as additional cardio-metabolic risk factors. RESULTS: The mean age of the participants was 36.0 ± 10.3 years. The prevalence of Met...

  2. Prevalence and associated factors of cardio-metabolic risk factors in Iranian seafarers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baygi, Fereshteh; Jensen, Olaf Chresten

    S was 14.9%. The common cardio-metabolic risk factors were excess weight (51.1%), abdominal obesity (38.5%), and smoking (27.8%) among Iranian seafarers. In multivariate analysis, age (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01–1.09) and body mass index (OR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01–1.27) were associated with the increase in......Background: Since Iran’s economy is based on the sale of petroleum products, seafaring is considered a crucial job. Little research has been done on issues related to seafarers’ health in Iranian maritime industry. The present study investigated the prevalence and associated factors of cardio-metabolic...... (of elevated total cholesterol, elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and elevated very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol) and general obesity were included as additional cardio-metabolic risk factors. Results: The mean age of the participants was 36.0 ± 10.3 years. The prevalence of Met...

  3. The Influence of Lifestyle on Cardio-metabolic Risk in Students from Timisoara University Center

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    Mihaela ORAVIȚAN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is a part of the activities in a cross border cooperation project that has proposed the management of obesity and cardiometabolic risk at students from Timisoara and Szeged university centres. The target group of Timisoara University Center was formed out of 600 students enrolled in the four major universities from Timisoara; target group students were questioned about their lifestyle and were evaluated anthropometric parameters, body composition and arterial stiffness; based on questionnaires was determine too the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes mellitus type II. Analysis of the results revealed the strong correlations between lifestyle and cardio-metabolic risk in these students.

  4. Disruptions in ovarian function are related to depression and cardio-metabolic risk during pre-menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleil, Maria E.; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Latham, Melissa D.; Adler, Nancy E.; Pasch, Lauri A.; Gregorich, Steven E.; Rosen, Mitchell P.; Cedars, Marcelle I.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the extent to which mild disruptions in ovarian function indexed by changes in menstrual cycle length may relate to cardio-metabolic and psychological health in pre-menopausal women. Methods Among 804 healthy, regularly-cycling women (ages 25–45, M=35.5 [5.5]), patterns of any change (shortening, lengthening, or increased variability) versus no change in menstrual cycle length were examined in relation to a composite of cardio-metabolic risk and individual risk factors (high-density lipoprotein [HDL], triglycerides, waist circumference, glucose, hypertensive status) as well as in relation to depression indicators (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression [CESD] score ≥16 [yes/no], lifetime depression diagnosis [yes/no], lifetime anti-depressant medication use [yes/no]). Models were also explored to test whether changes in menstrual cycle length mediated relations between depression history and cardio-metabolic risk. Results In covariate-adjusted models, compared to no change, any change in menstrual cycle length was associated with higher cardio-metabolic risk composite scores and lower HDL (p’s<.05). In addition, compared to no change, any change in menstrual cycle length was associated with a CESD score ≥16, having received a depression diagnosis, and having used an anti-depressant medication (p’s<.05). In exploratory analyses, any change in menstrual cycle length partially mediated the relation between depression history and cardio-metabolic risk (b=0.152, p=.040) which attenuated (b=0.129, p=.083) when any change in menstrual cycle length was covaried. Conclusions Findings suggest disruptions in ovarian function marked by subtle changes in menstrual cycle length may relate to aspects of cardio-metabolic, and psychological health among healthy, pre-menopausal women. PMID:23715377

  5. The role of physical training in lowering the cardio-metabolic risk

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    Szasz Timea

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The cardio-metabolic risk represents the overall risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and / or cardiovascular disease(including heart atack or stroke due to a complex risk factors. The aim of the current prospective study is to evaluate thelifestyle intervention group in a special benefit (overweight young students with cardio-metabolic risk. Material andMethods: Subjects considered for the study: young obese, sedentary, a number of 43 patients (mean age 21.3 ± 3.1years, 93% female. There were made two evaluations on an interval of 6 months, during which patients haveperformed physical training at least 3 times a week (individually according to the individual test, supervised by aphysical therapist. The remission rate was high (37%, from the initial of 43 patients only 27 remained at the second test.Results: After 6 months of lifestyle intervention, we noticed a significant decrease of weight (from 83.61 ± 21.04 to 79.7 ±20.13, body mass index (from 30.93 ± 6.67 to 29.55 ± 6.74, FindRisc score (2.7 to 2 waist circumference (from 98.98 ±10.14 to 89.54 ± 12.32, waist to hip ratio (from 0.87 to 0.85, visceral fat area (98.6 to 88. Conclusion: The activeintervention and closely monitoring of changing lifestyles leads to a significant improvement of cardiovascular risk factors atyoung obese patients. This type of intervention is effective both in terms of benefits in medium term, and relatively increaseddue compliance of young patients to programs involving physical activity.

  6. Assessment of Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors among Young Adult Females

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    Swati Dhruv

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Over the past two decades there has been a striking increase in the number of people with metabolic syndrome in developing countries. The current study was thus undertaken to map the prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome (MS and to assess the cardio-metabolic risk factors among young adult females (n = 1303 aged 18-26y from four girls hostel of the Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda. Approach: The anthropometric analysis showed a high prevalence of overweight/obesity (20.8%, abdominal obesity (12.7% among the subjects. The clinical profile revealed that 12.1% were hypertensives. The prevalence of dyslipidemia revealed that no one had hypercholesterolemia and 4.1% had hypertriglyceridemia, 12.1% had elevated LDL-C and 40.3% had low levels of HDL-C. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 2.4 and 4.1% according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF and World Health Organization (WHO criteria respectively. Lipid profile in relation to metabolic syndrome showed that VLDL-C and Triglyceride (TG values were non-significantly higher among the young adult females and HDL-C values were significantly (pResults: The three common and predominant risk factors (>80% identified were lower intake of fruits (81.5%, vegetables (96% and physical inactivity (88.7%. The other risk factors which were present between 30-50% were hypertension, lower HDL-C, Body Mass Index (BMI and Waist Circumference (WC. Among the non-modifiable factor heredity component was present in 34% of the subjects. Conclusion: The study highlights that lifestyle factors had equivalent risk for overweight and metabolic syndrome. Multiple risk factor scenario calls for lifestyle management to avert later consequences.

  7. Effect of Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors Clustering with or without Arterial Hypertension on Arterial Stiffness: A Narrative Review

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    Vasilios G. Athyros

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The clustering of cardio-metabolic risk factors, either when called metabolic syndrome (MetS or not, substantially increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD and causes mortality. One of the possible mechanisms for this clustering's adverse effect is an increase in arterial stiffness (AS, and in high central aortic blood pressure (CABP, which are significant and independent CVD risk factors. Arterial hypertension was connected to AS long ago; however, other MetS components (obesity, dyslipidaemia, dysglycaemia or MetS associated abnormalities not included in MetS diagnostic criteria (renal dysfunction, hyperuricaemia, hypercoaglutability, menopause, non alcoholic fatty liver disease, and obstructive sleep apnea have been implicated too. We discuss the evidence connecting these cardio-metabolic risk factors, which negatively affect AS and finally increase CVD risk. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of possible lifestyle and pharmacological interventions on all these cardio-metabolic risk factors, in an effort to reduce CVD risk and identify features that should be taken into consideration when treating MetS patients with or without arterial hypertension.

  8. Low Physical Activity Level and Short Sleep Duration Are Associated with an Increased Cardio-Metabolic Risk Profile: A Longitudinal Study in 8-11 Year Old Danish Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Mads F.; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Damsgaard, Camilla T.;

    2014-01-01

    Background: As cardio-metabolic risk tracks from childhood to adulthood, a better understanding of the relationship between movement behaviors (physical activity, sedentary behavior and sleep) and cardio-metabolic risk in childhood may aid in preventing metabolic syndrome (MetS) in adulthood. Obj...

  9. Sleep quality in middle-aged and elderly Chinese: distribution, associated factors and associations with cardio-metabolic risk factors

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    Lin Xu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor sleep quality has been associated with increased risk of heart disease, diabetes and mortality. However, limited information exists on the distribution and determinants of sleep quality and its associations with cardio-metabolic risk factors in Chinese populations. We aimed to evaluate this in the current study. Methods A cross-sectional survey conducted in 2005 of 1,458 men and 1,831 women aged 50–70 years from urban and rural areas of Beijing and Shanghai. Using a questionnaire, sleep quality was measured in levels of well, common and poor. Comprehensive measures of socio-demographical and health factors and biomarkers of cardio-metabolic disease were recorded. These were evaluated in association with sleep quality using logistic regression models. Results Half of the population reported good sleep quality. After adjusting for potential confounders, women and Beijing residents had almost half the probability to report good sleep quality. Good physical and mental health (good levels of self-rated health (OR 2.48; 95%CI 2.08 to 2.96 and no depression (OR 4.05; 95%CI 3.12 to 5.26 related to an increased chance of reporting good sleep quality, whereas short sleep duration ( Conclusion Levels of good sleep quality in middle-age and elderly Chinese were low. Gender, geographical location, self-rated health, depression and sleep quantity were major factors associated with sleep quality. Prospective studies are required to distil the factors that determine sleep quality and the effects that sleep patterns exert on cardio-metabolic health.

  10. Cardio-metabolic risk in 5-year-old children prenatally exposed to maternal psychosocial stress: the ABCD study

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    Stronks Karien

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence, both animal and human, suggests that modifiable factors during fetal and infant development predispose for cardiovascular disease in adult life and that they may become possible future targets for prevention. One of these factors is maternal psychosocial stress, but so far, few prospective studies have been able to investigate the longer-term effects of stress in detail, i.e. effects in childhood. Therefore, our general aim is to study whether prenatal maternal psychosocial stress is associated with an adverse cardio-metabolic risk profile in the child at age five. Methods/design Data are available from the Amsterdam Born Children and their Development (ABCD study, a prospective birth cohort in the Netherlands. Between 2003-2004, 8,266 pregnant women filled out a questionnaire including instruments to determine anxiety (STAI, pregnancy related anxiety (PRAQ, depressive symptoms (CES-D, parenting stress (PDH scale and work stress (Job Content Questionnaire. Outcome measures in the offspring (age 5-7 are currently collected. These include lipid profile, blood glucose, insulin sensitivity, body composition (body mass index, waist circumference and bioelectrical impedance analysis, autonomic nervous system activity (parasympathetic and sympathetic measures and blood pressure. Potential mediators are maternal serum cortisol, gestational age and birth weight for gestational age (intrauterine growth restriction. Possible gender differences in programming are also studied. Discussion Main strengths of the proposed study are the longitudinal measurements during three important periods (pregnancy, infancy and childhood, the extensive measurement of maternal psychosocial stress with validated questionnaires and the thorough measurement of the children's cardio-metabolic profile. The availability of several confounding factors will give us the opportunity to quantify the independent contribution of maternal stress during

  11. Obesity and Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in an Urban and Rural Population in the Ashanti Region-Ghana: A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obirikorang, Christian; Osakunor, Derick Nii Mensah; Anto, Enoch Odame; Amponsah, Samuel Opoku; Adarkwa, Opei Kwafo

    2015-01-01

    There is a surge in chronic diseases in the developing world, driven by a high prevalence of cardio-metabolic risk factors. This study described differences in prevalence of obesity and cardio-metabolic risk factors between urban and rural settlements in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. This comparative cross-sectional study included 672 participants (median age 50 years), of which 312 were from Kumasi (urban) and 360 from Jachie-Pramso (rural). Demographic, anthropometric and other cardio-metabolic risk factors were gathered and venous blood samples were drawn for biochemical assays. Results suggested significant differences in diastolic blood pressure (80.0 mmHg vs 79.5 mmHg; p = 0.0078), and fasting blood sugar (5.0 mmo/l vs 4.5 mmol/l; p consumption (p = 0.0186) were more prevalent amongst participants in the urban area. Markers of adiposity were higher amongst females than males in both areas (p < 0.05). In the urban area, hypertension, diabetes and lifestyle risk factors were more prevalent amongst males than females. Differences in risk factors by urban/rural residence remained significant after adjusting for gender and age. Obesity and cardio-metabolic risk factors are more prevalent amongst urban settlers, highlighting an urgent need to avert the rise of diet and lifestyle-related chronic diseases. PMID:26046349

  12. Moderate Activity and Fitness, Not Sedentary Time, Are Independently Associated with Cardio-Metabolic Risk in U.S. Adults Aged 18–49

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    Jeroen H. P. M. van der Velde

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study is one of the first to examine and compare the independent associations of objectively measured sedentary time, moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA and fitness with cardio-metabolic risk factors. We studied 543 men and women (aged 18–49 years from the NHANES 2003–2004 survey. Sedentary time and MVPA were measured by accelerometry. Fitness was assessed with a submaximal treadmill test. Cardio-metabolic risk factors included: waist circumference (WC, BMI, blood pressure, fasting glucose, HDL- and non HDL cholesterol, triglycerides (TG, and C-reactive protein (CRP. Sedentary time, MVPA and fitness were used as predictors for the cardio-metabolic outcomes in a multiple regression analysis. Standardized regression coefficients were computed. Results show that sedentary time was associated with HDL-cholesterol (β = −0.080, p = 0.05 and TG (β = 0.080, p = 0.03. These results became non-significant after adjustment for MVPA and fitness. MVPA was associated with WC (β = −0.226, BMI (β = −0.239, TG (β = −0.108 and HDL-cholesterol (β = 0.144 (all p < 0.05. These results remained significant after adjustment for sedentary time and fitness. Fitness was associated with WC (β = −0.287, BMI (β = −0.266, systolic blood pressure (β = −0.159, TG (β = −0.092, and CRP (β = −0.130 (all p < 0.05. After adjustment for sedentary time and MVPA these results remained significant. These differences in relative importance of sedentary time, MVPA and fitness on cardio-metabolic-risk are important in the design of prevention programs. In this population, the strength of the associations between MVPA and fitness with cardio-metabolic markers appeared to be similar; both MVPA and fitness showed independent associations with cardio-metabolic risk factors. In contrast, sedentary time showed no independent associations with cardio-metabolic risk after correction for fitness and MVPA.

  13. Low physical activity level and short sleep duration are associated with an increased cardio-metabolic risk: a longitudinal study in Danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, M.; Chaput, J.; Damsgaard, C.;

    2014-01-01

    examine prospective associations between movement behaviors and markers of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in 8–11 year old Danish children. Methods: Moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA; >2296 counts/min), sedentary time (<100 counts/min) and sleep duration were measured for one week using an accelerometer (Acti...... ‘Optimal well-being, development and health for Danish children through a healthy New Nordic Diet’. Supported by a grant from the Nordea Foundation.......Background: As cardio-metabolic risk tracks from childhood to adulthood, a better understanding of the relationship between movement behaviors (physical activity [PA], sedentary time and sleep) and cardio-metabolic risk in childhood may aid to prevent metabolic syndrome in adulthood. Aim: To...

  14. Obesity and Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in an Urban and Rural Population in the Ashanti Region-Ghana: A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Obirikorang

    Full Text Available There is a surge in chronic diseases in the developing world, driven by a high prevalence of cardio-metabolic risk factors. This study described differences in prevalence of obesity and cardio-metabolic risk factors between urban and rural settlements in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. This comparative cross-sectional study included 672 participants (median age 50 years, of which 312 were from Kumasi (urban and 360 from Jachie-Pramso (rural. Demographic, anthropometric and other cardio-metabolic risk factors were gathered and venous blood samples were drawn for biochemical assays. Results suggested significant differences in diastolic blood pressure (80.0 mmHg vs 79.5 mmHg; p = 0.0078, and fasting blood sugar (5.0 mmo/l vs 4.5 mmol/l; p < 0.0001 between the two groups. Further differences in anthropometric measures suggested greater adiposity amongst participants in the urban area. Participants in the urban area were more likely than rural participants, to have high total cholesterol and LDL-c (p < 0.0001 respectively. Risk factors including BMI ≥ 25 (p < 0.0001, BMI ≥ 30 (p < 0.0001, high waist circumference (p < 0.0001, high waist-to-height ratio (p < 0.0001 and alcohol consumption (p = 0.0186 were more prevalent amongst participants in the urban area. Markers of adiposity were higher amongst females than males in both areas (p < 0.05. In the urban area, hypertension, diabetes and lifestyle risk factors were more prevalent amongst males than females. Differences in risk factors by urban/rural residence remained significant after adjusting for gender and age. Obesity and cardio-metabolic risk factors are more prevalent amongst urban settlers, highlighting an urgent need to avert the rise of diet and lifestyle-related chronic diseases.

  15. Apo Lipoprotein A1 Gene Polymorphisms Predict Cardio-Metabolic Risk in South Asian Immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Sunita Dodani; Rebecca Henkhaus; Lei Dong; Butler, Merlin G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of death globally with increasing burden in South Asians in the US. Specific genetic variants that influence CAD have not been fully assessed in South Asian Immigrants. The goal is to identify Apo lipoprotein A1 (APOA1) gene polymorphisms and their association with CAD risk factors, metabolic syndrome and dysfunctional HDL (Dys-HDL). Methods: A community-based study on South Asians aged 35-65 years without CAD was conducted. APOA1 g...

  16. Nutrition: a key environmental dietary factor in clinical severity and cardio-metabolic risk in psoriatic male patients evaluated by 7-day food-frequency questionnaire

    OpenAIRE

    Barrea, Luigi; Macchia, Paolo Emidio; Tarantino, Giovanni; Di Somma, Carolina; Pane, Elena; Balato, Nicola; Napolitano, Maddalena; Colao, Annamaria; Savastano, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Background Western dietary pattern is included among the environmental dietary factors involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Nutritional data collection methods and gender differences might affect the association between diet and psoriasis. The 7-day food records is considered the “gold standard” of self-administered food frequency questionnaires. In this study, we evaluated the differences in the dietary intake, anthropometric measurements and cardio-metabolic risk profile in a group of...

  17. Effects of High and Low Fat Dairy Food on Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Jocelyne R Benatar; Karishma Sidhu; Stewart, Ralph A H

    2013-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Clear guidelines on the health effects of dairy food are important given the high prevalence of obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and increasing global consumption of dairy food. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of increased dairy food on cardio metabolic risk factors. DATA SOURCES: Searches were performed until April 2013 using MEDLINE, Science Direct, Google,Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, reference lists of articles, and proceedings of ...

  18. Effect of 12 Weeks High Oleic Peanut Consumption on Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors and Body Composition

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    Jayne A. Barbour

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological evidence indicates an inverse association between nut consumption and obesity, inflammation, hyperlipidaemia and glucose intolerance. We investigated effects of high oleic peanut consumption vs. a nut free diet on adiposity and cardio-metabolic risk markers. In a randomised cross-over design, 61 healthy subjects (65 ± 7 years, body mass index (BMI 31 ± 4 kg/m2 alternated either high oleic peanuts (15%–20% of energy or a nut free diet for 12 weeks. Body composition and mass, waist circumference, C-reactive protein (CRP, lipids, glucose and insulin were assessed at baseline and after each phase. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA compared the two diets. Consistent with other nut studies, there were no differences in lipids, CRP, glucose and insulin with peanut consumption. In contrast, some reports have demonstrated benefits, likely due to differences in the study cohort. Energy intake was 10% higher (853 kJ, p < 0.05, following peanut consumption vs. control, attributed to a 30% increase in fat intake (p < 0.001, predominantly monounsaturated (increase 22 g, p < 0.05. Despite greater energy intake during the peanut phase, there were no differences in body composition, and less than predicted increase (0.5 kg in body weight for this additional energy intake, possibly due to incomplete nutrient absorption and energy utilisation.

  19. The Influence of Lifestyle on Cardio-metabolic Risk in Students from Timisoara University Center

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela ORAVIȚAN; Claudiu AVRAM; Stela IURCIUC; Petru MERGHEȘ; Bogdan ALMĂJAN-GUȚĂ

    2013-01-01

    This study is a part of the activities in a cross border cooperation project that has proposed the management of obesity and cardiometabolic risk at students from Timisoara and Szeged university centres. The target group of Timisoara University Center was formed out of 600 students enrolled in the four major universities from Timisoara; target group students were questioned about their lifestyle and were evaluated anthropometric parameters, body composition and arterial stiffness; based on qu...

  20. A cross-sectional investigation of regional patterns of diet and cardio-metabolic risk in India

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    Reddy KS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of diet in India's rapidly progressing chronic disease epidemic is unclear; moreover, diet may vary considerably across North-South regions. Methods The India Health Study was a multicenter study of men and women aged 35-69, who provided diet, lifestyle, and medical histories, as well as blood pressure, fasting blood, urine, and anthropometric measurements. In each region (Delhi, n = 824; Mumbai, n = 743; Trivandrum, n = 2,247, we identified two dietary patterns with factor analysis. In multiple logistic regression models adjusted for age, gender, education, income, marital status, religion, physical activity, tobacco, alcohol, and total energy intake, we investigated associations between regional dietary patterns and abdominal adiposity, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Results Across the regions, more than 80% of the participants met the criteria for abdominal adiposity and 10 to 28% of participants were considered diabetic. In Delhi, the "fruit and dairy" dietary pattern was positively associated with abdominal adiposity [highest versus lowest tertile, multivariate-adjusted OR and 95% CI: 2.32 (1.03-5.23; Ptrend = 0.008] and hypertension [2.20 (1.47-3.31; Ptrend trend = 0.03] and the "snacks and sweets" pattern was positively associated with abdominal adiposity [2.05 (1.34-3.14; Ptrend = 0.03]. In Mumbai, the "fruit and vegetable" pattern was inversely associated with hypertension [0.63 (0.40-0.99; Ptrend = 0.05] and the "snack and meat" pattern appeared to be positively associated with abdominal adiposity. Conclusions Cardio-metabolic risk factors were highly prevalent in this population. Across all regions, we found little evidence of a Westernized diet; however, dietary patterns characterized by animal products, fried snacks, or sweets appeared to be positively associated with abdominal adiposity. Conversely, more traditional diets in the Southern regions were inversely related to diabetes and

  1. Low Physical Activity Level and Short Sleep Duration Are Associated with an Increased Cardio-Metabolic Risk Profile: A Longitudinal Study in 8-11 Year Old Danish Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Mads F.; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Damsgaard, Camilla T.; Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; Andersen, Rikke; Astrup, Arne; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Tetens, Inge; Ritz, Christian; Sjodin, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Background: As cardio-metabolic risk tracks from childhood to adulthood, a better understanding of the relationship between movement behaviors (physical activity, sedentary behavior and sleep) and cardio-metabolic risk in childhood may aid in preventing metabolic syndrome (MetS) in adulthood....... Objective: To examine independent and combined cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between movement behaviors and the MetS score in 8-11 year old Danish children. Design: Physical activity, sedentary time and sleep duration (seven days and eight nights) were assessed by accelerometer and fat mass...

  2. Impact of Vitamin D Replacement on Markers of Glucose Metabolism and Cardio-Metabolic Risk in Women with Former Gestational Diabetes--A Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Toh Peng Yeow

    Full Text Available Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM and vitamin D deficiency are related to insulin resistance and impaired beta cell function, with heightened risk for future development of diabetes. We evaluated the impact of vitamin D supplementation on markers of glucose metabolism and cardio metabolic risk in Asian women with former GDM and hypovitaminosis D. In this double blind, randomized controlled trial, 26 participants were randomized to receive either daily 4000 IU vitamin D3 or placebo capsules. 75 g Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT and biochemistry profiles were performed at baseline and 6 month visits. Mathematical models, using serial glucose, insulin and C peptide measurements from OGTT, were employed to calculate insulin sensitivity and beta cell function. Thirty three (76% women with former GDM screened had vitamin D level of <50 nmol/L at baseline. Supplementation, when compared with placebo, resulted in increased vitamin D level (+51.1 nmol/L vs 0.2 nmol/L, p<0.001 and increased fasting insulin (+20% vs 18%, p = 0.034. The vitamin D group also demonstrated a 30% improvement in disposition index and an absolute 0.2% (2 mmol/mol reduction in HbA1c. There was no clear change in insulin sensitivity or markers of cardio metabolic risk. This study highlighted high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among Asian women with former GDM. Six months supplementation with 4000 IU of vitamin D3 safely restored the vitamin D level, improved basal pancreatic beta-cell function and ameliorated the metabolic state. There was no effect on markers of cardio metabolic risk. Further mechanistic studies exploring the role of vitamin D supplementation on glucose homeostasis among different ethnicities may be needed to better inform future recommendations for these women with former GDM at high risk of both hypovitaminosis D and future diabetes.

  3. Soy and cardio-metabolic abnormalities: an update

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    Leila Azadbakht

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available

    • Soy protein contains beneficial components like complex carbohydrates, unsaturated fatty acids, vegetable protein, soluble fiber, oligosaccharides, vitamins, minerals, inositol-derived substances and phytoestrogens, particularly the isoflavones  genistein, diadzein, and glycitein, which might affect different cardio-metabolic abnormalities. Soy consumption has been reported to beneficially affect features of the metabolic syndrome in animal models and also in humans to some extent. There are inconsistent reports regarding the hypothesis of the effectiveness of soy protein on obesity. While some studies have shown that soy consumption can improve the features of the metabolic syndrome without affecting body weight, others showed that soy consumption has beneficial role in weight management and might improve the metabolic syndrome by affecting body weight control. Several studies have consistently reported the effects of soy on cardiovascular risks. Beneficial role of soy intake on diabetes is another aspect of soy inclusion in the diet. The present study discusses the effects of soy consumption on different cardio-metabolic abnormalities and provides information regarding the possible mechanisms by which soy protein might exert its beneficial roles.
    • KEY WORDS: Soy, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome.

  4. Cardio-Metabolic Disease Risks and Their Associations with Circulating 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Omega-3 Levels in South Asian and White Canadians.

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    Chao-Wu Xiao

    Full Text Available This study compared cardio-metabolic disease risk factors and their associations with serum vitamin D and omega-3 status in South Asian (SAC and White Canadians (WC living in Canada's capital region.Fasting blood samples were taken from 235 SAC and 279 WC aged 20 to 79 years in Ottawa, and 22 risk factors were measured.SAC men and women had significantly higher fasting glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, apolipoprotein B (ApoB, ratios of total (TC to HDL cholesterol (HDLC and ApoB to ApoA1, leptin, E-selectin, P-selectin, ICAM-1 and omega-3 (p 4%-<8% or high (≥ 8% levels of omega-3 indices were related to lower E-selectin, P-selectin, ICAM-1 and higher HDLC, 25(OHD levels in WC, but not in SAC. The BMIs of ≤ 25 kg/m2 were related to lower LDLC, ApoB, VEGF, creatinine and higher 25(OHD in WC, but not in SAC.The associations of vitamin D, omega-3 status, BMI and risk factors were more profound in the WC than SAC. Compared to WC, vitamin D status and omega-3 index may not be good predictive risk factors for the prevalence of CVD and diabetes in SAC.

  5. Interlinkage among cardio-metabolic disease markers in an urban poor setting in Nairobi, Kenya

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    Tilahun Nigatu Haregu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The main cardio-metabolic diseases – mostly cardiovascular diseases such as stroke and ischemic heart disease – share common clinical markers such as raised blood pressure and blood glucose. The pathways of development of many of these conditions are also interlinked. In this regard, a higher level of co-occurrence of the main cardio-metabolic disease markers is expected. Evidence about the patterns of occurrence of cardio-metabolic markers and their interlinkage in the sub-Saharan African setting is inadequate. Objective: The goal of the study was to describe the interlinkage among common cardio-metabolic disease markers in an African setting. Design: We used data collected in a cross-sectional study from 5,190 study participants as part of cardiovascular disease risk assessment in the urban slums of Nairobi, Kenya. Five commonly used clinical markers of cardio-metabolic conditions were considered in this analysis. These markers were waist circumference, blood pressure, random blood glucose, total blood cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. Patterns of these markers were described using means, standard deviations, and proportions. The associations between the markers were determined using odds ratios. Results: The weighted prevalence of central obesity, hypertension, hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertriglyceridemia were 12.3%, 7.0%, 2.5%, 10.3%, and 17.3%, respectively. Women had a higher prevalence of central obesity and hypercholesterolemia as compared to men. Blood glucose was strongly associated with central obesity, blood pressure, and triglyceride levels, whereas the association between blood glucose and total blood cholesterol was not statistically significant. Conclusions: This study shows that most of the common cardio-metabolic markers are interlinked, suggesting a higher probability of comorbidity due to cardio-metabolic conditions and thus the need for integrated approaches.

  6. Recently Discovered Adipokines and Cardio-Metabolic Comorbidities in Childhood Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Maria Barraco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available White adipose tissue (WAT asset, in terms of cell number, fat storage capacity and endocrine function, is largely determined in early stages of life and is pivotal for shaping the WAT pro-inflammatory behavior. WAT derived adipokines have been shown to play a main role in several cardio-metabolic abnormalities of obesity. This review focuses on the most recently identified adipokines, namely adipocyte-fatty acid-binding protein, chemerin, fibroblast growth factor-21, lipocalin-2, omentin-1 and vaspin; their role in the pathogenesis of obesity and associated cardio-metabolic abnormalities; and on their adaptive response to body weight change. Evidence consistently suggests a pathogenic role for A-FABP, chemerin and FGF-21. Nevertheless, large population studies are needed to verify whether they can be useful to predict the risk of cardio-metabolic abnormalities in adulthood and/or monitor the clinical response to therapeutic interventions.

  7. Obesity and cardio-metabolic risk factors in urban adults of Benin: Relationship with socio-economic status, urbanisation, and lifestyle patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delisle Hélène

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a dearth of information on diet-related chronic diseases in West Africa. This cross-sectional study assessed the rate of obesity and other cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors in a random sample of 200 urban adults in Benin and explored the associations between these factors and socio-economic status (SES, urbanisation as well as lifestyle patterns. Methods Anthropometric parameters (height, weight and waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and serum lipids (HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were measured. WHO cut-offs were used to define CVD risk factors. Food intake and physical activity were assessed with three non-consecutive 24-hour recalls. Information on tobacco use and alcohol consumption was collected using a questionnaire. An overall lifestyle score (OLS was created based on diet quality, alcohol consumption, smoking, and physical activity. A SES score was computed based on education, main occupation and household amenities (as proxy for income. Results The most prevalent CVD risk factors were overall obesity (18%, abdominal obesity (32%, hypertension (23%, and low HDL-cholesterol (13%. Diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia were uncommon. The prevalence of overall obesity was roughly four times higher in women than in men (28 vs. 8%. After controlling for age and sex, the odds of obesity increased significantly with SES, while a longer exposure to the urban environment was associated with higher odds of hypertension. Of the single lifestyle factors examined, physical activity was the most strongly associated with several CVD risk factors. Logistic regression analyses revealed that the likelihood of obesity and hypertension decreased significantly as the OLS improved, while controlling for potential confounding factors. Conclusion Our data show that obesity and cardio-metabolic risk factors are highly prevalent among urban adults in Benin, which calls for urgent measures to avert the

  8. Graded Maximal Exercise Testing to Assess Mouse Cardio-Metabolic Phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Petrosino

    Full Text Available Functional assessments of cardiovascular fitness (CVF are needed to establish animal models of dysfunction, test the effects of novel therapeutics, and establish the cardio-metabolic phenotype of mice. In humans, the graded maximal exercise test (GXT is a standardized diagnostic for assessing CVF and mortality risk. These tests, which consist of concurrent staged increases in running speed and inclination, provide diagnostic cardio-metabolic parameters, such as, VO2max, anaerobic threshold, and metabolic crossover. Unlike the human-GXT, published mouse treadmill tests have set, not staged, increases in inclination as speed progress until exhaustion (PXT. Additionally, they often lack multiple cardio-metabolic parameters. Here, we developed a mouse-GXT with the intent of improving mouse-exercise testing sensitivity and developing translatable parameters to assess CVF in healthy and dysfunctional mice. The mouse-GXT, like the human-GXT, incorporated staged increases in inclination, speed, and intensity; and, was designed by considering imitations of the PXT and differences between human and mouse physiology. The mouse-GXT and PXTs were both tested in healthy mice (C57BL/6J, FVBN/J to determine their ability to identify cardio-metabolic parameters (anaerobic threshold, VO2max, metabolic crossover observed in human-GXTs. Next, theses assays were tested on established diet-induced (obese-C57BL/6J and genetic (cardiac isoform Casq2-/- models of cardiovascular dysfunction. Results showed that both tests reported VO2max and provided reproducible data about performance. Only the mouse-GXT reproducibly identified anaerobic threshold, metabolic crossover, and detected impaired CVF in dysfunctional models. Our findings demonstrated that the mouse-GXT is a sensitive, non-invasive, and cost-effective method for assessing CVF in mice. This new test can be used as a functional assessment to determine the cardio-metabolic phenotype of various animal models or

  9. The gut microbiome in cardio-metabolic health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tue Haldor; Gøbel, Rikke J; Hansen, Torben;

    2015-01-01

    accumulated showing the association of distinct changes in gut microbiota composition and function with obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although causality in humans and the pathophysiological mechanisms involved have yet to be decisively established, several studies have demonstrated that...... the gut microbiota, as an environmental factor influencing the metabolic state of the host, is readily modifiable through a variety of interventions. In this review we provide an overview of the development of the gut microbiome and its compositional and functional changes in relation to cardio...

  10. Estimating the risk of cardio vascular diseases among pakistani diabetics using uk pds risk engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of risk estimation of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is helpful for clinician to identifying high risk populations for their effective treatment. Latest studies recommended only initiating cardio-protective treatment in diabetic patients based on personalized CHD risk estimates so as to reduce undue harm from overly aggressive risk factor modification. The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UK PDS) Risk Engine is a widely used tool to assess the risk of Cardio Vascular diseases (CVD) in diabetics. The literature search so far did not reveal any study of risk assessment among Pakistani Diabetics. Methods: This descriptive study is based on the data of 470 type-2 diabetics seen in Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore during 2011. The data of these 470 patients was analyzed through UKPDS Risk Engine. CHD risk was calculated. Results: The 10 years risk of CHD, fatal CHD, stroke and fatal stroke was 9.4%, 4.4%, 1.7% and 0.2% respectively. Conclusions: The present study show a lower risk of CVD occurring among Pakistani diabetics as compared to studies from western countries. (author)

  11. Combined Angiotensin Receptor Modulation in the Management of Cardio-Metabolic Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulis, Ludovit; Foulquier, Sébastien; Namsolleck, Pawel;

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, such as hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia or obesity are linked with chronic low-grade inflammation and dysregulation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Consequently, RAS inhibition by ACE inhibitors or angiotensin AT1 receptor (AT1R......) blockers is the evidence-based standard for cardiovascular risk reduction in high-risk patients, including diabetics with albuminuria. In addition, RAS inhibition reduces the new onset of diabetes mellitus. Yet, the high and increasing prevalence of metabolic disorders, and the high residual risk even....... Therefore, a concept of dual AT1R/AT2R modulation emerges as a putative means for risk reduction in cardio-metabolic diseases. The approach employing simultaneous RAS blockade (AT1R) and RAS stimulation (AT2R) is distinct from previous attempts of double intervention in the RAS by dual blockade. Dual...

  12. Effects of Dietary Protein Source and Quantity during Weight Loss on Appetite, Energy Expenditure, and Cardio-Metabolic Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Armstrong, Cheryl L. H.; Campbell, Wayne W.

    2016-01-01

    Higher protein meals increase satiety and the thermic effect of feeding (TEF) in acute settings, but it is unclear whether these effects remain after a person becomes acclimated to energy restriction or a given protein intake. This study assessed the effects of predominant protein source (omnivorous, beef/pork vs. lacto-ovo vegetarian, soy/legume) and quantity (10%, 20%, or 30% of energy from protein) on appetite, energy expenditure, and cardio-metabolic indices during energy restriction (ER) in overweight and obese adults. Subjects were randomly assigned to one protein source and then consumed diets with different quantities of protein (4 weeks each) in a randomized crossover manner. Perceived appetite ratings (free-living and in-lab), TEF, and fasting cardio-metabolic indices were assessed at the end of each 4-week period. Protein source and quantity did not affect TEF, hunger, or desire to eat, other than a modestly higher daily composite fullness rating with 30% vs. 10% protein diet (p = 0.03). While the 20% and 30% protein diets reduced cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and APO-B vs. 10% protein (p < 0.05), protein source did not affect cardio-metabolic indices. In conclusion, diets varying in protein quantity with either beef/pork or soy/legume as the predominant source have minimal effects on appetite control, energy expenditure and cardio-metabolic risk factors during ER-induced weight loss. PMID:26821042

  13. Effects of Dietary Protein Source and Quantity during Weight Loss on Appetite, Energy Expenditure, and Cardio-Metabolic Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Armstrong, Cheryl L H; Campbell, Wayne W

    2016-02-01

    Higher protein meals increase satiety and the thermic effect of feeding (TEF) in acute settings, but it is unclear whether these effects remain after a person becomes acclimated to energy restriction or a given protein intake. This study assessed the effects of predominant protein source (omnivorous, beef/pork vs. lacto-ovo vegetarian, soy/legume) and quantity (10%, 20%, or 30% of energy from protein) on appetite, energy expenditure, and cardio-metabolic indices during energy restriction (ER) in overweight and obese adults. Subjects were randomly assigned to one protein source and then consumed diets with different quantities of protein (4 weeks each) in a randomized crossover manner. Perceived appetite ratings (free-living and in-lab), TEF, and fasting cardio-metabolic indices were assessed at the end of each 4-week period. Protein source and quantity did not affect TEF, hunger, or desire to eat, other than a modestly higher daily composite fullness rating with 30% vs. 10% protein diet (p = 0.03). While the 20% and 30% protein diets reduced cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and APO-B vs. 10% protein (p protein source did not affect cardio-metabolic indices. In conclusion, diets varying in protein quantity with either beef/pork or soy/legume as the predominant source have minimal effects on appetite control, energy expenditure and cardio-metabolic risk factors during ER-induced weight loss. PMID:26821042

  14. Effects of Dietary Protein Source and Quantity during Weight Loss on Appetite, Energy Expenditure, and Cardio-Metabolic Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher protein meals increase satiety and the thermic effect of feeding (TEF in acute settings, but it is unclear whether these effects remain after a person becomes acclimated to energy restriction or a given protein intake. This study assessed the effects of predominant protein source (omnivorous, beef/pork vs. lacto-ovo vegetarian, soy/legume and quantity (10%, 20%, or 30% of energy from protein on appetite, energy expenditure, and cardio-metabolic indices during energy restriction (ER in overweight and obese adults. Subjects were randomly assigned to one protein source and then consumed diets with different quantities of protein (4 weeks each in a randomized crossover manner. Perceived appetite ratings (free-living and in-lab, TEF, and fasting cardio-metabolic indices were assessed at the end of each 4-week period. Protein source and quantity did not affect TEF, hunger, or desire to eat, other than a modestly higher daily composite fullness rating with 30% vs. 10% protein diet (p = 0.03. While the 20% and 30% protein diets reduced cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and APO-B vs. 10% protein (p < 0.05, protein source did not affect cardio-metabolic indices. In conclusion, diets varying in protein quantity with either beef/pork or soy/legume as the predominant source have minimal effects on appetite control, energy expenditure and cardio-metabolic risk factors during ER-induced weight loss.

  15. Sleep duration and its role in the aetiology of cardio-metabolic health outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Hense, Sabrina

    2011-01-01

    An adequate amount of sleep is believed to be important for optimal health and functioning throughout life and changes in sleep duration were found to be associated with several especially cardio-metabolic - health outcomes in adults as well as in children. The factors that influence sleep duration are multi-factorial and the interplay between sleep duration and other factors in the aetiology of cardio-metabolic outcomes is complex and not fully understood yet. Internationally comparable data...

  16. Depression treatment in individuals with cancer: a comparative analysis with cardio-metabolic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi B. Rane

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A clear picture of the current state of nationwide depression treatment practices in individuals with cancer and depression does not exist in the United States (US. Therefore, the primary objective of this study was to examine rates of any depression treatment among individuals with cancer and depression in the US. To better understand the relationship between any treatment for depression and presence of cancer, we used a comparison group of individuals with cardio-metabolic conditions owing to the similar challenges faced in management of depression in individuals with these conditions. We used a retrospective cross-sectional design and data from multiple years of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative household-survey on healthcare utilization and expenditures. Study sample consisted of adults aged 21 or older with self-reported depression and cancer (n=528 or self-reported depression and diabetes, heart disease or hypertension (n=1643. Depression treatment comprised of any use of antidepres- sants and/or any use of mental health counseling services. Treatment rates for depression were 78.0% and 81.7% among individuals with cancer and cardio-metabolic conditions respectively. After controlling for socio-demographic, access-to-care, number of physician-visits, health-status, and lifestyle risk-factors related variables; individuals with cancer were less likely to report any treatment for depression (Adjusted Odds Ratio=0.67; 95% Confidence Interval=0.49, 0.92 compared to individuals with cardio-metabolic conditions (P≤0.01. Our findings highlight the possibility that competing demands may crowd out treatment for depression and that cancer diagnosis may be a barrier to depression treatment.

  17. Associations between Sugar Intake from Different Food Sources and Adiposity or Cardio-Metabolic Risk in Childhood and Adolescence: The Korean Child–Adolescent Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Im Hur

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of childhood obesity is a serious public health problem associated with co-morbidities in adulthood, as well as childhood. This study was conducted to identify associations between total sugar intake and sugar intake from different foods (fruit, milk, and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs, and adiposity and continuous metabolic syndrome scores (cMetS among Korean children and adolescents using cohort data. The study subjects were children (n = 770 who participated in the 4th year (2008 of the Korean Child–Adolescent Cohort Study (KoCAS. Dietary intake data were collected via three-day 24-h food records, and sugar intake was calculated for the total sugar content of foods using our database compiled from various sources. Anthropometric measurements, assessments of body composition, and blood sample analysis were performed at baseline and at follow-up four years later. The cMetS was calculated based on waist circumference, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, glucose, and mean arterial blood pressure. According to multiple linear regression analysis, there were no significant associations between total sugar intake and adiposity and cMetS. However, higher intake of fruit sugar at baseline was significantly associated with lower body mass index (BMI z-scores and body fat percentages at baseline (β = −0.10, p = 0.02 and β = −0.78, p < 0.01, respectively. At follow-up, sugar intake from fruit at baseline was still negatively associated with the above outcomes, but only the relationship with BMI z-scores retained statistical significance (β = −0.08, p < 0.05. There was a significant positive relationship between consumption of sugar from SSBs and cMetS at baseline (β = 0.04, p = 0.02, but that relationship was not observed at follow-up (p = 0.83. Differences in consumption sugars from fruit and SSBs might play an important role in the risk of adiposity and metabolic disease in children and

  18. Continued improvement of cardiovascular mortality in Hungary - impact of increased cardio-metabolic prescriptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozan Peter

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last 35 years the poor ranking of Hungary on the list of life expectancy at birth among European countries, has not changed. In 1970 our lag behind the leading European countries was the smallest. The gap was growing between 1970 and 1993 but from 1994 onwards the life expectancy at birth in Hungary has increased continuously and somewhat faster than in other European countries. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between decreasing cardiovascular mortality rates, as a main cause of death and the increase in cardio-metabolic prescriptions and possible changes in lifestyle behavior. Methods Analyses were conducted on national data concerning cardiovascular mortality and the number of cardio-metabolic drug prescription per capita. The association between yearly rates of cardiovascular events and changes in antihypertensive, antilipidemic and antidiabetic prescription rates was analyzed. The changes in other cardiovascular risk factors, like lifestyle were also considered. Results We observed a remarkable decline of mortality due to stroke and acute myocardial infarction (AMI. The fall was significantly associated with all prescription rates. The proportion of each treatment type responsible for suppression of specific mortality rates is different. All treatment types comparably improved stroke mortality, while antilipidemic therapy improved AMI outcome. Conclusions These results emphasize the importance of a comprehensive strategy that maximizes the population coverage of effective treatments. Hungary appears to be at the beginning of the fourth stage of epidemiologic transition, i.e. it has entered the stage of delayed chronic noninfectious diseases.

  19. Cardio metabolic and immunological impacts of extra virgin olive oil consumption in overweight and obese older adults: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Both aging and obesity are related to dysregulated immune function which may be responsible for increased risk of infection and also chronic non-infectious diseases. Dietary lipids have been shown to impact immune and inflammatory responses and cardio-metabolic risk factors. No informati...

  20. Associations between Sugar Intake from Different Food Sources and Adiposity or Cardio-Metabolic Risk in Childhood and Adolescence: The Korean Child–Adolescent Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Yang-Im Hur; Hyesook Park; Jae-Heon Kang; Hye-Ah Lee; Hong Ji Song; Hae-Jeung Lee; Ok-Hyun Kim

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of childhood obesity is a serious public health problem associated with co-morbidities in adulthood, as well as childhood. This study was conducted to identify associations between total sugar intake and sugar intake from different foods (fruit, milk, and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs)), and adiposity and continuous metabolic syndrome scores (cMetS) among Korean children and adolescents using cohort data. The study subjects were children (n = 770) who participated ...

  1. Obesity and cardio-metabolic risk factors in urban adults of Benin: Relationship with socio-economic status, urbanisation, and lifestyle patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Delisle Hélène; Agueh Victoire; Fayomi Benjamin; Sodjinou Roger

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background There is a dearth of information on diet-related chronic diseases in West Africa. This cross-sectional study assessed the rate of obesity and other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in a random sample of 200 urban adults in Benin and explored the associations between these factors and socio-economic status (SES), urbanisation as well as lifestyle patterns. Methods Anthropometric parameters (height, weight and waist circumference), blood pressure, fasting plasma glu...

  2. Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval Training in a Gym Setting Improves Cardio-Metabolic and Psychological Health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam O Shepherd

    Full Text Available Within a controlled laboratory environment, high-intensity interval training (HIT elicits similar cardiovascular and metabolic benefits as traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT. It is currently unclear how HIT can be applied effectively in a real-world environment.To investigate the hypothesis that 10 weeks of HIT, performed in an instructor-led, group-based gym setting, elicits improvements in aerobic capacity (VO2max, cardio-metabolic risk and psychological health which are comparable to MICT.Ninety physically inactive volunteers (42±11 y, 27.7±4.8 kg.m-2 were randomly assigned to HIT or MICT group exercise classes. HIT consisted of repeated sprints (15-60 seconds, >90% HRmax interspersed with periods of recovery cycling (≤25 min.session-1, 3 sessions.week-1. MICT participants performed continuous cycling (~70% HRmax, 30-45 min.session-1, 5 sessions.week-1. VO2max, markers of cardio-metabolic risk, and psychological health were assessed pre and post-intervention.Mean weekly training time was 55±10 (HIT and 128±44 min (MICT (p<0.05, with greater adherence to HIT (83±14% vs. 61±15% prescribed sessions attended, respectively; p<0.05. HIT improved VO2max, insulin sensitivity, reduced abdominal fat mass, and induced favourable changes in blood lipids (p<0.05. HIT also induced beneficial effects on health perceptions, positive and negative affect, and subjective vitality (p<0.05. No difference between HIT and MICT was seen for any of these variables.HIT performed in a real-world gym setting improves cardio-metabolic risk factors and psychological health in physically inactive adults. With a reduced time commitment and greater adherence than MICT, HIT offers a viable and effective exercise strategy to target the growing incidence of metabolic disease and psychological ill-being associated with physical inactivity.

  3. Cardio-Metabolic Features of Type 2 Diabetes Subjects Discordant in the Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sa Rah Lee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of this study is to investigate the cardio-metabolic parameters and surrogate markers of insulin resistance in a discordant group of type 2 diabetes (T2DM subjects who satisfy the Adults Treatment Panel (ATP III criteria, but not the International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria, for metabolic syndrome (MetS.MethodsWe assessed the prevalence of MetS in T2DM subjects (n=167 who were selected from subjects registered at the diabetes center of Dong-A University Medical Center. We used the ATP III criteria and the IDF criteria for the diagnosis of MetS and sorted the subjects into 2 MetS groups: one group diagnosed per ATP III criteria (MetSa and one diagnosed per IDF criteria (MetSi. We then compared the clinical characteristics, metabolic parameters (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and uric acid values and co-morbidities (prevalence of microalbuminuria, fatty liver, and cardiovascular disease between the MetSa, MetSi, and discordant MetS groups.ResultsThe prevalence of MetS in the MetSa group (73.6% was higher than in the MetSi group (62.2%. The MetS prevalence in the discordant group was 11.4%. The discordant group showed no significant differences in clinical characteristics (except waist circumference and body mass index, metabolic parameters, or prevalence of co-morbidities, as compared with subjects with MetS by both criteria.ConclusionIn this study, cardio-metabolic features of the subjects diagnosed with MetS using ATP III criteria, but not IDF criteria, are not significantly different from those of subjects diagnosed with MetS using both criteria.

  4. Cardio-metabolic and immunological impacts of extra virgin olive oil consumption in overweight and obese older adults: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Rozati, M; Marcos, Ascensión; Meydani, S N

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Rozati et al. Background: Both aging and obesity are related to dysregulated immune function, which may be responsible for increased risk of infection and also chronic non-infectious diseases. Dietary lipids have been shown to impact immune and inflammatory responses and cardio-metabolic risk factors. No information on the impact of olive oil on immune responses of overweight and obese older adults is available. Objective: We aimed to determine the effect of replacing oils used in a ty...

  5. Health Outcomes of Information System Use Lifestyles among Adolescents: Videogame Addiction, Sleep Curtailment and Cardio-Metabolic Deficiencies

    OpenAIRE

    Ofir Turel; Anna Romashkin; Katherine M. Morrison

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Obesity is a rising problem among adolescents in modern societies; it results in long-term cardio-metabolic problems. Possible overlooked drivers of obesity and its consequent cardio-metabolic deficits include videogame addiction and the resulting curtailed sleep; both are growing problems among adolescents. The objective of this study is to examine possible associations among these concepts in adolescents, as a means to point to plausible interventions. Methods Data ...

  6. CARDIO-VASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DISEASES OF THE STOMATOGNATHIC SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Botez C; Brujbu Isabella Cristina; V.R. Murariu

    2011-01-01

    The association between dental and cardio-vascular diseases is essential as both are highly prevalent. Finding a possible causal relation between cardiovascular disease and chronic periodontal pathology, known to cause tooth loss, is therefore essential. The existence of some risk factors, such as smoking, bacterial infections, malnutrition and nutritional deficiencies, may explain the associations observed between cardio-vascular and oral pathologies. In the case of d...

  7. Pathophysiological, genetic and gene expression features of a novel rodent model of the cardio-metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H Wallis

    strain reported here provides a novel and sustainable model for investigating the pathogenesis and genetic basis of risks factors for the cardio-metabolic syndrome.

  8. DIABRISK - SL Prevention of cardio-metabolic disease with life style modification in young urban Sri Lankan's - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viberti Giancarlo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urban South-Asian's are predisposed to early onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and cardiovascular disease (CVD. There is an urgent need for country specific primary prevention strategies to address the growing burden of cardio-metabolic disease in this population. The aim of this clinical trial is to evaluate whether intensive (3-monthly lifestyle modification advice is superior to a less-intensive (12 monthly; control group lifestyle modification advice on a primary composite cardio-metabolic end point in 'at risk' urban subjects aged between 5-40 years. Methods/Design This is an open randomised controlled parallel group clinical trial performed at a single centre in Colombo, Sri-Lanka. A cluster sampling strategy was used to select a large representative sample of subjects aged between 5-40 years at high risk of T2DM and CVD for the intervention study. We have screened 23,298 (males 47% females 53% healthy subjects for four risk factors: obesity, elevated waist circumference, family history of diabetes and physical inactivity, using a questionnaire and anthropometry. Those with two or more risk-factors were recruited to the intervention trial. We aim to recruit 4600 subjects for the intervention trial. The primary composite cardio-metabolic end point is; new onset T2DM, impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glycaemia, new onset hypertension and albuminuria, following 5 years of intervention. The effect of the intervention on pre-specified secondary endpoints will also be evaluated. The study will be conducted according to good clinical and ethical practice, data analysis and reporting guidelines. Discussion DIABRISK-SL is a large population based trial to evaluate the prevalence of diabetes, pre-diabetes and cardio-metabolic risk factors among young urban Sri-Lankans and the effect of a primary prevention strategy on cardio-metabolic disease end points. This work will enable country specific and regional cardio-metabolic

  9. Depression treatment in individuals with cancer: a comparative analysis with cardio-metabolic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Pallavi B. Rane; Usha Sambamoorthi; Suresh Madhavan

    2013-01-01

    A clear picture of the current state of nationwide depression treatment practices in individuals with cancer and depression does not exist in the United States (US). Therefore, the primary objective of this study was to examine rates of any depression treatment among individuals with cancer and depression in the US. To better understand the relationship between any treatment for depression and presence of cancer, we used a comparison group of individuals with cardio-metabolic conditions owing...

  10. Depression Treatment in Individuals with Cancer: A Comparative Analysis with Cardio-Metabolic Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Pallavi B. Rane; Sambamoorthi, Usha; Madhavan, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    A clear picture of the current state of nation-wide depression treatment practices in individuals with cancer and depression does not exist in the United States (US). Therefore, the primary objective of this study was to examine rates of any depression treatment among individuals with cancer and depression in the US. To better understand the relationship between any treatment for depression and presence of cancer, we used a comparison group of individuals with cardio-metabolic conditions owin...

  11. A review of dopamine agonist therapy in type 2 diabetes and effects on cardio-metabolic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamos, E M; Levitt, D L; Munir, K M

    2016-02-01

    Dopamine action appears to play a role in changes that are seen in obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Bromocriptine-QR (Quick Release), a dopamine agonist, is approved for use in treatment of type 2 diabetes. It has demonstrated modest improvement in glycemic parameters, cholesterol and weight in certain cohorts. Limited data using cabergoline, a long-acting dopamine agonist, also demonstrate glycemic efficacy. Additionally, bromocriptine-QR appears to have a favorable cardiovascular risk reduction. The direct mechanism by which bromocriptine-QR, or central dopamine agonism, achieves modest glycemic control and favorable cardio-metabolic profile is unclear. This relationship appears to be more complex than the historical explanation of "resetting" the circadian clock and may further be elucidated using data in individuals with hyperprolactinemia and prolactinoma. PMID:26670921

  12. Assessment of the Efficacy of Cardio-Metabolic Pathology Treatment and of the Medical Recommendations Adherence in a Military Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lăcrămioara Ana MOLDOVAN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the efficacy of cardio-metabolic diseases treatment, the compliance to treatment, and to evaluate the obtained results compared to the previous published ones.Methods: A screening was conducted in the military population, including male and female with age at least 20 years, with of without: diabetes, impaired fasting glucose, obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia. The anthropometrics parameters, body fat percent, and blood pressure were evaluated. The following data were collected: glycemia, lipid profile, renal and hepatic function, level of physical activity, smoking status, personal associated diseases. The compliance to treatment was noted in percentages declared by patient in a survey. The IRIS 2 score of insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk using EURO’98 charts, Framingham Score and SCORE system were calculated. The metabolic syndrome diagnosis was performed using the International Diabetes Federation 2005 criteria. Results: 338 persons were investigated; the majority were males, 192 with normal glycemia. The objectives of the treatment were reached in < 50% cases for each pathological aspect. A negative correlation was found between anthropometric parameters and the compliance to diet and physical exercise, and positive correlation between bodyweight, high cardiovascular risk and medication. The study showed the same pattern of the treatment as in other studies, with a low compliance to medical nutrition therapy and with low percentage in witch the objective for cardio-metabolic pathology are reached. Conclusions: An active and sustained attitude is necessary to promote a healthy lifestyle in the respect of improvement of treatment and prevention of metabolic and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  13. Physical activity, Cardio-Respiratory Fitness, and Metabolic Traits in Rural Mexican Tarahumara

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dirk Lund; Alcala-Sanchez, Imelda; Leal-Berumen, Irene;

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To study the association between physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) and cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF) with key metabolic traits and anthropometric measures in the Tarahumara of Mexico. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in five rural communities in Chihuahua......, Me´xico including 64 adult Tarahumara, mean (SD) age 40.7 (12.9) years. Using a combined accelerometer and heart rate sensor, PAEE was measured over three consecutive days and nights and a sub-maximal step test was carried out in order to (1) calibrate heart rate at the individual level and (2...

  14. Health Outcomes of Information System Use Lifestyles among Adolescents: Videogame Addiction, Sleep Curtailment and Cardio-Metabolic Deficiencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofir Turel

    Full Text Available Obesity is a rising problem among adolescents in modern societies; it results in long-term cardio-metabolic problems. Possible overlooked drivers of obesity and its consequent cardio-metabolic deficits include videogame addiction and the resulting curtailed sleep; both are growing problems among adolescents. The objective of this study is to examine possible associations among these concepts in adolescents, as a means to point to plausible interventions.Data were collected from 94 adolescents who play videogames and are enrolled in outpatient clinics, using surveys, wearable sleep monitors (FitBit, physical exams, and blood tests at three points in time. These data were subjected to structural equation modeling (SEM analyses and bootstrapping-based mediation testing procedures.Videogame addiction among adolescents was negatively associated with sleep duration (β = -0.24. Sleep duration was negatively associated with obesity (β = -0.30, which in turn was associated with elevated blood pressure (β = 0.26, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (β = -0.18, high triglycerides (β = 0.61, and high insulin resistance (β = 0.39. The model explained 36.2% of the variation in sleep duration, 32.7% of the variation in obesity, and between 12.8% and 28.1% of the variation in cardio-metabolic indicators. Post-hoc analyses indicated that curtailed sleep is a possible full mediator of the association between videogame addiction, abdominal obesity and the associated cardio-metabolic deficits.The findings point to possible information systems use lifestyle-health links, which behooves researchers and practitioners to pay closer attention to possible adverse health outcomes of technology-related addictions. Interventions that target problematic video-gaming and sleep should be devised as a possible means for improving adolescents' long-term cardio-metabolic health.

  15. Health Outcomes of Information System Use Lifestyles among Adolescents: Videogame Addiction, Sleep Curtailment and Cardio-Metabolic Deficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Obesity is a rising problem among adolescents in modern societies; it results in long-term cardio-metabolic problems. Possible overlooked drivers of obesity and its consequent cardio-metabolic deficits include videogame addiction and the resulting curtailed sleep; both are growing problems among adolescents. The objective of this study is to examine possible associations among these concepts in adolescents, as a means to point to plausible interventions. Methods Data were collected from 94 adolescents who play videogames and are enrolled in outpatient clinics, using surveys, wearable sleep monitors (FitBit), physical exams, and blood tests at three points in time. These data were subjected to structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses and bootstrapping-based mediation testing procedures. Results Videogame addiction among adolescents was negatively associated with sleep duration (β = -0.24). Sleep duration was negatively associated with obesity (β = -0.30), which in turn was associated with elevated blood pressure (β = 0.26), low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (β = -0.18), high triglycerides (β = 0.61), and high insulin resistance (β = 0.39). The model explained 36.2% of the variation in sleep duration, 32.7% of the variation in obesity, and between 12.8% and 28.1% of the variation in cardio-metabolic indicators. Post-hoc analyses indicated that curtailed sleep is a possible full mediator of the association between videogame addiction, abdominal obesity and the associated cardio-metabolic deficits. Conclusion The findings point to possible information systems use lifestyle-health links, which behooves researchers and practitioners to pay closer attention to possible adverse health outcomes of technology-related addictions. Interventions that target problematic video-gaming and sleep should be devised as a possible means for improving adolescents’ long-term cardio-metabolic health. PMID:27149512

  16. AMP-activated protein kinase: an emerging drug target to regulate imbalances in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism to treat cardio-metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Rai Ajit K; Pinkosky, Stephen L; Filippov, Sergey; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Cramer, Clay T; Newton, Roger S

    2012-12-01

    The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic sensor of energy metabolism at the cellular as well as whole-body level. It is activated by low energy status that triggers a switch from ATP-consuming anabolic pathways to ATP-producing catabolic pathways. AMPK is involved in a wide range of biological activities that normalizes lipid, glucose, and energy imbalances. These pathways are dysregulated in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS), which represents a clustering of major cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes, lipid abnormalities, and energy imbalances. Clearly, there is an unmet medical need to find a molecule to treat alarming number of patients with MetS. AMPK, with multifaceted activities in various tissues, has emerged as an attractive drug target to manage lipid and glucose abnormalities and maintain energy homeostasis. A number of AMPK activators have been tested in preclinical models, but many of them have yet to reach to the clinic. This review focuses on the structure-function and role of AMPK in lipid, carbohydrate, and energy metabolism. The mode of action of AMPK activators, mechanism of anti-inflammatory activities, and preclinical and clinical findings as well as future prospects of AMPK as a drug target in treating cardio-metabolic disease are discussed. PMID:22798688

  17. Saguenay Youth Study: A multi-generational approach to studying virtual trajectories of the brain and cardio-metabolic health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Paus

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of the Saguenay Youth Study (SYS and its parental arm. The overarching goal of this effort is to develop trans-generational models of developmental cascades contributing to the emergence of common chronic disorders, such as depression, addictions, dementia and cardio-metabolic diseases. Over the past 10 years, we have acquired detailed brain and cardio-metabolic phenotypes, and genome-wide genotypes, in 1029 adolescents recruited in a population with a known genetic founder effect. At present, we are extending this dataset to acquire comparable phenotypes and genotypes in the biological parents of these individuals. After providing conceptual background for this work (transactions across time, systems and organs, we describe briefly the tools employed in the adolescent arm of this cohort and highlight some of the initial accomplishments. We then outline in detail the phenotyping protocol used to acquire comparable data in the parents.

  18. Effects of Dietary Protein Source and Quantity during Weight Loss on Appetite, Energy Expenditure, and Cardio-Metabolic Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Jia Li; Armstrong, Cheryl L.H.; Campbell, Wayne W.

    2016-01-01

    Higher protein meals increase satiety and the thermic effect of feeding (TEF) in acute settings, but it is unclear whether these effects remain after a person becomes acclimated to energy restriction or a given protein intake. This study assessed the effects of predominant protein source (omnivorous, beef/pork vs. lacto-ovo vegetarian, soy/legume) and quantity (10%, 20%, or 30% of energy from protein) on appetite, energy expenditure, and cardio-metabolic indices during energy restriction (ER)...

  19. Risk Factors of Non-Communicable Diseases and Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Esmailnasab, N; G. Moradi; A Delaveri

    2012-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is a common nmetabolic ndisorder, which leads to early Cardio Vascular Disease and diabetes type II. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its risk factors in Kurdistan, Iran. Method: The data was extracted from provincial section of Iranian national non-communicable surveillance survey conducted in 2005. The study was a population-based survey with multi-stage cluster sampling method. Adult Treatment Panel-III measures ...

  20. Self-management for obesity and cardio-metabolic fitness: Description and evaluation of the lifestyle modification program of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coates Alison M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sustainable lifestyle modification strategies are needed to address obesity and cardiovascular risk factors. Intensive, individualised programs have been successful, but are limited by time and resources. We have formulated a group-based lifestyle education program based upon national diet and physical activity (PA recommendations to manage obesity and cardio-metabolic risk factors. This article describes the content and delivery of this program, with information on compliance and acceptability. Methods Overweight/obese adults (n = 153 with metabolic syndrome were recruited from the community and randomly allocated to intervention (INT or control (CON. Written copies of Australian national dietary and PA guidelines were provided to all participants. INT took part in a 16-week lifestyle program which provided a curriculum and practical strategies on 1 dietary and PA information based on national guidelines, 2 behavioural self-management tools, 3 food-label reading, supermarkets tour and cooking, 4 exercise sessions, and 5 peer-group support. Compliance was assessed using attendance records and weekly food/PA logs. Participants' motivations, perceived benefits and goals were assessed through facilitated discussion. Program acceptability feedback was collected through structured focus groups. Results Although completion of weekly food/PA records was poor, attendance at information/education sessions (77% overall and exercise participation (66% overall was high, and compared with CON, multiple markers of body composition and cardio-metabolic health improved in INT. Participants reported that the most useful program components included food-label reading, cooking sessions, and learning new and different physical exercises, including home-based options. Participants also reported finding self-management techniques helpful, namely problem solving and short-term goal setting. The use of a group setting and supportive 'peer' leaders

  1. CARDIO-VASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DISEASES OF THE STOMATOGNATHIC SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botez C

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The association between dental and cardio-vascular diseases is essential as both are highly prevalent. Finding a possible causal relation between cardiovascular disease and chronic periodontal pathology, known to cause tooth loss, is therefore essential. The existence of some risk factors, such as smoking, bacterial infections, malnutrition and nutritional deficiencies, may explain the associations observed between cardio-vascular and oral pathologies. In the case of dental diseases, acceleration of atherosclerosis is supported by the role played by infections. The study – performed between 2008-2009 – analyzed 45 cases, selected from the patients hospitalized in the Medical Clinics of the Military Hospital of Ia[i. The patients included in the study suffered from arterial hypertension (HTA, cardiac insufficiency, ischemic cardiopathy, pectoral angina and subacute infectious endocarditis. All were subjected to a stomatological examination, for establishing their dental hygiene, the stomatological diseases they had had and the treatments performed. There are several ways in which infections of the oral cavity lead to cardiovascular disease. These include: transitory bacteriemia; inflammation and vascular lesions; diet and smoking.

