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Sample records for cardiac titin properties

  1. Acute exercise modifies titin phosphorylation and increases cardiac myofilament stiffness

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    Anna Eliane Müller

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Titin-based myofilament stiffness is largely modulated by phosphorylation of its elastic I-band regions N2-Bus (decreases passive stiffness, PT and PEVK (increases PT. Here, we tested the hypothesis that acute exercise changes titin phosphorylation and modifies myofilament stiffness. Adult rats were exercised on a treadmill for 15min, untrained animals served as controls. Titin phosphorylation was determined by Western blot analysis using phosphospecific antibodies to Ser4099 and Ser4010 in the N2-Bus region (PKG and PKA-dependent. respectively, and to Ser11878 and Ser 12022 in the PEVK region (PKCα and CaMKIIδ-dependent, respectively. Passive tension was determined by step-wise stretching of isolated skinned cardiomyocytes to sarcomere length ranging from 1.9-2.4µm and showed a significantly increased PT from exercised samples, compared to controls. In cardiac samples titin N2-Bus phosphorylation was significantly decreased by 40% at Ser4099, however, no significant changes were observed at Ser4010. PEVK phosphorylation at Ser11878 was significantly increased, which is probably mediated by the observed exercise-induced increase in PKCα activity. Interestingly, relative phosphorylation of Ser12022 was substantially decreased in the exercised samples. Surprisingly, in skeletal samples from acutely exercised animals we detected a significant decrease in PEVK phosphorylation at Ser11878 and an increase in Ser12022 phosphorylation; however, PKCα activity remained unchanged. In summary, our data show that a single exercise bout of 15 min affects titin domain phosphorylation and titin-based myocyte stiffness with obviously divergent effects in cardiac and skeletal muscle tissues. The observed changes in titin stiffness could play an important role in adapting the passive and active properties of the myocardium and the skeletal muscle to increased physical activity.

  2. Titin isoform variance and length dependence of activation in skinned bovine cardiac muscle.

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    Fukuda, Norio; Wu, Yiming; Farman, Gerrie; Irving, Thomas C; Granzier, Henk

    2003-11-15

    We have explored the role of the giant elastic protein titin in the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart by measuring the sarcomere length (SL) dependence of activation in skinned cardiac muscles with different titin-based passive stiffness characteristics. We studied muscle from the bovine left ventricle (BLV), which expresses a high level of a stiff titin isoform, and muscle from the bovine left atrium (BLA), which expresses more compliant titin isoforms. Passive tension was also varied in each muscle type by manipulating the pre-history of stretch prior to activation. We found that the SL-dependent increases in Ca2+ sensitivity and maximal Ca2+-activated tension were markedly more pronounced when titin-based passive tension was high. Small-angle X-ray diffraction experiments revealed that the SL dependence of reduction of interfilament lattice spacing is greater in BLV than in BLA and that the lattice spacing is coupled with titin-based passive tension. These results support the notion that titin-based passive tension promotes actomyosin interaction by reducing the lattice spacing. This work indicates that titin may be a factor involved in the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart by promoting actomyosin interaction in response to stretch.

  3. Rare Titin (TTN Variants in Diseases Associated with Sudden Cardiac Death

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    Oscar Campuzano

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A leading cause of death in western countries is sudden cardiac death, and can be associated with genetic disease. Next-generation sequencing has allowed thorough analysis of genes associated with this entity, including, most recently, titin. We aimed to identify potentially pathogenic genetic variants in titin. A total of 1126 samples were analyzed using a custom sequencing panel including major genes related to sudden cardiac death. Our cohort was divided into three groups: 432 cases from patients with cardiomyopathies, 130 cases from patients with channelopathies, and 564 post-mortem samples from individuals showing anatomical healthy hearts and non-conclusive causes of death after comprehensive autopsy. None of the patients included had definite pathogenic variants in the genes analyzed by our custom cardio-panel. Retrospective analysis comparing the in-house database and available public databases also was performed. We identified 554 rare variants in titin, 282 of which were novel. Seven were previously reported as pathogenic. Of these 554 variants, 493 were missense variants, 233 of which were novel. Of all variants identified, 399 were unique and 155 were identified at least twice. No definite pathogenic variants were identified in any of genes analyzed. We identified rare, mostly novel, titin variants that seem to play a potentially pathogenic role in sudden cardiac death. Additional studies should be performed to clarify the role of these variants in sudden cardiac death.

  4. Titin isoform switching is a major cardiac adaptive response in hibernating grizzly bears.

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    Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T; Wu, Yiming; Granzier, Henk

    2008-07-01

    The hibernation phenomenon captures biological as well as clinical interests to understand how organs adapt. Here we studied how hibernating grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) tolerate extremely low heart rates without developing cardiac chamber dilation. We evaluated cardiac filling function in unanesthetized grizzly bears by echocardiography during the active and hibernating period. Because both collagen and titin are involved in altering diastolic function, we investigated both in the myocardium of active and hibernating grizzly bears. Heart rates were reduced from 84 beats/min in active bears to 19 beats/min in hibernating bears. Diastolic volume, stroke volume, and left ventricular ejection fraction were not different. However, left ventricular muscle mass was significantly lower (300 +/- 12 compared with 402 +/- 14 g; P = 0.003) in the hibernating bears, and as a result the diastolic volume-to-left ventricular muscle mass ratio was significantly greater. Early ventricular filling deceleration times (106.4 +/- 14 compared with 143.2 +/- 20 ms; P = 0.002) were shorter during hibernation, suggesting increased ventricular stiffness. Restrictive pulmonary venous flow patterns supported this conclusion. Collagen type I and III comparisons did not reveal differences between the two groups of bears. In contrast, the expression of titin was altered by a significant upregulation of the stiffer N2B isoform at the expense of the more compliant N2BA isoform. The mean ratio of N2BA to N2B titin was 0.73 +/- 0.07 in the active bears and decreased to 0.42 +/- 0.03 (P = 0.006) in the hibernating bears. The upregulation of stiff N2B cardiac titin is a likely explanation for the increased ventricular stiffness that was revealed by echocardiography, and we propose that it plays a role in preventing chamber dilation in hibernating grizzly bears. Thus our work identified changes in the alternative splicing of cardiac titin as a major adaptive response in hibernating grizzly

  5. Tampering with springs: phosphorylation of titin affecting the mechanical function of cardiomyocytes.

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    Hamdani, Nazha; Herwig, Melissa; Linke, Wolfgang A

    2017-06-01

    Reversible post-translational modifications of various cardiac proteins regulate the mechanical properties of the cardiomyocytes and thus modulate the contractile performance of the heart. The giant protein titin forms a continuous filament network in the sarcomeres of striated muscle cells, where it determines passive tension development and modulates active contraction. These mechanical properties of titin are altered through post-translational modifications, particularly phosphorylation. Titin contains hundreds of potential phosphorylation sites, the functional relevance of which is only beginning to emerge. Here, we provide a state-of-the-art summary of the phosphorylation sites in titin, with a particular focus on the elastic titin spring segment. We discuss how phosphorylation at specific amino acids can reduce or increase the stretch-induced spring force of titin, depending on where the spring region is phosphorylated. We also review which protein kinases phosphorylate titin and how this phosphorylation affects titin-based passive tension in cardiomyocytes. A comprehensive overview is provided of studies that have measured altered titin phosphorylation and titin-based passive tension in myocardial samples from human heart failure patients and animal models of heart disease. As our understanding of the broader implications of phosphorylation in titin progresses, this knowledge could be used to design targeted interventions aimed at reducing pathologically increased titin stiffness in patients with stiff hearts.

  6. M line-deficient titin causes cardiac lethality through impaired maturation of the sarcomere.

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    Weinert, S.; Bergmann, N.; Luo, X.; Erdmann, B.; Gotthardt, M.

    2006-01-01

    Titin, the largest protein known to date, has been linked to sarcomere assembly and function through its elastic adaptor and signaling domains. Titin's M-line region contains a unique kinase domain that has been proposed to regulate sarcomere assembly via its substrate titin cap (T-cap). In this

  7. The link between exercise and titin passive stiffness.

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    Lalande, Sophie; Mueller, Patrick J; Chung, Charles S

    2017-09-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review focuses on how in vivo and molecular measurements of cardiac passive stiffness can predict exercise tolerance and how exercise training can reduce cardiac passive stiffness. What advances does it highlight? This review highlights advances in understanding the relationship between molecular (titin-based) and in vivo (left ventricular) passive stiffness, how passive stiffness modifies exercise tolerance, and how exercise training may be therapeutic for cardiac diseases with increased passive stiffness. Exercise can help alleviate the negative effects of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular co-morbidities associated with sedentary behaviour; this may be especially true in diseases that are associated with increased left ventricular passive stiffness. In this review, we discuss the inverse relationship between exercise tolerance and cardiac passive stiffness. Passive stiffness is the physical property of cardiac muscle to produce a resistive force when stretched, which, in vivo, is measured using the left ventricular end diastolic pressure-volume relationship or is estimated using echocardiography. The giant elastic protein titin is the major contributor to passive stiffness at physiological muscle (sarcomere) lengths. Passive stiffness can be modified by altering titin isoform size or by post-translational modifications. In both human and animal models, increased left ventricular passive stiffness is associated with reduced exercise tolerance due to impaired diastolic filling, suggesting that increased passive stiffness predicts reduced exercise tolerance. At the same time, exercise training itself may induce both short- and long-term changes in titin-based passive stiffness, suggesting that exercise may be a treatment for diseases associated with increased passive stiffness. Direct modification of passive stiffness to improve exercise tolerance is a potential therapeutic approach. Titin passive stiffness itself may

  8. Titin Diversity—Alternative Splicing Gone Wild

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    Wei Guo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Titin is an extremely large protein found in highest concentrations in heart and skeletal muscle. The single mammalian gene is expressed in multiple isoforms as a result of alternative splicing. Although titin isoform expression is controlled developmentally and in a tissue specific manner, the vast number of potential splicing pathways far exceeds those described in any other alternatively spliced gene. Over 1 million human splice pathways for a single individual can be potentially derived from the PEVK region alone. A new splicing pattern for the human cardiac N2BA isoform type has been found in which the PEVK region includes only the N2B type exons. The alterations in splicing and titin isoform expression in human heart disease provide impetus for future detailed study of the splicing mechanisms for this giant protein.

  9. Shiver me titin! Elucidating titin's role in shivering thermogenesis.

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    Taylor-Burt, Kari R; Monroy, Jenna; Pace, Cinnamon; Lindstedt, Stan; Nishikawa, Kiisa C

    2015-03-01

    Shivering frequency scales predictably with body mass and is 10 times higher in a mouse than a moose. The link between shivering frequency and body mass may lie in the tuning of muscle elastic properties. Titin functions as a muscle 'spring', so shivering frequency may be linked to titin's structure. The muscular dystrophy with myositis (mdm) mouse is characterized by a deletion in titin's N2A region. Mice that are homozygous for the mdm mutation have a lower body mass, stiffer gait and reduced lifespan compared with their wild-type and heterozygous siblings. We characterized thermoregulation in these mice by measuring metabolic rate and tremor frequency during shivering. Mutants were heterothermic at ambient temperatures of 20-37°C while wild-type and heterozygous mice were homeothermic. Metabolic rate increased at smaller temperature differentials (i.e. the difference between body and ambient temperatures) in mutants than in non-mutants. The difference between observed tremor frequencies and shivering frequencies predicted by body mass was significantly larger for mutant mice than for wild-type or heterozygous mice, even after accounting for differences in body temperature. Together, the heterothermy in mutants, the increase in metabolic rate at low temperature differentials and the decreased tremor frequency demonstrate the thermoregulatory challenges faced by mice with the mdm mutation. Oscillatory frequency is proportional to the square root of stiffness, and we observed that mutants had lower active muscle stiffness in vitro. The lower tremor frequencies in mutants are consistent with reduced active muscle stiffness and suggest that titin affects the tuning of shivering frequency. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Clinical evaluation of a matrix metalloproteinase-12 cleaved fragment of titin as a cardiovascular-specific serological biomarker

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    Vassiliadis, Efstathios; Melholt Rasmussen, Lars; Byrjalsen, Inger

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Titin is a muscle-specific protein found in cardiac and skeletal muscles which is responsible for restoring passive tension. Levels and functioning of titin have been shown to be affected by cardiac damage. Due to the inherent difficulty of measuring titin levels in vivo...... in a clinical setting, we aimed to develop an assay that could reliably measure fragments of degraded titin in serum and potentially be used in the assessment of cardiac muscle damage. METHODS: A competitive ELISA was developed to specifically measure levels of the titin sequence 12670' NVTVEARLIK 12679......', derived by the degradation of titin by matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12. Serum samples from 90 individuals were divided into 3 equally sized groups. One group had been diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) while the remaining two were asymptomatic individuals either with CT-scan signs...

  11. The role of titin in eccentric muscle contraction.

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    Herzog, Walter

    2014-08-15

    Muscle contraction and force regulation in skeletal muscle have been thought to occur exclusively through the relative sliding of and the interaction between the contractile filaments actin and myosin. While this two-filament sarcomere model has worked well in explaining the properties of isometrically and concentrically contracting muscle, it has failed miserably in explaining experimental observations in eccentric contractions. Here, I suggest, and provide evidence, that a third filament, titin, is involved in force regulation of sarcomeres by adjusting its stiffness in an activation-dependent (calcium) and active force-dependent manner. Upon muscle activation, titin binds calcium at specific sites, thereby increasing its stiffness, and cross-bridge attachment to actin is thought to free up binding sites for titin on actin, thereby reducing titin's free-spring length, thus increasing its stiffness and force upon stretch of active muscle. This role of titin as a third force regulating myofilament in sarcomeres, although not fully proven, would account for many of the unexplained properties of eccentric muscle contraction, while simultaneously not affecting the properties predicted by the two-filament cross-bridge model in isometric and concentric muscle function. Here, I identify the problems of the two-filament sarcomere model and demonstrate the advantages of the three-filament model by providing evidence of titin's contribution to active force in eccentric muscle function. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Titin-based stiffening of muscle fibers in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

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    Ottenheijm, Coen A.C.; Voermans, Nicol C.; Hudson, Bryan D.; Irving, Thomas; Stienen, Ger J.M.; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Granzier, Henk (IIT); (Radboud); (Ariz); (Vrije)

    2012-05-09

    Tenascin-X (TNX) is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein whose absence leads to Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS). TNX-deficient EDS patients present with joint hypermobility and muscle weakness attributable to increased compliance of the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that in response to the increased compliance of the extracellular matrix in TNX-deficient EDS patients, intracellular adaptations take place in the elastic properties of the giant muscle protein titin. We performed extensive single muscle fiber mechanical studies to determine active and passive properties in TNX-deficient EDS patients. Gel-electrophoresis, Western blotting, and microarray studies were used to evaluate titin expression and phosphorylation. X-ray diffraction was used to measure myofilament lattice spacing. Passive tension of muscle fibers from TNX-deficient EDS patients was markedly increased. Myofilament extraction experiments indicated that the increased passive tension is attributable to changes in the properties of the sarcomeric protein titin. Transcript and protein data indicated no changes in titin isoform expression. Instead, differences in posttranslational modifications within titin's elastic region were found. In patients, active tension was not different at maximal activation level, but at submaximal activation level it was augmented attributable to increased calcium sensitivity. This increased calcium sensitivity might be attributable to stiffer titin molecules. In response to the increased compliance of the extracellular matrix in muscle of TNX-deficient EDS patients, a marked intracellular stiffening occurs of the giant protein titin. The stiffening of titin partly compensates for the muscle weakness in these patients by augmenting submaximal active tension generation.

  13. The multiple roles of titin in muscle contraction and force production.

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    Herzog, Walter

    2018-01-20

    Titin is a filamentous protein spanning the half-sarcomere, with spring-like properties in the I-band region. Various structural, signaling, and mechanical functions have been associated with titin, but not all of these are fully elucidated and accepted in the scientific community. Here, I discuss the primary mechanical functions of titin, including its accepted role in passive force production, stabilization of half-sarcomeres and sarcomeres, and its controversial contribution to residual force enhancement, passive force enhancement, energetics, and work production in shortening muscle. Finally, I provide evidence that titin is a molecular spring whose stiffness changes with muscle activation and actin-myosin-based force production, suggesting a novel model of force production that, aside from actin and myosin, includes titin as a "third contractile" filament. Using this three-filament model of sarcomeres, the stability of (half-) sarcomeres, passive force enhancement, residual force enhancement, and the decrease in metabolic energy during and following eccentric contractions can be explained readily.

  14. Filamin actin-binding and titin-binding fulfill distinct functions in Z-disc cohesion.

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    Nicanor González-Morales

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins contribute to the contractile properties of muscles, most notably myosin thick filaments, which are anchored at the M-line, and actin thin filaments, which are anchored at the Z-discs that border each sarcomere. In humans, mutations in the actin-binding protein Filamin-C result in myopathies, but the underlying molecular function is not well understood. Here we show using Drosophila indirect flight muscle that the filamin ortholog Cheerio in conjunction with the giant elastic protein titin plays a crucial role in keeping thin filaments stably anchored at the Z-disc. We identify the filamin domains required for interaction with the titin ortholog Sallimus, and we demonstrate a genetic interaction of filamin with titin and actin. Filamin mutants disrupting the actin- or the titin-binding domain display distinct phenotypes, with Z-discs breaking up in parallel or perpendicularly to the myofibril, respectively. Thus, Z-discs require filamin to withstand the strong contractile forces acting on them.

  15. Dynamic Strength of Titin's Z-Disk End

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    Veronika Kollár

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Titin is a giant filamentous protein traversing the half sarcomere of striated muscle with putative functions as diverse as providing structural template, generating elastic response, and sensing and relaying mechanical information. The Z-disk region of titin, which corresponds to the N-terminal end of the molecule, has been thought to be a hot spot for mechanosensing while also serving as anchorage for its sarcomeric attachment. Understanding the mechanics of titin's Z-disk region, particularly under the effect of binding proteins, is of great interest. Here we briefly review recent findings on the structure, molecular associations, and mechanics of titin's Z-disk region. In addition, we report experimental results on the dynamic strength of titin's Z1Z2 domains measured by nanomechanical manipulation of the chemical dimer of a recombinant protein fragment.

  16. Titin-Actin Interaction: PEVK-Actin-Based Viscosity in a Large Animal

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    Charles S. Chung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Titin exhibits an interaction between its PEVK segment and the actin filament resulting in viscosity, a speed dependent resistive force, which significantly influences diastolic filling in mice. While diastolic disease is clinically pervasive, humans express a more compliant titin (N2BA:N2B ratio ~0.5–1.0 than mice (N2BA:N2B ratio ~0.2. To examine PEVK-actin based viscosity in compliant titin-tissues, we used pig cardiac tissue that expresses titin isoforms similar to that in humans. Stretch-hold experiments were performed at speeds from 0.1 to 10 lengths/s from slack sarcomere lengths (SL to SL of 2.15 μm. Viscosity was calculated from the slope of stress-relaxation vs stretch speed. Recombinant PEVK was added to compete off native interactions and this found to reduce the slope by 35%, suggesting that PEVK-actin interactions are a strong contributor of viscosity. Frequency sweeps were performed at frequencies of 0.1–400 Hz and recombinant protein reduced viscous moduli by 40% at 2.15 μm and by 50% at 2.25 μm, suggesting a SL-dependent nature of viscosity that might prevent SL ``overshoot’’ at long diastolic SLs. This study is the first to show that viscosity is present at physiologic speeds in the pig and supports the physiologic relevance of PEVK-actin interactions in humans in both health and disease.

  17. Seasonal changes in isoform composition of giant proteins of thick and thin filaments and titin (connectin) phosphorylation level in striated muscles of bears (Ursidae, Mammalia).

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    Salmov, N N; Vikhlyantsev, I M; Ulanova, A D; Gritsyna, Yu V; Bobylev, A G; Saveljev, A P; Makariushchenko, V V; Maksudov, G Yu; Podlubnaya, Z A

    2015-03-01

    Seasonal changes in the isoform composition of thick and thin filament proteins (titin, myosin heavy chains (MyHCs), nebulin), as well as in the phosphorylation level of titin in striated muscles of brown bear (Ursus arctos) and hibernating Himalayan black bear (Ursus thibetanus ussuricus) were studied. We found that the changes that lead to skeletal muscle atrophy in bears during hibernation are not accompanied by a decrease in the content of nebulin and intact titin-1 (T1) isoforms. However, a decrease (2.1-3.4-fold) in the content of T2 fragments of titin was observed in bear skeletal muscles (m. gastrocnemius, m. longissimus dorsi, m. biceps) during hibernation. The content of the stiffer N2B titin isoform was observed to increase relative to the content of its more compliant N2BA isoform in the left ventricles of hibernating bears. At the same time, in spite of the absence of decrease in the total content of T1 in the myocardium of hibernating brown bear, the content of T2 fragments decreased ~1.6-fold. The level of titin phosphorylation only slightly increased in the cardiac muscle of hibernating brown bear. In the skeletal muscles of brown bear, the level of titin phosphorylation did not vary between seasons. However, changes in the composition of MyHCs aimed at increasing the content of slow (I) and decreasing the content of fast (IIa) isoforms of this protein during hibernation of brown bear were detected. Content of MyHCs I and IIa in the skeletal muscles of hibernating Himalayan black bear corresponded to that in the skeletal muscles of hibernating brown bear.

  18. Effect of Ti/TiN multilayer protective nanocoatings on Zr-based metallic glasses mechanical performance

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    Tekaya, A.; Benameur, T.; Labdi, S.; Aubert, P.

    2013-01-01

    Ti/TiN multilayer and monolithic TiN nanocoatings have been deposited on Zr-based metallic glass substrates by means of RF sputtering technique at room temperature. Nanoindentation and nanoscratch tests are used to characterise the mechanical and tribological properties of coated samples. In addition, a Vickers indentation tests and scanning electron microscopy observation have been carried out to explore the deformation mechanism. When coated with the TiN and Ti/TiN multilayers, Zr 60 Ni 10 Cu 20 Al 10 bulk metallic glass shows a significant enhancement of both apparent hardness and elastic modulus with a decrease of the friction coefficient. The Vickers indentation shows a fragile behaviour of TiN coatings compared to the Ti/TiN multilayer one. Based on Bhowmick model description, experimental nanoindentation approach is taken to determine the variation of shear stress as function of the penetration depth. It is found that the shear stress developed in the TiN coatings is higher than that observed in the Ti/TiN multilayer. A correlation between finite-element analysis results and experimental data has been proposed. The monolithic or multilayer type of coatings is found to have an influence on the stress and plastic deformation distributions. - Highlights: • Nanocoating enhances the apparent mechanical performance of bulk metallic glass. • Fragile deformation of TiN coatings comparing with Ti/TiN multilayer coatings • Accommodation of the stress is between the layers and at the film/substrate interface. • Shear stress is higher in TiN coating comparing with Ti/TiN multilayer coatings. • Multilayer coatings exhibit an important influence on the stress distribution

  19. Physiological Mechanisms of Eccentric Contraction and Its Applications: A Role for the Giant Titin Protein.

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    Hessel, Anthony L; Lindstedt, Stan L; Nishikawa, Kiisa C

    2017-01-01

    When active muscles are stretched, our understanding of muscle function is stretched as well. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of concentric contraction has advanced considerably since the advent of the sliding filament theory, whereas mechanisms for increased force production during eccentric contraction are only now becoming clearer. Eccentric contractions play an important role in everyday human movements, including mobility, stability, and muscle strength. Shortly after the sliding filament theory of muscle contraction was introduced, there was a reluctant recognition that muscle behaved as if it contained an "elastic" filament. Jean Hanson and Hugh Huxley referred to this structure as the "S-filament," though their concept gained little traction. This additional filament, the giant titin protein, was identified several decades later, and its roles in muscle contraction are still being discovered. Recent research has demonstrated that, like activation of thin filaments by calcium, titin is also activated in muscle sarcomeres by mechanisms only now being elucidated. The mdm mutation in mice appears to prevent activation of titin, and is a promising model system for investigating mechanisms of titin activation. Titin stiffness appears to increase with muscle force production, providing a mechanism that explains two fundamental properties of eccentric contractions: their high force and low energetic cost. The high force and low energy cost of eccentric contractions makes them particularly well suited for athletic training and rehabilitation. Eccentric exercise is commonly prescribed for treatment of a variety of conditions including sarcopenia, osteoporosis, and tendinosis. Use of eccentric exercise in rehabilitation and athletic training has exploded to include treatment for the elderly, as well as muscle and bone density maintenance for astronauts during long-term space travel. For exercise intolerance and many types of sports injuries, experimental

  20. Titin-Based Nanoparticle Tension Sensors Map High-Magnitude Integrin Forces within Focal Adhesions.

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    Galior, Kornelia; Liu, Yang; Yehl, Kevin; Vivek, Skanda; Salaita, Khalid

    2016-01-13

    Mechanical forces transmitted through integrin transmembrane receptors play important roles in a variety of cellular processes ranging from cell development to tumorigenesis. Despite the importance of mechanics in integrin function, the magnitude of integrin forces within adhesions remains unclear. Literature suggests a range from 1 to 50 pN, but the upper limit of integrin forces remains unknown. Herein we challenge integrins with the most mechanically stable molecular tension probe, which is comprised of the immunoglobulin 27th (I27) domain of cardiac titin flanked with a fluorophore and gold nanoparticle. Cell experiments show that integrin forces unfold the I27 domain, suggesting that integrin forces exceed ∼30-40 pN. The addition of a disulfide bridge within I27 "clamps" the probe and resists mechanical unfolding. Importantly, incubation with a reducing agent initiates SH exchange, thus unclamping I27 at a rate that is dependent on the applied force. By recording the rate of S-S reduction in clamped I27, we infer that integrins apply 110 ± 9 pN within focal adhesions of rat embryonic fibroblasts. The rates of S-S exchange are heterogeneous and integrin subtype-dependent. Nanoparticle titin tension sensors along with kinetic analysis of unfolding demonstrate that a subset of integrins apply tension many fold greater than previously reported.

  1. Sputter deposition and characterisation of hard wear-resistant Ti/TiN multilayers

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    Simmonds, M.C.; Swygenhoven, H. van [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Multilayered Ti/TiN thin films have been synthesized by magnetron sputter deposition. Alternating layers of Ti and TiN with layer thickness in the 5-50 nm range are sequentially deposited. The structure of the films have been characterised by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction and reflection and Auger depth profiling. The mechanical properties have been investigated using pin-on-disc wear rate testing, nanoindentation determination of hardness and micro scratch testing. (author) 1 fig., 3 refs.

  2. Work Done by Titin Protein Folding Assists Muscle Contraction

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    Jaime Andrés Rivas-Pardo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Current theories of muscle contraction propose that the power stroke of a myosin motor is the sole source of mechanical energy driving the sliding filaments of a contracting muscle. These models exclude titin, the largest protein in the human body, which determines the passive elasticity of muscles. Here, we show that stepwise unfolding/folding of titin immunoglobulin (Ig domains occurs in the elastic I band region of intact myofibrils at physiological sarcomere lengths and forces of 6–8 pN. We use single-molecule techniques to demonstrate that unfolded titin Ig domains undergo a spontaneous stepwise folding contraction at forces below 10 pN, delivering up to 105 zJ of additional contractile energy, which is larger than the mechanical energy delivered by the power stroke of a myosin motor. Thus, it appears inescapable that folding of titin Ig domains is an important, but as yet unrecognized, contributor to the force generated by a contracting muscle.

  3. Pressure Overload by Transverse Aortic Constriction Induces Maladaptive Hypertrophy in a Titin-Truncated Mouse Model

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    Qifeng Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the giant sarcomeric protein titin (TTN are a major cause for inherited forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. We have previously developed a mouse model that imitates a TTN truncation mutation we found in a large pedigree with DCM. While heterozygous Ttn knock-in mice do not display signs of heart failure under sedentary conditions, they recapitulate the human phenotype when exposed to the pharmacological stressor angiotensin II or isoproterenol. In this study we investigated the effects of pressure overload by transverse aortic constriction (TAC in heterozygous (Het Ttn knock-in mice. Two weeks after TAC, Het mice developed marked impairment of left ventricular ejection fraction (p<0.05, while wild-type (WT TAC mice did not. Het mice also trended toward increased ventricular end diastolic pressure and volume compared to WT littermates. We found an increase in histologically diffuse cardiac fibrosis in Het compared to WT in TAC mice. This study shows that a pattern of DCM can be induced by TAC-mediated pressure overload in a TTN-truncated mouse model. This model enlarges our arsenal of cardiac disease models, adding a valuable tool to understand cardiac pathophysiological remodeling processes and to develop therapeutic approaches to combat heart failure.

  4. Titin force enhancement following active stretch of skinned skeletal muscle fibres.

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    Powers, Krysta; Joumaa, Venus; Jinha, Azim; Moo, Eng Kuan; Smith, Ian Curtis; Nishikawa, Kiisa; Herzog, Walter

    2017-09-01

    In actively stretched skeletal muscle sarcomeres, titin-based force is enhanced, increasing the stiffness of active sarcomeres. Titin force enhancement in sarcomeres is vastly reduced in mdm , a genetic mutation with a deletion in titin. Whether loss of titin force enhancement is associated with compensatory mechanisms at higher structural levels of organization, such as single fibres or entire muscles, is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether mechanical deficiencies in titin force enhancement are also observed at the fibre level, and whether mechanisms compensate for the loss of titin force enhancement. Single skinned fibres from control and mutant mice were stretched actively and passively beyond filament overlap to observe titin-based force. Mutant fibres generated lower contractile stress (force divided by cross-sectional area) than control fibres. Titin force enhancement was observed in control fibres stretched beyond filament overlap, but was overshadowed in mutant fibres by an abundance of collagen and high variability in mechanics. However, titin force enhancement could be measured in all control fibres and most mutant fibres following short stretches, accounting for ∼25% of the total stress following active stretch. Our results show that the partial loss of titin force enhancement in myofibrils is not preserved in all mutant fibres and this mutation likely affects fibres differentially within a muscle. An increase in collagen helps to reestablish total force at long sarcomere lengths with the loss in titin force enhancement in some mutant fibres, increasing the overall strength of mutant fibres. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Biomaterial property-controlled stem cell fates for cardiac regeneration

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    Yanyi Xu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction (MI affects more than 8 million people in the United States alone. Due to the insufficient regeneration capacity of the native myocardium, one widely studied approach is cardiac tissue engineering, in which cells are delivered with or without biomaterials and/or regulatory factors to fully regenerate the cardiac functions. Specifically, in vitro cardiac tissue engineering focuses on using biomaterials as a reservoir for cells to attach, as well as a carrier of various regulatory factors such as growth factors and peptides, providing high cell retention and a proper microenvironment for cells to migrate, grow and differentiate within the scaffolds before implantation. Many studies have shown that the full establishment of a functional cardiac tissue in vitro requires synergistic actions between the seeded cells, the tissue culture condition, and the biochemical and biophysical environment provided by the biomaterials-based scaffolds. Proper electrical stimulation and mechanical stretch during the in vitro culture can induce the ordered orientation and differentiation of the seeded cells. On the other hand, the various scaffolds biochemical and biophysical properties such as polymer composition, ligand concentration, biodegradability, scaffold topography and mechanical properties can also have a significant effect on the cellular processes.

  6. Intra-beat Scaling Properties of Cardiac Arrhythmias and Sudden Cardiac Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Eduardo; Lerma, Claudia; Echeverría, Juan C.; Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose

    2008-02-01

    We applied detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to characterize the intra-beat scaling dynamics of electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings from the PhysioNet Sudden Cardiac Death Holter Database. The main finding of this contribution is that, in such recordings involving different types of arrhythmias; the ECG waveform, besides showing a less-random intra-beat dynamics, becomes more regular during bigeminy, ventricular tachycardia (VT) or even atrial fibrillation (AFIB) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) despite the appearance of erratic traces. Thus, notwithstanding that these cardiac rhythm abnormalities are generally considered as irregular and some of them generated by random impulses or wavefronts, the intra-beat scaling properties suggest that regularity dominates the underlying mechanisms of arrhythmias. Among other explanations, this may result from shorted or restricted -less complex- pathways of conduction of the electrical activity within the ventricles.

  7. Individual globular domains and domain unfolding visualized in overstretched titin molecules with atomic force microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Mártonfalvi

    Full Text Available Titin is a giant elastomeric protein responsible for the generation of passive muscle force. Mechanical force unfolds titin's globular domains, but the exact structure of the overstretched titin molecule is not known. Here we analyzed, by using high-resolution atomic force microscopy, the structure of titin molecules overstretched with receding meniscus. The axial contour of the molecules was interrupted by topographical gaps with a mean width of 27.7 nm that corresponds well to the length of an unfolded globular (immunoglobulin and fibronectin domain. The wide gap-width distribution suggests, however, that additional mechanisms such as partial domain unfolding and the unfolding of neighboring domain multimers may also be present. In the folded regions we resolved globules with an average spacing of 5.9 nm, which is consistent with a titin chain composed globular domains with extended interdomain linker regions. Topographical analysis allowed us to allocate the most distal unfolded titin region to the kinase domain, suggesting that this domain systematically unfolds when the molecule is exposed to overstretching forces. The observations support the prediction that upon the action of stretching forces the N-terminal ß-sheet of the titin kinase unfolds, thus exposing the enzyme's ATP-binding site and hence contributing to the molecule's mechanosensory function.

  8. Titin Based Viscosity in Ventricular Physiology: An Integrative Investigation of PEVK-Actin Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Charles S; Methawasin, Methajit; Nelson, O Lynne; Radke, Michael H; Hidalgo, Carlos G; Gotthardt, Michael; Granzier, Henk L

    2011-01-01

    Viscosity is proposed to modulate diastolic function, but only limited understanding of the source(s) of viscosity exists. In-vitro experiments have shown that the proline-glutamic acid-valine-lysine (PEVK) rich element of titin interacts with actin, causing a viscous force in the sarcomere. It is unknown whether this mechanism contributes to viscosity in-vivo. We tested the hypothesis that PEVK-actin interaction causes cardiac viscosity and is important in-vivo via an integrative physiological study on a unique PEVK-knockout (KO) model. Both skinned cardiomyocytes and papillary muscle fibers were isolated from wildtype (WT) and PEVK KO mice and passive viscosity was examined using stretch-hold-release and sinusoidal analysis. Viscosity was reduced by ~60% in KO myocytes and ~50% in muscle fibers at room temperature. The PEVK-actin interaction was not modulated by temperature or diastolic calcium, but was increased by lattice compression. Stretch-hold and sinusoidal frequency protocols on intact isolated mouse hearts showed a smaller, 30–40% reduction in viscosity, possibly due to actomyosin interactions, and showed that microtubules did not contribute to viscosity. Transmitral Doppler echocardiography similarly revealed a 40% decrease in LV chamber viscosity in the PEVK KO in-vivo. This integrative study is the first to quantify the influence of a specific molecular (PEVK-actin) viscosity in-vivo and shows that PEVK-actin interactions are an important physiological source of viscosity. PMID:21708170

  9. Measurement of a MMP-2 degraded Titin fragment in serum reflects changes in muscle turnover induced by atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, S; Henriksen, K; Karsdal, M A

    2014-01-01

    used to assess biological and clinical relevance. RESULTS: A technically robust ELISA measuring the Titin fragment was developed against a Titin peptide fragment identified in human urine. The fragment was shown to be produced primarily by MMP-2 cleavage of Titin. In the rat muscle DEX induced atrophy...... model, Titin-MMP2 fragment was decreased in the beginning of DEX treatment, and then significantly increased later on during DEX administration. In the human bed rest study, the Titin-MMP2 fragment was initially decreased 11.9 (±3.7) % after 1day of bed rest, and then gradually increased ending up...... at a 16.4 (±4.6) % increase at day 47. CONCLUSIONS: We developed a robust ELISA measuring a muscle derived MMP-2 generated Titin degradation fragment in rat and human serum. Importantly, the fragment can be measured in serum and that these levels are related to induction of skeletal muscle atrophy....

  10. Titin Isoform Size is Not Correlated with Thin Filament Length in Rat Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Lewis Greaser

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms controlling thin filament length in muscle remain controversial. It was recently reported that thin filament length was related to titin size, and that the latter might be involved in thin filament length determination. Titin plays several crucial roles in the sarcomere, but its function as it pertains to the thin filament has not been explored. We tested this relationship using several muscles from wild type rats and from a mutant rat model which results in increased titin size. Myofibrils were isolated from skeletal muscles (extensor digitorum longus, external oblique, gastrocnemius, longissimus dorsi, psoas major, and tibialis anterior using both adult wild type (WT and homozygous mutant (HM rats. Phalloidin and antibodies against tropomodulin-4 and nebulin’s N-terminus were used to determine thin filament length. The WT rats studied express skeletal muscle titin sizes ranging from 3.2 to 3.7 MDa, while the HM rats express a giant titin isoform sized at 3.7 MDa. No differences in phalloidin-based thin filament length, nebulin N terminus distances from the Z line, or tropomodulin distances from the Z line were observed across genotypes. The data indicates that, although titin performs many sarcomeric functions, its correlation with thin filament length and structure could not be demonstrated in the rat. Current models of thin filament assembly are inadequate to explain the phalloidin, nebulin N terminus, and tropomodulin staining patterns in the myofibril.

  11. Detection of titin fragments in urine in response to exercise-induced muscle damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazue Kanda

    Full Text Available Many studies have attempted to determine the associations between blood biomarkers and exercise-induced muscle damage. However, poor correlations between the changes in biomarker levels and the magnitude of muscle symptoms have been reported. Recent advances in proteomic tools offer a strategy for the comprehensive analysis of protein expression, which can be used to identify biomarkers. Here, we used a proteomic analysis to identify urinary proteins that appear in response to a calf-raise exercise, including repetitive eccentric muscle contractions, and found that a titin (also known as connectin N-terminal fragment molecule appears in the urine after eccentric exercise. We measured the titin fragment in urine samples from nine individuals before and after eccentric exercise using a newly-established enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and found that the titin fragment excretion rate increased 96 h after the exercise (5.1 to 77.6 pg/min, p <0.01. The changes in the titin fragment excretion rate were correlated strongly with blood markers of muscle damage and with muscle symptoms. These findings suggest that the urinary titin fragment is potentially a noninvasive biomarker of muscle damage.

  12. Cardiac-Derived Extracellular Matrix Enhances Cardiogenic Properties of Human Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaetani, Roberto; Yin, Christopher; Srikumar, Neha; Braden, Rebecca; Doevendans, Pieter A; Sluijter, Joost P G; Christman, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The use of biomaterials has been demonstrated as a viable strategy to promote cell survival and cardiac repair. However, limitations on combinational cell-biomaterial therapies exist, as cellular behavior is influenced by the microenvironment and physical characteristics of the material. Among the

  13. 1H and 15N NMR resonance assignments and secondary structure of titin type I domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Nilges, Michael; Pastore, Annalisa [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (Germany)

    1997-01-15

    Titin/connect in is a giant muscle protein with a highly modular architecture consisting of multiple repeats of two sequence motifs, named type I and type II. Type I modules have been suggested to be intracellular members of the fibronectin type III (Fn3) domain family. Along the titin sequence they are exclusively present in the region of the molecule located in the sarcomere A-band. This region has been shown to interact with myosin and C-protein. One of the most noticeable features of type I modules is that they are particularly rich in semiconserved prolines, since these residues account for about 8% of their sequence. We have determined the secondary structure of a representative type I domain (A71) by 15N and 1HNMR. We show that the type I domains of titin have the Fn3 fold as proposed, consisting of a three- and a four-stranded {beta}-sheet. When the two sheets are placed on top of each other to form the {beta}-sandwich characteristic of the Fn3 fold, 8 out of 10 prolines are found on the same side of the molecule and form an exposed hydrophobic patch. This suggests that the semiconserved prolines might be relevant for the function of type I modules, providing a surface for binding to other A-band proteins. The secondary structure of A71 was structurally aligned to other extracellular Fn3 modules of known 3D structure. The alignment shows that titin type I modules have closest similarity to the first Fn3 domain of Drosophila neuroglian.

  14. Epitope of titin A-band-specific monoclonal antibody Tit1 5 H1.1 is highly conserved in several Fn3 domains of the titin molecule. Centriole staining in human, mouse and zebrafish cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikelsaar Aavo-Valdur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we have reported on the development of a new mouse anti-titin monoclonal antibody, named MAb Titl 5 H1.1, using the synthetic peptide N-AVNKYGIGEPLESDSVVAK-C which corresponds to an amino acid sequence in the A-region of the titin molecule as immunogen. In the human skeletal muscles, MAb Titl 5 H1.1 reacts specifically with titin in the A-band of the sarcomere and in different non-muscle cell types with nucleus and cytoplasm, including centrioles. In this report we have studied the evolutionary aspects of the binding of MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 with its target antigen (titin. Results We have specified the epitope area of MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 by subpeptide mapping to the hexapeptide N-AVNKYG-C. According to protein databases this amino acid sequence is located in the COOH-terminus of several different Fn3 domains of the A-region of titin molecule in many organisms, such as human being, mouse, rabbit, zebrafish (Danio rerio, and even in sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis. Our immunohisto- and cytochemical studies with MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 in human, mouse and zebrafish tissues and cell cultures showed a striated staining pattern in muscle cells and also staining of centrioles, cytoplasm and nuclei in non-muscle cells. Conclusions The data confirm that titin can play, in addition to the known roles in striated muscle cells also an important role in non-muscle cells as a centriole associated protein. This phenomenon is highly conserved in the evolution and is related to Fn3 domains of the titin molecule. Using titin A-band-specific monoclonal antibody MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 it was possible to locate titin in the sarcomeres of skeletal muscle cells and in the centrioles, cytoplasm and nuclei of non-muscle cells in phylogenetically so distant organisms as Homo sapiens, Mus musculus and zebrafish (Danio rerio.

  15. A mutation in the glutamate-rich region of RNA-binding motif protein 20 causes dilated cardiomyopathy through missplicing of titin and impaired Frank-Starling mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beqqali, Abdelaziz; Bollen, I. A. E.; Rasmussen, T. B.

    2016-01-01

    -rich region of RBM20. Western blot analysis of endogenous RBM20 protein revealed strongly reduced protein levels in the heart of an RBM20(E913K/+) carrier. RNA deep-sequencing demonstrated massive inclusion of exons coding for the spring region of titin in the RBM20(E913K/+) carrier. Titin isoform analysis...

  16. Cardiac myofibrillar contractile properties during the progression from hypertension to decompensated heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanft, Laurin M; Emter, Craig A; McDonald, Kerry S

    2017-07-01

    Heart failure arises, in part, from a constellation of changes in cardiac myocytes including remodeling, energetics, Ca 2+ handling, and myofibrillar function. However, little is known about the changes in myofibrillar contractile properties during the progression from hypertension to decompensated heart failure. The aim of the present study was to provide a comprehensive assessment of myofibrillar functional properties from health to heart disease. A rodent model of uncontrolled hypertension was used to test the hypothesis that myocytes in compensated hearts exhibit increased force, higher rates of force development, faster loaded shortening, and greater power output; however, with progression to overt heart failure, we predicted marked depression in these contractile properties. We assessed contractile properties in skinned cardiac myocyte preparations from left ventricles of Wistar-Kyoto control rats and spontaneous hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) rats at ~3, ~12, and >20 mo of age to evaluate the time course of myofilament properties associated with normal aging processes compared with myofilaments from rats with a predisposition to heart failure. In control rats, the myofilament contractile properties were virtually unchanged throughout the aging process. Conversely, in SHHF rats, the rate of force development, loaded shortening velocity, and power all increased at ~12 mo and then significantly fell at the >20-mo time point, which coincided with a decrease in left ventricular fractional shortening. Furthermore, these changes occurred independent of changes in β-myosin heavy chain but were associated with depressed phosphorylation of myofibrillar proteins, and the fall in loaded shortening and peak power output corresponded with the onset of clinical signs of heart failure. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This novel study systematically examined the power-generating capacity of cardiac myofilaments during the progression from hypertension to heart disease. Previously

  17. Dramatic elevation in urinary amino terminal titin fragment excretion quantified by immunoassay in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and in dystrophin deficient rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Alan S; Majchrzak, Mark J; Smith, Courtney M; Gagnon, Robert C; Devidze, Nino; Banks, Glen B; Little, Sean C; Nabbie, Fizal; Bounous, Denise I; DiPiero, Janet; Jacobsen, Leslie K; Bristow, Linda J; Ahlijanian, Michael K; Stimpson, Stephen A

    2017-07-01

    Enzyme-linked and electrochemiluminescence immunoassays were developed for quantification of amino (N-) terminal fragments of the skeletal muscle protein titin (N-ter titin) and qualified for use in detection of urinary N-ter titin excretion. Urine from normal subjects contained a small but measurable level of N-ter titin (1.0 ± 0.4 ng/ml). A 365-fold increase (365.4 ± 65.0, P = 0.0001) in urinary N-ter titin excretion was seen in Duchene muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. Urinary N-ter titin was also evaluated in dystrophin deficient rodent models. Mdx mice exhibited low urinary N-ter titin levels at 2 weeks of age followed by a robust and sustained elevation starting at 3 weeks of age, coincident with the development of systemic skeletal muscle damage in this model; fold elevation could not be determined because urinary N-ter titin was not detected in age-matched wild type mice. Levels of serum creatine kinase and serum skeletal muscle troponin I (TnI) were also low at 2 weeks, elevated at later time points and were significantly correlated with urinary N-ter titin excretion in mdx mice. Corticosteroid treatment of mdx mice resulted in improved exercise performance and lowering of both urinary N-ter titin and serum skeletal muscle TnI concentrations. Low urinary N-ter titin levels were detected in wild type rats (3.0 ± 0.6 ng/ml), while Dmd mdx rats exhibited a 556-fold increase (1652.5 ± 405.7 ng/ml, P = 0.002) (both at 5 months of age). These results suggest that urinary N-ter titin is present at low basal concentrations in normal urine and increases dramatically coincident with muscle damage produced by dystrophin deficiency. Urinary N-ter titin has potential as a facile, non-invasive and translational biomarker for DMD. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardiac extracellular matrix-fibrin hybrid scaffolds with tunable properties for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Corin; Budina, Erica; Stoppel, Whitney L; Sullivan, Kelly E; Emani, Sirisha; Emani, Sitaram M; Black, Lauren D

    2015-03-01

    Solubilized cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) is being developed as an injectable therapeutic that offers promise for promoting cardiac repair. However, the ECM alone forms a hydrogel that is very soft compared to the native myocardium. As both the stiffness and composition of the ECM are important in regulating cell behavior and can have complex synergistic effects, we sought to develop an ECM-based scaffold with tunable biochemical and mechanical properties. We used solubilized rat cardiac ECM from two developmental stages (neonatal, adult) combined with fibrin hydrogels that were cross-linked with transglutaminase. We show that ECM was retained within the gels and that the Young's modulus could be tuned to span the range of the developing and mature heart. C-kit+ cardiovascular progenitor cells from pediatric patients with congenital heart defects were seeded into the hybrid gels. Both the elastic modulus and composition of the scaffolds impacted the expression of endothelial and smooth muscle cell genes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the hybrid gels are injectable, and thus have potential for minimally invasive therapies. ECM-fibrin hybrid scaffolds offer new opportunities for exploiting the effects of both composition and mechanical properties in directing cell behavior for tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantitative determination of titin and nebulin in poultry meat by SDS-PAGE with an internal standard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomaszewska Gras, J.; Kijowski,; Schreurs, F.J.G.

    2002-01-01

    The method of quantitative determination of titin and nebulin in chicken meat by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis technique was developed by application of β-galactosidase as the internal standard. The method was tested first on marker protein samples of known concentrations (myosin, transferrin, glutamic

  20. Accessory left atrial diverticulae: contractile properties depicted with 64-slice cine-cardiac CT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Ronan P

    2012-02-01

    To assess the contractility of accessory left atrial appendages (LAAs) using multiphasic cardiac CT. We retrospectively analyzed the presence, location, size and contractile properties of accessory LAAs using multiphasic cardiac 64-slice CT in 102 consecutive patients (63 males, 39 females, mean age 57). Multiplanar reformats were used to create image planes in axial oblique, sagittal oblique and coronal oblique planes. For all appendages with an orifice diameter >or= 10 mm, axial and sagittal diameters and appendage volumes were recorded in atrial diastole and systole. Regression analysis was performed to assess which imaging appearances best predicted accessory appendage contractility. Twenty-three (23%) patients demonstrated an accessory LAA, all identified along the anterior LA wall. Dimensions for axial oblique (AOD) and sagittal oblique (SOD) diameters and sagittal oblique length (SOL) were 6.3-19, 3.4-20 and 5-21 mm, respectively. All appendages (>or=10 mm) demonstrated significant contraction during atrial systole (greatest diameter reduction was AOD [3.8 mm, 27%]). Significant correlations were noted between AOD-contraction and AOD (R = 0.57, P < 0.05) and SOD-contraction and AOD, SOD and SOL (R = 0.6, P < 0.05). Mean diverticulum volume in atrial diastole was 468.4 +\\/- 493 mm(3) and in systole was 171.2 +\\/- 122 mm(3), indicating a mean change in volume of 297.2 +\\/- 390 mm(3), P < 0.0001. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed SOL to be the strongest independent predictor of appendage contractility (R(2) = 0.86, P < 0.0001) followed by SOD (R(2) = 0.91, P < 0.0001). Accessory LAAs show significant contractile properties on cardiac CT. Those accessory LAAs with a large sagittal height or depth should be evaluated for contractile properties, and if present should be examined for ectopic activity during electrophysiological studies.

  1. Remodeling of cardiac passive electrical properties and susceptibility to ventricular and atrial arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eDhein

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Coordinated electrical activation of the heart is essential for the maintenance of a regular cardiac rhythm and effective contractions. Action potentials spread from one cell to the next via gap junction channels. Because of the elongated shape of cardiomyocytes, longitudinal resistivity is lower than transverse resistivity causing electrical anisotropy. Moreover, non-uniformity is created by clustering of gap junction channels at cell poles and by non-excitable structures such as collagenous strands, vessels or fibroblasts. Structural changes in cardiac disease often affect passive electrical properties by increasing non-uniformity and altering anisotropy. This disturbs normal electrical impulse propagation and is, consequently, a substrate for arrhythmia. However, to investigate how these structural changes lead to arrhythmias remains a challenge. One important mechanism, which may both cause and prevent arrhythmia, is the mismatch between current sources and sinks. Propagation of the electrical impulse requires a sufficient source of depolarizing current. In the case of a mismatch, the activated tissue (source is not able to deliver enough depolarizing current to trigger an action potential in the non-activated tissue (sink. This eventually leads to conduction block. It has been suggested that in this situation a balanced geometrical distribution of gap junctions and reduced gap junction conductance may allow successful propagation. In contrast, source-sink mismatch can prevent spontaneous arrhythmogenic activity in a small number of cells from spreading over the ventricle, especially if gap junction conductance is enhanced. Beside gap junctions, cell geometry and non-cellular structures strongly modulate arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The present review elucidates these and other implications of passive electrical properties for cardiac rhythm and arrhythmogenesis.

  2. Characterization of the in vitro expressed autoimmune rippling muscle disease immunogenic domain of human titin encoded by TTN exons 248-249

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelinka, L. [Biomedical Sciences Program, Kent State University, Kent, OH (United States); McCann, S.; Budde, J.; Sethi, S.; Guidos, M.; Giles, R. [Center for Applied Chemical Biology, Department of Biological Sciences, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Walker, G.R., E-mail: grwalker@ysu.edu [Center for Applied Chemical Biology, Department of Biological Sciences, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Biomedical Sciences Program, Kent State University, Kent, OH (United States)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Affinity purification of the autoimmune rippling muscle disease immunogenic domain of titin. {yields} Partial sequence analysis confirms that the peptides is in the I band region of titin. {yields} This region of the human titin shows high degree of homology to mouse titin N2-A. -- Abstract: Autoimmune rippling muscle disease (ARMD) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disease associated with myasthenia gravis (MG). Past studies in our laboratory recognized a very high molecular weight skeletal muscle protein antigen identified by ARMD patient antisera as the titin isoform. These past studies used antisera from ARMD and MG patients as probes to screen a human skeletal muscle cDNA library and several pBluescript clones revealed supporting expression of immunoreactive peptides. This study characterizes the products of subcloning the titin immunoreactive domain into pGEX-3X and the subsequent fusion protein. Sequence analysis of the fusion gene indicates the cloned titin domain (GenBank ID: (EU428784)) is in frame and is derived from a sequence of N2-A spanning the exons 248-250 an area that encodes the fibronectin III domain. PCR and EcoR1 restriction mapping studies have demonstrated that the inserted cDNA is of a size that is predicted by bioinformatics analysis of the subclone. Expression of the fusion protein result in the isolation of a polypeptide of 52 kDa consistent with the predicted inferred amino acid sequence. Immunoblot experiments of the fusion protein, using rippling muscle/myasthenia gravis antisera, demonstrate that only the titin domain is immunoreactive.

  3. The properties of batrachotoxin-modified cardiac Na channels, including state-dependent block by tetrodotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L Y; Yatani, A; Brown, A M

    1987-09-01

    Batrachotoxin (BTX) modification and tetrodotoxin (TTX) block of BTX-modified Na channels were studied in single cardiac cells of neonatal rats using the whole-cell patch-clamp recording technique. The properties of BTX-modified Na channels in heart are qualitatively similar to those in nerve. However, quantitative differences do exist between the modified channels of these two tissues. In the heart, the shift of the conductance-voltage curve for the modified channel was less pronounced, the maximal activation rate constant, (tau m)max, of modified channels was considerably slower, and the slow inactivation of the BTX-modified cardiac Na channels was only partially abolished. TTX blocked BTX-modified mammalian cardiac Na channels and the block decreased over the potential range of -80 to -40 mV. The apparent dissociation constant of TTX changed from 0.23 microM at -50 mV to 0.69 microM at 0 mV. No further reduction of block was observed at potentials greater than -40 mV. This is the potential range over which gating from closed to open states occurred. These results were explained by assuming that TTX has a higher affinity for closed BTX-modified channels than for open modified channels. Hence, the TTX-binding rate constants are considered to be state dependent rather than voltage dependent. This differs from the voltage dependence of TTX block reported for BTX-modified Na channels from membrane vesicles incorporated into lipid bilayers and from amphibian node of Ranvier.

  4. Functional property of the cardiac valve prosthesis evaluated in vivo by cine-radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakoshi, Sadaaki

    1986-01-01

    Functional property of the convexo-concave Bjoerk-Shiley cardiac valve prosthesis implanted in the mitral position of 21 patients was investigated by integrated cine-radiography repeated for a long term after operation. The maximum opening angle of the tilting disc was 58 ± 2 deg, and was not affected by atrial fibrillation nor by tachycardia up to 160 bpm. There was no change in the maximum opening angle of the disc observed during follow-up period. Good correlation between shortning of the disc opening time and increase in pulse rate suggests excellent adaptation of this prosthesis for tachycardia induced by exercise or electric pacing. However, atrial fibrillation causes time delay in disc closure immediately after prolonged R-R interval. Disc rotation alleviating disc wear was observed in all the patients whether it moves slow or quick. Dysfunction of the disc opening can be readily determined not only by measuring the maximum disc opening angle, but also by observing the characteristic movement indicated in this study. It is concluded from these results that clinical apprication for the convexo-concave Bjoerk-Shiley valve prosthesis is appropriate and cine-radiography is an useful non-invasive examination of cardiac valve prosthesis for long follow-up period. (author)

  5. Exercise training improves hypertension-induced autonomic dysfunction without influencing properties of peripheral cardiac vagus nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Octávio Barbosa; de Sordi, Carla Cristina; da Mota, Gustavo Ribeiro; Marocolo, Moacir; Chriguer, Rosângela Soares; da Silva, Valdo José Dias

    2017-12-01

    We examined the vagal transfer function of autonomic heart rate (HR) control in anesthetized sedentary and exercise-trained Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR). To this end, male SHR and Wystar-Kyoto (WKY) rats with 48-50weeks of age-old were divided into 4 groups: sedentary (SHR S , n=12) and trained (SHR T , n=14) hypertensive rats, sedentary (WKY S , n=13) and trained (WKY T , n=13) normotensive rats. The trained groups were submitted to swimming protocol for 9weeks. Blood pressure (BP), HR, HR variability (HRV), BP variability (BPV), baroreflex sensitivity and cardiac tonus were recorded in baseline conditions. Following, electric stimulation of peripheral vagus nerve was performed in anesthetized conditions. Resting bradycardia was observed in SHR T and WKY T when compared to their respective sedentary groups (pbaroreflex-mediated tachycardia values when compared to their respective sedentary counterparts (pBaroreflex bradycardic response in SHR T was higher than in SHR S (ptraining decreased BP in SHR and improved cardiovascular autonomic balance to the heart without changes in transduction properties of peripheral cardiac vagus nerve. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantification and comparison of the mechanical properties of four human cardiac valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thuy; Sulejmani, Fatiesa; Shin, Erica; Wang, Di; Sun, Wei

    2017-05-01

    Although having the same ability to permit unidirectional flow within the heart, the four main valves-the mitral valve (MV), aortic (AV), tricuspid (TV) and pulmonary (PV) valves-experience different loading conditions; thus, they exhibit different structural integrity from one another. Most research on heart valve mechanics have been conducted mainly on MV and AV or an individual valve, but none quantify and compare the mechanical and structural properties among the four valves from the same aged patient population whose death was unrelated to cardiovascular disease. A total of 114 valve leaflet samples were excised from 12 human cadavers whose death was unrelated to cardiovascular disease (70.1±3.7years old). Tissue mechanical and structural properties were characterized by planar biaxial mechanical testing and histological methods. The experimental data were then fitted with a Fung-type constitutive model. The four valves differed substantially in thickness, degree of anisotropy, and stiffness. The leaflets of the left heart (the AV leaflets and the anterior mitral leaflets, AML) were significantly stiffer and less compliant than their counterparts in the right heart. TV leaflets were the most extensible and isotropic, while AML and AV leaflets were the least extensible and the most anisotropic. Age plays a significant role in the reduction of leaflet stiffness and extensibility with nearly straightened collagen fibers observed in the leaflet samples from elderly groups (65years and older). Results from 114 human leaflet samples not only provided a baseline quantification of the mechanical properties of aged human cardiac valves, but also offered a better understanding of the age-dependent differences among the four valves. It is hoped that the experimental data collected and the associated constitutive models in this study can facilitate future studies of valve diseases, treatments and the development of interventional devices. Most research on heart valve

  7. Gel stretch method: a new method to measure constitutive properties of cardiac muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zile, M. R.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, B. A.; Baicu, C. F.; Cooper G, I. V.; Gharpuray, V.

    1998-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction is an important cause of congestive heart failure; however, the basic mechanisms causing diastolic congestive heart failure are not fully understood, especially the role of the cardiac muscle cell, or cardiocyte, in this process. Before the role of the cardiocyte in this pathophysiology can be defined, methods for measuring cardiocyte constitutive properties must be developed and validated. Thus this study was designed to evaluate a new method to characterize cardiocyte constitutive properties, the gel stretch method. Cardiocytes were isolated enzymatically from normal feline hearts and embedded in a 2% agarose gel containing HEPES-Krebs buffer and laminin. This gel was cast in a shape that allowed it to be placed in a stretching device. The ends of the gel were held between a movable roller and fixed plates that acted as mandibles. Distance between the right and left mandibles was increased using a stepper motor system. The force applied to the gel was measured by a force transducer. The resultant cardiocyte strain was determined by imaging the cells with a microscope, capturing the images with a CCD camera, and measuring cardiocyte and sarcomere length changes. Cardiocyte stress was characterized with a finite-element method. These measurements of cardiocyte stress and strain were used to determine cardiocyte stiffness. Two variables affecting cardiocyte stiffness were measured, the passive elastic spring and viscous damping. The passive spring was assessed by increasing the force on the gel at 1 g/min, modeling the resultant stress vs. strain relationship as an exponential [sigma = A/k(ekepsilon - 1)]. In normal cardiocytes, A = 23.0 kN/m2 and k = 16. Viscous damping was assessed by examining the loop area between the stress vs. strain relationship during 1 g/min increases and decreases in force. Normal cardiocytes had a finite loop area = 1.39 kN/m2, indicating the presence of viscous damping. Thus the gel stretch method provided accurate

  8. A case of late-onset, thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis with ryanodine receptor and titin antibodies and concomitant granulomatous myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanou, M I; Komorowski, L; Kade, S; Bornemann, A; Ziemann, U; Synofzik, M

    2016-09-13

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder, which has only rarely been reported to co-manifest with myositis. The diagnosis of concomitant myositis in patients with myasthenia gravis is clinically challenging, and requires targeted investigations for the differential diagnosis, including EMG, autoantibody assays, muscle biopsy and, importantly, imaging of the mediastinum for thymoma screening. This report presents a case-vignette of a 72-year-old woman with progressive proximal muscle weakness and myalgias, diagnosed with thymoma-associated myasthenia and bioptically verified granulomatous myositis, with positive autoantibody status for ryanodine receptor and titin antibodies. The diagnosis of concurrent myositis and myasthenia gravis, especially in the presence of ryanodine receptor and titin antibodies, should lead neurologists to adopt different treatment strategies compared to those applied in myasthenia or myositis alone. Moreover, further evidence is warranted that titin and, particularly, ryanodine receptor antibodies may co-occur or be pathophysiologically involved in myasthenia-myositis cases.

  9. Association of a single nucleotide polymorphism in titin gene with marbling in Japanese Black beef cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujita Tatsuo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marbling defined by the amount and distribution of intramuscular fat is an economically important trait of beef cattle in Japan. We have recently reported that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the endothelial differentiation, sphingolipid G-protein-coupled receptor, 1 (EDG1 gene were associated with marbling in Japanese Black beef cattle. As well as EDG1, the titin (TTN gene, involved in myofibrillogenesis, has been previously shown to possess expression difference in musculus longissimus muscle between low-marbled and high-marbled steer groups, and to be located within genomic region of a quantitative trait locus for marbling. Thus TTN was considered as a positional functional candidate for the gene responsible for marbling. In this study, we explored SNP in TTN and analyzed association of the SNP with marbling. Findings A SNP in the promoter region of TTN, referred to as g.231054C>T, was the only difference detected between high- and low-marbled steer groups. The SNP was associated with marbling in 3 experiments using 101 sires (P = 0.004, 848 paternal half-sib progeny steers from 5 sires heterozygous for the g.231054C>T (P = 0.046, and 820 paternal half-sib progeny steers from 3 sires homozygous for C allele at the g.231054C>T (P = 0.051, in Japanese Black beef cattle. The effect of genotypes of the SNP on subcutaneous fat thickness was not statistically significant (P > 0.05. Conclusion These findings suggest that in addition to the EDG1 SNPs, the TTN SNP polymorphism is associated with marbling and may be useful for effective marker-assisted selection to increase the levels of marbling in Japanese Black beef cattle. Further replicate studies will be needed to confirm the allelic association observed here, and to expand the results to evaluate all possible genotypic combinations of alleles.

  10. Fractal scale-invariant and nonlinear properties of cardiac dynamics remain stable with advanced age: a new mechanistic picture of cardiac control in healthy elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Daniel T; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2007-11-01

    Heart beat fluctuations exhibit temporal structure with robust long-range correlations, fractal and nonlinear features, which have been found to break down with pathologic conditions, reflecting changes in the mechanism of neuroautonomic control. It has been hypothesized that these features change and even break down also with advanced age, suggesting fundamental alterations in cardiac control with aging. Here we test this hypothesis. We analyze heart beat interval recordings from the following two independent databases: 1) 19 healthy young (average age 25.7 yr) and 16 healthy elderly subjects (average age 73.8 yr) during 2 h under resting conditions from the Fantasia database; and 2) 29 healthy elderly subjects (average age 75.9 yr) during approximately 8 h of sleep from the sleep heart health study (SHHS) database, and the same subjects recorded 5 yr later. We quantify: 1) the average heart rate (); 2) the SD sigma(R-R) and sigma(DeltaR-R) of the heart beat intervals R-R and their increments DeltaR-R; 3) the long-range correlations in R-R as measured by the scaling exponent alpha(R-R) using the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis; 4) fractal linear and nonlinear properties as represented by the scaling exponents alpha(sgn) and alpha(mag) for the time series of the sign and magnitude of DeltaR-R; and 5) the nonlinear fractal dimension D(k) of R-R using the fractal dimension analysis. We find: 1) No significant difference in (P > 0.05); 2) a significant difference in sigma(R-R) and sigma(DeltaR-R) for the Fantasia groups (P 0.5); and 3) no significant change in the fractal measures alpha(R-R) (P > 0.15), alpha(sgn) (P > 0.2), alpha(mag) (P > 0.3), and D(k) with age. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that fractal linear and nonlinear characteristics of heart beat dynamics break down with advanced age in healthy subjects. Although our results indeed show a reduced SD of heart beat fluctuations with advanced age, the inherent temporal fractal and nonlinear

  11. Ex vivo paracrine properties of cardiac tissue: Effects of chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucek, Robert J; Steele, Jasmine; Jacobs, Jeffery P; Steele, Peter; Asante-Korang, Alfred; Quintessenza, James; Steele, Ann

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac regenerative responses are responsive to paracrine factors. We hypothesize that chronic heart failure (HF) in pediatric patients affects cardiac paracrine signaling relevant to resident c-kit(+)cluster of differentiation (CD)34- cardiac stem cells (CSCs). Discarded atrial septum (huAS) and atrial appendages (huAA) from pediatric patients with HF (huAA-HF; n = 10) or without HF (n = 3) were explanted and suspension explant cultured in media. Conditioned media were screened for 120 human factors using unedited monoclonal antibody-based arrays. Significantly expressed (relative chemiluminescence >30 of 100) factors are reported (secretome). Emigrated cells were immunoselected for c-kit and enumerated as CSCs. After culture Day 7, CSCs emigrate from huAA but not huAS. The huAA secretome during CSC emigration included hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), epithelial cell-derived neutrophil attractant-78 (ENA-78)/chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL) 5, growth-regulated oncogene-α (GRO-α)/CXCL1, and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), candidate pro-migratory factors not present in the huAS secretome. Survival/proliferation of emigrated CSCs required coculture with cardiac tissue or tissue-conditioned media. Removal of huAA (Day 14) resulted in the loss of all emigrated CSCs (Day 28) and in decreased expression of 13 factors, including HGF, ENA-78/CXCL5, urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR)/CD87, and neutrophil-activating protein-2 (NAP-2)/CXCL7 candidate pro-survival factors. Secretomes of atrial appendages from HF patients have lower expression of 14 factors, including HGF, ENA-78/CXCL5, GRO-α/CXCL1, MIF, NAP-2/CXCL7, uPAR/CD87, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α compared with AA from patients without HF. Suspension explant culturing models paracrine and innate CSC interactions in the heart. In pediatric patients, heart failure has an enduring effect on the ex vivo cardiac-derived secretome, with lower expression of candidate pro

  12. Preclinical Evaluation of the Immunomodulatory Properties of Cardiac Adipose Tissue Progenitor Cells Using Umbilical Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Direct Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Perea-Gil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based strategies to regenerate injured myocardial tissue have emerged over the past decade, but the optimum cell type is still under scrutiny. In this context, human adult epicardial fat surrounding the heart has been characterized as a reservoir of mesenchymal-like progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs with potential clinical benefits. However, additional data on the possibility that these cells could trigger a deleterious immune response following implantation are needed. Thus, in the presented study, we took advantage of the well-established low immunogenicity of umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs to comparatively assess the immunomodulatory properties of cardiac ATDPCs in an in vitro allostimulatory assay using allogeneic mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs. Similar to UCBMSCs, increasing amounts of seeded cardiac ATDPCs suppressed the alloproliferation of T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (IL6, TNFα, and IFNγ was also specifically modulated by the different numbers of cardiac ATDPCs cocultured. In summary, we show that cardiac ATDPCs abrogate T cell alloproliferation upon stimulation with allogeneic mature MDDCs, suggesting that they could further regulate a possible harmful immune response in vivo. Additionally, UCBMSCs can be considered as valuable tools to preclinically predict the immunogenicity of prospective regenerative cells.

  13. Secondary structure determination by NMR spectroscopy of an immunoglobulin-like domain from the giant muscle protein titin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfuhl, M; Gautel, M; Politou, A S; Joseph, C; Pastore, A

    1995-07-01

    We present the complete 15N and 1H NMR assignment and the secondary structure of an immunoglobulin-like domain from the giant muscle protein titin. The assignment was obtained using homonuclear and 15N heteronuclear 2D and 3D experiments. The complementarity of 3D TOCSY-NOESY and 3D 15N NOESY-HSQC experiments, using WATERGATE for water suppression, allowed an efficient assignment of otherwise ambiguous cross peaks and was helpful in overcoming poor TOCSY transfer for some amino acids. The secondary structure is derived from specific NOEs between backbone alpha- and amide protons, secondary chemical shifts of alpha-protons and chemical exchange for the backbone amide protons. It consists of eight beta-strands, forming two beta-sheets with four strands each, similar to the classical beta-sandwich of the immunoglobulin superfamily, as previously predicted by sequence analysis. Two of the beta-strands are connected by type II beta-turns; the first beta-strand forms a beta-bulge. The whole topology is very similar to the only intracellular immunoglobulin-like domain for which a structure has been determined so far, i.e., telokin.

  14. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rehab; Heart failure - cardiac rehab References Anderson L, Taylor RS. Cardiac rehabilitation for people with heart disease: ... of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed ...

  15. Comparative study of the antioxidant properties of monocarbonyl curcumin analogues C66 and B2BrBC in isoproteranol induced cardiac damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzi-Petrushev, Nikola; Bogdanov, Jane; Krajoska, Jovanka; Ilievska, Jovana; Bogdanova-Popov, Biljana; Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Mitrokhin, Vadim; Sopi, Ramadan; Gagov, Hristo; Kamkin, Andre; Mladenov, Mitko

    2018-03-15

    To test the antioxidant properties of the newly synthesized (2E,6E)-2,6-bis(2-bromobenzylidene)cyclohexanone (B2BrBC) in parallel with C66 in rats with cardiac hypertrophy. The protective effects of both C66 and B2BrBC against oxidative stress in rats with cardiac hypertrophy, was studied by evaluating the activity of antioxidant enzymes, the relationship between the ratio of the activities of the antioxidant enzymes R = SOD/(GPx + CAT) and levels of thiols and lipid peroxidation in the heart. In order to gain better understanding of the antioxidant properties of the studied compounds, computational methods were utilized. The properties of selected structurally related derivatives were obtained on optimized geometries for ground states, using semi-empirical PM3 quantum mechanical calculations. The ratio R shows disequilibrium in rats with induced hypertrophy (p antioxidant. The obtained results indicated that the antioxidant ability of B2BrBC is positively associated with the catalytic SOD and GPx activities expressed through preserved t-SH levels. It seems plausible that for a compound to exhibit antioxidant activity, as most of the 2,6-bis(benzylidene)cyclohexanones do, they should be good electron donors. Understanding the relationship between cardiac hypertrophy induced oxidative injuries and supporters of endogenous reparatory machinery will help in establishing the beneficial role of adequate antioxidant supplementation. In this study reliable data on the preventive effects of newly synthesized symmetric monocarbonyl curcumin analogue B2BrBC and its role in the prevention of oxidative injuries on three levels (enzymatic, protein and lipid), in the heart hypertrophic onset, were obtained. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of electrical stimulation and postmortem storage on changes in titin, nebulin, desmin, troponin-T, and muscle ultrastructure in Bos indicus crossbred cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C Y; Stromer, M H; Rouse, G; Robson, R M

    1997-02-01

    The effects of electrical stimulation (ES) on degradation of titin, nebulin, desmin, and troponin-T (TN-T) and on structural changes in the longissimus muscle (LM) from Brahman x Simmental (B x S) cattle (Bos indicus cross) were determined. The left side of seven B x S beef carcasses was stimulated (200 V, 20 Hz) within 1 h of death, and the right side was the nonstimulated (NS) control. Myofibrils for SDS-PAGE and samples for transmission electron microscopy were prepared from the LM at 0, 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 d postmortem (PM). The SDS-PAGE results showed that the T1 band of titin was absent by 7 d in two animals, by 14 d in four animals, and by 28 d in one animal in both NS and ES samples. By SDS-PAGE, intact nebulin was gone by 7 d in two animals and by 14 d in five animals, but in blots, nebulin decreased by 7 d and was absent by 14 d in both NS and ES samples. The desmin band could still be seen as a light band at 28 d in Western blots of both NS and ES samples. A decrease in TN-T and a concomitant increase in the 30-kDa polypeptide were observed in both NS and ES samples. Western blots with a monoclonal antibody to TN-T confirmed that TN-T decreased at similar rates in NS and ES samples but showed that the 30-kDa polypeptide was more heavily labeled in ES samples from 7 to 28 d. Contraction nodes were present in O-d ES samples and were still observed in 28-d ES samples. Narrow, intermediate, and wide I-band fractures were seen earlier and at a greater frequency in ES than in NS samples. Overall, ES had no detectable effect on titin, nebulin, desmin, or TN-T degradation but accelerated the appearance and enhanced the frequency of three types of I-band fractures in the LM from Bos indicus crossbred cattle.