  2. How does the impact of a community trial on cardio-metabolic risk factors differ in terms of gender and living area? Findings from the Isfahan healthy heart program

    OpenAIRE

    Nizal Sarrafzadegan; Roya Kelishadi; Mansour Siavash; Gholamhossein Sadri; Hossein Malekafzali; Masoud Pourmoghaddas; Shahin Shirani; Maryam Boshtam; Sedigheh Asgary; Noushin Mohammadifard; Ahmad Bahonar; Babak Eshrati; Farhad Ghamsari

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of gender and living area on cardiovascular risk factors in the context of a comprehensive lifestyle intervention program. Design: Data from independent sample surveys before (2000--2001) and after (2007) a community trial, entitled the Isfahan Healthy Heart Program (IHHP) were used to compare differences in the intervention area (IA) and reference area (RA) by gender and living area. Setting: The interventions targeted the population living in Isfahan and Naja...

  3. Blood pressure-independent effect of candesartan on cardio-ankle vascular index in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Bokuda

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Kanako Bokuda1, Atsuhiro Ichihara1,2, Mariyo Sakoda1, Asako Mito1, Kenichiro Kinouchi1, Hiroshi Itoh11Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Endocrinology and Anti-Aging Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs are known to reduce the cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients. This study was designed to examine the effect of an ARB candesartan on subclinical atherosclerosis assessed by cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI in comparison with calcium channel blockers (CCBs alone in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS. A total of 53 consecutive hypertensive patients with MetS were randomly assigned to the candesartan group, in which candesartan was added on, or the CCBs group, in which CCBs were added on. Clinical and biological parameters were obtained before and after the 12-month treatment period. The primary measure of efficacy was the %change in CAVI. When treated with candesartan, but not CCBs, CAVI significantly decreased from 8.7 to 7.7 by 11%. Blood pressure (BP significantly decreased with both treatments, but the differences between groups were not significant. The changes in other parameters remained unchanged in both the groups. Analysis of covariance found that both the BP reduction and the therapy difference contributed to the decrease in CAVI, but the BP reduction was not involved in the decrease in CAVI caused by the difference in the therapy. Candesartan may be a better antihypertensive drug than CCBs to that subclinical atherosclerosis of patients with MetS.Keywords: albuminuria, ambulatory blood pressure, calcium channel blockers, carotid ­intima-media thickness

  4. How does the impact of a community trial on cardio-metabolic risk factors differ in terms of gender and living area? Findings from the Isfahan healthy heart program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizal Sarrafzadegan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the impact of gender and living area on cardiovascular risk factors in the context of a comprehensive lifestyle intervention program. Design: Data from independent sample surveys before (2000--2001 and after (2007 a community trial, entitled the Isfahan Healthy Heart Program (IHHP were used to compare differences in the intervention area (IA and reference area (RA by gender and living area. Setting: The interventions targeted the population living in Isfahan and Najaf-Abad counties as IA and Arak as RA. Participants: Overall, 12 514 individuals who were more than 19 years of age were studied at baseline, and 9570 were studied in postintervention phase. Interventions: Multiple activities were conducted in connection with each of the four main strategies of healthy nutrition, increasing physical activity, tobacco control, and coping with stress. Main Outcomes: Comparing serum lipids levels, blood pressure, blood glucose and obesity indices changes between IA and RA based on sex and living areas during the study. Results: In IA, while the prevalence of hypertension declined in urban and rural females (P < 0.05. In IA, the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia decreased in both females and males of urban and rural areas except for hypercholesterolemia in rural males (P < 0.01. In RA, the significant changes include both decrease in the hypercholesterolemia among rural males (P < 0.001 and hypertriglyceridemia in urban females (P < 0.01, while hypertriglyceridemia was significantly increased in rural females (P < 0.01. Conclusions: This comprehensive community trial was effective in controlling many risk factors in both sexes in urban and rural areas. These findings also reflect the transitional status of rural population in adopting urban lifestyle behaviors.

  5. Cardio Renal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KV Sahasranam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available For a long time, physicians have recognized that the kidney and the heart are related especially when there is severe dysfunction of either of them. Dysfunction of one of these organs seldom occurs in isolation. Of late the cardio renal syndrome is assuming significance because of its increasing incidence, awareness and complications. There is no definite definition of the cardio renal syndrome. However, an attempted definition states that it is a "decline in renal function in the setting of advanced heart failure". This definition does not cover the whole gamut of the cardio renal syndrome. Cardiac diseases are associated independently with a decrease in renal function and progression of existing renal disease. Chronic Kidney disease (CKD is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events and outcome. This bidirectional nature of cardiac and renal interaction is called Cardio Renal Syndrome (CRS.

  6. Multiple dietary supplements do not affect metabolic and cardio-vascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soare, Andreea; Weiss, Edward P; Holloszy, John O; Fontana, Luigi

    2014-02-01

    Dietary supplements are widely used for health purposes. However, little is known about the metabolic and cardiovascular effects of combinations of popular over-the-counter supplements, each of which has been shown to have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and pro-longevity properties in cell culture or animal studies. This study was a 6-month randomized, single-blind controlled trial, in which 56 non-obese (BMI 21.0-29.9 kg/m(2)) men and women, aged 38 to 55 yr, were assigned to a dietary supplement (SUP) group or control (CON) group, with a 6-month follow-up. The SUP group took 10 dietary supplements each day (100 mg of resveratrol, a complex of 800 mg each of green, black, and white tea extract, 250 mg of pomegranate extract, 650 mg of quercetin, 500 mg of acetyl-l-carnitine, 600 mg of lipoic acid, 900 mg of curcumin, 1 g of sesamin, 1.7 g of cinnamon bark extract, and 1.0 g fish oil). Both the SUP and CON groups took a daily multivitamin/mineral supplement. The main outcome measures were arterial stiffness, endothelial function, biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress, and cardiometabolic risk factors. Twenty-four weeks of daily supplementation with 10 dietary supplements did not affect arterial stiffness or endothelial function in nonobese individuals. These compounds also did not alter body fat measured by DEXA, blood pressure, plasma lipids, glucose, insulin, IGF-1, and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress. In summary, supplementation with a combination of popular dietary supplements has no cardiovascular or metabolic effects in non-obese relatively healthy individuals. PMID:24659610

  7. Vitamin D and cardio-metabolic health in the elderly : The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Vitezova (Anna)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Chapter 1 of this thesis introduces the reader to the background of the main topic – vitamin D, its metabolism and physiological effects. Since its discovery vitamin D has been recognized as an important factor in calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. Recently, there h

  8. 2 minute non-invasive screening for cardio-vascular diseases: relative limitation of C-Reactive Protein compared with more sensitive L-Homocystine as cardio-vascular risk factors; safe and effective treatment using the selective drug uptake enhancement method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu

    2003-01-01

    Contrary to the present practice of measurement of cardio-vascular risk factors or inflammatory risk factors such as C-Reactive Protein (CRP) from a blood sample from the vein of one arm, by using the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test Resonance Phenomena between 2 identical substances, one can non-invasively detect the approximate location on the body of abnormally increased risk factors in just 2 minutes, by detecting the resonance with L-Homocystine, even when blood CRP failed to detect any abnormality. This is performed by projecting a 0.5 to approximately 5mW red spectral laser beam with 560-670nm wavelength, to at least 6 standard parts of the body, when one of the control risk markers placed next to the laser beam also exists in the part of the body tested. It is generally believed that CRP is increased in the presence of acute myocardial infarct, chronic rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis, metabolic abnormalities such as often detected in diabetes, inflammation and underlying infection of the cardio-vascular system, and in some cancers. However, in our study, when the clinical significance of CRP and L-Homocystine was compared, we found that CRP often was not increased when there was extensive infection of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis as well as asymptomatic infection by Cytomegalovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus Type I, Human Herpes Virus Type 6, Borrelia Burgdorferi, or Chlamydia Trachomatis in the heart (and other parts of the body), particularly when there was liver cell dysfunction such as an increase in ALT. In contrast, L-Homocystine was often increased in the presence of localized infections of the heart and other parts of the body. For screening of Cardio-Vascular diseases by this method, 0.5mg of L-Homocystine as a control marker was found to be the most sensitive and reliable, compared with most effective amount of CRP, 0.5ng, for detecting early Cardio-Vascular problems due to various localized infections. About 0.5ng of cardiac Troponin T and cardiac

  9. Advanced cardiac chemical exchange saturation transfer (cardioCEST) MRI for in vivo cell tracking and metabolic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumphrey, Ashley; Yang, Zhengshi; Ye, Shaojing; Powell, David K.; Thalman, Scott; Watt, David S.; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Unrine, Jason; Thompson, Katherine; Fornwalt, Brandon; Ferrauto, Giuseppe; Vandsburger, Moriel

    2016-01-01

    An improved pre-clinical cardiac chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) pulse sequence (cardioCEST) was used to selectively visualize paramagnetic CEST (paraCEST)-labeled cells following intramyocardial implantation. In addition, cardioCEST was used to examine the effect of diet-induced obesity upon myocardial creatine CEST contrast. CEST pulse sequences were designed from standard turbo-spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences, and a cardiorespiratory-gated steady-state cine gradient-echo sequence. In vitro validation studies performed in phantoms composed of 20mM Eu-HPDO3A, 20mM Yb-HPDO3A, or saline demonstrated similar CEST contrast by spin-echo and gradient-echo pulse sequences. Skeletal myoblast cells (C2C12) were labeled with either Eu-HPDO3A or saline using a hypotonic swelling procedure and implanted into the myocardium of C57B6/J mice. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry confirmed cellular levels of Eu of 2.1 × 10−3 ng/cell in Eu-HPDO3A-labeled cells and 2.3 × 10−5 ng/cell in saline-labeled cells. In vivo cardioCEST imaging of labeled cells at ±15ppm was performed 24 h after implantation and revealed significantly elevated asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio values in regions of Eu-HPDO3A-labeled cells when compared with surrounding myocardium or saline-labeled cells. We further utilized the cardioCEST pulse sequence to examine changes in myocardial creatine in response to diet-induced obesity by acquiring pairs of cardioCEST images at ±1.8 ppm. While ventricular geometry and function were unchanged between mice fed either a high-fat diet or a corresponding control low-fat diet for 14 weeks, myocardial creatine CEST contrast was significantly reduced in mice fed the high-fat diet. The selective visualization of paraCEST-labeled cells using cardioCEST imaging can enable investigation of cell fate processes in cardioregenerative medicine, or multiplex imaging of cell survival with imaging of cardiac structure and function and

  10. Current imaging methods for evaluation of metabolic risk in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: The incidence of cardio - metabolic diseases increase in an increasingly early age is one of the challenges of the 21st century. This phenomenon is attributed largely of the obesity epidemic, it is particularly significant when the obesity occurs in childhood - obese children have a greater probability of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes earlier. What you will learn: The significance of the obesity epidemic in childhood and metabolic risk increase; The compartment of adipose tissue and their role in maintaining metabolic balance and its breach; The importance of imaging methods in recent studies related to obesity and cardio - metabolic diseases in children; New imaging methods for proofing of pathological fat accumulation in other tissues and organs and their role in the study of metabolic disorders. Discussion: Various studies of pathology at obesity prove that obesity indicators are not sufficient for individualized assessment of cardio - metabolic risk. Only by imaging methods, information about the accumulated fat in metabolically more active visceral and ectopic adipose tissue depots has been obtained. The most common imaging techniques for analysis of body composition and adiposity in children - dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), ultrasound , computed tomography ( CT) scan , magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) will be presented. Conclusion: The imaging methods are widely used in the obesity and metabolic risk studies, as the trend is to be applied increasingly into practice. The results from Imaging studies affect not only to therapeutic approach, but also to the motivation of parents and patients to comply prescribed measures

  11. Metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M Alshehri

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The constellation of dyslipidemia (hypertriglyceridemia and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, impaired glucose tolerance, and central obesity is now classified as metabolic syndrome, also called syndrome X. In the past few years, several expert groups have attempted to set forth simple diagnostic criteria for use in clinical practice to identify patients who manifest the multiple components of the metabolic syndrome. These criteria have varied somewhat in specific elements, but in general, they include a combination of multiple and metabolic risk factors. The most widely recognized of the metabolic risk factors are atherogenic dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and elevated plasma glucose. Individuals with these characteristics, commonly manifest a prothrombotic state as well as and a proinflammatory state. Atherogenic dyslipidemia consists of an aggregation of lipoprotein abnormalities including elevated serum triglyceride and apolipoprotein B (apoB, increased small LDL particles, and a reduced level of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C. The metabolic syndrome is often referred to as if it were a discrete entity with a single cause. Available data suggest that it truly is a syndrome, ie, a grouping of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD risk factors, that probably has more than one cause. Regardless of cause, the syndrome identifies individuals at an elevated risk for ASCVD. The magnitude of the increased risk can vary according to the components of the syndrome present as well as the other, non-metabolic syndrome risk factors in a particular person.

  12. Antioxidant and cardio protective effect of palm oil leaves extract (standardized ethanolic fraction) in rats' model of saturated fats induced metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibraheem, Zaid O; Satar, Munnavar; Abdullah, Nor A; Rathore, Hassaan; Tan, Young Chia; Uldin, Faiz; Basri, Rusliza; Abdullah, Mohammad H; John, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Recently, it is suggested to use POLE (palm oil leaf extract) as a nutraceutical health product in food industry due to its newly discovered content of polyphenols and antioxidant vitamins. In the experiment, the antioxidant and anti-lipid-peroxidation activities of the extract were confirmed using; DPPH (1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazil) radical scavenging activity, ferric ion induced lipid peroxidation inhibition, reducing power and hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity assays. The cardio-protective activity was studied in vivo using a model of metabolic syndrome induced by high fat diet. Lipid profile, obesity indices, renal tubular handling of water and electrolytes, blood pressure and arterial stiffness were measured at the end of the treatment period. Sprague Dawley rats weighing 150-200 g were divided into six groups, viz; group C; was treated as a negative control and fed with standard rodents chow, group H; was treated as a positive control and fed with an experimental diet enriched with saturated free fatty acids for 8 weeks, groups HP0.5, HP1 and HP2 which were fed with 0.5,1 and 2 g/kg (body weight) /day of POLE orally during the last 24 days of the high fat diet feeding period and group P; fed with highest dose of POLE. Results revealed that POLE possesses a cardio-protective effect which is ascribed to its content of polyphenols. PMID:24374430

  13. Validation of visualized transgenic zebrafish as a high throughput model to assay bradycardia related cardio toxicity risk candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Dingsheng; Liu, Aiming; Chen, Feng; Yang, Julin; Dai, Renke

    2012-10-01

    Drug-induced QT prolongation usually leads to torsade de pointes (TdP), thus for drugs in the early phase of development this risk should be evaluated. In the present study, we demonstrated a visualized transgenic zebrafish as an in vivo high-throughput model to assay the risk of drug-induced QT prolongation. Zebrafish larvae 48 h post-fertilization expressing green fluorescent protein in myocardium were incubated with compounds reported to induce QT prolongation or block the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) K⁺ current. The compounds sotalol, indapaminde, erythromycin, ofoxacin, levofloxacin, sparfloxacin and roxithromycin were additionally administrated by microinjection into the larvae yolk sac. The ventricle heart rate was recorded using the automatic monitoring system after incubation or microinjection. As a result, 14 out of 16 compounds inducing dog QT prolongation caused bradycardia in zebrafish. A similar result was observed with 21 out of 26 compounds which block hERG current. Among the 30 compounds which induced human QT prolongation, 25 caused bradycardia in this model. Thus, the risk of compounds causing bradycardia in this transgenic zebrafish correlated with that causing QT prolongation and hERG K⁺ current blockage in established models. The tendency that high logP values lead to high risk of QT prolongation in this model was indicated, and non-sensitivity of this model to antibacterial agents was revealed. These data suggest application of this transgenic zebrafish as a high-throughput model to screen QT prolongation-related cardio toxicity of the drug candidates. PMID:22744888

  14. Cardio-vascular risk in patients with non-valvular persisting atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalashnykova O.S.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Results of cardiovascular risk factors assessment of 133 patients with persisting non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF (main group being admitted for electrical cardioversion performance and comparison of these risk factors with cardiovascular risk profile of 6535 AF patients from Cohort 1 of the international GARFIELD registry (group of comparison are revealed in the article. Patients in the main group were older than 65 years (33,8%, in European population of GARFIELD registry the majority of patients older than 65 years – 73,8%; p<0,001. There were more women in European population of GARFIELD registry in comparison with our patients (44,8% vs 28,6%; р<0,001. With regard to co-morbidity characteristics, patients in our study had higher BMI (31,9 ± 5,7 vs 28,5 ± 5,2; p<0,001, hypercholesterolaemia (72,9% vs 46,1%; p<0,001, moderate renal dysfunction (GFR 30-59 mL/min (36,8% vs 12,1%; p<0,001 and alcohol abuse (6,8% vs 1,1%. Number of patients with the risk of thromboembolism complications (TEC ≥ 2 score by CHA2DS2-VASc was higher in European population of GARFIELD registry (86,0% vs 68,4%, <0,001, that is explained by prevalence of elderly patients in this group. The use of oral anticoagulants for thromboembolism prevention in high risk patients was low in both groups (approximately 70,0%, a large majority of patients in both groups were not treated effectively (64,1% vs. 55%, p = 0,148. Prevalence of TEC in case-history was similar in both groups (11,4% vs 15,9%, p = 0,141. So in our study patients with persistent non-valvular AF are characterized by higher cardiovascular risk in younger age in comparison with European population of AF patients from GARFIELD registry. For identification of “truly low-risk” patients with TEC, further improvement of risk stratification is required.

  15. Prevention of cardiovascular disease guided by total risk estimations - challenges and opportunities for practical implementation: highlights of a CardioVascular Clinical Trialists (CVCT) Workshop of the ESC Working Group on CardioVascular Pharmacology and Drug Therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zannad, Faiez

    2011-11-03

    This paper presents a summary of the potential practical and economic barriers to implementation of primary prevention of cardiovascular disease guided by total cardiovascular risk estimations in the general population. It also reviews various possible solutions to overcome these barriers. The report is based on discussion among experts in the area at a special CardioVascular Clinical Trialists workshop organized by the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Drug Therapy that took place in September 2009. It includes a review of the evidence in favour of the \\'treat-to-target\\' paradigm, as well as potential difficulties with this approach, including the multiple pathological processes present in high-risk patients that may not be adequately addressed by this strategy. The risk-guided therapy approach requires careful definitions of cardiovascular risk and consideration of clinical endpoints as well as the differences between trial and \\'real-world\\' populations. Cost-effectiveness presents another issue in scenarios of finite healthcare resources, as does the difficulty of documenting guideline uptake and effectiveness in the primary care setting, where early modification of risk factors may be more beneficial than later attempts to manage established disease. The key to guideline implementation is to improve the quality of risk assessment and demonstrate the association between risk factors, intervention, and reduced event rates. In the future, this may be made possible by means of automated data entry and various other measures. In conclusion, opportunities exist to increase guideline implementation in the primary care setting, with potential benefits for both the general population and healthcare resources.

  16. Role of aliskiren in cardio-renal protection and use in hypertensives with multiple risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Pimenta

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Eduardo Pimenta1, Suzanne Oparil21Endocrine Hypertension Research Centre and Clinical Centre of Research Excellence in Cardiovascular Disease and Metabolic Disorders, University of Queensland School of Medicine, Greenslopes Princess Alexandra Hospitals, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 2Vascular Biology and Hypertension Program, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: The renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS is a key mediator of blood pressure (BP and volume regulation in both normotensive and hypertensive persons. Stimulation of RAAS also contributes to hypertension-related target organ damage. The renin–angiotensinogen reaction is the first and rate-limiting step in the generation of angiotensin II (Ang II and has been a target of antihypertensive drug development for decades. Aliskiren is the first in a new class of orally effective direct renin inhibitors (DRIs and is approved for the treatment of hypertension in humans. It effectively reduces BP in the general population of hypertensive patients and has a tolerability and safety profile similar to placebo. Aliskiren has favorable effects on vascular inflammation and remodeling, on neurohumoral mediators of various forms of cardiovascular disease, including heart failure, and on proteinuria in diabetic patients. Additional outcome trials are needed to establish the role of this novel class of antihypertensive medication in preventing cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality.Keywords: hypertension, renin inhibitors, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system

  17. RANTES/CCL5 and risk for coronary events: results from the MONICA/KORA Augsburg case-cohort, Athero-Express and CARDIoGRAM studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Herder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chemokine RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted/CCL5 is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in mice, whereas less is known in humans. We hypothesised that its relevance for atherosclerosis should be reflected by associations between CCL5 gene variants, RANTES serum concentrations and protein levels in atherosclerotic plaques and risk for coronary events. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a case-cohort study within the population-based MONICA/KORA Augsburg studies. Baseline RANTES serum levels were measured in 363 individuals with incident coronary events and 1,908 non-cases (mean follow-up: 10.2±4.8 years. Cox proportional hazard models adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, metabolic factors and lifestyle factors revealed no significant association between RANTES and incident coronary events (HR [95% CI] for increasing RANTES tertiles 1.0, 1.03 [0.75-1.42] and 1.11 [0.81-1.54]. None of six CCL5 single nucleotide polymorphisms and no common haplotype showed significant associations with coronary events. Also in the CARDIoGRAM study (>22,000 cases, >60,000 controls, none of these CCL5 SNPs was significantly associated with coronary artery disease. In the prospective Athero-Express biobank study, RANTES plaque levels were measured in 606 atherosclerotic lesions from patients who underwent carotid endarterectomy. RANTES content in atherosclerotic plaques was positively associated with macrophage infiltration and inversely associated with plaque calcification. However, there was no significant association between RANTES content in plaques and risk for coronary events (mean follow-up 2.8±0.8 years. CONCLUSIONS: High RANTES plaque levels were associated with an unstable plaque phenotype. However, the absence of associations between (i RANTES serum levels, (ii CCL5 genotypes and (iii RANTES content in carotid plaques and either coronary artery disease or incident coronary events in

  18. Classification and Risk-factor Analysis of Postoperative Cardio-pulmonary 
Complications after Lobectomy in Patients with Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutian LAI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective There are incresing lung cancer patients detected and diagnosed at the intermediate stage when the pre-malignant or early lesions are amenable to resection and cure, owing to the progress of medical technology, the renewal of detection methods, the popularity of medical screening and the improvement of social health consciousness. The aim of this study is to investigate the risk factors of the occurrence of postoperative cardio-pulmonary complications in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients, based on routine laboratory tests, basic characteristics, and intraoperative variables in hospital. Methods The 421 patients after lobectomy in patients with stage I NSCLC at the West China Hospital of Sichuan University from January 2012 to December 2013 were included into the study and stratified into complication group and non-complication group, according to whether to occur postoperative cardio-pulmonary complications after lobectomy in 30 days. Results Of them, 64 (15.2% patients were finally identified and selected into the complication group, compared with 357 (84.8% in non-complication group: pneumonia (8.8%, 37/421 was the primary complication, and other main complications included atelectasis (5.9%, 25/421, pleural effusion (≥middle (5.0%, 21/421, persistent air leak (3.6%, 15/421; The operation time (P=0.007, amount of blood loss (P=0.034, preoperative chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (P=0.027, white blood cell (WBC count (P<0.001, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR (P<0.001 were significantly different between the two groups. According to the binary logistics regression analysis, preoperative COPD (OR=0.031, 95%CI: 0.012-0.078, P<0.001 and WBC count (OR=1.451, 95%CI: 1.212-1.736, P<0.001 were independent risk factors for postoperative cardio-pulmonary complications. Conclusion Among an array of clinical variables in hospital, operation time, preoperative white blood cell count, preoperative COPD

  19. Primary hyperparathyroidism and metabolic risk factors, impact of parathyroidectomy and vitamin D supplementation, and results of a randomized double-blind study

    OpenAIRE

    Norenstedt, Sophie; Pernow, Ylva; Brismar, Kerstin; Sääf, Maria; Ekip, Ayla; Granath, Fredrik; Zedenius, Jan; Nilsson, Inga-Lena

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitamin D insufficiency may increase the risk for cardio metabolic disturbances in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). Objective To analyze the vitamin D status and indices of the metabolic syndrome in PHPT patients and the effect of vitamin D supplementation after parathyroid adenomectomy (PTX). Design and methods Double-blinded, randomized clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00982722) performed at Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden, April 2008 to N...

  20. Effects of moxonidine on sympathetic nervous system activity: An update on metabolism, cardio, and other target-organ protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni F Karlafti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Moxonidine is the newest, second-generation, centrally acting antihypertensive agent. It has selective agonist activity at imidazoline I1 receptors and less adverse effects than the other centrally acting drugs. This fact authorizes the frequent use of moxonidine in clinical practice, as monotherapy or in combination with other antihypertensive agents. Also, moxonidine has beneficial effects in obese and metabolic syndrome and in target-organs, such as heart and kidneys.

  1. Cardio-metabolic health risks in indigenous populations of Southeast Asia and the influence of urbanization

    OpenAIRE

    Phipps, Maude E.; Chan, Kevin KL; Naidu, Rakesh; Mohamad, Nazaimoon W; Hoh, Boon-Peng; Quek, Kia-Fatt; Ahmad, Badariah; Harnida, Siti MI; Zain, Anuar ZM; Kadir, Khalid A

    2015-01-01

    Background South East Asia (SEA) is home to over 30 tribes of indigenous population groups who are currently facing rapid socio-economic change. Epidemiological transition and increased prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCD) has occured. In Peninsular Malaysia, the Orang Asli (OA) indigenous people comprise 0 · 6% (150,000) of the population and live in various settlements. OA comprise three distinct large tribes with smaller sub-tribes. The three large tribes include Proto-Malay (sub-...

  2. Blood pressure-independent effect of candesartan on cardio-ankle vascular index in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bokuda,

    2010-01-01

    Kanako Bokuda1, Atsuhiro Ichihara1,2, Mariyo Sakoda1, Asako Mito1, Kenichiro Kinouchi1, Hiroshi Itoh11Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Endocrinology and Anti-Aging Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are known to reduce the cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients. This study was designed to examine the effect of an ARB candesartan on subclinical atheroscle...

  3. Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Obese Adolescent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Manal; Nassef, Yasser E.; Shady, Mones Abu; Aziz, Ali Abdel; Malt, Heba A. El

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood and adolescent obesity is associated with insulin resistance, abnormal glucose metabolism, hypertension, dyslipidemia, inflammation, liver disease, and compromised vascular function. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factor abnormalities and metabolic syndrome in a sample of obese adolescent as prevalence data might be helpful in improving engagement with obesity treatment in future. The high blood lipid levels and obesity are the main risk factors for cardio vascular diseases. Atherosclerotic process begins in childhood. AIM: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between obesity in adolescent and their blood lipids levels and blood glucose level. METHODS: This study was conducted with 100 adolescents of both gender age 12-17 years and body mass index (BMI) greater than 95th percentiles and 100 normal adolescents as control group. The blood samples were collected from all adolescents after overnight fasting (10 hours) to analyze blood lipids (Total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein) and hematological profile (Hemoglobin, platelets and red blood cell, C reactive protein and fasting blood glucose. RESULTS: There were statistical difference between the two groups for red blood cells (P<0.001), Hemoglobin (P < 0.001) and platelets (P = 0.002), CRP (P = 0.02). Positive correlation was found between the two groups as regards total cholesterol (P = 0.0001), P value was positive for HDL (P = 0.005 and Atherogenic index P value was positive (P = 0.002). Positive correlation was found between the two group as regards fasting blood glucose (P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Saturated fat was associated with elevated lipid levels in obese children. These results reinforce the importance of healthy dietary habits since child-hood in order to reduce the risks of cardiovascular diseases in adulthood.

  4. Dietary Interventions and Changes in Cardio-Metabolic Parameters in Metabolically Healthy Obese Subjects: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Stelmach-Mardas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effect of diet on changes in parameters describing the body size phenotype of metabolically healthy obese subjects. The databases Medline, Scopus, Web of Knowledge and Embase were searched for clinical studies carried out between 1958 and June 2016 that reported the effect of dietary intervention on BMI, blood pressure, concentration of fasting triglyceride (TG, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, fasting glucose level, the homoeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and high sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (hsCRP in metabolically healthy, obese subjects. Twelve clinical studies met inclusion criteria. The combined analyzed population consists of 1827 subjects aged 34.4 to 61.1 with a BMI > 30 kg/m2. Time of intervention ranged from eight to 104 weeks. The baseline characteristics related to lipid profile were more favorable for metabolically healthy obese than for metabolically unhealthy obese. The meta-analyses revealed a significant associations between restricted energy diet and BMI (95% confidence interval (CI: −0.88, −0.19, blood pressure (systolic blood pressure (SBP: −4.73 mmHg; 95% CI: −7.12, −2.33; and diastolic blood pressure (DBP: −2.75 mmHg; 95% CI: −4.30, −1.21 and TG (−0.11 mmol/l; 95% CI: −0.16, −0.06. Changes in fasting glucose, HOMA-IR and hsCRP did not show significant changes. Sufficient evidence was not found to support the use of specific diets in metabolically healthy obese subjects. This analysis suggests that the effect of caloric restriction exerts its effects through a reduction in BMI, blood pressure and triglycerides in metabolically healthy obese (MHO patients.

  5. Lipoprotein metabolism indicators improve cardiovascular risk prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Cardiovascular disease risk increases when lipoprotein metabolism is dysfunctional. We have developed a computational model able to derive indicators of lipoprotein production, lipolysis, and uptake processes from a single lipoprotein profile measurement. This is the first study to inves...

  6. The coexistence of carotid and lower extremity atherosclerosis further increases cardio-cerebrovascular risk in type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Mei-Fang; Zhao, Cui-Chun; Li, Ting-ting; Tu, Yin-Fang; Lu, Jun-Xi; Zhang, Rong; Chen, Ming-Yun; Bao, Yu-Qian; Li, Lian-Xi; Jia, Wei-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Both carotid and lower limb atherosclerosis are associated with increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risks. However, it is still unclear whether the concomitant presence of carotid and lower extremity atherosclerosis further increases the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risks. Therefore, our aim is to investigate whether the coexistence of carotid and lower extremity atherosclerosis was associated with higher cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risks in patients with type...

  7. Breakfast Frequency and Development of Metabolic Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Odegaard, Andrew O; Jacobs, David R.; Steffen, Lyn M.; Horn, Linda Van; Ludwig, David S.; Pereira, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The relation of breakfast intake frequency to metabolic health is not well studied. The aim of this study was to examine breakfast intake frequency with incidence of metabolic conditions. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We performed an analysis of 3,598 participants from the community-based Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study who were free of diabetes in the year 7 examination when breakfast and dietary habits were assessed (1992–1993) and participated in at ...

  8. European Practice Assessment of Cardiovascular risk management (EPA Cardio: protocol of an international observational study in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Lieshout Jan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite important improvements in available prevention and treatment, cardiovascular diseases (CVD remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Not all high-risk patients and patients with CVD have healthy lifestyles and receive the best possible healthcare. Internationally comparative data are needed to compare cardiovascular risk management in different countries, and to examine the impact of improvement programs and others factors. Objectives This study aims to provide internationally comparative data on cardiovascular risk management provided in primary care and on health-related lifestyles of patients in Europe. The study will also explore the views of doctors and patients on innovative preventive services for CVDs. Design and methods An observational cross-sectional study is planned. In 10 European countries, stratified samples of 36 practices per country will be recruited. In each practice, three samples of 15 patients each will be sampled: patients with coronary heart disease, patients at high risk for CVD, and healthy adult patients. The quality of cardiovascular risk management has been specified in terms of 44 performance indicators that resulted from an international Delphi-procedure with general practitioners. Most indicators are based on medical records, and some on a structured interview with a contact person of the practice. Lifestyle (smoking, physical exercise, diet will be measured with previously validated questionnaires that are completed by patients. Additional measures include practice characteristics and exposure to programs to improve cardiovascular care.

  9. An abdominal aortic calcification as a RISK FACTOR FOR cardio -cerebral events in patients with peripheral arterial

    OpenAIRE

    V. A. Zelinskiy; M. V. Melnikov; A. Ye. Barsukov; Andreev, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The patients with abdominal aortic calcification have a high risk of cardiocerebral events, but the pathways of them have not been reported so far. The goal of our study was to assess the structure and function of myocardium and to determine the morphological features of carotid artery atherosclerosis in patients with abdominal aortic calcification.Materials and methods. A total of 167 executive patients with peripheral arterial disease were enrolled in study. The study group incl...

  10. CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN CHILDREN WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS

    OpenAIRE

    Z ABDEYASDAN; N. Sadeghi; M HASANPOOR; M Maaroofi; A HASAN ZADEH

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes melliuts is a chronic, metabolic disease that involves the macro and micro vascular complications and one of its maer ascular cowplications is the cardio vascular disease, as ,the risk of cardiovascular disease is 2-4 folds in diabetic patients in comparison with non diabetic individuals. The researches have demonstrated that the risk factors of the cardio vascular disease are formed at childhood. Therefore the preventive measures must begin from early childhood. S...

  11. An abdominal aortic calcification as a RISK FACTOR FOR cardio -cerebral events in patients with peripheral arterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Zelinskiy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. The patients with abdominal aortic calcification have a high risk of cardiocerebral events, but the pathways of them have not been reported so far. The goal of our study was to assess the structure and function of myocardium and to determine the morphological features of carotid artery atherosclerosis in patients with abdominal aortic calcification.Materials and methods. A total of 167 executive patients with peripheral arterial disease were enrolled in study. The study group included 85 patients with abdominal aortic calcification (men – 95.3 %; age median was – 66.6 ± 12. Control group included 82 patients without objective signs of abdominal aortic calcification. Abdominal aortic calcification was detected by CT imaging. All patients have undergone echocardiography and duplex scanning of carotid arteries.Results. Prevalence and severity of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease were statistically significant higher in patients with abdominal aortic calcification (91.7, 65.8 % vs. 67, 37.3 % (р < 0.01. We have found statistically significant differences between groupsin heart structure and function. A high left ventricular wall thickness (р < 0.01, left atrium dilation (р < 0.01 and enhanced of left ventricular mass (р < 0.05, ejection fraction reduction (р < 0.05 and more common diastolic dysfunction (р < 0.05 were determined inpatients with abdominal aortic calcification. An intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery was significantly higher in study group patients (1.38 ± 0.07 mm vs. 1.14 ± 0.06 mm (р < 0.001.Conclusion. Our findings suggested that abdominal aortic calcification is main reason of hypertrophy and dilation in the left heart due to enhanced peripheral resistance. Hypertrophy and dilation in the left heart is provided a high risk of cardiovascular events in patients withabdominal aortic calcification.

  12. Menopause versus aging: The predictor of obesity and metabolic aberrations among menopausal women of Karnataka, South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Dasgupta

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Menopausal transition brings about anomalies in total body composition characterized by an increased body fat mass and central adiposity. This creates a compatible atmosphere for abnormal metabolism and aggravated cardio metabolic risk factors. Thus, menopausal status and associated obesity is the major predictor of metabolic aberrations over age in menopausal women.

  13. Acro-cardio-facial syndrome

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    Dallapiccola Bruno

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acro-cardio-facial syndrome (ACFS is a rare genetic disorder characterized by split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHFM, facial anomalies, cleft lip/palate, congenital heart defect (CHD, genital anomalies, and mental retardation. Up to now, 9 patients have been described, and most of the reported cases were not surviving the first days or months of age. The spectrum of defects occurring in ACFS is wide, and both interindividual variability and clinical differences among sibs have been reported. The diagnosis is based on clinical criteria, since the genetic mechanism underlying ACFS is still unknown. The differential diagnosis includes other disorders with ectrodactyly, and clefting conditions associated with genital anomalies and heart defects. An autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance has been suggested, based on parental consanguinity and disease's recurrence in sibs in some families. The more appropriate recurrence risk of transmitting the disease for the parents of an affected child seems to be up to one in four. Management of affected patients includes treatment of cardiac, respiratory, and feeding problems by neonatal pediatricians and other specialists. Prognosis of ACFS is poor.

  14. Uric acid: A Danger Signal from the RNA World that may have a role in the Epidemic of Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome and CardioRenal Disease: Evolutionary Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Richard J Johnson; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Gaucher, Eric A.

    2011-01-01

    All humans are uricase knockouts; we lost the uricase gene due to a mutation that occurred in the mid Miocene approximately 15 million years ago. The consequence of being a uricase knockout is that we have higher serum uric acid levels that are less regulatable and can be readily influenced by diet. This increases our risk for gout and kidney stones, but there is also increasing evidence that uric acid increases our risk for hypertension, kidney disease, obesity and diabetes. This raises the ...

  15. Pharmacological foundations of cardio-oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minotti, Giorgio; Salvatorelli, Emanuela; Menna, Pierantonio

    2010-07-01

    Anthracyclines and many other antitumor drugs induce cardiotoxicity that occurs "on treatment" or long after completing chemotherapy. Dose reductions limit the incidence of early cardiac events but not that of delayed sequelae, possibly indicating that any dose level of antitumor drugs would prime the heart to damage from sequential stressors. Drugs targeted at tumor-specific moieties raised hope for improving the cardiovascular safety of antitumor therapies; unfortunately, however, many such drugs proved unable to spare the heart, aggravated cardiotoxicity induced by anthracyclines, or were safe in selected patients of clinical trials but not in the general population. Cardio-oncology is the discipline aimed at monitoring the cardiovascular safety of antitumor therapies. Although popularly perceived as a clinical discipline that brings oncologists and cardiologists working together, cardio-oncology is in fact a pharmacology-oriented translational discipline. The cardiovascular performance of survivors of cancer will only improve if clinicians joined pharmacologists in the search for new predictive models of cardiotoxicity or mechanistic approaches to explain how a given drug might switch from causing systolic failure to inducing ischemia. The lifetime risk of cardiotoxicity from antitumor drugs needs to be reconciled with the identification of long-lasting pharmacological signatures that overlap with comorbidities. Research on targeted drugs should be reshaped to appreciate that the terminal ballistics of new "magic bullets" might involve cardiomyocytes as innocent bystanders. Finally, the concepts of prevention and treatment need to be tailored to the notion that late-onset cardiotoxicity builds on early asymptomatic cardiotoxicity. The heart of cardio-oncology rests with such pharmacological foundations. PMID:20335321

  16. Gamma cardio 82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New trends in nuclear cardiology are briefly presented supported by a large bibliography. The following topics are reviewed: new tracers of myocardial perfusion and metabolism; quantitative analysis of cardiac function; nuclear stethoscope; gamma emission tomography; diagnostic value of cardiac dynamic tests (at rest and during exercise), pharmacological tests; new clinical applications of cardiovascular nuclear medicine

  17. Metabolic risk-factor clustering estimation in children: to draw a line across pediatric metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brambilla, P; Lissau, I; Flodmark, C-E;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The diagnostic criteria of the metabolic syndrome (MS) have been applied in studies of obese adults to estimate the metabolic risk-associated with obesity, even though no general consensus exists concerning its definition and clinical value. We reviewed the current literature on the MS...... and adolescents, analyzing the scientific evidence needed to detect a clustering of cardiovascular risk-factors. Finally, we propose a new methodological approach for estimating metabolic risk-factor clustering in children and adolescents. RESULTS: Major concerns were the lack of information on the background...... to quantify metabolic risk-factor clustering, collected in a multilevel Metabolic Individual Risk-factor And CLustering Estimation (MIRACLE) approach, and thus avoiding the use of the current MS term in children. CONCLUSION: Pediatricians should consider a novel and specific approach to assessing children...

  18. Acro-cardio-facial syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Dallapiccola Bruno; Digilio Maria

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Acro-cardio-facial syndrome (ACFS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHFM), facial anomalies, cleft lip/palate, congenital heart defect (CHD), genital anomalies, and mental retardation. Up to now, 9 patients have been described, and most of the reported cases were not surviving the first days or months of age. The spectrum of defects occurring in ACFS is wide, and both interindividual variability and clinical differences among sibs have b...

  19. Association between Appendicular Fat Mass and Metabolic Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Si Young; Kwon, Kil Young; Kim, Jung Hwan; Choi, Hyung Hwa; Han, Kun Hee; Han, Jee Hye

    2014-01-01

    Background Different regional fat depots have different effects on lipid and glucose metabolism. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between body fat distribution as measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and metabolic risk factors and to disclose whether there is any difference between groups with and without metabolic syndrome (MS). Methods A total of 292 participants (98 men, 194 women) over 19 years old underwent whole-body DEXA to evaluate body compositi...

  20. Current Approaches in Cardio-Renal Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Belguzar Kara

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, burden of cardiac and kidney diseases throughout the world is increasing. Studies show that the coexistence of both diseases contributes to increased mortality, morbidity, and healthcare costs. One of the major challenges facing health systems today is to prevent cardio-renal syndrome and provide quality health services to individuals with cardio-renal syndrome. The and #8220;cardio-renal syndrome and #8221; is a general term to describe different clinical conditions in whic...

  1. Correlation between B type natriuretic peptide and metabolic risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Wen-hua; Chen, Li-Ying; Dai, Hong-Lei; CHEN, JIAN-HUA; Yan CHEN; Fang, Li-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It has been shown that B type natriuretic peptide (BNP) level can indicate cardiovascular disease. However, the association between BNP and metabolic risk factors is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and metabolic risk factors. Material and methods A total of 11,508 subjects were selected from those who underwent health examinations in our hospital. NT-proBNP, waist circumference, blood ...

  2. Cardio-Surgery Operation from the Patient´s Point of View

    OpenAIRE

    Chmelíková, Petra

    2010-01-01

    With the hectic time of today, the number of people with cardio-vascular disorder increases continuously. A whole range of factors are the cause of this disorder. Among others, it is stress which people are mostly exposed to, due to the modern bustling style of life. Further, it is improper food, obesity, diabetes mellitus, smoking and many other reasons increasing the risk of this illness. In connection with cardio {--} vascular disorder, the patients may be confronted with the decision, whe...

  3. Metabolic state alters economic decision making under risk in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mkael Symmonds

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animals' attitudes to risk are profoundly influenced by metabolic state (hunger and baseline energy stores. Specifically, animals often express a preference for risky (more variable food sources when below a metabolic reference point (hungry, and safe (less variable food sources when sated. Circulating hormones report the status of energy reserves and acute nutrient intake to widespread targets in the central nervous system that regulate feeding behaviour, including brain regions strongly implicated in risk and reward based decision-making in humans. Despite this, physiological influences per se have not been considered previously to influence economic decisions in humans. We hypothesised that baseline metabolic reserves and alterations in metabolic state would systematically modulate decision-making and financial risk-taking in humans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a controlled feeding manipulation and assayed decision-making preferences across different metabolic states following a meal. To elicit risk-preference, we presented a sequence of 200 paired lotteries, subjects' task being to select their preferred option from each pair. We also measured prandial suppression of circulating acyl-ghrelin (a centrally-acting orexigenic hormone signalling acute nutrient intake, and circulating leptin levels (providing an assay of energy reserves. We show both immediate and delayed effects on risky decision-making following a meal, and that these changes correlate with an individual's baseline leptin and changes in acyl-ghrelin levels respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that human risk preferences are exquisitely sensitive to current metabolic state, in a direction consistent with ecological models of feeding behaviour but not predicted by normative economic theory. These substantive effects of state changes on economic decisions perhaps reflect shared evolutionarily conserved neurobiological mechanisms. We suggest that

  4. Report on the International Colloquium on Cardio-Oncology (Rome, 12–14 March 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewer, Michael; Gianni, Luca; Pane, Fabrizio; Sandri, Maria Teresa; Steiner, Rudolf K; Wojnowski, Leszek; Yeh, Edward T; Carver, Joseph R; Lipshultz, Steven E; Minotti, Giorgio; Armstrong, Gregory T; Cardinale, Daniela; Colan, Steven D; Darby, Sarah C; Force, Thomas L; Kremer, Leontien CM; Lenihan, Daniel J; Sallan, Stephen E; Sawyer, Douglas B; Suter, Thomas M; Swain, Sandra M; van Leeuwen, Flora E

    2014-01-01

    Cardio-oncology is a relatively new discipline that focuses on the cardiovascular sequelae of anti-tumour drugs. As any other young adolescent discipline, cardio-oncology struggles to define its scientific boundaries and to identify best standards of care for cancer patients or survivors at risk of cardiovascular events. The International Colloquium on Cardio-Oncology was held in Rome, Italy, 12–14 March 2014, with the aim of illuminating controversial issues and unmet needs in modern cardio-oncology. This colloquium embraced contributions from different kind of disciplines (oncology and cardiology but also paediatrics, geriatrics, genetics, and translational research); in fact, cardio-oncology goes way beyond the merging of cardiology with oncology. Moreover, the colloquium programme did not review cardiovascular toxicity from one drug or the other, rather it looked at patients as we see them in their fight against cancer and eventually returning to everyday life. This represents the melting pot in which anti-cancer therapies, genetic backgrounds, and risk factors conspire in producing cardiovascular sequelae, and this calls for screening programmes and well-designed platforms of collaboration between one key professional figure and another. The International Colloquium on Cardio-Oncology was promoted by the Menarini International Foundation and co-chaired by Giorgio Minotti (Rome), Joseph R Carver (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States), and Steven E Lipshultz (Detroit, Michigan, United States). The programme was split into five sessions of broad investigational and clinical relevance (what is cardiotoxicity?, cardiotoxicity in children, adolescents, and young adults, cardiotoxicity in adults, cardiotoxicity in special populations, and the future of cardio-oncology). Here, the colloquium chairs and all the session chairs briefly summarised what was said at the colloquium. Topics and controversies were reported on behalf of all members of the working group

  5. Metabolic Risk Profile and Cancer in Korean Men and Women

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Seulki; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Kim, Dongwoo; Kim, A-Rim; Kim, Eun-Jung; Seo, Hye-Young

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Associations between metabolic syndrome and several types of cancer have recently been documented. Methods: We analyzed the sample cohort data from the Korean National Health Insurance Service from 2002, with a follow-up period extending to 2013. The cohort data included 99 565 individuals who participated in the health examination program and whose data were therefore present ...

  6. Relationships between Body Fat Distribution, Epicardial Fat and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Obese Patients with and without Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Carla Lubrano; Maurizio Saponara; Giuseppe Barbaro; Palma Specchia; Eliana Addessi; Daniela Costantini; Marta Tenuta; Gabriella Di Lorenzo; Giuseppe Genovesi; Donini, Lorenzo M; Andrea Lenzi; Lucio Gnessi

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and metabolic syndrome, both closely related to obesity, often coexist in affected individuals; however, body mass index is not an accurate indicator of body fat and thus is not a good predictor of OSA and other comorbidities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the occurrence of OSA could be associated with an altered body fat distribution and a more evident cardio metabolic risk independently from obesity and metabolic syndrome. METHODS...

  7. Current Approaches in Cardio-Renal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belguzar Kara

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, burden of cardiac and kidney diseases throughout the world is increasing. Studies show that the coexistence of both diseases contributes to increased mortality, morbidity, and healthcare costs. One of the major challenges facing health systems today is to prevent cardio-renal syndrome and provide quality health services to individuals with cardio-renal syndrome. The and #8220;cardio-renal syndrome and #8221; is a general term to describe different clinical conditions in which heart and kidney dysfunctions coexist. Although the incidence of cardio-renal syndrome is increasing, the evidences are limited about its pathophysiology and effective management. Severe problems may occur due to the interaction of neurohumoral, hemodynamic, and other less known factors in patients with cardio-renal syndrome. Therefore, the management of cardio-renal syndrome requires a multidisciplinary, mutifaceted and patient-centred approach. The most recent developments on the definition, classification, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and prevention and management strategies of cardio-renal syndrome are discussed in this revie. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(4.000: 335-344

  8. Metabolic syndrome and risk of subsequent colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raluca Pais; Horatiu Silaghi; Alina Cristina Silaghi; Mihai Lucian Rusu; Dan Lucian Dumitrascu

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome and visceral obesity have an increasing prevalence and incidence in the general population. The actual prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is 24% in US population and between 24.6% and 30.9% in Europe. As demonstrated by many clinical trials (NAHANES Ⅲ, INTERHART) the metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of both diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition to cardiovascular disease, individual components of the metabolic syndrome have been linked to the development of cancer, particularly to colorectal cancer.Colorectal cancer is an important public health problem; in the year 2000 there was an estimated total of 944 717 incident cases of colorectal cancer diagnosed world-wide. This association is sustained by many epidemiological studies. Recent reports suggest that individuals with metabolic syndrome have a higher risk of colon or rectal cancer. Moreover, the clusters of metabolic syndrome components increase the risk of associated cancer. The physiopathological mechanism that links metabolic syndrome and colorectal cancer is mostly related to abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. Population and experimental studies demonstrated that hyperinsulinemia, elevated C-peptide, elevated body mass index, high levels of insulin growth factor-1, low levels of insulin growth factor binding protein-3, high leptin levels and low adiponectin levels are all involved in carcinogenesis. Understanding the pathological mechanism that links metabolic syndrome and its components to carcinogenesis has a major clinical significance and may have profound health benefits on a number of diseases including cancer, which represents a major cause of mortality and morbidity in our societies.

  9. Physical activity and risk of Metabolic Syndrome in an urban Mexican cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huitrón Gerardo

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Mexican population metabolic syndrome (MS is highly prevalent. It is well documented that regular physical activity (PA prevents coronary diseases, type 2 diabetes and MS. Most studies of PA have focused on moderate-vigorous leisure-time activity, because it involves higher energy expenditures, increase physical fitness, and decrease the risk of MS. However, for most people it is difficult to get a significant amount of PA from only moderately-vigorous leisure activity, so workplace activity may be an option for working populations, because, although may not be as vigorous in terms of cardio-respiratory efforts, it comprises a considerable proportion of the total daily activity with important energy expenditure. Since studies have also documented that different types and intensity of daily PA, including low-intensity, seem to confer important health benefits such as prevent MS, we sought to assess the impact of different amounts of leisure-time and workplace activities, including low-intensity level on MS prevention, in a sample of urban Mexican adults. Methods The study population consisted of 5118 employees and their relatives, aged 20 to 70 years, who were enrolled in the baseline evaluation of a cohort study. MS was assessed according to the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program, ATP III and physical activity with a validated self-administered questionnaire. Associations between physical activity and MS risk were assessed with multivariate logistic regression models. Results The prevalence of the components of MS in the study population were: high glucose levels 14.2%, high triglycerides 40.9%, high blood pressure 20.4%, greater than healthful waist circumference 43.2% and low-high density lipoprotein 76.9%. The prevalence of MS was 24.4%; 25.3% in men and 21.8% in women. MS risk was reduced among men (OR 0.72; 95%CI 0.57–0.95 and women (OR 0.78; 95%CI 0.64–0.94 who reported an amount of ≥30

  10. METABOLIC SYNDROME RISK ACROSS WEIGHT STATUS IN MEXICAN AMERICAN CHILDREN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexican Americans experience some of the highest rates of type 2 diabetes in this country. With the rising rates of obesity in Mexican American children, these children are also at increased risk for type 2 diabetes, especially when diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. There is not, however, standard ...

  11. Chromium supplementation alleviates risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome has been applied to a clustering of risk factors of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases including elevated blood lipids, elevated glucose, elevated blood pressure, proinflammatory state including increased C-reactive protein and TNF-alpha, and prothrombotic state including anomal...

  12. CardioKnowledge: A Knowledge Management Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Montoni, Mariella A.; Galotta, Catia; Rocha, Ana Regina; Rabelo, Álvaro; Rabelo, Lisia

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge management supports decision-making by capturing and analyzing key performance indicators, providing visibility into the effectiveness of the business model, and by concentrating collaborative work and employee knowledge reviews on critical business problems. CardioKnowledge is a knowledge management environment based on the business and process requirements of a health care organization in Cardiology. CardioKnowledge supports organizational processes in order to facilitate the comm...

  13. Dietary Fats and Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijela Ristic-Medic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The quantity and quality of fats consumed in the diet can have important effects on prevention and/or improvement clustering metabolic abnormalities of the metabolic syndrome. Fatty acids as food ingredients regulate cholesterol homeostasis and concentrations of blood lipoproteins, and affect the levels of other cardiometabolic risk factors, such as blood pressure, haemostasis, and body weight, through various mechanisms. There is convincing evidence that exchanging dietary saturated fat with monounsaturated fat produces beneficial effects on metabolic control, i.a. it lowers LDL-cholesterol concentrations, improves the postprandial lipid profile and lowers the blood pressure. Serum fatty acid composition mainly reflects dietary fat intake, but also endogenous fatty acid synthesis catalyzed by desaturases. Furthermore, high fat intake and serum fatty acid profile may influence the progression of obesity and insulin sensitivity. This review highlights current dietary guidance of fats quality recommendation in health and cardio metabolic risk.

  14. The effect of a periodontal intervention on cardiovascular risk markers in Indigenous Australians with periodontal disease: the PerioCardio study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Alex

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indigenous Australians experience an overwhelming burden of chronic disease, including cardiovascular diseases. Periodontal disease (inflammation of the tissues surrounding teeth is also widespread, and may contribute to the risk of cardiovascular diseases via pathogenic inflammatory pathways. This study will assess measures of vascular health and inflammation in Indigenous Australian adults with periodontal disease, and determine if intensive periodontal therapy improves these measures over a 12 month follow-up. The aims of the study are: (i to determine whether there is a dose response relationship between extent and severity of periodontal disease and measures of vascular health and inflammation among Indigenous Australian adults with moderate to severe periodontal disease; and (ii to determine the effects of periodontal treatment on changes in measures of vascular health and inflammation in a cohort of Indigenous Australians. Methods/Design This study will be a randomised, controlled trial, with predominantly blinded assessment of outcome measures and blinded statistical analysis. All participants will receive the periodontal intervention benefits (with the intervention delayed 12 months in participants who are randomised to the control arm. Participants will be Indigenous adults aged ≥25 years from urban centres within the Top End of the Northern Territory, Australia. Participants assessed to have moderate or severe periodontal disease will be randomised to the study's intervention or control arm. The intervention involves intensive removal of subgingival and supragingival calculus and plaque biofilm by scaling and root-planing. Study visits at baseline, 3 and 12 months, will incorporate questionnaires, non-fasting blood and urine samples, body measurements, blood pressure, periodontal assessment and non-invasive measures of vascular health (pulse wave velocity and carotid intima-media thickness. Primary outcome

  15. Neck circumference as a predictor of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and low-grade systemic inflammation in children: the ACFIES study

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez-Arbelaez, Diego; Camacho, Paul Anthony; Cohen, Daniel Dylan; Saavedra-Cortes, Sandra; Lopez-Lopez, Cristina; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio

    2016-01-01

    Background The current study aims to evaluate the association between neck circumference (NC) and several cardio-metabolic risk factors, to compare it with well-established anthropometric indices, and to determine the cut-off point value of NC for predicting children at increased risk of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and low-grade systemic inflammation. Methods A total of 669 school children, aged 8–14, were recruited. Demographic, clinical, anthropometric and biochemical data from a...

  16. Increased Cerebral Oxygen Metabolism and Ischemic Stress in Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome-Associated Risk Factors: Preliminary Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Uchino, Ken; Lin, Ridwan; Zaidi, Syed F.; Kuwabara, Hiroto; Sashin, Donald; Bircher, Nicholas; Chang, Yue-Fang; Hammer, Maxim D.; Reddy, Vivek; Jovin, Tudor G.; Vora, Nirav; Jumaa, Mouhammad; Massaro, Lori; Billigen, Julia; Boada, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and dyslipidemia are risk factors that characterize metabolic syndrome (MetS), which increases the risk for stroke by 40%. In a preliminary study, our aim was to evaluate cerebrovascular reactivity and oxygen metabolism in subjects free of vascular disease but with one or more of these risk factors. Volunteers (n=15) 59±15 (mean±SD)years of age clear of cerebrovascular disease by magnetic resonance angiography but with one or more risk factors were studied by ...

  17. Abdominal fat and metabolic risk in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revenga-Frauca, J; González-Gil, E M; Bueno-Lozano, G; De Miguel-Etayo, P; Velasco-Martínez, P; Rey-López, J P; Bueno-Lozano, O; Moreno, L A

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate fat distribution, mainly abdominal fat, and its relationship with metabolic risk variables in a group of 126 children and adolescents (60 males and 66 females) aged 5.0 to 14.9. According to IOTF criteria, 46 were classified as normal weight, 28 overweight and 52 obese. Weight, height, waist (WC) and hip circumferences were measured. The body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Total body fat, trunkal and abdominal fat were also assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Glucose, insulin, HDL-Cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), ferritine, homocystein and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Obesity status was related with insulin concentrations, CRP, TG and HDL. Obese patients had higher abdominal fat and higher CRP values than overweight and normal subjects. All markers of central body adiposity were related with insulin and lipid metabolism; however, they were not related with homocystein or ferritin. A simple anthropometric measurement, like waist circumference, seems to be a good predictor of the majority of the obesity related metabolic risk variables. PMID:20358355

  18. Designing and Using a High School Cardio Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Carol; Hall, Amber

    2012-01-01

    Attending a gym, fitness center or health club is a popular pastime of many people who wish to exercise and get in shape. Classes are offered in activities such as cardio endurance, toning, Pilates, spinning, step aerobics, core training, and kick boxing. Participants also use rooms with cardio equipment to get their own cardio workout. As many…

  19. Metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for gallstone disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nahum Méndez-Sánchez; Norberto C. Chavez-Tapia; Daniel Motola-Kuba; Karla Sanchez-Lara; Guadalupe Ponciano-Rodríguez; Héctor Baptista; Martha H. Ramos; Misael Uribe

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To establish an association between the presence of metabolic syndrome and the development of gallstone disease.METHOIDS: We carried out a cross-sectional study in a check-up unit in a university hospital in Mexico City. We enrolled 245 subjects, comprising 65 subjects with gallstones (36 women, 29 men) and 180 controls (79women and 101 men without gallstones). Body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, plasma insulin, and serum lipids and lipoproteins levels were measured. Insulin resistance was calculated by homeostasis model assessment. Unconditional logistic regressionanalysis (univariate and multivariate) was used to calculate the risk of gallstone disease associated with the presence of at least three of the criteria (Adult Treatment Panel Ⅲ). Analyses were adjusted for age and sex.RESULTS: Among 245 subjects, metabolic syndrome was present in 40% of gallstone disease subjects, compared with 17.2% of the controls, adjusted by age and gender (odds ratio (OR) = 2.79; 95%CI, 1.46-5.33; P = 0.002),a dose-dependent effect was observed with each component of metabolic syndrome (OR = 2.36, 95%CI, 0.72-7.71;P = 0.16 with one component and OR = 5.54, 95%CI,1.35-22.74; P = 0.02 with four components of metabolic syndrome). Homeostasis model assessment was significantly associated with gallstone disease (adjusted OR = 2.25;95%CI, 1.08-4.69; P = 0.03).CONCLUSION: We conclude that as for cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus, gallstone disease appears to be strongly associated with metabolic syndrome.

  20. Sedentary behavior and metabolic risk factors in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Krogstad, Cian

    2013-01-01

    Background: This cross-sectional study was aimed at testing if self-reported sedentary behavior was associated with objectively measured bio-markers for metabolic risk factors in the participants of “Fit Futures – a part of the Tromsø Study”. Methods: All first year students in upper secondary school in the Tromsø region were invited to participate in the Fit Futures study in 2010-2011. 508 girls and 530 boys attended, giving an attendance rate of > 90 %. The present analysis included all...

  1. Cardiorespiratory fitness, metabolic risk, and inflammation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulos, Antonios D; Douda, Helen T; Tokmakidis, Savvas P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the independent associations among cardiorespiratory fitness, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and C-reactive protein (CRP) in children. The sample consisted of 112 children (11.4  ±  0.4 years). Data was obtained for children's anthropometry, cardiorespiratory fitness, MetS components, and CRP levels. MetS was defined using criteria analogous to the Adult Treatment Panel III definition. A MetS risk score was also computed. Prevalence of the MetS was 5.4%, without gender differences. Subjects with low fitness showed significantly higher MetS risk (P strategies aiming at reducing obesity and improving cardiorespiratory fitness in childhood might contribute to the prevention of the MetS in adulthood. PMID:22315623

  2. The Relationship between Metabolic Syndrome and Childhood Maternal Education Level, Job Status Findings from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination, 2007-2009

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Bo-Yoon; Lee, Duk-Chul; Chun, Eun-Hye; Lee, Jee-Yon

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood socioeconomic status (SES) is known to affect cardio-metabolic disease risk. However, the relationship between childhood SES and metabolic syndrome (MetS) remains uncertain. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between childhood SES, as measured by maternal education and occupational status and adult-onset MetS in the Korean population. Methods We examined the association between childhood SES, as measured by maternal education level and occupational status during ...

  3. Metabolic syndrome and other cardiovascular risk factors among police officers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakrishnan Thayyil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Police force constitutes a special occupational group. They have been shown to be at high risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases. A multitude of factors may be responsible for this. There is very limited documentation of their health status and health surveillance activities are inadequate. Aim: The present study was designed to measure the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and other cardiovascular risk factors among police officers. Materials and Methods: The design was cross-sectional and spanned 900 policemen ( n = 900. A pre-tested questionnaire was used for collecting historical data. Anthropometric and biochemical measurements were carried out using standard techniques. MS was diagnosed using the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS 16.0 software. Results: MS was observed in 16.8% of the study population. High blood pressure and hyper-triglyceridemia were the commonest abnormalities. The prevalence of other cardiovascular risk factors were high body mass index (65.6%, hypertension (37.7%, diabetes (7%, smoking (10%, and alcohol use (48%. Conclusion: Our study identified police officers as a high-risk group for developing CVDs. The findings underscore the need for regular surveillance and lifestyle interventions in this important occupational group.

  4. Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Metabolic Risk, and Inflammation in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios D. Christodoulos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the independent associations among cardiorespiratory fitness, metabolic syndrome (MetS, and C-reactive protein (CRP in children. The sample consisted of 112 children (11.4  ±  0.4 years. Data was obtained for children’s anthropometry, cardiorespiratory fitness, MetS components, and CRP levels. MetS was defined using criteria analogous to the Adult Treatment Panel III definition. A MetS risk score was also computed. Prevalence of the MetS was 5.4%, without gender differences. Subjects with low fitness showed significantly higher MetS risk (<0.001 and CRP (<0.007, compared to the high-fitness pupils. However, differences in MetS risk, and CRP between fitness groups decreased when adjusted for waist circumference. These data indicate that the mechanisms linking cardiorespiratory fitness, MetS risk and inflammation in children are extensively affected by obesity. Intervention strategies aiming at reducing obesity and improving cardiorespiratory fitness in childhood might contribute to the prevention of the MetS in adulthood.