  17. Human skeletal muscle type 1 fibre distribution and response of stress-sensing proteins along the titin molecule after submaximal exhaustive exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Satu O A; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Flink, Riina; Selänne, Harri P; Gagnon, Sheila S; Ahtiainen, Juha P; Nindl, Bradley C; Lehti, Maarit

    2017-11-01

    Early responses of stress-sensing proteins, muscle LIM protein (MLP), ankyrin repeat proteins (Ankrd1/CARP and Ankrd2/Arpp) and muscle-specific RING finger proteins (MuRF1 and MuRF2), along the titin molecule were investigated in the present experiment after submaximal exhaustive exercise. Ten healthy men performed continuous drop jumping unilaterally on a sledge apparatus with a submaximal height until complete exhaustion. Five stress-sensing proteins were analysed by mRNA measurements from biopsies obtained immediately and 3 h after the exercise from exercised vastus lateralis muscle while control biopsies were obtained from non-exercised legs before the exercise. Decreased maximal jump height and increased serum creatine kinase activities as indirect markers for muscle damage and HSP27 immunostainings on muscle biopsies as a direct marker for muscle damage indicated that the current exercised protocol caused muscle damage. mRNA levels for four (MLP, Ankrd1/CARP, MuRF1 and MuRF2) out of the five studied stress sensors significantly (p exercise. The magnitude of MLP and Ankrd2 responses was related to the proportion of type 1 myofibres. Our data showed that the submaximal exhaustive exercise with subject's own physical fitness level activates titin-based stretch-sensing proteins. These results suggest that both degenerative and regenerative pathways are activated in very early phase after the exercise or probably already during the exercise. Activation of these proteins represents an initial step forward adaptive remodelling of the exercised muscle and may also be involved in the initiation of myofibre repair.

  18. Novel interactions of ankyrins-G at the costameres: The muscle-specific Obscurin/Titin-Binding-related Domain (OTBD) binds plectin and filamin C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiweilidan, Yimingjiang; Klauza, Izabela; Kordeli, Ekaterini, E-mail: ekaterini.kordeli@inserm.fr

    2011-04-01

    Ankyrins, the adapters of the spectrin skeleton, are involved in local accumulation and stabilization of integral proteins to the appropriate membrane domains. In striated muscle, tissue-dependent alternative splicing generates unique Ank3 gene products (ankyrins-G); they share the Obscurin/Titin-Binding-related Domain (OTBD), a muscle-specific insert of the C-terminal domain which is highly conserved among ankyrin genes, and binds obscurin and titin to Ank1 gene products. We previously proposed that OTBD sequences constitute a novel domain of protein-protein interactions which confers ankyrins with specific cellular functions in muscle. Here we searched for muscle proteins binding to ankyrin-G OTBD by yeast two hybrid assay, and we found plectin and filamin C, two organizing elements of the cytoskeleton with essential roles in myogenesis, muscle cell cytoarchitecture, and muscle disease. The three proteins coimmunoprecipitate from skeletal muscle extracts and colocalize at costameres in adult muscle fibers. During in vitro myogenesis, muscle ankyrins-G are first expressed in postmitotic myocytes undergoing fusion to myotubes. In western blots of subcellular fractions from C2C12 cells, the majority of muscle ankyrins-G appear associated with membrane compartments. Occasional but not extensive co-localization at nascent costameres suggested that ankyrin-G interactions with plectin and filamin C are not involved in costamere assembly; they would rather reinforce stability and/or modulate molecular interactions in sarcolemma microdomains by establishing novel links between muscle-specific ankyrins-G and the two costameric dystrophin-associated glycoprotein and integrin-based protein complexes. These results report the first protein-protein interactions involving the ankyrin-G OTBD domain and support the hypothesis that OTBD sequences confer ankyrins with a gain of function in vertebrates, bringing further consolidation and resilience of the linkage between sarcomeres

  19. A discrete electromechanical model for human cardiac tissue: effects of stretch-activated currents and stretch conditions on restitution properties and spiral wave dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis D Weise

    Full Text Available We introduce an electromechanical model for human cardiac tissue which couples a biophysical model of cardiac excitation (Tusscher, Noble, Noble, Panfilov, 2006 and tension development (adjusted Niederer, Hunter, Smith, 2006 model with a discrete elastic mass-lattice model. The equations for the excitation processes are solved with a finite difference approach, and the equations of the mass-lattice model are solved using Verlet integration. This allows the coupled problem to be solved with high numerical resolution. Passive mechanical properties of the mass-lattice model are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material. Active mechanical contraction is initiated by changes of the intracellular calcium concentration, which is a variable of the electrical model. Mechanical deformation feeds back on the electrophysiology via stretch-activated ion channels whose conductivity is controlled by the local stretch of the medium. We apply the model to study how stretch-activated currents affect the action potential shape, restitution properties, and dynamics of spiral waves, under constant stretch, and dynamic stretch caused by active mechanical contraction. We find that stretch conditions substantially affect these properties via stretch-activated currents. In constantly stretched medium, we observe a substantial decrease in conduction velocity, and an increase of action potential duration; whereas, with dynamic stretch, action potential duration is increased only slightly, and the conduction velocity restitution curve becomes biphasic. Moreover, in constantly stretched medium, we find an increase of the core size and period of a spiral wave, but no change in rotation dynamics; in contrast, in the dynamically stretching medium, we observe spiral drift. Our results may be important to understand how altered stretch conditions affect the heart's functioning.

  20. Bilary and urinary excretion of five cardiac glycosides and its correlation with their physical and chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzo, A; Ghirardi, P

    1977-05-01

    Biliary and urinary excretion of five tritium-labelled cardiac glycosides, i.e. Ouabain, K-strophanthoside, Digoxin, Digitoxin and Deslanatoside C, were investigated in anaesthetized guinea-pigs 5 h after i.v. or enteral administration. Urinary excretion is the main route of elimination in the case of Ouabain and Deslanatoside C. Conversely, biliary excretion is predominant in the case of Digoxin and Digitoxin. K-strophanthoside is excreted both via bile and urine. In conscious guinea-pigs treated i.v. with the same cardiac glycosides the highest levels were observed in urine, bile, kidneys and liver. The relative values of those levels were in agreement with the excretion pattern observed in anaesthetized animals. An inverse linear relation (P less than 0.05) was encountered between biliary excretion rate and polarity of glycoside molecula. This correlation has been previously observed by other authors in other species, but not in the rabbit. This suggests that the correlation may not be considered generally applicable at present.

  1. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may also do muscle-strengthening exercises, such as lifting weights or other resistance training exercises, two or three ... health concerns. Education about nutrition, lifestyle and healthy weight ... the most benefits from cardiac rehabilitation, make sure your exercise and ...

  2. Cardiac MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as coronary heart disease, heart valve problems, pericarditis, cardiac tumors, or damage from a heart attack. ... Palpitations Heart Valve Disease Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Pacemakers Pericarditis Stress Testing RELATED NEWS April 26, 2013 | News ...

  3. Cardiac Angiosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Esteves Cardoso

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite cardiac metastases are found in about 20% of cancer deaths, the presence of primary cardiac tumors is rare. Most primary tumors are benign, and malignant tumors comprise about 15%. We report a 21-year-old man with fever, dyspnea, and hemoptysis that was diagnosed with angiosarcoma of the right atrium and pulmonary metastasis. Patient was submitted to surgical tumor resection without adjuvant therapy and died four months after diagnosis.

  4. Cardiac Angiosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, Monique Esteves; Canale, Leonardo Secchin; Ramos, Rosana Grandelle; Salvador Junior, Edson da Silva; Lachtermacher, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Despite cardiac metastases are found in about 20% of cancer deaths, the presence of primary cardiac tumors is rare. Most primary tumors are benign, and malignant tumors comprise about 15%. We report a 21-year-old man with fever, dyspnea, and hemoptysis that was diagnosed with angiosarcoma of the right atrium and pulmonary metastasis. Patient was submitted to surgical tumor resection without adjuvant therapy and died four months after diagnosis.

  5. Cardiac Angiosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Monique Esteves; Canale, Leonardo Secchin; Ramos, Rosana Grandelle; Salvador Junior, Edson da Silva; Lachtermacher, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Despite cardiac metastases are found in about 20% of cancer deaths, the presence of primary cardiac tumors is rare. Most primary tumors are benign, and malignant tumors comprise about 15%. We report a 21-year-old man with fever, dyspnea, and hemoptysis that was diagnosed with angiosarcoma of the right atrium and pulmonary metastasis. Patient was submitted to surgical tumor resection without adjuvant therapy and died four months after diagnosis. PMID:24826214

  6. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  7. [Cardiac amyloidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussabah, Elhem; Zakhama, Lilia; Ksontini, Iméne; Ibn Elhadj, Zied; Boukhris, Besma; Naffeti, Sana; Thameur, Moez; Ben Youssef, Soraya

    2008-09-01

    PREREQUIS: Amyloidosis is a rare infiltrative disease characterized by multiple clinical features. Various organs are involved and the cardiovascular system is a common target of amyloidosis. Cardiac involvement may occur with or without clinical manifestations and is considered as a major prognostic factor. To analyze the clinical features of cardiac involvement, to review actual knowledgement concerning echocardiographic diagnostic and to evaluate recent advances in treatment of the disease. An electronic search of the relevant literature was carried out using Medline and Pubmed. Keys words used for the final search were amyloidosis, cardiopathy and echocardiography. We considered for analysis reviews, studies and articles between 1990 and 2007. Amyloidosis represents 5 to 10% of non ischemic cardiomyoparhies. Cardiac involvement is the first cause of restrictive cardiomyopathy witch must be evoked in front of every inexplained cardiopathy after the age of forty. The amyloid nature of cardiopathy is suggered if some manifestations were associated as a peripheric neuropathy, a carpal tunnel sydrome and proteinuria > 3g/day. Echocardiography shows dilated atria, a granular sparkling appearance of myocardium, diastolic dysfunction and thickened left ventricle contrasting with a low electric voltage. The proof of amyloidosis is brought by an extra-cardiac biopsy, the indications of endomyocardial biopsy are very limited. The identification of the amyloid nature of cardiopathy has an direct therapeutic implication: it indicates the use of digitalis, calcium channel blockers and beta-blockers. Today the treatment of amyloidosis remains very unsatisfactory especially in the cardiac involvement. An early diagnosis before the cardiac damage may facilitate therapy and improve prognosis.

  8. Effects of beta-adrenergic blockers with different ancillary properties on lipid peroxidation in hyperthyroid rat cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asayama, K; Dobashi, K; Hayashibe, H; Kato, K

    1989-10-01

    To determine whether beta-blockade protects rat heart against thyroxine (T4)-induced accelelation of lipid peroxidation, in vivo effects of 3 beta-blockers with different ancillary properties on the mitochondrial oxidative enzyme, antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxide were investigated. The rats were rendered hyperthyroid by adding T4 to their drinking water for 3 weeks and were treated simultaneously with either carteolol (a blocker with partial agonist activity; 30 mg/kg/day), atenolol (50 mg/kg/day) or arotinolol (a blocker with weak alpha-blocking action; 50 mg/kg/day). The T4-induced tachycardia was alleviated completely by either atenolol or arotinolol, but only partially by carteolol. Cytochrome c oxidase activity in the heart muscle was increased by T4 with a parallel increase in manganese (mitochondrial) superoxide dismutase. Atenolol, but neither carteolol nor arotinolol, suppressed this increase. Similarly, the T4-induced acceleration of lipid peroxidation was suppressed by atenolol alone. Glutathione peroxidase was markedly decreased, and both copper zinc (cytosolic) superoxide dismutase and catalase were also decreased or tended to be decreased by T4. The levels of these 3 enzymes were only minimally affected by the beta-blocker treatments. These results suggest that beta-blockade suppresses mitochondrial hypermetabolism and protects heart muscle against oxidative stress in hyperthyroidism, and that the ancillary properties of beta-blockers such as partial agonist activity and alpha-blocking action negate the protection.

  9. Cardiac Pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiandra, O.; Espasandin, W.; Fiandra, H.

    1984-01-01

    A complete survey of physiological biophysical,clinical and engineering aspects of cardiac facing,including the history and an assessment of possible future developments.Among the topics studied are: pacemakers, energy search, heart stimulating with pacemakers ,mathematical aspects of the electric cardio stimulation chronic, pacemaker implants,proceeding,treatment and control

  10. Differential expression of hERG1 channel isoforms reproduces properties of native I(Kr and modulates cardiac action potential characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Peter Larsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The repolarizing cardiac rapid delayed rectifier current, I(Kr, is composed of ERG1 channels. It has been suggested that two isoforms of the ERG1 protein, ERG1a and ERG1b, both contribute to I(Kr. Marked heterogeneity in the kinetic properties of native I(Kr has been described. We hypothesized that the heterogeneity of native I(Kr can be reproduced by differential expression of ERG1a and ERG1b isoforms. Furthermore, the functional consequences of differential expression of ERG1 isoforms were explored as a potential mechanism underlying native heterogeneity of action potential duration (APD and restitution. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The results show that the heterogeneity of native I(Kr can be reproduced in heterologous expression systems by differential expression of ERG1a and ERG1b isoforms. Characterization of the macroscopic kinetics of ERG1 currents demonstrated that these were dependent on the relative abundance of ERG1a and ERG1b. Furthermore, we used a computational model of the ventricular cardiomyocyte to show that both APD and the slope of the restitution curve may be modulated by varying the relative abundance of ERG1a and ERG1b. As the relative abundance of ERG1b was increased, APD was gradually shortened and the slope of the restitution curve was decreased. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that differential expression of ERG1 isoforms may explain regional heterogeneity of I(Kr kinetics. The data demonstrate that subunit dependent changes in channel kinetics are important for the functional properties of ERG1 currents and hence I(Kr. Importantly, our results suggest that regional differences in the relative abundance of ERG1 isoforms may represent a potential mechanism underlying the heterogeneity of both APD and APD restitution observed in mammalian hearts.

  11. Production and characterization of multilayer coatings of Ti/TiN on AISI 316L stainless steel by the PVD technique of cathodic arc ion plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forlerer, Elena; Rodriguez, Fernando; Mingolo, Norma

    2006-01-01

    Multilayer coatings were produced from bi-layers (compound layers) of Ti/TiN in a PVD reactor of cathodic arc ion plating. The process was carried out at an Argon gas pressure of 5x10 -3 Torr for the interlayer of Ti and a nitrogen + argon pressure of 2x10 -2 Torr for the deposit of TiN and a Bias voltage of -500V for the Ti layer and -100V for the TiN layer. The arc current held constant at 80 amp. The samples were kept at high temperatures ≥ 300 o C, mounted on a rotating system that held the test piece 15-25 cm from the Ti electrode. Certified composition AISI 316L and AISI 410 stainless steel were used for the substrate. Coatings with one or two compound layers with similar thicknesses were made. The coatings were characterized mechanically by adherence, thickness and microhardness by Vickers indentation with 25g loads. The texture was studied by X-ray diffraction and present phases and residual tensions were determined. The results of the X-ray diffraction show the presence of the mostly TiN phase, with fcc structure in the mono-layer and the bi-layer. Residual tensions are compressive and elevated due to the expansion of the TiN network during the deposition process. Measurements of the bi-layers at different angles showed a relaxing of the tensions close to the surface, which could be due to the effect of the second interlayer of Ti. Preferential orientations associated with the growth process of the layers and the developed microstructure were detected in the TiN (CW)

  12. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzke, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net

  13. Cardiac conduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cardiac conduction system is a group of specialized cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals to the ... contract. The main components of the cardiac conduction system are the SA node, AV node, bundle of ...

  14. Cardiac pacemaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolenik, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    The construction of a cardiac pacemaker is described which is characterized by particularly small dimensions, small weight and long life duration. The weight is under 100g, the specific weight under 1.7. Mass inertia forces which occur through acceleration and retardation processes, thus remain below the threshold values, above which one would have to reckon with considerable damaging of the surrounding body tissue. The maintaining of small size and slight weight is achieved by using an oscillator on COSMOS basis, where by considerably lower energy consumption, amongst others the lifetimes of the batteries used - a lithium anode with thionyl chloride electrolyte - is extended to over 5 years. The reliability can be increased by the use of 2 or more batteries. The designed dimension are 20x60x60 mm 3 . (ORU/LH) [de

  15. Cardiac regeneration therapy: connections to cardiac physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Naofumi; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2011-12-01

    Without heart transplantation, a large number of patients with failing hearts worldwide face poor outcomes. By means of cardiomyocyte regeneration, cardiac regeneration therapy is emerging with great promise as a means for restoring loss of cardiac function. However, the limited success of clinical trials using bone marrow-derived cells and myoblasts with heterogeneous constituents, transplanted at a wide range of cell doses, has led to disagreement on the efficacy of cell therapy. It is therefore essential to reevaluate the evidence for the efficacy of cell-based cardiac regeneration therapy, focusing on targets, materials, and methodologies. Meanwhile, the revolutionary innovation of cardiac regeneration therapy is sorely needed to help the millions of people who suffer heart failure from acquired loss of cardiomyocytes. Cardiac regeneration has been used only in limited species or as a developing process in the rodent heart; now, the possibility of cardiomyocyte turnover in the human heart is being revisited. In the pursuit of this concept, the use of cardiac stem/progenitor stem cells in the cardiac niche must be focused to usher in a second era of cardiac regeneration therapy for the severely injured heart. In addition, tissue engineering and cellular reprogramming will advance the next era of treatment that will enable current cell-based therapy to progress to "real" cardiac regeneration therapy. Although many barriers remain, the prevention of refractory heart failure through cardiac regeneration is now becoming a realistic possibility.

  16. Zebrafish heart as a model for human cardiac electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vornanen, Matti; Hassinen, Minna

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has become a popular model for human cardiac diseases and pharmacology including cardiac arrhythmias and its electrophysiological basis. Notably, the phenotype of zebrafish cardiac action potential is similar to the human cardiac action potential in that both have a long plateau phase. Also the major inward and outward current systems are qualitatively similar in zebrafish and human hearts. However, there are also significant differences in ionic current composition between human and zebrafish hearts, and the molecular basis and pharmacological properties of human and zebrafish cardiac ionic currents differ in several ways. Cardiac ionic currents may be produced by non-orthologous genes in zebrafish and humans, and paralogous gene products of some ion channels are expressed in the zebrafish heart. More research on molecular basis of cardiac ion channels, and regulation and drug sensitivity of the cardiac ionic currents are needed to enable rational use of the zebrafish heart as an electrophysiological model for the human heart.

  17. Cardiac sodium channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, A.S.; Asghari-Roodsari, A.; Tan, H.L.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac sodium channel are protein complexes that are expressed in the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes to carry a large inward depolarizing current (I-Na) during phase 0 of the cardiac action potential. The importance of I-Na for normal cardiac electrical activity is reflected by the high incidence of

  18. Current Perspectives in Cardiac Laterality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Campione

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The heart is the first organ to break symmetry in the developing embryo and onset of dextral looping is the first indication of this event. Looping is a complex process that progresses concomitantly to cardiac chamber differentiation and ultimately leads to the alignment of the cardiac regions in their final topology. Generation of cardiac asymmetry is crucial to ensuring proper form and consequent functionality of the heart, and therefore it is a highly regulated process. It has long been known that molecular left/right signals originate far before morphological asymmetry and therefore can direct it. The use of several animal models has led to the characterization of a complex regulatory network, which invariably converges on the Tgf-β signaling molecule Nodal and its downstream target, the homeobox transcription factor Pitx2. Here, we review current data on the cellular and molecular bases of cardiac looping and laterality, and discuss the contribution of Nodal and Pitx2 to these processes. A special emphasis will be given to the morphogenetic role of Pitx2 and to its modulation of transcriptional and functional properties, which have also linked laterality to atrial fibrillation.

  19. Cardiac gated ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, C. William, III; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1995-05-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. We evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50msec scan aperture. Multislice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. We observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a nonfailing model of the heart.

  20. Stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eFinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration,a combination of these approaches couldameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation ofmultiple cell players.

  1. Biomaterial based cardiac tissue engineering and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyer, Locke Davenport; Montgomery, Miles; Zhao, Yimu; Xiao, Yun; Conant, Genevieve; Korolj, Anastasia; Radisic, Milica

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, necessitating the development of effective treatment strategies. A myocardial infarction involves the blockage of a coronary artery leading to depletion of nutrient and oxygen supply to cardiomyocytes and massive cell death in a region of the myocardium. Cardiac tissue engineering is the growth of functional cardiac tissue in vitro on biomaterial scaffolds for regenerative medicine application. This strategy relies on the optimization of the complex relationship between cell networks and biomaterial properties. In this review, we discuss important biomaterial properties for cardiac tissue engineering applications, such as elasticity, degradation, and induced host response, and their relationship to engineered cardiac cell environments. With these properties in mind, we also emphasize in vitro use of cardiac tissues for high-throughput drug screening and disease modelling. PMID:25989939

  2. Cardiac sodium channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Ahmad S; Asghari-Roodsari, Alaleh; Tan, Hanno L

    2010-07-01

    Cardiac sodium channel are protein complexes that are expressed in the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes to carry a large inward depolarizing current (INa) during phase 0 of the cardiac action potential. The importance of INa for normal cardiac electrical activity is reflected by the high incidence of arrhythmias in cardiac sodium channelopathies, i.e., arrhythmogenic diseases in patients with mutations in SCN5A, the gene responsible for the pore-forming ion-conducting alpha-subunit, or in genes that encode the ancillary beta-subunits or regulatory proteins of the cardiac sodium channel. While clinical and genetic studies have laid the foundation for our understanding of cardiac sodium channelopathies by establishing links between arrhythmogenic diseases and mutations in genes that encode various subunits of the cardiac sodium channel, biophysical studies (particularly in heterologous expression systems and transgenic mouse models) have provided insights into the mechanisms by which INa dysfunction causes disease in such channelopathies. It is now recognized that mutations that increase INa delay cardiac repolarization, prolong action potential duration, and cause long QT syndrome, while mutations that reduce INa decrease cardiac excitability, reduce electrical conduction velocity, and induce Brugada syndrome, progressive cardiac conduction disease, sick sinus syndrome, or combinations thereof. Recently, mutation-induced INa dysfunction was also linked to dilated cardiomyopathy, atrial fibrillation, and sudden infant death syndrome. This review describes the structure and function of the cardiac sodium channel and its various subunits, summarizes major cardiac sodium channelopathies and the current knowledge concerning their genetic background and underlying molecular mechanisms, and discusses recent advances in the discovery of mutation-specific therapies in the management of these channelopathies.

  3. Hyperplastic Cardiac Sarcoma Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood A. Shariff

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary cardiac sarcomas are rare tumors with a median survival of 6–12 months. Data suggest that an aggressive multidisciplinary approach may improve patient outcome. We present the case of a male who underwent resection of cardiac sarcoma three times from the age of 32 to 34. This report discusses the malignant nature of cardiac sarcoma and the importance of postoperative multidisciplinary care.

  4. Giant cardiac myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlis, Peter; Lim, Eu Jin; Gow, Paul J; Seevanayagam, Siven; Calafiore, Paul; Chan, Robert K

    2007-10-01

    Although cardiac myxomas remain an uncommon group of malignancies, they are the most common form of primary cardiac tumour. Clinical presentations can be varied with local cardiac haemodynamic consequences, valvular insufficiency or even embolic phenomena. We present a case of a 46-year-old man with chronic abdominal pain and discuss a number of diagnostic challenges that were confronted up until a definitive diagnosis of cardiac myxoma was made. The resultant outcome was excellent with the patient achieving complete recovery from long term disabling symptoms.

  5. Cardiac event monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ECG) - ambulatory; Continuous electrocardiograms (EKGs); Holter monitors; Transtelephonic event monitors ... attached. You can carry or wear a cardiac event monitor up to 30 days. You carry the ...

  6. Multiple sources of passive stress relaxation in muscle fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, Wolfgang A; Leake, Mark C [Physiology and Biophysics Laboratory, University of Muenster, Schlossplatz 5, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2004-08-21

    The forces developed during stretch of nonactivated muscle consist of velocity-sensitive (viscous/viscoelastic) and velocity-insensitive (elastic) components. At the myofibrillar level, the elastic-force component has been described in terms of the entropic-spring properties of the giant protein titin, but entropic elasticity cannot account for viscoelastic properties, such as stress relaxation. Here we examine the contribution of titin to passive stress relaxation of isolated rat-cardiac myofibrils depleted of actin by gelsolin treatment. Monte Carlo simulations show that, up to {approx}5 s after a stretch, the time course of stress relaxation can be described assuming unfolding of 1-2 immunoglobulin domains per titin molecule. For extended periods of stress relaxation, the simulations failed to correctly describe the myofibril data, suggesting that in situ, titin-Ig domains may be more stable than predicted in earlier single-molecule atomic-force-microscopy studies. The reasons behind this finding remain unknown; simply assuming a reduced unfolding probability of domains-an effect found here by AFM force spectroscopy on titin-Ig domains in the presence of a chaperone, alpha-B-crystallin-did not help correctly simulate the time course of stress relaxation. We conclude that myofibrillar stress relaxation likely has multiple sources. Evidence is provided that in intact myofibrils, an initial, rapid phase of stress relaxation results from viscous resistance due to the presence of actin filaments.

  7. Fractal fluctuations in cardiac time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, B. J.; Zhang, R.; Sanders, A. W.; Miniyar, S.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Human heart rate, controlled by complex feedback mechanisms, is a vital index of systematic circulation. However, it has been shown that beat-to-beat values of heart rate fluctuate continually over a wide range of time scales. Herein we use the relative dispersion, the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean, to show, by systematically aggregating the data, that the correlation in the beat-to-beat cardiac time series is a modulated inverse power law. This scaling property indicates the existence of long-time memory in the underlying cardiac control process and supports the conclusion that heart rate variability is a temporal fractal. We argue that the cardiac control system has allometric properties that enable it to respond to a dynamical environment through scaling.

  8. Safety in cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siregar, S.

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of safety in cardiac surgery is a complex process, which involves many clinical, practical, methodological and statistical issues. The objective of this thesis was to measure and to compare safety in cardiac surgery in The Netherlands using the Netherlands Association for

  9. [Advances in cardiac pacing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carranza, María-José Sancho-Tello; Fidalgo-Andrés, María Luisa; Ferrer, José Martínez; Mateas, Francisco Ruiz

    2012-01-01

    This article contains a review of the current status of remote monitoring and follow-up involving cardiac pacing devices and of the latest developments in cardiac resynchronization therapy. In addition, the most important articles published in the last year are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Acebutolol in Cardiac Arrhythmias

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-04-20

    Apr 20, 1974 ... the cardiac output at rest and on exercise is not altered by the administration of acebutolol, and in patients with coronary artery disease, intravenous acebutolol produces a small fall in cardiac index, stroke index and in the parameters which are used to measure left ventricular. contractilityYo. We have used ...

  11. Cardiac Catheterization (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Educators Search English Español Cardiac Catheterization KidsHealth / For Kids / Cardiac Catheterization What's in this article? What Is ...

  12. Biomimetic material strategies for cardiac tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Molamma P., E-mail: nnimpp@nus.edu.sg [Health Care and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Venugopal, J. [Health Care and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Kai, Dan [NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Ramakrishna, Seeram [Health Care and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2011-04-08

    Cardiovascular disease precedes many serious complications including myocardial infarction (MI) and it remains a major problem for the global community. Adult mammalian heart has limited ability to regenerate and compensate for the loss of cardiomyocytes. Restoration of cardiac function by replacement of diseased myocardium with functional cardiomyocytes is an intriguing strategy because it offers a potential cure for MI. Biomaterials are fabricated in nanometer scale dimensions by combining the chemical, biological, mechanical and electrical aspects of material for potential tissue engineering (TE) applications. Synthetic polymers offer advantageous in their ability to tailor the mechanical properties, and natural polymers offer cell recognition sites necessary for cell, adhesion and proliferation. Cardiac tissue engineering (TE) aim for the development of a bioengineered construct that can provide physical support to the damaged cardiac tissue by replacing certain functions of the damaged extracellular matrix and prevent adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction after MI. Electrospun nanofibers are applied as heart muscle patches, while hydrogels serve as a platform for controlled delivery of growth factors, prevent mechanical complications and assist in cell recruitment. This article reviews the applications of different natural and synthetic polymeric materials utilized as cardiac patches, injectables or 3D constructs for cardiac TE. Smart organization of nanoscale assemblies with synergistic approaches of utilizing nanofibers and hydrogels could further advance the field of cardiac tissue engineering. Rapid innovations in biomedical engineering and cell biology will bring about new insights in the development of optimal scaffolds and methods to create tissue constructs with relevant contractile properties and electrical integration to replace or substitute the diseased myocardium.

  13. Mathematical cardiac electrophysiology

    CERN Document Server

    Colli Franzone, Piero; Scacchi, Simone

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the main mathematical and numerical models in computational electrocardiology, ranging from microscopic membrane models of cardiac ionic channels to macroscopic bidomain, monodomain, eikonal models and cardiac source representations. These advanced multiscale and nonlinear models describe the cardiac bioelectrical activity from the cell level to the body surface and are employed in both the direct and inverse problems of electrocardiology. The book also covers advanced numerical techniques needed to efficiently carry out large-scale cardiac simulations, including time and space discretizations, decoupling and operator splitting techniques, parallel finite element solvers. These techniques are employed in 3D cardiac simulations illustrating the excitation mechanisms, the anisotropic effects on excitation and repolarization wavefronts, the morphology of electrograms in normal and pathological tissue and some reentry phenomena. The overall aim of the book is to present rigorously the mathematica...

  14. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  15. Sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Parakh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death is one of the most common cause of mortality worldwide. Despite significant advances in the medical science, there is little improvement in the sudden cardiac death related mortality. Coronary artery disease is the most common etiology behind sudden cardiac death, in the above 40 years population. Even in the apparently healthy population, there is a small percentage of patients dying from sudden cardiac death. Given the large denominator, this small percentage contributes to the largest burden of sudden cardiac death. Identification of this at risk group among the apparently healthy individual is a great challenge for the medical fraternity. This article looks into the causes and methods of preventing SCD and at some of the Indian data. Details of Brugada syndrome, Long QT syndrome, Genetics of SCD are discussed. Recent guidelines on many of these causes are summarised.

  16. Imaging for cardiac electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Desjardins

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical cardiac electrophysiology is the study of the origin and treatment of arrhythmia. There has been considerable recent development in this field, where imaging has had a transformational impact. In this invited review, we offer a global overview of the most important developments in the use of imaging in cardiac electrophysiology. We first describe the radiological imaging modalities involved in cardiac electrophysiology, to assess cardiac anatomy, function and scar. We then introduce an imaging modality with which readers are probably unfamiliar (electroanatomical mapping [EAM], but which is routinely used by electrophysiologists to plan and guide cardiac mapping and cardiac ablation therapy by catheter, a therapy which can reduce or even cure arrhythmia. We identify the limitations of EAM and describe how radiological imaging modalities can complement this technique. We then describe and illustrate how imaging has helped the diagnosis of arrhythmogenic conditions, and how imaging is used to plan and guide clinical cardiac electrophysiologic procedures and assess their results and complications. We focus on the two most common arrhythmias for which imaging has the greatest impact: atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia.

  17. Cardiac tumors: echo assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Mankad MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tumors are exceedingly rare (0.001–0.03% in most autopsy series. They can be present anywhere within the heart and can be attached to any surface or be embedded in the myocardium or pericardial space. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific and highly variable related to the localization, size and composition of the cardiac mass. Echocardiography, typically performed for another indication, may be the first imaging modality alerting the clinician to the presence of a cardiac mass. Although echocardiography cannot give the histopathology, certain imaging features and adjunctive tools such as contrast imaging may aid in the differential diagnosis as do the adjunctive clinical data and the following principles: (1 thrombus or vegetations are the most likely etiology, (2 cardiac tumors are mostly secondary and (3 primary cardiac tumors are mostly benign. Although the finding of a cardiac mass on echocardiography may generate confusion, a stepwise approach may serve well practically. Herein, we will review such an approach and the role of echocardiography in the assessment of cardiac masses.

  18. Psychometric validation of the cardiac rehabilitation barriers scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasegaram, Shamila; Gagliese, Lucia; Oh, Paul; Stewart, Donna E; Brister, Stephanie J; Chan, Victoria; Grace, Sherry L

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Cardiac Rehabilitation Barriers Scale (CRBS). In total, 2636 cardiac inpatients from 11 hospitals completed a survey. One year later, participants completed a follow-up survey, which included the CRBS. A subsample of patients also completed a third survey which included the CRBS, the Cardiac Rehabilitation Enrolment Obstacles scale, and the Beliefs About Cardiac Rehabilitation scale three weeks later. The CRBS asked participants to rate 21 cardiac rehabilitation barriers on a five-point Likert scale regardless of cardiac rehabilitation referral or enrolment. Maximum likelihood factor analysis with oblique rotation resulted in a four-factor solution: perceived need/healthcare factors (eigenvalue = 6.13, Cronbach's α = .89), logistical factors (eigenvalue = 5.83, Cronbach's α = .88), work/time conflicts (eigenvalue = 3.78, Cronbach's α = .71), and comorbidities/functional status (eigenvalue = 4.85, Cronbach's α = .83). Mean total perceived barriers were significantly greater among non-enrollees than cardiac rehabilitation enrollees (P scales was also demonstrated. Test-retest reliability of the CRBS was acceptable (intraclass correlation coefficient = .64). The CRBS consists of four subscales and has sound psychometric properties. The extent to which identified barriers can be addressed to facilitate greater cardiac rehabilitation utilization warrants future study.

  19. Cardiac Extracellular Vesicles in Normal and Infarcted Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitry A. Chistiakov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart is a complex assembly of many cell types constituting myocardium, endocardium and epicardium that intensively communicate to each other in order to maintain the proper cardiac function. There are many types of intercellular intracardiac signals, with a prominent role of extracellular vesicles (EVs, such as exosomes and microvesicles, for long-distant delivering of complex messages. Cardiomyocytes release EVs, whose content could significantly vary depending on the stimulus. In stress, such as hypoxia, inflammation or injury, cardiomyocytes increase secretion of EVs. In hypoxic conditions, cardiac EVs are enriched with angiogenic and prosurvival factors. In acute myocardial infarction (AMI, damaged cardiac muscle cells produce EVs with increased content of angiogenic, anti-apoptotic, mitogenic and growth factors in order to induce repair and healing of the infarcted myocardium. Exosomal microRNAs play a central role in cardiac regeneration. In AMI, circulating cardiac EVs abundantly contain cardiac-specific miRNAs that serve as indicators of cardiac damage and have a big diagnostic potential as AMI biomarkers. Cardioprotective and regenerative properties of exosomes derived from cardiac and non-cardiac stem/progenitor cells are very helpful to be used in cell-free cardiotherapy and regeneration of post-infarct myocardium.

  20. Cardiac Extracellular Vesicles in Normal and Infarcted Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-01-05

    Heart is a complex assembly of many cell types constituting myocardium, endocardium and epicardium that intensively communicate to each other in order to maintain the proper cardiac function. There are many types of intercellular intracardiac signals, with a prominent role of extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes and microvesicles, for long-distant delivering of complex messages. Cardiomyocytes release EVs, whose content could significantly vary depending on the stimulus. In stress, such as hypoxia, inflammation or injury, cardiomyocytes increase secretion of EVs. In hypoxic conditions, cardiac EVs are enriched with angiogenic and prosurvival factors. In acute myocardial infarction (AMI), damaged cardiac muscle cells produce EVs with increased content of angiogenic, anti-apoptotic, mitogenic and growth factors in order to induce repair and healing of the infarcted myocardium. Exosomal microRNAs play a central role in cardiac regeneration. In AMI, circulating cardiac EVs abundantly contain cardiac-specific miRNAs that serve as indicators of cardiac damage and have a big diagnostic potential as AMI biomarkers. Cardioprotective and regenerative properties of exosomes derived from cardiac and non-cardiac stem/progenitor cells are very helpful to be used in cell-free cardiotherapy and regeneration of post-infarct myocardium.

  1. Anisotropic silk biomaterials containing cardiac extracellular matrix for cardiac tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppel, Whitney L; Hu, Dongjian; Domian, Ibrahim J; Kaplan, David L; Black, Lauren D

    2015-03-31

    Cardiac malformations and disease are the leading causes of death in the United States in live-born infants and adults, respectively. In both of these cases, a decrease in the number of functional cardiomyocytes often results in improper growth of heart tissue, wound healing complications, and poor tissue repair. The field of cardiac tissue engineering seeks to address these concerns by developing cardiac patches created from a variety of biomaterial scaffolds to be used in surgical repair of the heart. These scaffolds should be fully degradable biomaterial systems with tunable properties such that the materials can be altered to meet the needs of both in vitro culture (e.g. disease modeling) and in vivo application (e.g. cardiac patch). Current platforms do not utilize both structural anisotropy and proper cell-matrix contacts to promote functional cardiac phenotypes and thus there is still a need for critically sized scaffolds that mimic both the structural and adhesive properties of native tissue. To address this need, we have developed a silk-based scaffold platform containing cardiac tissue-derived extracellular matrix (cECM). These silk-cECM composite scaffolds have tunable architectures, degradation rates, and mechanical properties. Subcutaneous implantation in rats demonstrated that addition of the cECM to aligned silk scaffold led to 99% endogenous cell infiltration and promoted vascularization of a critically sized scaffold (10 × 5 × 2.5 mm) after 4 weeks in vivo. In vitro, silk-cECM scaffolds maintained the HL-1 atrial cardiomyocytes and human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and promoted a more functional phenotype in both cell types. This class of hybrid silk-cECM anisotropic scaffolds offers new opportunities for developing more physiologically relevant tissues for cardiac repair and disease modeling.

  2. Improving cardiac myocytes performance by CNTs platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina eMartinelli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of nanotechnology to the cardiovascular system has increasingly caught scientists’ attention as a potentially powerful tool for the development of new generation devices able to interface, repair or boost the performance of cardiac tissue. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are considered as promising materials for nanomedicine applications in general and have been recently tested towards excitable cell growth. CNTs are cylindrically shaped structures made up of rolled-up graphene sheets, with unique electrical, thermal and mechanical properties, able to effectively conducting electrical current in electrochemical interfaces. CNTs-based scaffolds have been recently found to support the in vitro growth of cardiac cells: in particular, their ability to improve cardiomyocytes proliferation, maturation and electrical behavior are making CNTs extremely attractive for the development and exploitation of interfaces able to impact on cardiac cells physiology and function.

  3. Socially differentiated cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Larsen, Finn Breinholt

    2012-01-01

    cardiac rehabilitation programme. Methods: From 1 September 2002 to 31 December 2005, 388 first-incidence MI patients ≤75 years were hospitalised. Register check for newly hospitalised MI patients, screening interview, and systematic referral were conducted by a project nurse. Patients were referred...... to a standard rehabilitation programme (SRP). If patients were identified as socially vulnerable, they were offered an extended version of the rehabilitation programme (ERP). Excluded patients were offered home visits by a cardiac nurse. Concordance principles were used in the individualised programme elements......Aim: The comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme after myocardial infarction (MI) improves quality of life and results in reduced cardiac mortality and recurrence of MI. Hospitals worldwide face problems with low participation rates in rehabilitation programmes. Inequality...

  4. Cardiac Procedures and Surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Procedure Does A stent is a wire mesh tube used to prop open an artery during ... a Heart Attack • Heart Attack Tools & Resources • Support Network Heart Attack Tools & Resources My Cardiac Coach What ...

  5. Defining the Cardiac Fibroblast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Malina J.; Tallquist, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis remains an important health concern, but the study of fibroblast biology has been hindered by a lack of effective means for identifying and tracking fibroblasts. Recent advances in fibroblast-specific lineage tags and reporters have permitted a better understanding of these cells. After injury multiple cell types have been implicated as the source for extracellular matrix producing cells, but emerging studies suggest that resident cardiac fibroblasts contribute substantially to the remodeling process. In this review, we discuss recent findings regarding cardiac fibroblast origin and identity. Our understanding of cardiac fibroblast biology and fibrosis is still developing and will expand profoundly in the next few years, with many of the recent findings regarding fibroblast gene expression and behavior laying down the groundwork for interpreting the purpose and utility of these cells before and after injury. PMID:27746422

  6. Cardiac Catheterization (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cases, the doctor might call for a cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan or a CAT scan . ... first couple of days. This means no heavy lifting (more than 10 pounds) and no sports. After ...

  7. Cardiac Catheterization (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor may also call for a cardiac MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan or a CT (computerized tomography) ... first couple of days. This means no heavy lifting (nothing over 10 pounds) and no sports. After ...

  8. Cardiac biomarkers in Neonatology

    OpenAIRE

    Vijlbrief, D.C.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the role for cardiac biomarkers in neonatology was investigated. Several clinically relevant results were reported. In term and preterm infants, hypoxia and subsequent adaptation play an important role in cardiac biomarker elevation. The elevated natriuretic peptides are indicative of abnormal function; elevated troponins are suggestive for cardiomyocyte damage. This methodology makes these biomarkers of additional value in the treatment of newborn infants, separate or as a co...

  9. Cardiac imaging in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority

  10. Cardiac imaging in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  11. Awareness in cardiac anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Serfontein, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac surgery represents a sub-group of patients at significantly increased risk of intraoperative awareness. Relatively few recent publications have targeted the topic of awareness in this group. The aim of this review is to identify areas of awareness research that may equally be extrapolated to cardiac anesthesia in the attempt to increase understanding of the nature and significance of this scenario and how to reduce it.

  12. Property (

    CERN Document Server

    Ershov, Mikhail; Kassabov, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The authors introduce and study the class of groups graded by root systems. They prove that if \\Phi is an irreducible classical root system of rank \\geq 2 and G is a group graded by \\Phi, then under certain natural conditions on the grading, the union of the root subgroups is a Kazhdan subset of G. As the main application of this theorem the authors prove that for any reduced irreducible classical root system \\Phi of rank \\geq 2 and a finitely generated commutative ring R with 1, the Steinberg group {\\mathrm St}_{\\Phi}(R) and the elementary Chevalley group \\mathbb E_{\\Phi}(R) have property (T). They also show that there exists a group with property (T) which maps onto all finite simple groups of Lie type and rank \\geq 2, thereby providing a "unified" proof of expansion in these groups.

  13. Engineered hybrid cardiac patches with multifunctional electronics for online monitoring and regulation of tissue function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiner, Ron; Engel, Leeya; Fleischer, Sharon; Malki, Maayan; Gal, Idan; Shapira, Assaf; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Dvir, Tal

    2016-01-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering approaches to treat myocardial infarction, cardiac cells are seeded within three-dimensional porous scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. However, current cardiac patches do not allow for online monitoring and reporting of engineered-tissue performance, and do not interfere to deliver signals for patch activation or to enable its integration with the host. Here, we report an engineered cardiac patch that integrates cardiac cells with flexible, free-standing electronics and a 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The patch exhibited robust electronic properties, enabling the recording of cellular electrical activities and the on-demand provision of electrical stimulation for synchronizing cell contraction. We also show that electroactive polymers containing biological factors can be deposited on designated electrodes to release drugs in the patch microenvironment on-demand. We expect that the integration of complex electronics within cardiac patches will eventually provide therapeutic control and regulation of cardiac function. PMID:26974408

  14. Engineered hybrid cardiac patches with multifunctional electronics for online monitoring and regulation of tissue function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiner, Ron; Engel, Leeya; Fleischer, Sharon; Malki, Maayan; Gal, Idan; Shapira, Assaf; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Dvir, Tal

    2016-06-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering approaches to treat myocardial infarction, cardiac cells are seeded within three-dimensional porous scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. However, current cardiac patches do not allow for online monitoring and reporting of engineered-tissue performance, and do not interfere to deliver signals for patch activation or to enable its integration with the host. Here, we report an engineered cardiac patch that integrates cardiac cells with flexible, freestanding electronics and a 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The patch exhibited robust electronic properties, enabling the recording of cellular electrical activities and the on-demand provision of electrical stimulation for synchronizing cell contraction. We also show that electroactive polymers containing biological factors can be deposited on designated electrodes to release drugs in the patch microenvironment on demand. We expect that the integration of complex electronics within cardiac patches will eventually provide therapeutic control and regulation of cardiac function.

  15. Patient-specific models of cardiac biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher T.; Chuang, Joyce; Frank, Lawrence R.; Nigam, Vishal; Belezzuoli, Ernest; Stark, Paul; Krummen, David E.; Narayan, Sanjiv; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Kerckhoffs, Roy C. P.

    2013-07-01

    Patient-specific models of cardiac function have the potential to improve diagnosis and management of heart disease by integrating medical images with heterogeneous clinical measurements subject to constraints imposed by physical first principles and prior experimental knowledge. We describe new methods for creating three-dimensional patient-specific models of ventricular biomechanics in the failing heart. Three-dimensional bi-ventricular geometry is segmented from cardiac CT images at end-diastole from patients with heart failure. Human myofiber and sheet architecture is modeled using eigenvectors computed from diffusion tensor MR images from an isolated, fixed human organ-donor heart and transformed to the patient-specific geometric model using large deformation diffeomorphic mapping. Semi-automated methods were developed for optimizing the passive material properties while simultaneously computing the unloaded reference geometry of the ventricles for stress analysis. Material properties of active cardiac muscle contraction were optimized to match ventricular pressures measured by cardiac catheterization, and parameters of a lumped-parameter closed-loop model of the circulation were estimated with a circulatory adaptation algorithm making use of information derived from echocardiography. These components were then integrated to create a multi-scale model of the patient-specific heart. These methods were tested in five heart failure patients from the San Diego Veteran's Affairs Medical Center who gave informed consent. The simulation results showed good agreement with measured echocardiographic and global functional parameters such as ejection fraction and peak cavity pressures.

  16. Cardiac radiology: centenary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roos, Albert; Higgins, Charles B

    2014-11-01

    During the past century, cardiac imaging technologies have revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of acquired and congenital heart disease. Many important contributions to the field of cardiac imaging were initially reported in Radiology. The field developed from the early stages of cardiac imaging, including the use of coronary x-ray angiography and roentgen kymography, to nowadays the widely used echocardiographic, nuclear medicine, cardiac computed tomographic (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) applications. It is surprising how many of these techniques were not recognized for their potential during their early inception. Some techniques were described in the literature but required many years to enter the clinical arena and presently continue to expand in terms of clinical application. The application of various CT and MR contrast agents for the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia is a case in point, as the utility of contrast agents continues to expand the noninvasive characterization of myocardium. The history of cardiac imaging has included a continuous process of advances in our understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, along with advances in imaging technology that continue to the present day.

  17. Initial Efficacy of a Cardiac Rehabilitation Transition Program: Cardiac TRUST

    OpenAIRE

    Dolansky, Mary A.; Zullo, Melissa; Boxer, Rebecca; Moore, Shirley M.

    2011-01-01

    Patients recovering from cardiac events are increasingly using postacute care, such as home health care and skilled nursing facility services. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the initial efficacy, feasibility, and safety of a specially designed postacute care transitional rehabilitation intervention for cardiac patients. Cardiac Transitional Rehabilitation Using Self- Management Techniques (Cardiac TRUST) is a family-focused intervention that includes progressive low-intensity wal...

  18. Pediatric cardiac postoperative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auler Jr. José Otávio Costa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo, Medical School is a referral center for the treatment of congenital heart diseases of neonates and infants. In the recent years, the excellent surgical results obtained in our institution may be in part due to modern anesthetic care and to postoperative care based on well-structured protocols. The purpose of this article is to review unique aspects of neonate cardiovascular physiology, the impact of extracorporeal circulation on postoperative evolution, and the prescription for pharmacological support of acute cardiac dysfunction based on our cardiac unit protocols. The main causes of low cardiac output after surgical correction of heart congenital disease are reviewed, and methods of treatment and support are proposed as derived from the relevant literature and our protocols.

  19. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Hochstrasser, Stefan; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The costs of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation are established and compared to the corresponding costs of usual care. The effect on health-related quality of life is analyzed. METHODS: An unprecedented and very detailed cost assessment was carried out, as no guidelines existed...... for the situation at hand. Due to challenging circumstances, the cost assessment turned out to be ex-post and top-down. RESULTS: Cost per treatment sequence is estimated to be approximately euro 976, whereas the incremental cost (compared with usual care) is approximately euro 682. The cost estimate is uncertain...... and may be as high as euro 1.877. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is more costly than usual care, and the higher costs are not outweighed by a quality of life gain. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is, therefore, not cost-effective....

  20. Interpreting biomagnetic fields of planar wave fronts in cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Rodrigo Weber; Koch, Hans

    2005-05-01

    The recent results of Holzer and co-workers reveal the existence of net currents that flow along the front of a planar wave propagating through cardiac tissue. This is an important contribution toward the better understanding of the physics of biomagnetic fields. However, although the authors claim their results reveal particular bidomain properties, we show in this short letter that the results allow multiple interpretations. For instance, cardiac anisotropy by itself may also explain the existence of a net current along the wave front. Based on our calculations, we suggest additional experiments that would allow distinguishing between these two explanations and thus provide further evidence on the basic physics behind cardiac biomagnetism.

  1. Cardiac optogenetics : using light to monitor cardiac physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Charlotte D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41375491X; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Knöpfel, Thomas; de Boer, Teun P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30481878X

    2017-01-01

    Our current understanding of cardiac excitation and its coupling to contraction is largely based on ex vivo studies utilising fluorescent organic dyes to assess cardiac action potentials and signal transduction. Recent advances in optogenetic sensors open exciting new possibilities for cardiac

  2. Cardiac output measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Möller Petrun

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, developments in the measuring of cardiac output and other haemodynamic variables are focused on the so-called minimally invasive methods. The aim of these methods is to simplify the management of high-risk and haemodynamically unstable patients. Due to the need of invasive approach and the possibility of serious complications the use of pulmonary artery catheter has decreased. This article describes the methods for measuring cardiac output, which are based on volume measurement (Fick method, indicator dilution method, pulse wave analysis, Doppler effect, and electrical bioimpedance.

  3. Quantitative cardiac computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, M.; Dueber, C.; Wolff, P.; Erbel, R.; Hoffmann, T.

    1985-06-01

    The scope and limitations of quantitative cardiac CT have been evaluated in a series of experimental and clinical studies. The left ventricular muscle mass was estimated by computed tomography in 19 dogs (using volumetric methods, measurements in two axes and planes and reference volume). There was good correlation with anatomical findings. The enddiastolic volume of the left ventricle was estimated in 22 patients with cardiomyopathies; using angiography as a reference, CT led to systematic under-estimation. It is also shown that ECG-triggered magnetic resonance tomography results in improved visualisation and may be expected to improve measurements of cardiac morphology.

  4. Mechanisms of Cardiac Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uygur, Aysu; Lee, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    Adult humans fail to regenerate their hearts following injury, and this failure to regenerate myocardium is a leading cause of heart failure and death worldwide. Although all adult mammals appear to lack significant cardiac regeneration potential, some vertebrates can regenerate myocardium throughout life. In addition, new studies indicate that mammals have cardiac regeneration potential during development and very soon after birth. The mechanisms of heart regeneration among model organisms, including neonatal mice, appear remarkably similar. Orchestrated waves of inflammation, matrix deposition and remodeling, and cardiomyocyte proliferation are commonly seen in heart regeneration models. Understanding why adult mammals develop extensive scarring instead of regeneration is a crucial goal for regenerative biology. PMID:26906733

  5. MULTILAYER COATINGS Ti/TiN, Cr/CrN AND W/WN DEPOSITED BY MAGNETRON SPUTTERING FOR IMPROVEMENT OF ADHESION TO BASE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Horník

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with evaluation of single and multilayer layer PVD coatings based on Cr and Ti widely used in tool application. Additionally, W and WN based coating which are not so widespread were designed and deposited as functionally graded material. The coatings properties were evaluated from the point of view of hardness and adhesion. The hardness measuring was carried out using nanoindentation method. The scratch test was performed to test adhesion. Moreover, the presence of metallic interlayer in functionally graded materials further increases the coating adhesion by gradually approaching its composition to the substrate. Coatings consisting of W and WN have showed very good adhesion. With regard to the results of the scratch test, the multilayer coatings of CrN, TiN and WN have increased adhesion and can be assumed to have their protective function improved. Results will be appliedin development of functionally graded layers for functionally graded materials.

  6. Neonatal cardiac emergencies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neonatal cardiac emergencies. The neonatal period is one that fills many generalists with fear – this article will help to dispel these concerns. George A Comitis, MB ChB, DCH (SA), DA (SA), FCPaed (SA), Cert Cardiology (SA) Paed. Consultant, Paediatric Cardiology Service of the Western Cape, Red Cross War Memorial ...

  7. Nonexercise cardiac stress testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, J.L.; Baldwin, T.

    1989-01-01

    Many patients who require evaluation for coronary artery disease are unable to undergo exercise stress testing because of physiologic or psychological limitations. Drs Vacek and Baldwin describe three alternative methods for assessment of cardiac function in these patients, all of which have high levels of diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. 23 references

  8. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Bruce Spottiswoode has a BSc in Electrical Engineering from the University of the Witwatersrand and a PhD in Biomedical Engineering on cardiac MRI from the. University of Cape Town. He has worked on developing electronics for the CSIR, on MRI image reconstruction for Siemens, and on X-ray imaging ...

  9. Sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Valenzuela, Antonio Jesus Sanchez; Lachica, E

    1992-01-01

    The study deals with the comparison of morphological, histochemical and biochemical methods applied to the detection of myocardial infarction in 150 medico-legal autopsies performed at the Institute of Forensic Pathology in Copenhagen. The study also included an NBT (formazan) test of cardiac cross...

  10. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  11. Post cardiac injury syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Nielsen, F E

    1991-01-01

    The post-pericardiotomy syndrome is a symptom complex which is similar in many respects to the post-myocardial infarction syndrome and these are summarized under the diagnosis of the Post Cardiac Injury Syndrome (PCIS). This condition, which is observed most frequently after open heart surgery...

  12. Differentiation of sarcoplasmic reticulum during cardiac myogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegg, W.; Michalak, M.

    1987-01-01

    The composition and function of fetal and mature sheep cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes were investigated. Phospholamban, a major phosphoprotein in the mature sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes, was present in early stages of cardiac myogenesis. This fetal form of phospholamban was phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase but not in the presence of Ca 2+ and calmodulin. 35 Ca 2+ uptake and Ca 2+ -dependent ATPase activity were low in fetal sarcoplasmic reticulum compared with the adult controls, although the apparent affinities for Ca 2+ were similar. Sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated at all developmental stages had very low levels of plasma membrane and mitochondrial contamination. Sarcoplasmic reticulum 45 Ca 2+ uptake and Ca 2+ -dependent. ATPase activities were not affected by micromolar concentrations of vanadate, and the accumulated 45 Ca 2+ could not be released by the addition of NaCl. The amount of both the 110- and 55-kDa protein bands, identified with pecific antibodies as Ca 2+ -ATPase and calsequestrin, respectively, was low in early stages of cardiac myogenesis. Age-related differences in the Ca 2+ transport properties of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum and in the amount of the Ca 2+ -ATPase and calsequestrin may explain alterations in the regulation of intracellular Ca 2+ concentrations in the fetal heart. This may contribute to the developmental changes in myocardial function

  13. Biomimetic phantom for cardiac diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Irvin; Zhou, Feng-Lei; Hubbard Cristinacce, Penny L; Parker, Geoffrey J M; Schneider, Jürgen E

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to characterize cardiac tissue microstructure, necessitating the use of physiologically relevant phantoms for methods development. Existing phantoms are generally simplistic and mostly simulate diffusion in the brain. Thus, there is a need for phantoms mimicking diffusion in cardiac tissue. A biomimetic phantom composed of hollow microfibers generated using co-electrospinning was developed to mimic myocardial diffusion properties and fiber and sheet orientations. Diffusion tensor imaging was carried out at monthly intervals over 4 months at 9.4T. 3D fiber tracking was performed using the phantom and compared with fiber tracking in an ex vivo rat heart. The mean apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy of the phantom remained stable over the 4-month period, with mean values of 7.53 ± 0.16 × 10(-4) mm(2) /s and 0.388 ± 0.007, respectively. Fiber tracking of the 1st and 3rd eigenvectors generated analogous results to the fiber and sheet-normal direction respectively, found in the left ventricular myocardium. A biomimetic phantom simulating diffusion in the heart was designed and built. This could aid development and validation of novel diffusion MRI methods for investigating cardiac microstructure, decrease the number of animals and patients needed for methods development, and improve quality control in longitudinal and multicenter cardiac diffusion MRI studies. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. Cardiac CT and cardiac MRI - competitive or complementary for nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshage, W.

    2004-01-01

    In summary, cardiac computed tomography (CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) are two different technologies with distinct imaging properties that gain increasing importance in clinical cardiology. Even though images may look similar, the areas of application of CT and MR are quite different. Clinical applications of cardiac CT focus on on-invasive imaging of the coronary arteries. In this respect, the higher spatial resolution of cardiac CT constitutes a significant advantage as compared to MR and clinical results are superior. Clinical applications of cardiac MR, next to morphologic imaging of the heart, are most frequently found in the context of intra-and pericardial masses, complex congenital anomalies, and the assessment of left ventricular function (dobutamine) and perfusion (adenosine) under stress. The evaluation of the size and localization of myocardial necrosis, scars, and fibrosis gains increasing importance, for example in the workup of myocardial infarction, but also myocarditis and cardiomyopathies. In this respect, magnetic resonance imaging partly constitutes an alternative to nuclear medicine methods. Due to the lack of ionizing radiation and a relatively high spatial resolution, an increase of MR diagnostic procedures at the expense of nuclear medicine can be expected. (orig.)

  15. Effects of AL 107, a novel semisynthetic cardiac glycoside, on the cardiovascular system in anaesthetized beagle dogs with pentobarbital-induced cardiac insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kogel, B; Schneider, J; Gleitz, J; Wilffert, B; Peters, Thies

    The inotropic efficacy, arrhythmogenicity and cardiohaemodynamic properties of AL 107 (3-alpha-methyl-digitoxigenin glucoside. CAS 62190-59-4), a novel cardiac glycoside, were studied in anaesthetized dogs with pentobarbital-induced acute cardiac insufficiency. Three groups of dogs received AL 107,

  16. Maternal cardiac metabolism in pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Laura X.; Arany, Zolt

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy causes dramatic physiological changes in the expectant mother. The placenta, mostly foetal in origin, invades maternal uterine tissue early in pregnancy and unleashes a barrage of hormones and other factors. This foetal ‘invasion’ profoundly reprogrammes maternal physiology, affecting nearly every organ, including the heart and its metabolism. We briefly review here maternal systemic metabolic changes during pregnancy and cardiac metabolism in general. We then discuss changes in cardiac haemodynamic during pregnancy and review what is known about maternal cardiac metabolism during pregnancy. Lastly, we discuss cardiac diseases during pregnancy, including peripartum cardiomyopathy, and the potential contribution of aberrant cardiac metabolism to disease aetiology. PMID:24448314

  17. The pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ping; Christia, Panagiota; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2014-02-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is characterized by net accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in the cardiac interstitium, and contributes to both systolic and diastolic dysfunction in many cardiac pathophysiologic conditions. This review discusses the cellular effectors and molecular pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis. Although activated myofibroblasts are the main effector cells in the fibrotic heart, monocytes/macrophages, lymphocytes, mast cells, vascular cells and cardiomyocytes may also contribute to the fibrotic response by secreting key fibrogenic mediators. Inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, reactive oxygen species, mast cell-derived proteases, endothelin-1, the renin/angiotensin/aldosterone system, matricellular proteins, and growth factors (such as TGF-β and PDGF) are some of the best-studied mediators implicated in cardiac fibrosis. Both experimental and clinical evidence suggests that cardiac fibrotic alterations may be reversible. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for initiation, progression, and resolution of cardiac fibrosis is crucial to design anti-fibrotic treatment strategies for patients with heart disease.

  18. Cardiac fusion and complex congenital cardiac defects in thoracopagus twins: diagnostic value of cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Jun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Hye-Sung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Most thoracopagus twins present with cardiac fusion and associated congenital cardiac defects, and assessment of this anatomy is of critical importance in determining patient care and outcome. Cardiac CT with electrocardiographic triggering provides an accurate and quick morphological assessment of both intracardiac and extracardiac structures in newborns, making it the best imaging modality to assess thoracopagus twins during the neonatal period. In this case report, we highlight the diagnostic value of cardiac CT in thoracopagus twins with an interatrial channel and complex congenital cardiac defects. (orig.)

  19. Remifentanil in critically ill cardiac patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruggeri Laura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Remifentanil has a unique pharmacokinetic profile, with a rapid onset and offset of action and a plasmatic metabolism. Its use can be recommended even in patients with renal impairment, hepatic dysfunction or poor cardiovascular function. A potential protective cardiac preconditioning effect has been suggested. Drug-related adverse effects seem to be comparable with other opioids. In cardiac surgery, many randomized controlled trials demonstrated that the potential benefits of the use of remifentanil not only include a profound protection against intraoperative stressful stimuli, but also rapid postoperative recovery, early weaning from mechanical ventilation, and extubation. Remifentanil shows ideal properties of sedative agents being often employed for minimally invasive cardiologic techniques, such as transcatheter aortic valve implantation and radio frequency treatment of atrial flutter, or diagnostic procedures such as transesophageal echocardiography. In intensive care units remifentanil is associated with a reduction in the time to tracheal extubation after cessation of the continuous infusion; other advantages could be more evident in patients with organ dysfunction. Effective and safe analgesia can be provided in case of short and painful procedures (i.e. chest drain removal. In conclusion, thanks to its peculiar properties, remifentanil will probably play a major role in critically ill cardiac patients.

  20. Fetal cardiac assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    The better understanding of fetal cardiovascular physiology coupled with improved technology for non-invasive study of the fetus now enable much more detailed assessment of fetal cardiac status than by heart rate alone. Even the latter, relatively simple, measurement contains much more information than was previously realized. It is also increasingly clear that no single measurement will provide the answer to all clinical dilemmas either on cardiac function or the welfare of the fetus as a whole. There are obvious clinical advantages in measuring several variables from one signal and the measurement of heart rate, heart rate variation and waveform from the ECG in labour is a potentially useful combination. Systolic time intervals or flow measurements could easily be added or used separately by combining real-time and Doppler ultrasound probes

  1. Cardiac nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerson, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    The book begins with a review of the radionuclide methods available for evaluating cardiac perfusion and function. The authors discuss planar and tomographic thallium myocardial imaging, first-pass and equilibrium radionuclide angiography, and imaging with infarct-avid tracers. Several common but more specialized procedures are then reviewed: nonogemetric measurement of left ventricular volume, phase (Fourier) analysis, stroke volume ratio, right ventricular function, and diastolic function. A separate chapter is devoted to drug interventions and in particular the use of radionuclide ventriculography to monitor doxorubicin toxicity and therapy of congestive heart failure. The subsequent chapters provide a comprehensive guide to test selection, accuracy, and results in acute myocardial infarction, in postmyocardial infarction, in chronic coronary artery disease, before and after medical or surgical revascularization, in valvular heart disease, in cardiomyopathies, and in cardiac trauma.

  2. Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Paeng, Jin Chul

    2004-01-01

    Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging has included Tc-99m Annexin imaging to visualize myocardial apoptosis, but is now usually associated with gene therapy and cell-based therapy. Cardiac gene therapy was not successful so far but cardiac reporter gene imaging was made possible using HSV-TK (herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase) and F-18 FHBG (fluoro-hydroxymethylbutyl guanine) or I-124 FIAU (fluoro-deoxyiodo-arabino-furanosyluracil). Gene delivery was performed by needle injection with or without catheter guidance. TK expression did not last longer than 2 weeks in myocardium. Cell-based therapy of ischemic heart or failing heart looks promising, but biodistribution and differentiation of transplanted cells are not known. Reporter genes can be transfected to the stem/progenitor cells and cells containing these genes can be transplanted to the recipients using catheter-based purging or injection. Repeated imaging should be available and if promoter are varied to let express reporter transgenes, cellular (trans)differentiation can be studied. NIS (sodium iodide symporter) or D2R receptor genes are promising in this aspect

  3. Engineered hybrid cardiac patches with multifunctional electronics for online monitoring and regulation of tissue function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiner, Ron; Engel, Leeya; Fleischer, Sharon; Malki, Maayan; Gal, Idan; Shapira, Assaf; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Dvir, Tal

    2016-06-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering approaches to treat myocardial infarction, cardiac cells are seeded within three-dimensional porous scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. However, current cardiac patches do not allow for online monitoring and reporting of engineered-tissue performance, and do not interfere to deliver signals for patch activation or to enable its integration with the host. Here, we report an engineered cardiac patch that integrates cardiac cells with flexible, freestanding electronics and a 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The patch exhibited robust electronic properties, enabling the recording of cellular electrical activities and the on-demand provision of electrical stimulation for synchronizing cell contraction. We also show that electroactive polymers containing biological factors can be deposited on designated electrodes to release drugs in the patch microenvironment on demand. We expect that the integration of complex electronics within cardiac patches will eventually provide therapeutic control and regulation of cardiac function.

  4. Ketamine in adult cardiac surgery and the cardiac surgery Intensive Care Unit: An evidence-based clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mazzeffi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine is a unique anesthetic drug that provides analgesia, hypnosis, and amnesia with minimal respiratory and cardiovascular depression. Because of its sympathomimetic properties it would seem to be an excellent choice for patients with depressed ventricular function in cardiac surgery. However, its use has not gained widespread acceptance in adult cardiac surgery patients, perhaps due to its perceived negative psychotropic effects. Despite this limitation, it is receiving renewed interest in the United States as a sedative and analgesic drug for critically ill-patients. In this manuscript, the authors provide an evidence-based clinical review of ketamine use in cardiac surgery patients for intensive care physicians, cardio-thoracic anesthesiologists, and cardio-thoracic surgeons. All MEDLINE indexed clinical trials performed during the last 20 years in adult cardiac surgery patients were included in the review.

  5. Blunt and Penetrating Cardiac Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellister, Seth A; Dennis, Bradley M; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2017-10-01

    Patients with traumatic cardiac injuries can present with wide variability in their severity of illness. The most severe will present in cardiac arrest, whereas the most benign may be altogether asymptomatic; most will fall somewhere in between. Management of cardiac injuries largely depends on mechanism of injury and patient physiology. Understanding the spectrum of injuries and their associated manifestations can help providers react more quickly and initiate potentially life-saving therapies more efficiently when time is critical. This article discusses the workup and management of both blunt and penetrating cardiac injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cardiac Dysautonomia in Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abildtrup, Mads; Shattock, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal, hereditary, neurodegenerative disorder best known for its clinical triad of progressive motor impairment, cognitive deficits and psychiatric disturbances. Although a disease of the central nervous system, mortality surveys indicate that heart disease is a leading cause of death. The nature of such cardiac abnormalities remains unknown. Clinical findings indicate a high prevalence of autonomic nervous system dysfunction - dysautonomia - which may be a result of pathology of the central autonomic network. Dysautonomia can have profound effects on cardiac health, and pronounced autonomic dysfunction can be associated with neurogenic arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Significant advances in the knowledge of neural mechanisms in cardiac disease have recently been made which further aid our understanding of cardiac mortality in Huntington's disease. Even so, despite the evidence of aberrant autonomic activity the potential cardiac consequences of autonomic dysfunction have been somewhat ignored. In fact, underlying cardiac abnormalities such as arrhythmias have been part of the exclusion criteria in clinical autonomic Huntington's disease research. A comprehensive analysis of cardiac function in Huntington's disease patients is warranted. Further experimental and clinical studies are needed to clarify how the autonomic nervous system is controlled and regulated in higher, central areas of the brain - and how these regions may be altered in neurological pathology, such as Huntington's disease. Ultimately, research will hopefully result in an improvement of management with the aim of preventing early death in Huntington's disease from cardiac causes.

  7. Potential of Bioactive Glasses for Cardiac and Pulmonary Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Kargozar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Repair and regeneration of disorders affecting cardiac and pulmonary tissues through tissue-engineering-based approaches is currently of particular interest. On this matter, different families of bioactive glasses (BGs have recently been given much consideration with respect to treating refractory diseases of these tissues, such as myocardial infarction. The inherent properties of BGs, including their ability to bond to hard and soft tissues, to stimulate angiogenesis, and to elicit antimicrobial effects, along with their excellent biocompatibility, support these newly proposed strategies. Moreover, BGs can also act as a bioactive reinforcing phase to finely tune the mechanical properties of polymer-based constructs used to repair the damaged cardiac and pulmonary tissues. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of different forms of BGs, alone or in combination with other materials (e.g., polymers, in regards to repair and regenerate injured tissues of cardiac and pulmonary systems.

  8. Antifibrinolytics in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achal Dhir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery exerts a significant strain on the blood bank services and is a model example in which a multi-modal blood-conservation strategy is recommended. Significant bleeding during cardiac surgery, enough to cause re-exploration and/or blood transfusion, increases morbidity and mortality. Hyper-fibrinolysis is one of the important contributors to increased bleeding. This knowledge has led to the use of anti-fibrinolytic agents especially in procedures performed under cardiopulmonary bypass. Nothing has been more controversial in recent times than the aprotinin controversy. Since the withdrawal of aprotinin from the world market, the choice of antifibrinolytic agents has been limited to lysine analogues either tranexamic acid (TA or epsilon amino caproic acid (EACA. While proponents of aprotinin still argue against its non-availability. Health Canada has approved its use, albeit under very strict regulations. Antifibrinolytic agents are not without side effects and act like double-edged swords, the stronger the anti-fibrinolytic activity, the more serious the side effects. Aprotinin is the strongest in reducing blood loss, blood transfusion, and possibly, return to the operating room after cardiac surgery. EACA is the least effective, while TA is somewhere in between. Additionally, aprotinin has been implicated in increased mortality and maximum side effects. TA has been shown to increase seizure activity, whereas, EACA seems to have the least side effects. Apparently, these agents do not differentiate between pathological and physiological fibrinolysis and prevent all forms of fibrinolysis leading to possible thrombotic side effects. It would seem prudent to select the right agent knowing its risk-benefit profile for a given patient, under the given circumstances.

  9. Exercise-related cardiac arrest in cardiac rehabilitation - The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prescribed physical activity plays a major role in the rehabilitation of patients with coronary artery disease, and as with any other form of treatment its benefits must be weighed against its possible risks. This study attempted to establish the safety of cardiac rehabilitation as a medical intervention at the Johannesburg Cardiac ...

  10. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal failure. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many types of cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation......) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit of comprehensively reviewing the available evidence...

  11. CSI cardiac prevent 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ramakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The CSI Cardiac Prevent 2015 was held at Hotel Taj Palace, New Delhi, on September 25-27, 2015. The major challenge was to create interest among cardiologists and physicians on preventive cardiology, a neglected area. The theme of the conference was "Innovations in Heart Disease Prevention.′′ This conference included "CSI at WHF Roadmap Workshop, Inauguration Ceremony, scientific program, plenary sessions, Nursing/Dietician track, Industry Exhibition, Social Events," Great India blood pressure Survey, and CSI Smart Heart App. A total of 848 delegates/faculties attended this conference against a total of 1140 people registered for the meeting.

  12. Single ventricle cardiac defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eren, B.; Turkmen, N.; Fedakar, R.; Cetin, V.

    2010-01-01

    Single ventricle heart is defined as a rare cardiac abnormality with a single ventricle chamber involving diverse functional and physiological defects. Our case is of a ten month-old baby boy who died shortly after admission to the hospital due to vomiting and diarrhoea. Autopsy findings revealed cyanosis of finger nails and ears. Internal examination revealed; large heart, weighing 60 grams, single ventricle, without a septum and upper membranous part. Single ventricle is a rare pathology, hence, this paper aims to discuss this case from a medico-legal point of view. (author)

  13. Assessment of Cardiac Function--Basic Principles and Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinale, Francis G

    2015-09-20

    Increased access and ability to visualize the heart has provided a means to measure a myriad of cardiovascular parameters in real or near real time. However, without fundamental knowledge regarding the basis for cardiac contraction and how to evaluate cardiac function in terms of loading conditions and inotropic state, appropriate interpretation of these cardiovascular parameters can be difficult and can lead to misleading conclusions regarding the functional state of the cardiac muscle. Thus, in this series of Comprehensive Physiology, the basic properties of cardiac muscle function, the cardiac cycle, and determinants of pump function will be reviewed. These basic concepts will then be integrated by presenting approaches in which the effects of preload, afterload, and myocardial contractility can be examined. Moreover, the utility of the pressure-volume relation in terms of assessing both myocardial contractility as well as critical aspects of diastolic performance will be presented. Finally, a generalized approach for the assessment and interpretation of cardiac function within the intact cardiovascular system will be presented. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Pentoxifylline Attenuates Cardiac Remodeling Induced by Tobacco Smoke Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minicucci, Marcos; Oliveira, Fernando; Santos, Priscila; Polegato, Bertha; Roscani, Meliza; Fernandes, Ana Angelica; Lustosa, Beatriz; Paiva, Sergio; Zornoff, Leonardo; Azevedo, Paula, E-mail: paulasa@fmb.unesp.br [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    Tobacco smoke exposure is an important risk factor for cardiac remodeling. Under this condition, inflammation, oxidative stress, energy metabolism abnormalities, apoptosis, and hypertrophy are present. Pentoxifylline has anti‑inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-thrombotic and anti-proliferative properties. The present study tested the hypothesis that pentoxifylline would attenuate cardiac remodeling induced by smoking. Wistar rats were distributed in four groups: Control (C), Pentoxifylline (PX), Tobacco Smoke (TS), and PX-TS. After two months, echocardiography, invasive blood pressure measurement, biochemical, and histological studies were performed. The groups were compared by two-way ANOVA with a significance level of 5%. TS increased left atrium diameter and area, which was attenuated by PX. In the isolated heart study, TS lowered the positive derivate (+dp/dt), and this was attenuated by PX. The antioxidants enzyme superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were decreased in the TS group; PX recovered these activities. TS increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and decreased 3-hydroxyacyl Coenzyme A dehydrogenases (OH-DHA) and citrate synthase (CS). PX attenuated LDH, 3-OH-DHA and CS alterations in TS-PX group. TS increased IL-10, ICAM-1, and caspase-3. PX did not influence these variables. TS induced cardiac remodeling, associated with increased inflammation, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and changed energy metabolism. PX attenuated cardiac remodeling by reducing oxidative stress and improving cardiac bioenergetics, but did not act upon cardiac cytokines and apoptosis.