  5. Vitamin D metabolic pathway genes and pancreatic cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Arem

    Full Text Available Evidence on the association between vitamin D status and pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. This inconsistency may be partially attributable to variation in vitamin D regulating genes. We selected 11 vitamin D-related genes (GC, DHCR7, CYP2R1, VDR, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, CYP27A1, RXRA, CRP2, CASR and CUBN totaling 213 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and examined associations with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our study included 3,583 pancreatic cancer cases and 7,053 controls from the genome-wide association studies of pancreatic cancer PanScans-I-III. We used the Adaptive Joint Test and the Adaptive Rank Truncated Product statistic for pathway and gene analyses, and unconditional logistic regression for SNP analyses, adjusting for age, sex, study and population stratification. We examined effect modification by circulating vitamin D concentration (≤50, >50 nmol/L for the most significant SNPs using a subset of cohort cases (n = 713 and controls (n = 878. The vitamin D metabolic pathway was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (p = 0.830. Of the individual genes, none were associated with pancreatic cancer risk at a significance level of p<0.05. SNPs near the VDR (rs2239186, LRP2 (rs4668123, CYP24A1 (rs2762932, GC (rs2282679, and CUBN (rs1810205 genes were the top SNPs associated with pancreatic cancer (p-values 0.008-0.037, but none were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Associations between these SNPs and pancreatic cancer were not modified by circulating concentrations of vitamin D. These findings do not support an association between vitamin D-related genes and pancreatic cancer risk. Future research should explore other pathways through which vitamin D status might be associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

  6. Metabolic syndrome and Framingham risk score in obese young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix F. Widjaja

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The increase number of the metabolic syndrome (MetS among young adults was mostly caused by obesity. MetS increases the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD which can be estimated by Framingham risk score (FRS. The study was aimed to know the prevalence of MetS and FRS in obese young adults and to associate them with the components of MetS. Methods: A total of 70 male and female students aged 18 to 25 years with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 in Faculty of Medicine Universitas Indonesia were selected consecutively. The blood samples used to test fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, and triglyceride were examined in Department of Clinical Pathology, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital after fasting for 14 to 16 hours. International Diabetes Federation (IDF definition was used to diagnose MetS. Univariate and bivariate analysis were done. Results: The prevalence of MetS based on IDF definition was 18.6% among obese young adults. The most associated MetS components was hypertriglyceridemia (OR 12.13; 95% CI 2.92-50.46; p = 0.001, followed with high blood pressure (OR 9.33; 95% CI 2.26-38.56; p = 0.001, low-HDL (OR 8.33; 95% CI 2.17-32.05; p = 0.003, and impaired fasting glucose (p = 0.03. Four subjects had FRS ≥ 1% and 66 subjects had risk < 1%. Increased FRS was not associated with MetS (p = 0.154. There was no component of MetS associated with increased FRS. Conclusion: Prevalence of MetS in obese young adults was similar with obese children and adolescents. Although no association of MetS and FRS was found, they are significant predictors for CHD which should not be used separately. (Med J Indones. 2013;22:100-6Keywords: Abdominal obesity, Framingham risk score, metabolic syndrome, young adults

  7. Novel Biomarkers for Cardio-renal Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sul Ra; Jeong, Kyung Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome (CRS) is a frequent and life-threatening syndrome. It is a disorder of the heart and kidneys in which acute or chronic dysfunction in one organ may induce acute or chronic dysfunction in the other organ. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is strongly associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with CRS. Early detection of renal dysfunction is not possible using the traditional marker, serum creatinine, and therefore efforts to explore possible biomarkers for ear...

  8. MR imaging evaluation of cardiovascular risk in metabolic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, R.W. van der; Lamb, H.J.; Smit, J.W.A.; Roos, A. de

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has become an important public health problem and has reached epidemic proportions globally. Metabolic syndrome is characterized by a cluster of metabolic abnormalities in an individual, with insulin resistance as the main characteristic. The major adverse consequence of metabolic

  9. Metabolic syndrome and risk of restenosis in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouterjukema, J; Monraats, PS; Zwinderman, AH; De Maat, MPM; Kastelein, JJP; Doevendans, PAF; De Winter, RJ; Tio, RA; Frants, RR; Van der Laarse, A; Van der Wall, EE; Jukema, JW

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Patients with metabolic syndrome have increased risk of cardiovascular events. The number of patients With Metabolic syndrome is rapidly increasing, and these patients Often need revascularization. However, only limited data are available on the effect of metabolic syndrome on restenosis

  10. The association between secondhand smoke and the risk of developing acute coronary syndromes, among non-smokers, under the presence of several cardiovascular risk factors: The CARDIO2000 case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanadis Christodoulos

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between secondhand smoke and the risk of developing a first event of acute coronary syndromes (ACS, i.e. acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina, among non-smokers, in relation to the presence of several other cardiovascular risk factors. Methods Eight hundred and forty-eight patients with first event of ACS and 1078 cardiovascular disease-free matched controls completed a detailed questionnaire regarding their exposure to secondhand smoke, among other investigated parameters. Results Two hundred and ninety–seven (35% of the patients and 259 (24% of the controls were defined as secondhand smokers. After controlling for several potential confounders, the results showed that non-smokers occasionally ( Conclusions Consequently, this study supports the hypothesis that even occasional secondhand smoke increases the risk of developing acute coronary syndromes, especially when other risk factors are present. Given the high prevalence of cigarette smoking, the public health consequences of passive smoking with regard to coronary heart disease are important.

  11. Exercise, Abdominal Obesity, Skeletal Muscle, and Metabolic Risk: Evidence for a Dose Response

    OpenAIRE

    Slentz, Cris A.; Houmard, Joseph A.; Kraus, William E.

    2009-01-01

    The obese are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. However, some who are obese have no metabolic abnormalities. So, it is not adipose tissue per se, but perhaps where it is located that is important for determining metabolic consequences. Regular exercise is known to reduce risk for metabolic disease through numerous mechanisms. The purpose of this report is to highlight some of the efficacy-based data on the effects of exercise (and also a sedentary lifestyle) on...

  12. Pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lucia Pacifico; Valerio Nobili; Caterina Anania; Paola Verdecchia; Claudio Chiesa

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a range of liver histology severity and outcomes in the absence of chronic alcohol use. The mildest form is simple steatosis in which triglycerides accumulate within hepatocytes. A more advanced form of NAFLD, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, includes inflammation and liver cell injury, progressive to cryptogenic cirrhosis. NAFLD has become the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children and adolescents. The recent rise in the prevalence rates of overweight and obesity likely explains the NAFLD epidemic worldwide. NAFLD is strongly associated with abdominal obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia, and most patients have evidence of insulin resistance. Thus, NAFLD shares many features of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), a highly atherogenic condition, and this has stimulated interest in the possible role of NAFLD in the development of atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence suggests that NAFLD is associated with a significantly greater overall mortality than in the general population, as well as with increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), independently of classical atherosclerotic risk factors. Yet, several studies including the pediatric population have reported independent associations between NAFLD and impaired flow-mediated vasodilatation and increased carotid artery intimal medial thickness-two reliable markers of subclinical atherosclerosis-after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and MetS. Therefore, the rising prevalence of obesity-related MetS and NAFLD in childhood may lead to a parallel increase in adverse cardiovascular outcomes. In children, the cardiovascular system remains plastic and damage-reversible if early and appropriate interventions are established effectively. Therapeutic goals for NAFLD should address nutrition, physical activity, and avoidance of smoking to prevent not only end-stage liver disease but also CVD.

  13. Key elements of plant-based diets associated with reduced risk of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Harris, Metria

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 20 %-25 % of adults worldwide have metabolic syndrome. Vegetarian and vegan diets have demonstrated effectiveness in improving body weight, glycemic control, and cardiovascular risk factors, as compared with conventional therapeutic approaches, and are potentially useful in the prevention of metabolic syndrome. This article consists of two steps: (1) a review of the literature on studies examining vegetarian and vegan diets and metabolic syndrome and (2) a review of foods and nutrients that are protective against or associated with metabolic syndromes that may help to explain the beneficial effects of plant-based dietary approaches for metabolic syndrome. The present review found eight observational research studies, and no intervention studies, examining the association of plant-based dietary approaches with metabolic syndrome. These studies, conducted mostly in Asian populations, yielded varying results. The majority, however, found better metabolic risk factors and lowered risk of metabolic syndrome among individuals following plant-based diets, as compared with omnivores. Some dietary components that are lower in the diets of vegetarians, such as energy intake, saturated fat, heme iron, and red and processed meat, may influence metabolic syndrome risk. In addition, plant-based diets are higher in fruits, vegetables, and fiber, which are protective against the development of metabolic syndrome. PMID:25084991

  14. Metabolic syndrome and its associated risk factors in Iranian adults: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Hajian-Tilaki, Karimollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a complex clustering cardiovascular risk factors such as abdominal obesity, hypertension, diabetes and dylipedemia. It has been a growing health problem in Iranian adults in recent decade. The objective of this article was to review the prevalence of MetS and the corresponding risk factors among Iranian adults. Methods: We conducted a systematic review to extract the published articles regarding metabolic syndrome and its risk factors among Iranian adu...

  15. Associations between metabolic disorders and risk of cancer in Danish men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Siv Mari; Gislason, Gunnar; Moore, Lynn L;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of metabolic disorders is increasing and has been suggested to increase cancer risk, but the relation between metabolic disorders and risk of cancer is unclear, especially in young adults. We investigated the associations between diabetes, hypertension......, and hypercholesterolemia on risk of all-site as well as site-specific cancers. METHODS: We consecutively included men and women from nationwide Danish registries 1996-2011, if age 20-89 and without cancer prior to date of entry. We followed them throughout 2012. Metabolic disorders were defined using discharge diagnosis...... codes and claimed prescriptions. We used time-dependent sex-stratified Poisson regression models adjusted for age and calendar year to assess associations between metabolic disorders, and risk of all-site and site-specific cancer (no metabolic disorders as reference). RESULTS: Over a mean follow...

  16. Risk Factors for Developing Metabolic Acidosis after Radical Cystectomy and Ileal Neobladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun Suk; Yoon, Hana; Chung, Woo Sik; Sim, Bong Suk; Ryu, Dong-Ryeol; Lee, Dong Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the serial changes of metabolic acidosis and identify associated risk factors in patients who underwent radical cystectomy and ileal neobladder. Material and Methods From January 2010 to August 2014, 123 patients who underwent radical cystectomy and ileal neobladder reconstruction for bladder cancer were included in this study. Metabolic acidosis was defined as a serum bicarbonate level less than 22 mEq/L and impaired renal function was defined as a GFR <50ml/min. The presence of metabolic acidosis was evaluated at 1 month, 1 year, and 2 years after surgery. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify risk factors associated with development of metabolic acidosis. Results Metabolic acidosis was observed in 52%, 19.5%, and 7.3% of patients at 1 month, 1 year, and 2 years after surgery, respectively. At 1 month after surgery, impaired renal function was the only independent risk factor associated with metabolic acidosis (OR 3.87, P = 0.046). At 1 year after surgery, diabetes was the only independent risk factor associated with metabolic acidosis (OR 5.68, P = 0.002). At 2 years post-surgery, both age and diabetes were significant risk factors associated with metabolic acidosis. Conclusion Approximately, half of patients experienced metabolic acidosis one month after ileal neobladder reconstruction. Preoperative impaired renal function was the most significant risk factor for developing metabolic acidosis in the early postoperative period. However, the incidence of metabolic acidosis decreased to less than 20% 1 year after surgery, and diabetes was an independent risk factor during this period. PMID:27384686

  17. Teneligliptin: a review on cardio-renal safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixit K. Patel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD. Various drugs including DPP4 inhibitors with different pharmacologic profile are being used in patients with type 2 diabetes for improving glycaemic control. Cardiovascular (CV safety is one of the important aspects while selecting the glucose lowering therapies. In addition, DPP-4 inhibitors differ in their mode of excretion and degree of accumulation, which require dose/frequency modification in patients with impaired renal function. Therefore, understanding the cardio-renal safety profile of DPP4 inhibitors is of great importance. Teneligliptin is a DPP4 inhibitor, approved recently for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The purpose of the present review is to integrate published literature and evaluate the cardio-renal safety of teneligliptin in type 2 diabetic patients. As per the available evidence, teneligliptin has apparently positive effects on CV safety markers like no QT prolongation at clinically relevant dose, small but significant improvement in left ventricular (LV function, improvement in adiponectin levels and improvement in endothelial dysfunction. These findings support the cardiovascular safety of teneligliptin in T2DM patients. Dual route of excretion makes teneligliptin suitable (no dose adjustment required for T2DM patients with renal failure. Available clinical evidence suggests that teneligliptin exerts cardiovascular safety in T2DM patients. This drug can be used in T2DM patients with CKD including end stage renal disease patients without any major safety concern. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(2.000: 229-234

  18. The cardio-renal anemia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimković Siniša

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The problem of anemia in congestive heart failure and chronic kidney disease was thought to be insignificant for a long period of time. Recent investigations pointed out that the problem of anemia should be defined in the context of the cardio-renal anemia syndrome. A positive feedback mechanism indicates that cardio-renal anemia syndrome is due to an interaction between congestive heart failure, chronic renal failure and anemia. The aim of the study was to present the possible pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome, epidemiological characteristics and therapeutic results of the former investigations. Results. The results of the retrospective and prospective controlled trails have shown that management of anemia with subcutaneous administration of recombinant human erythropoietin together with intravenous iron infusion for at least 3-6 months lead to: relief of symptoms (improved NYHA functional class; increased left ventricular ejection fraction; reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality; reduced number of rehospitalizations; reduced requirements for usual therapeutic agents (especially diuretics; and improved renal function. Conclusion. In patients with heart and kidney disease anemia should be routinely identified and appropriately treated. Subcutaneous recombinant erythropoietin and intravenous iron may significantly improve overall survival and quality of life of these patients. .

  19. Assessment and Screening of the Risk Factors in Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspinder Kaur

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetS is chronic inflammatory epidemic state contributing to total and cardiovascular mortality. The current study planned to assess and screen risk factors for MetS and its components. A cross-sectional study conducted to assess age, gender, social status, employment, education, family history, physical activity, dietary habits, alcohol, sleep, body mass index and stress as determinants of MetS. The results were analyzed by Chi Square test with statistical significance of p value <0.05. The frequency of MetS was 17.38% as per modified National Cholesterol Education Program–Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Females (57.38%, age >50 years (86.90%; p < 0.05, middle socioeconomic status (70.50%, illiteracy (39.35%, and unemployment (81.97%; p < 0.05 were found contributing though to different extents. Subjects with a sedentary lifestyle (72.14%, positive family history (42.63%, omnivore diet (47.55%, stress (78.69%; p < 0.05, insomnia (29.51% and increased BMI (83.62%; p < 0.001 had shown predisposition to MetS. However, the protective role of alcohol (38.28%, an active lifestyle (36.21%, vegetarian diet (62.07% and adequate sleep (73.11% was observed. A significant hypertension (98.37%; p < 0.001, dyslipidemia (77.05%; p < 0.001, dysglycemia (75.41%; p < 0.001 and obesity (59.02%; p < 0.001 was reported in MetS. Common concerns of female gender, increasing age and BMI, sedentary lifestyle, stress and positive family history should be considered for early identification and appropriate intervention to fight the growing MetS epidemic.

  20. The Cardio-oncology Program: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Care of Cancer Patients With Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Sarah; Pituskin, Edith; Paterson, D Ian

    2016-07-01

    Improved cancer survivorship has resulted in a growing number of Canadians affected by cancer and cardiovascular disease. As a consequence, cardio-oncology programs are rapidly emerging to treat cancer patients with de novo and preexisting cardiovascular disease. The primary goal of a cardio-oncology program is to preserve cardiovascular health to allow the timely delivery of cancer therapy and achieve disease-free remission. Multidisciplinary programs in oncology and cardiology have been associated with enhanced patient well-being and improved clinical outcomes. Because of the complex needs of these multisystem patients, a similar model of care is gaining acceptance. The optimal composition of the cardio-oncology team will typically involve support from cardiology, oncology, and nursing. Depending on the clinical scenario, additional consultation from dietetics, pharmacy, and social services might be required. Timely access to consultation and testing is another prerequisite for cardio-oncology programs because delays in treating cardiac complications and nonadherence to prescribed cancer therapy are each associated with poor outcomes. Recommended reasons for referral to cardio-oncology programs include primary prevention for those at high risk for cardiotoxicity and the secondary treatment of new or worsening cardiovascular disease in cancer patients and survivors. Management is multifaceted and can involve lifestyle education, pharmacotherapy, enhanced cardiovascular surveillance, and support services, such as exercise training. The lack of evidence to guide clinical decisions and recommendations in cardio-oncology is a major challenge and opportunity for health care professionals. Large multicentre prospective registries are needed to adequately power risk model calculations and generate hypotheses for novel interventions. PMID:27343743

  1. Assessment of the health status in the Massa Lombarda cohort: a preliminary description of the program evaluating cardio-cerebro-vascular disease risk factors and quality of life in an elderly population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascetti, S; Linarello, S; Scurti, M; Grandi, E; Gaddoni, M; Noera, G; Gaddi, A

    2004-01-01

    The Massa Lombarda program (MLP) is the first step of a European multi-center program, promoted and coordinated from Bologna University's Academic Spin off Health Research and Development, which attempts to manage advanced sanitary research in general population. The instant individual definition (IID) study is the first phase of the program concerning the study of risk factors (RF) and early diagnosis of coronary heart disease (CHD), through a new diagnostic technology called myocardial perfusion scoring system (MPS). The study consists of a longitudinal observational epidemiological investigation of adult population (above 25 years of age) resident in Massa Lombarda (Ravenna), with the survey of social and biological parameters. The elderly part of the population (1000 subjects above 75 years) was submitted to a more complex analysis, as part of the study on health status in European aging populations, aimed at revealing the determinants influencing the healthy aging, and at identifying their impact on mortality,cardiovascular and respiratory morbidity, disability and decline of quality of life. Laboratory analyses were aimed at identifying the following factors: (i) Genetic markers related to pro and anti-inflammatory cytokine- codifying genes. (ii) Oxidative stress-involved molecules,and inflammation-involved genes, and more in general genes involved in the brittleness(iii) (ApoE). Appraising the degree of interaction with non-genetic factors, like measurable immunological markers in the peripheral blood, markers of reactions to oxidative stress,evaluation of metabolic parameters. Moreover, old population is expected to answer the questionnaires for evaluation of the dietary habits, physical activity, self-sufficiency,cognitive ability, motor coordination, perceived stress and social relationships. PMID:15207428

  2. No Association of SNPs in One-Carbon Metabolism Genes with Prostate Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Victoria L; Rodriguez, Carmen; Sun, Juzhong; Talbot, Jeffrey T.; Michael J Thun; Eugenia E Calle

    2008-01-01

    One-carbon metabolism mediates the inter-conversion of folates for the synthesis of precursors used in DNA synthesis, repair and methylation. Inadequate folate nutrition or compromised metabolism can disrupt these processes and facilitate carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated associations of 39 candidate SNPs in nine one-carbon metabolism genes with risk of prostate cancer using 1,144 cases and 1,144 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort. None of these SNPs we...

  3. Risk of metabolic syndrome among children living in metropolitan Kuala Lumpur: A case control study

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail Mohd N; Bulgiba Awang; Poh Bee K; Wee Bee S; Ruzita Abdul T; Hills Andrew P

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background With the increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, the metabolic syndrome has been studied among children in many countries but not in Malaysia. Hence, this study aimed to compare metabolic risk factors between overweight/obese and normal weight children and to determine the influence of gender and ethnicity on the metabolic syndrome among school children aged 9-12 years in Kuala Lumpur and its metropolitan suburbs. Methods A case control study was conducted among 402 ch...

  4. Iron in Child Obesity. Relationships with Inflammation and Metabolic Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Dominique Bouglé; Jacques Brouard

    2013-01-01

    Iron (Fe) sequestration is described in overweight and in its associated metabolic complications, i.e., metabolic syndrome (MetS) and non-alcoholic liver fatty disease (NAFLD); however, the interactions between Fe, obesity and inflammation make it difficult to recognize the specific role of each of them in the risk of obesity-induced metabolic diseases. Even the usual surrogate marker of Fe stores, ferritin, is influenced by inflammation; therefore, in obese subjects inflammation parameters m...

  5. The Impact of Dietary and Metabolic Risk Factors on Cardiovascular Diseases and Type 2 Diabetes Mortality in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira Otto, Marcia C.; Afshin, Ashkan; Micha, Renata; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Fahimi, Saman; Singh, Gitanjali; Danaei, Goodarz; Sichieri, Rosely; Carlos A. Monteiro; Maria L C Louzada; Ezzati, Majid; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trends in food availability and metabolic risk factors in Brazil suggest a shift toward unhealthy dietary patterns and increased cardiometabolic disease risk, yet little is known about the impact of dietary and metabolic risk factors on cardiometabolic mortality in Brazil. Methods: Based on data from Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study, we used comparative risk assessment to estimate the burden of 11 dietary and 4 metabolic risk factors on mortality due to cardiovascular diseases...

  6. The Impact of Dietary and Metabolic Risk Factors on Cardiovascular Diseases and Type 2 Diabetes Mortality in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira Otto, Marcia C.; Ashkan Afshin; Renata Micha; Shahab Khatibzadeh; Saman Fahimi; Gitanjali Singh; Goodarz Danaei; Rosely Sichieri; Carlos A. Monteiro; Maria L C Louzada; Majid Ezzati; Dariush Mozaffarian

    2016-01-01

    Background Trends in food availability and metabolic risk factors in Brazil suggest a shift toward unhealthy dietary patterns and increased cardiometabolic disease risk, yet little is known about the impact of dietary and metabolic risk factors on cardiometabolic mortality in Brazil. Methods Based on data from Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study, we used comparative risk assessment to estimate the burden of 11 dietary and 4 metabolic risk factors on mortality due to cardiovascular diseases a...

  7. [Beta-blockers usage in cardio-vascular diseases co-existing with COPD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Dorota; Kowal, Aneta; Jankowska, Renata

    2012-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most frequent chronic diseases. Slightly reversable and progressive decrease in airflow through the airways is characteristic for the disease. It has been brought up last years that COPD course influences not only pulmonary system status but also many co-existing diseases in the eldery, especially cardio-vascular diseases, such as: ischaemic heart disease, hypertension, heart arrythmias, heart infarction. Wide usage and established position in the treatment of cardio-vascular diseases have the antagonists of beta-adrenergic receptors (beta-blockers). The aim of this work was the combination of the studies results quoted in the literature about the usage of beta-blockers in cardiovascular diseases co-existing with COPD. Conclusions. Nowadays there are no unambiguous recommendations for the usage of beta-blocker in patients with COPD and the decision about including them into treatment depends on the individually estimated risk of complications. PMID:23437704

  8. Metabolically Healthy Obesity and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in the Elderly Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolhaas, Chantal M.; van Rossum, Elisabeth F. C.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Hofman, Albert; Kavousi, Maryam; Franco, Oscar H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether being metabolically healthy obese (MHO)—defined by the presence of obesity in the absence of metabolic syndrome—is associated with subsequent cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains unclear and may depend on the participants’ age. We examined the association of being MHO with CVD risk in the elderly. Methods and Findings This study included 5,314 individuals (mean age 68 years) from the prospective population-based Rotterdam Study. We categorized our population in groups according to body mass index (BMI) and presence and absence of metabolic syndrome, and estimated the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (95%CI) for every group by using Cox proportional hazard models. Among 1048 (19.7%) obese individuals we identified 260 (24.8%) MHO subjects. Over 14 years of follow-up there were 861 incident CVD cases. In the multivariable adjusted analysis, we did not observe an increased CVD risk in MHO individuals (HR 1.07, 95%CI 0.75–1.53), compared to normal weight individuals without metabolic syndrome. CVD risk was increased by the presence of metabolic syndrome in normal weight (HR 1.35, 95%CI 1.02–1.80), overweight (HR 1.32, 95%CI 1.09–1.60) and obese (HR 1.33, 95%CI 1.07–1.66) individuals, compared to those with normal weight without metabolic syndrome. In a mediation analysis, 71.3% of the association between BMI and CVD was explained by the presence of metabolic syndrome. Conclusions In our elderly population, we found that the presence of obesity without metabolic syndrome did not confer a higher CVD risk. However, metabolic syndrome was strongly associated with CVD risk, and was associated with an increased risk in all BMI categories. Therefore, preventive interventions targeting cardiometabolic risk factors could be considered in elderly, regardless of weight status. PMID:27100779

  9. Race and ethnicity, obesity, metabolic health, and risk of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, Michelle D; Hedlin, Haley; Mackey, Rachel H;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether obesity unaccompanied by metabolic abnormalities is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk across racial and ethnic subgroups. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified 14 364 postmenopausal women from the Women's Health Initiative who had data on fasting...... serum lipids and serum glucose and no history of cardiovascular disease or diabetes at baseline. We categorized women by body mass index (in kg/m(2)) as normal weight (body mass index 18.5 to <25), overweight (body mass index 25 to <30), or obese (body mass index ≥30) and by metabolic health, defined......, overweight women had similar risk to normal weight women (HR 0.92, interaction P=0.05). Obese black women without metabolic syndrome had higher adjusted risk (HR 1.95) than obese white women (HR 1.07; interaction P=0.02). Among women with only 2 metabolic abnormalities, cardiovascular risk was increased in...

  10. The effect of milk and milk proteins on risk factors of metabolic syndrome in overweight adolecents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnberg, Karina

    of type-2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Overweight children have higher concentrations of the metabolic syndrome risk factors than normal weight children and the pathological condition underlying cardiovascular diseases, called atherosclerosis, seems to start in childhood. A...

  11. Adiponectin is associated with risk of the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in women

    OpenAIRE

    King, George A.; Deemer, Sarah E.; Thompson, Dixie L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine insulin resistance, markers of the metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and serum adiponectin concentrations in pre-menopausal Hispanic and non-Hispanic White (NHW) women. This cross-sectional study examined 119 pre-menopausal women (76 Hispanic, 45 NHW) for markers of the metabolic syndrome (ATP III criteria), level of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), CVD risk factors, and serum total adiponectin concentrations. Relationships between va...

  12. Metabolic Syndrome as a Risk Factor for Elevated Intraocular Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Sahinoglu-Keskek, Nedime; Keskek, Sakir Ozgur; Cevher, Selim; Kirim, Sinan; Kayiklik, Asim; Ortoglu, Gulay; Saler, Tayyibe

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between intraocular pressure and metabolic syndrome by comparing central corneal thicknesses. Methods: One hundred sixty-two subjects were enrolled in this cross-sectional study, with 89 subjects in a metabolic syndrome group and 73 subjects in a control group. Ophthalmological examinations, including intraocular pressure and central corneal thickness measurements, were performed on each subject. Serum fasting glucose, trigly...

  13. Central versus peripheral cardiovascular risk in metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.KevinShoemaker

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS; i.e. 3 of 5 of the following risk factors (RFs: elevated blood pressure, waist circumference, triglycerides, blood glucose or reduced HDL are thought to be prone to serious cardiovascular disease and there is debate as to whether the disease begins in the peripheral vasculature or centrally. This study investigates hemodynamics, cardiac function/morphology, as well as mechanical properties of the central (heart, carotid artery and peripheral (total peripheral resistance, forearm vascular bed vasculature in individuals without (1-2 RFs; n=28, or with (≥3 RFs; n=46 MetS. After adjustments for statin and blood pressure medication use, those with MetS had lower mitral valve E/A ratios (<3 RFs: 1.24±0.07; ≥3 RFs: 1.01±0.04; P=0.025, and higher total peripheral resistance index (<3 RFs: 48±2 mmHg/L/min/m2; ≥3 RFs: 53±2 mmHg/L/min/m2; P=0.04. There were no differences in heart size, carotid artery measurements, cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity, pulse wave velocity, stroke volume index, or cardiac output index due to MetS after adjustments for statin and blood pressure medication use. In a separate analysis, the use of statins was associated with increased inertia in the brachial vascular bed, increased HbA1c and decreased LDL cholesterol. The independent use of anti-hypertensive medication was associated with decreased predicted VO2max, triglycerides, diastolic blood pressure, interventricular septum thickness, calculated left ventricle mass, left ventricle posterior wall thickness, and left ventricle pre-ejection period, but increased carotid stiffness, HDL cholesterol, and heart rate. These data imply that both a central cardiac effect and a peripheral effect of vascular resistance are expressed in MetS. These data also indicate that variance in between-group responses due to pharmacological treatments are important factors to consider in studying cardiovascular changes in these individuals.

  14. Cardio-adipose tissue cross-talk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Søren; Jensen, Jan Skov; Bjerre, Mette;

    2014-01-01

    increases adiponectin secretion, indicating that NPs may improve adipose tissue function and in this way function as a cardio-protective agent in HF. Accordingly we investigated the interplay between plasma adiponectin, plasma proBNP, and development of HF. METHODS AND RESULTS: We prospectively followed...... 5574 randomly selected men and women from the community without ischaemic heart disease or HF. Plasma adiponectin and proBNP were measured at study entry. Median follow-up time was 8.5 years (interquartile range 8.0-9.1 years). During follow-up 271 participants developed symptomatic HF. Plasma...... and diastolic blood pressure, lipid profile, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and physical activity) by Cox regression analysis, adiponectin remained an independent predictor of HF: the hazard ratio (HR) per 1 standard deviation (SD) increase in adiponectin...

  15. Maternal-Fetal Metabolic Gene-Gene Interactions and Risk of Neural Tube Defects

    OpenAIRE

    Lupo, Philip J.; Mitchell, Laura E; Canfield, Mark A.; Shaw, Gary M.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Finnell, Richard H.; Zhu, Huiping

    2013-01-01

    Single-gene analyses indicate that maternal genes associated with metabolic conditions (e.g., obesity) may influence the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs). However, to our knowledge, there have been no assessments of maternal-fetal metabolic gene-gene interactions and NTDs. We investigated 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms among 7 maternal metabolic genes (ADRB3, ENPP1, FTO, LEP, PPARG, PPARGC1A, and TCF7L2) and 2 fetal metabolic genes (SLC2A2 and UCP2). Samples were obtained from 737 NTD c...

  16. Exosomes: a potential key target in cardio-renal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eGonzalez-Calero

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes have proven roles in regulating immune response, antigen presentation, RNA and protein transfer, and cell–cell (organ–organ interaction/signaling. These microvesicles can be considered a mechanism of non-classical secretion of proteins, and they represent a sub-proteome, thus assisting in the difficult task of biomarker discovery in a biological fluid as urine, plasma or serum. A potential role of exosomes in the cardio-renal syndrome is currently underexplored. Cardiovascular disease (CVD continues to be the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and, particularly, rates of cardiovascular events and death consistently increase as kidney function worsens. In other words, chronic kidney disease acts as a risk multiplier. Unfortunately, the relationship between markers of cardiovascular risk in kidney pathology often differs from that in the general population. Efforts in the search for novel action mechanisms simultaneously operating in both pathologies are thus of maximum interest.This article focuses to the role of exosomes in cardiovascular and renal diseases, in the search for novel key targets of interaction between heart and kidneys.

  17. Cardio-respiratory, haematological and biochemical parameter adjustments to exercise: effect of a probiotic in horses during training

    OpenAIRE

    Art, Tatiana; Votion, Dominique; Mc Entee, Kathleen; Amory, Hélène; Linden, Annick; Close, Roland; Lekeux, Pierre

    1994-01-01

    Two randomly distributed groups of thoroughbred horses were compared during a 12-week period for their cardio-respiratory and metabolic adjustment to strenuous exercise, training and detraining. The horses were trained following the same standardized schedule and were regularly investigated using standardized treadmill exercise tests (SET) of increasing speed. After the first SET and during the whole experimental period, a group of 6 horses received a probiotic (Bioracing) once a day while a ...

  18. The impact of metabolic risk management on recurrence of urinary stones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yigit Akin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Urinary stone disease is a common urologic problem and recurrence in stone formation is a very familiar issue to urologists. Although recurrence in stone formation has been linked to metabolic abnormalities, it can be accessible by metabolic risk analysis studies.Methods: Herein, we present our experience in metabolic risk management on recurrence of urinary stones for 10 years in Akdeniz University School of Medicine department of Urology. We retrospectively analyzed Akdeniz University Urinary Stone Database between dates of January 2000 and December 2010. We found over 3500 patients who were managed by SWL (shock wave lithotripsy or PCNL (percutaneus nephrolithotripsy or URS (Ureterorenoscopic lithotripsy or open surgery.Results: 525 patients’ metabolic risk analysis was ordered due to recurrent urinary stone disease. Only 134 (25.5 % current metabolic analysis were returned. Mean patient age was 32.2 years (range: 19-82 years.Patients were 103 male and 31 female. Stone analysis results were CaOx monohydrate in 48 (35.8 %, CaOx dihydrate in 8 (5.9 %, CaOx mono and dihydrate in 70 (52.2 %, uric acid in 3, CaOx monohydrate and uricacid in 2, cystine in 2, and struvite in 1 patient, respectively. The  metabolic risk analysis showed some abnormality in 54 (40.2 % patients.Conclusion: Although compliance to metabolic risk analysis studies is low among recurrent urinary stone formers, some significant metabolic abnormalities could be detected in those who are effectively screened.Recurrence of urinary stones in patients who are started on appropriate metabolic management can be prevented.

  19. A connection between combustion-related air pollutants and risk indicators for cardio-vascular disease? A panel study linked to the measurement campaign at Vaexjoe in the Biofuel-Health-Environment program.; Samband mellan foerbraenningsrelaterade luftfoeroreningar och riskindikatorer foer hjaert-kaerlsjukdom? - En panelstudie kopplad till maetkampanjen i Vaexjoe inom Biobraensle-Haelsa-Miljoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaervholm, Bengt; Forsberg, Bertil; Modig, Lars; Nielsen, Joern; Boman, Kurt; Jansson, Jan-Haakan [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Inst. foer Folkhaelsa och Klinisk Medicin

    2005-02-01

    The main aim of this study was to see if particles in ambient air is related to biological risk indicators of cardio vascular disease. The study was conducted during the winter and early spring 2003, within the framework of the Swedish Energy Agency's research program. The study was designed as a panel study with 40 participating females within the ages 25-66 years, all working at the local hospital. Based on continuous measurements of air pollutants and meteorological forecasts blood samples were taken at five occasions during days with predicted high or low pollution levels. Each blood sample were then analysed for the inflammatory markers fibrinogen and C-reactive protein (CRP). The levels of inflammatory markers were analysed in relation to measured levels of PM{sub 2.5} and NO{sub 2}, respectively. The analyses were made by calculating the ratio between each persons single values and their mean value based on all five measuring occasions. This was made for both of the two inflammatory markers. The ratios were then plotted and regressed against each of the studied pollutants. The results showed no evidence suggesting high pollution levels to be associated with high present levels on the studied markers at present levels.

  20. Metabolic Syndrome: An Important Risk Factor for Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is becoming commoner due to a rise in obesity rates among adults. Generally speaking, a person with metabolic syndrome is twice as likely to develop cardiovascular disease and five times as likely to develop diabetes as someone without metabolic syndrome. Increasing oxidative stress in metabolic syndrome and Parkinson’s disease is mentioned in the comprehensive articles; however, the system review about clear relation between metabolic syndrome and Parkinson’s disease is deficient. In this review, we will focus on the analysis that the metabolic syndrome may be a risk factor for Parkinson’s disease and the preventions that reduce the incident of Parkinson’s disease by regulating the oxidative stress.

  1. Study of the Dynamics of Transcephalic Cerebral Impedance Data during Cardio-Vascular Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atefi, S. R.; Seoane, F.; Lindecrantz, K.

    2013-04-01

    Postoperative neurological deficits are one of the risks associated with cardio vascular surgery, necessitating development of new techniques for cerebral monitoring. In this study an experimental observation regarding the dynamics of transcephalic Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with and without extracorporeal circulation (ECC) was conducted to investigate the potential use of electrical Bioimpedance for cerebral monitoring in cardio vascular surgery. Tetrapolar transcephalic EBI measurements at single frequency of 50 kHz were recorded prior to and during cardio vascular surgery. The obtained results show that the transcephalic impedance decreases in both groups of patients as operation starts, however slight differences in these two groups were also observed with the cerebral impedance reduction in patients having no ECC being less common and not as pronounced as in the ECC group. Changes in the cerebral impedance were in agreement with changes of haematocrit and temperature. The origin of EBI changes is still unexplained however these results encourage us to continue investigating the application of electrical bioimpedance cerebral monitoring clinically.

  2. Study of the Dynamics of Transcephalic Cerebral Impedance Data during Cardio-Vascular Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postoperative neurological deficits are one of the risks associated with cardio vascular surgery, necessitating development of new techniques for cerebral monitoring. In this study an experimental observation regarding the dynamics of transcephalic Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with and without extracorporeal circulation (ECC) was conducted to investigate the potential use of electrical Bioimpedance for cerebral monitoring in cardio vascular surgery. Tetrapolar transcephalic EBI measurements at single frequency of 50 kHz were recorded prior to and during cardio vascular surgery. The obtained results show that the transcephalic impedance decreases in both groups of patients as operation starts, however slight differences in these two groups were also observed with the cerebral impedance reduction in patients having no ECC being less common and not as pronounced as in the ECC group. Changes in the cerebral impedance were in agreement with changes of haematocrit and temperature. The origin of EBI changes is still unexplained however these results encourage us to continue investigating the application of electrical bioimpedance cerebral monitoring clinically.

  3. Metabolic syndrome and risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Rodrigues de Araújo Souza

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, has been considered the most common liver disease nowadays, which is also the most frequent cause of elevated transaminases and cryptogenic cirrhosis. The greatest input of fatty acids into the liver and consequent increased beta-oxidation contribute to the formation of free radicals, release of inflammatory cytokines and varying degrees of hepatocytic aggression, whose histological expression may vary from steatosis (HS to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. The differentiation of these forms is required by the potential risk of progression to cirrhosis and development of hepatocellular carcinoma. OBJECTIVE: To review the literature about the major risk factors for NAFLD in the context of metabolic syndrome, focusing on underlying mechanisms and prevention. METHOD: PubMed, MEDLINE and SciELO data basis analysis was performed to identify studies describing the link between risk factors for metabolic syndrome and NAFLD. A combination of descriptors was used, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, metabolic syndrome and risk factors. At the end, 96 clinical and experimental studies, cohorts, meta-analysis and systematic reviews of great impact and scientific relevance to the topic, were selected. RESULTS: The final analysis of all these data, pointed out the central obesity, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension as the best risk factors related to NAFLD. However, other factors were highlighted, such as gender differences, ethnicity, genetic factors and the role of innate immunity system. How these additional factors may be involved in the installation, progression and disease prognosis is discussed. CONCLUSION: Risk factors for NAFLD in the context of metabolic syndrome expands the prospects to 1 recognize patients with metabolic syndrome at high risk for NAFLD, 2 elucidate pathways common to other co-morbidities, 3

  4. A Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Program for American Indians with Metabolic Syndrome: The Balance Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Elisa T.; Jobe, Jared B.; Yeh, Jeunliang; Ali, Tauqeer; Rhoades, Everett R.; Knehans, Allen W.; Willis, Diane J.; Johnson, Melanie R.; Zhang, Ying; Poolaw, Bryce; Rogers, Billy

    2012-01-01

    The Balance Study is a randomized controlled trial designed to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in 200 American Indian (AI) participants with metabolic syndrome who reside in southwestern Oklahoma. Major risk factors targeted include weight, diet, and physical activity. Participants are assigned randomly to one of two groups, a guided or a…

  5. The Risk of Metabolic Syndrome among Institutionalized Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shang-Wei; Yen, Chia-Feng; Hung, Wen-Jui; Lin, Lam-Ping; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2012-01-01

    People with metabolic syndrome (MS) are at increased risk of coronary heart disease and other health problems, such as diabetes and stroke. However, there is little previous information on the prevalence and determinants of MS among people with intellectual disabilities (IDs). The present study aimed to examine the prevalence of MS risk factors…

  6. Division IAA Football Players and Risk Factors for Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repovich, Wendy E. S.; Babcock, Garth J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if body composition and blood pressure (BP), two markers for Metabolic Syndrome (MetS), were correlated in college football players. Height, weight, BMI, systolic (SBP) and Diastolic (DBP) blood pressure and body composition (three measures) were assessed in a Division IAA football team (N = 55). Data…

  7. Metabolic syndrome and dementia risk in a multiethnic elderly cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, Majon; Tang, Ming-Xin; Schupf, Nicole; Manly, Jennifer J.; Mayeux, Richard; Luchsinger, Jose A.

    2007-01-01

    Background/ Aims: The metabolic syndrome (MeSy) may be related to Alzheimer's disease ( AD). Our aims were to investigate the association of the MeSy with incident dementia in a multiethnic elderly cohort in the United States. Methods: We conducted cross-sectional and prospective analyses in 2,476 m

  8. Cardio-Respiratory Coordination Increases during Sleep Apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Riedl, M.; Müller, A.; Kraemer, J. F.; Penzel, T; Kurths, J.; Wessel, N.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the main source of morbidity and mortality in the United States with costs of more than $170 billion. Repetitive respiratory disorders during sleep are assumed to be a major cause of these diseases. Therefore, the understanding of the cardio-respiratory regulation during these events is of high public interest. One of the governing mechanisms is the mutual influence of the cardiac and respiratory oscillations on their respective onsets, the cardio-respiratory coord...

  9. Diet composition and activity level of at risk and metabolically healthy obese American adults

    OpenAIRE

    Hankinson, Arlene L.; Daviglus, Martha L; Van Horn, Linda; Chan, Queenie; Brown, Ian; Holmes, Elaine; Elliott, Paul; Stamler, Jeremiah

    2013-01-01

    Obesity often clusters with other major cardiovascular disease risk factors, yet a subset of the obese appears to be protected from these risks. Two obesity phenotypes are described, 1) “metabolically healthy” obese, broadly defined as body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m2 and favorable levels of blood pressure, lipids, and glucose; and 2) “at risk” obese, BMI ≥ 30 with unfavorable levels of these risk factors. More than 30% of obese American adults are metabolically healthy. Diet and activity det...

  10. Patients with psoriasis have insufficient knowledge of their risk of atherothrombotic disease and metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiveren, J; Philipsen, P; Therming, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    atherothrombotic disease and metabolic syndrome, and to assess the importance of the kind of treatment received and of membership of a patients' association. METHODS: In total, 218 patients with psoriasis (mean age 45.5 years, range 18-83), who were being treated with methotrexate or biological drugs responded to...... a questionnaire. RESULTS: Patients were well informed about their skin disease, but were less well informed about their risk of atherothrombotic disease/metabolic syndrome (visual analogue scale values of 6.91 and 5.15, respectively). Patients' knowledge of the disease was reflected by 74.......2-99.1% correct answers (CA). The risk of arthritis elicited 88% CA and of depression 41.7% CA, while the risk of atherothrombotic disease and metabolic syndrome produced only 11.9-15.3% CA. Patients treated with biological drugs had a significantly stronger sense of being more well informed about the risk of...

  11. The Seoul Metropolitan Lifestyle Intervention Program and Metabolic Syndrome Risk: A Retrospective Database Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Jina; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Ryu, Hosihn; Park, Mi-Suk; Lee, Hyang Sook; Park, Yoo Mi; Lim, Do-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Since 2011, the Seoul Metabolic Syndrome Management (SMESY) program has been employed as a community-wide, lifestyle modification intervention in Seoul, Korea. We aimed to determine if the SMESY intervention would be significantly associated with improvements in metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk factors. This retrospective database study included data from 25,449 participants aged 30–64 years between 1 January 2013 and 30 June 2013. In the SMESY program, 3 risk-stratified groups by the number of MetS factors were followed for 12 months with different intensity and timeframe of intervention. Among the high-(n = 7116) and moderate-risk groups (n = 14,762), all MetS factors (except triglycerides among the moderate-risk group) as well as MetS z-scores significantly improved over 12 months (all p < 0.05). Among the low-risk group (n = 3571), all factors aggravated significantly over 12 months (all p < 0.05). We observed temporal associations between the implementation of the SMESY program and improvements in MetS risk factors. However, such improvements differed by risk-stratified group, being most robust for the high-risk group, modest for the moderate-risk group, and aggravated for the low-risk group. Thus, more intensive interventions targeting different risk-stratified groups are needed, given a better understanding of the increase in risk factors observed in the low-risk group. PMID:27384576

  12. Low muscle fitness is associated with metabolic risk in youth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steene-Johannessen, Jostein; Anderssen, Sigmund A; Kolle, Elin; Andersen, Lars B

    2009-01-01

    9-and 15-yr-olds, respectively. We assessed muscular strength by measuring explosive, isometric, and endurance strength. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured directly as peak oxygen uptake during a cycle ergometry test. Risk factors included in the composite risk factor score (sum of z...

  13. Cardiovascular Risks Factors and their Relationship with Disorders of Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Lilian Leguen Gulgar; Maricel Castellanos; María de Jesús Sánchez Bouza; Mikhail Benet Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    Background: cardiovascular disease has been the leading cause of death in Cuba, where studies on emerging cardiovascular risk factors as predictors of cardiovascular risk are scarce. Objective: to determine the association between cardiovascular risk factors and disorders of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Methods: a correlational study was conducted with a sample of 105 men and women selected from a total of 346 workers of the University of Medical Sciences of Cienfuegos from June 2011 th...

  14. Self-Management Training for Chinese Obese Children at Risk for Metabolic Syndrome: Effectiveness and Implications for School Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jiying; Anderson, Laura M.; Ji, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the results of a school-based self-management intervention for Chinese obese children at risk for metabolic syndrome. Twenty-eight Chinese obese children (M age?=?10 years) and their parents participated in the study. Metabolic syndrome risk factors were measured pre- and post-intervention. The risk factors included Body Mass…

  15. Association between television viewing and the risk of metabolic syndrome in a community-based population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chiu-Shong

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a result of metabolic syndrome becoming an important issue during recent decades, many studies have explored the risk factors contributing to its development. However, less attention has been paid to the risk associated with sedentary behavior, especially television viewing. This study examined the association between television viewing time and the risk of having metabolic syndrome in a population of Taiwanese subjects. Methods This community-based cross-sectional study included 2,353 subjects (1,144 men and 1,209 women aged 40 and over from October, 2004 to September, 2005. Information about the time spent watching TV was obtained using a self-administered questionnaire. The definition of metabolic syndrome was according to the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel modified for Asians. Results Compared to subjects who viewed TV 20 hr/week had a 1.50-fold (95% confidence intervals (CI: 1.10, 2.03 risk for men and a 1.93-fold (95% CI: 1.37, 2.71 risk for women of having metabolic syndrome, after adjusting for physical activity and other covariates. Stratifying by the three categories of total activity levels, TV viewing time > 20 hr/week was found to still hold a significant risk for having metabolic syndrome in the lowest of the three categories of total activity level for men and in all three categories of total activity level for women. Conclusion The findings suggest that TV viewing is an independent risk factor associated with metabolic syndrome in Taiwanese people.

  16. Donation after cardio-circulatory death liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hieu Le Dinh; Arnaud de Roover; Abdour Kaba; Séverine Lauwick; Jean Joris; Jean Delwaide; Pierre Honoré

    2012-01-01

    The renewed interest in donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD) started in the 1990s following the limited success of the transplant community to expand the donation after brain-death (DBD) organ supply and following the request of potential DCD families.Since then,DCD organ procurement and transplantation activities have rapidly expanded,particularly for nonvital organs,like kidneys.In liver transplantation (LT),DCD donors are a valuable organ source that helps to decrease the mortality rate on the waiting lists and to increase the availability of organs for transplantation despite a higher risk of early graft dysfunction,more frequent vascular and ischemia-type biliary lesions,higher rates of re-listing and re-transplantation and lower graft survival,which are obviously due to the inevitable warm ischemia occurring during the declaration of death and organ retrieval process.Experimental strategies intervening in both donors and recipients at different phases of the transplantation process have focused on the attenuation of ischemia-reperfusion injury and already gained encouraging results,and some of them have found their way from pre-clinical success into clinical reality.The future of DCD-LT is promising.Concerted efforts should concentrate on the identification of suitable donors (probably Maastricht category Ⅲ DCD donors),better donor and recipient matching (high risk donors to low risk recipients),use of advanced organ preservation techniques (oxygenated hypothermic machine perfusion,normothermic machine perfusion,venous systemic oxygen persufflation),and pharmacological modulation (probably a multi-factorial biologic modulation strategy) so that DCD liver allografts could be safely utilized and attain equivalent results as DBD-LT.

  17. Vegetarian Dietary Patterns Are Associated With a Lower Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzo, Nico S.; Sabaté, Joan; Jaceldo-Siegl, Karen; Fraser, Gary E.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The study objective was to compare dietary patterns in their relationship with metabolic risk factors (MRFs) and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Cross-sectional analysis of 773 subjects (mean age 60 years) from the Adventist Health Study 2 was performed. Dietary pattern was derived from a food frequency questionnaire and classified as vegetarian (35%), semi-vegetarian (16%), and nonvegetarian (49%). ANCOVA was used to determine associations between dietary...

  18. The Metabolic Syndrome and Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease: Pathophysiology and Intervention Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A. LaGuardia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is characterized by a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors, including abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure and glucose concentrations, and dyslipidemia. The presence of this clinical entity is becoming more pervasive throughout the globe as the prevalence of obesity increases worldwide. Moreover, there is increased recognition of the complications and mortality related to this syndrome. This paper looks to examine the link between metabolic syndrome and the development of chronic kidney disease.

  19. Risk of Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes Mellitus Among Young Twins and Singletons in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard-Andersen, Morten; Hansen, Lone; da Silva, Leontina I;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVETwins in Africa may be at increased risk of metabolic disorders due to strained conditions in utero, including high exposure to infections. We studied metabolic syndrome (MS) and diabetes mellitus (DM) among young twins and singletons in Guinea-Bissau.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSThe study...... was cross-sectional and occurred from October 2009 until August 2011 at the Bandim Health Project, a demographic surveillance site in the capital Bissau. Twins and singleton controls between 5 and 32 years were visited at home. Fasting blood samples for metabolic measurements were collected. Zygosity...

  20. Metabolic and Lifestyle related risk factors for pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, Dorthe

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims: In spite of the fact that pancreatic cancer is a relatively infrequent disease, it ranks 8th in the worldwide ranking of cancer death due to the poor prognosis. The mortality rate is almost as high as the incidence with a M/I ratio of 98%, indicating an extremely dismal clinical course. This makes it imperative to try to develop new therapeutic strategies and to try to identify risk factors in order to intensify preventive efforts. The most important risk fact...

  1. Risk factors for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus : Metabolic Syndrome, Insulin Resistance and Primary Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of the study was to identify the extent of metabolic syndrome on the basis of ATP III and IDF definition in subjects aged 25 years and above from an urban population of Karachi. Also to see the association of risk factors related to diabetes and metabolic syndrome in this population. And finally to prove the hypothesis of intervention effect on the onset of type 2 diabetes in a high risk urban population and evaluate the rate of conversion of IGT to diabetes by these interve...

  2. Epigenetic and developmental influences on the risk of obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith CJ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Caitlin J Smith, Kelli K Ryckman Department of Epidemiology, University of Iowa, College of Public Health, Iowa City, IA, USA Abstract: Metabolic syndrome is a growing cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Metabolic syndrome is characterized by the presence of a variety of metabolic disturbances including obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and elevated fasting blood sugar. Although the risk for metabolic syndrome has largely been attributed to adult lifestyle factors such as poor nutrition, lack of exercise, and smoking, there is now strong evidence suggesting that predisposition to the development of metabolic syndrome begins in utero. First posited by Hales and Barker in 1992, the “thrifty phenotype” hypothesis proposes that susceptibility to adult chronic diseases can occur in response to exposures in the prenatal and perinatal periods. This hypothesis has been continually supported by epidemiologic studies and studies involving animal models. In this review, we describe the structural, metabolic and epigenetic changes that occur in response to adverse intrauterine environments including prenatal and postnatal diet, maternal obesity, and pregnancy complications. Given the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome in both the developed and developing worlds, a greater understanding and appreciation for the role of the intrauterine environment in adult chronic disease etiology is imperative. Keywords: epigenetics, metabolic syndrome, fetal programming, maternal, pregnancy complications

  3. REDUCTION OF CUMULATIVE CARDIOVASCULAR RISK IN PATIENTS WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION: THE ROLE OF ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS ACCORDING TO THE NEW EUROPEAN RECOMMENDATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Mamedov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Conception of total cardio-vascular risk plays important role in defining tactics of arterial hypertension therapy according to the new European recommendations. Choice of antihypertensive therapy is based on meta-analysis of large clinical studies with hard end points. It is recommended to use five classes of antihypertensive drugs in mono- and combined therapy. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors keep important place in the therapy of arterial hypertension accompanying with risk factors and associated diseases. Enalapril is one of the widely used ACE inhibitors, its efficiency was proved in prospective clinical studies. In high risk patients monotherapy with Enam (enalapril, Dr. Reddy’s decreases blood pressure and leads to positive metabolic changes. This results in significant risk reduction of cardio-vascular complications.

  4. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also influenced by body composition — people with more muscle and less fat generally have higher BMRs. previous continue Things That Can Go Wrong With Metabolism Most of the time your metabolism works effectively ...

  5. Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008255 Serum adiponectin level declines in the elderly with metabolic syndrome.WU Xiaoyan(吴晓琰),et al.Dept Geriatr,Huashan Hosp,Fudan UnivShanghai200040.Chin J Geriatr2008;27(3):164-167.Objective To investigate the correlation between ser-um adiponectin level and metabolic syndrome in the elderly·Methods Sixty-one subjects with metabolic syndrome and140age matched subjects without metabolic

  6. Cardio-respiratory Physiology of the European Eel (Agunilla anguilla) in Extreme Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Methling, Caroline

    The main objective of this PhD thesis was to study the cardio-respiratory capabilities of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) under extreme conditions. Three environmental conditions were studied i.e. temperature, dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide, while a fourth condition was physiological...... and focused on the impressive spawning migration of A. anguilla. Ambient temperature influences the rate of most biological functions including metabolic processes, which in turn determines the overall metabolic capacity. In Paper I it is demonstrated that A. anguilla has a wide thermal optimum as absolute......-course of contraction, and thus maximum attainable heart rate in vivo, greatly depended on ambient temperature. The relative ventricular mass was increased after long term acclimation to 0°C and 10°C compared to individuals acclimated to 20°C, indicative of a compensatory mechanism for the limitation in heart rate...

  7. Maternal Smoking, Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Variants, and Gastroschisis Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Mary M.; Reefhuis, Jennita; Gallagher, Margaret L; Mulle, Jennifer G.; Hoffmann, Thomas J.; Koontz, Deborah A.; Sturchio, Cynthia; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Witte, John S.; Richter, Patricia; Honein, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal smoking during pregnancy is one proposed risk factor for gastroschisis, but reported associations have been modest, suggesting that differences in genetic susceptibility might play a role. We included 108 non-Hispanic white and 62 Hispanic families who had infants with gastroschisis, and 1147 non-Hispanic white and 337 Hispanic families who had liveborn infants with no major structural birth defects (controls) in these analyses. DNA was extracted from buccal cells collected from infa...

  8. Paternal Metabolic and Cardiovascular Risk Factors for Fetal Growth Restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Hillman, Sara; Peebles, Donald M.; Williams, David J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Fathers of low–birth weight offspring are more likely to have type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in later life. We investigated whether paternal insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk factors were evident at the time that fetal growth–restricted offspring were born. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We carried out a case-control study of men who fathered pregnancies affected by fetal growth restriction, in the absence of recognized fetal disease (n = 42), compared with men who...

  9. Endocrine and Metabolic Biomarkers Predicting Early Childhood Obesity Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socha, Piotr; Hellmuth, Christian; Gruszfeld, Dariusz; Demmelmair, Hans; Rzehak, Peter; Grote, Veit; Weber, Martina; Escribano, Joaquin; Closa-Monasterolo, Ricardo; Dain, Elena; Langhendries, Jean-Paul; Riva, Enrica; Verduci, Elvira; Koletzko, Berthold

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence of long-term effects of early dietary intervention in infancy on later obesity risk. Many studies showed reduced risk of obesity with breastfeeding in infancy, which could be related to the reduced protein intake with human milk compared to infant formula. In a randomized controlled trial (Childhood Obesity Project), we were able to show that infant formula with reduced protein content results in lower BMI both at 2 and 6 years. These effects seem to be mediated mainly by branched-chain amino acids which stimulate the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 axis and insulin release. In this trial, we also showed an influence of high-protein diet on larger kidney size, which seems to be partly explained by a significant effect of free IGF-1 on kidney volume. The IGF-1 axis was shown to regulate early growth, adipose tissue differentiation and early adipogenesis in animals and in humans. Leptin and adiponectin can also be regarded as important endocrine regulators of obesity. These markers were tested in observational studies. Leptin seems to be closely correlated with BMI but changes in adiponectin require further exploration. Still, there is a lack of good data or some results are contradictory to indicate the role of either leptin or adiponectin in infancy for determining later obesity risk. PMID:27088335

  10. Birth weight and metabolic risk in women of different nutrition levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlica Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, obesity is one of the most important health problems in both developed and developing countries. Recent studies have shown a significant association of obesity and its complications with birth weight. The aim of our study was to analyze the effect of birth weight on the occurrence of metabolic disorders in normal weight and obese women. Material and Methods: The study group included 134 females of average age 41.71±11.56 years. In these women the relationship between birth weight and anthropometric and biochemical parameters, as well as with blood pressure values was analyzed. Results: Our results show that women with higher birth weight had higher values of the anthropometric indicators of fat mass and distribution (such as body mass index, total fat mass, waist circumference and hip circumference, as well as higher values of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol. In contrast, the values of systolic and diastolic blood pressure and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol were lower in women with higher birth weight. The analysis of metabolic profile in women of different nutritional status indicates that normal weight women with metabolic syndrome had a lower birth weight when compared with normal weight women without metabolic risk (3.15 vs. 3.40 kg, p>0.05. Conclusion: Higher birth weight is related with higher fat mass, while lower birth weight is related with metabolic disturbances. Birth weight seemed to be determinant of metabolic risk in normal weight women.

  11. The Effect of Exercise on the Cardiovascular Risk Factors Constituting the Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pattyn, Nele; Cornelissen, Véronique A; Eshghi, Saeed R. Toghi; Vanhees, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Background Numerous meta-analyses have investigated the effect of exercise in different populations and for single cardiovascular risk factors, but none have specifically focused on the metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients and the concomitant effect of exercise on all associated cardiovascular risk factors. Objective The aim of this article was to perform a systematic review with a meta-analysis of randomized and clinical controlled trials (RCTs, CTs) investigating the effect of exercise on car...

  12. Selective screening of 650 high risk Iranian patients for detection of inborn error of metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Pishva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although metabolic diseases individually are rare ,but overall have an incidence of 1/2000 and can cause devastating and irreversible effect if not diagnosed early and treated promptly. selective screening is an acceptable method for detection of these multi presentation diseases.Method: using panel neonatal screening for detection of metabolic diseases in 650 high risk Iranian patients in Fars province. The following clinical features were used as inclusion criteria for investigation of the patients.Lethargy, poor feeding ,persistent vomiting, cholestasis, intractable seizure ,decreased level of consciousness ,persistent hypoglycemia, unexplained acid base disturbance and unexplained neonatal death.Result: Organic acidemia with 40 cases (42% was the most frequent disorder diagnosed in our high risk populations, followed by disorder of galactose metabolism(30%, 15 patient had classic galactosemia(GALT

  13. Selective screening of 650 high risk Iranian patients for detection of inborn error of metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Pishva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although metabolic diseases individually are rare ,but overall have an incidence of 1/2000 and can cause devastating and irreversible effect if not diagnosed early and treated promptly. selective screening is an acceptable method for detection of these multi presentation diseases. Method: using panel neonatal screening for detection of metabolic diseases in 650 high risk Iranian patients in Fars province. The following clinical features were used as inclusion criteria for investigation of the patients. Lethargy, poor feeding ,persistent vomiting, cholestasis, intractable seizure ,decreased level of consciousness ,persistent hypoglycemia, unexplained acid base disturbance and unexplained neonatal death. Result: Organic acidemia with 40 cases (42% was the most frequent disorder diagnosed in our high risk populations, followed by disorder of galactose metabolism(30%, 15 patient had classic galactosemia(GALT

  14. Coffee intake and risk of obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Ask Tybjærg; Thomsen, Mette; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages. We tested the hypothesis that genetically high coffee intake is associated with low risk of obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, and with related components thereof. METHODS: We included 93,179 individuals from two large...... general population cohorts in a Mendelian randomization study. We tested first whether high coffee intake is associated with low risk of obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, and with related components thereof, in observational analyses; second, whether five genetic variants near the CYP1A1......, CYP1A2 and AHR genes are associated with coffee intake; and third, whether the genetic variants are associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, and with related components thereof. Finally, we tested the genetic association with type 2 diabetes in a meta-analysis including up...

  15. Breast cancer: further metabolic-endocrine risk markers?

    OpenAIRE

    Stoll, B. A.

    1997-01-01

    There is evidence that increased oestrogen receptor (ER) expression in normal mammary epithelium may be a risk marker for the development of breast cancer. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) is a potent inducer of mitosis and has been shown to synergize with oestrogen in stimulating the growth of human breast cancer in vitro. In these cells oestradiol has been shown to upregulate IGF type 1 receptor (IGFR), and recently a similar effect has been reported in normal human breast tissue xenogra...

  16. Genetic Variants of Homocysteine Metabolizing Enzymes and the Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janošíková, B.; Pavlíková, Markéta; Kocmanová, Dora; Vítová, D.; Veselá, K.; Krupková, L.; Kahleová, R.; Krijt, J.; Kraml, P.; Hyánek, J.; Zvárová, Jana; Anděl, M.; Kožich, V.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 79, - (2003), s. 167-175. ISSN 1096-7192 R&D Projects: GA MZd NM26; GA MZd NM6548 Keywords : coronary disease * risk factors * genes * homocysteine * metabolism Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 2.038, year: 2003

  17. Age and metabolic risk factors associated with oxidatively damaged DNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhr, Mille; Jensen, Annie; Eriksen, Louise; Grønbæk, Morten; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2015-01-01

    , cholesterol and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). In the group of men, there were significant positive associations between alcohol intake, HbA1c and FPG-sensitive sites in multivariate analysis. The levels of metabolic risk factors were positively associated with age, yet only few subjects fulfilled all...

  18. Metabolic Risk Susceptibility in Men Is Partially Related to Adiponectin/Leptin Ratio

    OpenAIRE

    Gloria Lena Vega; Grundy, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. High adiponectin/leptin ratio may be protective from metabolic risks imparted by high triglyceride, low HDL, and insulin resistance. Methods. This cross-sectional study examines plasma adipokine levels in 428 adult men who were subgrouped according to low (

  19. Metabolic Syndrome Is Associated with Increased Breast Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Bhandari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although individual metabolic risk factors are reported to be associated with breast cancer risk, controversy surrounds risk of breast cancer from metabolic syndrome (MS. We report the first systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between MS and breast cancer risk in all adult females. Methods. Studies were retrieved by searching four electronic reference databases [PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL, Web of Science, and ProQuest through June 30, 2012] and cross-referencing retrieved articles. Eligible for inclusion were longitudinal studies reporting associations between MS and breast cancer risk among females aged 18 years and older. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each study and pooled using random-effects models. Publication bias was assessed quantitatively (Trim and Fill and qualitatively (funnel plots. Heterogeneity was examined using Q and I2 statistics. Results. Representing nine independent cohorts and 97,277 adult females, eight studies met the inclusion criteria. A modest, positive association was observed between MS and breast cancer risk (RR: 1.47, 95% CI, 1.15–1.87; z=3.13; p=0.002; Q=26.28, p=0.001; I2=69.55%. No publication bias was observed. Conclusions. MS is associated with increased breast cancer risk in adult women.

  20. All-Cause Mortality Risk of Metabolically Healthy Obese Individuals in NHANES III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Durward

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mortality risk across metabolic health-by-BMI categories in NHANES-III was examined. Metabolic health was defined as: (1 homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR <2.5; (2 ≤2 Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III metabolic syndrome criteria; (3 combined definition using ≤1 of the following: HOMA-IR ≥1.95 (or diabetes medications, triglycerides ≥1.7 mmol/L, HDL-C <1.04 mmol/L (males or <1.30 mmol/L (females, LDL-C ≥2.6 mmol/L, and total cholesterol ≥5.2 mmol/L (or cholesterol-lowering medications. Hazard ratios (HR for all-cause mortality were estimated with Cox regression models. Nonpregnant women and men were included (n=4373, mean ± SD, age 37.1±10.9 years, BMI 27.3±5.8 kg/m2, 49.4% female. Only 40 of 1160 obese individuals were identified as MHO by all definitions. MHO groups had superior levels of clinical risk factors compared to unhealthy individuals but inferior levels compared to healthy lean groups. There was increased risk of all-cause mortality in metabolically unhealthy obese participants regardless of definition (HOMA-IR HR 2.07 (CI 1.3–3.4, P<0.01; ATP-III HR 1.98 (CI 1.4–2.9, P<0.001; combined definition HR 2.19 (CI 1.3–3.8, P<0.01. MHO participants were not significantly different from healthy lean individuals by any definition. While MHO individuals are not at significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality, their clinical risk profile is worse than that of metabolically healthy lean individuals.

  1. Cardiovascular risk and prevalence of metabolic syndrome by differing criteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei-ju; XUE Hao; SUN Kai; SONG Xiao-dong; WANG Yi-bo; ZHEN Yi-song; HAN Yun-feng; HUI Ru-tai

    2008-01-01

    Background The prevalence of metabolic syndrome(MetS)in hypertensive population in Chinese countryside is unknown.Firstly this study compared the prevalence of MetS according to National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) ATPlll,revised NCEP and International Diabetes Federation(IDF)definitions.Secondly,it investigated the association between MetS,coronary heart disease(CHD)and stroke in patients with hypertension. Methods In this CROSS sectional study,the cluster sampling method was used.Three MetS definitions were applied to 1418 normal subjects and 5348 hypertensive patients aged 40-75 years in rural areas in China.The agreement between different MetS definitions was estimated by K statistics.Logistic regression analyses determined the association between MetS defined by the three MetS definitions and CHD and stroke.Results In subjects without hypertension,the prevalence of Mets was 4.1%bv NCEP definition.8.3%revised NCEP definition and 7.8%IDF definition.In hypertensive individuals,the prevalence was 1 4.0%,32.9%,and 27.4%in men:35.6%,53.1%,and 50.2%in women by the same definitions,respectively.In hypertensive individuals,the agreement was 94.4%in men and 97.0%in women between revised NCEP and IDF definitions.The IDF defined MetS was more strongly associated with CHD than the NCEP or revised NCEP defined MetS(adjusted odds ratio:1.92 compared with 1.85 and 1.69 in men:1.64 compared with 1.48 and 1.60 in women).Conclusions In the patients with hypertension,the revised NCEP and IDF definitions identified more individuals than NCEP definition and their agreement is very high.The IDF defined MetS is more strongly associated with CHD than the NCEP or revised NCEP defined MetS,but weakly or not associated with stroke.

  2. Association of Adiponectin Polymorphism with Metabolic Syndrome Risk and Adiponectin Level with Stroke Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hui-Ping; Sun, Liang; Li, Xing-Hui; Che, Fu-Gang; Zhu, Xiao-Quan; Yang, Fan; Han, Jing; Jia, Chun-Yuan; Yang, Ze

    2016-01-01

    Many previous studies have provided evidence that the ADIPOQ +45T>G polymorphism (rs2241766) might cause metabolic syndrome (MS). As a cardiovascular manifestation of MS, the incidence of stroke is associated with adiponectin; however, the results remain controversial and inconsistent. Systematic searches of relevant studies published up to Dec 2014 and Jan 2016 on the ADIPOQ +45T>G polymorphism and the risk of MS and adiponectin levels and the risk of stroke, respectively, were conducted in MEDLINE and EMBASE. The odds ratio (OR) or risk ratio (RR) and their 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were extracted. Sixteen studies containing 4,113 MS cases and 3,637 healthy controls indicated a weak positive association between ADIPOQ +45 T>G and MS in the dominant genetic model (OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.03-1.65), which was also validated by stratified subgroup analyses. Twelve studies including 26,213 participants and 4,246 stroke cases indicated that 5 μg/ml increments in adiponectin level were not relevant to stroke risk (RR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.00-1.10, P = 0.069). This study suggested a weak positive association of ADIPOQ +45T>G with MS and a strong association with metabolic-related disease. Additionally, adiponectin level was not a causal factor of increasing stroke risk. PMID:27578536

  3. Flavan 3-ols improve metabolic syndrome risk factors: evidence and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakabe, Naomi

    2013-05-01

    Flavan 3-ols, a type of polyphenolic substance, are distributed in a number of plant foods. Of these foods, chocolate is very rich in flavan 3-ols as flavan 3-ol monomers, (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin, and the oligomers as procyanidins. There is evidence that cacao products containing flavan 3-ols have the potential to contribute to the risk reduction of cardiometabolic disorders according to recent epidemiological or intervention studies. This review focuses on recent advances in research on the ability of flavan 3-ols to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease as a result of improving metabolic syndrome risk factors and these mechanisms. PMID:23704807

  4. Iron in Child Obesity. Relationships with Inflammation and Metabolic Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Bouglé

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe sequestration is described in overweight and in its associated metabolic complications, i.e., metabolic syndrome (MetS and non-alcoholic liver fatty disease (NAFLD; however, the interactions between Fe, obesity and inflammation make it difficult to recognize the specific role of each of them in the risk of obesity-induced metabolic diseases. Even the usual surrogate marker of Fe stores, ferritin, is influenced by inflammation; therefore, in obese subjects inflammation parameters must be measured together with those of Fe metabolism. This cross-sectional study in obese youth (502 patients; 57% girls: 11.4 ± 3.0 years old (x ± SD; BMI z score 5.5 ± 2.3, multivariate regression analysis showed associations between Fe storage assessed by serum ferritin with risk factors for MetS and NAFLD, assessed by transaminase levels, which were independent of overweight and the acute phase protein fibrinogen. Further studies incorporating the measurement of complementary parameters of Fe metabolism could improve the comprehension of mechanisms involved.

  5. Protocol-based metabolic evaluation in high-risk patients with renal stones in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Julka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Renal calculus disease has a lifetime recurrence rate of 80%. Protocol-based metabolic evaluation in high-risk subjects for recurrent renal stones reveals abnormalities in a large subset of subjects. However, such information is not available in Indian subjects. Aims: To evaluate the abnormalities by a protocol-based metabolic evaluation in patients at a high risk for recurrent renal stones. Settings and Design: Prospective, academic tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: Fifty North Indian patients (38 males and 12 females; mean age 38 ± 10.2 years with recurrent or bilateral renal stones were evaluated. All subjects underwent a protocol-based evaluation involving estimation of serum total calcium, phosphorus, creatinine, albumin, iPTH, 25(OHD 3 , 1,25(OH 2 D 3 , and a calcium load test. Estimation of daily urinary excretion of volume, oxalate, calcium, uric acid, and citrate, and urinary acidification studies were performed. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics and t-test. Results: An underlying disorder was detected in 48 (96% patients. Almost half had two or more metabolic abnormalities. The metabolic abnormalities detected were: Hypercalciuria 26 (52% patients, renal hypercalciuria 16 (32%, absorptive hypercalciuria 6 (12%, unclassified hypercalciuria 4 (8%, hyperoxaluria 27 (54%, hyperuricosuria 9 (18%, distal renal tubular acidosis 4 (8%; 2 complete and 2 partial, primary hyperparathyroidism 3 (6%, and hypocitraturia 14 (n=18, 77%. In two patients, the etiology could not be detected. Conclusions: Protocol-based metabolic evaluation reveals metabolic abnormalities in majority of patients with nephrolithiasis. The spectrums of metabolic abnormalities are different in Indian subjects as compared to the western population.

  6. Polymorphisms in fatty acid metabolism-related genes are associated with colorectal cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeft, B.; Linseisen, J.; Beckmann, L.; Muller-Decker, K.; Canzian, F.; Husing, A.; Kaaks, R.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Jakobsen, M.U.; Overvad, K.; Hansen, R.D.; Knuppel, S.; Boeing, H.; Trichopoulou, A.; Koumantaki, Y.; Trichopoulos, D.; Berrino, F.; Palli, D.; Panico, S.; Tumino, R.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.; van Duijnhoven, F.J.B.; van Gils, C.H.; Peeters, P.H.; Dumeaux, V.; Lund, E.; Castano, J.M.H.; Munoz, X.; Rodriguez, L.; Barricarte, A.; Manjer, J.; Jirstrom, K.; Van Guelpen, B.; Hallmans, G.; Spencer, E.A.; Crowe, F.L.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.; Morois, S.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Chajes, V.; Jenab, M.; Boffetta, P.; Vineis, P.; Mouw, T.; Norat, T.; Riboli, E.; Nieters, A.

    2010-01-01

    as contributing factor to colon carcinogenesis. We examined the association between genetic variability in 43 fatty acid metabolism-related genes and colorectal risk in 1225 CRC cases and 2032 controls participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Three......Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignant tumor and the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The crucial role of fatty acids for a number of important biological processes suggests a more in-depth analysis of inter-individual differences in fatty acid metabolizing genes...

  7. SHIFTWORK AS ONE OF RISK FACTORS OF ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION AND METABOLIC DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background. Shiftwork is considered as one of risk factors of arterial hypertension (HT) and metabolic disorders. Aim. To study effects of different types of shift plan on HT and the metabolic disorders development. Material and Methods. 1091 men were included in the study. Patients were split into subgroups according to age (20–29, 30–39, 40–49, 50–59 years old) and shift plan (steady or shiftable work schedule). HT (blood pressure >130/85 mm Hg), abdominal obesity (waist circumference &g...

  8. Postprandial Metabolism of Macronutrients and Cardiometabolic Risk: Recent Developments, Emerging Concepts, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacome-Sosa, Miriam; Parks, Elizabeth J; Bruno, Richard S; Tasali, Esra; Lewis, Gary F; Schneeman, Barbara O; Rains, Tia M

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States. Although the role of habitual lifestyle factors such as physical activity and dietary patterns in increasing CVD risk has long been appreciated, less is known about how acute daily activities may cumulatively contribute to long-term disease risk. Here, the term acute refers to metabolic responses occurring in a short period of time after eating, and the goal of this article is to review recently identified stressors that can occur after meals and during the sleep-wake cycle to affect macronutrient metabolism. It is hypothesized that these events, when repeated on a regular basis, contribute to the observed long-term behavioral risks identified in population studies. In this regard, developments in research methods have supported key advancements in 3 fields of macronutrient metabolism. The first of these research areas is the focus on the immediate postmeal metabolism, spanning from early intestinal adsorptive events to the impact of incretin hormones on these events. The second topic is a focus on the importance of meal components on postprandial vasculature function. Finally, some of the most exciting advances are being made in understanding dysregulation in metabolism early in the day, due to insufficient sleep, that may affect subsequent processing of nutrients throughout the day. Key future research questions are highlighted which will lead to a better understanding of the relations between nocturnal, basal (fasting), and early postmeal events, and aid in the development of optimal sleep and targeted dietary patterns to reduce cardiometabolic risk. PMID:26980820

  9. Gastrointestinal and renal abnormalities in cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFC) is an uncommon autosomal recessive condition recently distinguished from Noonan syndrome but with more marked growth failure and ectodermal dysplasia. Abdominal symptoms are frequently described but anatomic lesions in CFC have rarely been described. We have found significant anatomic abnormalities in CFC patients including antral foveolar hyperplasia, severe constipation with fecal impaction, nephrocalcinosis and renal cysts. (orig.)

  10. The resistance evaluation: Effects of a specific training program on professional fire-fighter cardio-respiratory fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.J. Mourão

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The fire-fighters have an increased risk for developing cardiac pathologies and also a higher index of premature death than other individuals that perform high risk jobs. In this way, low physical fitness obviously limits fire-fighter performance, as well as degrades their health. However this fact not only damages the individual fire-fighter but also the institution that he represents hence severely questioning property and general public safety. The cardio-respiratory fitness had been identify as the most important physical fitness component. In this way, we developed a 12 weeks training program, to improve the cardio-respiratory fitness in a Professional fire-fighters corporation. According to reference values, before training these fire-fighters did not have enough cardio-respiratory fitness to adequately perform their job requirements with efficacy and safety (VO2máx=44,17ml/kg/min. However after training there was great improvement (VO2máx=52,69 ml/kg/min, providing a safe and more qualified service for the general population.

  11. Associations between metabolic disorders and risk of cancer in Danish men and women – a nationwide cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Siv Mari; Gislason, Gunnar; Moore, Lynn L.; Andersson, Charlotte; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Denis, Gerald V.; Schmiegelow, Michelle Dalgas

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of metabolic disorders is increasing and has been suggested to increase cancer risk, but the relation between metabolic disorders and risk of cancer is unclear, especially in young adults. We investigated the associations between diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia on risk of all-site as well as site-specific cancers. Methods We consecutively included men and women from nationwide Danish registries 1996–2011, if age 20–89 and without cancer prior to date...

  12. Alimentary Habits, Physical Activity, and Framingham Global Risk Score in Metabolic Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Thays Soliman; Piovesan, Carla Haas; Gustavo, Andréia da Silva; Macagnan, Fabrício Edler; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos; Feoli, Ana Maria Pandolfo, E-mail: anamariafeoli@hotmail.com [Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-04-15

    Metabolic syndrome is a complex disorder represented by a set of cardiovascular risk factors. A healthy lifestyle is strongly related to improve Quality of Life and interfere positively in the control of risk factors presented in this condition. To evaluate the effect of a program of lifestyle modification on the Framingham General Cardiovascular Risk Profile in subjects diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. A sub-analysis study of a randomized clinical trial controlled blind that lasted three months. Participants were randomized into four groups: dietary intervention + placebo (DIP), dietary intervention + supplementation of omega 3 (fish oil 3 g/day) (DIS3), dietary intervention + placebo + physical activity (DIPE) and dietary intervention + physical activity + supplementation of omega 3 (DIS3PE). The general cardiovascular risk profile of each individual was calculated before and after the intervention. The study included 70 subjects. Evaluating the score between the pre and post intervention yielded a significant value (p < 0.001). We obtained a reduction for intermediate risk in 25.7% of subjects. After intervention, there was a significant reduction (p < 0.01) on cardiovascular age, this being more significant in groups DIP (5.2%) and DIPE (5.3%). Proposed interventions produced beneficial effects for reducing cardiovascular risk score. This study emphasizes the importance of lifestyle modification in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Alimentary Habits, Physical Activity, and Framingham Global Risk Score in Metabolic Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolic syndrome is a complex disorder represented by a set of cardiovascular risk factors. A healthy lifestyle is strongly related to improve Quality of Life and interfere positively in the control of risk factors presented in this condition. To evaluate the effect of a program of lifestyle modification on the Framingham General Cardiovascular Risk Profile in subjects diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. A sub-analysis study of a randomized clinical trial controlled blind that lasted three months. Participants were randomized into four groups: dietary intervention + placebo (DIP), dietary intervention + supplementation of omega 3 (fish oil 3 g/day) (DIS3), dietary intervention + placebo + physical activity (DIPE) and dietary intervention + physical activity + supplementation of omega 3 (DIS3PE). The general cardiovascular risk profile of each individual was calculated before and after the intervention. The study included 70 subjects. Evaluating the score between the pre and post intervention yielded a significant value (p < 0.001). We obtained a reduction for intermediate risk in 25.7% of subjects. After intervention, there was a significant reduction (p < 0.01) on cardiovascular age, this being more significant in groups DIP (5.2%) and DIPE (5.3%). Proposed interventions produced beneficial effects for reducing cardiovascular risk score. This study emphasizes the importance of lifestyle modification in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases

  14. Metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and other cardiovascular risk factors in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, José Bonifácio; Santos, Alcione Miranda Dos; Barbosa, Marcelo Mesquita; Barbosa, Márcio Mesquita; Carvalho, Carolina Abreu de; Fonseca, Poliana Cristina de Almeida; Fonseca, Jessica Magalhães; Barbosa, Maria do Carmo Lacerda; Bogea, Eduarda Gomes; Silva, Antônio Augusto Moura da

    2016-04-01

    A cross-sectional population-based study using questionnaire and anthropometric data was conducted on 968 university students of São Luís, Brazil, from which 590 showed up for blood collection. In the statistical analysis the Student t-test, Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests were used. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome by the Joint Interim Statement (JIS) criteria was 20.5%, almost three times more prevalent in men (32.2%) than in women (13.5%) (P sedentary lifestyle, obesity, abdominal obesity, elevated triglycerides and metabolic syndrome than students from public institutions. High prevalences of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and other cardiovascular risk factors were found in this young population. This suggests that the burden of these diseases in the future will be increased. PMID:27076011

  15. [The significance of lifestyle as a risk factor for the metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujii, Satoru; Kuzuya, Hideshi

    2004-06-01

    The metabolic syndrome is featured by obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, additionally associated with inflammatory and fibrinolytic dysfunctions, all of which are risk factors of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. The lifestyle factors that could cause and aggravate the metabolic syndrome are physical inactivity, calorie-dense diet, habitual alcohol drinking and smoking, and psychosocial stress. Energy excess along with a lot of saturated fat, i.e. more fast food and sugar-containing drinks, and sedentary lifestyle like television viewing are contributing to the epidemic of obesity. The significance of lifestyle from birth to adulthood will be reviewed in the context of the metabolic syndrome, as well as the background and environment in which the convenient lifestyle spread far and wide among us. PMID:15206140

  16. Risk of metabolic syndrome among children living in metropolitan Kuala Lumpur: A case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Mohd N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, the metabolic syndrome has been studied among children in many countries but not in Malaysia. Hence, this study aimed to compare metabolic risk factors between overweight/obese and normal weight children and to determine the influence of gender and ethnicity on the metabolic syndrome among school children aged 9-12 years in Kuala Lumpur and its metropolitan suburbs. Methods A case control study was conducted among 402 children, comprising 193 normal-weight and 209 overweight/obese. Weight, height, waist circumference (WC and body composition were measured, and WHO (2007 growth reference was used to categorise children into the two weight groups. Blood pressure (BP was taken, and blood was drawn after an overnight fast to determine fasting blood glucose (FBG and full lipid profile, including triglycerides (TG, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and total cholesterol (TC. International Diabetes Federation (2007 criteria for children were used to identify metabolic syndrome. Results Participants comprised 60.9% (n = 245 Malay, 30.9% (n = 124 Chinese and 8.2% (n = 33 Indian. Overweight/obese children showed significantly poorer biochemical profile, higher body fat percentage and anthropometric characteristics compared to the normal-weight group. Among the metabolic risk factors, WC ≥90th percentile was found to have the highest odds (OR = 189.0; 95%CI 70.8, 504.8, followed by HDL-C≤1.03 mmol/L (OR = 5.0; 95%CI 2.4, 11.1 and high BP (OR = 4.2; 95%CI 1.3, 18.7. Metabolic syndrome was found in 5.3% of the overweight/obese children but none of the normal-weight children (p Conclusions We conclude that being overweight or obese poses a greater risk of developing the metabolic syndrome among children. Indian ethnicity is at higher risk compared to their counterparts of the same age. Hence, primary intervention strategies are

  17. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a particular food provides to the body. A chocolate bar has more calories than an apple, so ... More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood ...

  18. Relationship of Adipocyte Size with Adiposity and Metabolic Risk Factors in Asian Indians

    OpenAIRE

    Ved Prakash Meena; V Seenu; Sharma, M. C.; Saumya Ranjan Mallick; Ashu Seith Bhalla; Nandita Gupta; Anant Mohan; Randeep Guleria; Ravindra M. Pandey; Kalpana Luthra; Naval K. Vikram

    2014-01-01

    Background Enlargement of adipocyte is associated with their dysfunction and alterations in metabolic functions. Objectives We evaluated the association of adipocyte size of subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue with body composition and cardiovascular risk factors in Asian Indians. Methodology Eighty (40 males and 40 females) non-diabetic adult subjects undergoing elective abdominal surgery were included. Pre-surgery evaluation included anthropometric measurements, % body fat by bioimpedan...

  19. Pycnogenol® supplementation improves health risk factors in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcaro, G; Cornelli, U; Luzzi, R; Cesarone, M R; Dugall, M; Feragalli, B; Errichi, S; Ippolito, E; Grossi, M G; Hosoi, M; Cornelli, M; Gizzi, G

    2013-10-01

    This open, controlled study evaluated the effects of 6 month supplementation with Pycnogenol® maritime pine bark extract on health risk factors in subjects with metabolic syndrome. Pycnogenol® was used with the aim of improving risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome, central obesity, elevated triglycerides (TG), low HDL cholesterol, high blood pressure and fasting blood glucose. Sixty-four subjects (range 45-55 years) presenting with all five risk factors of metabolic syndrome were included, and Pycnogenol® was administered for 6 months. A group of 66 equivalent subjects were followed up as controls. In the 6-month study Pycnogenol® supplementation 150 mg/day decreased waist circumference, TG levels, blood pressure and increased the HDL cholesterol levels in subjects. Pycnogenol lowered fasting glucose from baseline 123 ± 8.6 mg/dl to 106.4 ± 5.3 after 3 months and to 105.3 ± 2.5 at the end of the study (p Pycnogenol from 106.2 ± 2.2 cm to 98.8 ± 2.3 cm and to 98.3 ± 2.1 after 3 and 6 months. Women's waist decreased from 90.9 ± 1.6 cm to 84.6 ± 2.1 cm and to 83.6 ± 2.2 cm after 3 and 6 months. Both genders waist circumference reduction was significant as compared to controls at both time points. In addition, plasma free radicals decrease in the Pycnogenol group was more effective than in the control group (-34.6%; p Pycnogenol® for improving health risk factors in subjects with metabolic syndrome. PMID:23359520

  20. Arterial distensibility in adolescents: the influence of adiposity, the metabolic syndrome, and classic risk factors.

    OpenAIRE

    Whincup, P H; Gilg, J A; Donald, A E; Katterhorn, M.; Oliver, C.; Cook, D.G.; Deanfield, J E

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis develops from childhood, but the determinants of this preclinical stage remain uncertain. We examined the relations of classic coronary risk factors, adiposity and its associated metabolic disturbances, to arterial distensibility (a marker of early arterial disease) in 13- to 15-year-olds, some of whom had previously been studied at ages 9 to 11 years. METHODS AND RESULTS: Brachial artery distensibility was measured by a noninvasive ultrasound technique in 471 Brit...

  1. Association of Relatives of Hemodialysis Patients with Metabolic Syndrome, Albuminuria and Framingham Risk Score

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jiun-Chi; Chen, Szu-Chia; Lin, Ming-Yen; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Tsai, Jer-Chia; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim Metabolic syndrome (MetS), albuminuria, and the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) are significant predictors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the relationship and clinical significance of these CVD predictors in individuals with a family history of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are unclear. We investigated the association of relatives of hemodialysis (HD) patients with MetS, albuminuria, and the FRS. Methods One hundred and sixty-six relatives of HD patients and 374 ag...

  2. Relation of serum total antioxidant status with metabolic risk factors in Korean adults

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Ho-Kyung; Yoon, Sun

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relation of total antioxidant status (TAS) to metabolic risk factors in Korean adults. Anthropometric measures, blood pressure, serum lipids and fasting glucose were determined in 406 men and women. TAS was measured by using commercially available Randox kit. Serum TAS was significantly positively correlated with body weight (p=0.004), body mass index (BMI) (p=0.033), waist circumference (p=0.017), total cholesterol (p=0.038) and triglycerid...

  3. Racial Disparities between the Sex Steroid Milieu and the Metabolic Risk Profile

    OpenAIRE

    Loreto Jackson; Ronald Goldberg; Robert Ross; Arlette Perry; Xuewen Wang

    2010-01-01

    Aims and Method. The present study examined the relationship between the metabolic risk profile (MRP) and total testosterone (TT) and free testosterone using the free androgen index (FAI) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in 36 Caucasian American (CA) and 30 African-American (AA) women volunteering for a weight loss study. Results. After controlling for age, significant relationships were found between TT and diastolic blood pressure (P = .004 and P = .015 in CA and AA women, resp.). Ad...

  4. The healthy Nordic diet, obesity and obesity-related metabolic risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Kanerva, Noora

    2014-01-01

    Obesity causes metabolic dysregulations that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Diet is known to play a key role in preventing obesity. In epidemiological studies, because single food and nutrient studies focusing on obesity have produced generally inconsistent results, nutrition researchers have shifted to exploring the health related effects of the whole diet, measured with dietary scores. Recently, a diet constructed of healthy Nordic foods has bee...

  5. Prenatal Stress and Stress Coping Style Interact to Predict Metabolic Risk in Male Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Boersma, Gretha J.; Moghadam, Alexander A.; Cordner, Zachary A.; Tamashiro, Kellie L.

    2014-01-01

    Both prenatal stress (PNS) exposure and a passive stress-coping style have been identified as risk factors for insulin resistance in rats. In the current study, we test the hypothesis that PNS and stress-coping style may interact in predicting susceptibility for metabolic disease. To test this hypothesis, adult male control and PNS offspring were behaviorally characterized using a defensive burying test to have either a passive or proactive stress-coping style. In adulthood, all rats were fed...

  6. Long-Term Exercise and Risk of Metabolic and Cardiac Diseases: The Erlangen Fitness and Prevention Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kemmler, Wolfgang; von Stengel, Simon; Bebenek, Michael; Kalender, Willi A.

    2013-01-01

    In female subjects, ageing and the menopausal transition contribute to a rapid increase of metabolic and cardiac risk factors. Exercise may be an option to positively impact various risk factors prone to severe metabolic and cardiac diseases and events. This study was conducted to determine the long-term effect of a multipurpose exercise program on metabolic and cardiac risk scores in postmenopausal women. 137 osteopenic Caucasian females (55.4 ± 3.2 yrs), 1–8 years postmenopausal, were inclu...

  7. Multi-metabolic altered patterns and cardiovascular risk factors associated to hypertension in the community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Ocampo Segura.

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Fundaments: Among other factors, hypertension , hypercholesterolemia and hyperinsulonemia form the so called metabolic syndrome Many studies relate hypertension to other risk factors and to metabolic-endocrine disorders. Objective: To know the relationship between Hypertension and hypercholesterolemia and other cardiovascular risk factors in a community of Cienfuegos city, Cuba. Method: Study of non paired cases and controls . the cases gathered 60 hypertensive patients aged 18 or more years without discrimination of sex, skin color, and other socio demographic features of the population and the control group gathered 60 non- hypertensive individuals from the same population. Results: Family history of hypertension OR:64( 29:14,19 and alcohol consumption OR: 19,8 ( 4,6:84,8 were the most frequent risk factors in the population. The presence of Diabetes mellitus OR 7,8( 2,7:22,4 and dyslipidemia OR 2,7 ( 1,3: 5,6 were the endocrine-metablic factors that associated the most to hypertension Important was the relationship between altered tolerance to glucose and risk factors OR: 14,49 ( 3,64: 57,67 and the relationship altered tolerance to glucose and familial antecedents of hypertension in hypertensive patients which showed a significant association.Conclusion: In the community under study family history of hypertension, alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and altered glucose are strongly associated to hypertension and constitute risk factors that should be taken into consideration in order to diminish the mortality rate due to vascular disorders.

  8. Genetic polymorphism of drug metabolizing enzymes in association with risk of bile duct cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukongviriyapan, Veerapol

    2012-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is the most common cancer in endemic areas of liver fluke infection. Although the liver fluke is recognized as a carcinogenic agent in cholangiocarcinogenesis, other factors may play important roles in bringing about the high prevalence of the cancer in populations of this region. Drug metabolizing enzymes (DME) are essential for detoxification of toxic and carcinogenic chemicals. Moreover, DME can play an alternative role by activating chemicals to more toxic metabolites. The large variation of DME activity among individuals is partly due to polymorphism of the genes encoding enzymes. Defective or variant alleles of DME genes may modify the risk of cancer in those who are exposeed to carcinogenic agents. The focus in this review is on DME genes which have been reported to be associated with CCA risk. These include CYP1A2, arylamine- N-acetyltransferase-1 (NAT1) and NAT2, NADPH-quinone oxidorecutase-1 (NQO1), glutathione-S-transferase M1 (GSTM1), GSTT1, GSTO1 and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). Mutant alleles which have been reportedly associated with an increased risk include CYP1A2*1F, GSTT1 null, GSTO1 and MTHFR 677C>T, whereas, slow NAT2 and NQO1*2 decrease risk and NAT1 variants and GSTM1 null have no effect. These genes modify the risk of cancer potentially by interaction and exposure with certain environmental conditions, thereby altering the metabolism of causative agents. PMID:23480767

  9. Metabolic endotoxemia with obesity: Is it real and is it relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutagy, Nabil E; McMillan, Ryan P; Frisard, Madlyn I; Hulver, Matthew W

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is associated with metabolic derangements in multiple tissues, which contribute to the progression of insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. The underlying stimulus for these metabolic derangements in obesity are not fully elucidated, however recent evidence in rodents and humans suggests that systemic, low level elevations of gut derived endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) may play an important role in obesity related, whole-body and tissue specific metabolic perturbations. LPS initiates a well-characterized signaling cascade that elicits many pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways when bound to its receptor, Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4). Low-grade elevation in plasma LPS has been termed "metabolic endotoxemia" and this state is associated with a heightened pro-inflammatory and oxidant environment often observed in obesity. Given the role of inflammatory and oxidative stress in the etiology of obesity related cardio-metabolic disease risk, it has been suggested that metabolic endotoxemia may serve a key mediator of metabolic derangements observed in obesity. This review provides supporting evidence of mechanistic associations with cell and animal models, and provides complimentary evidence of the clinical relevance of metabolic endotoxemia in obesity as it relates to inflammation and metabolic derangements in humans. Discrepancies with endotoxin detection are considered, and an alternate method of reporting metabolic endotoxemia is recommended until a standardized measurement protocol is set forth. PMID:26133659

  10. Flu vaccination in populations with cardio/neurovascular risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2013-01-01

    Invited seminar (part of an expert workshop on 'Flu vaccination in Elderly Populations') presenting the evidence based on our research on the link between influenza vaccination and cardiovascular disease including acute myocardial infarction and stroke or transient ischaemic attack and the implications of the findings for clinical practice and policy.

  11. Identifying postmenopausal women at risk for cognitive decline within a healthy cohort using a panel of clinical metabolic indicators: potential for detecting an at-Alzheimer's risk metabolic phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettberg, Jamaica R; Dang, Ha; Hodis, Howard N; Henderson, Victor W; St John, Jan A; Mack, Wendy J; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2016-04-01

    Detecting at-risk individuals within a healthy population is critical for preventing or delaying Alzheimer's disease. Systems biology integration of brain and body metabolism enables peripheral metabolic biomarkers to serve as reporters of brain bioenergetic status. Using clinical metabolic data derived from healthy postmenopausal women in the Early versus Late Intervention Trial with Estradiol (ELITE), we conducted principal components and k-means clustering analyses of 9 biomarkers to define metabolic phenotypes. Metabolic clusters were correlated with cognitive performance and analyzed for change over 5 years. Metabolic biomarkers at baseline generated 3 clusters, representing women with healthy, high blood pressure, and poor metabolic phenotypes. Compared with healthy women, poor metabolic women had significantly lower executive, global and memory cognitive performance. Hormone therapy provided metabolic benefit to women in high blood pressure and poor metabolic phenotypes. This panel of well-established clinical peripheral biomarkers represents an initial step toward developing an affordable, rapidly deployable, and clinically relevant strategy to detect an at-risk phenotype of late-onset Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26973115

  12. Risk of the Development of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease in Metabolically Healthy Obese People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nan Hee; Seo, Ji A; Cho, Hyunjoo; Seo, Ji Hye; Yu, Ji Hee; Yoo, Hye Jin; Kim, Sin Gon; Choi, Kyung Mook; Baik, Sei Hyun; Choi, Dong Seop; Shin, Chol; Cho, Nam Han

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The reported effects of a metabolically healthy obese (MHO) phenotype on diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk are contradictory. Within the context of a population-based cohort study, we aimed to investigate the long-term risk of an MHO status for the development of diabetes and CVD, and whether consistency of this phenotype or age affected cardiometabolic outcomes. We recruited 7588 subjects without diabetes or CVD, aged 40 to 69 years at baseline examination, from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study, and followed-up these subjects for 10 years biennially. Participants were divided into 4 groups based on the body mass index and the presence of metabolic syndrome: metabolically healthy normal weight (MHNW), MHO, metabolically unhealthy normal weight (MUNW), and metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO). We defined persistent phenotypes if subjects maintained the same phenotype at every visit from baseline to their last visit. Incident diabetes and CVD morbidity or mortality were identified during 10 years of follow-up. Compared to MHNW controls, MUNW and MUO groups had increased risk for development of diabetes (hazard ratio [HR] 3.0 [95% CI: 2.5–3.6], and 4.0 [3.4–4.7], respectively) and CVD (HR 1.6 [1.3–2.0], and 1.9 [1.5–2.4], respectively). However, the MHO group showed only a marginal increase in risk for diabetes and CVD (HR 1.2 [0.99–1.6], 1.4 [0.99–1.8], respectively). The impact of MHO on the development of diabetes was more prominent in younger individuals (HR 1.9 [1.2–3.1] vs 1.1 [0.8–1.4], diabetes and CVD was significantly higher than those with persistent MHNW (1.9 [1.2–3.1], 2.1 [1.2–3.7], respectively). MHO phenotype, even if maintained for a long time, was associated with a significantly higher risk for the development of diabetes and CVD in Korean subjects. PMID:27082607

  13. Clinical utility of polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolism for breast cancer risk prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaik Mohammad Naushad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the issues in translating the laboratory derived data obtained during discovery phase of research to a clinical setting using a breast cancer model. Laboratory-based risk assessment indi-cated that a family history of breast cancer, reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC1 G80A, thymidylate synthase (TYMS 5’-UTR 28bp tandem repeat, methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and catecholamine-O-methyl transferase (COMT genetic polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolic pathway increase the risk for breast cancer. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII C1561T and cytosolic serine hydroxymethyl transferase (cSHMT C1420T polymorphisms were found to decrease breast cancer risk. In order to test the clinical validity of this information in the risk prediction of breast cancer, data was stratified based on number of protective alleles into four categories and in each category sensitivity and 1-specificity values were obtained based on the distribution of number of risk alleles in cases and controls. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were plotted and the area under ROC curve (C was used as a measure of discriminatory ability between cases and controls. In subjects without any protective allele, aberrations in one-carbon metabolism showed perfect prediction (C=0.93 while the predictability was lost in subjects with one protective allele (C=0.60. However, predictability increased steadily with increasing number of protective alleles (C=0.63 for 2 protective alleles and C=0.71 for 3 protective alleles. The cut-off point for discrimination was >4 alleles in all predictable combinations. Models of this kind can serve as valuable tools in translational re-search, especially in identifying high-risk individuals and reducing the disease risk either by life style modification or by medical intervention.

  14. Analysis of risk factors for benign prostatic hyperplasia and metabolic syndrome in the elderly undergoing health examination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王蕾蕾

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalences of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and metabolic syndrome (MS) and to analyze the risk factors for benign prostatic hyperplasia and metabolic syndrome in the elderly.Methods A total of 490 elderly men undergoing health examination in our hospital from January 2010 to

  15. Risk of development of chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes having metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To measure the relation of creatinine clearance in type-2 diabetic patients with different components of metabolic syndrome and to quantify the relationship of frequency of incident CKD with increasing number of metabolic syndrome components while controlling for age, gender and duration of diabetes. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Patients having type-2 Diabetes for more than 5 years were enrolled. Information regarding age, gender, duration of diabetes, type of diabetes, treatment taking, complete fasting lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, Body Mass Index (BMI), 24 hours urinary proteins and creatinine clearance, co-existent risk factors like hypertension and ischemic heart disease was taken. Patients were divided into groups having one to all five metabolic syndrome traits. Progressive increase in the metabolic syndrome traits was compared with decline in creatinine clearance. Pearson correlation test and multiple logistic regression were applied to determine correlation with significance at r and p <0.05. Out of 104 evaluated female and male patients, 70% had hypertension, ischemic heart disease and a family history of diabetes. While 20% had normal creatinine clearance, 37% had a creatinine clearance between 60-90 ml/min, 19% had a creatinine clearance of 30-59 ml/min, 18% had a creatinine clearance of less than 30 ml/min and 10% were already in stage 5 CKD. The decline in renal function was more severe in subjects evaluated who had a higher number of features of the metabolic syndrome. Age was the only significant determinant of development of CKD (p=0.05). The renal function progressively declined with 3 or more features of the metabolic syndrome. (author)

  16. A combined continuous and interval aerobic training improves metabolic syndrome risk factors in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari-Sarraf V

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Vahid Sari-Sarraf,1 Akbar Aliasgarzadeh,2 Mohammad-Mahdi Naderali,3 Hamid Esmaeili,1 Ebrahim K Naderali4 1Department of Exercise Physiology, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Tabriz, 2Bone Research Centre, Endocrine Unit, Department of Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 3The School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, 4Faculty of Science, Liverpool Hope University, Liverpool, UK Abstract: Individuals with metabolic syndrome have significantly higher risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes leading to premature death mortality. Metabolic syndrome has a complex etiology; thus, it may require a combined and multi-targeted aerobic exercise regimen to improve risk factors associated with it. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combined continuous and interval aerobic training on patients with metabolic syndrome. Thirty adult male with metabolic syndrome (54±8 years were randomly divided into two groups: test training group (TTG; n=15 and control group (CG; n=15. Subjects in TTG performed combined continuous and interval aerobic training using a motorized treadmill three times per week for 16 weeks. Subjects in CG were advised to continue with their normal activities of life. Twenty-two men completed the study (eleven men in each group. At the end of the study, in TTG, there were significant (for all, P<0.05 reductions in total body weight (-3.2%, waist circumference (-3.43 cm, blood pressure (up to -12.7 mmHg, and plasma insulin, glucose, and triacylglyceride levels. Moreover, there were significant (for all, P<0.05 increases VO2max (-15.3% and isometric strength of thigh muscle (28.1% and high-density lipoprotein in TTG. None of the above indices were changed in CG at the end of 16-week study period. Our study suggests that adoption of a 16-week combined continuous and interval aerobic training regimen in men

  17. The Preventable Causes of Death in the United States: Comparative Risk Assessment of Dietary, Lifestyle, and Metabolic Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaei, Goodarz; Ding, Eric L.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Taylor, Ben; Rehm, Jürgen; Murray, Christopher J. L.; Ezzati, Majid

    2009-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the number of deaths caused by risk factors is needed for health policy and priority setting. Our aim was to estimate the mortality effects of the following 12 modifiable dietary, lifestyle, and metabolic risk factors in the United States (US) using consistent and comparable methods: high blood glucose, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and blood pressure; overweight–obesity; high dietary trans fatty acids and salt; low dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids, omega-3 fatty acids (seafood), and fruits and vegetables; physical inactivity; alcohol use; and tobacco smoking. Methods and Findings We used data on risk factor exposures in the US population from nationally representative health surveys and disease-specific mortality statistics from the National Center for Health Statistics. We obtained the etiological effects of risk factors on disease-specific mortality, by age, from systematic reviews and meta-analyses of epidemiological studies that had adjusted (i) for major potential confounders, and (ii) where possible for regression dilution bias. We estimated the number of disease-specific deaths attributable to all non-optimal levels of each risk factor exposure, by age and sex. In 2005, tobacco smoking and high blood pressure were responsible for an estimated 467,000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 436,000–500,000) and 395,000 (372,000–414,000) deaths, accounting for about one in five or six deaths in US adults. Overweight–obesity (216,000; 188,000–237,000) and physical inactivity (191,000; 164,000–222,000) were each responsible for nearly 1 in 10 deaths. High dietary salt (102,000; 97,000–107,000), low dietary omega-3 fatty acids (84,000; 72,000–96,000), and high dietary trans fatty acids (82,000; 63,000–97,000) were the dietary risks with the largest mortality effects. Although 26,000 (23,000–40,000) deaths from ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, and diabetes were averted by current alcohol use, they were

  18. The preventable causes of death in the United States: comparative risk assessment of dietary, lifestyle, and metabolic risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodarz Danaei

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Knowledge of the number of deaths caused by risk factors is needed for health policy and priority setting. Our aim was to estimate the mortality effects of the following 12 modifiable dietary, lifestyle, and metabolic risk factors in the United States (US using consistent and comparable methods: high blood glucose, low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol, and blood pressure; overweight-obesity; high dietary trans fatty acids and salt; low dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids, omega-3 fatty acids (seafood, and fruits and vegetables; physical inactivity; alcohol use; and tobacco smoking. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used data on risk factor exposures in the US population from nationally representative health surveys and disease-specific mortality statistics from the National Center for Health Statistics. We obtained the etiological effects of risk factors on disease-specific mortality, by age, from systematic reviews and meta-analyses of epidemiological studies that had adjusted (i for major potential confounders, and (ii where possible for regression dilution bias. We estimated the number of disease-specific deaths attributable to all non-optimal levels of each risk factor exposure, by age and sex. In 2005, tobacco smoking and high blood pressure were responsible for an estimated 467,000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 436,000-500,000 and 395,000 (372,000-414,000 deaths, accounting for about one in five or six deaths in US adults. Overweight-obesity (216,000; 188,000-237,000 and physical inactivity (191,000; 164,000-222,000 were each responsible for nearly 1 in 10 deaths. High dietary salt (102,000; 97,000-107,000, low dietary omega-3 fatty acids (84,000; 72,000-96,000, and high dietary trans fatty acids (82,000; 63,000-97,000 were the dietary risks with the largest mortality effects. Although 26,000 (23,000-40,000 deaths from ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, and diabetes were averted by current alcohol use, they were outweighed by

  19. Fat cell size and adipokine expression in relation to gender, depot and metabolic risk factors in morbidly obese adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yiying; Zitsman, Jeffrey L.; Hou, Jue; Fennoy, Ilene; Guo, Kaiying; Feinberg, Joshua; Leibel, Rudolph L

    2013-01-01

    Objective To understand the regulation of adipocyte size and adipokine expression in relation to gender, anatomic location, adiposity, and metabolic risk factors in adolescents with morbid obesity. Design and Methods Adipocyte size and adipokine expression in paired abdominal subcutaneous (SAT) and omental (VAT) surgical adipose tissues were related to gender, anatomic location, adiposity, and metabolic risk factors in a group of morbidly obese adolescents. Results Significant depot- and/or g...

  20. Heterogeneity in cost-effectiveness of lifestyle counseling for metabolic syndrome risk groups -primary care patients in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Inna; Hellström, Lennart; Johansson, Pia

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical trials have indicated that lifestyle interventions for patients with lifestyle-related cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors (the metabolic syndrome) are cost-effective. However, patient characteristics in primary care practice vary considerably, i.e. they exhibit heterogeneity in risk factors. The cost-effectiveness of lifestyle interventions is likely to differ over heterogeneous patient groups. METHODS: Patients (62 men, 80 women) in the Kalmar Metabolic Syndrome Pr...

  1. Eating habits of preschool children and the risk of obesity, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Kostecka, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Background & Objective : Nutrient excess and nutrient deficiency in the diets of preschool children can lead to permanent modification of metabolic pathways and increased risk of diet-dependent diseases in adults. Children are most susceptible to the adverse consequences of bad eating habits.The objective of this study was to evaluate the eating habits and the diets of preschool children as risk factors for excessive weight, obesity, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. Methods : Th...

  2. The cardio-protective signaling and mechanisms of adiponectin

    OpenAIRE

    Nanayakkara, Gayani; Kariharan, Thiruchelvan; Wang, Lili; Zhong, Juming; Amin, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    Adiponectin is an endogenous insulin-sensitizing hormone which has been found to regulate energy metabolism throughout the body, including the heart. However, low levels of adiponectin are found in patients with diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Thus it has been suggested to be an independent predictor for cardiovascular risk. Paradoxically, recent studies have also determined that adiponectin has cardioprotective effects against various cardiac related pathologies which lea...

  3. The prevalence of metabolic risk factors among outpatients with diagnosed nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valantinas, Jonas; Apanaviciene, Daiva Asta; Maroziene, Ligita; Sveikata, Audrius

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease; there is growing evidence that it is a hepatic manifestation of a metabolic syndrome. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of metabolic risk factors among patients with NAFLD. Material/Methods Outpatients with NAFLD were recruited into the study. Family physicians recorded patients’ demographic and anthropometric data, leisure-time physical activity, concomitant diseases, and pharmacological treatment for NAFLD into standardized Case Report Forms. Results In total, data on 798 patients were analyzed. Most patients were women and they were older than the men (mean age, 60.2±9.6 vs. 54.5±11.4 years; p30 kg/m2 or central obesity in the 2 age groups (≤60 years and >60 years). Hypertension and diabetes were more prevalent among older men and women. Dyslipidemia was more common among older women. The level of leisure-time physical activity was lower in women and in older patients. The most frequently prescribed pharmacological agents were cytoprotective agents, lipid-lowering drugs, and antioxidants. Conclusions Metabolic risk factors were highly prevalent among patients with NAFLD. Obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia were more prevalent among women. The differences in the prevalence of hypertension seemed to be influenced by older age of women. PMID:22534719

  4. Metabolic Risk Susceptibility in Men Is Partially Related to Adiponectin/Leptin Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Lena Vega

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. High adiponectin/leptin ratio may be protective from metabolic risks imparted by high triglyceride, low HDL, and insulin resistance. Methods. This cross-sectional study examines plasma adipokine levels in 428 adult men who were subgrouped according to low (<6.5 μg/mLand high (≥6.5 μg/mLadiponectin levels or a low or high ratio of adiponectin/leptin. Results. Men with high adiponectin/leptin ratio had lower plasma triglyceride and higher HDL cholesterol than those with low ratio. Similarly, those with high adiponectin/leptin ratio had lower TG/HDL cholesterol ratio and HOMA2-IR than those with low ratio. In contrast, levels of adiponectin or the ratio of adiponectin/leptin did not associate with systolic blood pressure. But the ratio of adiponectin/leptin decreased progressively with the increase in the number of risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Conclusion. Adipokine levels may reflect adipose tissue triglyceride storage capacity and insulin sensitivity. Leptin is an index of fat mass, and adiponectin is a biomarker of triglyceride metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Men with high adiponectin/leptin ratios have better triglyceride profile and insulin sensitivity than men with a low ratio regardless of waist girth.

  5. Gestational diabetes - metabolic risks of adult women with respect to birth weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vejrazkova, D; Lukasova, P; Vankova, M; Bradnova, O; Vacinova, G; Vcelak, J; Cirmanova, V; Andelova, K; Krejci, H; Bendlova, B

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disorders such as obesity, insulin resistance and other components of metabolic syndrome (MetS) are connected with birth weight. Low and high birth weight is associated with a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus, the mechanism is not clear. In this study, we evaluated the association between birth weight and anthropometric as well as biochemical components of MetS in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in comparison with control women. In part of the GDM group, we re-evaluated metabolic changes over 5-8 years. Anthropometry, blood pressure, glucose metabolism during the 3-h oGTT, lipid profile, uric acid, thyroid hormones, and liver enzymes were assessed. From the analyzed components of MetS in adult women we proved the association of low birth weight (birth weight <25th percentile) with glucose processing, in particular among women with a history of GDM. Low birth weight GDM women revealed significantly higher postchallenge insulin secretion and lower peripheral insulin sensitivity. Re-examinations indicate this association persists long after delivery. PMID:26680474

  6. Cardio-respiratory, haematological and biochemical parameter adjustments to exercise: effect of a probiotic in horses during training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Art, T; Votion, D; McEntee, K; Amory, H; Linden, A; Close, R; Lekeux, P

    1994-01-01

    Two randomly distributed groups of thoroughbred horses were compared during a 12-week period for their cardio-respiratory and metabolic adjustment to strenuous exercise, training and detraining. The horses were trained following the same standardized schedule and were regularly investigated using standardized treadmill exercise tests (SET) of increasing speed. After the first SET and during the whole experimental period, a group of 6 horses received a probiotic (Bioracing) once a day while a group of 5 horses received a placebo. All other conditions were similar for both groups. During each SET, the oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide output, tidal volume (inspired volume), respiratory rate and expired minute volume were obtained using 2 ultrasonic pneumotachographs and a mass spectrometer. All the parameters were the mean of the values calculated during the last 20 s of the SET. Heart rate was continuously measured with a polar horse tester. Venous blood was sampled before and after the test and analyzed for various biochemical parameters. In both groups, training induced significant modification in most of the cardio-respiratory parameters, ie peak oxygen uptake, peak carbon dioxide output, respiratory exchange ratio, ventilation/min to oxygen-uptake ratio and oxygen-uptake to heart-rate ratio. After the 3-week detraining period, most of the values were again similar to the pre-training values in both groups. However, the training-induced modifications of most of the cardio-respiratory parameters occurred earlier and were proportionally greater in the probiotic-treated group than in the control. The respiratory coefficient decreased in the control but not in the treated group. All other parameters changed similarly in both groups. This suggests that Bioracing could modify the physiological effects of training by improving some aerobic metabolic capacities for carbohydrate utilization, but that this effect occurs only during training and not during periods of physical

  7. Diet, nutrition intake, and metabolism in populations at high and low risk for colon cancer. Metabolism of bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turjman, N; Goodman, G T; Jaeger, B; Nair, P P

    1984-10-01

    High levels of fecal bile acids have been associated with populations at high risk for developing colon cancer. In this study, 168 subjects were drawn from populations that show low and high mortality from colon cancer [pure vegetarians, lacto-ovo vegetarians, and nonvegetarians Seventh-day Adventists (SDA) and demographically comparable group from the general population]. Lyophilized aliquots of 3-day stool samples were examined for levels of primary (cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids) and secondary (deoxycholic and lithocholic acids) bile acids. Total bile acids (mg/g lyophilized stools) were statistically different among dietary groups: SDA pure vegetarians 2.16 +/- 0.32, SDA lacto-ovo vegetarians 3.66 +/- 0.41, SDA nonvegetarians 4.39 +/- 0.44, general population nonvegetarians 6.04 +/- 0.75; but were similar when stool weights, body weights, and fat intake were taken into account. The most striking difference was evident in the ratio of secondary to primary bile acids: when compared to SDA pure vegetarians, both SDA lacto-ovo vegetarians and SDA nonvegetarians had twice the ratio while values for general population nonvegetarians were five to six times. The data indicate that these differences in excretion patterns among dietary groups reveal distinctly characteristic metabolic features associated with diet and lifestyle. PMID:6486102

  8. Diet and Gut Microbial Function in Metabolic and Cardiovascular Disease Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Katie A; Bennett, Brian J

    2016-10-01

    Over the past decade, the gut microbiome has emerged as a novel and largely unexplored source of variability for metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk, including diabetes. Animal and human studies support several possible pathways through which the gut microbiome may impact health, including the production of health-related metabolites from dietary sources. Diet is considered important to shaping the gut microbiota; in addition, gut microbiota influence the metabolism of many dietary components. In the present paper, we address the distinction between compositional and functional analysis of the gut microbiota. We focus on literature that highlights the value of moving beyond surveys of microbial composition to measuring gut microbial functioning to delineate mechanisms related to the interplay between diet and gut microbiota in cardiometabolic health. PMID:27541295

  9. Risk factors for the development of metabolic syndrome in obese children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folić Nevena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. High prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS in children and adolescents is a great concern of the modern society. Objective. Our aim was to determine the influence of previously investigated, but also and potentially novel risk factors for the development of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents. Methods. Observational case-control clinical study was conducted involving children and adolescents with obesity/metabolic syndrome, treated on inpatient basis from January 2008 to January 2012 at the Pediatric Clinic of the Clinical Centre Kragujevac, Kragujevac, Serbia. The group of “cases” (n=28 included patients aged 10-16 years with the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF criteria, while the control group included twice as many obese patients (n=56 matched to the compared group. Results. Presence of maternal gestational diabetes (ORadjusted: 39.426; 95% CI: 1.822-853.271; p=0.019, and/or lack of breastfeeding in the first six months of life (ORadjusted: 0.079; 95% CI: 0.009-0.716; p=0.024 were significant predictors for developing MetS. Also, microalbuminuria is associated with MetS in obese children and adolescents (ORadjusted: 1.686; 95% CI: 1.188-2.393; p=0.003. Conclusion. Presence of maternal gestational diabetes and/or lack of infant breastfeeding are considered as relevant factors that may contribute to the increased risk of developing MetS syndrome, while microalbuminuria is frequently associated with MetS in obese children and adolescents. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175007

  10. Maternal-fetal metabolic gene-gene interactions and risk of neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Philip J; Mitchell, Laura E; Canfield, Mark A; Shaw, Gary M; Olshan, Andrew F; Finnell, Richard H; Zhu, Huiping

    2014-01-01

    Single-gene analyses indicate that maternal genes associated with metabolic conditions (e.g., obesity) may influence the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs). However, to our knowledge, there have been no assessments of maternal-fetal metabolic gene-gene interactions and NTDs. We investigated 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms among 7 maternal metabolic genes (ADRB3, ENPP1, FTO, LEP, PPARG, PPARGC1A, and TCF7L2) and 2 fetal metabolic genes (SLC2A2 and UCP2). Samples were obtained from 737 NTD case-parent triads included in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study for birth years 1999-2007. We used a 2-step approach to evaluate maternal-fetal gene-gene interactions. First, a case-only approach was applied to screen all potential maternal and fetal interactions (n = 76), as this design provides greater power in the assessment of gene-gene interactions compared to other approaches. Specifically, ordinal logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for each maternal-fetal gene-gene interaction, assuming a log-additive model of inheritance. Due to the number of comparisons, we calculated a corrected p-value (q-value) using the false discovery rate. Second, we confirmed all statistically significant interactions (q < 0.05) using a log-linear approach among case-parent triads. In step 1, there were 5 maternal-fetal gene-gene interactions with q < 0.05. The "top hit" was an interaction between maternal ENPP1 rs1044498 and fetal SLC2A2 rs6785233 (interaction OR = 3.65, 95% CI: 2.32-5.74, p = 2.09×10(-8), q=0.001), which was confirmed in step 2 (p = 0.00004). Our findings suggest that maternal metabolic genes associated with hyperglycemia and insulin resistance and fetal metabolic genes involved in glucose homeostasis may interact to increase the risk of NTDs. PMID:24332798

  11. Prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors and metabolic syndrome in obese Kuwaiti adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boodai SA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Shurooq A Boodai,1 Lynne M Cherry,2 Naveed A Sattar,2 John J Reilly3 1University of Glasgow School of Medicine, Yorkhill Hospitals, Glasgow, Scotland; 2Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, British Heart Foundation Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland; 3University of Strathclyde Physical Activity for Health Group, School of Psychological Sciences and Health, Glasgow, Scotland Background: Childhood and adolescent obesity is associated with insulin resistance, abnormal glucose metabolism, hypertension, dyslipidemia, inflammation, liver disease, and compromised vascular function. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factor abnormalities and metabolic syndrome (MetS in a sample of obese Kuwaiti adolescents, as prevalence data might be helpful in improving engagement with obesity treatment in future. Methods: Eighty obese Kuwaiti adolescents (40 males with a mean (standard deviation age of 12.3 years (1.1 years participated in the present study. All participants had a detailed clinical examination and anthropometry, blood pressure taken, and assessment of fasting levels of C-reactive protein, intracellular adhesion molecule, interleukin-6, fasting blood glucose, insulin, liver function tests (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma glutamyltransferase, lipid profile (cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment, and adiponectin. MetS was assessed using two recognized criteria modified for use in younger individuals. Results: The cardiometabolic risk factors with highest prevalence of abnormal values included aspartate aminotransferase (88.7% of the sample and insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment (67.5%, intracellular adhesion molecule (66.5%, fasting insulin (43.5%, C-reactive protein (42.5%, low

  12. National and subnational mortality effects of metabolic risk factors and smoking in Iran: a comparative risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzadfar Farshad

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality from cardiovascular and other chronic diseases has increased in Iran. Our aim was to estimate the effects of smoking and high systolic blood pressure (SBP, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, total cholesterol (TC, and high body mass index (BMI on mortality and life expectancy, nationally and subnationally, using representative data and comparable methods. Methods We used data from the Non-Communicable Disease Surveillance Survey to estimate means and standard deviations for the metabolic risk factors, nationally and by region. Lung cancer mortality was used to measure cumulative exposure to smoking. We used data from the death registration system to estimate age-, sex-, and disease-specific numbers of deaths in 2005, adjusted for incompleteness using demographic methods. We used systematic reviews and meta-analyses of epidemiologic studies to obtain the effect of risk factors on disease-specific mortality. We estimated deaths and life expectancy loss attributable to risk factors using the comparative risk assessment framework. Results In 2005, high SBP was responsible for 41,000 (95% uncertainty interval: 38,000, 44,000 deaths in men and 39,000 (36,000, 42,000 deaths in women in Iran. High FPG, BMI, and TC were responsible for about one-third to one-half of deaths attributable to SBP in men and/or women. Smoking was responsible for 9,000 deaths among men and 2,000 among women. If SBP were reduced to optimal levels, life expectancy at birth would increase by 3.2 years (2.6, 3.9 and 4.1 years (3.2, 4.9 in men and women, respectively; the life expectancy gains ranged from 1.1 to 1.8 years for TC, BMI, and FPG. SBP was also responsible for the largest number of deaths in every region, with age-standardized attributable mortality ranging from 257 to 333 deaths per 100,000 adults in different regions. Discussion Management of blood pressure through diet, lifestyle, and pharmacological interventions should be a priority in Iran

  13. The prevalence of stunting, overweight and obesity, and metabolic disease risk in rural South African children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunger David B

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low- to middle-income countries are undergoing a health transition with non-communicable diseases contributing substantially to disease burden, despite persistence of undernutrition and infectious diseases. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and patterns of stunting and overweight/obesity, and hence risk for metabolic disease, in a group of children and adolescents in rural South Africa. Methods A cross-sectional growth survey was conducted involving 3511 children and adolescents 1-20 years, selected through stratified random sampling from a previously enumerated population living in Agincourt sub-district, Mpumalanga Province, South Africa. Anthropometric measurements including height, weight and waist circumference were taken using standard procedures. Tanner pubertal assessment was conducted among adolescents 9-20 years. Growth z-scores were generated using 2006 WHO standards for children up to five years and 1977 NCHS/WHO reference for older children. Overweight and obesity for those 2 for overweight and obesity respectively were used for those ≥ 18 years. Waist circumference cut-offs of ≥ 94 cm for males and ≥ 80 cm for females and waist-to-height ratio of 0.5 for both sexes were used to determine metabolic disease risk in adolescents. Results About one in five children aged 1-4 years was stunted; one in three of those aged one year. Concurrently, the prevalence of combined overweight and obesity, almost non-existent in boys, was substantial among adolescent girls, increasing with age and reaching approximately 20-25% in late adolescence. Central obesity was prevalent among adolescent girls, increasing with sexual maturation and reaching a peak of 35% at Tanner Stage 5, indicating increased risk for metabolic disease. Conclusions The study highlights that in transitional societies, early stunting and adolescent obesity may co-exist in the same socio-geographic population. It is likely that this profile

  14. TV and Inactivity Are Separate Contributors to Metabolic Risk Factors in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Ulf Ekelund; Søren Brage; Karsten Froberg; Maarike Harro; Sigmund A Anderssen; Sardinha, Luis B.; Chris Riddoch; Lars Bo Andersen

    2006-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. Childhood obesity is a rapidly growing problem. Twenty-five years ago, overweight children were rare. Now, 155 million of the world's children are overweight, and 30–45 million are obese. Both conditions are diagnosed by comparing a child's body mass index (BMI; weight divided by height squared) with the average BMI for their age and sex. Being overweight during childhood is worrying because it is one of the so-called metabolic-risk factors that increase the chanc...

  15. Sixteen weeks of resistance training can decrease the risk of metabolic syndrome in healthy postmenopausal women

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    Conceição MS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Miguel Soares Conceição,1 Valéria Bonganha,1 Felipe Cassaro Vechin,2 Ricardo Paes de Barros Berton,1 Manoel Emílio Lixandrão,1 Felipe Romano Damas Nogueira,1 Giovana Vergínia de Souza,1 Mara Patricia Traina Chacon-Mikahil,1 Cleiton Augusto Libardi2 1Exercise Physiology Laboratory, School of Physical Education, State University of Campinas, Campinas, 2Laboratory of Neuromuscular Adaptation to Strength Training, School of Physical Education and Sport, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Background: The postmenopausal phase has been considered an aggravating factor for developing metabolic syndrome. Notwithstanding, no studies have as yet investigated the effects of resistance training on metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. Thus, the purpose of this study was to verify whether resistance training could reduce the risk of metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. Methods: Twenty postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to a resistance training protocol (n = 10, 53.40 ± 3.95 years, 64.58 ± 9.22 kg or a control group (n = 10, 53.0 ± 5.7 years, 64.03 ± 5.03 kg. In the resistance training protocol, ten exercises were performed, with 3 × 8–10 maximal repetitions three times per week, and the load was increased every week. Two-way analysis of variance was used to evaluate specific metabolic syndrome Z-score, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, waist circumference, blood pressure, strength, and body composition. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: The main results demonstrated a significant decrease of metabolic syndrome Z-score when the postmenopausal women performed resistance training (P = 0.0162. Moreover, we observed decreases in fasting blood glucose for the resistance training group (P = 0.001, and also significant improvements in lean body mass (P = 0.042, 2.46%, reduction of body fat percentage (P = 0.001, −6.75% and noticeable increases in

  16. Polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism as maternal risk factors for Down syndrome in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-shuai WANG; Fu-yuan QIAO; Ling FENG; Juan-juan LV

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between genetic polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR), the central enzymes in folate metabolism that affects DNA methylation and synthesis, and the risk of Down syndrome in China. Methods: Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral lymphocytes of 64 mothers of children with Down syndrome and 70 age matched control subjects. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism were used to examine the polymorphisms of MTHFR 677C→T, MTRR 66A→G and the relationship between these genotypes and the risk of Down syndrome was analyzed. Results: The results show that the MTHFR 677C→T polymorphism is more prevalent among mothers of children with Down syndrome than among control mothers, with an odds ratio of 3.78 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.78~8.47). In addition, the homozygous MTRR 66A→G polymorphism was independently associated with a 5.2-fold increase in estimated risk (95% CI, 1.90~14.22). The combined presence of both polymorphisms was associated with a greater risk of Down syndrome than the presence of either alone, with an odds ratio of 6.0 (95% CI, 2.058~17.496).The two polymorphisms appear to act without a multiplicative interaction. Conclusion: MTHFR and MTRR gene mutation alleles are related to Down syndrome, and CT, TT and GG gene mutation types increase the risk of Down syndrome.

  17. Modifiable Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Indigenous Populations

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    Adam A. Lucero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify modifiable cardio-metabolic and lifestyle risk factors among indigenous populations from Australia (Aboriginal Australians/Torres Strait Islanders, New Zealand (Māori, and the United States (American Indians and Alaska Natives that contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD. Methods. National health surveys were identified where available. Electronic databases identified sources for filling missing data. The most relevant data were identified, organized, and synthesized. Results. Compared to their non-indigenous counterparts, indigenous populations exhibit lower life expectancies and a greater prevalence of CVD. All indigenous populations have higher rates of obesity and diabetes, hypertension is greater for Māori and Aboriginal Australians, and high cholesterol is greater only among American Indians/Alaska Natives. In turn, all indigenous groups exhibit higher rates of smoking and dangerous alcohol behaviour as well as consuming less fruits and vegetables. Aboriginal Australians and American Indians/Alaska Natives also exhibit greater rates of sedentary behaviour. Conclusion. Indigenous groups from Australia, New Zealand, and the United States have a lower life expectancy then their respective non-indigenous counterparts. A higher prevalence of CVD is a major driving force behind this discrepancy. A cluster of modifiable cardio-metabolic risk factors precede CVD, which, in turn, is linked to modifiable lifestyle risk factors.

  18. Association between markers of glucose metabolism and risk of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinming; Ye, Yao; Wu, Han; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope; Zhang, Honghe; Li, Peiwei; Huang, Jian; Yang, Jun; Wu, Yihua; Xia, Dajing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Independent epidemiological studies have evaluated the association between markers of glucose metabolism (including fasting glucose, fasting insulin, homeostasis model of risk assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and C peptide) and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, such associations have not been systematically analysed and no clear conclusions have been drawn. Therefore, we addressed this issue using a meta-analysis approach. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources PubMed and EMBASE were searched up to May 2015. Primary and secondary outcome measures Either a fixed-effects or random-effects model was adopted to estimate overall ORs for the association between markers of glucose metabolism and the risk of CRC. In addition, dose–response, meta-regression, subgroup and publication bias analyses were conducted. Results 35 studies involving 25 566 patients and 5 706 361 participants were included. Higher levels of fasting glucose, fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, HbA1c and C peptide were all significantly associated with increased risk of CRC (fasting glucose, pooled OR=1.12, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.18; fasting insulin, pooled OR=1.42, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.69; HOMA-IR, pooled OR=1.47, 95% CI 1.24 to 1.74; HbA1c, pooled OR=1.22, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.47 (with borderline significance); C peptide, pooled OR=1.27, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.49). Subgroup analysis suggested that a higher HOMA-IR value was significantly associated with CRC risk in all subgroups, including gender, study design and geographic region. For the relative long-term markers, the association was significant for HbA1c in case–control studies, while C peptide was significantly associated with CRC risk in both the male group and colon cancer. Conclusions The real-time composite index HOMA-IR is a better indicator for CRC risk than are fasting glucose and fasting insulin. The relative long-term markers, HbA1c and C peptide, are also valid predictors for

  19. Chemotherapy refractory testicular germ cell tumor is associated with a variant in Armadillo Repeat gene deleted in Velco-Cardio-Facial syndrome (ARVCF

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    ChunkitFung

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is evidence that inherited genetic variation affects both testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT treatment outcome and risks of late-complications arising from cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Using a candidate gene approach, we examined associations of three genes involved in the cisplatin metabolism pathway, GSTP1, COMT, and TPMT, with TGCT outcome and cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity. Material and Methods: Our study population includes a subset of patients (n=137 from a genome-wide association study at the University of Pennsylvania that evaluates inherited genetic susceptibility to TGCT. All patients in our study had at least one course of cisplatin-based chemotherapy with at least one year of follow up. A total of 90 markers in GSTP1, COMT and TPMT and their adjacent genomic regions (± 20 kb were analyzed for associations with refractory TGCT after first course of chemotherapy, progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS, peripheral neuropathy, and ototoxicity. Results: After adjustment for multiple comparisons, one SNP, rs2073743, in the flanking region (± 20 kb of COMT was associated with refractory TGCT after initial chemotherapy. This SNP lies within the intron region of the Armadillo Repeat gene deleted in Velco-Cardio-Facial syndrome (ARVCF. The G allele of rs2073743 predisposed patients to refractory disease with a relative risk of 2.6 (95% CI 1.1, 6.3; P=0.03. Assuming recessive inheritance, patients with the GG genotype had 22.7 times higher risk (95% CI 3.3, 155.8; P=0.04 of developing refractory disease when compared to those with the GC or CC genotypes. We found no association of our candidate genes with peripheral neuropathy, ototoxicity, PFS and OS. Discussion: This is the first study to suggest that germline genetic variants of ARVCF may affect TGCT outcome. The result of this study is hypothesis generating and should be validated in future studies.