  15. Methods and apparatus for determining cardiac output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Richard J. (Inventor); Mukkamala, Ramakrishna (Inventor); Sherman, Derin A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for determining a dynamical property of the systemic or pulmonary arterial tree using long time scale information, i.e., information obtained from measurements over time scales greater than a single cardiac cycle. In one aspect, the invention provides a method and apparatus for monitoring cardiac output (CO) from a single blood pressure signal measurement obtained at any site in the systemic or pulmonary arterial tree or from any related measurement including, for example, fingertip photoplethysmography.According to the method the time constant of the arterial tree, defined to be the product of the total peripheral resistance (TPR) and the nearly constant arterial compliance, is determined by analyzing the long time scale variations (greater than a single cardiac cycle) in any of these blood pressure signals. Then, according to Ohm's law, a value proportional to CO may be determined from the ratio of the blood pressure signal to the estimated time constant. The proportional CO values derived from this method may be calibrated to absolute CO, if desired, with a single, absolute measure of CO (e.g., thermodilution). The present invention may be applied to invasive radial arterial blood pressure or pulmonary arterial blood pressure signals which are routinely measured in intensive care units and surgical suites or to noninvasively measured peripheral arterial blood pressure signals or related noninvasively measured signals in order to facilitate the clinical monitoring of CO as well as TPR.

  16. Cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, M.S.; Ambudkar, I.S.; Young, E.P.; Naseem, S.M.; Heald, F.P.; Shamoo, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect on the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum of an atherogenic (1% cholesterol) diet fed during the neonatal vs the juvenile period of life was studied in Yorkshire swine. Male piglets were randomly assigned at birth to 1 of 4 groups: group I (control), group II (lactation feeding), group III (juvenile period feeding) and group IV (lactation and juvenile feeding). All animals were killed at 55 weeks of age and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) isolated for assay of calcium uptake, Ca 2+ -Mg 2+ ATPase activity, and lipid analysis by thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography. The amount of cholesterol/mg SR protein and the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio were higher in the animals fed during lactation (groups II and IV) and lower in those fed only during the juvenile period (group III). Phospholipid fatty acid patterns as measured by gas chromatography were unaltered in any group. Calcium uptake was markedly diminished in all experimental conditions: group II 47%, group III 65% and group IV 96%. Compared to the observed changes in calcium transport, the ATP hydrolytic activity was relatively less affected. Only in group IV a significant decrease (41%) was seen. Groups II and III show no change in ATP hydrolytic activity. The decrease in calcium uptake and altered cholesterol/phospholipid ratio without effect on ATP hydrolytic activity is consistent with an uncoupling of calcium transport related to the atherogenic diet in early life. (author)

  17. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw…

  18. Pediatric Cardiac Surgery In Eritrea.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The teams consisted of volunteer physicians from Germany, Italy and Switzerland including cardiac surgeons, pediatric cardiologists, cardiac anesthesiologists, pediatric intensivists, perfusionists, and other nursing staff. Each mission has routinely included at least 18 health professionals of different category to maximize the.

  19. Diagnostic value of cardiac cineangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Man Chung; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Im, Chung Gie; Yoo, Shi Joon

    1979-01-01

    Cineangiography is essential and excellent tool for evaluation of anatomy and pathophysiology of heart disease. 114 cases of cardiac cineangiography were analyzed. The following conditions are easily interpreted and diagnosed accurately by cineangiography. 1. Valvular insufficiency, especially small amount. 2. Valve motion, shape analysis. 3. Detection of shunt. 4. Ventricle wall movement. 5. Complexed congenita cardiac anomaly. 6. Coronary artery stenosis.

  20. The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rossau, Henriette Knold; Nakano, Anne

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database (DHRD) aims to improve the quality of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) to the benefit of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). STUDY POPULATION: Hospitalized patients with CHD with stenosis on coronary angiography treated with percutane...

  1. Neuromuscular diseases after cardiac transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateen, Farrah J.; van de Beek, Diederik; Kremers, Walter K.; Daly, Richard C.; Edwards, Brooks S.; McGregor, Christopher G. A.; Wijdicks, Eelco F. M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac transplantation is a therapeutic option in end-stage heart failure. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) disease is known to occur in cardiac transplant recipients but has not been fully characterized. METHODS: This retrospective cohort review reports the PNS-related concerns of 313

  2. Cardiac arrest – cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within 10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care (with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care the rate of survival is higher.

  3. Preparation of human cardiac anti-myosin: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, H.; Souza, I.T.T.

    1990-01-01

    The present communication is a review of the physicochemical characterization and immunological properties of myosin isolated from the cardiac muscle, the production of monoclonal antibody anti-myosin, the radiolabeling of this antibody and its applications as radiopharmaceuticals to imaging myocardial infarcts. The classical example of radioimmunologic diagnosis of non malignant tissues is the detection of myocardial infarction by radiolabeled antibodies to myosin. (author)

  4. Spatiotemporal representation of cardiac vectorcardiogram (VCG signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hui

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vectorcardiogram (VCG signals monitor both spatial and temporal cardiac electrical activities along three orthogonal planes of the body. However, the absence of spatiotemporal resolution in conventional VCG representations is a major impediment for medical interpretation and clinical usage of VCG. This is especially so because time-domain features of 12-lead ECG, instead of both spatial and temporal characteristics of VCG, are widely used for the automatic assessment of cardiac pathological patterns. Materials and methods We present a novel representation approach that captures critical spatiotemporal heart dynamics by displaying the real time motion of VCG cardiac vectors in a 3D space. Such a dynamic display can also be realized with only one lead ECG signal (e.g., ambulatory ECG through an alternative lag-reconstructed ECG representation from nonlinear dynamics principles. Furthermore, the trajectories are color coded with additional dynamical properties of space-time VCG signals, e.g., the curvature, speed, octant and phase angles to enhance the information visibility. Results In this investigation, spatiotemporal VCG signal representation is used to characterize various spatiotemporal pathological patterns for healthy control (HC, myocardial infarction (MI, atrial fibrillation (AF and bundle branch block (BBB. The proposed color coding scheme revealed that the spatial locations of the peak of T waves are in the Octant 6 for the majority (i.e., 74 out of 80 of healthy recordings in the PhysioNet PTB database. In contrast, the peak of T waves from 31.79% (117/368 of MI subjects are found to remain in Octant 6 and the rest (68.21% spread over all other octants. The spatiotemporal VCG signal representation is shown to capture the same important heart characteristics as the 12-lead ECG plots and more. Conclusions Spatiotemporal VCG signal representation is shown to facilitate the characterization of space-time cardiac

  5. Cardiac changes in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding-Barclay, Michael A; Stern, Jessica; Mehler, Philip S

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder, which is associated with many different medical complications as a result of the weight loss and malnutrition that characterise this illness. It has the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder. A large portion of deaths are attributable to the cardiac abnormalities that ensue as a result of the malnutrition associated with anorexia nervosa. In this review, the cardiac complications of anorexia nervosa will be discussed. A comprehensive literature review on cardiac changes in anorexia nervosa was carried out. There are structural, functional, and rhythm-type changes that occur in patients with anorexia nervosa. These become progressively significant as ongoing weight loss occurs. Cardiac changes are inherent to anorexia nervosa and they become more life-threatening and serious as the anorexia nervosa becomes increasingly severe. Weight restoration and attention to these cardiac changes are crucial for a successful treatment outcome.

  6. [Maternal cardiac arrhythmias in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatkowska-Freund, Małgorzata; Ciach, Katarzyna; Kowalewska-Włas, Agnieszka; Preis, Krzysztof

    2005-12-01

    Perinatal care of women with cardiac arrhythmias is very important for every obstetrician. Maternal heart disease complicates 0.2 to 4% of pregnancies. The purpose of this study was to analyze the course of pregnancy, delivery and postpartum period pregnant women with cardiac arrhythmias We analyzed 14 pregnant women with cardiac arrhythmias. hospitalized in the Department of Obstetrics of Medical University of Gdańsk, 1998-2003. Time of delivery, weight and length of neonates in patients with cardiac arrhythmias was presented. Delivery and postpartum period were uncomplicated in all the patients and no stimulation was used. In two women with congenital complete atrio-ventricular block dicavital heart stimulator was applied. All patients and infants were discharged from hospital in good condition. We found no cardiological complications during pregnancy in patients with cardiac arrhythmias.

  7. Cardiac asystole in partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C A; Fish, D R

    2000-06-01

    Literature review shows many anecdotal case reports of cardiac asystole in ictal recordings of partial seizures. We have reviewed our data from the last five years, of patients who are being assessed for epilepsy surgery and found 2 out of more than 1,500 complex partial seizures, recorded in 589 consecutive patients, showing a significant period of asystole (13 and 15 seconds). Our previous studies of cardiac and respiratory parameters during partial seizures showed that a central apnoea occurred in 39%. It is probable that sudden death during seizures is due to the interaction of both cardiac and respiratory irregularities. Although rare (occurrence cardiac asystole occurring in an epilepsy monitoring unit highlights the need for resuscitation equipment to be readily available and for trained nursing staff. Furthermore, it is important to recognize that the semiology of seizures may be affected by the consequences of secondary cardiac asystole.

  8. Electrospun biocomposite nanofibrous patch for cardiac tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Ramakrishna, Seeram [Health Care and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Kai, Dan [NUS Graduate School of Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh, E-mail: nnimpp@nus.edu.s [Islamic Azad University, Najafabad Branch, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    A bioengineered construct that matches the chemical, mechanical, biological properties and extracellular matrix morphology of native tissue could be suitable as a cardiac patch for supporting the heart after myocardial infarction. The potential of utilizing a composite nanofibrous scaffold of poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide)/gelatin (PLGA/Gel) as a biomimetic cardiac patch is studied by culturing a population of cardiomyocyte containing cells on the electrospun scaffolds. The chemical characterization and mechanical properties of the electrospun PLGA and PLGA/Gel nanofibers were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and tensile measurements. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was also studied and the cardiomyocytes seeded on PLGA/Gel nanofibers were found to express the typical functional cardiac proteins such as alpha-actinin and troponin I, showing the easy integration of cardiomyocytes on PLGA/Gel scaffolds. Our studies strengthen the application of electrospun PLGA/Gel nanofibers as a bio-mechanical support for injured myocardium and as a potential substrate for induction of endogenous cardiomyocyte proliferation, ultimately reducing the cardiac dysfunction and improving cardiac remodeling.

  9. Cardiac potassium channel subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Nicole; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2014-01-01

    . The underlying posttranscriptional and posttranslational remodeling of the individual K(+) channels changes their activity and significance relative to each other, and they must be viewed together to understand their role in keeping a stable heart rhythm, also under menacing conditions like attacks of reentry......About 10 distinct potassium channels in the heart are involved in shaping the action potential. Some of the K(+) channels are primarily responsible for early repolarization, whereas others drive late repolarization and still others are open throughout the cardiac cycle. Three main K(+) channels...... that they could constitute targets for new pharmacological treatment of atrial fibrillation. The interplay between the different K(+) channel subtypes in both atria and ventricle is dynamic, and a significant up- and downregulation occurs in disease states such as atrial fibrillation or heart failure...

  10. Cardiac Rehabilitation Series: Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Sherry L.; Bennett, Stephanie; Ardern, Chris I.; Clark, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in Canada. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has a long robust history here, and there are established clinical practice guidelines. While the effectiveness of CR in the Canadian context is clear, only 34% of eligible patients participate, and strategies to increase access for under-represented groups (e.g., women, ethnic minority groups) are not yet universally applied. Identified CR barriers include lack of referral and physician recommendation, travel and distance, and low perceived need. Indeed there is now a national policy position recommending systematic inpatient referral to CR in Canada. Recent development of 30 CR Quality Indicators and the burgeoning national CR registry will enable further measurement and improvement of the quality of CR care in Canada. Finally, the Canadian Association of CR is one of the founding members of the International Council of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, to promote CR globally. PMID:24607018

  11. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both...... supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in hypertensive patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or HF. Also, some of the antihypertensive drugs commonly used to reduce blood pressure, such as thiazide diuretics, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia......, hypomagnesemia), further contributing to arrhythmias, whereas effective control of blood pressure may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between hypertension and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society...

  12. Mediastinitis after cardiac transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noedir A. G. Stolf

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assessment of incidence and behavior of mediastinitis after cardiac transplantation. METHODS: From 1985 to 1999, 214 cardiac transplantations were performed, 12 (5.6% of the transplanted patients developed confirmed mediastinitis. Patient's ages ranged from 42 to 66 years (mean of 52.3±10.0 years and 10 (83.3% patients were males. Seven (58.3% patients showed sternal stability on palpation, 4 (33.3% patients had pleural empyema, and 2 (16.7% patients did not show purulent secretion draining through the wound. RESULTS: Staphylococcus aureus was the infectious agent identified in the wound secretion or in the mediastinum, or both, in 8 (66.7% patients. Staphylococcus epidermidis was identified in 2 (16.7% patients, Enterococcus faecalis in 1 (8.3% patient, and the cause of mediastinitis could not be determined in 1 (8.3% patient. Surgical treatment was performed on an emergency basis, and the extension of the débridement varied with local conditions. In 2 (16.7% patients, we chose to leave the surgical wound open and performed daily dressings with granulated sugar. Total sternal resection was performed in only 1 (8.3% patient. Out of this series, 5 (41.7% patients died, and the causes of death were related to the infection. Autopsy revealed persistence of mediastinitis in 1 (8.3% patient. CONCLUSION: Promptness in diagnosing mediastinitis and precocious surgical drainage have changed the natural evolution of this disease. Nevertheless, observance of the basic precepts of prophylaxis of infection is still the best way to treat mediastinitis.

  13. Cardiac syncope in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massin, Martial M; Malekzadeh-Milani, Sophie; Benatar, Avram

    2007-02-01

    To assess the epidemiology of cardiac syncope in children and evaluate the guidelines on its management. We analyzed the etiology to syncope and diagnostic workup in consecutive pediatric patients presenting with syncope in our emergency departments or cardiac outpatient clinics between 1997 and 2005, and who were subsequently diagnosed as having cardiac syncope. A primary cardiac cause was identified in 11 syncopal patients presenting to the emergency room and 14 patients to the cardiac clinic: supraventricular tachyarrhythmia in 9, ventricular tachyarrhythmia in 10, pacemaker dysfunction in 2, and isolated cases of sick sinus syndrome, hypoxic spell, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and primary pulmonary hypertension. Some elements suggested potential cardiac disease as a cause of syncope in all cases. The resting electrocardiogram and the echocardiogram were interpreted as positive and relevant to the diagnosis in 17 and 3 patients, respectively. Exercise electrocardiogram and Holter recording provided diagnostic information previously not seen on the resting electrocardiogram in six and three patients, respectively. Three children have died and one child has neurological sequelae following resuscitation. Our data support the premise that careful history taking with special focus on the events leading up to syncope, as well as a complete physical examination, can guide practitioners in discerning which syncopal children need further cardiac investigations. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Metoclopramide-induced cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M. Rumore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of cardiac arrest in a patient receiving intravenous (IV metoclopramide and review the pertinent literature. A 62-year-old morbidly obese female admitted for a gastric sleeve procedure, developed cardiac arrest within one minute of receiving metoclopramide 10 mg via slow intravenous (IV injection. Bradycardia at 4 beats/min immediately appeared, progressing rapidly to asystole. Chest compressions restored vital function. Electrocardiogram (ECG revealed ST depression indicative of myocardial injury. Following intubation, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. Various cardiac dysrrhythmias including supraventricular tachycardia (SVT associated with hypertension and atrial fibrillation occurred. Following IV esmolol and metoprolol, the patient reverted to normal sinus rhythm. Repeat ECGs revealed ST depression resolution without pre-admission changes. Metoclopramide is a non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist. Seven cases of cardiac arrest and one of sinus arrest with metoclopramide were found in the literature. The metoclopramide prescribing information does not list precautions or adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to cardiac arrest. The reaction is not dose related but may relate to the IV administration route. Coronary artery disease was the sole risk factor identified. According to Naranjo, the association was possible. Other reports of cardiac arrest, severe bradycardia, and SVT were reviewed. In one case, five separate IV doses of 10 mg metoclopramide were immediately followed by asystole repeatedly. The mechanism(s underlying metoclopramide’s cardiac arrest-inducing effects is unknown. Structural similarities to procainamide may play a role. In view of eight previous cases of cardiac arrest from metoclopramide having been reported, further elucidation of this ADR and patient monitoring is needed. Our report should alert clinicians to monitor patients and remain diligent in surveillance and

  15. Fetal cardiac rhabdomyoma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mostafa Ghavami

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The primary manifestation of cardiac tumors in embryonic period is a very rare condition. Cardiac rhabdomyomas most frequently arise in the ventricular myocardium, they may also occur in the atria and the epicardial surface. In spite of its benign nature, the critical location of the tumor inside the heart can lead to lethal arrhythmias and chamber obstruction. Multiple rhabdomyomas are strongly associated with tuberous sclerosis which is associated with mental retardation and epilepsy of variable severity. Ultrasonography as a part of routine prenatal screening, is the best method for the diagnosis of cardiac rhabdomyomas. In the review of articles published in Iran, fetal cardiac rhabdomyoma was not reported. Case presentation: We report a case of cardiac rhabdomyoma on a 24-year-old gravid 1, referred to Day Medical Imaging Center for routine evaluation of fetal abnormalities at 31 weeks of her gestational age. Ultrasonographic examination displayed a homogenous echogenic mass (13×9mm, originating from the left ventricle of the fetal heart. It was a normal pregnancy without any specific complications. Other organs of the fetus were found normal and no cardiac abnormalities were appeared. No Pericardial fluid effusion was found. The parents did not have consanguineous marriage. They did not also have any specific disease such as tuberous sclerosis. Conclusion: The clinical features of cardiac rhabdomyomas vary widely, depending on the location, size, and number of tumors in the heart. Although cardiac rhabdomyoma is a benign tumor in many affected fetuses, an early prenatal diagnosis of the tumor is of great significance in making efficient planning and providing adequate follow up visits of the patients and the complications such as, heart failure and outlet obstruction of cardiac chambers.

  16. Acupuncture therapy related cardiac injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-feng; Wang, Xian

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac injury is the most serious adverse event in acupuncture therapy. The causes include needling chest points near the heart, the cardiac enlargement and pericardial effusion that will enlarge the projected area on the body surface and make the proper depth of needling shorter, and the incorrect needling method of the points. Therefore, acupuncture practitioners must be familiar with the points of the heart projected area on the chest and the correct needling methods in order to reduce the risk of acupuncture therapy related cardiac injury.

  17. Salacia oblonga root improves cardiac lipid metabolism in Zucker diabetic fatty rats: Modulation of cardiac PPAR-α-mediated transcription of fatty acid metabolic genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Tom H.-W.; Yang Qinglin; Harada, Masaki; Uberai, Jasna; Radford, Jane; Li, George Q.; Yamahara, Johji; Roufogalis, Basil D.; Li Yuhao

    2006-01-01

    Excess cardiac triglyceride accumulation in diabetes and obesity induces lipotoxicity, which predisposes the myocytes to death. On the other hand, increased cardiac fatty acid (FA) oxidation plays a role in the development of myocardial dysfunction in diabetes. PPAR-α plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis of lipid metabolism. We have previously demonstrated that the extract from Salacia oblonga root (SOE), an Ayurvedic anti-diabetic and anti-obesity medicine, improves hyperlipidemia in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats (a genetic model of type 2 diabetes and obesity) and possesses PPAR-α activating properties. Here we demonstrate that chronic oral administration of SOE reduces cardiac triglyceride and FA contents and decreases the Oil red O-stained area in the myocardium of ZDF rats, which parallels the effects on plasma triglyceride and FA levels. Furthermore, the treatment suppressed cardiac overexpression of both FA transporter protein-1 mRNA and protein in ZDF rats, suggesting inhibition of increased cardiac FA uptake as the basis for decreased cardiac FA levels. Additionally, the treatment also inhibited overexpression in ZDF rat heart of PPAR-α mRNA and protein and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, acyl-CoA oxidase and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase mRNAs and restored the downregulated acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA. These results suggest that SOE inhibits cardiac FA oxidation in ZDF rats. Thus, our findings suggest that improvement by SOE of excess cardiac lipid accumulation and increased cardiac FA oxidation in diabetes and obesity occurs by reduction of cardiac FA uptake, thereby modulating cardiac PPAR-α-mediated FA metabolic gene transcription

  18. Inverse correlation between cardiac injury and cardiac anxiety: A potential role for communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, M.H.C.T.; Voshaar, R.C.O.; van Deelen, F.M.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.; Pop, G.; Speckens, A.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: General anxiety in cardiac patients is associated with worsened cardiac course. An acute coronary syndrome (ACS) might evoke specific cardiac anxiety. We explored the characteristics associated with cardiac anxiety in ACS patients. Methods: We assessed cardiac anxiety in 237 patients

  19. Inverse Correlation Between Cardiac Injury and Cardiac Anxiety A Potential Role for Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, Maria H. C. T.; Oude Voshaar, Richard; van Deelen, Femke M.; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.; Pop, Gheorghe; Speckens, Anne E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: General anxiety in cardiac patients is associated with worsened cardiac course. An acute coronary syndrome (ACS) might evoke specific cardiac anxiety. We explored the characteristics associated with cardiac anxiety in ACS patients. Methods: We assessed cardiac anxiety in 237 patients

  20. Inverse correlation between cardiac injury and cardiac anxiety: a potential role for communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, M.H.C.T. van; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Deelen, F.M. van; Balkom, A.J.L.M. van; Pop, G.A.; Speckens, A.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: General anxiety in cardiac patients is associated with worsened cardiac course. An acute coronary syndrome (ACS) might evoke specific cardiac anxiety. We explored the characteristics associated with cardiac anxiety in ACS patients. METHODS: We assessed cardiac anxiety in 237 patients

  1. Engineered Biomaterials to Enhance Stem Cell-Based Cardiac Tissue Engineering and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Anwarul; Waters, Renae; Roula, Boustany; Dana, Rahbani; Yara, Seif; Alexandre, Toubia; Paul, Arghya

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. Since adult cardiac cells are limited in their proliferation, cardiac tissue with dead or damaged cardiac cells downstream of the occluded vessel does not regenerate after myocardial infarction. The cardiac tissue is then replaced with nonfunctional fibrotic scar tissue rather than new cardiac cells, which leaves the heart weak. The limited proliferation ability of host cardiac cells has motivated investigators to research the potential cardiac regenerative ability of stem cells. Considerable progress has been made in this endeavor. However, the optimum type of stem cells along with the most suitable matrix-material and cellular microenvironmental cues are yet to be identified or agreed upon. This review presents an overview of various types of biofunctional materials and biomaterial matrices, which in combination with stem cells, have shown promises for cardiac tissue replacement and reinforcement. Engineered biomaterials also have applications in cardiac tissue engineering, in which tissue constructs are developed in vitro by combining stem cells and biomaterial scaffolds for drug screening or eventual implantation. This review highlights the benefits of using biomaterials in conjunction with stem cells to repair damaged myocardium and give a brief description of the properties of these biomaterials that make them such valuable tools to the field. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Robotic Applications in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan P. Kypson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, cardiac surgery has been performed through a median sternotomy, which allows the surgeon generous access to the heart and surrounding great vessels. As a paradigm shift in the size and location of incisions occurs in cardiac surgery, new methods have been developed to allow the surgeon the same amount of dexterity and accessibility to the heart in confined spaces and in a less invasive manner. Initially, long instruments without pivot points were used, however, more recent robotic telemanipulation systems have been applied that allow for improved dexterity, enabling the surgeon to perform cardiac surgery from a distance not previously possible. In this rapidly evolving field, we review the recent history and clinical results of using robotics in cardiac surgery.

  3. Understanding traumatic blunt cardiac injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Al Thani, Hassan; Zarour, Ahmad; Latifi, Rifat

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac injuries are classified as blunt and penetrating injuries. In both the injuries, the major issue is missing the diagnosis and high mortality. Blunt cardiac injuries (BCI) are much more common than penetrating injuries. Aiming at a better understanding of BCI, we searched the literature from January 1847 to January 2012 by using MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. Using the key word "Blunt Cardiac Injury," we found 1814 articles; out of which 716 articles were relevant. Herein, we review the causes, diagnosis, and management of BCI. In conclusion, traumatic cardiac injury is a major challenge in critical trauma care, but the guidelines are lacking. A high index of suspicion, application of current diagnostic protocols, and prompt and appropriate management is mandatory.

  4. Understanding traumatic blunt cardiac injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman El-Menyar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac injuries are classified as blunt and penetrating injuries. In both the injuries, the major issue is missing the diagnosis and high mortality. Blunt cardiac injuries (BCI are much more common than penetrating injuries. Aiming at a better understanding of BCI, we searched the literature from January 1847 to January 2012 by using MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. Using the key word "Blunt Cardiac Injury," we found 1814 articles; out of which 716 articles were relevant. Herein, we review the causes, diagnosis, and management of BCI. In conclusion, traumatic cardiac injury is a major challenge in critical trauma care, but the guidelines are lacking. A high index of suspicion, application of current diagnostic protocols, and prompt and appropriate management is mandatory.

  5. Recent developments in cardiac pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, D J

    1995-10-01

    Indications for cardiac pacing continue to expand. Pacing to improve functional capacity, which is now common, relies on careful patient selection and technical improvements, such as complex software algorithms and diagnostic capabilities.

  6. Cardiac Regeneration and Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Mignone, John; MacLellan, W Robb

    2015-10-01

    After decades of believing the heart loses the ability to regenerate soon after birth, numerous studies are now reporting that the adult heart may indeed be capable of regeneration, although the magnitude of new cardiac myocyte formation varies greatly. While this debate has energized the field of cardiac regeneration and led to a dramatic increase in our understanding of cardiac growth and repair, it has left much confusion in the field as to the prospects of regenerating the heart. Studies applying modern techniques of genetic lineage tracing and carbon-14 dating have begun to establish limits on the amount of endogenous regeneration after cardiac injury, but the underlying cellular mechanisms of this regeneration remained unclear. These same studies have also revealed an astonishing capacity for cardiac repair early in life that is largely lost with adult differentiation and maturation. Regardless, this renewed focus on cardiac regeneration as a therapeutic goal holds great promise as a novel strategy to address the leading cause of death in the developed world. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Cardiac misconceptions in healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Neil; Patience, Fiona; Maclean, Elizabeth; Corrigall, Helen; Bradbury, Ian; Thompson, David R; Atherton, Iain; Leslie, Stephen J

    2012-12-01

    Cardiac misconceptions are common and may have a detrimental effect on patients. Such misconceptions may be introduced or reinforced by vague and inconsistent advice from healthcare staff and can adversely affect health outcomes. To assess whether level of cardiac misconceptions significantly differs between groups of healthcare staff based on occupation. The 22-item York cardiac beliefs questionnaire (YCBQ) was administered to a convenience sample of healthcare staff (n = 263) in direct contact with cardiac patients. Data was also collected on the occupation of healthcare staff and years worked. Medical staff had the lowest mean score (17.5, CI 15.6-19.4), indicating fewest misconceptions, and unqualified healthcare workers had the highest mean score (32.1, CI 28.4-35.7). Analysis by ANOVA indicated differences between staff groups to be statistically significant (F = 17.66, p misconception score (Pearson's r = - 0.243, p misconceptions in different groups of healthcare staff. Education to correct cardiac misconceptions should be particularly targeted at unqualified healthcare staff. The importance of maintaining appropriate ratios of qualified to unqualified healthcare staff in the care of cardiac patients is supported by this study.

  8. FGF21 and cardiac physiopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna ePlanavila

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The heart is not traditionally considered either a target or a site of fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21 production. However, recent findings indicate that FGF21 can act as a cardiomyokine; that is, it is produced by cardiac cells at significant levels and acts in an autocrine manner on the heart itself. The heart is sensitive to the effects of FGF21, both systemic and locally generated, owing to the expression in cardiomyocytes of β-Klotho, the key co-receptor known to confer specific responsiveness to FGF21 action. FGF21 has been demonstrated to protect against cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac inflammation, and oxidative stress. FGF21 expression in the heart is induced in response to cardiac insults, such as experimental cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial infarction in rodents, as well as in failing human hearts. Intracellular mechanisms involving PPARα and Sirt1 mediate transcriptional regulation of the FGF21 gene in response to exogenous stimuli. In humans, circulating FGF21 levels are elevated in coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis, and are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. These findings provide new insights into the role of FGF21 in the heart and may offer potential therapeutic strategies for cardiac disease.

  9. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Marie; Diaz, Lars Jorge; Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm

    2014-01-01

    genetic testing for DM1. Information on incident cardiac diseases was obtained from the NPR. We estimated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of cardiac disease compared with the background population, overall and according to selected diagnostic subgroups (cardiomyopathy, heart failure, conduction...... disorders, arrhythmias, and device implantation). In the DM cohort, SIR for any cardiac disease was 3.42 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.01-3.86]; for a cardiac disease belonging to the selected subgroups 6.91 (95% CI: 5.93-8.01) and for other cardiac disease 2.59 (95% CI: 2.03-3.25). For a cardiac disease...... belonging to the selected subgroups, the risk was particularly high in the first year after DM diagnosis [SIR 15.4 (95% CI: 10.9-21.3)] but remained significantly elevated in subsequent years [SIR 6.07 (95% CI: 5.11-7.16]). The risk was higher in young cohort members [e.g. 20-39 years: SIR 18.1 (95% CI: 12...

  10. Sudden Cardiac Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard, Bjarke; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Jabbari, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to describe the use of pharmacotherapy in a nationwide cohort of young patients with sudden cardiac death (SCD). Background Several drugs have been associated with an increased risk of SCD and sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS). It remains unclear how....... Autopsy was performed in 55%. Overall, 58% of SCD cases (n = 786) received at least 1 drug within 90 days before death. The most common drugs were analgesic drugs (n = 239; 18%), antihypertensive drugs (n = 234; 17%), and antibiotic drugs (n = 218; 16%). After multivariable adjustment, prescription...... of “brugadogenic” drugs or >1 QT-prolonging drug was associated with an increased risk of SADS compared with explained SCD (odds ratio: 2.16 [95% confidence interval: 1.12 to 4.17] and 2.91 [95% confidence interval: 1.46 to 5.81], respectively). Conclusions Pharmacotherapy was identified in 58% of the SCD cases...

  11. Cardiac output during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebenmann, C; Rasmussen, P.; Sørensen, H.

    2015-01-01

    Several techniques assessing cardiac output (Q) during exercise are available. The extent to which the measurements obtained from each respective technique compares to one another, however, is unclear. We quantified Q simultaneously using four methods: the Fick method with blood obtained from...... the right atrium (Q(Fick-M)), Innocor (inert gas rebreathing; Q(Inn)), Physioflow (impedance cardiography; Q(Phys)), and Nexfin (pulse contour analysis; Q(Pulse)) in 12 male subjects during incremental cycling exercise to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (FiO2  = 12%). While all four methods reported...... a progressive increase in Q with exercise intensity, the slopes of the Q/oxygen uptake (VO2) relationship differed by up to 50% between methods in both normoxia [4.9 ± 0.3, 3.9 ± 0.2, 6.0 ± 0.4, 4.8 ± 0.2 L/min per L/min (mean ± SE) for Q(Fick-M), Q(Inn), QP hys and Q(Pulse), respectively; P = 0...

  12. Risk factors and the effect of cardiac resynchronization therapy on cardiac and non-cardiac mortality in MADIT-CRT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perkiomaki, Juha S; Ruwald, Anne-Christine; Kutyifa, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To understand modes of death and factors associated with the risk for cardiac and non-cardiac deaths in patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (CRT-D) vs. implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy, which may help clarify...... the action and limitations of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in relieving myocardial dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: In Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial-Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (MADIT-CRT), during 4 years of follow-up, 169 (9.3%) of 1820 patients died of known...... causes, 108 (63.9%) deemed cardiac, and 61 (36.1%) non-cardiac. In multivariate analysis, increased baseline creatinine was significantly associated with both cardiac and non-cardiac deaths [hazard ratio (HR) 2.97, P

  13. Cardiac output monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathews Lailu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive and non-invasive methods of estimation of cardiac output (CO were developed to overcome the limitations of invasive nature of pulmonary artery catheterization (PAC and direct Fick method used for the measurement of stroke volume (SV. The important minimally invasive techniques available are: oesophageal Doppler monitoring (ODM, the derivative Fick method (using partial carbon dioxide (CO 2 breathing, transpulmonary thermodilution, lithium indicator dilution, pulse contour and pulse power analysis. Impedance cardiography is probably the only non-invasive technique in true sense. It provides information about haemodynamic status without the risk, cost and skill associated with the other invasive or minimally invasive techniques. It is important to understand what is really being measured and what assumptions and calculations have been incorporated with respect to a monitoring device. Understanding the basic principles of the above techniques as well as their advantages and limitations may be useful. In addition, the clinical validation of new techniques is necessary to convince that these new tools provide reliable measurements. In this review the physics behind the working of ODM, partial CO 2 breathing, transpulmonary thermodilution and lithium dilution techniques are dealt with. The physical and the physiological aspects underlying the pulse contour and pulse power analyses, various pulse contour techniques, their development, advantages and limitations are also covered. The principle of thoracic bioimpedance along with computation of CO from changes in thoracic impedance is explained. The purpose of the review is to help us minimize the dogmatic nature of practice favouring one technique or the other.

  14. Primary Cardiac Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ching Hsueh

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary cardiac lymphoma (PCL has rarely been reported in Chinese populations. PCL mostly occurs in the right atrium. The clinical manifestations may be variable and are attributed to its location, the presence of congestive heart failure, pericardial effusion, arrhythmia, and cardiomegaly. The prognosis is usually poor because it is usually found too late and therefore, clinicians should be aware of PCL. Imaging examinations are the best methods for initial diagnosis and include echocardiography, computed tomography (CT scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and radioisotope scan. However, the final diagnosis is made by pathology, such as cytologic examination of the effusive fluid and tissue biopsy. Because the tumors are difficult to resect, the main treatment for the disease is chemotherapy, which can be successful. Here, we report a 58-year-old man who had a tumor measuring 8 × 5 cm in the right atrium. By clinical staging, including chest X-ray, echocardiography, CT scan of the abdomen, MRI of the heart, whole body tumor Gallium scan, and gastrointestinal series, no metastatic lesion or involvement was found in other parts of the body. Pathologic findings including cytology of pericardial effusion and heart tumor biopsy revealed the case as a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. After chemotherapy with COP (cyclophosphamide + vincristine + prednisone and CHOPBE (COP + doxorubicin + bleomycin + etoposide regimens, the intracardiac tumor had disappeared, but the patient survived for 12 months in total, despite additional radiotherapy over the pericardial lesions. It was presumed that because the tumor was very large and involved all 3 layers of the heart, it did not respond as well to the therapy as expected.