  20. Hypoadiponectinemia in overweight children contributes to a negative metabolic risk profile 6 years later

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kynde, Iben; Heitmann, Berit L; Bygbjerg, Ib C;

    2009-01-01

    follow-up data 6 years later (n = 169). Cardiometabolic risk profile was calculated using a continuous composite score derived from summing of 6 factors standardized to the sample means (Z scores): body mass index, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, total serum cholesterol to serum high......Prognostic biomarkers are needed to identify children at increased cardiometabolic risk. The objective was to study whether markers of metabolism and inflammation, for example, circulating plasma adiponectin, leptin, interleukin-8, and hepatocyte growth factor, are associated with cardiometabolic......-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, serum triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, and the reciprocal value of fitness (maximum watts per kilogram). Overweight was defined using international classification of body mass index cutoff points for children. Plasma adiponectin, leptin, interleukin-8, and hepatocyte...

  1. Relationship of adipocyte size with adiposity and metabolic risk factors in Asian Indians.

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    Ved Prakash Meena

    Full Text Available Enlargement of adipocyte is associated with their dysfunction and alterations in metabolic functions.We evaluated the association of adipocyte size of subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue with body composition and cardiovascular risk factors in Asian Indians.Eighty (40 males and 40 females non-diabetic adult subjects undergoing elective abdominal surgery were included. Pre-surgery evaluation included anthropometric measurements, % body fat by bioimpedance, abdominal fat area at L2-3 level (computed tomography and biochemical investigations (fasting blood glucose and insulin, lipids and hsCRP. During surgery, about 5 grams each of omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue was obtained for adipocyte size determination.Females had higher BMI, % body fat, skinfold thickness, total and subcutaneous abdominal fat area as compared to males. Overweight was present in 42.5% and 67.5%, and abdominal obesity in 5% and 52.5% males and females, respectively. Subcutaneous adipocyte size was significantly higher than omental adipocyte size. Omental adipocyte size correlated more strongly than subcutaneous adipocyte size with measures of adiposity (BMI, waist circumference, %BF, total and subcutaneous abdominal fat area and biochemical measures (fasting glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and HOMA-IR, the correlations being stronger in females. The correlation of adipocyte size with metabolic parameters was attenuated after adjusting for measures of adiposity.Omental adipocyte size, though smaller than the subcutaneous adipocyte size, was more closely related to measures of adiposity and metabolic parameters. However, the relationship was not independent of measures of adiposity.

  2. Metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and other cardiovascular risk factors in university students

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    José Bonifácio Barbosa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A cross-sectional population-based study using questionnaire and anthropometric data was conducted on 968 university students of São Luís, Brazil, from which 590 showed up for blood collection. In the statistical analysis the Student t-test, Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests were used. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome by the Joint Interim Statement (JIS criteria was 20.5%, almost three times more prevalent in men (32.2% than in women (13.5% (P < 0.001. The prevalence of insulin resistance was 7.3% and the prevalence of low HDL-cholesterol was high (61.2%, both with no statistically significant differences by sex. Men showed a higher percentage of smoking, overweight, high blood pressure, high blood glucose and increased fasting hypertriglyceridemia. Women were more sedentary. University students of private institutions had higher prevalences of sedentary lifestyle, obesity, abdominal obesity, elevated triglycerides and metabolic syndrome than students from public institutions. High prevalences of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and other cardiovascular risk factors were found in this young population. This suggests that the burden of these diseases in the future will be increased.

  3. Nursing care in childcare services: Acantose nigricans as a marker for metabolic risk

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    Caroline Evelin Nascimento Kluczynik Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze the association between the presence of Acantose nigricans and metabolic changes in overweight adolescents, so as to ascertain the relevance of the identification of this marker in the nursing consultation. METHOD: a cross-sectional study undertaken between April 2009 and April 2010 with 118 adolescents who were service users of the Center for Child Obesity in Campina Grande in the Brazilian State of Paraíba (PB. The presence of Acantose nigricans, and the subjects' anthropometric measurements, were investigated. The following exams were made: insulin, triglycerides, HDL-Cholesterol, Glucose and the homeostatic model of assessment (HOMA-IR. RESULTS: there was association between the presence of Acantose nigricans and participants with insulin resistance (p=0.008, metabolic syndrome (p=0.031, elevated triglycerides (p=0.045 and altered HDL (p=0.002. CONCLUSIONS: the suggestion is supported that the detection/identification of Acantose nigricans may be used in the nursing consultation as a tool for identifying overweight adolescents with greater risk of metabolic changes.

  4. The Assessment of Relation Between Lipids Metabolism Disorder and Periodontal Diseases in Cardiovascular Patients

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    AK.Khoshkhoo Nejad

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There are many risk factor for periodontal diseases and from this point the disorders of lipid metabolism also may be a risk factor for pcriodononlal diseases.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relation of periodontal disease and disorder of lipids metabolism in cardio vascular patients.Materials and Methods: In this sectional study, 45 patients who were hospitalized in shahid rajaee hospital divided and studied in two group, (included test group with 27 patents and control group with 18 patient. In both group the level of serum lipids including triglycerid, total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol were determined and periodontal status were estimated by CPITN index. Then statistical result processed by Mann-Whiney U test and spearman- correlation.Results: The results showed thai CPITN index in high lipid group was more than low lipid group and spearman correlation between triglycerid and CPITN was 0.2S3 between cholesterol and CPITN was 0.372 and between LDL and CPITN was 0.230.Conclusion: In this study we found that there is a specific and significant relation between periodontal disease and serum lipids in cardio vascular patients.

  5. Aromatase inhibitors, efficacy and metabolic risk in the treatment of postmenopausal women with early breast cancer

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    Stefano Gonnelli

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Stefano Gonnelli1, Roberto Petrioli21Department of Internal Medicine, Endocrine-Metabolic Science and Biochemistry, University of Siena, Italy (Dir. R. Nuti.; 2Department of Human Pathology and Oncology, Medical Oncology Section, University of Siena, Italy (Dir. G. FranciniAbstract: The third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs, letrozole, anastrozole and exemestane, are becoming the first choice endocrine drugs for post-menopausal women with breast cancer, since they present greater efficacy when compared with tamoxifen in both adjuvant and metastatic setting. In particular, several large and well designed trials have suggested an important role for AIs in the adjuvant treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer either in the upfront, sequential or extended adjuvant mode. Overall, AIs are associated with a small but significant improvement in disease free survival. The expanding use of AIs in the treatment of early breast cancer means that individual patients will be exposed to the agents for longer durations, making it increasingly important to establish their long-term safety. This review focused on the effects of AIs on bone metabolism, serum lipids and cardiovascular risk. AIs have adverse effects on bone turnover with a reduction of bone mineral density and an increase in the rate of fragility fractures. With respect to tamoxifen AIs present lower thrombotic risk and a less favorable impact on lipid profile, whereas the true effects on cardiovascular risk still remain to be clarified. An adequate monitoring of bone mineral density (BMD and lipid profile could be recommended for post-menopausal women candidate to AIs.Keywords: breast cancer, aromatase inhibitors, bone loss, lipids, cardiovascular risk

  6. Polymorphisms of estrogen-metabolizing genes and breast cancer risk: a multigenic study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Ding-fen; ZHOU Xin; HU Ming-bai; XIE Wei; MAO Zong-fu; CHEN Dong-e; LIU Fang; ZHENG Fang

    2005-01-01

    Background Endogenous estrogen plays a very important role in the carcinogenesis and progression of breast cancer. The enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and metabolism of estrogen have been proposed to contribute to this effect. To examine this hypothesis, we conducted a case-control study to investigate the relationship between polymorphisms of genes responsible for estrogen biosynthesis (CYP17, cytochrome P450c17a and CYP19, aromatase cytochrome P450) and estrogen sulfation of inactivation (SULT1A1, sulfotransferase1A1) and the risk of breast cancer in Chinese women. Methods This study involved 213 breast cancer patients and 430 matched controls. PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and short tandem repeat polymorphism (STRP) assays were used to detect the mononucleotide transition of CYP17 and SULT1A1 and tandem repeat polymorphism of CYP19. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine OR and 95% CI of each and all three high-risk genotypes, of all three genotypes combined, and of estrogen exposure factors. The relationship between each high-risk genotype and clinicalpathological characteristics were also assessed. Results The frequency of A2 allele of CYP17 was 49.8% in cases and 49.1% in controls (P=0.82). The frequency of His allele of SULT1A1 was significantly higher in cases (13.6%) than in controls (9.5%) (P<0.05). There was also significant difference of the (TTTA)10 allele of CYP19 which was 12.4% in cases and 8.2% in controls (P<0.05). When the CYP17 A2 allele, CYP19 (TTTA)10 and SULT1A1 His allele were considered as the "putative high-risk" genotype, there was an increased risk of breast cancer with the number of high-risk genotypes in a dose-response effect (trend, P=0.05). In multivariate analysis, the SULT1A1 genotype remained the most significant determinant for breast cancer, with OR=2.37 (95% CI 1.23-4.74), followed by CYP19, with OR=1.75 (95% CI 1.27-3.56). The (TTTA)10 allele of CYP19 was associated with tumor

  7. Long-Term Exercise and Risk of Metabolic and Cardiac Diseases: The Erlangen Fitness and Prevention Study

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    Wolfgang Kemmler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In female subjects, ageing and the menopausal transition contribute to a rapid increase of metabolic and cardiac risk factors. Exercise may be an option to positively impact various risk factors prone to severe metabolic and cardiac diseases and events. This study was conducted to determine the long-term effect of a multipurpose exercise program on metabolic and cardiac risk scores in postmenopausal women. 137 osteopenic Caucasian females (55.4 ± 3.2 yrs, 1–8 years postmenopausal, were included in the study. Eighty-six subjects joined the exercise group (EG and performed an intense multipurpose exercise program which was carefully supervised during the 12-year period, while 51 females maintained their habitual physical activity (CG. Main outcome measures were 10-year coronary heart disease risk (10 y CHD risk, metabolic syndrome Z-score (MetS Index, and 10-year myocardial infarction risk (10 y hard CHD risk. Significant between-group differences all in favor of the EG were determined for 10 y-CHD risk (EG: 2.65±2.09% versus CG: 5.40±3.30%; P=0.001, MetS-Index (EG: −0.42±1.03% versus CG: 1.61±1.88; P=0.001, and 10 y-hard-CHD risk (EG: 2.06±1.17% versus CG: 3.26±1.31%; P=0.001. Although the nonrandomized design may prevent definite evidence, the intense multi-purpose exercise program determined the long-term efficacy and feasibility of an exercise program to significantly impact metabolic and cardiac risk scores in postmenopausal women. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01177761.

  8. Frequency of Metabolic Risk Factors in Children with Urinary Tract Stones Referred to Hamadan Pediatric Nephrology Clinic

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    H.E. Momtaz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Urinary stones are among the most common complaints referred to nephrologist and urologists. Although incidence of urolithiasis is low in children compared to adults and only 7% of all urinary stones are diagnosed before the age of 16 but stones are detected more frequently in pediatric age group in recent years. Metabolic derangements, infection, neurogenic bladder and urinary obstruction are major risk factors of urolithiasis. Common metabolic risk factors of urolithiasis in children are hypercalciuria, uricosuria, hypocitraturia, hyperoxaluria, metabolic acidosis and cystinuria. There are many clinical studies about the frequency of these metabolic risk factors with different results reflecting difference in diet, geographic area and genetics in study populations. In this study we tried to evaluate the frequency of metabolic causes of urinary stones in children referred to Hamadan pediatric nephrology clinic.Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional-descriptive study 156 patients referred due to urinary stones to pediatric nephrology clinic underwent thorough metabolic evaluations including: serum calcium,phosphorus, uric acid, creatinine and non fasting random urine sample for calcium, creatinine , uric acid , oxalate, citrate and cystine . urine solute: creatinine ratios were calculated and compared with normative data.Results: Of 156 patients 136(87.2% had metabolic derangements including: hyperuricosuria in 71 (45.5%, hypercalciuria in 41(26.3%, hypocitraturia in 26 (16.7%, hyperoxaluria in 16(10.3%,cystinuria in 1(0.6% and metabolic acidosis in 39 (25%.Conclusion: High rate of metabolic derangement in pediatric urinary stone patients mandates proper metabolic evaluation in all of them. hyperuricosuria was the most common metbolic finding instead of hypercalciuria in this study. This could be due to differences in diet, geographic area and genetic background in various populations.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci

  9. The Global Cardiovascular Risk Transition: Associations of Four Metabolic Risk Factors with Macroeconomic Variables in 1980 and 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaei, Goodarz; Singh, Gitanjali M; Paciorek, Christopher J; Lin, John K; Cowan, Melanie J; Finucane, Mariel M; Farzadfar, Farshad; Stevens, Gretchen A; Riley, Leanne M; Lu, Yuan; Rao, Mayuree; Ezzati, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Background It is commonly assumed that globally CVD risk factors are associated with affluence and Westernization. We investigated the associations of body mass index (BMI), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and serum total cholesterol (TC) with national income, Western diet, and (for BMI) urbanization in 1980 and 2008. Methods and Results Country-level risk factor estimates for 199 countries between 1980 and 2008 were from a previous systematic analysis of population-based data. We analyzed the associations between risk factors and natural logarithm of per-capita GDP [Ln(GDP)], a measure of Western diet, and (for BMI) percent population living in urban areas. In 1980, there was a positive association between national income and population mean BMI, SBP, and TC. By 2008, the slope of the association between Ln(GDP) and SBP became negative for women and zero for men. TC was associated with national income and Western diet throughout the period. In 1980, BMI rose with per-capita GDP and then flattened at about Int$7000; by 2008, the relationship resembled an inverted-U for women, peaking at middle income levels. BMI had a positive relationship with percent urban population in both 1980 and 2008. FPG had weaker associations with these country macro characteristics, but was positively associated with BMI. Conclusions The changing associations of metabolic risk factors with macroeconomic variables indicate that there will be a global pandemic of hyperglycemia and diabetes, together with high blood pressure in low income countries, unless effective lifestyle, and pharmacological interventions are implemented. PMID:23481623

  10. Adolescent Metabolic Syndrome Risk Is Increased with Higher Infancy Weight Gain and Decreased with Longer Breast Feeding

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    Kim Khuc

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is increasing in pediatric age groups worldwide. Meeting the criteria for the metabolic syndrome puts children at risk for later cardiovascular and metabolic disease. Methods. Using linear regression, we examined the association between infant weight gain from birth to 3 months and risk for the metabolic syndrome among 16- to 17-year-old Chilean adolescents (n=357, accounting for the extent of breastfeeding in infancy and known covariates including gender, birth weight, and socioeconomic status. Results. Participants were approximately half male (51%, born at 40 weeks of gestation weighing 3.5 kg, and 48% were exclusively breastfed for ≥90 days. Factors independently associated with increased risk of metabolic syndrome in adolescence were faster weight gain in the first 3 months of life (B=0.16, P<0.05 and male gender (B=0.24, P<0.05. Breastfeeding as the sole source of milk for ≥90 days was associated with significantly decreased risk of metabolic syndrome (B=−0.16. Conclusion. This study adds to current knowledge about early infant growth and breastfeeding and their long-term health effects.

  11. Comparison between BMI and Inverted BMI in Evaluating Metabolic Risk and Body Composition in Iranian Children

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    Forough Saki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare BMI and inverted BMI in evaluating body measurement, resting blood pressure, Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA parameters of fat mass and metabolic risk factors in Iranian children Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study on 477 children aged 9-18 yearsin the South of Iran. Weight, height, resting blood pressure, waist and hip circumference and pubertal stage of all participants was measured with standard methods. DEXA was used to determine body composition index. Blood samples were checked for serum lipid profiles and fasting blood sugar (FBS. Metabolic risk score (MRS was calculated by the summation of the Z-scores for TC, TG/HDL, LDL, systolic blood pressure, and waist circumference minus HDL Z-score. Results: BMI did not have a normal distribution in our participants but iBMI had a normal distribution. IBMI had more significant correlation with waist to hip ratio and systolic blood pressure (r2=0.053 and r2=0.182 than BMI (r2=0.041 and r2=0.101. MRS had a positive correlation with BMI (P

  12. Deficits in Mental State Attributions in Individuals with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Jennifer S.; Radoeva, Petya D.; Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Chow, Carolyn; Hopkins, Jessica; Tran, Wen-Ching; Mehta, Ami; Enrique, Nicole; Gilbert, Chelsea; Antshel, Kevin M.; Fremont, Wanda; Kates, Wendy R.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2012-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS; 22q11.2 deletion syndrome) results from a genetic mutation that increases risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). We compared Theory of Mind (ToM) skills in 63 individuals with VCFS (25% with an ASD diagnosis) and 43 typically-developing controls, and investigated the relationship of ToM to reciprocal social behavior. We administered a video-based task to assess mentalizing at two sites (UCLA and SUNY Upstate Medical University). The videos depicted interac...

  13. Effects of a 12-Week Hatha Yoga Intervention on Metabolic Risk and Quality of Life in Hong Kong Chinese Adults with and without Metabolic Syndrome.

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    Caren Lau

    Full Text Available To determine the efficacy of a 12-week Hatha yoga intervention to improve metabolic risk profiles and health-related quality of life (HRQoL in Chinese adults with and without metabolic syndrome (MetS.We conducted a controlled trial within an university-affiliated hospital. 173 Chinese men and women aged 18 or above were assigned to either the yoga intervention group (n = 87 or the control group (n = 86. Primary outcomes included 12-week change in metabolic risk factors and MetS z score. Secondary outcome was HRQoL (Medical Outcomes Short Form Survey at 12 weeks.The mean age of participants was 52.0 (SD 7.4, range 31-71 years. Analysis involving the entire study population revealed that the yoga group achieved greater decline in waist circumference (p0.05. There were no significant differences in the intervention effects on waist circumference and MetS z score between the MetS subgroups (both p>0.05.A 12-week Hatha yoga intervention improves metabolic risk profiles and HRQoL in Chinese adults with and without MetS.Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613000816752.

  14. Cardiovascular Risks Factors and their Relationship with Disorders of Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism

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    Lilian Leguen Gulgar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: cardiovascular disease has been the leading cause of death in Cuba, where studies on emerging cardiovascular risk factors as predictors of cardiovascular risk are scarce. Objective: to determine the association between cardiovascular risk factors and disorders of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Methods: a correlational study was conducted with a sample of 105 men and women selected from a total of 346 workers of the University of Medical Sciences of Cienfuegos from June 2011 through July 2012. The variables analyzed were age, sex, blood pressure, waist circumference, tobacco use, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein A and B, TC/HDL ratio and apo B/apo AI ratio. Results: women older than 45 years had a higher prevalence of elevated waist circumference (60.0 %, hypertension (46.7 % and type 2 diabetes mellitus (54.3 % with hypertriglyceridemia (43.3 %, low HDLc levels (36.7 % and were 2.8 times more likely to develop elevated waist circumference; 66.7 % of the diabetic patients had low HDLc levels, 33.3 % developed hypertriglyceridemia and 66.7 % had a high total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio. Conclusions: an association between age older than 45 years, female sex, obesity, hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus was observed. There was a higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL cholesterol levels in obese and diabetic patients. Increased risk of low HDL cholesterol and high total cholesterol / HDL cholesterol ratio were also found.

  15. Association of relatives of hemodialysis patients with metabolic syndrome, albuminuria and Framingham Risk Score.

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    Jiun-Chi Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Metabolic syndrome (MetS, albuminuria, and the Framingham Risk Score (FRS are significant predictors for cardiovascular disease (CVD. However, the relationship and clinical significance of these CVD predictors in individuals with a family history of end-stage renal disease (ESRD are unclear. We investigated the association of relatives of hemodialysis (HD patients with MetS, albuminuria, and the FRS. METHODS: One hundred and sixty-six relatives of HD patients and 374 age- and sex- matched community controls were enrolled. MetS was defined using the Adult Treatment Panel III for Asians. Albuminuria was defined as urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥ 30 mg/g. CVD risk was evaluated by the FRS. RESULTS: A significantly higher prevalence of MetS (19.9% vs. 12.5%, P = 0.026, albuminuria (12.7% vs. 5.1%, P = 0.002 and high FRS risk ≥ 10% of 10-year risk (15.7% vs. 8.5%, P = 0.013 was found in relatives of HD patients compared to their counterpart controls. In multivariate analysis, being relatives of HD patients (vs. controls was an independent determinant for MetS (odds ratio [OR], 1.785; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.045 to 3.050, albuminuria (OR, 2.891; 95% CI, 1.431 to 5.841, and high FRS risk (OR, 1.863; 95% CI, 1.015 to 3.418. Higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR, 1.034; 95% CI, 1.017 to 1.052 and betel nut chewing (OR, 13.994; 95% CI, 3.384 to 57.871 were independent determinants for having a high FRS risk in relatives of HD patients. CONCLUSIONS: Being relatives of HD patients was independently associated with MetS, albuminuria and high FRS risk, suggesting family members of ESRD patients may have higher CVD risks through the interactions of renal risk factors. Proactive surveillance of these CVD predictors and preventive strategies should be targeted to this high-risk population.

  16. Cortico-cardio-respiratory network interactions during anesthesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Shiogai

    Full Text Available General anesthetics are used during medical and surgical procedures to reversibly induce a state of total unconsciousness in patients. Here, we investigate, from a dynamic network perspective, how the cortical and cardiovascular systems behave during anesthesia by applying nonparametric spectral techniques to cortical electroencephalography, electrocardiogram and respiratory signals recorded from anesthetized rats under two drugs, ketamine-xylazine (KX and pentobarbital (PB. We find that the patterns of low-frequency cortico-cardio-respiratory network interactions may undergo significant changes in network activity strengths and in number of network links at different depths of anesthesia dependent upon anesthetics used.

  17. Metabolic syndrome risk assessment in children: use of a single score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Khéde Dourado Villa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To calculate a score of metabolic syndrome (MetS in children and set a cutoff point of this score for the prediction of MetS risk. METHODS: The study included a random sample of 348 children aged 8 and 9 years of Viçosa, Southeast Brazil. Factor analysis by principal components (PCA was used to determine, among various risk factors, those with higher degrees of intercorrelation. The chosen variables were: waist circumference (PC, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA, high density lipoprotein (HDL, triglycerides (TAG and mean arterial pressure (MAP. Z-scores were created for each one of these parameters and the sum of these z-scores constituted the MetS score. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to identify the cutoff of MetS score, using as gold standard the presence or absence of MetS determined according to criteria age-modified. RESULTS: The prevalence of MetS in the sample was 8.9% by adopting specific criteria for age, and 24% when considering the cutoff of MetS score. The selected cutoff point of 1.86 was accurate to predict the MetS risk in this sample due to its high sensitivity (96.7%, specificity (82.7% and AUC of 0.96. CONCLUSIONS: This original Brazilian study presents the MetS score as a suitable alternative for the study of Metabolic Syndrome in children, given the lack of consensus for the definition of this syndrome in childhood.

  18. Association of folate metabolism genes MTHFR and MTRR with multiple complex congenital malformation risk in Chinese population of Shanxi

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qin; Bai, Baoling; Liu, Xiaozhen; Miao, Chunyue; Li, Huili

    2014-01-01

    Birth defects are common, serious malformations with a complex etiology that suggests involvement of both genetic and environmental factors. Low dietary folate and polymorphisms in genes of folate metabolism can influence risk for birth defects. In the present study 250 Chinese birth defects cases who suffered 1-8 types of birth defect disease phenotypes were subjected and two genetic variants in two folate metabolism key enzymes, rs1801394 of methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) and rs180113...

  19. Differences in Regional Brain Metabolism Associated with Specific Formulations of Hormone Therapy in Postmenopausal Women at Risk for AD

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Geist, Cheri L.; Kenna, Heather A.; Williams, Katherine; Wroolie, Tonita; Powers, Bevin; Brooks, John; Rasgon, Natalie L.

    2010-01-01

    Differential cerebral metabolic effects of various hormone therapy formulations, and their associations with cognitive status, remain to be established. The principal aim of the current study wasto assess relationships between regional cerebral metabolism and estrogen-based hormone therapies. Postmenopausal women (n=53) at elevated risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) were on estrogen-containing hormone therapy for at least one year prior to enrollment in a prospective, randomized clinical trial...

  20. "Prevalence and criteria of metabolic syndrome in an urban population: Yazd Healthy Heart Project "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadrbafoghi SM

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metabolic syndrome is a complex of metabolic disorders that contemporary occurrence in a person is more than the risk of occurrence of each one separately. this syndrome has gained researcher's attention because of its relationship with cardiovascular disease and diabetes type II and its high prevalence in populations Methods: A cross-sectional study performed on 1110 participants, 20-74 years old with cluster sampling. All of them had interview and special questionnaire were filled. Epidemiologic and demographic data were about hypertention cardio vascular disease and related lab data. Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 32.1% that it was significantly more in women than men .this prevalence increased with age and BMI in both sexes .the most common metabolic disorder was TG>=150. 19.2% have none, 21.1% have one, 27.6% have two, 20.8% have three,9% have four and 2.3% have all criteria of metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: Approximately one third of population of Yazd have metabolic syndrome and according to other statistics of Iran, this prevalence is more than U.S and Europe. It seems there is an urgent need for a national multicenter program for determinding risk factors for metabolic syndrome.

  1. Effect of Calcium-vitamin D Supplementation on Metabolic Profiles in Pregnant Women at Risk for Pre-eclampsia: A Randomized Placebo-controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Sima-Sadat Sabihi; Hassan Khorammian; Zahra Heidarzadeh; Zohreh Tabassi; Zatollah Asemi; Mansooreh Samimi

    2012-01-01

    Increased metabolic profiles during pregnancy are associated with an increased risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and remain a significant medical challenge. To our knowledge, no reports are available indicating the effects of calcium-vitamin D supplementation on metabolic profiles among pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia. This study was designed to determine the effects of consumption calcium-vitamin D supplements on metabolic profiles among Iranian pregnant women at risk for pre-...

  2. Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks in 188 countries, 1990–2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard Iburg, Kim

    2015-01-01

    minimum risk exposure level (TMREL). Risks are organised into a hierarchy with blocks of behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks at the fi rst level of the hierarchy. The next level in the hierarchy includes nine clusters of related risks and two individual risks, with more detail...... and 134·0 million DALYs. Risk factor patterns vary across regions and countries and with time. In sub-Saharan Africa, the leading risk factors are child and maternal malnutrition, unsafe sex, and unsafe water, sanitation, and handwashing. In women, in nearly all countries in the Americas, north Africa......-income countries, in north Africa and the Middle East, Europe, and Asia. For men and women, unsafe sex is the leading risk in a corridor from Kenya to South Africa. Interpretation Behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks can explain half of global mortality and more than one-third of global...

  3. Consortium analysis of gene and gene–folate interactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathways with ovarian carcinoma risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelemen, Linda E; Terry, Kathryn L; Goodman, Marc T;

    2014-01-01

    SCOPE: We reevaluated previously reported associations between variants in pathways of one-carbon (1-C) (folate) transfer genes and ovarian carcinoma (OC) risk, and in related pathways of purine and pyrimidine metabolism, and assessed interactions with folate intake. METHODS AND RESULTS: Odds......11587873 (OR = 0.92; p = 6 × 10(-5)) and rs828054 (OR = 1.06; p = 1 × 10(-4)). Thirteen variants in the pyrimidine metabolism genes, DPYD, DPYS, PPAT, and TYMS, also interacted significantly with folate in a multivariant analysis (corrected p = 9.9 × 10(-6)) but collectively explained only 0.2% of OC risk....... Although no other associations were significant after multiple testing correction, variants in SHMT1 in 1-C transfer, previously reported with OC, suggested lower risk at higher folate (p(interaction) = 0.03-0.006). CONCLUSION: Variation in pyrimidine metabolism genes, particularly DPYD, which...

  4. Relative risk of diabetes, dyslipidaemia, hypertension and the metabolic syndrome in people with severe mental illnesses: Systematic review and metaanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Michael B

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe mental illnesses (SMI may be independently associated with cardiovascular risk factors and the metabolic syndrome. We aimed to systematically assess studies that compared diabetes, dyslipidaemia, hypertension and metabolic syndrome in people with and without SMI. Methods We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL & PsycINFO. We hand searched reference lists of key articles. We employed three search main themes: SMI, cardiovascular disease, and each cardiovascular risk factor. We selected cross-sectional, case control, cohort or intervention studies comparing one or more risk factor in both SMI and a reference group. We excluded studies without any reference group. We extracted data on: study design, cardiovascular risk factor(s and their measurement, diagnosis of SMI, study setting, sampling method, nature of comparison group and data on key risk factors. Results Of 14592 citations, 134 papers met criteria and 36 were finally included. 26 reported on diabetes, 12 hypertension, 11 dyslipidaemia, and 4 metabolic syndrome. Most studies were cross sectional, small and several lacked comparison data suitable for extraction. Meta-analysis was possible for diabetes, cholesterol and hypertension; revealing a pooled risk ratio of 1.70 (1.21 to 2.37 for diabetes and 1.11 (0.91 to 1.35 of hypertension. Restricting SMI to schizophreniform illnesses yielded a pooled risk ratio for diabetes of 1.87 (1.68 to 2.09. Total cholesterol was not higher in people with SMI (Standardized Mean Difference -0.10 (-0.55 to 0.36 and there were inconsistent data on HDL, LDL and triglycerides with some, but not all, reporting lower levels of HDL cholesterol and raised triglyceride levels. Metabolic syndrome appeared more common in SMI. Conclusion Diabetes (but not hypertension is more common in SMI. Data on other risk factors were limited by poor quality or inconsistent research findings, but a small number of studies show greater prevalence

  5. Inherited variation in carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes and risk of colorectal polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Ellen L; Potter, John D; Bamlet, William R; Rider, David N; Bigler, Jeannette

    2007-02-01

    Exposures such as cigarette smoke and meat contain a variety of procarcinogens, which are thought to play a role in elevation of risk for colorectal polyps and/or cancer. These procarcinogens (including heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) are metabolized by a variety of polymorphic enzymes including N-acetyltransferases, sulfotransferases, cytochrome P450 enzymes and epoxide hydrolase. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the encoding genes NAT1, NAT2, SULT1A1, SULT1A2, CYP1A1 or EPHX1 is associated with risk of colorectal polyps and interacts with cigarette use or meat intake to modify risk of colorectal polyps. We examined the role of these genes in a clinic-based study of 651 Caucasian cases with hyperplastic polyps, adenomatous polyps or both types of polyps and 556 polyp-free controls. We found evidence for interaction between NAT acetylator status and SULT1A1 genotype in risk of hyperplastic polyps: individuals with SULT1A1 638AA genotype and NAT1 and NAT2 intermediate/fast phenotypes had 3.5-fold increased risk (95% CI 1.2-10.3) compared with individuals with SULT1A1 638GG genotype and NAT1 and NAT2 slow phenotypes. Data were also consistent with interactions between smoking and variation in SULT1A1, CYP1A1 and EPHX1 and between meat intake and variation in CYP1A1 and EPHX1. No interactions were statistically significant. Although results should be interpreted with caution considering sample size and the number of hypotheses examined, our study suggests future avenues of investigation in larger investigations of genetic and lifestyle factors in the pathway to colorectal cancer. PMID:16926176

  6. Dietary intake of manganese and the risk of the metabolic syndrome in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Biao; Su, Xuefen; Su, Danting; Zeng, Fangfang; Wang, Maggie Haitian; Huang, Lichun; Huang, Enshan; Zhu, Yibo; Zhao, Dong; He, Denghua; Zhu, Xuhui; Yeoh, Engkiong; Zhang, Ronghua; Ding, Gangqiang

    2016-09-01

    Animal studies have suggested that Mn might be associated with some components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). A few epidemiological studies have assessed dietary Mn intake and its association with the risk of the MetS and its components among Chinese adults. In this study, we assessed daily dietary Mn intake and its relationship with MetS risk among Chinese adults in Zhejiang Province using data from the 5th Chinese National Nutrition and Health Survey (2010-2012). A total of 2111 adults were included. Dietary Mn intake was assessed using 3-d 24-h dietary recalls; health-related data were obtained by questionnaire surveys, physical examinations and laboratory assessments. The mean intake of Mn was 6·07 (sd 2·94) mg/d for men (n 998) and 5·13 (sd 2·65) mg/d for women (n 1113). Rice (>42 %) was the main food source of Mn. The prevalence of the MetS was 28·0 % (590/2111). Higher Mn intake was associated with a decreased risk of the MetS in men (Q4 v. Q1 OR 0·62; 95 % CI 0·42, 0·92; P trend=0·043) but an increased risk in women (Q4 v. Q1 OR 1·56; 95 % CI 1·02, 2·45; P trend=0·078). In addition, Mn intake was inversely associated with abdominal obesity (P trend=0·016) and hypertriacylglycerolaemia (P trend=0·029) in men, but positively associated with low HDL-cholesterol in both men (P trend=0·003) and women (P trend<0·001). Our results suggest that higher Mn intakes may be protective against the MetS in men. The inverse association between Mn intake and the MetS in women might be due to the increased risk for low HDL-cholesterol. PMID:27385039

  7. A perspective on vegetarian dietary patterns and risk of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaté, Joan; Wien, Michelle

    2015-04-01

    The vegetarian dietary pattern is traditionally a plant-based diet that includes fruits, vegetables, cereals, legumes, nuts, vegetable oils, soya, and possibly dairy products and/or eggs. Vegetarians and other populations who follow a plant-based dietary pattern enjoy longevity. Specifically, vegetarian dietary patterns have been associated with a lower risk for developing IHD, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, specific cancers, lower all-cause mortality and reduction in cause-specific mortality. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the USA is approximately 20 % and is currently increasing in developing countries in line with the obesity epidemic. The health care costs associated with the MetS are on a magnitude of 1.6 overall compared with healthy individuals, which makes it an important public health problem. Current evidence from several cross-sectional and case-control studies shows an association between consumption of a vegetarian dietary pattern and a reduced prevalence or risk of developing the MetS. There is a need for further research to be conducted, particularly prospective cohort studies to evaluate the effect of vegetarian dietary patterns on reducing the incidence of the MetS and, clinical trials should be designed to explore vegetarian dietary patterns for the reversal of the MetS in high-risk populations. This research could contribute to reduce the societal and economic burdens associated with the disorder. PMID:26148917

  8. A planar elliptical model of cardio-vagal hysteresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state-dependent portion of cardio-vagal baroreflex control is called baroreflex hyteresis: we observe hysteresis when RR interval and carotid diameter depend on both the direction and value of arterial pressure. The elasticity of arterial walls, as well as the responsiveness of central command reset controls the real-time pattern of neural outflow, which is indirectly measured by RR interval in humans. We model the state-dependent relationship among pressure, vessel diameter and heart rate as a three-dimensional planar ellipse. Two-dimensional projections of this ellipse provide motion direction and quantify hysteresis between mechanical (pressure–diameter), neural (diameter–heart rate), and integrated baroreflex (pressure–heart rate) components. A convenient measure for the magnitude of hysteresis is the ratio of the semi-minor and semi-major axes of the best fitting ellipse. This ratio is given a sign according to the direction of its motion. The signed sum of the hysteresis ratio for vessel mechanics and central neural control reliably predicts cardio-vagal hysteresis. Using this relationship, we can quantify the relative importance of neural versus mechanical contributions to integrated baroreflex responses

  9. Demographic characteristics and metabolic risk factors in Croatian children with urolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milošević, Danko; Batinić, Danica; Turudić, Daniel; Batinić, Danko; Topalović-Grković, Marija; Gradiški, Ivan Pavao

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess demographic data, clinical presentation, metabolic features, and treatment in 76 children with urolithiasis presented from 2002 to 2011. Urolithiasis is responsible for 2.5/1,000 pediatric hospitalizations, with new cases diagnosed in 1.1/1,000 admissions. From the observed period, two-fold rise of incidence rate was observed. Compiling the data from other pediatric institutions in our country, we estimated present overall incidence rate in Croatia as 6.5/100,000 children under 18 years. There were 41 boys and 35 girls (ratio 1.17:1). The mean age at diagnosis was 9.7 (range 0.8-16) years and follow-up duration was 5.3 (range 1.8-10) years. Renal colic (75.0 %) and hematuria (57.89 %) were the main symptoms. In 65.78 % of children, stones were unilateral. Stones were located in kidney in 52.63 %, in the ureter in 26.32 %, and in bladder in 6.58 % cases. Stone analysis showed calcium oxalate in 75.0 % of the cases. Associated urinary tract abnormalities were found in 19.73 % children. Most common metabolic disturbances were hypercalciuria (47.37 %) and idiopathic or mild hyperoxaluria (18.42 %). Urine saturation (EQUIL2) was elevated in 61.84 % cases. Spontaneous stone evacuation occurred in 51.21 % children. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, surgical evacuation, and endoscopic removal of calculi were performed in 21.0, 6.58, and 5.26 % of cases, respectively. Follow-up conservative therapy, consisting of fluid/diet recommendations and additional potassium citrate and/or chlorothiazide in children with increased risk, was sufficient for stone recurrence prevention in 92.1 % of children. In conclusion, the study gave insight in epidemiology and metabolic disturbances of urinary stone disease in Croatian children. PMID:24096520

  10. Interactions of Lipid Genetic Risk Scores with Estimates of Metabolic Health in a Danish Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Johanne M; Allin, Kristine H; Sandholt, Camilla H; Borglykke, Anders; Krarup, Nikolaj Thure; Grarup, Niels; Linneberg, Allan; Jørgensen, Torben; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf

    2015-01-01

    these susceptibility loci has not been fully elucidated. We tested if genetic risk scores (GRS) of lipid-associated SNPs associate with fasting serum lipid traits and if the effects are modulated by lifestyle factors or estimates of metabolic health. METHODS AND RESULTS: -The SNPs were genotyped in two...... cross-sectional design, we investigated if the effect of these wGRSs on lipid levels were modulated by diet, alcohol consumption, physical activity and smoking or the individual metabolic health status as estimated from BMI, waist circumference and insulin resistance assessed using HOMA-IR. All four...... lipid wGRSs associated strongly with their respective trait (from P=3.3×10(-69) to P=1.1×10(-123)). We found interactions between the triglyceride wGRS and BMI and waist circumference on fasting triglyceride levels in Inter99 and replicated these findings in Health2006 (Pinteraction=9.8×10(-5) and 2...

  11. Selenium, zinc, and copper plasma levels in patients with schizophrenia: relationship with metabolic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidović, Bojana; Dorđević, Brižita; Milovanović, Srđan; Škrivanj, Sandra; Pavlović, Zoran; Stefanović, Aleksandra; Kotur-Stevuljević, Jelena

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the plasma selenium (Se), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) levels and to evaluate their possible association with metabolic syndrome (MetS) components in patients with schizophrenia. The study group consisted of 60 patients with schizophrenia and 60 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, and biochemical analysis of fasting blood were performed in all subjects. Patients with schizophrenia had significantly higher plasma Cu concentrations compared with controls (0.97 ± 0.31 vs. 0.77 ± 0.32 mg/L, p = 0.001). The plasma Cu concentration showed a positive correlation with plasma glucose and diastolic blood pressure in the patient groups (r s = 0.263, p < 0.05 and r s = 0.272, p < 0.05, respectively). The plasma Se level correlated positive with MetS score (r s = 0.385, p < 0.01), waist circumference (r s = 0.344, p < 0.05), plasma glucose (r s = 0.319, p < 0.05), and triglyceride concentrations (r s = 0.462, p < 0.001) in patients with schizophrenia. Plasma Zn did not correlate with any of the MetS components. These results suggest that alterations in plasma Cu and Se levels in medicated patients with schizophrenia could be associated with metabolic risk factors. PMID:24150923

  12. ALK7 Gene Polymorphism is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome Risk and Cardiovascular Remodeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenchao; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Wei [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Lv, Ruijuan [Department of Emergency, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Wang, Zhihao [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Department of Geriatrics, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Shang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yun; Zhong, Ming [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Chen, Yuguo; Tang, Mengxiong, E-mail: tangmengxiongsdu8@163.com [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Department of Emergency, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China)

    2013-08-15

    Activin receptor-like kinase 7 (ALK7) is a type I receptor for the TGF-β superfamily and has recently been demonstrated to play an important role in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis. To investigate the association of the ALK7 gene polymorphism with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular remodeling in MetS patients. The single nucleotide polymorphism rs13010956 in the ALK7 gene was genotyped in 351 Chinese subjects undergoing carotid and cardiac ultrasonography. The associations of the ALK7 gene polymorphism with the MetS phenotype, MetS parameters, and cardiovascular ultrasonic features were analyzed. The rs13010956 polymorphism in the ALK7 gene was found to be significantly associated with the MetS phenotype in females (p < 0.05) and was also significantly associated with blood pressure in the total (p < 0.05) and female populations (p < 0.01). Further analysis revealed that rs13010956 was associated with mean intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries in females (p < 0.05). After control for body mass index, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and triglycerides, rs13010956 was also found to be significantly associated with left ventricular mass index in the total (p < 0.05) and female populations (p < 0.05). Our findings suggested that the ALK7 gene polymorphism rs13010956 was significantly associated with MetS risk in females and may be involved in cardiovascular remodeling in MetS patients.

  13. ALK7 Gene Polymorphism is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome Risk and Cardiovascular Remodeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activin receptor-like kinase 7 (ALK7) is a type I receptor for the TGF-β superfamily and has recently been demonstrated to play an important role in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis. To investigate the association of the ALK7 gene polymorphism with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular remodeling in MetS patients. The single nucleotide polymorphism rs13010956 in the ALK7 gene was genotyped in 351 Chinese subjects undergoing carotid and cardiac ultrasonography. The associations of the ALK7 gene polymorphism with the MetS phenotype, MetS parameters, and cardiovascular ultrasonic features were analyzed. The rs13010956 polymorphism in the ALK7 gene was found to be significantly associated with the MetS phenotype in females (p < 0.05) and was also significantly associated with blood pressure in the total (p < 0.05) and female populations (p < 0.01). Further analysis revealed that rs13010956 was associated with mean intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries in females (p < 0.05). After control for body mass index, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and triglycerides, rs13010956 was also found to be significantly associated with left ventricular mass index in the total (p < 0.05) and female populations (p < 0.05). Our findings suggested that the ALK7 gene polymorphism rs13010956 was significantly associated with MetS risk in females and may be involved in cardiovascular remodeling in MetS patients

  14. Increased metabolic risk in adolescent offspring of mothers with type 1 diabetes: The EPICOM study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachová, Zuzana; Bytoft, Birgitte; Knorr, Sine;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We aimed to investigate metabolic risk factors, insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in adolescent offspring of mothers with type 1 diabetes compared with offspring of non-diabetic mothers. METHODS: During 1993-1999, pregnancies of women with type 1 diabetes in Denmark were.......7 years; range 13.0-19.8 years) and 303 control offspring (mean age 16.8 years; range 13.5-20.4 years). Index offspring had higher BMI SD score (0.44: 95% CI 0.21, 0.66) compared with controls, after adjustments for pubertal development and maternal pre-pregnancy BMI. Furthermore, index offspring had a...... prospectively reported to a central registry in the Danish Diabetes Association. Data included information on maternal demography, diabetes status and pregnancy outcome. We invited 746 eligible children from this cohort (index offspring) to a follow-up examination. Control offspring were identified through The...

  15. Relationship between physical activity, physical fitness and multiple metabolic risk in youths from Muzambinho's study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, João Paulo Dos Anjos Souza; Basso, Luciano; Seabra, André; Prista, Antonio; Tani, Go; Maia, José António Ribeiro; Forjaz, Cláudia Lúcia De Moraes

    2016-08-01

    Negative associations between physical activity (PA), physical fitness and multiple metabolic risk factors (MMRF) in youths from populations with low PA are reported. The persistence of this association in moderately-to highly active populations is not, however, well established. The aim of the present study was to investigate this association in a Brazilian city with high frequency of active youths. We assessed 122 subjects (9.9 ± 1.3 years) from Muzambinho city. Body mass index, waist circumference, glycaemia, cholesterolaemia, systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured. Maximal handgrip strength and one-mile walk/run test were used. Leisure time PA was assessed by interview. Poisson regression was used in the analysis. The model explained 11% of the total variance. Only relative muscular strength and one-mile walk/run were statistically significant (p fitness and strength might help to further reduce their MMRF. PMID:26452452

  16. Metabolic syndrome and risk of incident diabetes: findings from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Potsdam Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost Hans-Georg

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several aspects concerning the relationship between the metabolic syndrome and incident diabetes are incompletely understood including the magnitude of the risk estimate, potential gender differences in the associations between the metabolic syndrome and incident diabetes, the associations between the components of the metabolic syndrome and incident diabetes, and whether the metabolic syndrome provides additional prediction beyond its components. To shed light on these issues, we examined the prospective association between the metabolic syndrome defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP and International Diabetes Federation (IDF and diabetes. Methods We used data for 2796 men and women aged 35–65 years from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Potsdam Study followed for an average of 6.9 years. This analysis employed a case-cohort design that included 697 participants who developed diabetes and 2099 participants who did not. Incident diabetes was identified on the basis of self-reports and verified by contacting the patient's attending physician. Results The adjusted hazard ratio for the NCEP definition was 4.62 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.90–5.48 and that for the IDF definition was 4.59 (95% CI: 3.84–5.50. The adjusted hazard ratios for the NCEP but not IDF definition were higher for women than men. When participants who had no cardiometabolic abnormalities were used as the reference group for the NCEP definition, the adjusted hazard ratio for having 3 or more abnormalities increased to 22.50 (95% CI: 11.21–45.19. Of the five components, abdominal obesity and hyperglycemia were most strongly associated with incident diabetes. Conclusion In this study population, both definitions of the metabolic syndrome provided similar estimates of relative risk for incident diabetes. The increase in risk for participants with the metabolic syndrome according to the NCEP

  17. Changes in Metabolic Health Status Over Time and Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hwan; Yang, Hae Kyung; Ha, Hee-Sung; Lee, Jin-Hee; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Park, Yong-Moon; Yim, Hyeon-Woo; Kang, Moo-Il; Lee, Won-Chul; Son, Ho-Young; Yoon, Kun-Ho

    2015-10-01

    Metabolic health and obesity are not stable conditions, and changes in the status of these conditions might lead to different clinical outcomes. We aimed to determine whether changes in metabolic health status or obesity over time have any effect on the risk of future diabetes. Nondiabetic individuals (n = 2692) from a population-based prospective cohort study with baseline and 2 follow-up examinations at 4-year intervals were included. Being "metabolically obese" (MO) was defined as being in the highest quartile of the TyG index (ln [fasting triglycerides (mg/dL) × fasting glucose (mg/dL)/2]), whereas falling into the lower 3 quartiles was regarded as being "metabolically healthy" (MH). Individuals were classified as "obese" (O) or "nonobese" (NO) using a body mass index of 25 kg/m2 as a cut-off. The risk of diabetes at year 8 was assessed according to changes of metabolic health status between year 0 and 4. Multivariate-adjusted relative risks (RRs) (95% confidence interval [CI]) of diabetes were significantly higher in individuals who retained the MONO phenotype (RR 3.72, 95% CI 2.10, 6.60) or who had progressed to MONO from the MHNO phenotype (RR 1.96, 95% CI 1.06, 3.61), whereas it was not significant in individuals who had improved to MHNO from the MONO phenotype (RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.26, 1.74) compared with individuals who retained the MHNO phenotype. In contrast, obese individuals had significantly higher RRs for diabetes, independent of changes in metabolic health status, whereas weight reduction resulted in a decreased risk of diabetes. Sensitivity analysis using the presence or absence of the metabolic syndrome as a definition of metabolic health revealed similar results. Changes in metabolic health status were an independent risk factor for future diabetes in nonobese individuals, whereas general obesity had a greater contribution to the risk of obese individuals developing diabetes. These observations might imply a different intervention strategy for

  18. Cardiovascular Risks in Relation to Daidzein Metabolizing Phenotypes among Chinese Postmenopausal Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao-min; Ho, Suzanne C.; Chen, Yu-ming; Liu, Jun; Woo, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies suggested that the inter-individual differences in metabolizing isoflavone daidzein to equol or O-desmethylangolensin (ODMA) might explain the inconsistency of the soy/isoflavones efficacy on cardiovascular health. Objectives The study aims to evaluate the relationship between equol and ODMA phenotypes and cardiovascular risks with habitual isoflavone consumption in Chinese postmenopausal women. Methods This is a cross-sectional study among 726 prehypertensive postmenopal women who were screened for a randomized controlled trial. 648 women returned a daidzein-challenged urine samples for determination of equol and O-DMA production. 595 attended clinic visits for assessment of cardiovascular risks including body composition, blood pressure (BP), serum lipids, uric acid, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), fasting glucose and free fatty acid (FFA). Results The prevalences of equol and O-DMA producers were 53.2% and 60.9% respectively. Equol producers had higher fat free mass (p = 0.001), lower systolic (p = 0.01) and diastolic (p = 0.01) BP, serum triglyceride (p = 0.023), hs-CRP (p = 0.015) and FFA (p = 0.001) than non-producers. O-DMA producers had lower body fat% (p = 0.032), SBP (p = 0.02), total cholesterol (p = 0.002) than non-producers. The significant differences remained after further adjustment for potential confounders. The habitual soy isoflavones intake had little relation to cardiovascular risk factors in either equol/O-DMA producer phenotypes. Conclusion Equol/O-DMA producers had more favorable cardiovascular risk profiles than non-producers in prehypertensive postmenopausal women. PMID:24533060

  19. Long Oxygen Desaturation Time is a Risk Factor for Metabolic Syndrome

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    Erdem Akbal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess metabolic syndrome (MS prevalence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS and to evaluate the relationship between sleep parameters and MS incidence.Materials and Methods: Included in this study were 101 patients with complaints of snoring, witnessed apnea, excessive daytime sleepiness, and no prior OSAS diagnosis. An apnea-hypopnea index (AHI score ≥5 was required for the diagnosis of OSAS. The patient group included 80 cases, and the control group (AHI <5 included 21 cases. MS diagnosis was based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III.Results: MS was diagnosed in 33.3% of controls (7/21 and in 66.3% of OSAS patients (53/80 (p=0.006. The MS frequency was 51.7% (15/29 in mild OSAS (AHI 5-14, 77.8% (14/18 in moderate OSAS (AHI 15-29.9, and 72.7% (24/33 in severe OSAS (AHI ≥30. In patients with oxygen desaturation time (ODT <5.75 minutes, the MS frequency was 38.9%, while it was 74.2% in patients with ODT ≥5.75 minutes (p=0.005. In the logistic regression analysis with multiple variables (including AHI ≥5, body mass index [BMI] ≥27 kg/m2, age and ODT ≥5.75, it was determined that ODT, age and BMI increase the risk of MS independent of other risk factors.Conclusions: We found that ODT, age and BMI, which are independent of other risk factors, are determinants of MS in patients with OSAS. Additionally, the time of hypoxia, which is independent of AHI, also increases the risk of MS. Turk Jem 2008; 12: 63-7

  20. Associations between heart rate variability, metabolic syndrome risk factors, and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Melanie I; Kiviniemi, Antti; Gill, Dawn P; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Petrella, Robert J

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in heart rate variability (HRV) in metabolic syndrome (MetS) and to determine associations between HRV parameters, MetS risk factors, and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)). Participants (n = 220; aged 23-70 years) were assessed for MetS risk factors (waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) and 5-min supine HRV (time and frequency domain and nonlinear). HRV was compared between those with 3 or more (MetS+) and those with 2 or fewer MetS risk factors (MetS-). Multiple linear regression models were built for each HRV parameter to investigate associations with MetS risk factors and HOMA-IR. Data with normal distribution are presented as means ± SD and those without as median [interquartile range]. In women, standard deviation of R-R intervals 38.0 [27.0] ms, 44.5 [29.3] ms; p = 0.020), low-frequency power (5.73 ± 1.06 ln ms(2), 6.13 ± 1.05 ln ms(2); p = 0.022), and the standard deviation of the length of the Poincaré plot (46.8 [31.6] ms, 58.4 [29.9] ms; p = 0.014) were lower and heart rate was higher (68 [13] beats/min, 64 [12] beats/min; p = 0. 018) in MetS+ compared with MetS-, with no differences in men. Waist circumference was most commonly associated with HRV, especially frequency domain parameters. HOMA-IR was associated with heart rate. In conclusion, MetS+ women had a less favourable HRV profile than MetS- women, but there were no differences in men. HOMA-IR was associated with heart rate, not HRV. PMID:26140416

  1. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  2. Descriptive data on cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors in ambulatory and non-ambulatory adults with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.G. McPhee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Forty-two participants with cerebral palsy were recruited for a study examining traditional and novel indicators of cardiovascular risk (McPhee et al., 2015 [1]. Data pertaining to the prevalence of obesity, smoking, hypertension, and metabolic risk are provided. These data are presented along with the scoring methods used in evaluation of the study participants. Percentages are included for comparative purposes with the existing literature.

  3. Genetic Variations in Xenobiotic Metabolic Pathway Genes, Personal Hair Dye Use, and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yawei; Hughes, Kathryn J.; Zahm, Shelia Hoar; Zhang, Yaqun; Holford, Theodore R.; Dai, Li; Bai, Yana; Han, Xuesong; Qin, Qin; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zhu, Yong; Leaderer, Brian; Zheng, Tongzhang

    2009-01-01

    From 1996 to 2000, the authors conducted a population-based case-control study among Connecticut women to test the hypothesis that genetic variation in xenobiotic metabolic pathway genes modifies the relation between hair dye use and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. No effect modifications were found for women who started using hair dyes in 1980 or afterward. For women who started using hair dye before 1980 as compared with never users, a statistically significantly increased risk of non-Hodgkin...

  4. Lipoprotein Particles, Insulin, Adiponectin, C-Reactive Protein and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease among Men with Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kuller, Lewis H; Grandits, Gregory; Cohen, Jerome D.; Neaton, James D.; Ronald, Prineas

    2006-01-01

    We tested the hypotheses whether nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) determined lipoprotein particles, insulin and adiponectin, and C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell (WBC) count as markers of inflammation predicted risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) death among 428 men age 35–57 years with metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) in a matched case control study within the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial.

  5. The Age-Specific Quantitative Effects of Metabolic Risk Factors on Cardiovascular Diseases and Diabetes: A Pooled Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gitanjali M Singh; Goodarz Danaei; Farshad Farzadfar; Stevens, Gretchen A; Mark Woodward; David Wormser; Stephen Kaptoge; Gary Whitlock; Qing Qiao; Sarah Lewington; Emanuele Di Angelantonio; Stephen Vander Hoorn; Lawes, Carlene M. M.; Ali, Mohammed K; Dariush Mozaffarian

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effects of systolic blood pressure (SBP), serum total cholesterol (TC), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and body mass index (BMI) on the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) have been established in epidemiological studies, but consistent estimates of effect sizes by age and sex are not available. METHODS: We reviewed large cohort pooling projects, evaluating effects of baseline or usual exposure to metabolic risks on ischemic heart disease (IHD), hypertensive heart disease (HH...

  6. Metabolic syndrome: a risk factor for high intraocular pressure in the Israeli population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tamara; Wygnanski-Jaffe; Itzhak; Bieran; Dorit; Tekes-Manova; Yair; Morad; Isaac; Ashkenazi; Eedy; Mezer

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the association among elevated intraocular pressure(IOP), the metabolic syndrome(Met S), body mass index(BMI), and some of their components in the Israeli population.METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of12 747 soldiers of the Israeli Defense Forces, aged 35 y or older, who underwent a routine periodical medical examination between 1991 and 2004. None of the subjects received medical treatment for either glaucoma or ocular hypertension. High IOP(>21 mm Hg) was correlated with age, sex, arterial blood pressure, total blood cholesterol levels, triglyceride levels, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking, BMI and Met S.RESULTS: A statistically significant difference was found between the IOP of subjects with a low risk and higher risk for the development of Met S(P <0.0001 for males, P =0.0026 for females). A statistically significant positive correlation was found in male subjects between high BMI and elevated IOP(r =0.11677, P <0.0001).CONCLUSION: Met S and BMI were significantly more prevalent in subjects with increased IOP levels. We suggest that both should be taken into consideration in the assessment of glaucoma suspects.

  7. TRPV4 deficiency causes sexual dimorphism in bone metabolism and osteoporotic fracture risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Eerden, B C J; Oei, L; Roschger, P; Fratzl-Zelman, N; Hoenderop, J G J; van Schoor, N M; Pettersson-Kymmer, U; Schreuders-Koedam, M; Uitterlinden, A G; Hofman, A; Suzuki, M; Klaushofer, K; Ohlsson, C; Lips, P J A; Rivadeneira, F; Bindels, R J M; van Leeuwen, J P T M

    2013-12-01

    We explored the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) in murine bone metabolism and association of TRPV4 gene variants with fractures in humans. Urinary and histomorphometrical analyses demonstrated reduced osteoclast activity and numbers in male Trpv4(-/-) mice, which was confirmed in bone marrow-derived osteoclast cultures. Osteoblasts and bone formation as shown by serum procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide and histomorphometry, including osteoid surface, osteoblast and osteocyte numbers were not affected in vivo. Nevertheless, osteoblast differentiation was enhanced in Trpv4(-/-) bone marrow cultures. Cortical and trabecular bone mass was 20% increased in male Trpv4(-/-) mice, compared to sex-matched wild type (Trpv4(+/+)) mice. However, at the same time intracortical porosity was increased and bone matrix mineralization was reduced. Together, these lead to a maximum load, stiffness and work to failure of the femoral bone, which were not different compared to Trpv4(+/+) mice, while the bone material was less resistant to stress and less elastic. The differential impacts on these determinants of bone strength were likely responsible for the lack of any changes in whole bone strength in the Trpv4(-/-) mice. None of these skeletal parameters were affected in female Trpv4(-/-) mice. The T-allele of rs1861809 SNP in the TRPV4 locus was associated with a 30% increased risk (95% CI: 1.1-1.6; p=0.013) for non-vertebral fracture risk in men, but not in women, in the Rotterdam Study. Meta-analyses with the population-based LASA study confirmed the association with non-vertebral fractures in men. This was lost when the non-population-based studies Mr. OS and UFO were included. In conclusion, TRPV4 is a male-specific regulator of bone metabolism, a determinant of bone strength, and a potential risk predictor for fractures through regulation of bone matrix mineralization and intra-cortical porosity. This identifies TRPV4 as a unique sexually

  8. The Impact of Dietary and Metabolic Risk Factors on Cardiovascular Diseases and Type 2 Diabetes Mortality in Brazil.

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    Marcia C de Oliveira Otto

    Full Text Available Trends in food availability and metabolic risk factors in Brazil suggest a shift toward unhealthy dietary patterns and increased cardiometabolic disease risk, yet little is known about the impact of dietary and metabolic risk factors on cardiometabolic mortality in Brazil.Based on data from Global Burden of Disease (GBD Study, we used comparative risk assessment to estimate the burden of 11 dietary and 4 metabolic risk factors on mortality due to cardiovascular diseases and diabetes in Brazil in 2010. Information on national diets and metabolic risks were obtained from the Brazilian Household Budget Survey, the Food and Agriculture Organization database, and large observational studies including Brazilian adults. Relative risks for each risk factor were obtained from meta-analyses of randomized trials or prospective cohort studies; and disease-specific mortality from the GBD 2010 database. We quantified uncertainty using probabilistic simulation analyses, incorporating uncertainty in dietary and metabolic data and relative risks by age and sex. Robustness of findings was evaluated by sensitivity to varying feasible optimal levels of each risk factor.In 2010, high systolic blood pressure (SBP and suboptimal diet were the largest contributors to cardiometabolic deaths in Brazil, responsible for 214,263 deaths (95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 195,073 to 233,936 and 202,949 deaths (95% UI: 194,322 to 211,747, respectively. Among individual dietary factors, low intakes of fruits and whole grains and high intakes of sodium were the largest contributors to cardiometabolic deaths. For premature cardiometabolic deaths (before age 70 years, representing 40% of cardiometabolic deaths, the leading risk factors were suboptimal diet (104,169 deaths; 95% UI: 99,964 to 108,002, high SBP (98,923 deaths; 95%UI: 92,912 to 104,609 and high body-mass index (BMI (42,643 deaths; 95%UI: 40,161 to 45,111.suboptimal diet, high SBP, and high BMI are major causes of

  9. The Impact of Dietary and Metabolic Risk Factors on Cardiovascular Diseases and Type 2 Diabetes Mortality in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Otto, Marcia C.; Afshin, Ashkan; Micha, Renata; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Fahimi, Saman; Singh, Gitanjali; Danaei, Goodarz; Sichieri, Rosely; Monteiro, Carlos A; Louzada, Maria L. C.; Ezzati, Majid; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2016-01-01

    Background Trends in food availability and metabolic risk factors in Brazil suggest a shift toward unhealthy dietary patterns and increased cardiometabolic disease risk, yet little is known about the impact of dietary and metabolic risk factors on cardiometabolic mortality in Brazil. Methods Based on data from Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study, we used comparative risk assessment to estimate the burden of 11 dietary and 4 metabolic risk factors on mortality due to cardiovascular diseases and diabetes in Brazil in 2010. Information on national diets and metabolic risks were obtained from the Brazilian Household Budget Survey, the Food and Agriculture Organization database, and large observational studies including Brazilian adults. Relative risks for each risk factor were obtained from meta-analyses of randomized trials or prospective cohort studies; and disease-specific mortality from the GBD 2010 database. We quantified uncertainty using probabilistic simulation analyses, incorporating uncertainty in dietary and metabolic data and relative risks by age and sex. Robustness of findings was evaluated by sensitivity to varying feasible optimal levels of each risk factor. Results In 2010, high systolic blood pressure (SBP) and suboptimal diet were the largest contributors to cardiometabolic deaths in Brazil, responsible for 214,263 deaths (95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 195,073 to 233,936) and 202,949 deaths (95% UI: 194,322 to 211,747), respectively. Among individual dietary factors, low intakes of fruits and whole grains and high intakes of sodium were the largest contributors to cardiometabolic deaths. For premature cardiometabolic deaths (before age 70 years, representing 40% of cardiometabolic deaths), the leading risk factors were suboptimal diet (104,169 deaths; 95% UI: 99,964 to 108,002), high SBP (98,923 deaths; 95%UI: 92,912 to 104,609) and high body-mass index (BMI) (42,643 deaths; 95%UI: 40,161 to 45,111). Conclusion suboptimal diet, high SBP, and high

  10. Treatment patterns and risk factor control in patients with and without metabolic syndrome in cardiac rehabilitation

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    Gitt A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Anselm Gitt1, Christina Jannowitz2, Marthin Karoff3, Barbara Karmann2, Martin Horack1, Heinz Völler4,51Institut für Herzinfarktforschung an der Universität Heidelberg, Ludwigshafen,2Medical Affairs, MSD Sharp and Dohme GmbH, Haar, 3Klinik Königsfeld der Deutschen Rentenversicherung Westfalen in Ennepetal (NRW, Klinik der Universität Witten-Herdecke, 4Kardiologie, Klinik am See, Rüdersdorf, 5Center of Rehabilitation Research, University Potsdam, GermanyAim: Metabolic syndrome (MetS is a clustering of factors that are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. We aimed to investigate the proportion of patients with MetS in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation (CR, and to describe differences between patients with MetS compared to those without MetS with regard to (1 patient characteristics including demographics, risk factors, and comorbidities, (2 risk factor management including drug treatment, and (3 control status of risk factors at entry to CR and discharge from CR.Methods: Post-hoc analysis of data from 27,904 inpatients (Transparency Registry to Objectify Guideline-Oriented Risk Factor Management registry that underwent a CR period of about 3 weeks were analyzed descriptively in total and compared by their MetS status.Results: In the total cohort, mean age was 64.3 years, (71.7% male, with no major differences between groups. Patients had been referred after a ST elevation of myocardial infarction event in 41.1% of cases, non-ST elevation of myocardial infarction in 21.8%, or angina pectoris in 16.7%. They had received a percutaneous coronary intervention in 55.1% and bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft in 39.5%. Patients with MetS (n = 15,819 compared to those without MetS (n = 12,085 were less frequently males, and in terms of cardiac interventions, more often received coronary artery bypass surgery. Overall, statin use increased from 79.9% at entry to 95.0% at discharge (MetS: 79.7% to 95.2%. Patients with Met

  11. Systems pharmacology for traditional Chinese medicine with application to cardio-cerebrovascular diseases

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    Yingxue Fu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Identified as a treasure of natural herbal products, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM has attracted extensive attention for their moderate treatment effect and lower side effect. Cardio-cerebrovascular diseases (CCVD are a leading cause of death. TCM is used in China to prevent and treat CCVD. However, the complexity of TCM poses challenges in understanding the mechanisms of herbs at a systems-level, thus hampering the modernization and globalization of TCM. A novel model, termed traditional Chinese medicine systems pharmacology (TCMSP analysis platform, which relies on the theory of systems pharmacology and integrates absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADME/T evaluation, target prediction and network/pathway analysis, was proposed to address these problems. Here, we review the development of systems pharmacology, the TCMSP approach and its applications in the investigations of CCVD and compare it with other methods. TCMSP assists in uncovering the mechanisms of action of herbal formulas used in treating CCVD. It can also be applied in ascertaining the different syndrome patterns of coronary artery disease, decoding the multi-scale mechanisms of herbs, and in understanding the mechanisms of herbal synergism.

  12. Lethal systemic Degos disease with prominent cardio-pulmonary involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degos disease (DD) is a rare obstructive vasculopathy characterized by distinctive skin lesions. Involvement of the soles, palms and genitalia is rare. In most cases disease has an unfavorable course and involves gastrointestinal tract, central nervous system and occasionally other organs. Pleural and pericardial involvements are usually minor manifestations with prolonged course. Death occurs in approximately 50% of the patients usually due to intestinal perforation or central nervous system bleeding. We describe a 48-year-old man of lethal systemic DD. Widespread skin lesions with involvement of palm plantar surfaces, genitalia and scalp were ignored for 3 years, whereas the disease revealed its own malignant nature. The disorder progressed to nervous, gastrointestinal and cardiopulmonary system that led to death after 5 months from onset of systemic involvement as severe restrictive cardio-pulmonary insufficiency. Autopsy showed diffuse fibrotic changes in serial membranes and internal organs. (author)

  13. Examining associations between dietary patterns and metabolic CVD risk factors: a novel use of structural equation modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Michelle Alessandra; Baltar, Valéria Troncoso; Marchioni, Dirce Maria; Fisberg, Regina Mara

    2016-05-01

    The association between dietary patterns and metabolic cardiovascular risk factors has long been addressed but there is a lack of evidence towards the effects of the overall diet on the complex net of biological inter-relationships between risk factors. This study aimed to derive dietary patterns and examine their associations with metabolic cardiovascular risk factors following a theoretic model for the relationship between them. Participants included 417 adults of both sexes, enrolled to the cross-sectional population-based study performed in Brazil. Body weight, waist circumference, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, blood pressure, total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratio, TAG:HDL-cholesterol ratio, fasting plasma glucose and serum leptin were evaluated. Food consumption was assessed by two non-consecutive 24-h dietary recalls adjusted for the within-person variation of intake. A total of three dietary patterns were derived by exploratory structural equation modelling: 'Traditional', 'Prudent' and 'Modern'. The 'Traditional' pattern had a negative and direct effect on obesity indicators (serum LEP, body weight and waist circumference) and negative indirect effects on total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratio, TAG:HDL-cholesterol ratio and fasting plasma glucose. The 'Prudent' pattern had a negative and direct effect on systolic blood pressure. No association was observed for the 'Modern' pattern and metabolic risk factors. In conclusion, the 'Traditional' and 'Prudent' dietary patterns were negatively associated with metabolic cardiovascular risk factors among Brazilian adults. Their apparent protective effects against obesity and high blood pressure may be important non-pharmacological strategies for the prevention and control of obesity-related metabolic disorders and CVD. PMID:26931638

  14. Metabolic risk factors, physical activity and physical fitness in azorean adolescents: a cross-sectional study

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    Soares-Miranda Luísa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of metabolic syndrome has increased over the last few decades in adolescents and has become an important health challenge worldwide. This study analyzed the relationships between metabolic risk factors (MRF and physical activity (PA and physical fitness (PF in a sample of Azorean adolescents. Methods A cross-sectional school-based study was conducted on 417 adolescents (243 girls aged 15-18 from the Azorean Islands, Portugal. Height, weight, waist circumference, fasting glucose, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressure were measured. A sum of MRF was computed, and adolescents were classified into three groups: no MRF, one MRF and two or more MRF. PA was assessed by a sealed pedometer. PF was assessed using five tests from the Fitnessgram Test Battery. Dietary intake was obtained using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Results Mean daily steps for girls and boys were 7427 ± 2725 and 7916 ± 3936, respectively. Fifty-nine percent of the adolescents showed at least one MRF and 57.6% were under the healthy zone in the 20 m Shuttle Run Test. Ordinal logistic regression analysis showed that after adjusting for sex, body mass index, socio-economic status and adherence to a Mediterranean diet, adolescents who were in the highest quartile of the pedometer step/counts (≥9423 steps/day and those who achieved the healthy zone in five tests were less likely to have one or more MRF (OR = 0.56;95%CI:0.33-0.95; OR = 0.55;95%CI:0.31-0.98, respectively. Conclusions Daily step counts and PF levels were negatively associated with having one or more MRF among Azorean adolescents. Our findings emphasize the importance of promoting and increasing regular PA and PF to reduce the public health burden of chronic diseases associated with a sedentary lifestyle.

  15. Association between dietary phylloquinone intake and peripheral metabolic risk markers related to insulin resistance and diabetes in elderly subjects at high cardiovascular risk

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    Juanola-Falgarona Martí

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin K has been related to glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity and diabetes. Because inflammation underlies all these metabolic conditions, it is plausible that the potential role of vitamin K in glucose metabolism occurs through the modulation of cytokines and related molecules. The purpose of the study was to assess the associations between dietary intake of vitamin K and peripheral adipokines and other metabolic risk markers related to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods Cross-sectional and longitudinal assessments of these associations in 510 elderly participants recruited in the PREDIMED centers of Reus and Barcelona (Spain. We determined 1-year changes in dietary phylloquinone intake estimated by food frequency questionnaires, serum inflammatory cytokines and other metabolic risk markers. Results In the cross-sectional analysis at baseline no significant associations were found between dietary phylloquinone intake and the rest of metabolic risk markers evaluated, with exception of a negative association with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. After 1-year of follow-up, subjects in the upper tertile of changes in dietary phylloquinone intake showed a greater reduction in ghrelin (−15.0%, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (−12.9%, glucagon-like peptide-1 (−17.6%, IL-6 (−27.9%, leptin (−10.3%, TNF (−26.9% and visfatin (−24.9% plasma concentrations than those in the lowest tertile (all p Conclusion These results show that dietary phylloquinone intake is associated with an improvement of cytokines and other markers related to insulin resistance and diabetes, thus extending the potential protection by dietary phylloquinone on chronic inflammatory diseases. Trial registration http://www.controlled-trials.com as ISRCTN35739639

  16. The number of metabolic abnormalities associated with the risk of gallstones in a non-diabetic population.

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    Chung-Hung Tsai

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate whether metabolic syndrome is associated with gallstones, independent of hepatitis C infection or chronic kidney disease (CKD, in a non-diabetic population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 8,188 Chinese adult participants that underwent a self-motivated health examination were recruited into the final analysis after excluding the subjects who had a history of cholecystectomy, diabetes mellitus, or were currently using antihypertensive or lipid-lowering agents. Gallstones were defined by the presence of strong intraluminal echoes that were gravity-dependent or that attenuated ultrasound transmission. RESULTS: A total of 447 subjects (5.5% had gallstones, with 239 (5.1% men and 208 (6.0% women. After adjusting for age, gender, obesity, education level, and lifestyle factors, included current smoking, alcohol drinking, regular exercise, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and CKD, there was a positive association between metabolic syndrome and gallstones. Moreover, as compared to subjects without metabolic abnormalities, subjects with one, two, and three or more suffered from a 35, 40, and 59% higher risk of gallstones, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Non-diabetic subjects with metabolic syndrome had a higher risk of gallstones independent of hepatitis C or CKD, and a dose-dependent effect of metabolic abnormalities also exists.

  17. Echocardiographic epicardial adipose tissue is related to anthropometric and clinical parameters of metabolic syndrome: a new indicator of cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobellis, Gianluca; Ribaudo, Maria Cristina; Assael, Filippo; Vecci, Elio; Tiberti, Claudio; Zappaterreno, Alessandra; Di Mario, Umberto; Leonetti, Frida

    2003-11-01

    Metabolic syndrome is related to multiple cardiovascular risk factors. Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) plays a key role in metabolic syndrome. Easy detection of VAT could be an important tool to increase knowledge of metabolic syndrome. The objective of this study was to study the relationship of echocardiographic epicardial adipose tissue to anthropometric and clinical parameters of metabolic syndrome. We selected 72 consecutive subjects, 46.5 +/- 17.4 yr of age, with a body mass index between 22 and 47 kg/m(2). Each subject underwent transthoracic echocardiogram to measure epicardial fat thickness on right ventricle and magnetic resonance imaging to calculate visceral adipose tissue. Anthropometric, metabolic, and cardiac parameters were also evaluated. Echocardiographic epicardial adipose tissue showed a very good correlation with magnetic resonance imaging abdominal VAT and epicardial fat measurement (Bland-Altman plot and linear regression). Multiple regression analysis showed that waist circumference (r(2) = 0.428; P = 0.01), diastolic blood pressure (r(2) = 0. 387; P = 0.02), and fasting insulin (r(2) = 0.387; P = 0.03) were the strongest independent variables correlated with epicardial adipose tissue. Echocardiographic epicardial adipose tissue could be applied as an easy and reliable imaging indicator of VAT and cardiovascular risk. PMID:14602744

  18. Impact of the Heart WATCH Program on Patients at Risk of Developing Metabolic Syndrome, Prediabetes or Cardiovascular Disease

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    Jennifer Fink

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Metabolic syndrome is a set of metabolic risk factors associated with increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. We retrospectively evaluated the effectiveness of a lifestyle modification program (Heart WATCH geared toward reducing development of chronic disease in women deemed at risk for metabolic syndrome, prediabetes and/or cardiovascular disease. Methods: Our institution’s Heart WATCH program consists of screening sessions with a multidisciplinary team (physician/nurse, nutritionist and psychologist, a minimum of three visits with a nurse practitioner and weekly follow-up phone calls for a 14-week period. Sociodemographic variables were obtained at initial visit. Biometric testing indices and self-reported clinical and behavioral health measures were recorded pre- and postintervention, and compared using paired t-tests or McNemar’s test as appropriate. Results: Heart WATCH enrolled 242 women from November 2006 to April 2014, and 193 (80% completed all phases of the 14-week lifestyle intervention. Postintervention, participants demonstrated improved health status in all areas and improved significantly in the following areas: diet/nutrition (P=0.014, exercise (P<0.001, stress (P<0.0001, quality of life (P=0.003, weight (P<0.0001, waist circumference (P=0.01 and total cholesterol (P=0.019. Clinically meaningful improvements were realized by participants who moved to a healthier classification in a number of vital signs and blood panel indices. Conclusions: These findings suggest the “elevated risk profile” for women with components of metabolic syndrome can be reversed through a lifestyle program focused on reducing risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease and prediabetes. Future research is needed to determine mechanisms of risk reduction as well as optimal patient-centered and culturally appropriate approaches to weight management.

  19. Uncontrolled blood pressure and risk of sleep apnea among blacks: findings from the metabolic syndrome outcome (MetSO) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seixas, A; Ravenell, J; Williams, N J; Williams, S K; Zizi, F; Ogedegbe, G; Jean-Louis, G

    2016-03-01

    Uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) is linked to increased risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, few studies have assessed the impact of this relationship among blacks with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Data for this study were collected from 1035 blacks (mean age=62±13 years) enrolled in the Metabolic Syndrome Outcome study. Patients with a score ⩾6 on the Apnea Risk Evaluation System were considered at risk for OSA. Of the sample, 77.1% were low-to-high OSA risk and 92.3% were hypertensive, of which 16.8% had uncontrolled BP levels. Analysis also showed that 60.4% were diabetic, 8.9% had a stroke history, 74.3% had dyslipidemia, 69.8% were obese and 30.9% had a history of heart disease. Logistic regression analyses were employed to investigate associations between uncontrolled BP and OSA risk, while adjusting for known covariates. Findings showed that uncontrolled BP independently increased the odds of OSA risk twofold (odds ratio=2.02, 95% confidence interval=1.18-3.48, P<0.05). In conclusion, our findings show that uncontrolled BP was associated with a twofold greater risk of OSA among blacks, suggesting that those with MetS and who have uncontrolled BP should be screened for the presence of OSA. PMID:26246311

  20. Preventive role of exercise training in autonomic, hemodynamic, and metabolic parameters in rats under high risk of metabolic syndrome development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes-Silva, Ivana Cinthya; Mostarda, Cristiano; Moreira, Edson Dias; Silva, Kleiton Augusto Santos; dos Santos, Fernando; de Angelis, Kátia; Farah, Vera de Moura Azevedo; Irigoyen, Maria Claudia

    2013-03-15

    High fructose consumption contributes to metabolic syndrome incidence, whereas exercise training promotes several beneficial adaptations. In this study, we demonstrated the preventive role of exercise training in the metabolic syndrome derangements in a rat model. Wistar rats receiving fructose overload in drinking water (100 g/l) were concomitantly trained on a treadmill (FT) or kept sedentary (F) for 10 wk. Control rats treated with normal water were also submitted to exercise training (CT) or sedentarism (C). Metabolic evaluations consisted of the Lee index and glycemia and insulin tolerance test (kITT). Blood pressure (BP) was directly measured, whereas heart rate (HR) and BP variabilities were evaluated in time and frequency domains. Renal sympathetic nerve activity was also recorded. F rats presented significant alterations compared with all the other groups in insulin resistance (in mg · dl(-1) · min(-1): F: 3.4 ± 0.2; C: 4.7 ± 0.2; CT: 5.0 ± 0.5 FT: 4.6 ± 0.4), mean BP (in mmHG: F: 117 ± 2; C: 100 ± 2; CT: 98 ± 2; FT: 105 ± 2), and Lee index (in g/mm: F = 0.31 ± 0.001; C = 0.29 ± 0.001; CT = 0.27 ± 0.002; FT = 0.28 ± 0.002), confirming the metabolic syndrome diagnosis. Exercise training blunted all these derangements. Additionally, FS group presented autonomic dysfunction in relation to the others, as seen by an ≈ 50% decrease in baroreflex sensitivity and 24% in HR variability, and increases in sympathovagal balance (140%) and in renal sympathetic nerve activity (45%). These impairments were not observed in FT group, as well as in C and CT. Correlation analysis showed that both Lee index and kITT were associated with vagal impairment caused by fructose. Therefore, exercise training plays a preventive role in both autonomic and hemodynamic alterations related to the excessive fructose consumption. PMID:23329818

  1. Risk factors of disturbances in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and some pleiotropic effects of antihypertensive therapy in pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A V Padyganova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The any kind of hypertension developing during the pregnancy, associated with high cardiovascular risk in the future. At the pregnancy complicated by development by arterial hypertension, there are more expressed changes of a carbohydrate and lipide metabolism, than it is peculiar to normally proceeding pregnancy, were by important pathogenetic links of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular complications. Identification of new mechanisms of action of antihypertensive means associated with positive influences on exchange processes, is represented very demanded, considering pandemic nature of prevalence of metabolic violations in modern population.

  2. Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease, Metabolic Syndrome and Sleepiness in Truck Drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio de Padua Mansur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground:Truck driver sleepiness is a primary cause of vehicle accidents. Several causes are associated with sleepiness in truck drivers. Obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS are associated with sleep disorders and with primary risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVD. We analyzed the relationship between these conditions and prevalence of sleepiness in truck drivers.Methods:We analyzed the major risk factors for CVD, anthropometric data and sleep disorders in 2228 male truck drivers from 148 road stops made by the Federal Highway Police from 2006 to 2011. Alcohol consumption, illicit drugs and overtime working hours were also analyzed. Sleepiness was assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale.Results:Mean age was 43.1 ± 10.8 years. From 2006 to 2011, an increase in neck (p = 0.011 and abdominal circumference (p < 0.001, total cholesterol (p < 0.001, triglyceride plasma levels (p = 0.014, and sleepiness was observed (p < 0.001. In addition, a reduction in hypertension (39.6% to 25.9%, p < 0.001, alcohol consumption (32% to 23%, p = 0.033 and overtime hours (52.2% to 42.8%, p < 0.001 was found. Linear regression analysis showed that sleepiness correlated closely with body mass index (β = 0.19, Raj2 = 0.659, p = 0.031, abdominal circumference (β = 0.24, Raj2 = 0.826, p = 0.021, hypertension (β = -0.62, Raj2 = 0.901, p = 0.002, and triglycerides (β = 0.34, Raj2 = 0.936, p = 0.022. Linear multiple regression indicated that hypertension (p = 0.008 and abdominal circumference (p = 0.025 are independent variables for sleepiness.Conclusions:Increased prevalence of sleepiness was associated with major components of the MetS.

  3. Prenatal stress and stress coping style interact to predict metabolic risk in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Gretha J; Moghadam, Alexander A; Cordner, Zachary A; Tamashiro, Kellie L

    2014-04-01

    Both prenatal stress (PNS) exposure and a passive stress-coping style have been identified as risk factors for insulin resistance in rats. In the current study, we test the hypothesis that PNS and stress-coping style may interact in predicting susceptibility for metabolic disease. To test this hypothesis, adult male control and PNS offspring were behaviorally characterized using a defensive burying test to have either a passive or proactive stress-coping style. In adulthood, all rats were fed either a standard chow or a high-fat diet for 3 weeks. After 3 weeks of diet exposure, glucose and insulin levels were assessed during an oral glucose tolerance test. Under high-fat diet conditions, PNS rats display elevated glucose and insulin responses to the oral glucose tolerance test, indicative of glucose intolerance. Interestingly, these effects of PNS were far more pronounced in rats characterized by a passive stress-coping style. Additionally, the passively coping PNS rats also gained more weight on the high-fat diet than all other rats tested. This observation suggests that a stressful prenatal environment in combination with a passive stress-coping strategy may prime an individual to be sensitive to diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24467745

  4. 3-Self behavior modification programs base on the PROMISE Model for clients at metabolic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarakamhang, Ungsinun

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this mixed methods research were 1) to study effects of the health behavior modification program (HBMP) conducted under the principles of the PROMISE Model and the CIPP Model and 2) to compare the 3-self health behaviors and the biomedical indicators before with after the program completion. During the program, three sample groups including 30 program leaders, 30 commanders and 120 clients were assessed, and there were assessments taken on 4,649 volunteers who were at risk of metabolic syndrome before and after the program conducted in 17 hospitals. The collected data were analyzed by the t-test and the path analysis. The research instruments were questionnaires used for program evaluation, structuralized interview forms, and questionnaires used for 3-self health behavior assessment. The findings were as follows: 1) During the program, the assessment result deriving from comparing the overall opinions toward the program among the three sample groups showed no difference (F=2.219), 2) The program management factors based on the PROMISE Model (positive reinforcement, optimism, context, and process or activity provision) had an overall influence on the product or success of the HBMP (pbehaviors (self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-care) were significantly higher than those appeared before the participation (p< 0.05), and their biomedical indicators (BMI, blood pressure, waistline, blood glucose, lipid profiles, cholesterol, and HbA1c) were significantly lower than those measured before the program (p< 0.05). PMID:22980111

  5. A Nested Case-Control Study of Metabolically Defined Body Size Phenotypes and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Neil; Cross, Amanda J; Abubakar, Mustapha; Jenab, Mazda; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Dossus, Laure; Racine, Antoine; Kühn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena A; Tjønneland, Anne; Petersen, Kristina E N; Overvad, Kim; Quirós, J Ramón; Jakszyn, Paula; Molina-Montes, Esther; Dorronsoro, Miren; Huerta, José-María; Barricarte, Aurelio; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Travis, Ruth C; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Masala, Giovanna; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Siersema, Peter D; Peeters, Petra H; Ohlsson, Bodil; Ericson, Ulrika; Palmqvist, Richard; Nyström, Hanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Freisling, Heinz; Kong, So Yeon; Tsilidis, Kostas; Muller, David C; Riboli, Elio; Gunter, Marc J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is positively associated with colorectal cancer. Recently, body size subtypes categorised by the prevalence of hyperinsulinaemia have been defined, and metabolically healthy overweight/obese individuals (without hyperinsulinaemia) have been suggested to be at lower risk of...... cardiovascular disease than their metabolically unhealthy (hyperinsulinaemic) overweight/obese counterparts. Whether similarly variable relationships exist for metabolically defined body size phenotypes and colorectal cancer risk is unknown. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The association of metabolically defined body......) metabolically healthy/overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2), (3) metabolically unhealthy/normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2), and (4) metabolically unhealthy/overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2). Additionally, in separate models, waist circumference measurements (using the International Diabetes Federation cut-points [≥80 cm for women...

  6. Alcohol use behaviors and risk of metabolic syndrome in South Korean middle-aged men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kyungjoo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is thought that small volumes of alcohol may have positive effects on health. However, excessive drinking results in serious health problems. An accurate method to determine individual alcohol use behaviors are needed to assess objectively the extent to which drinking affects health. This study investigated the association between risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS and alcohol use behaviors in middle-aged South Korean men using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. Methods This study used data from the South Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination (KNHANES IV (2008, which extracted the standard survey household by using the proportional systematic sampling method. Data of 714 participants from KNHANES IV, 2008 were analyzed using Surveyfreq and Surveylogistic regression to investigate the association between MetS and alcohol use behaviors in middle-aged South Korean men. Results After adjustment for education, smoking, and physical activity, alcohol use behaviors were significantly associated with an increased risk of hypertension [odds ratio (OR = 2.54, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.5-4.06 in the hazardous group; OR = 2.99, 95% CI = 1.84-4.92 in the problem group]; impaired fasting glucose (OR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.16-3.99 in the hazardous group; OR = 2.48, 95% CI = 1.42-4.33 in the problem group; dyslipidemia (OR = 2.19, 95% CI = 1.38-3.47 in the problem group; abdominal obesity (OR = 1.93, 95% CI = 1.17-3.19 in the hazardous group; OR = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.17-2.92 in the problem group; and MetS (OR = 2.16, 95% CI = 1.24-3.77 in the hazardous group; OR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.41-4.58 in problem group. Conclusions This study found that excessive alcohol use behaviors increased the risk of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, abdominal obesity, and MetS. Considering the rising rate of alcohol consumption and heavy drinking at single sittings, a culture of less risky alcohol consumption must be established to promote

  7. Role of heterogeneity of lipids in predicting risk of atheroma formation in metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Assessing impact of heterogeneous lipids in predisposing cardiovascular (CV) atheroma formation in adolescents with metabolic syndrome (MS). Study Design: Cross-sectional analytical. Place and Duration of Study: Educational Institutes of Lahore. Six months Material and Methods: A total of 193, 17-25 year old subjects, 106 males and 87 females were recruited. A record regarding each subject's personal, socioeconomic, educational, dietary and family histories was taken. They underwent the following anthropometric measurements: waist circumference/WC (cm), hip circumference/HC (cm), height (inches), weight (kg), waist hip ratio/WHR, body mass index/BMI and blood pressure. Laboratory investigations included fasting blood samples for glucose and lipids; including total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c) and triglycerides (TG). Calculations for TG/HDL ratio and TC/HDL ratio were made. Results: Metabolic syndrome (MS) was present in 26 (13.5%) individuals. Male to female ratio was 3:1. Values of waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride and HDL-c, were all high. On comparison of fasting lipid profile, TC/HDL ratio and TG/HDL ratio, it was observed that the average total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, TCL/HDL ratio were insignificant. The average triglyceride level and TG/HDL ratio were all high. The ROC curve for total cholesterol, HDL-c, TG, TC/HDL and TG/HDL ratio yielded 0.555, 0.526, 0.912, 0.548 and 0.913 areas under the curve. Plasma TG, TG/HDL ratio produced significant p-values < 0.001. Abnormal triglycerides and TG/HDL ratio at a cutoff of 3.98 was diagnosed with high sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion: Fasting triglyceride and HDL-c play a major role in the pathogenesis of MS at an early age. Triglyceride level and TG/HDL ratio as opposed to HDL-c and TC/HDL-c clearly define the risk for development of atheroma formation in our adolescent

  8. Interaction between paraoxonase 1 polymorphism and prenatal pesticide exposure on metabolic markers in children using a multiplex approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Nellemann, Christine; Wohlfahrt-Veje, Christine; Jensen, Tina Kold; Main, Katharina M.; Andersen, Helle Raun

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal environmental exposures may influence the risk of cardio-metabolic diseases later in life. This study used a multiplex approach to investigate non-fasting serum levels of metabolic markers in a cohort of school-aged children for whom associations between prenatal pesticide exposure and...... body fat content and blood pressure were previously found to be dependent on paraoxonase1 (PON1) Q192R genotype. In children with the PON1 192 R-allele, leptin, glucagon, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) were positively associated with prenatal pesticide exposure. For PON1 192 QQ......-homozygote children none of the biomarkers were significantly affected by prenatal pesticide exposure. In children with the R-allele, leptin was associated with both body fat measures and prenatal pesticide exposure and seems to mediate body fat accumulation in exposed children. These findings support our previous...

  9. Serum 25(OHD is inversely associated with metabolic syndrome risk profile among urban middle-aged Chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Xiao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a variety of chronic metabolic diseases. Limited evidence regarding vitamin D deficiency exists within the Chinese population. The present study aims to examine the association between serum vitamin D concentrations and cardiometabolic risk factors in the young and middle-aged, urban Chinese population Methods The cross-sectional relationships between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] concentrations and indices of adiposity and cardiometabolic risk factors (e.g., body mass index, waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, etc. were evaluated in 601 non-diabetic adults. Result Vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency was present in 66% of the tested population, and serum 25(OHD levels were lower in patients who were overweight/obese or suffered metabolic syndrome when compared to individuals of healthy weight without metabolic syndrome (24.08 ± 8.08 vs 31.70 ± 11.77 ng/ml, 21.52 ± 6.9 vs 31.74 ± 10.21 ng/ml respectively. 25(OHD was inversely associated with waist circumference, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, triglycerides and LDL-cholesterol, and it was positively associated with HDL-cholesterol in a multivariable-adjusted regression model. Conclusion Vitamin D deficiency is common in the young and middle-aged, urban Chinese population, with high prevalence in overweight/obese individuals and patients with metabolic syndrome. Low vitamin D concentration was associated with indices of adiposity and cardiometabolic risk factors. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the cause-effect relation between vitamin D status, obesity and related metabolic disorders. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials (ISRCTN21527585

  10. Adverse Metabolic Risk Profiles in Greenlandic Inuit Children Compared to Danish Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Andersen, T.; Sorensen, K.; Andersen, L. B.; Aachmann-Andersen, N. J.; Aksglaede, L.; Juul, A.; Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2013-01-01

    Objective During recent decades, the prevalence of metabolic morbidity has increased rapidly in adult Greenlandic Inuit. To what extent this is also reflected in the juvenile Inuit population is unknown. The objective was, therefore, in the comparison with Danish children, to evaluate metabolic...... tendencies toward higher prevalence of diabetes and metabolic morbidity in the adult Greenlandic Inuit population may also be present in the Inuit children population....

  11. Active Smoking and Risk of Metabolic Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Kan; Liu, Jianmin; Ning, Guang

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological evidence suggests that smoking has been associated with emergence of metabolic syndrome. However, data on this issue are inconsistent and controversial. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis to examine the association between smoking and metabolic syndrome. Methodology and Principal Findings We searched the Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library database up to March 2012 to identify prospective cohort studies related to smoking and metabolic syndrome. Reference l...

  12. Oral Arginine Metabolism May Decrease the Risk for Dental Caries in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento, M. M.; Liu, Y.; Kalra, R.; Perry, S.; Adewumi, A.; Xu, X.; Primosch, R.E.; Burne, R A

    2013-01-01

    Arginine metabolism by oral bacteria via the arginine deiminase system (ADS) increases the local pH, which can neutralize the effects of acidification from sugar metabolism and reduce the cariogenicity of oral biofilms. To explore the relationship between oral arginine metabolism and dental caries experience in children, we measured ADS activity in oral samples from 100 children and correlated it with their caries status and type of dentition. Supragingival dental plaque was collected from to...

  13. Combinational risk factors of metabolic syndrome identified by fuzzy neural network analysis of health-check data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ushida Yasunori

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lifestyle-related diseases represented by metabolic syndrome develop as results of complex interaction. By using health check-up data from two large studies collected during a long-term follow-up, we searched for risk factors associated with the development of metabolic syndrome. Methods In our original study, we selected 77 case subjects who developed metabolic syndrome during the follow-up and 152 healthy control subjects who were free of lifestyle-related risk components from among 1803 Japanese male employees. In a replication study, we selected 2196 case subjects and 2196 healthy control subjects from among 31343 other Japanese male employees. By means of a bioinformatics approach using a fuzzy neural network (FNN, we searched any significant combinations that are associated with MetS. To ensure that the risk combination selected by FNN analysis was statistically reliable, we performed logistic regression analysis including adjustment. Results We selected a combination of an elevated level of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (γ-GTP and an elevated white blood cell (WBC count as the most significant combination of risk factors for the development of metabolic syndrome. The FNN also identified the same tendency in a replication study. The clinical characteristics of γ-GTP level and WBC count were statistically significant even after adjustment, confirming that the results obtained from the fuzzy neural network are reasonable. Correlation ratio showed that an elevated level of γ-GTP is associated with habitual drinking of alcohol and a high WBC count is associated with habitual smoking. Conclusions This result obtained by fuzzy neural network analysis of health check-up data from large long-term studies can be useful in providing a personalized novel diagnostic and therapeutic method involving the γ-GTP level and the WBC count.

  14. Association between adherence to the Korean Food Guidance System and the risk of metabolic abnormalities in Koreans

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Hyun Ju; Han, Sung Nim; Song, Sujin; Paik, Hee Young; Baik, Hyun Wook; Joung, Hyojee

    2011-01-01

    Consumption of a diet consistent with dietary guidelines is believed to have a beneficial effect on the prevention of chronic diseases and the promotion of general health. This study was conducted to explore the relationship between adherence to the Korean Food Guidance System (KFGS), which was based on the 2010 revised KDRIs, and the risk of metabolic abnormalities. Five hundred and ninety-six Korean adults between 30 and 59 years of age were recruited by advertisement to the Bundang Jesaeng...

  15. LA Sprouts Randomized Controlled Nutrition, Cooking and Gardening Program Reduces Obesity and Metabolic Risk in Latino Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Gatto, Nicole M.; Martinez, Lauren C.; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Davis, Jaimie N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of a 12-week gardening, nutrition, and cooking intervention (“LA Sprouts”) on dietary intake, obesity parameters and metabolic disease risk among low-income, primarily Hispanic/Latino youth in Los Angeles. Methods Randomized control trial involving four elementary schools [2 schools randomized to intervention (172, 3rd–5th grade students); 2 schools randomized to control (147, 3rd–5th grade students)]. Classes were taught in 90-minute sessions once a week to ea...

  16. Association between yogurt consumption and the risk of Metabolic Syndrome over 6 years in the SUN study

    OpenAIRE

    Sayon-Orea, C. (Carmen); Bes-Rastrollo, M.; Marti, A; Pimenta, A.M. (Adriano Marçal); Martin-Calvo, N. (Nerea); Martinez-Gonzalez, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of yogurt consumption in the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is not fully understood and the available epidemiologic evidence is scarce. The aim of our study was to assess the association between total, whole-fat, or low-fat yogurt consumption and the risk of developing MetS. Methods: Yogurt consumption was assessed at baseline through a 136-item validate...

  17. Avocado Oil Supplementation Modifies Cardiovascular Risk Profile Markers in a Rat Model of Sucrose-Induced Metabolic Changes

    OpenAIRE

    Octavio Carvajal-Zarrabal; Cirilo Nolasco-Hipolito; M. Guadalupe Aguilar-Uscanga; Guadalupe Melo-Santiesteban; Patricia M. Hayward-Jones; Barradas-Dermitz, Dulce M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of avocado oil administration on biochemical markers of cardiovascular risk profile in rats with metabolic changes induced by sucrose ingestion. Twenty-five rats were divided into five groups: a control group (CG; basic diet), a sick group (MC; basic diet plus 30% sucrose solution), and three other groups (MCao, MCac, and MCas; basic diet plus 30% sucrose solution plus olive oil and avocado oil extracted by centrifugation or using solvent,...

  18. Prognostic Accuracy of Immunologic and Metabolic Markers for Type 1 Diabetes in a High-Risk Population

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ping; Beam, Craig A.; Cuthbertson, David; Sosenko, Jay M.; Skyler, Jay S.; Krischer, Jeffrey P.; ,

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To establish and compare the prognostic accuracy of immunologic and metabolic markers in predicting onset of type 1 diabetes in those with high risk in a prospective study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 339 subjects from the Diabetes Prevention Trial–Type 1 (DPT-1) parenteral study, who were islet cell antibody (ICA)-positive, with low first-phase insulin response (FPIR) and/or abnormal glucose tolerance at baseline, were followed until clinical diabetes onset or study end ...

  19. Analyzing correlation between epicardial fat area and metabolic syndrome risk factor by using low-dose Lung CT

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Hyon-Chol; Lee, Hae-Kag; Lee, Heon; Cha, Jang-Gyu; Kim, Yoon-Shin; Cho, Jae-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To study about the blood count of a risk factor related to physical measurement and metabolic syndrome, and the area of epicardial fat for medical checkup patients. Methods: From April 1st to November 15th in 2014, we measured the area of epicardial fat in the adult out patients under 60 years of age, who are in good health; and the patients took the blood test and low-dose lung CT. In order to identify the relationship between the area of epicardial fat and the risk factor of met...

  20. Polymorphisms of Estrogen Metabolism-Related Genes and Prostate Cancer Risk in Two Populations of African Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emeville, Elise; Ferdinand, Séverine; Punga, Augustin; Lufuma, Simon; Blanchet, Pascal; Romana, Marc; Multigner, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Background Estrogens are thought to play a critical role in prostate carcinogenesis. It has been suggested that polymorphisms of genes encoding enzymes involved in estrogen metabolism are risk factors for prostate cancer. However, few studies have been performed on populations of African ancestry, which are known to have a high risk of prostate cancer. Objective We investigated whether functional polymorphisms of CYP17, CYP19, CYP1B1, COMT and UGT1A1 affected the risk of prostate cancer in two different populations of African ancestry. Methods In Guadeloupe (French West Indies), we compared 498 prostate cancer patients and 565 control subjects. In Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo), 162 prostate cancer patients were compared with 144 controls. Gene polymorphisms were determined by the SNaPshot technique or short tandem repeat PCR analysis. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results The AA genotype and the A allele of rs4680 (COMT) appeared to be inversely associated with the risk of prostate cancer in adjusted models for both Afro-Caribbean and native African men. For the A allele, a significant inverse association was observed among cases with low-grade Gleason scores and localized clinical stage, in both populations. Conclusions These preliminary results support the hypothesis that polymorphisms of genes encoding enzymes involved in estrogen metabolism may modulate the risk of prostate cancer in populations of African ancestry. PMID:27074016

  1. Prenatal findings in cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templin, Ludivine; Baumann, Clarisse; Busa, Tiffany; Heckenroth, Hélène; Pouvreau, Nathalie; Toutain, Annick; Cave, Hélène; Verloes, Alain; Sigaudy, Sabine; Philip, Nicole

    2016-02-01

    Our study was designed to analyze prenatal manifestations in patients affected with cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS), in order to define indications of DNA testing in utero. Prenatal features were extracted from a national database and additional data were collected from 16 families contacted through the French association of CFC-Costello syndrome. We collected results of ultrasound scan (USS) biometrics, presence of congenital birth defects, and polyhydramnios. From the database, increased nuchal translucency was present in 13% of pregnancies, polyhydramnios in 52%, macrosomia and/or macrocephaly in 16%. Of the 16 pregnancies, 81% were complicated by abnormal USS findings. Polyhydramnios was reported in 67%. Head circumference, biparietal diameter, and abdominal circumference were above the 90th centile in 72%, 83% and, 81% of fetuses, respectively. Contrasting with macrosomia, femur length was below the 10th centile in 38%. Urinary tract abnormalities were found in 47% of fetuses. Most CFCS fetuses showed a combination of macrocephaly, macrosomia, and polyhydramnios, contrasting with relatively short femora. This growth pattern is also seen in Costello syndrome. We suggest that screening for CFCS and Costello gene mutations could be proposed in pregnancies showing this unusual pattern of growth parameters. PMID:26494162

  2. Comparison of Accuracy of Diabetes Risk Score and Components of the Metabolic Syndrome in Assessing Risk of Incident Type 2 Diabetes in Inter99 Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafizadeh, Tracy B; Moler, Edward J; Kolberg, Janice A; Nguyen, Uyen Thao; Hansen, Torben; Jørgensen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2011-01-01

    Background: Given the increasing worldwide incidence of diabetes, methods to assess diabetes risk which would identify those at highest risk are needed. We compared two risk-stratification approaches for incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); factors of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and a previously...... developed diabetes risk score, PreDxH Diabetes Risk Score (DRS). DRS assesses 5 yr risk of incident T2DM based on the measurement of 7 biomarkers in fasting blood. Methodology/Principal Findings: DRS was evaluated in baseline serum samples from 4,128 non-diabetic subjects in the Inter99 cohort (Danes aged...... 30–60) for whom diabetes outcomes at 5 years were known. Subjects were classified as having MetS based on the presence of at least 3 MetS risk factors in baseline clinical data. The sensitivity and false positive rate for predicting diabetes using MetS was compared to DRS. When the sensitivity was...

  3. Maternal folate, alcohol and energy metabolism-related gene polymorphisms and the risk of recurrent pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, F; Yamada, H; Kishi, R; Minakami, H

    2012-10-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that the condition of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) may be multifactorial, with both genetic predisposition and environmental factors potentially involved in its pathogenesis. The aim of this study is to elucidate the associations between maternal folate, alcohol and energy metabolism-related gene polymorphisms and the risk of RPL. This case-control study, which involved 116 cases with two or more instances of RPL and 306 fertile controls, was performed in the city of Sapporo, Japan. The associations between eight single nucleotide polymorphisms of folate, alcohol and energy metabolism-related genes [methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), 5-methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase (MTR), 5-methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase reductase (MTRR), alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), beta-3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG)], and RPL were assessed. Without consideration of cigarette smoking or alcohol use, the risk of RPL significantly decreased in women with the MTHFR rs1801133 TT, MTR rs1805087 AG or ALDH2 rs671 AA genotype (P < 0.05). The risk of RPL associated with cigarette smoking and alcohol use decreased significantly in women carrying the MTHFR rs1801133 T allele [odds ratio (OR), 0.51; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.27-0.95]. Similarly, the risk of RPL significantly decreased in women carrying the MTR rs1805087 G allele (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.23-0.85). Our findings suggest that maternal gene polymorphisms related to folate metabolism may decrease the risk of RPL. Molecular epidemiological studies are needed to unequivocally elucidate the multifactorial effects of both genetic and environmental factors on human fecundity. PMID:25102261

  4. The age-specific quantitative effects of metabolic risk factors on cardiovascular diseases and diabetes: a pooled analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitanjali M Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effects of systolic blood pressure (SBP, serum total cholesterol (TC, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, and body mass index (BMI on the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD have been established in epidemiological studies, but consistent estimates of effect sizes by age and sex are not available. METHODS: We reviewed large cohort pooling projects, evaluating effects of baseline or usual exposure to metabolic risks on ischemic heart disease (IHD, hypertensive heart disease (HHD, stroke, diabetes, and, as relevant selected other CVDs, after adjusting for important confounders. We pooled all data to estimate relative risks (RRs for each risk factor and examined effect modification by age or other factors, using random effects models. RESULTS: Across all risk factors, an average of 123 cohorts provided data on 1.4 million individuals and 52,000 CVD events. Each metabolic risk factor was robustly related to CVD. At the baseline age of 55-64 years, the RR for 10 mmHg higher SBP was largest for HHD (2.16; 95% CI 2.09-2.24, followed by effects on both stroke subtypes (1.66; 1.39-1.98 for hemorrhagic stroke and 1.63; 1.57-1.69 for ischemic stroke. In the same age group, RRs for 1 mmol/L higher TC were 1.44 (1.29-1.61 for IHD and 1.20 (1.15-1.25 for ischemic stroke. The RRs for 5 kg/m(2 higher BMI for ages 55-64 ranged from 2.32 (2.04-2.63 for diabetes, to 1.44 (1.40-1.48 for IHD. For 1 mmol/L higher FPG, RRs in this age group were 1.18 (1.08-1.29 for IHD and 1.14 (1.01-1.29 for total stroke. For all risk factors, proportional effects declined with age, were generally consistent by sex, and differed by region in only a few age groups for certain risk factor-disease pairs. CONCLUSION: Our results provide robust, comparable and precise estimates of the effects of major metabolic risk factors on CVD and diabetes by age group.

  5. Components of Metabolic Syndrome as Risk Factors for Hearing Threshold Shifts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shan Sun

    Full Text Available Hearing loss was a common, chronically disabling condition in the general population and had been associated with several inflammatory diseases. Metabolic syndrome, which was associated with insulin resistance and visceral obesity, was considered a chronic inflammatory disease. To date, few attempts had been made to establish a direct relationship between hearing loss and metabolic syndrome. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between metabolic syndrome and hearing loss by analyzing the data in the reports of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004.This study included 2100 participants aged ≤ 65 years who enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999-2004. We examined the relationship between the presence of different features of metabolic syndrome in the participants and their pure-tone air-conduction hearing thresholds, including low-frequency and high-frequency thresholds.After adjusting for potential confounders, such as age, medical conditions, and smoking status, the participants with more components of metabolic syndrome were found to have higher hearing thresholds than those with fewer components of metabolic syndrome (p < 0.05 for a trend. The low-frequency hearing threshold was associated with individual components of metabolic syndrome, such as abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, elevated triglycerides, and a low level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C (p < 0.05 for all parameters.The results indicated that the presence of a greater number of components of metabolic syndrome was significantly associated with the hearing threshold in the US adult population. Among the components of metabolic syndrome, the most apparent association was observed between low HDL and hearing loss.

  6. Comparison of accuracy of diabetes risk score and components of the metabolic syndrome in assessing risk of incident type 2 diabetes in Inter99 cohort.

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    Tracy B Shafizadeh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given the increasing worldwide incidence of diabetes, methods to assess diabetes risk which would identify those at highest risk are needed. We compared two risk-stratification approaches for incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM; factors of metabolic syndrome (MetS and a previously developed diabetes risk score, PreDx® Diabetes Risk Score (DRS. DRS assesses 5 yr risk of incident T2DM based on the measurement of 7 biomarkers in fasting blood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DRS was evaluated in baseline serum samples from 4,128 non-diabetic subjects in the Inter99 cohort (Danes aged 30-60 for whom diabetes outcomes at 5 years were known. Subjects were classified as having MetS based on the presence of at least 3 MetS risk factors in baseline clinical data. The sensitivity and false positive rate for predicting diabetes using MetS was compared to DRS. When the sensitivity was fixed to match MetS, DRS had a significantly lower false positive rate. Similarly, when the false positive rate was fixed to match MetS, DRS had a significantly higher specificity. In further analyses, subjects were classified by presence of 0-2, 3 or 4-5 risk factors with matching proportions of subjects distributed among three DRS groups. Comparison between the two risk stratification schemes, MetS risk factors and DRS, were evaluated using Net Reclassification Improvement (NRI. Comparing risk stratification by DRS to MetS factors in the total population, the NRI was 0.146 (p = 0.008 demonstrating DRS provides significantly improved stratification. Additionally, the relative risk of T2DM differed by 15 fold between the low and high DRS risk groups, but only 8-fold between the low and high risk MetS groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: DRS provides a more accurate assessment of risk for diabetes than MetS. This improved performance may allow clinicians to focus preventive strategies on those most in need of urgent intervention.

  7. Reduced Risk for Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance Associated with Ovo-Lacto-Vegetarian Behavior in Female Buddhists: A Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jui-Kun Chiang; Ying-Lung Lin; Chi-Ling Chen; Chung-Mei Ouyang; Ying-Tai Wu; Yu-Chiao Chi; Kuo-Chin Huang; Wei-Shiung Yang

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The association of vegetarian status with the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is not clear. In Asia, Buddhists often have vegetarian behavior for religious rather than for health reasons. We hypothesize that the vegetarian in Buddhism is associated with better metabolic profiles, lower risk for the MetS and insulin resistance (IR). Methods We enrolled 391 female vegetarians (∼80% lacto-ovo-vegetarians) and 315 non-vegetarians from health-checkup clinics at a Buddhist hospital i...

  8. Comparison of metabolic parameters and Framingham cardiovascular risk scores before and after in-hospital treatment with antipsychotics

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    Wysokiński, Adam

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. The objective of this naturalistic study was to evaluate changes in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS and Framingham cardiovascular risk scores in adult with schizophrenia after inhospital treatment with antipsychotics. Methods. For 58 patients (36 women and 22 men the following data was acquired on admission and at discharge: body height and weight, waist circumference, cigarette smoking, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides (TGA, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, blood pressure, concomitant use of antidiabetic, antihypertensive and antihyperlipidemic medications. Results. Mean TGA levels increased significantly (140.32 mg/dL vs. 180.17 mg/dL, other parameters did not change. MetS prevalence on admission and at discharge did not differ significantly, irrespective of definition used (IDF: 50.00% vs. 60.34%; ATPIII: 39.66% vs. 43.10%; ATPIII A: 46.55% vs. 51.72%. Two cardiovascular risk scores were reduced at discharge: stroke, 10-year (4.10% vs. 3.46% and hypertension, 4-year (22.18% vs. 16.58%. Other Framingham risk scores did not change. Very high prevalence of abnormal body weight (up to 65%, abdominal obesity (63% in men and 89% in women, hypertension (>50% and lipid abnormalities (31-64% was found. Conclusions. We have found a very high rate of MetS in patients treated with antipsychotics. No metabolic parameters improved after hospital stay, while some worsened. This did not, however, result in increased risk of cardiovascular events. Abnormal body weight and lipid abnormalities were very common in our study population. Our results indicate that metabolic parameters should be monitored regularly, particularly in outpatient settings, and appropriate treatment should be introduced as soon as any signifand appropriate treatment should be introduced as soon as any significant changes are found.

  9. Association between dietary patterns and the risk of metabolic syndrome among Lebanese adults

    OpenAIRE

    Naja, F.; Nasreddine, L.; Itani, L.; Adra, N.; Sibai, A.M.; Hwalla, N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The main objective of this study was to evaluate the association between dietary patterns and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its metabolic abnormalities among Lebanese adults, using data from a national nutrition survey. Methods A cross-sectional analysis involving adults aged ≥18 years (n = 323) with no prior history of chronic diseases was conducted. Participants completed a brief sociodemographic and 61-item food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometric measurements and fasting b...

  10. Serum leptin is associated with cardiometabolic risk and predicts metabolic syndrome in Taiwanese adults

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Yu-Che; Chen I-Chuan; Hsiao Kuang-Yu; Li Wen-Cheng; Wang Shih-Hao; Wu Kuan-Han

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Leptin is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, few studies have assessed its relationship with metabolic syndrome, especially in an Asian population. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess leptin levels and evaluate its association with CVD and metabolic syndrome. Methods In 2009, 957 subjects, who underwent a routine physical examination and choose leptin examination, were selected to participate. Participants (269 females and 688 males) w...

  11. Evaluation of hyperandrogenemia and metabolic risk profile in women with postadolescent acne

    OpenAIRE

    Leyla Baykal Selçuk; Deniz Aksu Arıca; Savaş Yaylı

    2016-01-01

    Background and Design: Postadolescent acne is a disease with relapses frequently seen in women. Treatment is difficult. In our study, we aimed to investigate the clinical and biochemical characteristics of hyperandrogenism and the prevalence of metabolic disorders, such as metabolic syndrome (MS) and dyslipidemia in women with postadolescent acne. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 50 women who attended our department with the complaint of postadolescent acne between July 2014...

  12. Disturbances of Tryptophan Metabolism and Risk of Depression in HCV Patients Treated with IFN-Alpha

    OpenAIRE

    Oxenkrug, GF; Turski, WA; Zgrajka, W; Weinstock, JV; Ruthazer, R.; P. Summergrad

    2014-01-01

    Depression is a common side-effect of interferon (IFN)-alpha treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and melanoma. Disturbances of tryptophan (TRP) metabolism might contribute to development of IFN-alpha–associated depression due to IFN-alpha-induced activation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a rate-limiting enzyme of TRP–kynurenine (KYN) metabolism. The increased frequency of high producer (T) allele of IFN-gamma (IFNG) (+874) gene, that encodes IFNG production, in depressed pat...

  13. Circulating Irisin Levels Are Positively Associated with Metabolic Risk Factors in Sedentary Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, María; Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Serrano, Marta; Ortega, Francisco; Delgado, Elías; Sanchez-Ragnarsson, Cecilia; Valdés, Sergio; Botas, Patricia; Ricart, Wifredo; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A physically active life-style plays an independent role in the protection against type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Irisin, a novel exercise-induced myokine, activates thermogenesis in rodents through increasing beige fat cells abundance within white fat. We aimed to investigate circulating irisin levels in association with the degree of physical activity and various metabolic parameters in humans. Methods Circulating irisin levels (ELISA) and metabolic parameters wer...

  14. Strict vegetarian diet improves the risk factors associated with metabolic diseases by modulating gut microbiota and reducing intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Soo; Hwang, Seong-Soo; Park, Eun-Jin; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2013-10-01

    Low-grade inflammation of the intestine results in metabolic dysfunction, in which dysbiosis of the gut microbiota is intimately involved. Dietary fibre induces prebiotic effects that may restore imbalances in the gut microbiota; however, no clinical trials have been reported in patients with metabolic diseases. Here, six obese subjects with type 2 diabetes and/or hypertension were assigned to a strict vegetarian diet (SVD) for 1 month, and blood biomarkers of glucose and lipid metabolisms, faecal microbiota using 454-pyrosequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA genes, faecal lipocalin-2 and short-chain fatty acids were monitored. An SVD reduced body weight and the concentrations of triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and haemoglobin A1c, and improved fasting glucose and postprandial glucose levels. An SVD reduced the Firmicutes-to-Bacteroidetes ratio in the gut microbiota, but did not alter enterotypes. An SVD led to a decrease in the pathobionts such as the Enterobacteriaceae and an increase in commensal microbes such as Bacteroides fragilis and Clostridium species belonging to clusters XIVa and IV, resulting in reduced intestinal lipocalin-2 and short-chain fatty acids levels. This study underscores the benefits of dietary fibre for improving the risk factors of metabolic diseases and shows that increased fibre intake reduces gut inflammation by changing the gut microbiota. PMID:24115628

  15. A 24-h assessment of physical activity and cardio-respiratory fitness among female hospital cleaners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Korshøj; Krustrup, Peter; Jespersen, Tobias;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of methods for objective 24-h sampling of physical activity among cleaners. Twenty cleaners participated in three 24-h measurements. Amount of steps, heart rate (HR), cardio-respiratory fitness, body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure were...... measured. The methods were feasible for the objective 24-h sampling of physical activity and cardio-respiratory fitness among cleaners. Measurements showed that the cleaners walked 20,198 ± 4,627 steps per day. During working hours, the average cardio-respiratory load was 25 ± 6% of heart rate reserve (HRR......). The cleaners had a low estimated cardio-respiratory fitness (34 mlO2/kg/min), a high BMI (50%, >25 kg/m(2)) and blood pressure (50%, >120/>80 mmHg). The high amount of steps, the relatively high cardiovascular load at work and low cardio-respiratory fitness illustrate the need for further investigation...

  16. Impact of 4 different definitions used for the assessment of the prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome in primary healthcare:The German Metabolic and Cardiovascular Risk Project (GEMCAS

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    Wasem Jürgen

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome (MetSyn places individuals at increased risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Prevalence rates of the population of the MetSyn are still scarce. Moreover, the impact of different definitions of the MetSyn on the prevalence is unclear. Aim here is to assess the prevalence of the MetSyn in primary health care and to investigate the impact of four different definitions of the MetSyn on the determined prevalence with regard to age, gender and socio-economic status. Methods The German-wide cross-sectional study was conducted during two weeks in October 2005 in 1.511 randomly selected general practices. Blood samples were analyzed, blood pressure and waist circumference assessed, data on lifestyle, medication, chronic disorders, and socio-demographic characteristics collected. MetSyn prevalence was estimated according to the definitions of NCEP ATP III (2001, AHA/NHLBI (2004, 2005, and IDF (2005. Descriptive statistics and prevalence rate ratios using the PROG GENMOD procedure, were calculated. Cohen's kappa was used as measure for interreliability between the different prevalence estimates. Results Data of 35,869 patients (age range: 18–99, women 61.1% were included. The prevalence was lowest using the NCEP ATP III- (all: 19.8%, men 22.7%, women: 18.0%, highest according to the IDF-definition (32.7%, 40.3%, 28.0%. The increase in prevalence with recent definitions was more pronounced for men than for women, and was particularly high for men and women aged 60–79 years. The IDF-definition resulted in a higher prevalence especially in those with the highest educational status. Agreement (kappa between the NCEP ATP III- and IDF-definition was 0.68 (men 0.61, women 0.74, between the updated the AHA/NHLBI- (2005 and IDF-definition 0.85 (men 0.79, women 0.89. Conclusion The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is associated with age, gender, and educational status and increases considerably with each

  17. PHARMACOECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF CARVEDILOL THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION AND METABOLIC RISK FACTORS (ACCORDING TO THE CAMELLIA STUDY

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    S. Y. Martsevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To perform cost-effectiveness analysis of 24 weeks antihypertensive therapy based on carvedilol or metoprolol in patients with arterial hypertension (HT 1-2 degrees and overweight/obesity. To assess effects of carvedilol therapy on 10-year expected risk of cardiovascular complications (CVC.Material and methods. Patients with HT and overweight/obesity (n=320 were included into the study and randomly split in two groups. Patients of the first group (n=160 received carvedilol as a basic therapy and patients of the second group (n=160 — metoprolol. Both groups of the patients were comparable on key clinical characteristics.Results. In 24 weeks of treatment systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP decreased significantly in comparison with the baseline level (p<0.0001. Dose doubling of beta-blockers was required more often in patients treated with carvedilol. At the same time a combined antihypertensive therapy of the patients treated with carvedilol was required less (p>0.05. Target BP levels were achieved in carvedilol and metoprolol groups in 96.2and 95.5% of patients respectively (p=0.85. Carvedilol had better effect on plasma metabolic indicators such as glucose (p<0.01, lipid profile, uric acid level. Reduction in expected 10-year risk of death was more pronounced in 24 weeks carvedilol treatment. Cost of target BP level achievement was approximately 2.5 times higher in carvedilol group than this in metoprolol group. However cost of additional therapy was higher in metoprolol group. 1% reduction of the 10-year expected risk of CVC death cost 1 847 rubles in carvedilol therapy.Conclusion. Carvedilol therapy (vs metoprolol one has a higher cost under comparable efficacy. Additional expenses are compensated with the favorable effect on metabolic indices and a more pronounced effect on reduction in the 10-year expected risk of CCO death. That is why carvedilol can be recommended to patients with HT and metabolic risk factors. Longer studies

  18. Blueberries and Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic Syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disorders that increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Type 2 diabetes, elevated blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidemia are among the metabolic alterations that predispose the individual to several adverse cardiovascular complications. The hea...

  19. The Preventable Causes of Death in the United States: Comparative Risk Assessment of Dietary, Lifestyle, and Metabolic Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Goodarz Danaei; Ding, Eric L.; Dariush Mozaffarian; Ben Taylor; Jürgen Rehm; Murray, Christopher J L; Majid Ezzati

    2009-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background A number of modifiable factors are responsible for many premature or preventable deaths. For example, being overweight or obese shortens life expectancy, while half of all long-term tobacco smokers in Western populations will die prematurely from a disease directly related to smoking. Modifiable risk factors fall into three main groups. First, there are lifestyle risk factors. These include tobacco smoking, physical inactivity, and excessive alcohol use (small amou...

  20. Association of Serum Ferritin Level with Risk of Incident Abnormal Glucose Metabolism in Southwestern China: a Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fangli; Zhao, Zhuoxian; Tian, Li; Zheng, Tianpeng; Gao, Yun; Chen, Tao; Yan, Fangfang; Tian, Haoming

    2016-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aimed to analyze the association between serum ferritin levels and the risk of abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM) in Southwestern Chinese population. The 383 subjects who are aged ≥20 years and free of AGM at baseline between in 2007 and in 2008 were included in Southwestern China, and their baseline serum ferritin levels were measured. Among these subjects, 140 subjects were developed into AGM during the follow-up (2008-2012). In logistic regression models, the relative risk in the top versus that in the lowest quartile of serum ferritin levels was 2.86 (p = 0.013) in females and 3.50 (p = 0.029) in males after adjusting the age, gender, family history of diabetes, current smoking, and alcohol; however, serum ferritin levels were not significantly associated with incident of AGM after controlling for metabolic factors (waist circumference, systolic pressure (SBP), triglyceride (TG), and homeostasis model assessment formula insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)). Elevated serum ferritin levels are associated with AGM but not an independent risk factor. PMID:26073512

  1. CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN CHILDREN WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z ABDEYASDAN

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes melliuts is a chronic, metabolic disease that involves the macro and micro vascular complications and one of its maer ascular cowplications is the cardio vascular disease, as ,the risk of cardiovascular disease is 2-4 folds in diabetic patients in comparison with non diabetic individuals. The researches have demonstrated that the risk factors of the cardio vascular disease are formed at childhood. Therefore the preventive measures must begin from early childhood. So the present study was planned with the goals to determine and compare the cardia-vascular risk factors in the diabetic children with type 1 of diabetes mellitus. Method: This was an analytic, cross sectional study that has been done in two groups (case-control. In this research, 148 children, suffering from the typel diabetes mellitus being supported by the metabolism and endocrine research center, were chosen in the continues case manner and for the control group, 148 children, matched with the study group (according to the age and the sex, at 6-18 years old from the schools in Isfahan city randomly and at 2-6 years from the neiborhoods of the case group. The data-gathering tool was the questionnaires includes lipid profile, blood pressure, weight and height. To analyze the data we used the analytic (t student and logistic regression and descriptive (mean and standard deviation statistic methods and SPSS. Results: Findings revealed that the means of Lipid profile, systolic blood pressure and body mass index had not statistically significant differences in the two groups. But the mean of diastolic blood pressure and the mean arterial blood pressure in the control group were more than the case group and this difference was significant. The mean, 75 and 95 percentiles for cholesterol and LDL in all the age groups, mean, 75 and 95 percentile for triglyceride in all the age groups except the age group of 1-4 years in the diabetic and non diabetic groups were

  2. Preoperative risk stratification using metabolic parameters of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro [Kobe University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kobe (Japan); Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kobe (Japan); Suenaga, Yuko; Ueno, Yoshiko; Maeda, Tetsuo; Sofue, Keitarou; Sugimura, Kazuro [Kobe University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kobe (Japan); Ebina, Yasuhiko; Yamada, Hideto [Kobe University School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kobe (Japan); Okunaga, Takashi; Kubo, Kazuhiro [Kobe University Hospital, Department of Radiology Division, Kobe (Japan); Kanda, Tomonori [Teikyo University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Tamaki, Yukihisa [Shimane University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Shimane (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of metabolic parameters obtained by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for preoperative stratification of high-risk and low-risk endometrial carcinomas. Preoperative {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was performed in 56 women with endometrial cancer. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax), metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) of primary tumours were compared with clinicopathological features of surgical specimens. Diagnostic performance in terms of differentiation of low-risk disease (endometrioid histology, histological grade 1 or 2, invasion of less than half of the myometrium, and FIGO stage I) from high-risk disease was assessed. MTV and TLG were significantly higher in patients with higher histological grade (p = 0.0026 and p = 0.034), larger tumour size (p = 0.002 and p = 0.0017), lymphovascular space involvement (LVSI; p = 0.012 and p = 0.0051), myometrial invasion (p = 0.027 and p = 0.031), cervical stromal invasion (p = 0.023 and p = 0.014), ovarian metastasis (p = 0.00022 and p = 0.00034), lymph node metastasis (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001), and higher FIGO stage (p = 0.0011 and p = 0.00048). SUVmax was significantly higher in patients with larger tumour size (p = 0.0025), LVSI (p = 0.00023) and myometrial invasion (p < 0.0001). The areas under the ROC curves (AUCs) for distinguishing high-risk from low-risk carcinoma were 0.625, 0.829 and 0.797 for SUVmax, MTV and TLG, respectively. AUCs for both MTV and TLG were significantly larger than that for SUVmax (p = 0.0049 and p = 0.021). The optimal TLG cut-off value of 70.2, determined by ROC analysis, was found to have 72.0 % sensitivity and 74.2 % specificity for risk stratification. MTV and TLG of primary endometrial cancer show better correlations with clinicopathological features and are more useful for differentiating high-risk from low-risk carcinoma than SUVmax. (orig.)