  15. Elastic, silk-cardiac extracellular matrix hydrogels exhibit time-dependent stiffening that modulates cardiac fibroblast response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppel, Whitney L; Gao, Albert E; Greaney, Allison M; Partlow, Benjamin P; Bretherton, Ross C; Kaplan, David L; Black, Lauren D

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure is the leading cause of death in the United States and rapidly becoming the leading cause of death worldwide. While pharmacological treatments can reduce progression to heart failure following myocardial infarction, there still exists a need for new therapies that promote better healing postinjury for a more functional cardiac repair and methods to understand how the changes to tissue mechanical properties influence cell phenotype and function following injury. To address this need, we have optimized a silk-based hydrogel platform containing cardiac tissue-derived extracellular matrix (cECM). These silk-cECM hydrogels have tunable mechanical properties, as well as rate-controllable hydrogel stiffening over time. In vitro, silk-cECM scaffolds led to enhanced cardiac fibroblast (CF) cell growth and viability with culture time. cECM incorporation improved expression of integrin an focal adhesion proteins, suggesting that CFs were able to interact with the cECM in the hydrogel. Subcutaneous injection of silk hydrogels in rats demonstrated that addition of the cECM led to endogenous cell infiltration and promoted endothelial cell ingrowth after 4 weeks in vivo. This naturally derived silk fibroin platform is applicable to the development of more physiologically relevant constructs that replicate healthy and diseased tissue in vitro and has the potential to be used as an injectable therapeutic for cardiac repair. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 3058-3072, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Involvement of adenosine and standardization of aqueous extract of garlic (Allium sativum Linn.) on cardioprotective and cardiodepressant properties in ischemic preconditioning and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion induced cardiac injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashish Kumar; Munajjam, Arshee; Vaishnav, Bhawna; Sharma, Richa; Sharma, Ashok; Kishore, Kunal; Sharma, Akash; Sharma, Divya; Kumari, Rita; Tiwari, Ashish; Singh, Santosh Kumar; Gaur, Samir; Jatav, Vijay Singh; Srinivasan, Barthu Parthi; Agarwal, Shyam Sunder

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of garlic (Allium sativum Linn.) aqueous extracts on ischemic preconditioning and ischemia-reperfusion induced cardiac injury, as well as adenosine involvement in ischemic preconditioning and garlic extract induced cardioprotection. A model of ischemia-reperfusion injury was established using Langendorff apparatus. Aqueous extract of garlic dose was standardized (0.5%, 0.4%, 0.3%, 0.2%, 0.1%, 0.07%, 0.05%, 0.03%, 0.01%), and the 0.05% dose was found to be the most effective. Higher doses (more than 0.05%) were highly toxic, causing arrhythmia and cardiodepression, whereas the lower doses were ineffective. Garlic exaggerated the cardioprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning. The cardioprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning and garlic cardioprotection was significantly attenuated by theophylline (1,000 µmol/L) and 8-SPT (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and expressed by increased myocardial infarct size, increased LDH level, and reduced nitrite and adenosine levels. These findings suggest that adenosine is involved in the pharmacological and molecular mechanism of garlic induced cardioprotection and mediated by the modulation of nitric oxide. PMID:23554727

  17. Expanded cardiac rehabilitation reduces cardiac events over five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, Julie

    2011-01-01

    In people with coronary artery disease, does an expanded cardiac rehabilitation program reduce cardiac deaths, myocardial infarctions, and hospital admissions due to cardiovascular disease? Randomised, controlled trial with intention-to-treat analysis. A University hospital in Sweden. People aged less than 75 years who had had a recent myocardial infarction or coronary artery bypass grafts were eligible to participate. Severe co-morbidities were exclusion criteria. Randomisation of 224 participants allocated 111 to undergo expanded cardiac rehabilitation and 113 to a control group. Both groups received standard cardiac rehabilitation, including physical training, education, group and individual counselling, and support to cease smoking. All participants received appropriate preventive medications. In addition, the intervention group received 20 group sessions of stress management, 3 sessions of cooking and diet counselling by a dietician, and a 5-day stay at a 'patient hotel' with several activities including physical training and information. Although other outcomes were reported at the conclusion of 1-year follow-up, the outcomes at the 5-year follow-up were rates of cardiac events: cardiovascular death, acute myocardial infarction, and readmission to a hospital due to other cardiovascular causes. All participants were followed up via national registers of health and mortality. During the 5-year follow-up, 53 (48%) participants in the expanded cardiac rehabilitation group and 68 (60%) participants in the control group had a cardiac event (hazard ratio 0.69, 95% CI 0.48 to 0.99). This difference was mainly due to only 12 (11%) participants having non-fatal myocardial infarctions in the treatment group versus 23 (20%) in the control group (hazard ratio 0.47, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.97). The number of hospitalisations and the number of days of hospitalisation were both significantly fewer in the treatment group than in the control group. Expanded cardiac rehabilitation

  18. Perioperative Rosuvastatin in Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhe; Jayaram, Raja; Jiang, Lixin; Emberson, Jonathan; Zhao, Yan; Li, Qi; Du, Juan; Guarguagli, Silvia; Hill, Michael; Chen, Zhengming; Collins, Rory; Casadei, Barbara

    2016-05-05

    Complications after cardiac surgery are common and lead to substantial increases in morbidity and mortality. Meta-analyses of small randomized trials have suggested that perioperative statin therapy can prevent some of these complications. We randomly assigned 1922 patients in sinus rhythm who were scheduled for elective cardiac surgery to receive perioperative rosuvastatin (at a dose of 20 mg daily) or placebo. The primary outcomes were postoperative atrial fibrillation within 5 days after surgery, as assessed by Holter electrocardiographic monitoring, and myocardial injury within 120 hours after surgery, as assessed by serial measurements of the cardiac troponin I concentration. Secondary outcomes included major in-hospital adverse events, duration of stay in the hospital and intensive care unit, left ventricular and renal function, and blood biomarkers. The concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and C-reactive protein after surgery were lower in patients assigned to rosuvastatin than in those assigned to placebo (PSTICS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01573143.).

  19. Comparing Methods for Cardiac Output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeser, Karin; Zemtsovski, Mikhail; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2018-01-01

    tomography (CT) angiography. Sixty-two patients, scheduled for elective heart surgery, were included; 1 was subsequently excluded for logistic reasons. Inclusion criteria were coronary artery bypass surgery (N = 42) and aortic valve replacement (N = 19). Exclusion criteria were chronic atrial fibrillation...... of the left ventricular outflow tract. METHODS: The primary aim was a systematic comparison of CO with Doppler-derived 3D TEE and CO by thermodilution in a broad population of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. A subanalysis was performed comparing cross-sectional area by TEE with cardiac computed......, left ventricular ejection fraction below 0.40 and intracardiac shunts. Nineteen randomly selected patients had a cardiac CT the day before surgery. All images were stored for blinded post hoc analyses, and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess agreement between measurement methods, defined as the bias...

  20. Exercise-induced cardiac remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Rory B; Baggish, Aaron L

    2012-01-01

    Early investigations in the late 1890s and early 1900s documented cardiac enlargement in athletes with above-normal exercise capacity and no evidence of cardiovascular disease. Such findings have been reported for more than a century and continue to intrigue scientists and clinicians. It is well recognized that repetitive participation in vigorous physical exercise results in significant changes in myocardial structure and function. This process, termed exercise-induced cardiac remodeling (EICR), is characterized by structural cardiac changes including left ventricular hypertrophy with sport-specific geometry (eccentric vs concentric). Associated alterations in both systolic and diastolic functions are emerging as recognized components of EICR. The increasing popularity of recreational exercise and competitive athletics has led to a growing number of individuals exhibiting these findings in routine clinical practice. This review will provide an overview of EICR in athletes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-21

    Neurological Outcome; Cardiac Arrest; Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest; Brain Anoxia Ischemia; Hypoxia, Brain; Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain; Cardiac Arrest With Successful Resuscitation; Cardiac Arrest, Out-Of-Hospital; Brain Injuries

  2. An airline cardiac arrest program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, M F; Donaldson, E; Geddes, J S

    1997-11-04

    As many as 1000 lives are lost annually from cardiac arrest in commercial aircraft. Ventricular fibrillation (VF), the most common mechanism, can be treated effectively only with prompt defibrillation, whereas the current policy of most airlines is to continue cardiopulmonary resuscitation pending aircraft diversion. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of making semiautomatic external defibrillators (AEDs) available for use on airline passengers with cardiac arrest. AEDs were installed on international Qantas aircraft and at major terminals, selected crew were trained in their use, and all crew members were trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Supervision was provided by medical volunteers or (remotely) by airline physicians. During a 64-month period, AEDs were used on 109 occasions: 63 times for monitoring an acutely ill passenger and 46 times for cardiac arrest. Twenty-seven episodes of cardiac arrest occurred in aircraft, often (11 of 27 [41%]) unwitnessed, and they were usually (21 of 27 [78%]) associated with asystole or pulseless idioventricular rhythm. All 19 arrests in terminals were witnessed; VF was present in 17 (89%). Overall, defibrillation was initially successful in 21 of 23 cases (91%). Long-term survival from VF was achieved in 26% (2 of 6 in aircraft and 4 of 17 in terminals). The ability to monitor cardiac rhythm aided decisions on diversion, which was avoided in most passengers with asystole or idioventricular rhythm. AEDs in aircraft and terminals, with appropriate crew training, are helpful in the management of cardiac emergencies. Survival from VF is practicable and is comparable with the most effective prehospital ambulance emergency services. Costly aircraft diversions can be avoided in clearly futile situations, enhancing the cost-effectiveness of the program.

  3. Cardiac index in atrio- and interventricular delay optimized cardiac resynchronization therapy and cardiac contractility modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumampos J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT is an established therapy for heart failure patients and improves quality of life in patients with sinus rhythm, reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, left bundle branch block and wide QRS duration. Since approximately sixty percent of heart failure patients have a normal QRS duration they do not benefit or respond to the CRT. Cardiac contractility modulation (CCM releases nonexcitatoy impulses during the absolute refractory period in order to enhance the strength of the left ventricular contraction. The aim of the investigation was to evaluate differences in cardiac index between optimized and nonoptimized CRT and CCM devices versus standard values. Impedance cardiography, a noninvasive method was used to measure cardiac index (CI, a useful parameter which describes the blood volume during one minutes heart pumps related to the body surface. CRT patients indicate an increase of 39.74 percent and CCM patients an improvement of 21.89 percent more cardiac index with an optimized device.

  4. Hypokalemia and sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Keld

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately three million people suffer sudden cardiac death annually. These deaths often emerge from a complex interplay of substrates and triggers. Disturbed potassium homeostasis among heart cells is an example of such a trigger. Thus, hypokalemia and, also, more transient......, drugs with a proven significant positive effect on mortality and morbidity rates in heart failure patients all increase plasma potassium concentration. Thus, it may prove beneficial to pay more attention to hypokalemia and to maintain plasma potassium levels in the upper normal range. The more at risk...... of fatal arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death a patient is, the more attention should be given to the potassium homeostasis....

  5. Inferring cardiac phase response curve in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikovsky, Arkady; Kralemann, Bjoern; Fruehwirth, Matthias; Rosenblum, Michael; Kenner, Thomas; Schaefer, Jochen; Moser, Maximilian

    2014-03-01

    Characterizing properties of biological oscillators with phase response cirves (PRC) is one of main theoretical tools in neuroscience, cardio-respiratory physiology, and chronobiology. We present a technique that allows the extraction of the PRC from a non-invasive observation of a system consisting of two interacting oscillators, in this case heartbeat and respiration, in its natural environment and under free-running conditions. We use this method to obtain the phase coupling functions describing cardio-respiratory interactions and the phase response curve of 17 healthy humans. We show at which phase the cardiac beat is susceptible to respiratory drive and extract the respiratory-related component of heart rate variability. This non-invasive method of bivariate data analysis for the determination of phase response curves of coupled oscillators may find application in other biological and physical systems.

  6. Measuring Cardiac Output during Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignati, Carlo; Cattadori, Gaia

    2017-07-01

    Cardiac output is a key parameter in the assessment of cardiac function, and its measurement is fundamental to the diagnosis, treatment, and prognostic evaluation of all heart diseases. Until recently, cardiac output determination during exercise had been only possible through invasive methods, which were not practical in the clinical setting. Because [Formula: see text]o 2 is cardiac output times arteriovenous content difference, evaluation of cardiac output is usually included in its measurement. Because of the difficulty of directly measuring peak exercise cardiac output, indirect surrogate parameters have been proposed, but with only modest clinical usefulness. Direct measurement of cardiac output can now be made by several noninvasive techniques, such as rebreathing inert gases, impedance cardiology, thoracic bioreactance, estimated continuous cardiac output technology, and transthoracic echocardiography coupled to cardiopulmonary exercise testing, which allow more definitive results and better understanding of the underlying physiopathology.

  7. Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device implantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2014-01-01

    Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) treatment, including permanent pacemakers (PMs), cardiac resynchronization therapy devices with defibrillators (CRT-Ds) or without (CRT-Ps), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are associated with increased patient...

  8. Cardiac symptoms before sudden cardiac death caused by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Thomas Hadberg; Risgaard, Bjarke; Jabbari, Reza

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a frequent cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD) among the young (SCDY). The aim of this study was to characterize symptoms before SCDY due to HCM. METHODS AND RESULTS: Through review of all death certificates, we identified all SCDs in Danes aged 1-35 years...

  9. Genetic testing for inheritable cardiac channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szepesváry, Eszter; Kaski, Juan Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac channelopathies are linked to an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden death. This article reviews the clinical characteristics and genetic basis of common cardiac ion-channel diseases, highlights some genotype-phenotype correlations, and summarizes genetic testing for inheritable cardiac channelopathies.

  10. Regulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy: the nuclear option

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W.D. Kuster (Diederik)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiac hypertrophy is the response of the heart to an increased workload. After myocardial infarction (MI) the surviving muscle tissue has to work harder to maintain cardiac output. This sustained increase in workload leads to cardiac hypertrophy. Despite its apparent appropriateness,

  11. Childhood cancer survivors: cardiac disease & social outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijen, E.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The thesis is divided in two parts; Cardiac health problems and healthcare consumption & social outcomes in CCS. The general aims of part 1 creates optimal conditions for the evaluation of cardiac events in 5-year childhood cancer survivors, evaluation of the long term risk of cardiac events, and to

  12. The cardiac patient in Ramadan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamsi-Pasha, Majed; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Ramadan is one of the five fundamental pillars of Islam. During this month, the majority of the 1.6 billion Muslims worldwide observe an absolute fast from dawn to sunset without any drink or food. Our review shows that the impact of fasting during Ramadan on patients with stable cardiac disease is minimal and does not lead to any increase in acute events. Most patients with the stable cardiac disease can fast safely. Most of the drug doses and their regimen are easily manageable during this month and may need not to be changed. Ramadan fasting is a healthy nonpharmacological means for improving cardiovascular risk factors. Most of the Muslims, who suffer from chronic diseases, insist on fasting Ramadan despite being exempted by religion. The Holy Quran specifically exempts the sick from fasting. This is particularly relevant if fasting worsens one's illness or delays recovery. Patients with unstable angina, recent myocardial infarction, uncontrolled hypertension, decompensated heart failure, recent cardiac intervention or cardiac surgery or any debilitating diseases should avoid fasting. PMID:27144139

  13. [Acute cardiac failure in pheochromocytoma.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønler, Morten; Munk, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma (P) is an endocrine catecholamine-secreting tumor. Classical symptoms like hypertension, attacks of sweating, palpitations, headache and palor are related to catecholamine discharge. We provide a case of P in a 71 year-old man presenting with acute cardiac failure, severe reduction...

  14. Lentiginosis, Deafness and Cardiac Abnormalities*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... death. The familia:l form is milder. The cardiac lesion commonly consists of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy of either ventricle or abnor- malities of the ECG.' The obstructive lesion may be pro- gressive ... that the more severe cases would be unable to bear child- ren, even if they lived long enough.

  15. Cardiac tumors: optimal cardiac MR sequences and spectrum of imaging appearances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reviews the optimal cardiac MRI sequences for and the spectrum of imaging appearances of cardiac tumors. CONCLUSION: Recent technologic advances in cardiac MRI have resulted in the rapid acquisition of images of the heart with high spatial and temporal resolution and excellent myocardial tissue characterization. Cardiac MRI provides optimal assessment of the location, functional characteristics, and soft-tissue features of cardiac tumors, allowing accurate differentiation of benign and malignant lesions.

  16. Effects of doxorubicin on cardiac muscle subsarcolemmal and intermyofibrillar mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavazis, Andreas N; Morton, Aaron B; Hall, Stephanie E; Smuder, Ashley J

    2017-05-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly effective chemotherapeutic used in the treatment of a broad spectrum of malignancies. However, clinical use of DOX is highly limited by cumulative and irreversible cardiomyopathy that occurs following DOX treatment. The pathogenesis of DOX-induced cardiac muscle dysfunction is complex. However, it has been proposed that the etiology of this myopathy is related to mitochondrial dysfunction, as a result of the dose-dependent increase in the mitochondrial accumulation of DOX. In this regard, cardiac muscle possesses two morphologically distinct populations of mitochondria. Subsarcolemmal (SS) mitochondria are localized just below the sarcolemma, whereas intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria are found between myofibrils. Mitochondria in both regions exhibit subtle differences in biochemical properties, giving rise to differences in respiration, lipid composition, enzyme activities and protein synthesis rates. Based on the heterogeneity of SS and IMF mitochondria, we hypothesized that acute DOX administration would have distinct effects on each cardiac mitochondrial subfraction. Therefore, we isolated SS and IMF mitochondria from the hearts of female Sprague-Dawley rats 48h after administration of DOX. Our results demonstrate that while SS mitochondria appear to accumulate greater amounts of DOX, IMF mitochondria demonstrate a greater apoptotic and autophagic response to DOX exposure. Thus, the divergent protein composition and function of the SS and IMF cardiac mitochondria result in differential responses to DOX, with IMF mitochondria appearing more susceptible to damage after DOX treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Bioactive Extracellular Matrix Scaffold Promotes Adaptive Cardiac Remodeling and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly E.M. Mewhort, MD, PhD

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Structural cardiac remodeling after ischemic injury can induce a transition to heart failure from progressive loss of cardiac function. Cellular regenerative therapies are promising but face significant translational hurdles. Tissue extracellular matrix (ECM holds the necessary environmental cues to stimulate cell-based endogenous myocardial repair pathways and promote adaptive remodeling toward functional recovery. Heart epicardium has emerged as an important anatomic niche for endogenous repair pathways including vasculogenesis and cardiogenesis. We show that acellular ECM scaffolds surgically implanted on the epicardium following myocardial infarction (MI can attenuate structural cardiac remodeling and improve functional recovery. We assessed the efficacy of this strategy on post-MI functional recovery by comparing intact bioactive scaffolds with biologically inactivated ECM scaffolds. We confirm that bioactive properties within the acellular ECM biomaterial are essential for the observed functional benefits. We show that interaction of human cardiac fibroblasts with bioactive ECM can induce a robust cell-mediated vasculogenic paracrine response capable of functional blood vessel assembly. Fibroblast growth factor-2 is uncovered as a critical regulator of this novel bioinductive effect. Acellular bioactive ECM scaffolds surgically implanted on the epicardium post-MI can reprogram resident fibroblasts and stimulate adaptive pro-reparative pathways enhancing functional recovery. We introduce a novel surgical strategy for tissue repair that can be performed as an adjunct to conventional surgical revascularization with minimal translational challenges.

  18. Biologically improved nanofibrous scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaarathy, V. [Centre for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, NUSNNI, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore); Department of Nanoscience and Technology, School of Physical Sciences, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India); Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, 138673 (Singapore); Venugopal, J., E-mail: nnijrv@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, NUSNNI, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore); Gandhimathi, C. [Centre for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, NUSNNI, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore); Ponpandian, N.; Mangalaraj, D. [Department of Nanoscience and Technology, School of Physical Sciences, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India); Ramakrishna, S. [Centre for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, NUSNNI, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-11-01

    Nanofibrous structure developed by electrospinning technology provides attractive extracellular matrix conditions for the anchorage, migration and differentiation of stem cells, including those responsible for regenerative medicine. Recently, biocomposite nanofibers consisting of two or more polymeric blends are electrospun more tidily in order to obtain scaffolds with desired functional and mechanical properties depending on their applications. The study focuses on one such an attempt of using copolymer Poly(L-lactic acid)-co-poly (ε-caprolactone) (PLACL), silk fibroin (SF) and Aloe Vera (AV) for fabricating biocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering. SEM micrographs of fabricated electrospun PLACL, PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV nanofibrous scaffolds are porous, beadless, uniform nanofibers with interconnected pores and obtained fibre diameter in the range of 459 ± 22 nm, 202 ± 12 nm and 188 ± 16 nm respectively. PLACL, PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV electrospun mats obtained at room temperature with an elastic modulus of 14.1 ± 0.7, 9.96 ± 2.5 and 7.0 ± 0.9 MPa respectively. PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers have more desirable properties to act as flexible cell supporting scaffolds compared to PLACL for the repair of myocardial infarction (MI). The PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers had a contact angle of 51 ± 12° compared to that of 133 ± 15° of PLACL alone. Cardiac cell proliferation was increased by 21% in PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers compared to PLACL by day 6 and further increased to 42% by day 9. Confocal analysis for cardiac expression proteins myosin and connexin 43 was observed better by day 9 compared to all other nanofibrous scaffolds. The results proved that the fabricated PLACL/SF/AV nanofibrous scaffolds have good potentiality for the regeneration of infarcted myocardium in cardiac tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Fabricated nanofibrous scaffolds are porous, beadless and uniform structures. • PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers improve the

  19. Biologically improved nanofibrous scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaarathy, V.; Venugopal, J.; Gandhimathi, C.; Ponpandian, N.; Mangalaraj, D.; Ramakrishna, S.

    2014-01-01

    Nanofibrous structure developed by electrospinning technology provides attractive extracellular matrix conditions for the anchorage, migration and differentiation of stem cells, including those responsible for regenerative medicine. Recently, biocomposite nanofibers consisting of two or more polymeric blends are electrospun more tidily in order to obtain scaffolds with desired functional and mechanical properties depending on their applications. The study focuses on one such an attempt of using copolymer Poly(L-lactic acid)-co-poly (ε-caprolactone) (PLACL), silk fibroin (SF) and Aloe Vera (AV) for fabricating biocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering. SEM micrographs of fabricated electrospun PLACL, PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV nanofibrous scaffolds are porous, beadless, uniform nanofibers with interconnected pores and obtained fibre diameter in the range of 459 ± 22 nm, 202 ± 12 nm and 188 ± 16 nm respectively. PLACL, PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV electrospun mats obtained at room temperature with an elastic modulus of 14.1 ± 0.7, 9.96 ± 2.5 and 7.0 ± 0.9 MPa respectively. PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers have more desirable properties to act as flexible cell supporting scaffolds compared to PLACL for the repair of myocardial infarction (MI). The PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers had a contact angle of 51 ± 12° compared to that of 133 ± 15° of PLACL alone. Cardiac cell proliferation was increased by 21% in PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers compared to PLACL by day 6 and further increased to 42% by day 9. Confocal analysis for cardiac expression proteins myosin and connexin 43 was observed better by day 9 compared to all other nanofibrous scaffolds. The results proved that the fabricated PLACL/SF/AV nanofibrous scaffolds have good potentiality for the regeneration of infarcted myocardium in cardiac tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Fabricated nanofibrous scaffolds are porous, beadless and uniform structures. • PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers improve the

  20. Sarcospan Regulates Cardiac Isoproterenol Response and Prevents Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy-Associated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvatiyar, Michelle S; Marshall, Jamie L; Nguyen, Reginald T; Jordan, Maria C; Richardson, Vanitra A; Roos, Kenneth P; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2015-12-23

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a fatal cardiac and skeletal muscle disease resulting from mutations in the dystrophin gene. We have previously demonstrated that a dystrophin-associated protein, sarcospan (SSPN), ameliorated Duchenne muscular dystrophy skeletal muscle degeneration by activating compensatory pathways that regulate muscle cell adhesion (laminin-binding) to the extracellular matrix. Conversely, loss of SSPN destabilized skeletal muscle adhesion, hampered muscle regeneration, and reduced force properties. Given the importance of SSPN to skeletal muscle, we investigated the consequences of SSPN ablation in cardiac muscle and determined whether overexpression of SSPN into mdx mice ameliorates cardiac disease symptoms associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy cardiomyopathy. SSPN-null mice exhibited cardiac enlargement, exacerbated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and increased fibrosis in response to β-adrenergic challenge (isoproterenol; 0.8 mg/day per 2 weeks). Biochemical analysis of SSPN-null cardiac muscle revealed reduced sarcolemma localization of many proteins with a known role in cardiomyopathy pathogenesis: dystrophin, the sarcoglycans (α-, δ-, and γ-subunits), and β1D integrin. Transgenic overexpression of SSPN in Duchenne muscular dystrophy mice (mdx(TG)) improved cardiomyofiber cell adhesion, sarcolemma integrity, cardiac functional parameters, as well as increased expression of compensatory transmembrane proteins that mediate attachment to the extracellular matrix. SSPN regulates sarcolemmal expression of laminin-binding complexes that are critical to cardiac muscle function and protects against transient and chronic injury, including inherited cardiomyopathy. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  1. Cardiac troponin: an emerging cardiac biomarker in animal health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal V. Undhad

    Full Text Available Analysis of cardiac troponin I (cTn I and T (cTnT are considered the “gold standard” for the non-invasive diagnosis of myocardial injury in human and animals. It has replaced traditionally used cardiac biomarkers such as myoglobin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, creatine kinase (CK and CK-MB due to its high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of myocardial injury. Cardiac troponins are proteins that control the calcium-mediated interaction between actin and myosin, allowing contraction at the sarcomere level. Concentration of the cTn can be correlated microscopic lesion and loss of immunolabeling in myocardium damage. Troponin concentration remains elevated in blood for 1-2wks so that wide window is available for diagnosis of myocardial damage. The cTn test has >95% specificity and sensitivity and test is less time consuming (10 to 15 minutes and less costly (INR 200 to INR 500. [Vet. World 2012; 5(8.000: 508-511

  2. Cardiac MRI in mice at 9.4 Tesla with a transmit-receive surface coil and a cardiac-tailored intensity-correction algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnovik, David E; Dai, Guangping; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Rosen, Bruce R; Seethamraju, Ravi

    2007-08-01

    To evaluate the use of a transmit-receive surface (TRS) coil and a cardiac-tailored intensity-correction algorithm for cardiac MRI in mice at 9.4 Tesla (9.4T). Fast low-angle shot (FLASH) cines, with and without delays alternating with nutations for tailored excitation (DANTE) tagging, were acquired in 13 mice. An intensity-correction algorithm was developed to compensate for the sensitivity profile of the surface coil, and was tailored to account for the unique distribution of noise and flow artifacts in cardiac MR images. Image quality was extremely high and allowed fine structures such as trabeculations, valve cusps, and coronary arteries to be clearly visualized. The tag lines created with the surface coil were also sharp and clearly visible. Application of the intensity-correction algorithm improved signal intensity, tissue contrast, and image quality even further. Importantly, the cardiac-tailored properties of the correction algorithm prevented noise and flow artifacts from being significantly amplified. The feasibility and value of cardiac MRI in mice with a TRS coil has been demonstrated. In addition, a cardiac-tailored intensity-correction algorithm has been developed and shown to improve image quality even further. The use of these techniques could produce significant potential benefits over a broad range of scanners, coil configurations, and field strengths. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Multimodality Cardiac Imaging for the Assessment of Left Atrial Function and the Association With Atrial Arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Javier; Bertelsen, Litten; de Knegt, Martina Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Several cardiac imaging modalities are able to visualize the left atrium (LA) and, therefore, allow for quantification of both structural and functional properties of this cardiac chamber. In echocardiography, only the maximal LA volume is included in the assessment of diastolic function at the c......Several cardiac imaging modalities are able to visualize the left atrium (LA) and, therefore, allow for quantification of both structural and functional properties of this cardiac chamber. In echocardiography, only the maximal LA volume is included in the assessment of diastolic function...... atrial fibrillation, which will be a point of focus in this review. Pivotal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies have revealed high correlation between LA fibrosis and risk of atrial fibrillation recurrence after catheter ablation, and subsequent multimodality imaging studies have uncovered...... an inverse relationship between LA reservoir function and degree of LA fibrosis. This has sparked an increased interest into the application of advanced imaging modalities, including both speckle tracking echocardiography and tissue tracking by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Even though increasing...

  4. Sudden cardiac death in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Camilo Pellegrino dos Santos

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The most accepted definition of sudden cardiac death nowadays is an unexplained death occurred suddenly within one hour of symptom onset. If it was not witnessed, individuals need to had been observed for at least 24 hours before the event and should be discarded the possibility of non cardiac causes of sudden death, pulmonary embolism or extensive malignancy. The term athlete refers to individuals of any age who participate in collective or individual regular physical activity, as well as physical training program for regular competitions. The sudden death of a young athlete, whether amateur or professional, especially during competitions, is always dramatic, with strong negative social impact and in the media. The fact that sports are recommended as a formula for longevity and quality of life makes these events a cause for concern in sports and society in general.

  5. Massage therapy after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Amy T; Sundt, Thoralf M; Cutshall, Susanne M; Bauer, Brent A

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac surgery presents a life-saving and life-enhancing opportunity to hundreds of thousands of patients each year in the United States. However, many patients face significant challenges during the postoperative period, including pain, anxiety, and tension. Mounting evidence demonstrates that such challenges can impair immune function and slow wound healing, in addition to causing suffering for the patient. Finding new approaches to mitigate these challenges is necessary if patients are to experience the full benefits of surgery. Massage therapy is a therapy that has significant evidence to support its role in meeting these needs. This paper looks at the data surrounding the use of massage therapy in cardiac surgery patients, with a special focus on the experience at Mayo Clinic. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cardiac blood pool emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itti, R.; Philippe, L.; Lorgeron, J.M.; Charbonnier, B.; Raynaud, P.; Brochier, M.

    1983-01-01

    After blood pool labeling using technetium-99m, a series of cardiac pictures is acquired during the rotation of a gamma-camera about the patient. Computer processing leads to reconstruction of various tomographic slices from the original planar projection. Electrocardiographic gating selects the different phases of the cardiac cycle. Individual slices through the left ventricular region are added in order to provide ''thick'' slices on which global and regional parameters of the left ventricular function can be determined. Due to the proportionality existing between count rates and labeled blood volumes, any geometrical model can be avoided. The delineation of regions of interest for count integration is made easier due to the absence of superimposition of structures; no correction for background is necessary. Tomography thus appears to be more consistent and more accurate than the classical methods using planar projections. In addition, right ventricular morphological and kinetic studies can be performed in the same conditions as for the left ventricle [fr

  7. Functional cardiomyocytes derived from Isl1 cardiac progenitors via Bmp4 stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Cagavi

    Full Text Available As heart failure due to myocardial infarction remains a leading cause of morbidity worldwide, cell-based cardiac regenerative therapy using cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs could provide a potential treatment for the repair of injured myocardium. As adult CPCs may have limitations regarding tissue accessibility and proliferative ability, CPCs derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs could serve as an unlimited source of cells with high proliferative ability. As one of the CPCs that can be derived from embryonic stem cells, Isl1 expressing cardiac progenitor cells (Isl1-CPCs may serve as a valuable source of cells for cardiac repair due to their high cardiac differentiation potential and authentic cardiac origin. In order to generate an unlimited number of Isl1-CPCs, we used a previously established an ESC line that allows for isolation of Isl1-CPCs by green fluorescent protein (GFP expression that is directed by the mef2c gene, specifically expressed in the Isl1 domain of the anterior heart field. To improve the efficiency of cardiac differentiation of Isl1-CPCs, we studied the role of Bmp4 in cardiogenesis of Isl1-CPCs. We show an inductive role of Bmp directly on cardiac progenitors and its enhancement on early cardiac differentiation of CPCs. Upon induction of Bmp4 to Isl1-CPCs during differentiation, the cTnT+ cardiomyocyte population was enhanced 2.8±0.4 fold for Bmp4 treated CPC cultures compared to that detected for vehicle treated cultures. Both Bmp4 treated and untreated cardiomyocytes exhibit proper electrophysiological and calcium signaling properties. In addition, we observed a significant increase in Tbx5 and Tbx20 expression in differentiation cultures treated with Bmp4 compared to the untreated control, suggesting a link between Bmp4 and Tbx genes which may contribute to the enhanced cardiac differentiation in Bmp4 treated cultures. Collectively these findings suggest a cardiomyogenic role for Bmp4 directly on a pure population of

  8. Cardiac surgery in the parturient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Shobana; Cook, Christopher R; Collard, Charles D

    2009-03-01

    Heart disease is the primary cause of nonobstetric mortality in pregnancy, occurring in 1%-3% of pregnancies and accounting for 10%-15% of maternal deaths. Congenital heart disease has become more prevalent in women of childbearing age, representing an increasing percentage (up to 75%) of heart disease in pregnancy. Untreated maternal heart disease also places the fetus at risk. Independent predictors of neonatal complications include a maternal New York Heart Association heart failure classification >2, anticoagulation use during pregnancy, smoking, multiple gestation, and left heart obstruction. Because cardiac surgical morbidity and mortality in the parturient is higher than nonpregnant patients, most parturients with cardiac disease are first managed medically, with cardiac surgery being reserved when medical management fails. Risk factors for maternal mortality during cardiac surgery include the use of vasoactive drugs, age, type of surgery, reoperation, and maternal functional class. Risk factors for fetal mortality include maternal age >35 yr, functional class, reoperation, emergency surgery, type of myocardial protection, and anoxic time. Nonetheless, acceptable maternal and fetal perioperative mortality rates may be achieved through such measures as early preoperative detection of maternal cardiovascular decompensation, use of fetal monitoring, delivery of a viable fetus before the operation and scheduling surgery on an elective basis during the second trimester. Additionally, fetal morbidity may be reduced during cardiopulmonary bypass by optimizing maternal oxygen-carrying capacity and uterine blood flow. Current maternal bypass recommendations include: 1) maintaining the pump flow rate >2.5 L x min(-1) x m(-2) and perfusion pressure >70 mm Hg; 2) maintaining the hematocrit > 28%; 3) using normothermic perfusion when feasible; 4) using pulsatile flow; and 5) using alpha-stat pH management.

  9. The paediatrician and cardiac auscultation

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Douglas L

    2003-01-01

    The cardiac auscultation (CA) skills of paediatric residents and office-based paediatricians have recently been shown to be suboptimal. CA is known to have a high degree of specificity and sensitivity, and is inexpensive. New teaching aids and availability of surrogate patient heart sounds and murmurs now allow most physicians to acquire CA skills. These teaching aids should be available in all medical schools and in all postgraduate paediatric training programs. While the relationship betwee...

  10. Neurological Complications of Cardiac Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Gottesman, Rebecca F.; McKhann, Guy M.; Hogue, Charles W.

    2008-01-01

    Neurological injury resulting from cardiac surgery has a range of manifestations from focal neurological deficit to encephalopathy or coma. As the safety of drug-eluting stents comes into question, more patients will likely undergo coronary artery bypass graft surgery. These projections, along with the growing proportions of elderly patients and those with comorbidities, portend the potential for rising rates of perioperative neurological complications. The risk for neurological injury may be...

  11. Clinical application of cardiac SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Shigeyuki

    1999-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has replaced planar imaging techniques for myocardial scintigraphy. Thallium-201 was the dominant agent employed for myocardial perfusion imaging. Today new technetium-99m labelled radionuclides have been used as excellent alternatives to 201 Tl for detection of coronary artery disease, prognostification, and even assessment of myocardial viability. Pharmacologic stress imaging using either dipyridamole, adenosine or dobutamine is a substitute for exercise stress. Accurate determination of myocardial viability is vitally important for clinical decision making for patients with LV dysfunction who will most benefit from revascularization. Stunned and hibernated myocardium may result in profound regional LTV dysfunction in absence of necrosis. The various approach such as stress-redistribution-reinjection imaging, rest-redistribution imaging and stress-redistribution-24 hours delayed imaging has been utilized to assess myocardial viability with 201 Tl. Quantitative assessment of 99m Tc MIBI uptake reflect the degree of viability. 123 I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analog of norepinephrine, has been used for scintigraphic assessment of regional cardiac adrenergic innervation. Cardiac sympathetic denervation, assessed by 123 I-MIBG, due to ischemia in non-Q myocardial infarction and unstable angina has been shown. Quantitative cardiac MIBG scintigram was shown to have prognostic value in patients with severe congestive heart failure. 23 I-BMIPP (ρ-methyl-iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid) has been used to assess myocardial fatty acid utilization. BMIPP has the memory function of ischemia in unstable angina, since decreased BMIPP uptake persists several days after ischemic episode. Nuclear cardiology in Japan has experienced an expansion in the techniques including use of new radionuclides, 99m Tc perfusion agents, 123 I-MIBG and 23 I-BMIPP and in associated clinical application to the various cardiac diseases

  12. Clinical application of cardiac SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Shigeyuki [Yokohama Rosai Hospital (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has replaced planar imaging techniques for myocardial scintigraphy. Thallium-201 was the dominant agent employed for myocardial perfusion imaging. Today new technetium-99m labelled radionuclides have been used as excellent alternatives to {sup 201}Tl for detection of coronary artery disease, prognostification, and even assessment of myocardial viability. Pharmacologic stress imaging using either dipyridamole, adenosine or dobutamine is a substitute for exercise stress. Accurate determination of myocardial viability is vitally important for clinical decision making for patients with LV dysfunction who will most benefit from revascularization. Stunned and hibernated myocardium may result in profound regional LTV dysfunction in absence of necrosis. The various approach such as stress-redistribution-reinjection imaging, rest-redistribution imaging and stress-redistribution-24 hours delayed imaging has been utilized to assess myocardial viability with {sup 201}Tl. Quantitative assessment of {sup 99m}Tc MIBI uptake reflect the degree of viability. {sup 123}I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analog of norepinephrine, has been used for scintigraphic assessment of regional cardiac adrenergic innervation. Cardiac sympathetic denervation, assessed by {sup 123}I-MIBG, due to ischemia in non-Q myocardial infarction and unstable angina has been shown. Quantitative cardiac MIBG scintigram was shown to have prognostic value in patients with severe congestive heart failure. {sup 23}I-BMIPP ({rho}-methyl-iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid) has been used to assess myocardial fatty acid utilization. BMIPP has the memory function of ischemia in unstable angina, since decreased BMIPP uptake persists several days after ischemic episode. Nuclear cardiology in Japan has experienced an expansion in the techniques including use of new radionuclides, {sup 99m}Tc perfusion agents, {sup 123}I-MIBG and {sup 23}I-BMIPP and in associated clinical

  13. Gene Therapy in Cardiac Arrhythmias

    OpenAIRE

    Praveen, S.V; Francis, Johnson; Venugopal, K

    2006-01-01

    Gene therapy has progressed from a dream to a bedside reality in quite a few human diseases. From its first application in adenosine deaminase deficiency, through the years, its application has evolved to vascular angiogenesis and cardiac arrhythmias. Gene based biological pacemakers using viral vectors or mesenchymal cells tested in animal models hold much promise. Induction of pacemaker activity within the left bundle branch can provide stable heart rates. Genetic modification of the AV...

  14. Pregnancy as a cardiac stress model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eunhee; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy occurs during pregnancy as a consequence of both volume overload and hormonal changes. Both pregnancy- and exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy are generally thought to be similar and physiological. Despite the fact that there are shared transcriptional responses in both forms of cardiac adaptation, pregnancy results in a distinct signature of gene expression in the heart. In some cases, however, pregnancy can induce adverse cardiac events in previously healthy women without any known cardiovascular disease. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of non-obstetric mortality during pregnancy. To understand how pregnancy can cause heart disease, it is first important to understand cardiac adaptation during normal pregnancy. This review provides an overview of the cardiac consequences of pregnancy, including haemodynamic, functional, structural, and morphological adaptations, as well as molecular phenotypes. In addition, this review describes the signalling pathways responsible for pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy and angiogenesis. We also compare and contrast cardiac adaptation in response to disease, exercise, and pregnancy. The comparisons of these settings of cardiac hypertrophy provide insight into pregnancy-associated cardiac adaptation. PMID:24448313

  15. Neurological complications of cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottesman, Rebecca F; McKhann, Guy M; Hogue, Charles W

    2008-11-01

    Neurological injury resulting from cardiac surgery has a range of manifestations from focal neurological deficit to encephalopathy or coma. As the safety of drug-eluting stents comes into question, more patients will likely undergo coronary artery bypass graft surgery. These projections, along with the growing proportions of elderly patients and those with comorbidities, portend the potential for rising rates of perioperative neurological complications. The risk for neurological injury may be determined by the type of procedure, by patient-specific characteristics, and by the extent of cerebral embolization and hypoperfusion during and after surgery. Changes in surgical techniques, including the use of off-pump surgery, have not decreased rates of brain injury from cardiac surgery. When appropriate, modern neuroimaging techniques should be used in postoperative patients to confirm diagnosis, to provide information on potential etiology, to direct appropriate therapy, and to help in prognostication. Management of postoperative medications and early use of rehabilitation services is a recommended strategy to optimize the recovery for individuals with neurological injury after cardiac surgery.

  16. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Singh Gulati, G., E-mail: gulatigurpreet@rediffmail.com [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Seth, S. [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Sharma, S. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India)

    2012-02-15

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  17. Astragaloside IV Prevents Cardiac Remodeling in the Apolipoprotein E-Deficient Mice by Regulating Cardiac Homeostasis and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong-Zhi Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypercholesterolemia is a risk factor for the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Astragaloside IV (AST-IV possesses cardiovascular protective properties. We hypothesize that AST-IV prevents cardiac remodeling with hypercholesterolemia via modulating tissue homeostasis and alleviating oxidative stress. Methods: The ApoE-/- mice were treated with AST-IV at 1 or 10 mg/kg for 8 weeks. The blood lipids tests, echocardiography, and TUNEL were performed. The mRNA expression profile was detected by real-time PCR. The myocytes size and number, and the expressions of proliferation (ki67, senescence (p16INK4a, oxidant (NADPH oxidase 4, NOX4 and antioxidant (superoxide dismutase, SOD were observed by immunofluorescence staining. Results: Neither 1 mg/kg nor 10 mg/kg AST-IV treatment could decrease blood lipids in ApoE-/- mice. However, the decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF and fractional shortening (FS in ApoE–/– mice were significantly improved after AST-IV treatment. The cardiac collagen volume fraction declined nearly in half after AST-IV treatment. The enlarged myocyte size was suppressed, and myocyte number was recovered, and the alterations of genes expressions linked to cell cycle, proliferation, senescence, p53-apoptosis pathway and oxidant-antioxidants in the hearts of ApoE-/- mice were reversed after AST-IV treatment. The decreased ki67 and increased p16INK4a in the hearts of ApoE-/- mice were recovered after AST-IV treatment. The percentages of apoptotic myocytes and NOX4-positive cells in AST-IV treated mice were decreased, which were consistent with the gene expressions. Conclusion: AST-IV treatment could prevent cardiac remodeling and recover the impaired ventricular function induced by hypercholesterolemia. The beneficial effect of AST-IV might partly be through regulating cardiac homeostasis and anti-oxidative stress.

  18. Gold nanorod-incorporated gelatin-based conductive hydrogels for engineering cardiac tissue constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaei, Ali; Saini, Harpinder; Christenson, Wayne; Sullivan, Ryan Tanner; Ros, Robert; Nikkhah, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    The development of advanced biomaterials is a crucial step to enhance the efficacy of tissue engineering strategies for treatment of myocardial infarction. Specific characteristics of biomaterials including electrical conductivity, mechanical robustness and structural integrity need to be further enhanced to promote the functionalities of cardiac cells. In this work, we fabricated UV-crosslinkable gold nanorod (GNR)-incorporated gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hybrid hydrogels with enhanced material and biological properties for cardiac tissue engineering. Embedded GNRs promoted electrical conductivity and mechanical stiffness of the hydrogel matrix. Cardiomyocytes seeded on GelMA-GNR hybrid hydrogels exhibited excellent cell retention, viability, and metabolic activity. The increased cell adhesion resulted in abundance of locally organized F-actin fibers, leading to the formation of an integrated tissue layer on the GNR-embedded hydrogels. Immunostained images of integrin β-1 confirmed improved cell-matrix interaction on the hybrid hydrogels. Notably, homogeneous distribution of cardiac specific markers (sarcomeric α-actinin and connexin 43), were observed on GelMA-GNR hydrogels as a function of GNRs concentration. Furthermore, the GelMA-GNR hybrids supported synchronous tissue-level beating of cardiomyocytes. Similar observations were also noted by, calcium transient assay that demonstrated the rhythmic contraction of the cardiomyocytes on GelMA-GNR hydrogels as compared to pure GelMA. Thus, the findings of this study clearly demonstrated that functional cardiac patches with superior electrical and mechanical properties can be developed using nanoengineered GelMA-GNR hybrid hydrogels. In this work, we developed gold nanorod (GNR) incorporated gelatin-based hydrogels with suitable electrical conductivity and mechanical stiffness for engineering functional cardiac tissue constructs (e.g. cardiac patches). The synthesized conductive hybrid hydrogels properly

  19. Mast Cells: Key Contributors to Cardiac Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Levick

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Historically, increased numbers of mast cells have been associated with fibrosis in numerous cardiac pathologies, implicating mast cells in the development of cardiac fibrosis. Subsequently, several approaches have been utilised to demonstrate a causal role for mast cells in animal models of cardiac fibrosis including mast cell stabilising compounds, rodents deficient in mast cells, and inhibition of the actions of mast cell-specific proteases such as chymase and tryptase. Whilst most evidence supports a pro-fibrotic role for mast cells, there is evidence that in some settings these cells can oppose fibrosis. A major gap in our current understanding of cardiac mast cell function is identification of the stimuli that activate these cells causing them to promote a pro-fibrotic environment. This review will present the evidence linking mast cells to cardiac fibrosis, as well as discuss the major questions that remain in understanding how mast cells contribute to cardiac fibrosis.

  20. Cardiac tamponade: contrast reflux as an indicator of cardiac chamber equalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauta Foeke Jacob

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic hemopericardium remains a rare entity; it does however commonly cause cardiac tamponade which remains a major cause of death in traumatic blunt cardiac injury. Objectives We present a case of blunt chest trauma complicated by cardiac tamponade causing cardiac chamber equalization revealed by reflux of contrast. Case report A 29-year-old unidentified male suffered blunt chest trauma in a motor vehicle collision. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated a periaortic hematoma and hemopericardium. Significant contrast reflux was seen in the inferior vena cava and hepatic veins suggesting a change in cardiac chamber pressures. After intensive treatment including cardiac massage this patient expired of cardiac arrest. Conclusion Reflux of contrast on CT imaging can be an indicator of traumatic cardiac tamponade.

  1. Cardiac-specific ablation of glutaredoxin 3 leads to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experimental and clinical investigations have demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is increased during cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Excess ROS can directly impair cardiac contraction through modification of Ca2+ handling proteins or activate multiple effectors and sig...

  2. Sensing Cardiac Electrical Activity With a Cardiac Myocyte--Targeted Optogenetic Voltage Indicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang Liao, Mei-Ling; de Boer, Teun P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30481878X; Mutoh, Hiroki; Raad, Nour; Richter, Claudia; Wagner, Eva; Downie, Bryan R; Unsöld, Bernhard; Arooj, Iqra; Streckfuss-Bömeke, Katrin; Döker, Stephan; Luther, Stefan; Guan, Kaomei; Wagner, Stefan; Lehnart, Stephan E; Maier, Lars S; Stühmer, Walter; Wettwer, Erich; van Veen, Toon|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/229701310; Morlock, Michael M; Knöpfel, Thomas; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: Monitoring and controlling cardiac myocyte activity with optogenetic tools offer exciting possibilities for fundamental and translational cardiovascular research. Genetically encoded voltage indicators may be particularly attractive for minimal invasive and repeated assessments of cardiac

  3. Complexity analysis of experimental cardiac arrhythmia

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Binbin; Binczak, Stéphane; Jacquir, Sabir; Pont, Oriol; Yahia, Hussein

    2014-01-01

    International audience; To study the cardiac arrhythmia, an in vitro experimental model and Multielectrodes Array (MEA) are used. This platform serves as an intermediary of the electrical activities of cardiac cells and the signal processing / dynamics analysis. Through it the extracellular potential of cardiac cells is acquired, allowing a real-time monitoring / analyzing. Since MEA has 60 electrodes / channels dispatched in a rectangular region, it allows real-time monitoring and signal acq...

  4. Skeletal Extracellular Matrix Supports Cardiac Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells: a Potential Scaffold for Engineered Cardiac Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Hong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Decellularized cardiac extracellular matrix (cECM has been widely considered as an attractive scaffold for engineered cardiac tissue (ECT, however, its application is limited by immunogenicity and shortage of organ donation. Skeletal ECM (sECM is readily available and shows similarities with cECM. Here we hypothesized that sECM might be an alternative scaffold for ECT strategies. Methods: Murine ventricular tissue and anterior tibial muscles were sectioned into 300 mm-thick, and then cECM and sECM were acquired by pretreatment/SDS/TritonX-100 three-step-method. Acellularity and morphological properties of ECM was assessed. SECM was recellularized with murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs or mESC-derived cardiomyocytes (mESC-CMs, and was further studied by biocompatibility assessment, immunofluorescent staining, quantitative real-time PCR and electrophysiological experiment. Results: The relative residual contents of DNA, protein and RNA of sECM were comparable with cECM. The morphological properties and microstructure of sECM were similar to cECM. SECM supported mESCs to adhere, survive, proliferate and differentiate into functional cardiac microtissue with both electrical stimulated response and normal adrenergic response. Purified mESC-CMs also could adhere, survive, proliferate and form a sECM-based ECT with synchronized contraction within 6 days of recellularization. Conclusion: ECMs from murine skeletal muscle support survival and cardiac differentiation of mESCs, and are suitable to produce functional ECT patch. This study highlights the potential of patient specific of sECM to replace cECM for bioengineering ECT.

  5. Penetrating cardiac injury following sewing needle ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobnach, Sanju; Castillo, Franco; Blanco Vinent, René; Kahn, Delawir; Bhyat, Ahmed

    2011-07-01

    Penetrating cardiac injuries are common in South Africa. Reports describing traumatic lesions to the heart caused by caudo-cranial migration of ingested foreign bodies are however extremely rare. Delayed presentation and intervention are associated with poor outcome in these patients; cardiac tamponade remains the most serious complication. We present the case of a 19 year-old man who sustained a left ventricular injury after intentionally swallowing eight sewing needles. The impacted needle was removed through a median sternotomy and the patient recovered uneventfully. Copyright © 2011 Australasian Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The need for cardiac follow-up in adults with mild congenital cardiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Mascha; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Vogels, Ton; Zwinderman, Koos H.; van der Wall, Ernst E.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S. Pauline; Ottenkamp, Jaap

    2002-01-01

    To discuss the need for continuing cardiac surveillance in adults with hemodynamically insignificant congenital cardiac disease. In 82 patients with mild congenital cardiac malformations, aged from 17 to 32 years, we investigated the subjective health status, the health-related quality of life, any

  7. Cardiac disorders with psychosomatic background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Bielejewska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Psychosomatic disorders can be described as psychosocial-derived organic disorders. The influence of depression, sleep disorders, quality of life, addictions, work environment, family situation, and stress on atrial fibrillation, palpitations, syncope, chest pain, coronary heart disease, and heart failure has been analysed in this paper. The correlation between psychosomatic disorders and the cardiovascular system has been shown. It allows us to conclude that an attending physician, while taking medical history of cardiac patients, should take into consideration factors that may have a negative impact on their mental health, which can be risk factors in the development or aggravation of an already present cardiovascular disease.

  8. Respiratory gating in cardiac PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Martin Lyngby; Rasmussen, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory motion due to breathing during cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) results in spatial blurring and erroneous tracer quantification. Respiratory gating might represent a solution by dividing the PET coincidence dataset into smaller respiratory phase subsets. The aim...... stress (82)RB-PET. Respiratory rates and depths were measured by a respiratory gating system in addition to registering actual respiratory rates. Patients undergoing adenosine stress showed a decrease in measured respiratory rate from initial to later scan phase measurements [12.4 (±5.7) vs 5.6 (±4.......7) min(-1), P PET...

  9. FGF21 and Cardiac Physiopathology

    OpenAIRE

    Planavila, Anna; Redondo-Angulo, Ibon; Villarroya, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    The heart is not traditionally considered either a target or a site of fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) production. However, recent findings indicate that FGF21 can act as a cardiomyokine; that is, it is produced by cardiac cells at significant levels and acts in an autocrine manner on the heart itself. The heart is sensitive to the effects of FGF21, both systemic and locally generated, owing to the expression in cardiomyocytes of β-Klotho, the key co-receptor known to confer specific resp...

  10. Cardiac leiomyosarcoma, a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Gill, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    In this case report we present the history of a patient admitted with recurrent pulmonary edema. Transesophageal chocardiography showed a tumour in the left atrium, occluding the ostium of the mitral valve and mimicking intermittent mitral stenosis. Cardiac surgery followed by pathological...... examination revealed that the tumour was a leiomyosarcoma. Images from the echocardiography as well as the pathological findings are shown and discussed. The present case report illustrates that atrial tumors comprise also sarcomas, suggesting the use of careful, rapid diagnostic procedures and treatment...

  11. [Cardiac effects of radiation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuohinen, Suvi; Turpeinen, Anu; Skyttä, Tanja; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa

    2015-01-01

    Because of increased life-expentancy cancer patients having undergone radiation therapy nowadays live longer, and late-appearing adverse effects are therefore playing a more significant role. Radiation therapy given to the chest is known to approximately double the risk of heart disease, the cumulative total radiation dose being the most important risk-increasing factor. The most significant adverse effects appear only years after the treatment. The mortality from late manifestations reduces the total benefit of radiation therapy. Patients with radiation therapy due to a cancer of the left breast or Hodgkin's lymphoma are particularly susceptible to cardiac effects. A safe radiation dose is not known.

  12. Response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteeg, Henneke; Schiffer, Angélique A; Widdershoven, Jos W

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a promising treatment for a subgroup of patients with advanced congestive heart failure and a prolonged QRS interval. Despite the majority of patients benefiting from CRT, 10-40% of patients do not respond to this treatment and are labeled as nonresponders....... Given that there is a lack of consensus on how to define response to CRT, the purpose of this viewpoint is to discuss currently used definitions and their shortcomings, and to provide recommendations as to how an expansion of the criteria for CRT response may be useful to clinicians....

  13. Heart Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different? Updated:Mar 15,2018 People often use these ... The heart attack symptoms in women can be different than men. What is cardiac arrest? Sudden cardiac ...

  14. Carbon nanotube-incorporated collagen hydrogels improve cell alignment and the performance of cardiac constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun HY

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hongyu Sun,* Jing Zhou,* Zhu Huang,* Linlin Qu,* Ning Lin,* Chengxiao Liang, Ruiwu Dai, Lijun Tang, Fuzhou Tian General Surgery Center, Chengdu Military General Hospital, Chengdu, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs provide an essential 2-D microenvironment for cardiomyocyte growth and function. However, it remains to be elucidated whether CNT nanostructures can promote cell–cell integrity and facilitate the formation of functional tissues in 3-D hydrogels. Here, single-walled CNTs were incorporated into collagen hydrogels to fabricate (CNT/Col hydrogels, which improved mechanical and electrical properties. The incorporation of CNTs (up to 1 wt% exhibited no toxicity to cardiomyocytes and enhanced cell adhesion and elongation. Through the use of immunohistochemical staining, transmission electron microscopy, and intracellular calcium-transient measurement, the incorporation of CNTs was found to improve cell alignment and assembly remarkably, which led to the formation of engineered cardiac tissues with stronger contraction potential. Importantly, cardiac tissues based on CNT/Col hydrogels were noted to have better functionality. Collectively, the incorporation of CNTs into the Col hydrogels improved cell alignment and the performance of cardiac constructs. Our study suggests that CNT/Col hydrogels offer a promising tissue scaffold for cardiac constructs, and might serve as injectable biomaterials to deliver cell or drug molecules for cardiac regeneration following myocardial infarction in the near future. Keywords: carbon nanotubes, collagen hydrogel, cardiac constructs, cell alignment, tissue functionality

  15. Effects of GABA, Neural Regulation, and Intrinsic Cardiac Factors on Heart Rate Variability in Zebrafish Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Rafael Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Heart rate (HR) is a periodic activity that is variable over time due to intrinsic cardiac factors and extrinsic neural control, largely by the autonomic nervous system. Heart rate variability (HRV) is analyzed by measuring consecutive beat-to-beat intervals. This variability can contain information about the factors regulating cardiac activity under normal and pathological conditions, but the information obtained from such analyses is not yet fully understood. In this article, HRV in zebrafish larvae was evaluated under normal conditions and under the effect of substances that modify intrinsic cardiac activity and cardiac activity modulated by the nervous system. We found that the factors affecting intrinsic activity have negative chronotropic and arrhythmogenic effects at this stage of development, whereas neural modulatory factors have a lesser impact. The results suggest that cardiac activity largely depends on the intrinsic properties of the heart tissue in the early stages of development and, to a lesser extent, in the maturing nervous system. We also report, for the first time, the influence of the neurotransmitter gamma amino butyric acid on HRV. The results demonstrate the larval zebrafish model as a useful tool in the study of intrinsic cardiac activity and its role in heart diseases.

  16. Cardiac disease and arrhythmogenesis: Mechanistic insights from mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lois Choy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The mouse is the second mammalian species, after the human, in which substantial amount of the genomic information has been analyzed. With advances in transgenic technology, mutagenesis is now much easier to carry out in mice. Consequently, an increasing number of transgenic mouse systems have been generated for the study of cardiac arrhythmias in ion channelopathies and cardiomyopathies. Mouse hearts are also amenable to physical manipulation such as coronary artery ligation and transverse aortic constriction to induce heart failure, radiofrequency ablation of the AV node to model complete AV block and even implantation of a miniature pacemaker to induce cardiac dyssynchrony. Last but not least, pharmacological models, despite being simplistic, have enabled us to understand the physiological mechanisms of arrhythmias and evaluate the anti-arrhythmic properties of experimental agents, such as gap junction modulators, that may be exert therapeutic effects in other cardiac diseases. In this article, we examine these in turn, demonstrating that primary inherited arrhythmic syndromes are now recognized to be more complex than abnormality in a particular ion channel, involving alterations in gene expression and structural remodelling. Conversely, in cardiomyopathies and heart failure, mutations in ion channels and proteins have been identified as underlying causes, and electrophysiological remodelling are recognized pathological features. Transgenic techniques causing mutagenesis in mice are extremely powerful in dissecting the relative contributions of different genes play in producing disease phenotypes. Mouse models can serve as useful systems in which to explore how protein defects contribute to arrhythmias and direct future therapy.

  17. Entropy Rate Maps of Complex Excitable Dynamics in Cardiac Monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Schlemmer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of spatiotemporal complexity remains a challenging task. This holds in particular for the analysis of data from fluorescence imaging (optical mapping, which allows for the measurement of membrane potential and intracellular calcium at high spatial and temporal resolutions and, therefore, allows for an investigation of cardiac dynamics. Dominant frequency maps and the analysis of phase singularities are frequently used for this type of excitable media. These methods address some important aspects of cardiac dynamics; however, they only consider very specific properties of excitable media. To extend the scope of the analysis, we present a measure based on entropy rates for determining spatiotemporal complexity patterns of excitable media. Simulated data generated by the Aliev–Panfilov model and the cubic Barkley model are used to validate this method. Then, we apply it to optical mapping data from monolayers of cardiac cells from chicken embryos and compare our findings with dominant frequency maps and the analysis of phase singularities. The studies indicate that entropy rate maps provide additional information about local complexity, the origins of wave breakup and the development of patterns governing unstable wave propagation.

  18. Cardiac angiosarcoma: an unexpected diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Roberto Furst Crenitte

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac angiosarcoma is a rare entity. The incidence through autopsy findings ranges between 0.001% and 0.03%. The disease usually presents with non-specific symptoms, although asymptomatic cases are frequent; therefore, diagnosis is unexpected and consequently delayed. The authors report the case of a middle-aged man with a recent onset cough and dyspnea. He sought medical care several times without receiving a definite diagnosis until a plain chest radiography was taken showing a mediastinal enlargement, which was the reason why he was hospitalized for clinical investigation. During the diagnostic workup, an echodopplercardiogram and a thoracic computed tomography were performed, showing a heterogeneous soft-tissue mass infiltrating the pericardium and the anterior atrial wall. Multiple and scattered pulmonary nodules were also present. A pulmonary nodule was biopsied, which revealed an angiosarcoma. The clinical features added to the radiological and histological findings permitted the diagnosis of right atrial angiosarcoma. The authors highlight the unexpected pattern in the presentation of cardiac tumors.

  19. Hemodynamics driven cardiac valve morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steed, Emily; Boselli, Francesco; Vermot, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical forces are instrumental to cardiovascular development and physiology. The heart beats approximately 2.6 billion times in a human lifetime and heart valves ensure that these contractions result in an efficient, unidirectional flow of the blood. Composed of endocardial cells (EdCs) and extracellular matrix (ECM), cardiac valves are among the most mechanically challenged structures of the body both during and after their development. Understanding how hemodynamic forces modulate cardiovascular function and morphogenesis is key to unraveling the relationship between normal and pathological cardiovascular development and physiology. Most valve diseases have their origins in embryogenesis, either as signs of abnormal developmental processes or the aberrant re-expression of fetal gene programs normally quiescent in adulthood. Here we review recent discoveries in the mechanobiology of cardiac valve development and introduce the latest technologies being developed in the zebrafish, including live cell imaging and optical technologies, as well as modeling approaches that are currently transforming this field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Cardiac arrhythmia detection using photoplethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradkar, Neeraj; Chowdhury, Shubhajit Roy

    2017-07-01

    Cardiovascular Diseases (CVDs) cause a very large number of casualties around the world every year and cardiac arrhythmias contribute to significant proportion of CVD related deaths. Bedside cardiac activity monitors in hospitals are based on electrocardiogram (ECG) processing and are known to produce too many false alarms. Moving beyond bedside care, ECG is not very suitable for use in wearable devices. Photoplethysmography (PPG) on the other hand provides an inexpensive and more wearable device-friendly alternative. This work presents a technique to detect life threatening arrhythmias using only PPG waveforms. PhysioNet Challenge 2015 data is used to detect five types of arrhythmias namely, tachycardia, bradycardia, asystole, ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. A novel technique is employed to assign pulse quality index to every PPG pulse and highest quality portion of the signal is used for detection. Results indicate that PPG provides a viable alternative for conventional ECG based detection. An overall true positive rate (TPR) of 93% was achieved with true negative rate (TNR) of 53.78% suggesting that PPG is a viable option for arrhythmia detection.

  1. Sudden Cardiac Death in Children. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.V. Pshenichnaya

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the prevalence, terminology, classification of sudden cardiac death. A description of congenital structural heart diseases associated with a risk of sudden cardiac death is given. The issues of etiology and pathogenesis of life-threatening conditions are described in detail.

  2. Sudden Cardiac Death in Children. Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.V. Pshenichnaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the dysplastic changes in musculo-valve structures of the heart, arrhythmias and conduction disorders, associated with a risk of sudden cardiac death. The diagnostic criteria for sudden cardiac death, the events of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, prevention of life-threatening conditions in children are provided.

  3. MicroRNAs in cardiac arrhythmia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Carlsen, Anting L; Christiansen, Kasper M

    2014-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a genetic cardiac condition associated with prolonged ventricular repolarization, primarily a result of perturbations in cardiac ion channels, which predisposes individuals to life-threatening arrhythmias. Using DNA screening and sequencing methods, over 700 different L...

  4. Cardiac arrhythmias in adult patients with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnier, Miriam J; Rutten, Frans H; Kors, Jan A

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The pathogenesis of cardiac arrhythmias in asthma patients has not been fully elucidated. Adverse drug effects, particularly those of β2-mimetics, may play a role. The aim of this study was to determine whether asthma is associated with the risk of cardiac arrhythmias...

  5. Cardiac MRI of the athlete's heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakken, N.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    The increase in pre-participation cardiovascular screening using the Lausanne protocol will ultimately lead to an increased use of cardiac MRI and MDCT in the cardiovascular work-up of athletes. The role of cardiac MRI is well established in the evaluation of cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, aortic

  6. Athletes at Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasic, Kim

    2010-01-01

    High school athletes represent the largest group of individuals affected by sudden cardiac death, with an estimated incidence of once or twice per week. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are the most frequent cause of sudden cardiac death. Athletes participating in basketball, football, track, soccer, baseball, and swimming were found to…

  7. Fetal Primary Cardiac Tumors During Perinatal Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fetal primary cardiac tumors are rare, but they may cause complications, which are sometimes life threatening, including arrhythmias, hydrops fetalis, ventricular outflow/inflow obstruction, cardiac failure, and even sudden death. Among fetal primary cardiac tumors, rhabdomyomas are most common, followed by teratomas, fibromas, hemangiomas, and myxomas. Everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, has been reported to be an effective drug to cause tumor remission in three neonates with multiple cardiac rhabdomyomas. Neonatal cardiac surgery for the resection of primary cardiac tumors found by fetal echocardiography has been reported sporadically. However, open fetal surgery for pericardial teratoma resection, which was performed successfully via a fetal median sternotomy in one case report, could be a promising intervention to rescue these patients with large pericardial effusions. These recent achievements undoubtedly encourage further development in early management of fetal cardiac tumors. Owing to the rarity of fetal primary cardiac tumors, relevant information in terms of prenatal diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis remains to be clarified.

  8. Corticosteroids in cardiac surgery: a continuing controversy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac surgery leads to significant improvements in symptoms of cardiac disease and quality of life, but is still associated with a substantial risk of adverse events and postoperative disability. The perioperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) likely plays a role in the

  9. Acute cardiac failure in neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sparrow, Patrick

    2012-02-03

    We present a case of rapid onset acute cardiac failure developing as part of neuroleptic malignant syndrome in a 35-year-old woman following treatment with thioridazine and lithium. Post mortem histology of cardiac and skeletal muscle showed similar changes of focal cellular necrosis and vacuolation suggesting a common disease process.

  10. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roccio, M.; Goumans, M. J.; Sluijter, J. P. G.; Doevendans, P. A.

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new

  11. Is fetal cardiac function gender dependent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clur, S. A. B.; Oude Rengerink, K.; Mol, B. W.; Ottenkamp, J.; Bilardo, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    An increased nuchal translucency (NT) is more common in males. A delayed diastolic cardiac function maturation has been proposed to explain this and the reported gender-related differences in ductus venosus (DV) flow. To investigate gender-related differences in fetal cardiac function. One hundred

  12. Is fetal cardiac function gender dependent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clur, S. A. B.; Rengerink, K. Oude; Mol, B. W.; Ottenkamp, J.; Bilardo, C. M.

    Introduction An increased nuchal translucency (NT) is more common in males. A delayed diastolic cardiac function maturation has been proposed to explain this and the reported gender-related differences in ductus venosus (DV) flow. Objective To investigate gender-related differences in fetal cardiac

  13. Cyanide poisoning and cardiac disorders: 161 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Jean-Luc; Desmettre, Thibault; Manzon, Cyril; Judic-Peureux, Virginie; Peugeot-Mortier, Caroline; Giocanti, Jean-Pascal; Hachelaf, Mohamed; Grangeon, Marie; Hostalek, Ulrike; Crouzet, Julien; Capellier, Gilles

    2010-05-01

    Inhalation of hydrogen cyanide from smoke in structural fires is common, but cardiovascular function in these patients is poorly documented. The objective was to study the cardiac complications of cyanide poisoning in patients who received early administration of a cyanide antidote, hydroxocobalamin (Cyanokit; Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany [in the United States, marketed by Meridian Medical Technologies, Bristol, TN]). The medical records of 161 fire survivors with suspected or confirmed cyanide poisoning were reviewed in an open, multicenter, retrospective review of cases from the Emergency Medical Assistance Unit (Service d'Aide Médical d'Urgence) in France. Cardiac arrest (61/161, 58 asystole, 3 ventricular fibrillation), cardiac rhythm disorders (57/161, 56 supraventricular tachycardia), repolarization disorders (12/161), and intracardiac conduction disorders (5/161) were observed. Of the total 161 patients studied, 26 displayed no cardiac disorder. All patients were given an initial dose of 5 g of hydroxocobalamin. Non-responders received a second dose of 5 g of hydroxocobalamin. Of the patients initially in cardiac arrest, 30 died at the scene, 24 died in hospital, and 5 survived without cardiovascular sequelae. Cardiac disorders improved with increasing doses of hydroxocobalamin, and higher doses of the antidote seem to be associated with a superior outcome in patients with initial cardiac arrest. Cardiac complications are common in cyanide poisoning in fire survivors. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultrasound Imaging in Teaching Cardiac Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher D.; Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Quinn, Joe G.; Roe, Sean M.; Stewart, Michael T.; Tansey, Etain A.

    2016-01-01

    This laboratory session provides hands-on experience for students to visualize the beating human heart with ultrasound imaging. Simple views are obtained from which students can directly measure important cardiac dimensions in systole and diastole. This allows students to derive, from first principles, important measures of cardiac function, such…

  15. Cardiac spindle cell hemangioma: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Young; Lee, In Jae; Min, Kwang Sun; Jeon, Eui Yong; Lee, Yul; Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Spindle cell hemangioma is an uncommon vascular lesion histologically resembling a cavernous hemangioma and Kaposi's sarcoma with a predilection for the extremities. There are no radiologic reports concerning cardiac spindle cell hemangioma in the current literature. We report here a case of cardiac spindle cell hemangioma.

  16. Tannin, oxalate, saponin, cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two species of cola, Cola nitida and Cola acuminate, were investigated for their possible relative contents of the secondary plant products:- tannin, oxalate, saponin, cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides. The two cola species gave low levels of tannin and oxalate but very high levels of cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides as ...

  17. Blood storage duration and morbidity and mortality in children undergoing cardiac surgery. A retrospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltsavias, Iris; Faraoni, David; Willems, Ariane; Kenz, Hanane El; Melot, Christian; de Hert, Stefan; van der Linden, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Blood transfusion is frequently required in children undergoing cardiac surgery and is associated with altered postoperative outcome. This may be due to alterations in red blood cell properties related to the storage process. To evaluate the effect of blood storage duration on postoperative

  18. Characterization of epicardial-derived cardiac interstitial cells: differentiation and mobilization of heart fibroblast progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Ruiz-Villalba

    Full Text Available The non-muscular cells that populate the space found between cardiomyocyte fibers are known as 'cardiac interstitial cells' (CICs. CICs are heterogeneous in nature and include different cardiac progenitor/stem cells, cardiac fibroblasts and other cell types. Upon heart damage CICs soon respond by initiating a reparative response that transforms with time into extensive fibrosis and heart failure. Despite the biomedical relevance of CICs, controversy remains on the ontogenetic relationship existing between the different cell kinds homing at the cardiac interstitium, as well as on the molecular signals that regulate their differentiation, maturation, mutual interaction and role in adult cardiac homeostasis and disease. Our work focuses on the analysis of epicardial-derived cells, the first cell type that colonizes the cardiac interstitium. We present here a characterization and an experimental analysis of the differentiation potential and mobilization properties of a new cell line derived from mouse embryonic epicardium (EPIC. Our results indicate that these cells express some markers associated with cardiovascular stemness and retain part of the multipotent properties of embryonic epicardial derivatives, spontaneously differentiating into smooth muscle, and fibroblast/myofibroblast-like cells. Epicardium-derived cells are also shown to initiate a characteristic response to different growth factors, to display a characteristic proteolytic expression profile and to degrade biological matrices in 3D in vitro assays. Taken together, these data indicate that EPICs are relevant to the analysis of epicardial-derived CICs, and are a god model for the research on cardiac fibroblasts and the role these cells play in ventricular remodeling in both ischemic or non/ischemic myocardial disease.

  19. SDF-1 induces TNF-mediated apoptosis in cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrah, Andrew A; Schwarskopf, Martina; Wang, Edward R; LaRocca, Thomas; Dhume, Ashwini; Zhang, Shihong; Hadri, Lahouria; Hajjar, Roger J; Schecter, Alison D; Tarzami, Sima T

    2018-01-01

    Chemokines are small secreted proteins with chemoattractant properties that play a key role in inflammation. One such chemokine, Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) also known as CXCL12, and its receptor, CXCR4, are expressed and functional in cardiac myocytes. SDF-1 both stimulates and enhances the cellular signal which attracts potentially beneficial stem cells for tissue repair within the ischemic heart. Paradoxically however, this chemokine is known to act in concert with the inflammatory cytokines of the innate immune response which contributes to cellular injury through the recruitment of inflammatory cells during ischemia. In the present study, we have demonstrated that SDF-1 has dose dependent effects on freshly isolated cardiomyocytes. Using Tunnel and caspase 3-activation assays, we have demonstrated that the treatment of isolated adult rat cardiac myocyte with SDF-1 at higher concentrations (pathological concentrations) induced apoptosis. Furthermore, ELISA data demonstrated that the treatment of isolated adult rat cardiac myocyte with SDF-1 at higher concentrations upregulated TNF-α protein expression which directly correlated with subsequent apoptosis. There was a significant reduction in SDF-1 mediated apoptosis when TNF-α expression was neutralized which suggests that SDF-1 mediated apoptosis is TNF-α-dependent. The fact that certain stimuli are capable of driving cardiomyocytes into apoptosis indicates that these cells are susceptible to clinically relevant apoptotic triggers. Our findings suggest that the elevated SDF-1 levels seen in a variety of clinical conditions, including ischemic myocardial infarction, may either directly or indirectly contribute to cardiac cell death via a TNF-α mediated pathway. This highlights the importance of this receptor/ligand in regulating the cardiomyocyte response to stress conditions.

  20. FET-biosensor for cardiac troponin biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Mohd Khairuddin Md; Faris Mohamad Fathil, Mohamad; Hashim, Uda

    2017-11-01

    Acute myocardial infarction or myocardial infarction (MI) is a major health problem, due to diminished flow of blood to the heart, leads to higher rates of mortality and morbidity. The most specific markers for cardiac injury are cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) which have been considered as `gold standard'. Due to higher specificity, determination of the level of cardiac troponins became a predominant indicator for MI. Currently, field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensors have been main interest to be implemented in portable sensors with the ultimate application in point-of-care testing (POCT). In this paper, we review on the FET-based biosensor based on its principle of operation, integration with nanomaterial, surface functionalization as well as immobilization, and the introduction of additional gate (for ambipolar conduction) on the device architecture for the detection of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) biomarker.

  1. Cardiac fluid dynamics meets deformation imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Ferro, Matteo; Stolfo, Davide; De Paris, Valerio; Lesizza, Pierluigi; Korcova, Renata; Collia, Dario; Tonti, Giovanni; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Pedrizzetti, Gianni

    2018-02-20

    Cardiac function is about creating and sustaining blood in motion. This is achieved through a proper sequence of myocardial deformation whose final goal is that of creating flow. Deformation imaging provided valuable contributions to understanding cardiac mechanics; more recently, several studies evidenced the existence of an intimate relationship between cardiac function and intra-ventricular fluid dynamics. This paper summarizes the recent advances in cardiac flow evaluations, highlighting its relationship with heart wall mechanics assessed through the newest techniques of deformation imaging and finally providing an opinion of the most promising clinical perspectives of this emerging field. It will be shown how fluid dynamics can integrate volumetric and deformation assessments to provide a further level of knowledge of cardiac mechanics.