  3. Metabolic, Anthropometric, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Related Risk Factors in Normal and Pre-Diabetic Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Thani, Mohamed H; Nasser, Heba S; Sayegh, Suzan; Haddad, Alexandra; Sadoun, Eman

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major global health problem. The present study examines the relationship between the metabolic, anthropometric and Finnish risk score (FINDRISC) among normal and pre-diabetic adults. Subjects (n = 1319, aged above 18 years) from the Qatari population were classified into two groups based on their hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurements (non-diabetic A1cdiabetic 5.6% ≤ A1c ≤ 6.4%) were examined for their anthropometric (height, weight and waist circumference), metabolic [fat, fat free mass (FFM), muscle mass (MM), total body water (TBW), bone mass, degree of obesity, basal metabolic rate (BMR), body mass index (BMI), metabolic age, visceral fat rating, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), total cholesterol (Total-C), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG), fasting / random plasma glucose (FPG / RPG), HbA1c and vitamin D (VitD)] and FINDRISC. Means and frequencies were determined in aggregate and by subgroups for all variables and correlations between categorical variables were tested to estimate the association between the anthropometric and metabolic risk factors with the FINDRISC. A percentage of 74.8% (n = 987) of the study population aged below 45 years old and their overall BMI was 28.8±5.2kg/m2 (overweight). Pre-diabetic subgroup have shown a statistically higher FINDRISC compared to their non-diabetic counterparts (11.2±4.1 vs. 9.8±4, p<0.001). The FINDRISC was significantly and directly correlated with the BMI, HbA1c and FPG. However, HbA1c was correlated directly with BMI, SBP, DBP, FPG / RPG and indirectly with the levels of HDL. This study demonstrates an apparent relationship between the HbA1c and FINDRISC score. Pursuing further research on this association may permit using HbA1c with the FINDRISC in predicting the risk of T2DM to be a better tool rather than using the current FPG/RPG, OGTT methods. PMID:27530580

  4. Cardiomyopathy and the use of implanted cardio-defibrillators in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminer, S J; Pickoff, A S; Dunnigan, A; Sterba, R; Wolff, G S

    1990-05-01

    Children and adults with cardiomyopathy and ventricular dysrhythmias have a uniformly poor prognosis, despite medical therapy. The use of automatic implantable cardio-defibrillators in adult patients with medically resistant ventricular dysrhythmias has resulted in a positive impact on survival. Because of its size and former lack of programmability, the device has been used rarely in children. Four patients with cardiomyopathy, in whom refractory ventricular dysrhythmias were managed with automatic implantable cardio-defibrillators, are presented. Two of these children are the youngest and smallest known in whom the device has been used; one of them received the first programmable model. The use of the automatic implantable cardio-defibrillator may enhance survival in selected young patients. PMID:1693196

  5. A Nested Case–Control Study of Metabolically Defined Body Size Phenotypes and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Neil; Cross, Amanda J.; Abubakar, Mustapha; Jenab, Mazda; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Dossus, Laure; Racine, Antoine; Kühn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena A.; Tjønneland, Anne; Petersen, Kristina E. N.; Overvad, Kim; Quirós, J. Ramón; Jakszyn, Paula; Molina-Montes, Esther; Dorronsoro, Miren; Huerta, José-María; Barricarte, Aurelio; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Masala, Giovanna; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Siersema, Peter D.; Peeters, Petra H.; Ohlsson, Bodil; Ericson, Ulrika; Palmqvist, Richard; Nyström, Hanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Freisling, Heinz; Kong, So Yeon; Tsilidis, Kostas; Muller, David C.; Riboli, Elio; Gunter, Marc J

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is positively associated with colorectal cancer. Recently, body size subtypes categorised by the prevalence of hyperinsulinaemia have been defined, and metabolically healthy overweight/obese individuals (without hyperinsulinaemia) have been suggested to be at lower risk of cardiovascular disease than their metabolically unhealthy (hyperinsulinaemic) overweight/obese counterparts. Whether similarly variable relationships exist for metabolically defined body size phenotypes and colorectal cancer risk is unknown. Methods and Findings The association of metabolically defined body size phenotypes with colorectal cancer was investigated in a case–control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Metabolic health/body size phenotypes were defined according to hyperinsulinaemia status using serum concentrations of C-peptide, a marker of insulin secretion. A total of 737 incident colorectal cancer cases and 737 matched controls were divided into tertiles based on the distribution of C-peptide concentration amongst the control population, and participants were classified as metabolically healthy if below the first tertile of C-peptide and metabolically unhealthy if above the first tertile. These metabolic health definitions were then combined with body mass index (BMI) measurements to create four metabolic health/body size phenotype categories: (1) metabolically healthy/normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2), (2) metabolically healthy/overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2), (3) metabolically unhealthy/normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2), and (4) metabolically unhealthy/overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2). Additionally, in separate models, waist circumference measurements (using the International Diabetes Federation cut-points [≥80 cm for women and ≥94 cm for men]) were used (instead of BMI) to create the four metabolic health/body size phenotype categories. Statistical tests used in the analysis were all two-sided, and a

  6. Association between adherence to the Korean Food Guidance System and the risk of metabolic abnormalities in Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyun Ju; Han, Sung Nim; Song, Sujin; Paik, Hee Young; Baik, Hyun Wook; Joung, Hyojee

    2011-12-01

    Consumption of a diet consistent with dietary guidelines is believed to have a beneficial effect on the prevention of chronic diseases and the promotion of general health. This study was conducted to explore the relationship between adherence to the Korean Food Guidance System (KFGS), which was based on the 2010 revised KDRIs, and the risk of metabolic abnormalities. Five hundred and ninety-six Korean adults between 30 and 59 years of age were recruited by advertisement to the Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital (BJGH), and those not taking regular medications and without diagnoses of fulminant disease were included. Data were collected on anthropometric measurements, diagnostic parameters for metabolic syndrome (MetS), and 3-day dietary intakes from individuals in the study. The number of servings consumed from each food group was compared to the KFGS recommended servings for each of the 6 food groups. Poor adherence to the recommendations for servings of milk and dairy products (OR: 2.038, 1.128-3.682) was associated with a higher risk of MetS, and poor adherence to the guidelines for fruit consumption (OR: 1.849, 1.027-3.329) was associated with a higher risk for the existence an elevated waist circumference. Conversely, the consumption of meat, fish, eggs, and beans above the recommended number of servings was associated with a lower risk of having an elevated waist circumference (OR: 0.523, 0.288-0.950), and the consumption of vegetables above the recommended number of servings was associated with a reduced risk of having elevated fasting glucose (OR: 0.533, 0.298-0.954). These results suggest that adherence to the KFGS guidelines helps to prevent the development of MetS, but this association needs to be confirmed by prospective studies. PMID:22259682

  7. Association of physical activity with risk of metabolic syndrome: findings from a cross-sectional study conducted in rural area, Nantong, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jing; Wu, Chuanli; Xu, Guangfei; Huang, Jianping; Gao, Yuexia; Lu, Qingyun; Hua, Tianqi; Cai, Hui

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome increases rapidly worldwide, and its association with physical activity (PA) varies with race and lifestyles. Little is known about the association in rural China. The Nantong Metabolic Syndrome Study recruited 13,505 female and 6997 male participants in 2007 and 2008. Socio-demographic characteristics, and physiological and behavioural data were collected. Logistic regression model was applied to estimate associations of metabolic syndrome and its components with different PAs. The overall metabolic syndrome prevalence was 21.6% in current study. Increasing total PA or moderate-to-vigorous-intensity occupational PA was associated with decreasing 5%-60% risk of having metabolic syndrome and abnormal metabolic syndrome components in both genders. An association between leisure-time PA and blood pressure was found in men, but no associations between leisure-time PA and metabolic syndrome components were found in women. Commuting PA, such as walking and taking bus, by bicycle and walking only, was associated with decrease of 20%-45% risk of several abnormal metabolic syndrome components in women. This study provides information for future investigation into the nature of these associations so that recommendations can be developed to reduce the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among rural population in China. PMID:26853182

  8. Metabolic syndrome and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in elderly women: Challenging the current definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragsbæk, Katrine; Neergaard, Jesper S; Laursen, Janne M; Hansen, Henrik B; Christiansen, Claus; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Karsdal, Morten A; Brix, Susanne; Henriksen, Kim

    2016-09-01

    The prognostic value of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) is believed to vary with age. With an elderly population expecting to triple by 2060, it is important to evaluate the validity of MetS in this age group. We examined the association of MetS risk factors with later risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in elderly Caucasian women. We further investigated if stratification of individuals not defined with MetS would add predictive power in defining future disease prevalence of individuals with MetS.The Prospective Epidemiological Risk Factor Study, a community-based cohort study, followed 3905 Danish women since 2000 (age: 70.1 ± 6.5) with no previous diagnosis of T2DM or CVD, holding all measurements used for MetS definition; central obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and hyperglycemia combined with register-based follow-up information.Elderly women with defined MetS presented a 6.3-fold increased risk of T2DM (95% confidence interval: [3.74-10.50]) and 1.7-fold increased risk of CVD (1.44-2.05) compared to women with no MetS risk factors. Subdividing the control group without defined MetS revealed that both centrally obese controls and controls holding other MetS risk factors also had increased risk of T2DM (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.21 [1.25-3.93] and HR = 1.75 [1.04-2.96]) and CVD (HR = 1.51 [1.25-1.83] and HR = 1.36 [1.15-1.60]) when compared to controls with no MetS risk factors.MetS in elderly Caucasian women increased risk of future T2DM and CVD. While not defined with MetS, women holding only some risk factors for MetS were also at increased risk of T2DM or CVD compared to women with no MetS risk factors. PMID:27603394

  9. [Informative value of cardio-pulmonary exertion test in dyspnea diagnosis among asbestos-cement goods production workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhabina, S A

    2009-01-01

    The article deals with diagnosis of respiratory system changes through cardio-pulmonary exertion test in dyspneic individuals over 10 years exposed to dust at work. The results help to assess changes in the cardio-respiratory system, further prognosis and expedience of continued work in the hazardous conditions. PMID:19882774

  10. Factor Structure of Indices of the Second Derivative of the Finger Photoplethysmogram with Metabolic Components and Other Cardiovascular Risk Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Tomoyuki Kawada; Toshiaki Otsuka

    2013-01-01

    Background The second derivative of the finger photoplethysmogram (SDPTG) is an indicator of arterial stiffness. The present study was conducted to clarify the factor structure of indices of the SDPTG in combination with components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), to elucidate the significance of the SDPTG among various cardiovascular risk factors. Methods The SDPTG was determined in the second forefinger of the left hand in 1,055 male workers (mean age, 44.2±6.4 years). Among 4 waves of SDP...

  11. An epigenetic map of age-associated autosomal loci in northern European families at high risk for the metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    ALI Omar; Cerjak, Diana; Kent, Jack W; James, Roland; Blangero, John; Carless, Melanie A.; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of chronic diseases such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and cardiovascular disease increases with age in all populations. Epigenetic features are hypothesized to play important roles in the pathophysiology of age-associated diseases, but a map of these markers is lacking. We searched for genome-wide age-associated methylation signatures in peripheral blood of individuals at high risks for MetS by profiling 485,000 CpG sites in 192 individuals ...

  12. The relationship of vitamin D with non-traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease in subjects with metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Makariou, Stefania; Liberopoulos, Evangelos; Florentin, Matilda; Lagos, Konstantinos; Gazi, Irene; Challa, Anna; Elisaf, Moses

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Several studies implicate an inverse relationship between 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)Vit D) serum levels and metabolic syndrome (MetS). We sought to investigate a possible relationship between 25(OH)Vit D and emerging risk factors associated with MetS, such as small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (sdLDL-C) concentration, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels. Material and methods We studied 11...

  13. A proposed cutoff point of waist-to-height ratio for metabolic risk in African township adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Kruger, H. Salomé; Faber, Mieke; Schutte, Aletta E; Ellis, Suria M

    2013-01-01

    Objective: A waist:height ratio (WHtR) higher than 0.5 has been proposed as a cutoff point for abdominal obesity in both sexes and at all ages. It is unknown if this cutoff point is appropriate for previously undernourished adolescents. We assessed the cutoff value of the WHtR associated with an increased metabolic risk in 178 black South African 14- to 18-y-old adolescents (69 boys, 109 girls). Methods: We measured weight, height, waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose an...

  14. Metabolic risk factors for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma: a prospective study of 580 000 subjects within the Me-Can project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and a decreased risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). However, little is known about the risk of EAC and ESCC related to other metabolic risk factors. We aimed to examine the risk of EAC and ESCC in relation to metabolic risk factors, separately and combined in a prospective cohort study. The Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer cohort includes prospective cohorts in Austria, Norway and Sweden, with blood pressure, lipids, glucose and BMI available from 578 700 individuals. Relative risk (RR) for EAC and ESCC was calculated using Cox’s proportional hazards analysis for metabolic risk factors categorized into quintiles and transformed into z-scores. The standardized sum of all z-scores was used as a composite score for the metabolic syndrome (MetS). In total, 324 histologically verified cases of esophageal cancer were identified (114 EAC, 184 ESCC and 26 with other histology). BMI was associated with an increased risk of EAC (RR 7.34 (95% confidence interval, 2.88-18.7) top versus bottom quintile) and negatively associated with the risk of ESCC (RR 0.38 (0.23-0.62)). The mean value of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (mid blood pressure) was associated with the risk of ESCC (RR 1.77 (1.37-2.29)). The composite MetS score was associated with the risk of EAC (RR 1.56 (1.19-2.05) per one unit increase of z-score) but not ESCC. In accordance with previous studies, high BMI was associated with an increased risk of EAC and a decreased risk of ESCC. An association between high blood pressure and risk of ESCC was observed but alcohol consumption is a potential confounding factor that we were not able to adjust for in the analysis. The MetS was associated with EAC but not ESCC. However this association was largely driven by the strong association between BMI and EAC. We hypothesize that this association is more likely to be explained by factors directly related to obesity than the

  15. Cardiovascular Risk Factors (Diabetes, Hypertension, Hypercholesterolemia and Metabolic Syndrome) in Older People with Intellectual Disability: Results of the HA-ID Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Winter, C. F.; Bastiaanse, L. P.; Hilgenkamp, T. I. M.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and the metabolic syndrome are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In older people with intellectual disability (ID), CVD is a substantial morbidity risk. The aims of the present study, which was part of the Healthy Ageing in Intellectual Disability (HA-ID) study, were (1) to…

  16. Insulin resistance, the metabolic syndrome, and risk of incident cardiovascular disease: a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jørgen; Hansen, Tine W; Rasmussen, Susanne;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The goal was to clarify if insulin resistance (IR) would predict cardiovascular disease (CVD) independent of the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn). BACKGROUND: Although the cause of MetSyn is not well defined, IR has been proposed to be an important cause. Only a small number of population...

  17. Metabolic Syndrome, Obesity, and Related Risk Factors among College Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Jesse S.; Lofgren, Ingrid E.; Burke, Joanne D.; Reilly, Ruth A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to characterize the prevalence of overweight/obesity, metabolic syndrome (MbS) and its criteria, and nutrient intakes of college-age men and women via a large-scale screening. Participants and Methods: From August 2005 to July 2008, 2,722 subjects were recruited for the ongoing, cross-sectional…

  18. TRPV4 deficiency causes sexual dimorphism in bone metabolism and osteoporotic fracture risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerden, B.C. van der; Oei, L.; Roschger, P.; Fratzl-Zelman, N.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Schoor, N.M. van; Pettersson-Kymmer, U.; Schreuders-Koedam, M.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Hofman, A.; Suzuki, M.; Klaushofer, K.; Ohlsson, C.; Lips, P.J.; Rivadeneira, F.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Leeuwen, J.P. van

    2013-01-01

    We explored the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) in murine bone metabolism and association of TRPV4 gene variants with fractures in humans. Urinary and histomorphometrical analyses demonstrated reduced osteoclast activity and numbers in male Trpv4(-/-) mice, which was confirm

  19. TRPV4 deficiency causes sexual dimorphism in bone metabolism and osteoporotic fracture risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.C.J. van der Eerden (Bram); L. Oei; P. Roschger (Paul); N. Fratzl-Zelman (Nadja); J.G. Hoenderop (Joost); N.M. van Schoor (Natasja); U. Pettersson-Kymmer (Ulrika); M. Schreuders-Koedam (M.); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A. Hofman (Albert); M. Suzuki (Masachika); K. Klaushofer (Klaus); C. Ohlsson (Claes); P.J.A. Lips (P. J A); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); R.J.M. Bindels (René); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe explored the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) in murine bone metabolism and association of TRPV4 gene variants with fractures in humans. Urinary and histomorphometrical analyses demonstrated reduced osteoclast activity and numbers in male Trpv4-/- mice, which w

  20. The relation between AKT1, cannabis use and metabolic risk factors in psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liemburg, Edith; Bruins, Jojanneke; Van Beveren, Nico J.M.; Bruggeman, Richard; Alizadeh, Behrooz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular and metabolic problems combined with a bad lifestyle are a major cause of a shortened life expectancy in chronic psychotic disorders. While the incidence of cannabis use is twice as high in psychosis compared to the general population, use of cannabis has been associated w

  1. Dietary treatment in phenylketonuria does not lead to increased risk of obesity or metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rocha, Julio C.; van Spronsen, Francjan J.; Almeida, Manuela F.; Soares, Gabriela; Quelhas, Dulce; Ramos, Elisabete; Guimaraes, Joao T.; Borges, Nuno

    2012-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the consequences of the special energy enriched diet used to treat patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) in terms of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) development. Objective: To investigate the prevalence of overweight and obesity, and its consequences in terms

  2. Insomnia, daytime sleepiness and cardio-cerebrovascular diseases in the elderly: a 6-year prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Jaussent

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine 1 the associations between history of cardio-cerebrovascular diseases (CVD and insomnia complaints and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, and 2 the relationships between sleep complaints and future CVD in persons over 65. METHODS: CVD was assessed at baseline and during two, four, and six-year follow-up in 5494 non-demented subjects. Self-reported insomnia complaints (poor sleep quality, difficulty in initiating sleep, difficulty in maintening sleep, and early morning awakening, EDS and sleep medication use were evaluated at baseline. Logistic regression models and Cox proportional hazard models, with delayed entry and age of participants as the time scale, were adjusted for socio-demographic, lifestyle and clinical variables. RESULTS: At baseline, 748 participants had a past-history of CVD. A past-history of CVD was associated with EDS (OR = 1.28 95%CI = [1.05-1.57] and the number of insomnia complaints (OR = 1.26 95%CI = [1.03-1.55] for 1-2 insomnia complaints; OR = 1.32 95%CI = [1.03-1.71] for ≥3 complaints. In longitudinal analyses, neither the four components of insomnia nor the number of insomnia complaints were significantly associated with first or recurrent CVD events (n = 391 events. EDS was independently associated with future CVD events even after adjusting for prescribed sleep medication and past-history of CVD (HR = 1.35 95%CI = [1.06-1.71]. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the relationships between sleep complaints and CVD could be complex. Insomnia complaints are more likely a consequence of CVD, whereas EDS appears to be a determinant of CVD independently of past-history of CVD. EDS screening may thus constitute a means of detecting persons at high risk of CVD.

  3. Possible association of high urinary magnesium and taurine to creatinine ratios with metabolic syndrome risk reduction in Australian aboriginals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Atsumi; Taguchi, Takashi; Mori, Hideki; Thorpe, Marjorie; Yamori, Yukio; Mori, Mari

    2011-01-01

    Background. Because of the epidemic of metabolic syndrome (MS) in Australian Aboriginals known for their higher cardiovascular mortality and shorter life expectancy, we analyzed the possible relationship of their MS risks with the current dietary custom. Methods. The subjects were 84 people aged 16-79 years. The health examination was conducted according to the basic protocol of WHO-CARDIAC (Cardiovascular Diseases and Alimentary Comparison) Study. Results. The highest prevalence among MS risks was abdominal obesity (over 60%). After controlling for age and sex, the odds of obesity decreased significantly with high level of urinary magnesium/creatinine ratio (Mg/cre) (OR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.02-0.57; P Aboriginal people of this area may partly be due to the reduction of beneficial nutrients intake including Mg and taurine. PMID:21738855

  4. Cancer risk and key components of metabolic syndrome:a population-based prospective cohort study in Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wei; SHEN Hong-bing; LU Feng; LIU Si-jun; DU Jiang-bo; WANG Jian-ming; QIAN Yun; SHEN Chong; JIN Guang-fu; HU Zhi-bin

    2012-01-01

    Background The key components of metabolic syndrome (MS) are waist circumference,blood pressure,fast blood glucose,high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) and triglycerides (TG).These components have,separately and jointly,been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases.In this study,we aimed to explore the association between MS components and cancer risk in a population-based cohort in China.Methods We established a population-based cohort with 17 779 individuals aged 35 and above at baseline in 2004 and 2005 in Changzhou,Jiangsu Province,China.All participants were face-to-face interviewed to complete a questionnaire and were accepted physical examinations including blood tests for glucose and lipids and physical measurements for obesity and blood pressure.In 2009,a total of 16 284 subjects (6886 men and 9398 women,91.6%) attended the flow-up interviews and the participants or their family members reported all the hospitalizations and diseases including cancer occurred during the follow-up period.Multivariate Cox regression was used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) of metabolic syndrome components and cancer incidence.Results There was a dose-response association between cancer risk and the number of MS components presented at baseline (P for trend=0.012) and the HR (95% confidence interval (CI)) was 2.63 (1.27-5.45) for subjects carrying 3 or more metabolic syndrome components after adjustment for possible confounding factors.Specifically,the multivariate-adjusted HRs (95% CIs) for cancer risk in subjects with central obesity,high fasting glucose,low HDL-c were 1.94 (1.01-3.74),2.04 (1.10-3.77) and 2.05 (1.09-3.88),respectively.Conclusions In this population-based,prospective cohort study in China,we found MS components,e.g.,central obesity,high fasting glucose,low HDL-c were risk factors for cancer development.Early intervention of MS components may be also beneficial to reduce cancer burden.

  5. Correlation of Visceral Fat Area with Metabolic Risk Factors in Romanian Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hâncu Anca

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between visceral fat area (VFA, estimated by bioimpedance, and cardiovascular risk factors independent of BMI and waist circumference in a cohort of Romanian patients. Material and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study, in which were collected data from 751 patients ≥18 years of age from Cluj-Napoca. Anthropometric, biochemistry, body composition and medical history parameters were recorded from patients’ files. Results: Compared with the participants with VFA <100 cm2, those with VFA ≥100 cm2 had significantly worse levels of the laboratory parameters describing the glycemic metabolism, lipid metabolism and liver functions (p <0.05 for all. A higher percentage of participants with VFA ≥100 cm2 had diabetes, obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia and hypo-HDL cholesterolemia (p <0.05 for all. VFA was correlated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total and LDL-cholesterol levels, triglycerides, ALT, previous diagnosis of diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia and hypo-HDL cholesterolemia independent of BMI and waist circumference. Conclusions: Among this cohort of Romanian adults, an increasing level of visceral adiposity was correlated with worse lipid and glucose metabolism parameters as well as with increased levels of ALT, which probably reflects liver fat deposition.

  6. Metabolic disorders and cardiovascular risk in treatment-naive HIV-infected patients of sub-saharan origin starting antiretrovirals: impact of westernized lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eholié, Serge Paul; Lacombe, Karine; Krain, Alysa; Diallo, Zelica; Ouiminga, Mariama; Campa, Pauline; Bouchaud, Olivier; Bissagnene, Emmanuel; Girard, Pierre-Marie

    2015-04-01

    In a cohort of HIV-infected patients of sub-Saharan origin we describe the incidence of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and lipodystrophy after 3 years of combined antiretroviral therapy, and model the 10-year risk of cardiovascular diseases, while taking into account environmental factors. This is a multinational, prospective cohort study conducted in HIV outpatient clinics from four tertiary care centers set in France and Côte d'Ivoire. The participants were HIV-infected, treatment-naive patients eligible to start antiretroviral treatment and were of sub-Saharan African origin. The main outcome measures were the incidence of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and lipodystrophy, and the assessment of the 10-year risk of cardiovascular diseases using Framingham risk prediction, D.A.D. Cardiovascular Disease Risk, and WHO/ISH prediction charts. Of 245 patients followed for up to 3 years, the incidence of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and lipodystrophy was 5.5, 8.5, and 6.8 per 100 person-years of follow-up (cumulative incidence: 14.4%, 19.2%, and 18.1%, respectively). Living in France as well as female gender and being overweight were risk factors for metabolic disorders as whole and only first generation protease inhibitors were marginally associated with metabolic syndrome. Cardiovascular risk as modeled through the three equations was high in all patients with the synergistic and deleterious effect of living in France compared to Côte d'Ivoire. This cohort study shows how the synergy between HIV, antiretroviral (ARV) exposure, and westernization of life style in a cohort of HIV-infected patients of sub-Saharan origin leads to a progressive increase in the risk of lipodystrophy, as well as metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance, all associated with increased cardiovascular risk. PMID:25707418

  7. Eating habits of preschool children and the risk of obesity, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostecka, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Background & Objective : Nutrient excess and nutrient deficiency in the diets of preschool children can lead to permanent modification of metabolic pathways and increased risk of diet-dependent diseases in adults. Children are most susceptible to the adverse consequences of bad eating habits.The objective of this study was to evaluate the eating habits and the diets of preschool children as risk factors for excessive weight, obesity, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. Methods : The study was conducted on 350 randomly selected preschool children attending kindergartens in south-eastern Poland. Three-day dietary recalls were processed and evaluated in the Dieta 5 application. Results : The analyzed diets were characterized by low diversity and a high share of processed foods, such as pate, sausages, ketchup, mayonnaise, fried meat, French fries and fast-food. The dietary content of vegetables, raw fruit, dairy products and whole grain products was alarmingly low. Conclusions : Diets characterized by excessive energy value and nutritional deficiency can lead to health problems. In most cases, excessive weight gain in children can be blamed on parents and caretakers who are not aware of the health consequences of high-calorie foods rich in fats and sugar. PMID:25674127

  8. Metabolic Risk: Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Patient’s Guide The number of people at risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) ... lifestyle therapies because studies suggest it will reduce cardiovascular risk. Medications to lower LDL cholesterol may be added ...

  9. Managing Metabolic Syndrome and CHD Risk Factors: Evidence based re-examination of macro nutrients from the Malaysian Population Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kalyana Sundram

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of dietary factors and habits associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk are undergoing dramatic rethinking in light of fast emerging new scientific data. Multiple risk assessments, especially in understanding Metabolic Syndrome triggers in the population have further confounded understanding and management of traditional risk factors. By far the largest change-impact is being made with regard to fat consumption, especially saturated fats. Emerging evidence, largely t...

  10. Prospective Study of Optimal Obesity Index Cutoffs for Predicting Development of Multiple Metabolic Risk Factors: The Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Kwang-Pil; Oh, Dae-Kyu; Min, Haesook; Kim, Cheong-Sik; Park, Jae-Kyung; Kim, Yeonjung; Kim, Sung Soo

    2012-01-01

    Background In this prospective cohort study, we estimated the risk of developing more than 1 metabolic risk factor, using different obesity indices. In addition, we investigated the relative usefulness of the obesity indices for predicting development of such risk factors and calculated optimal cutoffs for the obesity indices. Methods The cohort comprised 10 038 representative residents of a small city and a rural county who were recruited in 2001–2002. Follow-up examinations were conducted e...

  11. WHAT CAN WE EXPECT USING ACE INHIBITOR RAMIPRIL IN PERSONS WITH HIGH CARDIOVASCULAR RISK AND EARLY DISORDERS OF CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM? LESSONS OF DREAM TRIAL

    OpenAIRE

    M. N. Mamedov; M. B. Stroeva

    2016-01-01

    Primary prevention of diabetes in persons with high cardiovascular risk is an actual problem. Results of DREAM trial are discussed. Influence of ACE inhibitor, ramipril, on risk of diabetes onset in patients with pre-diabetes and low cardiovascular risk is focused. Metabolic effects of other groups of antihypertensive drugs and their ability to prevent diabetes onset are compared. Ramipril three years therapy resulted in normalization in glucose level but did not have effect on frequency of d...

  12. Program Management Model for Health Behavioral Modification in Metabolic Risk of Public Hospitals, Bangkok

    OpenAIRE

    Ungsinun Intarakamhang

    2012-01-01

    This action research is aimed to investigate the success of the program management for health behavioral modification (HBM) in Metabolic Syndrome (MS) of public hospitals in Bangkok which was granted by the 13th district of National Health Security Office (NHSO), Thailand, for the total of 13 projects. The research process was divided into 3 phases as preparation, monitoring and conclusion phase. Data collection was done in the mid and at the end of the project through a 4-scale questionnaire...

  13. Long Oxygen Desaturation Time is a Risk Factor for Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Erdem Akbal; Burcu Oktay; Hikmet Fırat; Mustafa Özbek; Sadık Ardıç; Murat Kızılgün

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess metabolic syndrome (MS) prevalence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and to evaluate the relationship between sleep parameters and MS incidence.Materials and Methods: Included in this study were 101 patients with complaints of snoring, witnessed apnea, excessive daytime sleepiness, and no prior OSAS diagnosis. An apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) score ≥5 was required for the diagnosis of OSAS. The patient group included 80 cases, and the control group (AH...

  14. Leptin receptor polymorphisms interact with polyunsaturated fatty acids to augment risk of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Catherine M; Goumidi, Louisa; Bertrais, Sandrine; Field, Martyn R; Ordovas, Jose M; Cupples, L Adrienne; Defoort, Catherine; Lovegrove, Julie A; Drevon, Christian A; Blaak, Ellen E; Gibney, Michael J; Kiec-Wilk, Beata; Karlstrom, Britta; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; McManus, Ross; Hercberg, Serge; Lairon, Denis; Planells, Richard; Roche, Helen M

    2010-02-01

    The leptin receptor (LEPR) is associated with insulin resistance, a key feature of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Gene-fatty acid interactions may affect MetS risk. The objective was to investigate the relationship among LEPR polymorphisms, insulin resistance, and MetS risk and whether plasma fatty acids, a biomarker of dietary fatty acids, modulate this. LEPR polymorphisms (rs10493380, rs1137100, rs1137101, rs12067936, rs1805096, rs2025805, rs3790419, rs3790433, rs6673324, and rs8179183), biochemical measurements, and plasma fatty acid profiles were determined in the LIPGENE-SU.VI.MAX study of MetS cases and matched controls (n = 1754). LEPR rs3790433 GG homozygotes had increased MetS risk compared with the minor A allele carriers [odds ratio (OR) = 1.65; 95% CI: 1.05-2.57; P = 0.028], which may be accounted for by their increased risk of elevated insulin concentrations (OR 2.40; 95% CI: 1.28-4.50; P = 0.006) and insulin resistance (OR = 2.15; 95% CI: 1.18-3.90; P = 0.012). Low (less than median) plasma (n-3) and high (n-6) PUFA status exacerbated the genetic risk conferred by GG homozygosity to hyperinsulinemia (OR 2.92-2.94) and insulin resistance (OR 3.40-3.47). Interestingly, these associations were abolished against a high (n-3) or low (n-6) PUFA background. Importantly, we replicated some of these findings in an independent cohort. Homozygosity for the LEPR rs3790433 G allele was associated with insulin resistance, which may predispose to increased MetS risk. Novel gene-nutrient interactions between LEPR rs3790433 and PUFA suggest that these genetic influences were more evident in individuals with low plasma (n-3) or high plasma (n-6) PUFA. PMID:20032477

  15. Breakfast patterns and their likelihood of increased risk of overweight/obesity and risk factors for metabolic syndrome in adults 19+ years: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about the relationship of specific types of breakfast consumed and the risk of overweight/obesity or risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Cluster analysis using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2008 data identified 12 breakfast clusters—including no breakfast, in...

  16. METABOLIC AND AUTOIMMUNE RISK FACTORS FOR CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE (CAD IN HEART TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Khalilulin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most essential autoimmunity risk factors for development of CAD are increasing level of anticardiolipin antibodies and homocystein. This report presents retrospective analyses of 39 heart transplant recipients with maximal follow up over 16 years. Our results showed that hyperhomocystenemia and high levels of anticardiolipin antibodies play great value in development of CAD. Thus relative risks for development of CAD in presence both high levels of anticardiolipin antibodies and homocysteine are higher, than in traditional nonimmune risk factors. 

  17. Recruitment and blocking properties of the CardioFit stimulation lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahilea Anholt, Tamar; Ayal, Shai; Goldberg, Joshua A.

    2011-06-01

    The CardioFit vagal stimulation system has been developed as a proposed therapy for congestive heart failure (CHF). CardioFit is to be implanted in several hundred CHF patients enrolled in the INOVATE-HF clinical trial, an FDA approved study. The CardioFit stimulation lead (CSL), which is a cuff electrode that delivers stimulation pulses to the right cervical vagus, was designed to recruit efferent cardiac vagal fibers while minimizing unwanted recruitment of other fibers. This paper presents the CSL and measurements of its recruiting and blocking properties when placed on isolated porcine vagus nerves maintained at an elevated temperature in oxygenated artificial cerebrospinal fluid. Using charge balanced quasi-trapezoidal pulses driven through the CSL, we show in eight out of nine nerves a 63% ± 13% (mean ± SD) unidirectional attenuation of the A-fiber compound action potential attained at a current of 3.0 ± 0.8 mA. The threshold for the activation of A- and B-fibers was found to be 0.3 ± 0.17 mA and 2.5 ± 1.1 mA, respectively. The results presented here should help to guide the optimal parameters used in the upcoming deployment of the CardioFit system.

  18. Transitions in Physiologic Coupling: Sleep Stage and Age Dependence of Cardio-respiratory Phase Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Ronny P.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2012-02-01

    Recent studies have focused on various features of cardiac and respiratory dynamics with the aim to better understand key aspects of the underlying neural control of these systems. We investigate how sleep influences cardio-respiratory coupling, and how the degree of this coupling changes with transitions across sleep stages in healthy young and elderly subjects. We analyze full night polysomnographic recordings of 189 healthy subjects (age range: 20 to 90 years). To probe cardio-respiratory coupling, we apply a novel phase synchronization analysis method to quantify the adjustment of rhythms between heartbeat and breathing signals. We investigate how cardio-respiratory synchronization changes with sleep-stage transitions and under healthy aging. We find a statistically significant difference in the degree of cardio-respiratory synchronization during different sleep stages for both young and elderly subjects and a significant decline of synchronization with age. This is a first evidence of how sleep regulation and aging influence a key nonlinear mechanism of physiologic coupling as quantified by the degree of phase synchronization between the cardiac and respiratory systems, which is of importance to develop adequate modeling approaches.

  19. [Somatotype of the patients with obesity and associated cardio-vascular patholodgy. Clinical and anthropological bonds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukavneva, N S; Pozdniakov, A L; Nikitiuk, D B

    2008-01-01

    In the article there are presented major anthropometric parameters of patients (male and female) with obesity, combined with cardiovascular pathology, before and after treatment. Constitutional predisposition to obesity is defined. Efficacy of dietary therapy is estimated and with obesity are defined on the basil of associated cardio-vascular pathology. PMID:18839806

  20. Relevance of liver fat to the impact of dietary extrinsic sugars on lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, B A

    2015-08-01

    In contrast to the decline in mortality from many non-infectious, chronic diseases in the UK, death from liver disease has increased exponentially in men and women over the past 40 years. This is primarily because of the over consumption of alcohol, but also the increased prevalence of obesity, which is linked to early pathology through the accumulation of liver fat. Supra-physiological intakes of fructose-containing sugar can produce acute, adverse effects on lipid metabolism, and deliver excess energy that increases bodyweight and the deposition of fat in sites other than adipose tissue, including the liver. This review addresses the variable metabolic origins of liver fat, and the key importance of postprandial lipid metabolism in this respect. The effects of supra-physiological intakes of sugar are also considered in context of the real world and established threshold for the adverse effects of sugar on cardio-metabolic risk factors. The review concludes that while the average intake of sugar in the UK falls well below this critical threshold, intakes in subgroups of adults, and especially adolescents, may be cause for concern. There is also evidence to suggest that raised liver fat, acquired, in part, through an impaired removal of postprandial lipaemia, can increase sensitivity to the adverse effects of sugar at all ages. PMID:25992705

  1. Distribution and characteristics of risk factors for cardiovascular–metabolic disease in a rural Kenyan community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Muchira

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions/recommendations: The prevalence of CVMD was high but some risk factors usually associated with CVMD were not observed. There is need for locally-tailored approaches in treatment and prevention of CVMD at the local level.

  2. Variations in tryptophan hydroxylase 2 linked to decreased serotonergic activity are associated with elevated risk for metabolic syndrome in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloiber, S; Kohli, M A; Brueckl, T; Ripke, S; Ising, M; Uhr, M; Menke, A; Unschuld, P G; Horstmann, S; Salyakina, D; Muller-Myhsok, B; Binder, E B; Holsboer, F; Lucae, S

    2010-07-01

    Major depression and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) are interacting clinical conditions influenced by genetic susceptibility. For both disorders, impaired serotonergic neurotransmission in specific brain areas has been suggested. This led us to investigate whether variants in the gene coding for tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2), the brain-specific and rate-limiting enzyme for serotonin biosynthesis, might be predictive for an increased liability for the development of MetS in depressed patients. In a case-control study consisting of 988 patients with recurrent unipolar depression (RUD) and 1023 psychiatric healthy controls, MetS components were ascertained according to the International Diabetes Foundation criteria. A total of 41 single nucleotide polymorphisms fully covering the TPH2 gene region were genotyped in stage 1 (300 patients/300 controls), resulting in significant genetic associations of polymorphisms located in exon 7 and intron 8 of TPH2 and the occurrence of MetS in depressed patients after correction for age, gender and multiple testing (51 RUD-MetS/179 RUD-non-MetS). We were able to confirm the significant association of rs17110690 in stage 2 (688 patients/723 controls; 110 RUD-MetS/549 RUD-non-MetS) and to link risk-genotypes and risk-haplotypes for MetS to lower TPH2 mRNA expression and to lower 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels in cerebrospinal fluid previously reported in functional studies. Our findings suggest that TPH2 polymorphisms characterize a subgroup of depressed patients who are especially prone to develop metabolic disorders induced by a genotype-dependent impairment of serotonergic neurotransmission. Identifying depressed patients at high risk for MetS using genetic variants could have direct clinical impact on individualized disease management and prevention strategies. PMID:19125159

  3. Factor Structure of Indices of the Second Derivative of the Finger Photoplethysmogram with Metabolic Components and Other Cardiovascular Risk Indicators

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    Tomoyuki Kawada

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe second derivative of the finger photoplethysmogram (SDPTG is an indicator of arterial stiffness. The present study was conducted to clarify the factor structure of indices of the SDPTG in combination with components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS, to elucidate the significance of the SDPTG among various cardiovascular risk factors.MethodsThe SDPTG was determined in the second forefinger of the left hand in 1,055 male workers (mean age, 44.2±6.4 years. Among 4 waves of SDPTG components, the ratios of the height of the "a" wave to that of the "b" and "d" waves were expressed as b/a and d/a, and used as SDPTG indices for the analysis.ResultsPrincipal axis factoring analysis was conducted using age, SDPTG indices, components of MetS, and the serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP and uric acid. Three factors were extracted, and the SDPTG indices were categorized in combination with age as the third factor. Metabolic components and the SDPTG indices were independently categorized. These three factors explained 44.4% of the total variation. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed age, d/a, serum uric acid, serum CRP, and regular exercise as independent determinants of the risk of MetS. The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals were 1.08 (1.04 to 1.11, 0.10 (0.01 to 0.73, 1.24 (1.06 to 1.44, 3.59 (2.37 to 5.42, and 0.48 (0.28 to 0.82, respectively.ConclusionThe SDPTG indices were categorized in combination with age, and they differed in characteristics from components of MetS or inflammatory markers. In addition, this cross-sectional study also revealed decrease of the d/a as a risk factor for the development of MetS.

  4. Cardio-postural interactions and short-arm centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaber, Andrew; Goswami, Nandu; Xu, Da; Laurin, Alexendre

    Transform was applied to decompose the representative signals on a time-scale basis in a frequency region of [0.01 - 0.1] Hz. Their linear coupling was quantified through a coherence metric and the synchrony was characterised via the phase information to determine regions where pairs of signals were in phase lock and thereby inferring an interaction or coupling. From these data we investigate the percent time in each of two coupled interactions: EMG-SBP and COP-SBP. RESULTS: The time percentages from EMG-SBP was 6.2% (baseline), 8.1% (pre-stand), 7.7% (1g), 13.6% (2g), 10.8% (post-stand), and 8.2 (recovery-stand).ANOVA comparison (EMG-SBP) among baseline supine (6.2%), 1g (7.7%), and 2g (13.6%) yielded a p value of 0.04. Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc test showed that 2g is significantly higher than supine1 (p=0.04) and marginal significant difference between 1g and 2g (p=0.052). There was no effect of centrifugation on stand EMG-SBP, but COP-SBP was marginally increased in the recovery stand (pre-stand: 10.5%; post-stand 8.9%; recovery-stand 15.7%, p=0.20). CONCLUSION: These data indicated the activation of cardio-postural control system throughout stand and supine centrifugation, with elevation of the recruitment of muscle pump at 2g.

  5. Impaired glucose metabolism in response to high fat diet in female mice conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF or ovarian stimulation alone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miaoxin Chen

    Full Text Available Individuals conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF may be at increased risk of cardio-metabolic disorders. We recently reported that IVF conceived male mice displayed impaired glucose metabolism at normal and high body weights. In this study, we examined glucose metabolism in mature female C57BL/6J mice that were conceived by natural conception (NC, by ovarian stimulation (OS or by IVF following chow or high-fat diet (HFD for 8 weeks. By design, litter size was comparable between groups, but interestingly the birth weight of IVF and OS females was lower than NC females (p ≤ 0.001. Mature IVF female mice displayed increased fasting glucose as compared to NC and OS mice, irrespective of diet. Mature IVF and OS mice were also more susceptible to the metabolic consequences of high fat diet as compared with NC females, with impaired glucose tolerance (p ≤ 0.01, whereas peripheral insulin resistance and increased hepatic expression of gluconeogenic genes Ppargc1α, Pck1 and G6pc was observed in IVF mice only (p<0.05. This study suggests that ovarian stimulation alone and IVF program distinct metabolic effects in females, but that high fat diet may be required to unmask these effects. This study adds to the growing body of literature that assisted reproduction procedures may increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in an obesity prone environment.

  6. Optimized alkylated cyclodextrin polysulphates with reduced risks on thromboembolic accidents improve osteoarthritic chondrocyte metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Groeneboer, Sara; Lambrecht, Stijn; Dhollander, Aad; Jacques, Peggy; Cruyssen, Bert Vander; Lories, Rik J.; Devreese, Katrien; Chiers, Koen; Elewaut, Dirk; Verbruggen, Gust

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the ability of different cyclodextrin polysulphate (CDPS) derivatives to affect human articular cartilage cell metabolism in vitro. Methods. OA chondrocytes were cultured in alginate and exposed to 5 µg/ml of 2,3,6-tri-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin (ME-CD), 2,3-di-O-methyl-6-sulphate-β-cyclodextrin (ME-CD-6-S), 2,6-di-O-methyl-3-sulphate-β-cyclodextrin (ME-CD-3-S), (2-carboxyethyl)-β-CDPS (CE-CDPS), (2-hydroxypropyl)-β-CDPS (HP-CDPS), 6-monoamino-6-monodeoxy-β-CDPS (MA-CDPS) ...

  7. Brain imaging and genetic risk in the pediatric population, part 1: inherited metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Maria Gabriela; Vairo, Filippo; Souza, Carolina Fischinger; Giugliani, Roberto; Vedolin, Leonardo Modesti

    2015-02-01

    In this article, the genotype-MR phenotype correlation of the most common or clinically important inherited metabolic diseases (IMD) in the pediatric population is reviewed. A nonsystematic search of the PubMed/Medline database of relevant studies about "genotype-phenotype correlation" in IMD was performed. Some MR phenotypes related to specific gene mutations were found, such as bilateral hypertrophy of inferior olives in patients harboring POLG and SURF1 mutations, and central lesions in the cervical spinal cord in patients with nonketotic hyperglycinemia harboring GLRX5 gene mutation. PMID:25476511

  8. Chronoecological health watch of arterial stiffness and neuro-cardio-pulmonary function in elderly community at high altitude (3524 m), compared with Japanese town.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, K; Norboo, T; Otsuka, Y; Higuchi, H; Hayajiri, M; Narushima, C; Sato, Y; Tsugoshi, T; Murakami, S; Wada, T; Ishine, M; Okumiya, K; Matsubayashi, K; Yano, S; Chogyal, T; Angchuk, D; Ichihara, K; Cornélissen, G; Halberg, F

    2005-10-01

    have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease than low-latitude peers. To determine how these indices are associated with maintained cognitive function deserves further study by the longitudinal follow-up of these communities in terms of longevity and aging in relation to their neuro-cardio-pulmonary function. PMID:16275510

  9. Metabolic syndrome in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: association with traditional risk factors for coronary heart disease and lupus characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles, Rw; Lanna, Ccd; Ferreira, Ga; Ribeiro, Al

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) in patients with SLE and to analyze the association of MetS with traditional risk factors for CHD and lupus characteristics. In this cross-sectional study the frequency of MetS was determined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III in patients with SLE. The association of MetS with the traditional risk factors for CHD not included in the syndrome definition, and with lupus characteristics was examined. The mean age (sd) of the 162 females patients was 38.8(11.2) years. The frequency of MetS was 32.1%. Abdominal obesity and hypertension were the two most common components of the syndrome (86.5% each) followed by low levels of HDL-cholesterol (84.6%), hypertriglyceridemia (69.2%) and hyperglycemia (15.4%). MetS was significantly associated with older age, family history of CHD, obesity, postmenopausal status, LDL-c > or =100mg/dl, and higher Framingham risk score. Lupus characteristics associated with MetS were history of nephrotic proteinuria during follow-up and current cyclophosphamide use, higher modified SLEDAI-2k, higher damage index score (SLICC/ACR), and older age at lupus diagnosis. In the logistic regression analysis, obesity, LDL-c > or =100mg/dl, older age at lupus diagnosis, higher damage index and nephrotic proteinuria were independently associated with MetS. We conclude that MetS diagnosis was frequent in patients with lupus. The syndrome was associated not only with traditional risk factors for CHD, confirming the clustering of those risk factors, but also with lupus characteristics. Some of those factors, especially LDL-c > or =100mg/dl and age at lupus diagnosis, have been associated with atherosclerosis in lupus patients. Lupus (2010) 19, 803-809. PMID:20118159

  10. Metabolic syndrome in Internal Medicine patients: the pilot NIMEC study (National Internal Medicine Equivalent/Complex C-V-@Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nardi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Metabolic Syndrome (MetS, currently defined as slight differences in the criteria of diagnosis – depending on which authority is quoted [i.e.: NCEP-ATP III (National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III; WHO (World Health Organization; IDF (International Diabetes Federation; AACE (American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists], designates a cluster of metabolic risk factors that come together in a single individual, leading to cardiovascular disease. MetS is quite common, approximately 20-30% of the population in industrialized countries being affected. However, most of epidemiological data regarding MetS are derived from populations consisting mostly of middle-aged and younger subjects. AIM OF THE STUDY To assess the prevalence of the MetS in Internal Medicine wards and to determine its related comorbidities, including other clinical forms of atherosclerotic disease such as CHD risk equivalents. METHODS Our study was performed in patients admitted in Internal Medicine wards and selected as a randomization list in 12 Emilia Romagna-Marche FADOI centers. 1.316 patients were registered. According to explicit inclusion/exclusion criteria, we studied overall 902 participants (50.6% men, mean of age: 71-73 years. RESULTS According to NCEP-ATP III and IDF criteria the prevalence of MetS was 45.3% (IC 95%: 41.6-49.1 and 38.6% (IC 95%: 34.9-42.3, respectively. Patients with MetS presented a higher significant rate of ALT increase, syncope, atrial fibrillation, COPD, unstable angina, chronic kidney disease, cancer, valvular heart disease, peripheral arterial disease and carotid plaques. A strong association between IDF-MetS and congestive heart failure was observed, suggesting a role of central obesity as an independent risk factor in the elderly. DISCUSSION World-wide populations are becoming older. Aging and MetS are two conditions that represent an important part of health-care spending. Trunkal fatness increases in

  11. The impact of dietary habits and metabolic risk factors on cardiovascular and diabetes mortality in countries of the Middle East and North Africa in 2010: a comparative risk assessment analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Afshin, Ashkan; Micha, Renata; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Fahimi, Saman; Shi, Peilin; Powles, John; Singh, Gitanjali; Yakoob, Mohammad Yawar; Abdollahi, Morteza; Al-Hooti, Suad; Farzadfar, Farshad; HOUSHIAR-RAD, Anahita; Hwalla, Nahla; Koksal, Eda; Musaiger, Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    Objective/design We conducted a comparative risk assessment analysis to estimate the cardiometabolic disease (CMD) mortality attributable to 11 dietary and 4 metabolic risk factors in 20 countries of the Middle East by age, sex and time. The national exposure distributions were obtained from a systematic search of multiple databases. Missing exposure data were estimated using a multilevel Bayesian hierarchical model. The aetiological effect of each risk factor on disease-specific mortality wa...

  12. Evaluation of hyperandrogenemia and metabolic risk profile in women with postadolescent acne

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    Leyla Baykal Selçuk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Postadolescent acne is a disease with relapses frequently seen in women. Treatment is difficult. In our study, we aimed to investigate the clinical and biochemical characteristics of hyperandrogenism and the prevalence of metabolic disorders, such as metabolic syndrome (MS and dyslipidemia in women with postadolescent acne. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 50 women who attended our department with the complaint of postadolescent acne between July 2014 and December 2014. The presence of androgenetic alopecia (AGA, hirsutism, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, MS, dyslipidemia, and obesity was evaluated. Results: Seborrhea was present in 56%, hirsutism in 40%, AGA in 26%, and PCOS in 24% of women with postadolescent acne. The prevalence of MS and dyslipidemia was 24% and 44%, respectively. The prevalence of MS was significantly higher in patients with AGA and hirsutism. There was no association of MS with menstrual irregularity and PCOS. There was no significant association of dyslipidemia with AGA, hirsutism, PCOS, and menstrual irregularity. Conclusion: Clinical symptoms of hyperandrogenism, such as hirsutism, AGA, and PCOS were more common in women with postadolescent acne but androgenic hormone profile abnormalities were minimal. As a result, postadolescent acne resistant to treatment may be considered as an early marker in the early diagnosis of PCOS in women to prevent the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, MS and hypercholesterolemia.

  13. Effect of a weight loss intervention on anthropometric measures and metabolic risk factors in pre- versus postmenopausal women

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    Zahradnik Hans-Peter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study examines changes in body weight, fat mass, metabolic and hormonal parameters in overweight and obese pre- and postmenopausal women who participated in a weight loss intervention. Methods Seventy-two subjects were included in the analysis of this single arm study (premenopausal: 22 women, age 43.7 ± 6.4 years, BMI 31.0 ± 2.4 kg/m2; postmenopausal: 50 women, age 58.2 ± 5.1 years, BMI 32.9 ± 3.7 kg/m2. Weight reduction was achieved by the use of a meal replacement and fat-reduced diet. In addition, from week 6 to 24 participants attended a guided exercise program. Body composition was analyzed with the Bod Pod®. Blood pressures were taken at every visit and blood was collected at baseline and closeout of the study to evaluate lipids, insulin, cortisol and leptin levels. Results BMI, fat mass, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, glucose, leptin and cortisol were higher in the postmenopausal women at baseline. Both groups achieved a substantial and comparable weight loss (pre- vs. postmenopausal: 6.7 ± 4.9 vs 6.7 ± 4.4 kg; n.s.. However, in contrast to premenopausal women, weight loss in postmenopausal women was exclusively due to a reduction of fat mass (-5.3 ± 5.1 vs -6.6 ± 4.1 kg; p Blood pressure, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, and glucose improved significantly only in postmenopausal women whereas total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol were lowered significantly in both groups. Conclusion Both groups showed comparable weight loss and in postmenopausal women weight loss was associated with a pronounced improvement in metabolic risk factors thereby reducing the prevalence of metabolic syndrome.

  14. Metabolic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles Shaeffer

    2004-01-01

    @@ The emergence of cardiac disease as the number one world-wide cause of death justifies efforts to identify individuals at higher risk for preventive therapy. The metabolic syndrome, originally described by Reaven, 1 has been associated with higher cardiovascular disease risk. 2 Type Ⅱ diabetes is also a frequent sequela. 3

  15. Carotid Intima-Media Thickness as the Cardiometabolic Risk Indicator in Patients with Nonfunctional Adrenal Mass and Metabolic Syndrome Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evran, Mehtap; Akkuş, Gamze; Berk Bozdoğan, İlayda; Gök, Mustafa; Deniz, Ali; Sert, Murat; Tetiker, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Our purpose was to show the association of adrenal incidentaloma and metabolic syndrome in consideration of the studies and to detect the increase in the carotid intima-media thickness which is regarded as the precessor of atherosclerosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Eighty-one patients who were diagnosed with adrenal mass were included in the study. Hormonal evaluation, insulin rezistance measurement with the HOMA-IR and 1-mg DST were performed of all patients. The patients were classified as follows: mass size Cushing syndrome. The remaining 76 patients were accepted as nonfunctional. It was seen with regard to metabolic and biochemical parameters that plasma glucose (p=0.01), insulin (p=0.00) and triglyceride (p=0.012) values of all patients were significantly high compared to those of the control group. It was detected that measured heart rate (p=0.00), end-diastolic diameter (p=0.02), end-systolic diameter (p=0.014) and carotid intima-media thickness (p=0.00) values of the patients with adrenal mass were significantly higher than those of the healthy control group. CONCLUSIONS We found that the increased insulin resistance, increased risk of cardiovascular disease with the increase in the thickness of carotid intima-media and diastolic disfunction parameters, although the patients with adrenal incidentaloma are nonfunctional. PMID:27015815

  16. Avocado Oil Supplementation Modifies Cardiovascular Risk Profile Markers in a Rat Model of Sucrose-Induced Metabolic Changes

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    Octavio Carvajal-Zarrabal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of avocado oil administration on biochemical markers of cardiovascular risk profile in rats with metabolic changes induced by sucrose ingestion. Twenty-five rats were divided into five groups: a control group (CG; basic diet, a sick group (MC; basic diet plus 30% sucrose solution, and three other groups (MCao, MCac, and MCas; basic diet plus 30% sucrose solution plus olive oil and avocado oil extracted by centrifugation or using solvent, resp.. Glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, low- and high-density lipoproteins (LDL, HDL, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL, lactic dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration were analyzed. Avocado oil reduces TG, VLDL, and LDL levels, in the LDL case significantly so, without affecting HDL levels. An effect was exhibited by avocado oil similar to olive oil, with no significant difference between avocado oil extracted either by centrifugation or solvent in myocardial injury biochemical indicators. Avocado oil decreased hs-CRP levels, indicating that inflammatory processes were partially reversed. These findings suggested that avocado oil supplementation has a positive health outcome because it reduces inflammatory events and produces positive changes in the biochemical indicators studied, related to the development of metabolic syndrome.

  17. Development of Dietary Patterns Spanning Infancy and Toddlerhood: Relation to Body Size, Composition and Metabolic Risk Markers at Three Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Louise B. B.; Mølgaard, Christian; Ejlerskov, Katrine Tschentscher;

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the development of dietary patterns during toddlerhood and the relation to growth and health. The study objective was to characterise the development of dietary patterns from 9-36 mo of age and investigate the association to body size, body composition and metabolic risk...... markers at 36 mo. Food records were filled out at 9, 18 and 36 mo of age (n = 229). Dietary patterns were identified by principal component analysis (PCA). Three dietary patterns were identified: Transition Food, Healthy Food and Traditional Food. The course of development in dietary patterns from 9-36 mo...... indicated tracking for a relatively large group of participants in the three patterns. Transition Food and Healthy Food were associated with some of the investigated outcomes. Children with lower adherence to the Transition Food pattern than average at 18 and 36 mo irrespectively of intake at 9 mo had...

  18. The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Index (DGAI) was created to assess adherence to the dietary recommendations of the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) in relation to chronic disease risk. The objective of the present study was to assess the relationship between dietary patterns con...

  19. The age-specific quantitative effects of metabolic risk factors on cardiovascular diseases and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Gitanjali M; Danaei, Goodarz; Farzadfar, Farshad;

    2013-01-01

    The effects of systolic blood pressure (SBP), serum total cholesterol (TC), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and body mass index (BMI) on the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) have been established in epidemiological studies, but consistent estimates of effect sizes by age and sex are not availa...

  20. Metabolic syndrome in hemodialysis patients as a risk factor for new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant: a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonet J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Josep Bonet1, Albert Martinez-Castelao2, Beatriz Bayés11Department of Nephrology, Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Spain; 2Department of Nephrology, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, IDIBELL, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, SpainPurpose: Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of biochemical abnormalities including cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors. The development of diabetes mellitus after renal transplant represents a major posttransplant complication that may adversely affect graft/patient survival. The aim of this study was to assess the role of metabolic syndrome in patients on hemodialysis as a risk factor for the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant.Patients and methods: This was a prospective observational epidemiologic study carried out in adult nondiabetic patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis and on the renal transplant waiting list between November 2008 and April 2009. Patients were followed up from Visit 1 (baseline to 6 months after the renal transplant. The analysis of the role of metabolic syndrome in hemodialysis patients as a risk factor for the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant included the estimation of relative risk and its 95% confidence interval (CI.Results: A total of 383 evaluable patients were entered into the study (mean age, 52.7 years; male, 57.7%; Caucasian, 90.1%. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome on hemodialysis was 30.4% (95% CI, 25.8%–35.4%. Hypertension was the most prevalent criterion for metabolic syndrome (65.0%, followed by low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (52.7%, abdominal obesity (36.2%, hypertriglyceridemia (32.4%, and impaired glucose (8.9%. After the renal transplant, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was still 25.8%. During the posttransplant period, the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus reached 13.0% (95% CI, 7.8%–20.6% and patients with pretransplant metabolic syndrome were 2

  1. Melatonin ameliorates metabolic risk factors, modulates apoptotic proteins, and protects the rat heart against diabetes-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Ali H; El-Missiry, Mohamed A; Othman, Azza I

    2015-01-15

    The present study investigated the ability of melatonin in reducing metabolic risk factors and cardiac apoptosis induced by diabetes. Streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected into male rats, and after diabetic induction melatonin (10mg/kg i.g.) was administered orally for 21 days. Diabetic hearts showed increased number of apoptotic cells with downregulation of Bcl-2 and activation of p53 and CD95 as well as the caspases 9, 8 and 3. In addition, there was a significant decrease in insulin level, hyperglycemia, elevated HOMA-IR, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total lipids, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low and very low-density lipoprotein and decreased high-density lipoprotein. These changes were coupled with a significant increase in the activities of creatin kinase-MB (CK-MB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the serum of the diabetic rats indicating myocardium injury. Oral administration of melatonin for 3 weeks after diabetes induction ameliorated the levels of hyperglycemia, insulin, HbA1c, lipids profile and HOMA-IR. The oral melatonin treatment of diabetic rats significantly decreased the number of apoptotic cells in the heart compared to diabetic rats. It enhanced Bcl-2 expression and blocked the activation of CD95 as well as caspases 9, 8 and 3. These changes were accompanied with significant improvement of CK-MB and LDH in the serum indicating the ameliorative effect of melatonin on myocardium injury. Melatonin effectively ameliorated diabetic myocardium injury, apoptosis, reduced the metabolic risk factors and modulated important steps in both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis. Thus, melatonin may be a promising pharmacological agent for ameliorating potential cardiomyopathy associated with diabetes. PMID:25510232

  2. Adherence to the food-based Japanese dietary guidelines in relation to metabolic risk factors in young Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Terumi; Murakami, Kentaro; Livingstone, M Barbara E; Sasaki, Satoshi; Uenishi, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-28

    While Japanese diets have attracted considerable attention because of, for example, the long-life expectancy in Japan, their health benefits have not been examined. In the present study, we cross-sectionally examined whether adherence to the food-based Japanese dietary guidelines is associated with metabolic risk factors in 1083 Japanese women aged 18-22 years. Based on the Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top, adherence to the food-based Japanese dietary guidelines was assessed using dietary information on consumed servings of grain dishes, vegetable dishes, fish and meat dishes, milk and fruits and energy from snacks and alcoholic beverages during the preceding month, which was derived from a comprehensive diet history questionnaire. Higher dietary adherence was associated with higher intakes of protein, carbohydrate, dietary fibre, Na, K and vitamin C, and lower intakes of total and saturated fat. There was also an inverse association between dietary adherence and dietary energy density. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, dietary adherence was inversely associated with waist circumference (P for trend = 0·002). It also showed an inverse association with LDL-cholesterol concentrations (P for trend = 0·04). There was no association with the other metabolic risk factors examined, including BMI, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total and HDL-cholesterol, TAG, glucose, glycated Hb and insulin concentrations. In conclusion, higher adherence to the food-based Japanese dietary guidelines, which was characterised by favourable dietary intakes of foods and nutrients as well as lower energy density, was associated with lower waist circumference and LDL-cholesterol concentrations in this group of young Japanese women. PMID:26212663

  3. [Metabolic abnormalities, lipodystrophy and cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Pascale; Blanc, Myriam

    2006-05-15

    Life expectancy of HIV-infected patients has improved considerably with HAART. However long term use of HAART is linked with lipodystrophy syndrom (subcutaneous lipoatrophy and central fat accumulation) associated with dyslipemia (hypoHDL, hyperLDL and hypertriglyceridemia) and insulin resistance. It is also linked with mitochondrial toxicity clinically expressed by chronic fatigue syndrom and premature aging. The induced metabolic syndrom has cardiovascular consequences and myocardial infarction is the cause of 7% of the HIV-infected deaths in 2000. Assessment of these complications should be done at least every year. Treatment options concern antiretroviral therapy with the search for the least toxic drug (but with equal antiviral efficacy), symptomatic treatment (statin, fibrates, thiazolidinediones, metformin) and lifestyle modifications (first of all, stopping cigarette smoking!) PMID:16775979

  4. Insulin resistance, the metabolic syndrome, and risk of incident cardiovascular disease: a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jørgen; Hansen, Tine W; Rasmussen, Susanne; Ibsen, Hans; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Madsbad, Sten

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The goal was to clarify if insulin resistance (IR) would predict cardiovascular disease (CVD) independent of the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn). BACKGROUND: Although the cause of MetSyn is not well defined, IR has been proposed to be an important cause. Only a small number of population......-based studies have sought to clarify if IR predicts CVD independent of MetSyn. METHODS: This was a prospective Danish population-based study of 2,493 men and women, age 41 to 72 years, without major CVD at baseline. We defined MetSyn according to both the International Diabetes Foundation (IDF) and the National...... Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) criteria, and we quantified IR by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). Prevalence of MetSyn was 21% according to IDF criteria and 16% according to NCEP criteria. Accordingly, we defined IDF-HOMA-IR as belonging to the highest 21% of the HOMA-IR distribution, and...

  5. Review: Efficacy of alginate supplementation in relation to appetite regulation and metabolic risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Georg; Pedersen, C; Kristensen, Mette Bredal;

    2013-01-01

    vehicle applied for alginate supplementation, the majority of animal and human studies suggest that alginate consumption does suppress satiety and to some extent energy intake. Only one long-term intervention trial found effects on weight loss. In addition, alginates seem to exhibit beneficial influence......This review provides a critical update on human and animal studies investigating the effect of alginate supplementation on appetite regulation, glycaemic and insulinemic responses, and lipid metabolism with discussion of the evidence on potential mechanisms, efficacy and tolerability. Dependent on...... on postprandial glucose absorption and insulin response in animals and humans. However, alginate supplementation was only found to have cholesterol-lowering properties in animals. Several mechanisms have been suggested for the positive effect observed, which involve delayed gastric emptying...

  6. The effects of exercise on C-reactive protein, insulin, leptin and some cardiometabolic risk factors in Egyptian children with or without metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Nashwa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence and magnitude of obesity in the children and the adolescents have increased dramatically in the developing countries over the last 20–30 years. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS in children is increasing. Aim: This study aimed to investigate the changes of C-reactive protein (CRP, leptin, insulin, and blood lipids before and after the exercise therapy in normal and obese children (with or without metabolic syndrome. Methods The study covered 49 normal children (control, 32 obese children without metabolic syndrome and 12 obese children with metabolic syndrome. We examined the influence of exercise (3 times/week for 12 weeks on the levels of serum CRP, leptin, insulin, homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C in all groups. Results There were significant correlations between HOMA-IR and the individual components of the metabolic syndrome. After 12 weeks of exercise, both of the obese children groups, with and without metabolic syndrome, showed reduced body weight, body mass index (BMI, and CRP level, and increased HDL-C level. The percentage of metabolic syndrome decreased from 12.9% before the exercise training to 7.5% after training. Also, there was a significant reduction in BMI (from 47.3 to 32.6%, in systolic blood pressure (from 18.3 to 15.1% and in HDL-C level (from 18.3 to 9.7%. Conclusion Overweight children have multiple risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome. 12-week exercise may have a positive effect on reducing risk factors for the metabolic syndrome.

  7. The relation of metabolic syndrome according to five definitions to cardiovascular risk factors - a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Ming-May

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP, International Diabetes Federation (IDF, American Heart Association and National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI, World Health Organization (WHO, and the European Group for the Study of Insulin Resistance (EGIR definitions of metabolic syndrome (MetS have been commonly used by studies, little is known about agreement among these five definitions. We examined the agreement among these five definitions and explored their relationship with risk factors of cardiovascular disease in a Taiwan population. Methods A total of 1305 subjects aged 40 years and over in Taiwan were analyzed. Biomedical markers and anthropometric indices were measured. Agreement among definitions was determined by the kappa statistic. Logistic regression models were fit to estimate the odds of a high cardiovascular risk group for five definitions of MetS. Results The agreement among the NCEP, IDF, and AHA/NHLBI definitions was from substantial to very good, and agreement between the WHO and EGIR definitions was also substantial. All MetS definitions were significantly associated prevalence of microalbuminuria, elevated highly sensitive CRP (hs-CRP, and arterial stiffness only in women. In men, MetS by NCEP and AHA/NHLBI was associated with elevated level of hs-CRP and arterial stiffness. MetS by WHO and EGIR were significantly associated with microalbuminuria. And MetS by WHO was the only MetS definition that significantly associated with prevalence of arterial stiffness (OR: 2.75, 95% CI: 1.22-6.19. Conclusions The associations of these five definitions with cardiovascular risk factors were similar in women, and it was evident that the five definitions performed better in women than in men, with higher ORs observed in relation to arterial stiffness, elevated hs-CRP, and higher Framingham risk scores.

  8. Intrinsic features in microRNA transcriptomes link porcine visceral rather than subcutaneous adipose tissues to metabolic risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jideng Ma

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are non-coding small RNA ∼22 nucleotides in length that can regulate the expression of a wide range of coding genes at the post-transcriptional level. Visceral adipose tissues (VATs and subcutaneous adipose tissues (SATs, the two main fat compartments in mammals, are anatomically, physiologically, metabolically, and clinically distinct. Various studies of adipose tissues have focused mainly on DNA methylation, and mRNA and protein expression, nonetheless little research sheds directly light on the miRNA transcriptome differences between these two distinct adipose tissue types. Here, we present a comprehensive investigation of miRNA transcriptomes across six variant porcine adipose tissues by small RNA-sequencing. We identified 219 known porcine miRNAs, 97 novel miRNA*s, and 124 miRNAs that are conserved to other mammals. A set of universally abundant miRNAs (i.e., miR-148a-3p, miR-143-3p, miR-27b-3p, miR-let-7a-1-5p, and miR-let-7f-5p across the distinct adipose tissues was found. This set of miRNAs may play important housekeeping roles that are involved in adipogenesis. Clustering analysis indicated significant variations in miRNA expression between the VATs and SATs, and highlighted the role of the greater omentum in responding to potential metabolic risk because of the observed enrichment in this tissue of the immune- and inflammation-related miRNAs, such as the members of miR-17-92 cluster and miR-181 family. Differential expression of the miRNAs between the VATs and SATs, and miRNA target prediction analysis revealed that the VATs-specific enriched miRNAs were associated mainly with immune and inflammation responses. In summary, the differences of miRNA expression between the VATs and SATs revealed some of their intrinsic differences and indicated that the VATs might be closely associated with increased risk of metabolic disorders.

  9. Flavan 3-ols improve metabolic syndrome risk factors: evidence and mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Osakabe, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Flavan 3-ols, a type of polyphenolic substance, are distributed in a number of plant foods. Of these foods, chocolate is very rich in flavan 3-ols as flavan 3-ol monomers, (+)-catechin and (−)-epicatechin, and the oligomers as procyanidins. There is evidence that cacao products containing flavan 3-ols have the potential to contribute to the risk reduction of cardiometabolic disorders according to recent epidemiological or intervention studies. This review focuses on recent advances in researc...

  10. 3-Self Behavior Modification Programs Base on the PROMISE Model for Clients at Metabolic Risk

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this mixed methods research were 1) to study effects of the health behavior modification program (HBMP) conducted under the principles of the PROMISE Model and the CIPP Model and 2) to compare the 3-self health behaviors and the biomedical indicators before with after the program completion. During the program, three sample groups including 30 program leaders, 30 commanders and 120 clients were assessed, and there were assessments taken on 4,649 volunteers who were at risk o...

  11. Prebiotic fiber modulation of the gut microbiota improves risk factors for obesity and the metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Parnell, Jill A.; Reimer, Raylene A.

    2012-01-01

    Prebiotic fibers are non-digestible carbohydrates that promote the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut. Prebiotic consumption may benefit obesity and associated co-morbidities by improving or normalizing the dysbiosis of the gut microbiota. We evaluated the dose response to a prebiotic diet on the gut microbiota, body composition and obesity associated risk factors in lean and genetically obese rats. Prebiotic fibers increased Firmicutes and decreased Bacteroidetes, a profile often assoc...

  12. 冠心病心衰患者心踝血管指数与心血管疾病危险因素的关系%Relationship between Cardio-ankle Vascular Index and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors of Coronary Heart Disease with Chronic Heart Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周颖; 蒋梅先; 刘永明

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨冠心病心衰患者心踝血管指数(CAVI)与心血管危险因素的相关性.方法 对102例患者进行CAVI检测及病史采集,根据CAVI水平分为CAVI异常组和CAVI正常组,分析CAVI与心血管危险因素的关系.结果 两组冠心病心衰患者的年龄、收缩压、脉压、高血压、糖尿病、高脂血症差异有统计学意义;二分类Logistic回归分析,年龄、高血压是冠心病心衰患者CAVI增高的独立危险因素.结论 年龄、高血压是冠心病心衰患者CAVI增高的独立危险因素.%Objective: To detect the correlation of CAVI and cardiovascular disease risk factors in CHD with CHF patients. Methods: 102 patients for the CAVI detection and basic information were divided into the CAVI abnormal group and the CAVI normal group. The relationship of CAVI and cardiovascular risk factors was analysed. Results: Some indices had significant differences in 2 groups such as the age,the systolic blood pressure, the pulse pressure,the hypertension,the diabetes and the hyperlipidemia. Binary logistic regression analysis demonstrated that age and hypertension were independent risk factors for the CAVI increase in the CHD with CHF patients. Conclusion: Age and hypertension were independent risk factors for the CAVI increase in the CHD with CHF patients.

  13. The association of leptin and C-reactive protein with the cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic syndrome score in Taiwanese adults

    OpenAIRE

    Chiu Feng-Hsiang; Chuang Chung Hsun; Li Wen-Cheng; Weng Yi-Ming; Fann Wen-Chih; Lo Hsiang-Yun; Sun Cheng; Wang Shih-Hao

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and leptin levels have been independently associated with the cardiovascular risk factors. The aim of the present study was to determine if their serum levels were associated with cardiovascular risk factors or metabolic syndrome as well as their correlation in the Taiwanese population. Methods This retrospective study included 999 subjects (> 18 y), who underwent a physical examination in Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital-Linkou and Chiayi in Tai...

  14. Polymorphisms of Genes in the Lipid Metabolism Pathway and the Risk of Biliary Tract Cancers and Stones: A Population-based Case-Control Study in Shanghai, China

    OpenAIRE

    Andreotti, Gabriella; Chen, Jinbo; Gao, Yu-Tang; Rashid, Asif; Chen, Bingshu E.; Rosenberg, Philip; Sakoda, Lori C.; Jie DENG; Shen, Ming-Chang; Wang, Bing-Sheng; Han, Tian-Quan; Zhang, Bai-He; Yeager, Meredith; Welch, Robert; Chanock, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers, encompassing the gallbladder, extrahepatic bile duct, and ampulla of Vater, are uncommon, yet highly fatal malignancies. Gallstones, the primary risk factor for biliary cancers, are linked with hyperlipidemia. We examined the associations of 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of five genes in the lipid metabolism pathway with the risks of biliary cancers and stones in a population-based case-control study in Shanghai, China. We included 235 gallbladder, 125 extra...

  15. Joint Association of Sitting Time and Physical Activity with Metabolic Risk Factors among Middle-Aged Malays in a Developing Country: A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Anne H. Y.; Moy, Foong Ming

    2013-01-01

    Background Prolonged sitting is associated with increased weight and higher risks for abdominal obesity, dyslipidaemia, hyperglycaemia and hypertension among the adult population. This has been well documented in the West, but studies on these associations are lacking in developing countries, including Malaysia. Objective This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the joint association of sitting time and physical activity with metabolic risk factors among middle-aged working adults. Methodo...

  16. Women's higher health risks in the obesogenic environment: a gender nutrition approach to metabolic dimorphism with predictive, preventive, and personalised medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Shapira Niva

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Women's evolution for nurturing and fat accumulation, which historically yielded health and longevity advantages against scarcity, may now be counteracted by increasing risks in the obesogenic environment, recently shown by narrowing gender health gap. Women's differential metabolism/disease risks, i.e. in fat accumulation/distribution, exemplified during puberty/adolescence, suggest gender dimorphism with obesity outcomes. Women's higher body fat percentage than men, even with equal...

  17. Angiotensin-(1-7): Beyond the Cardio-Renal Actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Passos-Silva, Danielle G; Verano-Braga, Thiago; Santos, Robson AS

    2013-01-01

    involves downstream effectors such as NO, FOXO1 and COX2. Through these mechanisms, Ang-(1-7) is able to improve pathological conditions such as fibrosis and inflammation in organs such as lungs, liver and kidney. In addition, this heptapeptide has positive effects in metabolism, increasing the glucose...... uptake and lipolysis while decreasing insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Ang-(1-7) is also able to improve cerebroprotection against ischemic stroke, besides its effects on learning and memory. The reproductive system can also be affected by Ang-(1-7) treatment, with enhanced ovulation, spermatogenesis...

  18. Roles of Vascular and Metabolic Components in Cognitive Dysfunction of Alzheimer disease: Short- and Long-term Modification by Non-genetic Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki eSato

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that a specific set of genetic and non-genetic risk factors contributes to the onset of Alzheimer disease (AD. Non-genetic risk factors include diabetes, hypertension in mid-life, and probably dyslipidemia in mid-life. This review focuses on the vascular and metabolic components of non-genetic risk factors. The mechanisms whereby non-genetic risk factors modify cognitive dysfunction are divided into four components, short- and long-term effects of vascular and metabolic factors. These consist of 1 compromised vascular reactivity, 2 vascular lesions, 3 hypo/hyperglycemia, and 4 exacerbated AD histopathological features, respectively. Vascular factors compromise cerebrovascular reactivity in response to neuronal activity and also cause irreversible vascular lesions. On the other hand, representative short-term effects of metabolic factors on cognitive dysfunction occur due to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Non-genetic risk factors also modify the pathological manifestations of AD in the long-term. Therefore, vascular and metabolic factors contribute to aggravation of cognitive dysfunction in AD through short-term and long-term effects. Beta-amyloid could be involved in both vascular and metabolic components. It might be beneficial to support treatment in AD patients by appropriate therapeutic management of non-genetic risk factors, considering the contributions of these four elements to the manifestation of cognitive dysfunction in individual patients, though all components are not always present. It should be clarified how these four components interact with each other. To answer this question, a clinical prospective study that follows up clinical features with respect to these four components: 1 functional MRI or SPECT for cerebrovascular reactivity, 2 MRI for ischemic lesions and atrophy, 3 clinical episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, 4 amyloid-PET and tau-PET for pathological features of AD, would be required.

  19. Metabolic risk factors, coping with stress, and psychological well-being in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavar, Ivan; Lovrić, Sanjin; Vukojević, Mladenka; Sesar, Irena; Petric-Vicković, Ivanka; Sesar, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the risk factors (age, obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, consumption of alchohol and drugs, positive family history, and exposure to sunlight), coping with stress, psychological well-being and age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). Forty patients with ARMD (case group) and 63 presbyopes (control group) participated in the study. Patient data were collected through general information questionnaire including patient habits, the COPE questionnaire that showed the way the patients handling stress, and the GHQ that analyzed the psychological aspects of their quality of life. These questionnaires were administered to the patients during ophthalmologic examination. The study involved 46 (44.66%) men and 57 (55.33%) women. Statistical analysis showed that the major risks for the development of ARMD were elevated cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL cholesterol in plasma. A significantly higher number ofARMD patients had a positive family history when compared with presbyopes. This study showed presbyopes to cope with emotional problems significantly better and to have a lower level of social dysfunction when compared with ARMD patients. However, it is necessary to conduct further studies in a large number of patients to determine more accurately the pathophysiological mechanisms of metabolic factors as well as the impact of the disease on the quality of life in patients with ARMD. PMID:24974669

  20. Possible Association of High Urinary Magnesium and Taurine to Creatinine Ratios with Metabolic Syndrome Risk Reduction in Australian Aboriginals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsumi Hamada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Because of the epidemic of metabolic syndrome (MS in Australian Aboriginals known for their higher cardiovascular mortality and shorter life expectancy, we analyzed the possible relationship of their MS risks with the current dietary custom. Methods. The subjects were 84 people aged 16–79 years. The health examination was conducted according to the basic protocol of WHO-CARDIAC (Cardiovascular Diseases and Alimentary Comparison Study. Results. The highest prevalence among MS risks was abdominal obesity (over 60%. After controlling for age and sex, the odds of obesity decreased significantly with high level of urinary magnesium/creatinine ratio (Mg/cre (OR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.02–0.57; P<.05. The significant inverse associations of fat intake with Mg/cre and of fast food intake with urinary taurine/creatinine ratio were revealed. Conclusions. The high prevalence of obesity in the Aboriginal people of this area may partly be due to the reduction of beneficial nutrients intake including Mg and taurine.

  1. Central obesity and atherogenic dyslipidemia in metabolic syndrome are associated with increased risk for colorectal adenoma in a Chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Tsann

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS is composed of cardiovascular risk factors including insulin resistance, obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Most of the components of MetS have been linked to the development of neoplasm. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between individual components of MetS and colorectal adenoma. Methods The study subjects were recruited from a pool of 4872 individuals who underwent a health check-up examination during the period January 2006 to May 2008. Each participant fulfilled a structured questionnaire. MetS was defined based on the America Heart Association and National Heart Lung Blood Institute criteria. Subjects with history of colon cancer, colon polyps, colitis, or prior colonic surgery were excluded. Results A total of 4122 subjects were included for final analysis (2367 men and 1755 women; mean age, 49.6 ± 11.7 years. Of them, MetS was diagnosed in 708 men (29.9% and in 367 women (20.9%. Among the patients with MetS, 34.6% had adenoma, 31.7% had hyperplastic polyps and 23.3% were polyp-free (p Conclusions Of the components of MetS analyzed in this study, central obesity and dyslipidemia are independent risk factors for colorectal adenoma. With regard to the prevention of colorectal neoplasm, life-style modification such as weight reduction is worthwhile.

  2. CardioGuard: A Brassiere-Based Reliable ECG Monitoring Sensor System for Supporting Daily Smartphone Healthcare Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Sungjun; Kim, Jeehoon; Kang, Seungwoo; Lee, Youngki; Baek, Hyunjae; Park, Kwangsuk

    2014-01-01

    We propose CardioGuard, a brassiere-based reliable electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring sensor system, for supporting daily smartphone healthcare applications. It is designed to satisfy two key requirements for user-unobtrusive daily ECG monitoring: reliability of ECG sensing and usability of the sensor. The system is validated through extensive evaluations. The evaluation results showed that the CardioGuard sensor reliably measure the ECG during 12 representative daily activities including div...

  3. Age associated differences in prevalence of individual rotterdam criteria and metabolic risk factors during reproductive age in 446 caucasian women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, D; Mumm, H; Ravn, P;

    2012-01-01

    resistance were unchanged between age groups, but glucose levels were significantly higher in older age groups. Rotterdam criteria: The prevalence of PCO and biochemical hyperandrogenism decreased in the oldest age group whereas clinical hyperandrogenism increased. Young patients are characterized by PCO and...... biochemical hyperandrogenism, whereas older patients are more obese with more severe hirsutism and more cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors....

  4. Women's higher health risks in the obesogenic environment: a gender nutrition approach to metabolic dimorphism with predictive, preventive, and personalised medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapira Niva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women's evolution for nurturing and fat accumulation, which historically yielded health and longevity advantages against scarcity, may now be counteracted by increasing risks in the obesogenic environment, recently shown by narrowing gender health gap. Women's differential metabolism/disease risks, i.e. in fat accumulation/distribution, exemplified during puberty/adolescence, suggest gender dimorphism with obesity outcomes. Women's higher body fat percentage than men, even with equal body mass index, may be a better risk predictor. Differential metabolic responses to weight-reduction diets, with women's lower abdominal fat loss, better response to high-protein vs. high-carbohydrate diets, higher risks with sedentariness vs. exercise benefits, and tendency toward delayed manifestation of central obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain cancers until menopause—but accelerated thereafter—suggest a need for differing metabolic and chronological perspectives for prevention/intervention. These perspectives, including women's differential responses to lifestyle changes, strongly support further research with a gender nutrition emphasis within predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine.

  5. Is age-related failure of metabolic reprogramming a principal mediator in idiopathic Parkinson's disease? Implications for treatment and inverse cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Peter A

    2016-08-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective degeneration of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and other vulnerable nervous system regions characterized by extensive axonal arborization and intense energy requirements. Systemic age-related depression of mitochondrial function, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and depressed expression of genes supporting energy homeostasis is more severe in IPD than normal aging such that energy supply may exceed regional demand. In IPD, the overall risk of malignancy is reduced. Cancer is a collection of proliferative diseases marked by malignant transformation, dysregulated mitosis, invasion and metastasis. Many cancers demonstrate normal mitochondrial function, preserved OXPHOS, competent mechanisms of energy homeostasis, and metabolic reprogramming capacities that are lacking in IPD. Metabolic reprogramming adjusts OXPHOS and glycolytic pathways in response to changing metabolic needs. These opposite metabolic features form the basis of a two component hypothesis. First, that depressed mitochondrial function, OXPHOS deficiency and impaired metabolic reprogramming contribute to focal energy failure, neurodegeneration and disease expression in IPD. Second, that the same systemic metabolic deficits inhibit development and proliferation of malignancies in IPD. Studies of mitochondrial aging, familial PD (FPD), the lysosomal storage disorder, Gaucher's disease, Parkinson's disease cybrids, the mitochondrial cytopathies, and disease-related metabolic reprogramming both in IPD and cancer provide support for this model. PMID:27372878

  6. IMPROVEMENT OF CARDIO-RESPIRATORY FUNCTION IN THE ELDERLY USING SOME MARTIAL ARTS EXERCISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cojocariu A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to identify the martial arts exercises which to improve the cardio-respiratory function to the elderly. It was started from the hypothesis that using the psycho-corporal gymnastics exercises (Tam The, it is possible to improve the heart rate, blood pressure and pulmonary elasticity values to the elderly, which would lead to the strengthening of health. In this experiment it was included 8 subjects with normal health status, aged between 55 and 60 years. The experiment was carried out over a period of six months, twice a week, one hour per course. Following the present study, we state the TAM-THE exercises have proven its efficiency in improving the cardio-respiratory function to elderly, especially regarding the improvement of heart rate and systolic blood pressure at rest and also of pulmonary elasticity.

  7. AMP-activated protein kinase and ATP-citrate lyase are two distinct molecular targets for ETC-1002, a novel small molecule regulator of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkosky, Stephen L.; Filippov, Sergey; Srivastava, Rai Ajit K.; Hanselman, Jeffrey C.; Bradshaw, Cheryl D.; Hurley, Timothy R.; Cramer, Clay T.; Spahr, Mark A.; Brant, Ashley F.; Houghton, Jacob L.; Baker, Chris; Naples, Mark; Adeli, Khosrow; Newton, Roger S.

    2013-01-01

    ETC-1002 (8-hydroxy-2,2,14,14-tetramethylpentadecanedioic acid) is a novel investigational drug being developed for the treatment of dyslipidemia and other cardio-metabolic risk factors. The hypolipidemic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-obesity, and glucose-lowering properties of ETC-1002, characterized in preclinical disease models, are believed to be due to dual inhibition of sterol and fatty acid synthesis and enhanced mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation. However, the molecular mechanism(s) mediating these activities remained undefined. Studies described here show that ETC-1002 free acid activates AMP-activated protein kinase in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase β-independent and liver kinase β 1-dependent manner, without detectable changes in adenylate energy charge. Furthermore, ETC-1002 is shown to rapidly form a CoA thioester in liver, which directly inhibits ATP-citrate lyase. These distinct molecular mechanisms are complementary in their beneficial effects on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in vitro and in vivo. Consistent with these mechanisms, ETC-1002 treatment reduced circulating proatherogenic lipoproteins, hepatic lipids, and body weight in a hamster model of hyperlipidemia, and it reduced body weight and improved glycemic control in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. ETC-1002 offers promise as a novel therapeutic approach to improve multiple risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome and benefit patients with cardiovascular disease. PMID:23118444

  8. CardioVilla 2011: congratulations to the health of cardiovascular medicine in Cuba

    OpenAIRE

    Raúl Dueñas Fernández; Alberto Morales Salinas; Rubén Tomás Moro Rodríguez; Jesús A. Satorre Ygualada

    2011-01-01

    In this editorial, some of the most relevant issues dealt with in CardioVilla IV Cardiac Congress 2011 are presented. This congress was held in Santa Clara, Cuba, from October 13th to 15th, 2011. It was sponsored by several scientific societies, including the American Society of Cardiology. A video conference was organized with the representatives of this society. At the conference, the 25th anniversaries of Cardiology Centers Saturmino Lora, William Soler and Ernesto Che Guevara were...

  9. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation challenges in selected Botswana hospitals: Nurse managers’ views

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmi Rajeswaran; Valerie J. Ehlers

    2013-01-01

    Road traffic accident victims, as well as persons experiencing cardiac and other medical emergencies, might lose their lives due to the non-availability of trained personnel to provide effective cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with functional equipment and adequate resources.The objectives of the study were to identify unit managers’ perceptions about challenges encountered when performing CPR interventions in the two referral public hospitals in Botswana. These results could be used to ...

  10. Craniofacial and Dental Development in Cardio-facio-cutaneous Syndrome: The Importance of Ras Signaling Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Alice F.; Oberoi, Snehlata; Landan, Maya; Charles, Cyril; Groth, Jessica; Martinez, Anna; Fairley, Cecilia; Weiss, Lauren A.; Tidyman, William E.; Klein, Ophir D.; Rauen, Katherine A.

    2012-01-01

    Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFC) is a RASopathy that is characterized by craniofacial, dermatologic, gastrointestinal, ocular, cardiac, and neurologic anomalies. CFC is caused by activating mutations in the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway that lies downstream of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. RTK signaling is known to play a central role in craniofacial and dental development, but to date, no studies have systematically examined individuals with C...

  11. Capacidad cardio-respiratoria de niños escolares que viven a moderada altitud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROSSANA GÓMEZ-CAMPOS

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar la capacidad cardio-respiratoria de niños escolares que viven a moderada altitud. Pacientes y Método: Fueron seleccionados 795 niños (394 niños y 401 niñas de escuelas públicas del área urbana de moderada altitud (2.320 msnm de Arequipa, Perú. Se evaluaron variables antropométricas (masa corporal, estatura, porcentaje de grasa y capacidad cardio-respiratoria a través del test indirecto de Course Navette, considerando las siguientes categorías: deficiente, malo, aceptable, bueno, muy bueno y excelente. Resultados: Los resultados muestran diferencias significativas en todas las categorías (p < 0,05. Se verificó que los valores medios de las categorías malo y deficiente en ambos sexos son inferiores a los de la categoría aceptable (p < 0,05. Se determinó que el 19% de niños y 21% de niñas mostraron bajo nivel de capacidad cardio-respiratoria, además se verificó correlación negativa baja con la categoría sobrepeso (r = -0,20 a -0,22 y moderada con la obesidad (r = -0,39 a -0,42 en ambos sexos. Conclusiones: Existen bajos niveles de capacidad cardio-respiratoria en niños de ambos sexos niños escolares que viven a moderada altitud, que se correlaciona negativamente con el exceso de peso corporal. Los resultados sugieren que uno de cada 5 niños se encuentra con posibilidades de padecer algún evento de índole cardiovascular.

  12. Metabolic Syndrome in South African Patients with Severe Mental Illness: Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloojee, Shamima; Burns, Jonathan K; Motala, Ayesha A

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a surge of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Africa. CVD is the leading cause of mortality among patients with severe mental illness (SMI) in developed countries, with little evidence from the African context. Objective To determine the prevalence and risk factors for MetS among South African patients with SMI. Method In a cross sectional study, individuals with SMI treated with antipsychotics and a control group without a mental illness, matched for age, gender and ethnicity were evaluated for MetS using the 2009 Joint Interim statement (JIS) criteria. Results Of the 276 study group subjects, 65.9% were male, 84.1% black African, 9.1% white, 5.4% of Indian descent and 1.5% coloured (mixed race) with a mean age of 34.7 years (±12.5). Schizophrenia was the most common diagnosis (73.2%) and 40% were taking first generation antipsychotics. The prevalence of MetS was 23.2% (M: 15.4%, F: 38.3%) in the study group and 19.9% (M: 11.9%, F: 36.3%) in the control group (p = 0.4). MetS prevalence was significantly higher in study subjects over 55 years compared to controls (p = 0.03). Increased waist circumference (p< 0.001) and low high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (p = 0.003) were significantly more prevalent in study subjects compared to controls. In study subjects, risk factors associated with MetS included age (OR: 1.09, 95% CI 1.06–1.12, p < 0.001), female gender (OR: 2.19, 95% CI 1.06–4.55, p = 0.035) and Indian descent (OR: 5.84, 95% CI 1.66–20.52, p = 0.006) but not class of antipsychotic (p = 0.26). Conclusion The overall MetS prevalence was not increased in patients with SMI compared to controls; however, the higher prevalence of the individual components (HDL cholesterol and waist circumference) suggests an increased risk for CVD, especially in patients over 55 years. PMID:26882230

  13. Insulin resistance, insulin response, and obesity as indicators of metabolic risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrannini, Ele; Balkau, Beverley; Coppack, Simon W;

    2007-01-01

    -cholesterol, and lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and insulin response to higher heart rate, blood pressure and fasting glucose, and the same dyslipidemic profile as IR (P < or = 0.05 for all). By factor analysis, three main factors (related to IR, age, and fatness, respectively) appeared to underlie......CONTEXT: Insulin resistance (IR) and obesity, especially abdominal obesity, are regarded as central pathophysiological features of a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs), but their relative roles remain undefined. Moreover, the differential impact of IR viz. insulin response has not been...... evaluated. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to dissect out the impact of obesity, abdominal obesity, and IR/insulin response on CVRF. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study. SETTING: The study was conducted at 21 research centers in Europe. SUBJECTS: The study included a cohort of 1308...

  14. Metabolic predictors of post-partum disease and culling risk in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Hesam A; Leblanc, Stephen J; Leslie, Ken E; Duffield, Todd F

    2011-05-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to determine the relationship between serum non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA), glucose and calcium (Ca) with the occurrence of displaced abomasum (DA), clinical ketosis and culling in Holstein cows. Eight hundred and forty-nine cows from 16 farms were sampled weekly for the first 3 weeks post-partum. The cows were under clinical observation from calving until 60 days in milk (DIM) and during this time there were 22 cases of DA, 31 cases of clinical ketosis and 39 cows were culled. Elevated concentrations of BHBA were associated with DA, clinical ketosis and culling. In the first week after calving, cows with serum BHBA ≥1000μmol/L had 13.6 times greater odds of developing DA than cows with lower values. Serum NEFA and BHBA concentrations during week 1 were associated with the subsequent occurrence of clinical ketosis. The odds of clinical ketosis were 6.3 times greater in cows with serum NEFA ≥ 1.0mmol/L in the first week after calving. In addition, cows with BHB ≥1200μmol/L in the first week after calving, were at 4.7 times greater risk of developing clinical ketosis. In the first and second weeks after calving the serum Ca concentration was associated with subsequent culling. In addition, cows with NEFA concentration ≥ 1.0mmol/L were 3.6 times more likely to be culled within the following 2 months. The study indicated that early post-partum serum BHBA, NEFA and Ca concentrations have potential as indicators of disease and culling risk in dairy cows. PMID:20457532

  15. Remote heart function monitoring: role of the CardioMEMS HF System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanoli, Emilio; D'Elia, Emilia; La Rovere, Maria T; Gronda, Edoardo

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure is a pandemic condition that is challenging cardiology today. The primary economical and social burden of this syndrome is hospitalization rate whose costs represent the highest ones within the entire healthcare management. Remote monitoring of physiological data, obtained through self-reporting via telephone calls or, automatically, using external devices is a potential novel approach to implement management of patients with heart failure and reduce hospitalization rates. Relatively large but, sometimes, contradicting information exists about the efficacy of remote monitoring via different noninvasive approaches to reduce the economical and social burden of heart failure management. This leaves still partly unaddressed this critical issue and generates the need for new approaches. In this context, the CardioMEMS device that can chronically monitor pulmonary pressures from a small microchip inserted transvenously in the pulmonary artery seems to represent an innovative tool to challenge hospitalization rates. Consecutive analyses from the CHAMPION study had indeed documented the efficacy of the CardioMEMS in the remote monitoring of the pulmonary circulation status of patients with heart failure and in providing adequate information to optimally manage such patients with the final result of a significant hospitalization rate reduction. The striking information here is that this appears to be true in patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction also. Overall, the reports from the CHAMPION study encourage the use of CardioMEMS but larger populations are needed to definitively prove its value. PMID:26881785

  16. CardioGenBase: A Literature Based Multi-Omics Database for Major Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandar V

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs account for high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Both, genetic and epigenetic factors are involved in the enumeration of various cardiovascular diseases. In recent years, a vast amount of multi-omics data are accumulated in the field of cardiovascular research, yet the understanding of key mechanistic aspects of CVDs remain uncovered. Hence, a comprehensive online resource tool is required to comprehend previous research findings and to draw novel methodology for understanding disease pathophysiology. Here, we have developed a literature-based database, CardioGenBase, collecting gene-disease association from Pubmed and MEDLINE. The database covers major cardiovascular diseases such as cerebrovascular disease, coronary artery disease (CAD, hypertensive heart disease, inflammatory heart disease, ischemic heart disease and rheumatic heart disease. It contains ~1,500 cardiovascular disease genes from ~2,4000 research articles. For each gene, literature evidence, ontology, pathways, single nucleotide polymorphism, protein-protein interaction network, normal gene expression, protein expressions in various body fluids and tissues are provided. In addition, tools like gene-disease association finder and gene expression finder are made available for the users with figures, tables, maps and venn diagram to fit their needs. To our knowledge, CardioGenBase is the only database to provide gene-disease association for above mentioned major cardiovascular diseases in a single portal. CardioGenBase is a vital online resource to support genome-wide analysis, genetic, epigenetic and pharmacological studies.

  17. CardioGRID: a framework for the analysis of cardiological signals in GRID computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes the development of the CardioGRID framework into the GRID infrastructure. The core GRID services; Workload Management System (WMS), Data Management System and Grid Authentication have been implemented. Additionally, a web-based tool -the CardioGRID portal- has been developed to facilitate the user interaction with the GRID. As a result, the user is able to process the electrocardiogram (ECG) signals obtained form a portable data acquisition device and to process it on the GRID. Once the CardioGRID portal is prompted and the user identity is verified through a digital X.509 certificate, the operator may either upload new raw ECG data to the GRID Storage Elements or use already stored data. Then, subsequent analytics from these data are performed as GRID jobs and relevant medical quantities are derived through middle-ware job retrieval mechanism. In summary in this paper was described the development of a medical GRID based system, and its integration to an existing platform for Digital Repositories Infrastructure.

  18. Cardio-thoracic surgical patients' experience on bedside nursing handovers: Findings from a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupieri, Giulia; Creatti, Chiara; Palese, Alvisa

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of postoperative cardio-thoracic surgical patients experiencing nursing bedside handover. A descriptive qualitative approach was undertaken. A purposeful sampling technique was adopted, including 14 patients who went through cardio-thoracic surgery and witnessed at least two bedside handovers. The study was performed in a Cardio-thoracic ICU localised in a Joint Commission International accredited Academic Hospital in north-eastern Italy from August to November 2014. The experience of patients participating at the bedside handover is based on four main themes: (1) 'discovering a new nursing identity', (2) 'being apparently engaged in a bedside handover', (3) 'experiencing the paradox of confidentiality' and (4) 'having the situation under control'. With the handover performed at the bedside in a postoperative setting, two interconnected potential effects may be achieved with regard to patients, nurses and the nursing profession. Nurses have a great opportunity to express their closeness to patients and to promote awareness of the important growth that nursing has achieved over the years as a profession and discipline. Therefore, patients may better perceive nursing competence and feel safer during the postoperative care pathway. They can appreciate nurses' humanity in caring and trust their competence and professionalism. PMID:27080568

  19. CardioGRID: a framework for the analysis of cardiological signals in GRID computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco Garcia Eijo, Juan; Risk, Marcelo; Prieto Castrillo, Francisco; Suarez Ortega, Cesar; Boton Fernandez, Maria; Pardo Diaz, Alfonso; Rubio del Solar, Manuel; Ramos Pollan, Raul

    2011-09-01

    The present paper describes the development of the CardioGRID framework into the GRID infrastructure. The core GRID services; Workload Management System (WMS), Data Management System and Grid Authentication have been implemented. Additionally, a web-based tool -the CardioGRID portal- has been developed to facilitate the user interaction with the GRID. As a result, the user is able to process the electrocardiogram (ECG) signals obtained form a portable data acquisition device and to process it on the GRID. Once the CardioGRID portal is prompted and the user identity is verified through a digital X.509 certificate, the operator may either upload new raw ECG data to the GRID Storage Elements or use already stored data. Then, subsequent analytics from these data are performed as GRID jobs and relevant medical quantities are derived through middle-ware job retrieval mechanism. In summary in this paper was described the development of a medical GRID based system, and its integration to an existing platform for Digital Repositories Infrastructure.

  20. Cardio-autonomic control and wellbeing due to oscillating color light exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Vincent; Kelz, Christina; Goswami, Nandu; Stossier, Harald; Tafeit, Erwin; Moser, Maximilian

    2013-04-10

    We investigated the cardio-autonomic and psychological effects of colored light cycling with the wavelength of ultradian rhythms. In two consecutive experiments, an explorative, longitudinal test followed by a randomized crossover design, 20 healthy subjects each were exposed to oscillating red, green and blue light. Heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV) and subjective wellbeing were measured. Significant effects of the oscillating color light exposure were observed for heart rate and cardio-autonomic control rhythms, derived from HRV (p≤.001). These effects on HRV were replicated in the second experiment in comparison to a similar white light exposure protocol (p≤.05). Vigilance showed improvement over the two weeks (p≤.001) in the longitudinal study. External color light cycling at the wavelength of blood pressure oscillations appears to amplify the endogenous autonomic oscillations. This leads to an optimization of cardio-autonomic control; an effect that was reflected shortly after the onset of the light exposure sessions by the increase of heart rate variability. From the results, we conclude that it takes repeated light exposure session to foster the positive effects on the psychological aspects, as we observed an increase of subjectively perceived mood only in the longitudinal study, not for the crossover design study. The results of our study imply some possible health effects of a color light exposure that is adjusted to 10 s and 1 min oscillations of humans' ultradian rhythms. These novel results show possible applications of oscillating visual inputs to the activation of processes connected to physiological regulation. PMID:23506685

  1. Cardio-respiratory symptoms in panic disorder: a contribution from cognitive-behaviour therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lucia Spear King

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia treated with cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT associated with the medication with patients treated only with medication and verify the behaviour of the cardio-respiratory symptoms of both groups. Methods: Randomized sample in the Psychiatry Institute of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, divided in two groups of 25 participants each. Group 1 undertook 10 weekly sessions of CBT with one hour of duration each together with medication. Group 2, Control, were administered medication that only consisted of tricyclic anti-depressants and selective inhibitors of the re-uptake of serotonin. Evaluation instruments were applied at the beginning and to the end of the interventions. Results: According to the applied scales, group 1 showed statistically more significant results than group 2, with: reduction of panic attacks, cardio-respiratory symptoms, anticipatory anxiety, agoraphobia avoidance and fear of bodily sensations. Conclusion: Exposures (in vivo and interoceptive, especially for induction symptom exercises and relaxation, were considered essential to prepare patients with panic disorder to handle future cardio-respiratory symptoms and panic attacks with agoraphobia.

  2. Chronic hepatitis B infection is not associated with increased risk of vascular mortality while having an association with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoonizadeh, Aezam; Ghoroghi, Shima; Sharafkhah, Maryam; Khoshnia, Masoud; Mirzaei, Samaneh; Shayanrad, Amaneh; Poustchi, Hossein; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to assess the association of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) with vascular mortality and metabolic syndrome (MS) using data from a large population-based cohort study in Iran. A total of 12,781 participants (2249 treatment-naïve CHB and 10,532 without CHB) were studied. Logistic regression model was used to assess the association between MS and CHB with adjustment for age, ALT, PLT, alcohol intake, smoking, exercise, and socioeconomic status. MS was defined according to the ATPIII guidelines. Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the hazard ratios for overall and vascular related mortality. There was a significant association between CHB infection and overall mortality (hazard ratio (95%CI) of 1.44 (1.16-1.79), P < 0.001) after adjusting for other confounders. However, we found no association between CHB infection and mortality from vascular events (hazard ratio (95%CI) of 1.31 (0.93-1.84), P = 0.124) even after subgroup analysis by ALT. Furthermore, increased risk of overall mortality in CHB infected individuals was not related to MS and vice versa (P for interaction = 0.06). We noted a significant direct association between CHB infection and MS in women (OR (95%CI); 1.23 (1.07-1.42), P < 0.004). However, CHB was inversely associated with MS in men (OR (95%CI), 0.85 (0.79-0.99). This gender dependent association was related to high BP levels in women. In this study no association between CHB infection and mortality from vascular events was found. Further longitudinal studies should be done to investigate the exact impact of HBV infection on metabolic parameters and vascular pathology. PMID:26742819

  3. Distribution and association of hs-CRP with cardiovascular risk variables of metabolic syndrome in adolescent learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan A. Rensburg

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Metabolic syndrome (MetS and its associated cardiovascular risk are on the increase in children. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP has emerged as a useful marker for inflammation associated with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Our aim was to determine the distribution of hs-CRP in an effort to identify the MetS variable that is critical in modulating plasma CRP levels in a population of South African adolescents. Design: A cross-sectional analytical study design was used for this investigation, where the dependent and independent variables were measured simultaneously.Methods: Anthropometric variables, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose and lipids were performed on 324 consenting learners aged 15–18 years from three different ethnic groups (Black, White and Coloured. The National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III for ages 15–18 year olds was used to define MetS.Results: The prevalence of MetS and obesity was 3.7% and 7.1%, respectively. The hs-CRP levels were significantly higher in subjects with a waist-circumference greater than the 90th percentile (p < 0.01 and in obese learners with MetS, but was lower in adolescents with normal weight and MetS. Median hs-CRP levels increased with an increasing number of metabolic abnormalities and exceeded 3 mg/L in 19% of adolescents. Gender and ethnic differences were observed.Conclusion: Our findings suggest that obesity and waist circumference appear to be major mediators of hs-CRP levels in South African adolescents.

  4. En la población Canaria, la función de Framingham estima mejor el riesgo de mortalidad cardiovascular que la función SCORE Framingham function estimates the risk of cardio vascular mortality more effectively than SCORE function in the population of the Canary Islands (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cabrera de León

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Comparar la estimación de eventos cardiovasculares fatales con las funciones de Framingham y SCORE, además de explorar su capacidad para detectar el riesgo aportado por factores no incluidos en sus ecuaciones: sedentarismo, obesidad, perímetro abdominal, razón abdomen/estatura, razón abdomen/pelvis y consumo excesivo de alcohol. Métodos: Estudio transversal de 5.289 personas, de 30 a 69 años de edad, obtenidas por muestreo aleatorio en la población general de Canarias. Se calibraron las funciones de Framingham y SCORE, y se estimó su concordancia. Se obtuvo, para estas edades, la tasa poblacional de mortalidad cardiovascular y se confrontó con el riesgo predicho por las funciones. Resultados: En los hombres, la tasa de mortalidad por 100.000 habitantes fue de 67,4, en tanto que la estimación de Framingham, SCORE-Low y SCORE-High fue de 80, 140 y 270, respectivamente. En las mujeres, frente a una tasa de 19,3, la estimación fue de 30, 50 y 70, respectivamente. Ambas funciones detectaron el incremento del riesgo aportado por los factores estudiados, con la excepción, en las mujeres, del sedentarismo con SCORE y del consumo excesivo de alcohol con ambas funciones. En los hombres, tomando para Framingham los puntos de corte de >12%, >15% y >20%, la concordancia con SCORE-Low produjo una Kappa de 0,6, 0,7 y 0,5, respectivamente. Conclusiones: La función de Framingham estimó mejor las tasas de mortalidad que la función SCORE. Únicamente la función de Framingham detectó en ambos sexos el riesgo cardiovascular aportado por el sedentarismo. En Canarias recomendamos la aplicación de la función de Framingham calibrada.Introduction: To compare the performance of the Framingham and SCORE functions to estimate fatal cardiovascular events. In addition, we explored the ability of both functions to detect the risk contributed by factors not included in their equations: sedentariness, obesity, abdominal circumference, abdomen

  5. Risk factors and birth prevalence of birth defects and inborn errors of metabolism in Al Ahsa, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Waleed Hamad Al Bu Ali; Magdy Hassan Balaha; Mohammed Saleh Al Moghannum; Ibrahim Hashim

    2011-01-01

    Background Birth defects and inborn errors of metabolism are related to variable poor perinatal and neonatal outcomes. Our aim was to explore the pattern and prevalence of birth defects and metabolic birth errors in Al-Ahsa Governorate in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. Methods This retrospective case control study was done from April 2006 to 2009. Children with any birth defect or metabolic errors of metabolism at birth or in the neonatology section were our sample for study. Control g...

  6. Hypovitaminosis D and Associated Cardiometabolic Risk in Women with PCOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ashok Kumar; Das, Swarnalata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) frequently suffer from metabolic disturbances like insulin resistance, hypertension and atherogenic dyslipidemia. Accumulating evidences suggest that Vitamin D deficiency is common in PCOS and may be associated with metabolic and endocrinal dysfunctions in PCOS. Thus women with PCOS may be at elevated risk of cardiovascular disease. Aim Present study aims to evaluate Vitamin D status and to assess its association with metabolic and endocrinal dysregulations in women with PCOS, which might help in early identification and prevention of future symptomatic cardiac disease. Materials and Methods A total of 44 women with PCOS, diagnosed by Rotterdam criteria and 45 healthy control without PCOS, were evaluated for Vitamin D and cardiometabolic risk factors, including fasting plasma glucose, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hs-CRP. That apart, several endocrinal parameters of hyperandrogenism were also examined. Several correlation studies were determined to establish the role of Vitamin D as a cardiometabolic risk factor in PCOS. Results Results were expressed as mean±SD and were statistically analysed using SPSS software version 16, unpaired student’s t-test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. We found lower levels of Vitamin D, which was statistically significant as compared to healthy controls. Hyperinsulinemia, rise in insulin resistance and marked dyslipidemia was observed in the present study. Another relevant finding was significant correlation of Vitamin D with insulin and Homeostatic Model of Assessment- Insulin Resistance Index (HOMA-IR). Conclusion Hypovitaminosis D was prevalent in PCOS. This was related to metabolic and hormonal disorders in PCOS. Possibly this combined with impaired fasting glucose, IR and dyslipidemia, could account for Cardio vascular risks in PCOS. Further prospective observational studies and randomized control trials are required to explore the above hypothesis. PMID

  7. Genetic polymorphisms in CYP1A1, GSTM1, GSTP1 and GSTT1 metabolic genes and risk of lung cancer in Asturias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolic genes have been associated with the function of metabolizing and detoxifying environmental carcinogens. Polymorphisms present in these genes could lead to changes in their metabolizing and detoxifying ability and thus may contribute to individual susceptibility to different types of cancer. We investigated if the individual and/or combined modifying effects of the CYP1A1 MspI T6235C, GSTM1 present/null, GSTT1 present/null and GSTP1 Ile105Val polymorphisms are related to the risk of developing lung cancer in relation to tobacco consumption and occupation in Asturias, Northern Spain. A hospital-based case–control study (CAPUA Study) was designed including 789 lung cancer patients and 789 control subjects matched in ethnicity, age, sex, and hospital. Genotypes were determined by PCR or PCR-RFLP. Individual and combination effects were analysed using an unconditional logistic regression adjusting for age, pack-years, family history of any cancer and occupation. No statistically significant main effects were observed for the carcinogen metabolism genes in relation to lung cancer risk. In addition, the analysis did not reveal any significant gene-gene, gene-tobacco smoking or gene-occupational exposure interactions relative to lung cancer susceptibility. Lastly, no significant gene-gene combination effects were observed. These results suggest that genetic polymorphisms in the CYP1A1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 metabolic genes were not significantly associated with lung cancer risk in the current study. The results of the analysis of gene-gene interactions of CYP1A1 MspI T6235C, GSTM1 present/null, GSTT1 present/null and GSTP1 Ile105Val polymorphisms in lung cancer risk indicate that these genes do not interact in lung cancer development

  8. Development of Dietary Patterns Spanning Infancy and Toddlerhood: Relation to Body Size, Composition and Metabolic Risk Markers at Three Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise BB Andersen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the development of dietary patterns during toddlerhood and the relation to growth and health. The study objective was to characterise the development of dietary patterns from 9-36 mo of age and investigate the association to body size, body composition and metabolic risk markers at 36 mo. Food records were filled out at 9, 18 and 36 mo of age (n = 229. Dietary patterns were identified by principal component analysis (PCA. Three dietary patterns were identified: Transition Food, Healthy Food and Traditional Food. The course of development in dietary patterns from 9-36 mo indicated tracking for a relatively large group of participants in the three patterns. Transition Food and Healthy Food were associated with some of the investigated outcomes. Children with lower adherence to the Transition Food pattern than average at 18 and 36 mo irrespectively of intake at 9 mo had higher BMI z-scores at 36 mo. Similar trend was identified for higher fat mass indices. Children with lower adherence to the Healthy Food pattern than average at all three ages compared to children with higher adherence to the Healthy Food pattern at the first two registrations, 9 and 18 mo had higher total cholesterol and LDL. Hence, this could represent undesirable development of dietary patterns in toddlers. In conclusion, development of dietary patterns can be exploratory characterised by PCA and related to potential cardiovascular risk markers in toddlers even within a relatively homogeneous population with a high socioeconomic status. The tracking of dietary patterns from 9 mo of age indicates a need for early and sustained promotion of healthy diets.

  9. Síndrome metabólica: identificando fatores de risco Metabolic syndrome: identifying the risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simão Augusto Lottenberg

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS Discutir a síndrome metabólica e a identificação de seus fatores de risco, inclusive na faixa etária pediátrica. FONTES DE DADOS: Artigos de revisão indexados. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS:A síndrome metabólica caracteriza-se pela resistência à insulina e pela presença de fatores de risco para doenças cardiovasculares e diabetes melito tipo 2. Não existe ainda um consenso com relação a seus critérios diagnósticos. Na presente revisão, os critérios diagnósticos da Associação Americana de Cardiologia (US National Cholesterol Education Program, Associação Americana de Endocrinologistas Clínicos, Organização Mundial da Saúde e Federação Internacional de Diabetes são apresentados, e as possibilidades de aplicação dos mesmos na infância são discutidas. São também abordados os aspectos fisiopatológicos da síndrome, principalmente aqueles relacionados ao período perinatal e à infância. CONCLUSÃO: A síndrome metabólica tem sido identificada de forma cada vez mais freqüente, principalmente durante a adolescência. Mudanças de estilo de vida, como alimentação e atividade física, são fundamentais na sua prevenção e tratamento. Tratamento medicamentoso e, eventualmente, tratamento cirúrgico também devem ser considerados, dependendo da gravidade, mesmo nesta fase da vida.OBJECTIVES: To discuss the metabolic syndrome and identify its risk factors, including in the pediatric age group. SOURCES: Indexed review articles. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: The metabolic syndrome is characterized by insulin resistance and the presence of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus type 2. Consensus has not yet been reached on its diagnostic criteria. This review presents diagnostic criteria defined by the American Heart Association (US National Cholesterol Education Program, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the World Health Organization and the International Diabetes Federation

  10. The cutoff values of visceral fat area and waist circumference for identifying subjects at risk for metabolic syndrome in elderly Korean: Ansan Geriatric (AGE cohort study

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    Koh Young

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Korea, the cutoff values of waist circumference (WC for the identification of metabolic syndrome (MetS were suggested to be 90 cm for men and 85 cm for women based on the analysis mainly in middle-aged adults. As aging is associated with increased fat, especially abdominal visceral fat, the cutoff value of WC may differ according to age. In addition, the usefulness of visceral abdominal fat area (VFA to predict MetS in the elderly has not been studied yet. We aimed to suggest WC and VFA criteria and to compare the predictability of WC and VFA to identify people at risk for MetS. Methods A total of 689 elderly subjects aged ≥63 years (308 men, 381 women were chosen in this cross-sectional study from an ongoing, prospective, population-based study, the Ansan Geriatric (AGE cohort study. VFA was measured by single slice abdominal computed tomography scanning. The metabolic risk factors except WC (plasma glucose, blood pressure, serum triglycerides and HDL cholesterol levels were defined using modified NCEP-ATP III criteria. We estimated the accuracy of VFA and WC for identifying at least two of these factors by receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis. Results Two hundred three of 308 men and 280 of 381 women had ≥2 metabolic risk factors. The area under the ROC curve (AUC value for VFA to predict the presence of ≥2 metabolic risk factors was not significantly different from that for WC (men, 0.735 and 0.750; women, 0.715 and 0.682; AUC values for VFA and WC, respectively. The optimal cutoff points for VFA and WC for predicting the presence of ≥2 metabolic risk factors were 92.6 cm2 and 86.5 cm for men and 88.9 cm2 and 86.5 cm for women. Conclusion WC had comparable power with VFA to identify elderly people who are at risk for MetS. Elderly Korean men and women had very similar cutoff points for both VFA and WC measurements for estimating the risk of MetS. Age-specific cutoff point for WC might be

  11. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Murcia Region, a southern European Mediterranean area with low cardiovascular risk and high obesity

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    Huerta José M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome (MS is associated with subsequent appearance of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. As compared to other Spanish regions, Murcia (southern Spain registers increased obesity as well as cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of MS and its components, awareness of obesity as a health risk and associated lifestyles. Methods A population-based, cross-sectional study was conducted in 2003, covering a sample of 1555 individuals 20 years and over. MS was defined according to the Revised National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (R-ATPIII, International Diabetes Federation (IDF and Joint Interim Statement (JIS criteria. Both low (94/80 and high (102/88 waist circumference (WC thresholds were considered. Results Prevalence of MS was 27.2% (95%CI: 25.2-29.2, 32.2% (95%CI: 30.1-34.3 and 33.2% (95%CI: 31.2-35.3 according to the R-ATPIII, IDF and JIS94/80 respectively. It increased with age until reaching 52.6% (R-ATPIII or 60.3% (JIS94/80 among persons aged 70 years and over, and was higher in persons with little or no formal education (51.7% R-ATPIII, 57.3% JIS94/80. The most common risk factors were hypertension (46.6% and central obesity (40.7% and 66.1% according to high and low WC cut-off points respectively. Although most persons were aware that obesity increased health risks, regular exercise was very unusual (13.0% centrally obese, 27.2% non-centrally obese. Adherence to dietary recommendations was similar among centrally obese and non-centrally obese subjects. Conclusions Prevalence of MS is high in our population, is comparable to that found in northern Europe and varies with the definition used. Adherence to preventive recommendations and to adequate weight promotion is very low. In the absence of a specific treatment for MS, integrated intervention based on a sustained increase in physical activity and changes in diet should be

  12. Different physical activity subtypes and risk of metabolic syndrome in middle-aged and older Chinese people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS is growing rapidly in China. Tai chi and dancing are common types of exercise among middle-aged and elderly Chinese. It remains unclear whether these activities are associated with a lower risk of MetS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 15,514 individuals (6,952 men, 8,562 women aged 50 to 70 years from the Dongfeng-Tongji Cohort in Shiyan, China participated in a cross-sectional study. Physical activity and other lifestyle factors were assessed with semi-structured questionnaires during face-to-face interviews. MetS was defined by the current National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult treatment Panel III criteria for Asian Americans. The prevalence of MetS was 33.2% in the study population. In the multivariable-adjusted logistic regression analyses, total physical activity levels were monotonically associated with a lower odds of MetS [OR 0.75 comparing extreme quintiles, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.66-0.86, P<0.001]. Compared with non-exercisers in a specific exercise type, jogging (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.68-1.00, P = 0.046, tai chi (OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.60-0.88, P<0.001, and dancing (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.47-0.67, P<0.001 were associated with significantly lower odds of MetS. Furthermore, each 1-h/week increment in tai chi and dancing was associated with a 5% (95% CI 2%-9% and a 9% (95% CI 6%, 12% lower risk of MetS. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Jogging, tai chi and dancing are associated with a significantly lower risk of having MetS in middle-aged and older Chinese. Future intervention studies should consider the role of jogging, tai chi and dancing in preventing MetS.

  13. Regular consumption of pulses for 8 weeks reduces metabolic syndrome risk factors in overweight and obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollard, R C; Luhovyy, B L; Panahi, S; Nunez, M; Hanley, A; Anderson, G H

    2012-08-01

    Pulses are low in energy density, supporting their inclusion in the diet for the management of risk factors of the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn). The aim of the present study was to describe the effects of frequent consumption (five cups/week over 8 weeks) of pulses (yellow peas, chickpeas, navy beans and lentils), compared with counselling to reduce energy intake by 2093 kJ/d (500 kcal/d), on risk factors of the MetSyn in two groups (nineteen and twenty-one subjects, respectively) of overweight or obese (mean BMI 32·8 kg/m2) adults. Body weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting blood parameters and 24 h food intakes were measured at weeks 1, 4 and 8. Blood glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and ghrelin were measured after a 75 g oral glucose load at weeks 1 and 8. At week 8, both groups reported reductions in energy intake, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, glycosylated Hb (HbA1c) and glucose AUC and homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) following the glucose load (P < 0·05). However, HDL, fasting C-peptide and insulin AUC responses were dependent on diet (P < 0·05). HDL and C-peptide increased by 4·5 and 12·3 %, respectively, in the pulse group, but decreased by 0·8 and 7·6 %, respectively, in the energy-restricted group. Insulin AUC decreased in both females and males on the energy-restricted diet by 24·2 and 4·8 %, respectively, but on the pulse diet it decreased by 13·9 % in females and increased by 27·3 % in males (P < 0·05). In conclusion, frequent consumption of pulses in an ad libitum diet reduced risk factors of the MetSyn and these effects were equivalent, and in some instances stronger, than counselling for dietary energy reduction. PMID:22916807

  14. Genetic markers of inflammation may not contribute to metabolic traits in Mexican children

    OpenAIRE

    Vashi, Neeti; Stryjecki, Carolina; Peralta-Romero, Jesus; Suarez, Fernando; Gomez-Zamudio, Jaime; Ana I. Burguete-Garcia; Cruz, Miguel; Meyre, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Low-grade chronic inflammation is a common feature of obesity and its cardio-metabolic complications. However, little is known about a possible causal role of inflammation in metabolic disorders. Mexico is among the countries with the highest obesity rates in the world and the admixed Mexican population is a relevant sample due to high levels of genetic diversity. Methods: Here, we studied 1,462 Mexican children recruited from Mexico City. Six genetic variants in five inflammation...

  15. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If you already have metabolic syndrome, making these healthy lifestyle choices can help reduce your risk of heart disease and other health problems. If lifestyle changes alone can’t control your ... to help. Maintain a healthy weight Your doctor can measure your body mass ...

  16. Tobacco smoking, polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism enzyme genes, and risk of localized and advanced prostate cancer: results from the California Collaborative Prostate Cancer Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between tobacco smoking and prostate cancer (PCa) remains inconclusive. This study examined the association between tobacco smoking and PCa risk taking into account polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism enzyme genes as possible effect modifiers (9 polymorphisms and 1 predicted phenotype from metabolism enzyme genes). The study included cases (n = 761 localized; n = 1199 advanced) and controls (n = 1139) from the multiethnic California Collaborative Case–Control Study of Prostate Cancer. Multivariable conditional logistic regression was performed to evaluate the association between tobacco smoking variables and risk of localized and advanced PCa risk. Being a former smoker, regardless of time of quit smoking, was associated with an increased risk of localized PCa (odds ratio [OR] = 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0–1.6). Among non-Hispanic Whites, ever smoking was associated with an increased risk of localized PCa (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.1–2.1), whereas current smoking was associated with risk of advanced PCa (OR = 1.4; 95% CI = 1.0–1.9). However, no associations were observed between smoking intensity, duration or pack-year variables, and advanced PCa. No statistically significant trends were seen among Hispanics or African-Americans. The relationship between smoking status and PCa risk was modified by the CYP1A2 rs7662551 polymorphism (P-interaction = 0.008). In conclusion, tobacco smoking was associated with risk of PCa, primarily localized disease among non-Hispanic Whites. This association was modified by a genetic variant in CYP1A2, thus supporting a role for tobacco carcinogens in PCa risk

  17. Effects of Korean Red Ginseng on Cardiovascular Risks in Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome: a Double-blind Randomized Controlled Study

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Byoung-Jin; Lee, Yong-Jae; Lee, Hye-Ree; Jung, Dong-Hyuk; Na, Ha-Young; Kim, Hong-Bae; Shim, Jae-Yong

    2012-01-01

    Background This study investigated the effects of Korean red ginseng (KRG) supplementation on metabolic parameters, inflammatory markers, and arterial stiffness in subjects with metabolic syndrome. Methods We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-center study in 60 subjects who were not taking drugs that could affect metabolic and vascular functions. Subjects were randomized into either a KRG (4.5 g/d) group or a placebo group for a 12-week study. We collected anthr...

  18. Metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogia Atul

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The Metabolic syndrome is a widely prevalent and multi-factorial disorder. The syndrome has been given several names, including- the metabolic syndrome, the insulin resistance syndrome, the plurimetabolic syndrome, and the deadly quartet. With the formulation of NCEP/ATP III guidelines, some uniformity and standardization has occurred in the definition of metabolic syndrome and has been very useful for epidemiological purposes. The mechanisms underlying the metabolic syndrome are not fully known; however resistance to insulin stimulated glucose uptake seems to modify biochemical responses in a way that predisposes to metabolic risk factors. The clinical relevance of the metabolic syndrome is related to its role in the development of cardiovascular disease. Management of the metabolic syndrome involves patient-education and intervention at various levels. Weight reduction is one of the main stays of treatment. In this article we comprehensively discuss this syndrome- the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical relevance and management. The need to do a comprehensive review of this particular syndrome has arisen in view of the ever increasing incidence of this entitiy. Soon, metabolic syndrome will overtake cigarette smoking as the number one risk factor for heart disease among the US population. Hardly any issue of any primary care medical journal can be opened without encountering an article on type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia or hypertension. It is rare to see type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity or hypertension in isolation. Insulin resistance and resulting hyperinsulinemia have been implicated in the development of glucose intolerance (and progression to type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, polycystic ovary yndrome, hypercoagulability and vascular inflammation, as well as the eventual development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease manifested as myocardial infarction, stroke and myriad end organ diseases. Conversely

  19. Impact of early psychosocial factors (childhood socioeconomic factors and adversities) on future risk of type 2 diabetes, metabolic disturbances and obesity: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Tamayo Teresa; Christian Herder; Rathmann Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Psychological factors and socioeconomic status (SES) have a notable impact on health disparities, including type 2 diabetes risk. However, the link between childhood psychosocial factors, such as childhood adversities or parental SES, and metabolic disturbances is less well established. In addition, the lifetime perspective including adult socioeconomic factors remains of further interest. We carried out a systematic review with the main question if there is evidence in po...

  20. A randomized controlled trial of an exercise intervention targeting cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors for prostate cancer patients from the RADAR trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androgen deprivation therapy leads to a number of adverse effects including deterioration of the musculoskeletal system and increased risk factors for cardiovascular and metabolic complications. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects, efficacy, retention and compliance of a physical exercise intervention in a large established cohort of prostate cancer patients from the Randomised Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy (RADAR) study. Specifically, we aim to compare short- and long-term effects of a prostate cancer-specific supervised exercise program to a standard public health physical activity strategy utilizing printed resources on cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors. Our primary outcomes are cardiorespiratory capacity, abdominal obesity, and lipid and glycemic control, while secondary outcomes include self-reported physical activity, quality of life and psychological distress. Multi-site randomized controlled trial of 370 men from the RADAR study cohort undergoing treatment or previously treated for prostate cancer involving androgen deprivation therapy in the cities of Perth and Newcastle (Australia), and Wellington (New Zealand). Participants will be randomized to (1) supervised resistance/aerobic exercise or (2) printed material comprising general physical activity recommendations. Participants will then undergo progressive training for 6 months. Measurements for primary and secondary endpoints will take place at baseline, 6 months (end of intervention), and at 6 months follow-up. This study uses a large existent cohort of patients and will generate valuable information as to the continuing effects of exercise specifically targeting cardiovascular function and disease risk, insulin metabolism, abdominal obesity, physical function, quality of life and psychological distress. We expect dissemination of the knowledge gained from this project to reduce risk factors for the development of co-morbid diseases commonly associated with androgen

  1. A randomized controlled trial of an exercise intervention targeting cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors for prostate cancer patients from the RADAR trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph David

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgen deprivation therapy leads to a number of adverse effects including deterioration of the musculoskeletal system and increased risk factors for cardiovascular and metabolic complications. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects, efficacy, retention and compliance of a physical exercise intervention in a large established cohort of prostate cancer patients from the Randomised Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy (RADAR study. Specifically, we aim to compare short- and long-term effects of a prostate cancer-specific supervised exercise program to a standard public health physical activity strategy utilizing printed resources on cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors. Our primary outcomes are cardiorespiratory capacity, abdominal obesity, and lipid and glycemic control, while secondary outcomes include self-reported physical activity, quality of life and psychological distress. Methods/Design Multi-site randomized controlled trial of 370 men from the RADAR study cohort undergoing treatment or previously treated for prostate cancer involving androgen deprivation therapy in the cities of Perth and Newcastle (Australia, and Wellington (New Zealand. Participants will be randomized to (1 supervised resistance/aerobic exercise or (2 printed material comprising general physical activity recommendations. Participants will then undergo progressive training for 6 months. Measurements for primary and secondary endpoints will take place at baseline, 6 months (end of intervention, and at 6 months follow-up. Discussion This study uses a large existent cohort of patients and will generate valuable information as to the continuing effects of exercise specifically targeting cardiovascular function and disease risk, insulin metabolism, abdominal obesity, physical function, quality of life and psychological distress. We expect dissemination of the knowledge gained from this project to reduce risk factors for the

  2. Randomized controlled trial of the efficacy of aerobic exercise in reducing metabolic risk in healthy older people: The Hertfordshire Physical Activity Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp Stephen J; Sleigh Alison; Rolfe Ema; Horton Kenneth; Besson Hervé; Brage Soren; Savage David B; Purslow Lisa R; Horton Jessica; Finucane Francis M; Martin Helen J; Sayer Avan; Cooper Cyrus; Ekelund Ulf; Griffin Simon J

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background While there are compelling observational data confirming that individuals who exercise are healthier, the efficacy of aerobic exercise interventions to reduce metabolic risk and improve insulin sensitivity in older people has not been fully elucidated. Furthermore, while low birth weight has been shown to predict adverse health outcomes later in life, its influence on the response to aerobic exercise is unknown. Our primary objective is to assess the efficacy of a fully su...

  3. Effects of a Brown Beans Evening Meal on Metabolic Risk Markers and Appetite Regulating Hormones at a Subsequent Standardized Breakfast: A Randomized Cross-Over Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Anne; Johansson, Elin; Ekström, Linda; Björck, Inger

    2013-01-01

    Background Dietary prevention strategies are increasingly recognized as essential to combat the current epidemic of obesity and related metabolic disorders. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential prebiotic effects of indigestible carbohydrates in Swedish brown beans (Phaseolus vulgaris var. nanus) in relation to cardiometabolic risk markers and appetite regulating hormones. Methods Brown beans, or white wheat bread (WWB, reference product) were provided as evening meal...

  4. The genetics of folate metabolism and maternal risk of birth of a child with Down syndrome and associated congenital heart defects

    OpenAIRE

    Coppedè, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Almost 15 years ago it was hypothesized that polymorphisms of genes encoding enzymes involved in folate metabolism could lead to aberrant methylation of peri-centromeric regions of chromosome 21, favoring its abnormal segregation during maternal meiosis. Subsequently, more than 50 small case-control studies investigated whether or not maternal polymorphisms of folate pathway genes could be risk factors for the birth of a child with Down syndrome (DS), yielding conflicting and inconclusive res...

  5. Ultrasound-Derived Abdominal Muscle Thickness Better Detects Metabolic Syndrome Risk in Obese Patients than Skeletal Muscle Index Measured by Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry

    OpenAIRE

    Ayumi Ido; Yuki Nakayama; Kojiro Ishii; Motoyuki Iemitsu; Koji Sato; Masahiro Fujimoto; Toshiyuki Kurihara; Takafumi Hamaoka; Noriko Satoh-Asahara; Kiyoshi Sanada

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia has never been diagnosed based on site-specific muscle loss, and little is known about the relationship between site-specific muscle loss and metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk factors. To this end, this cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the relationship between site-specific muscle size and MetS risk factors. Subjects were 38 obese men and women aged 40-82 years. Total body fat and lean body mass were assessed by whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Muscle ...

  6. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices on Lifestyle and Cardiovascular Risk Factors Among Metabolic Syndrome Patients in an Urban Tertiary Care Institute in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekara, Priyanwada; de Silva, Angela; Swarnamali, Hasinthi; Senarath, Upul; Katulanda, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a significant predictor of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). A pretested questionnaire was used to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practice (KAP) of CVD and its risks among Sri Lankan urban adults (35-55 years) with MetS. KAP scores were predefined as high, moderate, and low. Of the participants (n = 423), 13% were males and 87% were females. Attitudes scores were high among this population, though their knowledge and practices scores on CVD risk factors were moderate. Participants with high mean knowledge scores had significantly lower waist circumference (WC) and showed a trend toward reduced fasting blood glucose levels. Participants with high practice scores had significantly lower BMI and WC, which signify that better knowledge and practices are associated with decrease in CVD risk markers in these patients. The study reveals that urban MetS patients have a moderate knowledge and practice score, though their attitude score is high regarding CVD risk factors. PMID:26512029

  7. Effect of a 21 day Daniel Fast on metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk factors in men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloomer Richard J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary modification via caloric restriction is associated with multiple effects related to improved