  2. FET-biosensor for cardiac troponin biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Arshad Mohd Khairuddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myocardial infarction or myocardial infarction (MI is a major health problem, due to diminished flow of blood to the heart, leads to higher rates of mortality and morbidity. The most specific markers for cardiac injury are cardiac troponin I (cTnI and cardiac troponin T (cTnT which have been considered as ‘gold standard’. Due to higher specificity, determination of the level of cardiac troponins became a predominant indicator for MI. Currently, field-effect transistor (FET-based biosensors have been main interest to be implemented in portable sensors with the ultimate application in point-of-care testing (POCT. In this paper, we review on the FET-based biosensor based on its principle of operation, integration with nanomaterial, surface functionalization as well as immobilization, and the introduction of additional gate (for ambipolar conduction on the device architecture for the detection of cardiac troponin I (cTnI biomarker.

  3. Verification of cardiac mechanics software: benchmark problems and solutions for testing active and passive material behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Sander; Gurev, Viatcheslav; Arens, Sander; Augustin, Christoph M; Baron, Lukas; Blake, Robert; Bradley, Chris; Castro, Sebastian; Crozier, Andrew; Favino, Marco; Fastl, Thomas E; Fritz, Thomas; Gao, Hao; Gizzi, Alessio; Griffith, Boyce E; Hurtado, Daniel E; Krause, Rolf; Luo, Xiaoyu; Nash, Martyn P; Pezzuto, Simone; Plank, Gernot; Rossi, Simone; Ruprecht, Daniel; Seemann, Gunnar; Smith, Nicolas P; Sundnes, Joakim; Rice, J Jeremy; Trayanova, Natalia; Wang, Dafang; Jenny Wang, Zhinuo; Niederer, Steven A

    2015-12-08

    Models of cardiac mechanics are increasingly used to investigate cardiac physiology. These models are characterized by a high level of complexity, including the particular anisotropic material properties of biological tissue and the actively contracting material. A large number of independent simulation codes have been developed, but a consistent way of verifying the accuracy and replicability of simulations is lacking. To aid in the verification of current and future cardiac mechanics solvers, this study provides three benchmark problems for cardiac mechanics. These benchmark problems test the ability to accurately simulate pressure-type forces that depend on the deformed objects geometry, anisotropic and spatially varying material properties similar to those seen in the left ventricle and active contractile forces. The benchmark was solved by 11 different groups to generate consensus solutions, with typical differences in higher-resolution solutions at approximately 0.5%, and consistent results between linear, quadratic and cubic finite elements as well as different approaches to simulating incompressible materials. Online tools and solutions are made available to allow these tests to be effectively used in verification of future cardiac mechanics software.

  4. Association between dental caries and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of cardiac origin in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, Yasunori; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Zhang, Bo; Uehara, Yoshinari; Ogawa, Masahiro; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nonogi, Hiroshi; Nagao, Ken; Kimura, Takeshi; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-04-01

    Oral infection contributes to atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. We hypothesized that dental caries may be associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) of cardiac origin, but not non-cardiac origin. We compared the age-adjusted incidence of OHCA (785,591 cases of OHCA: 55.4% of cardiac origin and 44.6% of non-cardiac origin) to the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries between 2005 and 2011 in the 47 prefectures of Japan. In both the total population and males over 65 years, the number of cases of dental caries was significantly associated with the number of OHCA of total and cardiac origin from 2005 to 2011, but not those of non-cardiac origin. In the total population, the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries was not significantly associated with the age-adjusted incidence of OHCA (total OHCA: r correlation coefficient=0.22, p=0.14; OHCA of cardiac origin: r=0.25, p=0.09; OHCA of non-cardiac origin: r=-0.002, p=0.99). Among male patients over 65 years, the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries was significantly associated with OHCA of total and cardiac origin, but not non-cardiac origin (total OHCA: r=0.47, p<0.001; OHCA of cardiac origin: r=0.37, p=0.01; OHCA of non-cardiac origin: r=0.28, p=0.054). While oral hygiene is important in all age groups, it may be particularly associated with OHCAs of cardiac origin in males over 65 years. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Major Cardiac Events After Non-cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Gabriela; Lopes, Ana; Reis, Pedro; Carvalho, Vasco; Santos, Alice; Abelha, Fernando José

    2016-08-01

    Postoperative cardiovascular complications might be difficult to assess and are known to be associated with longer hospital stay and increased costs as well as higher morbidity and mortality rates. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictors for major cardiac events (MCE) after non-cardiac surgery. The study included 4398 patients who were admitted to the Surgical Intensive Care Unit between January 1, 2006 and July 19, 2013. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS II) were calculated, and all variables entered as parameters were evaluated independently. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the independent factors for MCE. A total of 107 people experienced MCE. The independent predictors for postoperative MCE were higher fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) (odds ratio [OR] 38.97; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 10.81-140.36), history of ischemic heart disease (OR 3.38; 95 % CI 2.12-5.39), history of congestive heart disease (OR 2.39; 95 % CI 1.49-3.85), history of insulin therapy for diabetes (OR 2.93; 95 % CI 1.66-5.19), and increased SAPS II (OR 1.03; 95 % CI 1.01-1.05). Having a MCE was associated with a longer length of stay in the surgical intensive care unit (OR 1.01, 95 % CI 1.00-1.01). FiO2, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart disease, insulin therapy for diabetes, SAPS II, and length of stay in the surgical intensive care unit were independent predictors for MCE.

  6. Descartes, Cardiac Heat, and Alchemy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitsch, Dorothea

    2016-11-01

    René Descartes (1596-1650) insisted on a heat and light theory to explain cardiac movement, and used concepts such as distillation of the vital spirits, fermentation in the digestive process, and fermentation in the circulation of the blood. I argue that his theory of the body as a heat-exchange system was based on alchemical and natural philosophical notions of fire and light expounded by precursors and contemporaries who included Jean D'Espagnet, Jean Fernel, Jan Baptist van Helmont, and Andreas Libavius. Descartes endeavoured to mechanise their approaches, creating a theory in which fire and heat, a legacy from thermal explanations of physiology, were transformed into alchemical fire, and then into mechanistic or physicalist heat.

  7. Multiscale measurement of cardiac energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Soyeon; Pham, Toan; Han, Jun-Chiew; Nielsen, Poul; Taberner, Andrew; Hickey, Anthony; Loiselle, Denis

    2013-09-01

    Herein we describe our laboratories' experimental methods for interrogating cardiac energetics at the organ (whole heart), tissue (trabecula) and perforated fibre (mitochondrial) levels. In whole heart and trabecula experiments, we focus on measuring pressure-volume (force-length) work and oxygen consumption (heat production) from which mechanical efficiency is derived. In both preparations (i.e. across scales differing by three orders of magnitude) we find efficiency values of 10%-15%. Mitochondrial experiments invoke a trio of titration protocols to yield information on oxygen consumption, ATP flux, membrane potential, electron leak and reactive oxygen species production, the latter two of which index energy transfer inefficiencies. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Fractals analysis of cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Mohammed

    2005-09-06

    Heart rhythms are generated by complex self-regulating systems governed by the laws of chaos. Consequently, heart rhythms have fractal organization, characterized by self-similar dynamics with long-range order operating over multiple time scales. This allows for the self-organization and adaptability of heart rhythms under stress. Breakdown of this fractal organization into excessive order or uncorrelated randomness leads to a less-adaptable system, characteristic of aging and disease. With the tools of nonlinear dynamics, this fractal breakdown can be quantified with potential applications to diagnostic and prognostic clinical assessment. In this paper, I review the methodologies for fractal analysis of cardiac rhythms and the current literature on their applications in the clinical context. A brief overview of the basic mathematics of fractals is also included. Furthermore, I illustrate the usefulness of these powerful tools to clinical medicine by describing a novel noninvasive technique to monitor drug therapy in atrial fibrillation.

  9. Biomagnetic study of cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenici, R R; Melillo, G

    1991-01-01

    Clinical magnetocardiographic mapping was initiated in the Cardiovascular Biomagnetism Unit of the Catholic University of Rome about 10 years ago. Since then several hundred patients have been investigated. However, the most interesting data have been collected after the development, in 1984, of the present laboratory configuration, which allows simultaneous MCG mapping and invasive electrophysiological procedures. Perspective studies have been carried out to validate the accuracy of MCG for localisation of arrhythmogenic structures and for early detection of patients at risk of sudden death. Although the diagnostic applicability of the method is still under evaluation, preliminary results are reported, concerning 120 patients, investigated between 1985 and 1990, with cardiac arrhythmias associated with ventricular pre-excitation, ischaemic heart disease or cardiomyopathies.

  10. Approach to cardiac resyncronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobreanu, Dan; Dagres, Nikolaos; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2012-01-01

    and completed the questions. Thirty-two per cent of the responding centres always use CRT in heart failure (HF) patients with New York Heart Association functional class II and QRS width >120 ms, and 55% of the responding centres demand additional criteria when indicating CRT, most often QRS width >150 ms (49......%) and echocardiographic criteria of asynchrony (34%). Only 10% of centres indicate CRT in all HF patients with QRS >120 ms and right bundle branch block, and 51% demand additional criteria, most frequently echocardiographic asynchrony parameters. The vast majority of centres also indicate CRT in patients with atrial...... fibrillation and standard criteria for CRT. In 24% of the centres, biventricular pacemaker (CRT-P) is implanted in all situations, unless there is an indication for secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death, while 10% always choose to implant a biventricular defibrillator (CRT-D). There are no clear...

  11. Gene Therapy in Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen S.V

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy has progressed from a dream to a bedside reality in quite a few human diseases. From its first application in adenosine deaminase deficiency, through the years, its application has evolved to vascular angiogenesis and cardiac arrhythmias. Gene based biological pacemakers using viral vectors or mesenchymal cells tested in animal models hold much promise. Induction of pacemaker activity within the left bundle branch can provide stable heart rates. Genetic modification of the AV node mimicking beta blockade can be therapeutic in the management of atrial fibrillation. G protein overexpression to modify the AV node also is experimental. Modification and expression of potassium channel genes altering the delayed rectifier potassium currents may permit better management of congenital long QT syndromes. Arrhythmias in a failing heart are due to abnormal calcium cycling. Potential targets for genetic modulation include the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump, calsequestrin and sodium calcium exchanger.Lastly the ethical concerns need to be addressed.

  12. Cardiac Function Remains Impaired Despite Reversible Cardiac Remodeling after Acute Experimental Viral Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Moritz Becher

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Infection with Coxsackievirus B3 induces myocarditis. We aimed to compare the acute and chronic phases of viral myocarditis to identify the immediate effects of cardiac inflammation as well as the long-term effects after resolved inflammation on cardiac fibrosis and consequently on cardiac function. Material and Methods. We infected C57BL/6J mice with Coxsackievirus B3 and determined the hemodynamic function 7 as well as 28 days after infection. Subsequently, we analyzed viral burden and viral replication in the cardiac tissue as well as the expression of cytokines and matrix proteins. Furthermore, cardiac fibroblasts were infected with virus to investigate if viral infection alone induces profibrotic signaling. Results. Severe cardiac inflammation was determined and cardiac fibrosis was consistently colocalized with inflammation during the acute phase of myocarditis. Declined cardiac inflammation but no significantly improved hemodynamic function was observed 28 days after infection. Interestingly, cardiac fibrosis declined to basal levels as well. Both cardiac inflammation and fibrosis were reversible, whereas the hemodynamic function remains impaired after healed viral myocarditis in C57BL/6J mice.

  13. Negative predictive value of cardiac troponin for predicting adverse cardiac events following blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guild, Cameron S; deShazo, Matthew; Geraci, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac-specific troponins (Tns) are sensitive and specific markers of myocardial injury that have been shown to be predictive of outcomes in many cardiac and noncardiac conditions. We sought to determine whether normal cardiac Tn concentrations obtained during the first 24 hours following blunt chest trauma would predict good cardiac outcomes. A PubMed/MEDLINE search was performed to identify prospective studies in patients with blunt chest trauma in which serial cardiac TnT or TnI values were measured within 24 hours of admission and clinical outcomes assessed. Ten studies qualified for review. Studies that used the lower reference limit of Tn as the cutoff for cardiac injury showed 100% negative predictive value (NPV) for developing cardiac complications, whereas studies using higher Tn cutoffs showed wider variation in NPV (50%-98%). Cardiac Tn measured within 24 hours using the lower reference limit (LRL) as the cutoff appears to have excellent NPV for clinically significant adverse cardiac events. This could allow for early discharge after a 24-hour observation period in otherwise uncomplicated blunt chest trauma patients and avoid the need for more expensive cardiac imaging and additional resource utilization.

  14. Regulation of cardiac remodeling by cardiac Na/K-ATPase isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Catherine Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac remodeling occurs after cardiac pressure/volume overload or myocardial injury during the development of heart failure and is a determinant of heart failure. Preventing or reversing remodeling is a goal of heart failure therapy. Human cardiomyocyte Na+/K+-ATPase has multiple α isoforms (1-3. The expression of the α subunit of the Na+/K+-ATPase is often altered in hypertrophic and failing hearts. The mechanisms are unclear. There are limited data from human cardiomyocytes. Abundant evidences from rodents show that Na+/K+-ATPase regulates cardiac contractility, cell signaling, hypertrophy and fibrosis. The α1 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase is the ubiquitous isoform and possesses both pumping and signaling functions. The α2 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase regulates intracellular Ca2+ signaling, contractility and pathological hypertrophy. The α3 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase may also be a target for cardiac hypertrophy. Restoration of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase expression may be an effective approach for prevention of cardiac remodeling. In this article, we will overview: (1 the distribution and function of isoform specific Na+/K+-ATPase in the cardiomyocytes. (2 the role of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase in the regulation of cell signaling, contractility, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. Selective targeting of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase isoform may offer a new target for the prevention of cardiac remodeling.

  15. Impact of prolonged walking exercise on cardiac structure and function in cardiac patients versus healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benda, Nathalie Mm; Hopman, Maria Te; van Dijk, Arie Pj; Oxborough, David; George, Keith P; Thijssen, Dick Hj; Eijsvogels, Thijs Mh

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that endurance exercise can cause an acute transient decrease in cardiac function in healthy subjects. Whether this also occurs in cardiac patients is unknown. We investigated the impact of prolonged single day and three-day walking exercise on cardiac function and cardiac biomarkers between cardiac patients and healthy controls in an observational study. We recruited 10 cardiac patients (nine males, one female, 68 ± 5 years) and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects (nine males, one female, 68 ± 4 years) to perform 30 or 40 km of walking exercise per day for three consecutive days. Cardiac function was examined using echocardiography and cardiac biomarkers (cardiac troponin and B-type natriuretic peptide) with blood samples. Data were collected before walking and directly after walking on day 1 and day 3. Post-exercise early systolic tissue contraction velocity of the left ventricle (p = 0.005) and global longitudinal left ventricle strain (P = 0.026) were increased in both groups compared with baseline. Post-exercise right ventricle peak early diastolic tissue filling velocity and systolic blood pressure/left ventricle end-systolic volume ratio decreased in both groups (p = 0.043 and p = 0.028, respectively). Post-exercise cardiac troponin levels increased (p = 0.045) but did not differ across groups (p = 0.60), whereas B-type natriuretic peptide levels did not change (p = 0.43). This study suggests that stable cardiac patients are capable of performing three days of prolonged walking exercise without clinically significant acute overall deterioration in cardiac function or more pronounced increase in cardiac biomarkers compared with healthy controls. © The European Society of Cardiology 2016.

  16. The cardiac glycoside ouabain activates NLRP3 inflammasomes and promotes cardiac inflammation and dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoi Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Cardiac glycosides such as digoxin are Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitors that are widely used for the treatment of chronic heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias; however, recent epidemiological studies have suggested a relationship between digoxin treatment and increased mortality. We previously showed that nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3 inflammasomes, which regulate caspase-1-dependent interleukin (IL-1β release, mediate the sterile cardiovascular inflammation. Because the Na+/K+-ATPase is involved in inflammatory responses, we investigated the role of NLRP3 inflammasomes in the pathophysiology of cardiac glycoside-induced cardiac inflammation and dysfunction. The cardiac glycoside ouabain induced cardiac dysfunction and injury in wild-type mice primed with a low dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, although no cardiac dysfunction was observed in mice treated with either ouabain or LPS alone. Ouabain also induced cardiac inflammatory responses, such as macrophage infiltration and IL-1β release, when mice were primed with LPS. These cardiac manifestations were all significantly attenuated in mice deficient in IL-1β. Furthermore, deficiency of NLRP3 inflammasome components, NLRP3 and caspase-1, also attenuated ouabain-induced cardiac dysfunction and inflammation. In vitro experiments revealed that ouabain induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation as well as subsequent IL-1β release from macrophages, and this activation was mediated by K+ efflux. Our findings demonstrate that cardiac glycosides promote cardiac inflammation and dysfunction through NLRP3 inflammasomes and provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying the adverse effects of cardiac glycosides.

  17. Pharmacological bridge to cardiac transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisance, D; Dubois Rande, J L; Deleuze, P H; Hillion, M L; Duval, A M; Tavolaro, O; Romano, P; Castaigne, A; Tarral, A; Cachera, J P

    1989-01-01

    From September 1985 to August 1988, 32 patients were referred from various intensive care units throughout Paris for urgent cardiac transplantation or for a mechanical bridge to transplantation. At time of admission, under maximal sympathomimetic therapy, the cardiac index (CI) was 1.81 +/- 0.26 l/min per m2, the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP 31 +/- 7 mmHg), systemic vascular resistances (SVR) 2053 +/- 469 dynes s cm-5. In 25, diuresis was less than 25 ml/h. Five were anuric. Prior to any final decision, a new inotropic agent, enoximone, was infused in addition to previous treatment as a 10 min bolus iv 1.5-2 mg/kg every 8 h. In 3, the situation further deteriorated, leading to a Jarvik 7-70 implantation within 12 h. In 29 however, within 3 h, the Cl increased to 2.69 +/- 0.56 as SVR dropped to 1410 +/- 453 and PCWP to 18 +/- 7. Diuresis increased to more than 100 ml/h in all. This permitted an indepth evaluation of the transplant candidates leading to contraindications to transplantation in 16. Nine patients could be weaned off iv enoximone. Four of these are still living (NYHA class III) with a follow up of 6-17 months. In 11, transplantation was performed within 2 days. Four died within a month, 2 with multiple organ failure. One patient died after 5 months. Six are back to normal life, NYHA class I (follow up 10 months-2.5 years). This protocol suggests that in patients with extreme heart failure, immediate survival may be increased by iv enoximone therapy, permitting a better selection of the recipients, more efficient pre-transplantation intensive care and consequently a decrease in the indications for a temporary mechanical bridge to a staged transplantation.

  18. Assessing quality in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer A.M. Nashef

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a the strong temporal, if not causal, link between the intervention and the outcome in cardiac surgery and therefore a link becomes established between operative mortality and the measurement of surgical performance. In Britain the law stipulates that data collected by any public body or using public funds must be made freely available. Tools and mechanisms we devise and develop are likely to form the models on which the quality of care is assessed in other surgical and perhaps medical specialties. Measuring professional performance should be done by the profession. To measure risk there are a number of scores as crude mortality is not enough. A very important benefit of assessing the risk of death is to use this knowledge in the determination of the indication to operate. The second benefit is in the assessment of the quality of care as risk prediction gives a standard against performance of hospitals and surgeons. Peer review and “naming and shaming” are two mechanisms to monitor quality. There are two potentially damaging outcomes from the publication of results in a league-table form: the first is the damage to the hospital; the second is to refuse to operate on high-risk patients. There is a real need for quality monitoring in medicine in general and in cardiac surgery in particular. Good quality surgical work requires robust knowledge of three crucial variables: activity, risk prediction and performance. In Europe, the three major specialist societies have agreed to establish the European Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery Institute of Accreditation (ECTSIA. Performance monitoring is soon to become imperative. If we surgeons are not on board, we shall have no control on its final destination, and the consequences may be equally damaging to us and to our patients.

  19. ICD in cardiac resinhronization therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damijan Vokač

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with advanced heart failure bears bad prognosis, despite modern medical treatment year mortality rate spans from 30 up to 70%. Besides terminal heart failure the second most frequent cause is sudden death due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias as ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation. Ventricular fibrillation is very frequent cause of mortality of terminal heart failure especially in ischemic subgroup. Clinical studies have presented improvement of heart function by use of biventricular stimulation of patients with advanced heart failure and intraventricular conduction defects as left bundle branch block. Method very successfully improves acute hemodynamic parameters due to resynchronization of septal and lateral wall of left ventricle and improves economy of the heart contraction. Although these effects are present immediately after implantation they persist also through longer period. Method improves quality of life and also decreases mortality rate proved by clinical studies. Despite successful therapy mortality rate due to sudden death remains high. Implantable cardioverters defibrillators successfully prevent sudden cardiac death due to ventricular tachyarrhythmia. They are successful due to straightforward recognition of ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation and immediate electrical schock delivery. Cardiovertes defibrillators are successful in prevention of sudden cardiac death but they do not improve quality of life of heart failure patients like resynchronization therapy. Thus, combined therapy resynchronization and cardioverter defibrillator as a single implantable device has been developed.Conclusions: Due to very successful combined therapy the application of biventricular cardioverters defibrillators into clinical practice has increased. Implantation of biventricular cardioverter defibrillator is complex but very successful procedure. It is economically acceptable when proper indication has been stated. Large

  20. The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rossau, Henriette Knold; Nakano, Anne; Foghmar, Sussie; Eichhorst, Regina; Prescott, Eva; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Soja, Anne Merete Boas; Gislason, Gunnar H; Larsen, Mogens Lytken; Andersen, Ulla Overgaard; Gustafsson, Ida; Thomsen, Kristian K; Boye Hansen, Lene; Hammer, Signe; Viggers, Lone; Christensen, Bo; Kvist, Birgitte; Lindström Egholm, Cecilie; May, Ole

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database (DHRD) aims to improve the quality of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) to the benefit of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Hospitalized patients with CHD with stenosis on coronary angiography treated with percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, or medication alone. Reporting is mandatory for all hospitals in Denmark delivering CR. The database was initially implemented in 2013 and was fully running from August 14, 2015, thus comprising data at a patient level from the latter date onward. Patient-level data are registered by clinicians at the time of entry to CR directly into an online system with simultaneous linkage to other central patient registers. Follow-up data are entered after 6 months. The main variables collected are related to key outcome and performance indicators of CR: referral and adherence, lifestyle, patient-related outcome measures, risk factor control, and medication. Program-level online data are collected every third year. Based on administrative data, approximately 14,000 patients with CHD are hospitalized at 35 hospitals annually, with 75% receiving one or more outpatient rehabilitation services by 2015. The database has not yet been running for a full year, which explains the use of approximations. The DHRD is an online, national quality improvement database on CR, aimed at patients with CHD. Mandatory registration of data at both patient level as well as program level is done on the database. DHRD aims to systematically monitor the quality of CR over time, in order to improve the quality of CR throughout Denmark to benefit patients.

  1. The role of autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lanfang; Xu, Jin; He, Lu; Peng, Lijun; Zhong, Qiaoqing; Chen, Linxi; Jiang, Zhisheng

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is conserved in nature from lower eukaryotes to mammals and is an important self-cannibalizing, degradative process that contributes to the elimination of superfluous materials. Cardiac hypertrophy is primarily characterized by excess protein synthesis, increased cardiomyocyte size, and thickened ventricular walls and is a major risk factor that promotes arrhythmia and heart failure. In recent years, cardiomyocyte autophagy has been considered to play a role in controlling the hypertrophic response. However, the beneficial or aggravating role of cardiomyocyte autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy remains controversial. The exact mechanism of cardiomyocyte autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy requires further study. In this review, we summarize the controversies associated with autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy and provide insights into the role of autophagy in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. We conclude that future studies should emphasize the relationship between autophagy and the different stages of cardiac hypertrophy, as well as the autophagic flux and selective autophagy. Autophagy will be a potential therapeutic target for cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27084518

  2. Mathematical Models of Cardiac Pacemaking Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan eLi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past half century, there has been intense and fruitful interaction between experimental and computational investigations of cardiac function. This interaction has, for example, led to deep understanding of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling; how it works, as well as how it fails. However, many lines of inquiry remain unresolved, among them the initiation of each heartbeat. The sinoatrial node, a cluster of specialized pacemaking cells in the right atrium of the heart, spontaneously generates an electro-chemical wave that spreads through the atria and through the cardiac conduction system to the ventricles, initiating the contraction of cardiac muscle essential for pumping blood to the body. Despite the fundamental importance of this primary pacemaker, this process is still not fully understood, and ionic mechanisms underlying cardiac pacemaking function are currently under heated debate. Several mathematical models of sinoatrial node cell membrane electrophysiology have been constructed as based on different experimental data sets and hypotheses. As could be expected, these differing models offer diverse predictions about cardiac pacemaking activities. This paper aims to present the current state of debate over the origins of the pacemaking function of the sinoatrial node. Here, we will specifically review the state-of-the-art of cardiac pacemaker modeling, with a special emphasis on current discrepancies, limitations, and future challenges.

  3. Cardiac channelopathies associated with infantile fatal ventricular arrhythmias: from the cradle to the bench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Koichi; Makiyama, Takeru; Wu, Jie; Ding, Wei-Guang; Kimura, Hiromi; Naiki, Nobu; Ohno, Seiko; Itoh, Hideki; Nakanishi, Toshio; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Horie, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Fatal ventricular arrhythmias in the early period of life have been associated with cardiac channelopathies for decades, and postmortem analyses in SIDS victims have provided evidence of this association. However, the prevalence and functional properties of cardiac ion channel mutations in infantile fatal arrhythmia cases are not clear. Seven infants with potentially lethal arrhythmias at age channelopathies. Functional assays revealed both gain and loss of channel function in SCN5A mutations, as well as loss of function associated with the KCNH2 mutation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cardiac myxoma in pregnancy: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac myxoma in pregnancy is rare and the clinical characteristics of this entity have been insufficiently elucidated. This article aims to describe the treatment options and the risk factors responsible for the maternal and feto-neonatal prognoses. A comprehensive search of the literature of cardiac myxoma in pregnancy was conducted and 44 articles with 51 patients were included in the present review. Transthoracic echocardiography was the most common diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of cardiac myxoma during pregnancy. Cardiac myxoma resection was performed in 95.9% (47/49); while no surgical resection was performed in 4.1% (2/49) patients (P=0.000). More patients had an isolated cardiac myxoma resection in comparison to those with a concurrent or staged additional cardiac operation [87.2% (41/47) vs. 12.8% (6/47), P=0.000]. A voluntary termination of the pregnancy was done in 7 (13.7%) cases. In the remaining 31 (60.8%) pregnant patients, cesarean section was the most common delivery mode representing 61.3% and vaginal delivery was more common accounting for 19.4%. Cardiac surgery was performed in the first, second and third trimester in 5 (13.9%), 14 (38.9%) and 17 (47.2%) patients, respectively. No patients died. In the delivery group, 20 (76.9%) neonates were event-free survivals, 4 (15.4%) were complicated and 2 (7.7%) died. Neonatal prognoses did not differ between the delivery modes, treatment options, timing of cardiac surgery and sequence of cardiac myxoma resection in relation to delivery. The diagnosis of cardiac myxoma in pregnancy is important. Surgical treatment of cardiac myxoma in the pregnant patients has brought about favorable maternal and feto-neonatal outcomes in the delivery group, which might be attributable to the shorter operation duration and non-emergency nature of the surgical intervention. Proper timing of cardiac surgery and improved cardiopulmonary bypass conditions may result in even better maternal and feto-neonatal survivals.

  5. The Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Hüche; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Tilsted, Hans-Henrik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As a subregistry to the Western Denmark Heart Registry (WDHR), the Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry (WDHR-CCTR) is a clinical database established in 2008 to monitor and improve the quality of cardiac computed tomography (CT) in Western Denmark. OBJECTIVE: We...... positive and negative predictive values for both university (96%/99%) and nonuniversity centers (97%/99%). CONCLUSION: WDHR-CCTR provides ongoing prospective registration of all cardiac CTs performed in Western Denmark since 2008. Overall, the registry data have a high degree of completeness and validity...

  6. Cardiac myxoma in pregnancy: a comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:Cardiac myxoma in pregnancy is rare and the clinical characteristics of this entity have been insufficiently elucidated. This article aims to describe the treatment options and the risk factors responsible for the maternal and feto-neonatal prognoses.Methods:A comprehensive search of the literature of cardiac myxoma in pregnancy was conducted and 44 articles with 51 patients were included in the present review.Results:Transthoracic echocardiography was the most common diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of cardiac myxoma during pregnancy. Cardiac myxoma resection was performed in 95.9% (47/49; while no surgical resection was performed in 4.1% (2/49 patients (P=0.000. More patients had an isolated cardiac myxoma resection in comparison to those with a concurrent or staged additional cardiac operation [87.2% (41/47 vs. 12.8% (6/47, P=0.000]. A voluntary termination of the pregnancy was done in 7 (13.7% cases. In the remaining 31 (60.8% pregnant patients, cesarean section was the most common delivery mode representing 61.3% and vaginal delivery was more common accounting for 19.4%. Cardiac surgery was performed in the first, second and third trimester in 5 (13.9%, 14 (38.9% and 17 (47.2% patients, respectively. No patients died. In the delivery group, 20 (76.9% neonates were event-free survivals, 4 (15.4% were complicated and 2 (7.7% died. Neonatal prognoses did not differ between the delivery modes, treatment options, timing of cardiac surgery and sequence of cardiac myxoma resection in relation to delivery.Conclusion:The diagnosis of cardiac myxoma in pregnancy is important. Surgical treatment of cardiac myxoma in the pregnant patients has brought about favorable maternal and feto-neonatal outcomes in the delivery group, which might be attributable to the shorter operation duration and non-emergency nature of the surgical intervention. Proper timing of cardiac surgery and improved cardiopulmonary bypass conditions may result in

  7. Pharyngeal mesoderm regulatory network controls cardiac and head muscle morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Itamar; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Avraham, Roi; Rinon, Ariel; Ma, Hsiao-Yen; Cross, Joe W; Leviatan, Noam; Hegesh, Julius; Roy, Achira; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Rechavi, Gideon; Carvajal, Jaime; Tole, Shubha; Kioussi, Chrissa; Quaggin, Susan; Tzahor, Eldad

    2012-11-13

    The search for developmental mechanisms driving vertebrate organogenesis has paved the way toward a deeper understanding of birth defects. During embryogenesis, parts of the heart and craniofacial muscles arise from pharyngeal mesoderm (PM) progenitors. Here, we reveal a hierarchical regulatory network of a set of transcription factors expressed in the PM that initiates heart and craniofacial organogenesis. Genetic perturbation of this network in mice resulted in heart and craniofacial muscle defects, revealing robust cross-regulation between its members. We identified Lhx2 as a previously undescribed player during cardiac and pharyngeal muscle development. Lhx2 and Tcf21 genetically interact with Tbx1, the major determinant in the etiology of DiGeorge/velo-cardio-facial/22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Furthermore, knockout of these genes in the mouse recapitulates specific cardiac features of this syndrome. We suggest that PM-derived cardiogenesis and myogenesis are network properties rather than properties specific to individual PM members. These findings shed new light on the developmental underpinnings of congenital defects.

  8. Cardiac Electrophysiology: Normal and Ischemic Ionic Currents and the ECG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klabunde, Richard E.

    2017-01-01

    Basic cardiac electrophysiology is foundational to understanding normal cardiac function in terms of rate and rhythm and initiation of cardiac muscle contraction. The primary clinical tool for assessing cardiac electrical events is the electrocardiogram (ECG), which provides global and regional information on rate, rhythm, and electrical…

  9. Cardiac conduction system anomalies and sudden cardiac death: insights from murine models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Eva Aranega

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac conduction system (CCS is a series of specialized tissues in the heart responsible for the initiation and co-ordination of the heartbeat. Alterations in the CCS, especially the His-Purkinje system, have been identified as an important player in the generation of lethal arrhythmias. Unstable arrhythmias secondary to channelopathies highly increase the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD. Sudden cardiac death is a major contributor to mortality in industrialized nations, and most cases of SCD in the young are related to inherited ion channel diseases. In this review we examine how murine transgenic models have contributed to understanding that a broad variety of cardiac arrhythmias involve the cardiac specialized conduction system and may lead to sudden cardiac death.

  10. Cardiac carcinoid: tricuspid delayed hyperenhancement on cardiac 64-slice multidetector CT and magnetic resonance imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martos, R

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Carcinoid heart disease is a rare condition in adults. Its diagnosis can be easily missed in a patient presenting to a primary care setting. We revised the advantages of using coronary multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing this condition. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied a 65-year-old patient with carcinoid heart disease and right heart failure using transthoracic Doppler-echocardiogram, cardiac MDCT and MRI. Cardiac echocardiogram revealed marked thickening and retraction of the tricuspid leaflets with dilated right atrium and ventricle. Cardiac MDCT and MRI demonstrated fixation and retraction of the tricuspid leaflets with delayed contrast hyperenhancement of the tricuspid annulus. CONCLUSION: This case demonstrates fascinating imaging findings of cardiac carcinoid disease and highlights the increasing utility of contrast-enhanced MRI and cardiac MDCT in the diagnosis of this interesting condition.

  11. Cardiac tumours: non invasive detection and assessment by gated cardiac blood pool radionuclide imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, D.; Wainwright, R.; Brennand-Roper, D.; Deverall, P.; Sowton, E.; Maisey, M.

    1980-01-01

    Four patients with cardiac tumours were investigated by gated cardiac blood pool radionuclide imaging and echocardiography. Contrast angiocardiography was performed in three of the cases. Two left atrial tumours were detected by all three techniques. In one of these cases echocardiography alone showed additional mitral valve stenosis, but isotope imaging indicated tumour size more accurately. A large septal mass was detected by all three methods. In this patient echocardiography showed evidence of left ventricular outflow obstruction, confirmed at cardiac catheterisation, but gated isotope imaging provided a more detailed assessment of the abnormal cardiac anatomy. In the fourth case gated isotope imaging detected a large right ventricular tumour which had not been identified by echocardiography. Gated cardiac blood pool isotope imaging is a complementary technique to echocardiography for the non-invasive detection and assessment of cardiac tumours. (author)

  12. Accordion-like honeycombs for tissue engineering of cardiac anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmayr, George C.; Cheng, Mingyu; Bettinger, Christopher J.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Langer, Robert; Freed, Lisa E.

    2008-12-01

    Tissue-engineered grafts may be useful in myocardial repair; however, previous scaffolds have been structurally incompatible with recapitulating cardiac anisotropy. Here, we use microfabrication techniques to create an accordion-like honeycomb microstructure in poly(glycerol sebacate), which yields porous, elastomeric three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds with controllable stiffness and anisotropy. Accordion-like honeycomb scaffolds with cultured neonatal rat heart cells demonstrated utility through: (1) closely matched mechanical properties compared to native adult rat right ventricular myocardium, with stiffnesses controlled by polymer curing time; (2) heart cell contractility inducible by electric field stimulation with directionally dependent electrical excitation thresholds (pthe formation of grafts with aligned heart cells and mechanical properties more closely resembling native myocardium.

  13. Myocardial Ischemia Induces SDF-1α Release in Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong-Sung; Jacobs, Denise; Emontzpohl, Christoph; Goetzenich, Andreas; Soppert, Josefin; Jarchow, Mareike; Schindler, Lisa; Averdunk, Luisa; Kraemer, Sandra; Marx, Gernot; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Pallua, Norbert; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Simons, David; Stoppe, Christian

    2016-06-01

    In the present observational study, we measured serum levels of the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) in 100 patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass at seven distinct time points including preoperative values, myocardial ischemia, reperfusion, and the postoperative course. Myocardial ischemia triggered a marked increase of SDF-1α serum levels whereas cardiac reperfusion had no significant influence. Perioperative SDF-1α serum levels were influenced by patients' characteristics (e.g., age, gender, aspirin intake). In an explorative analysis, we observed an inverse association between SDF-1α serum levels and the incidence of organ dysfunction. In conclusion, time of myocardial ischemia was identified as the key stimulus for a significant upregulation of SDF-1α, indicating its role as a marker of myocardial injury. The inverse association between SDF-1α levels and organ dysfunction association encourages further studies to evaluate its organoprotective properties in cardiac surgery patients.

  14. Fabrication of omentum-based matrix for engineering vascularized cardiac tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevach, Michal; Soffer-Tsur, Neta; Fleischer, Sharon; Shapira, Assaf; Dvir, Tal

    2014-06-01

    Fabricating three-dimensional, biocompatible microenvironments to support functional tissue assembly remains a key challenge in cardiac tissue engineering. We hypothesized that since the omentum can be removed from patients by minimally invasive procedures, the obtained underlying matrices can be manipulated to serve as autologous scaffolds for cardiac patches. Here we initially characterized the structural, biochemical and mechanical properties of the obtained matrix, and demonstrated that cardiac cells cultivated within assembled into elongated and aligned tissues, generating a strong contraction force. Co-culture with endothelial cells resulted in the formation of blood vessel networks in the patch without affecting its function. Finally, we have validated that omental scaffolds can support mesenchymal and induced pluripotent stem cells culture, thus may serve as a platform for engineering completely autologous tissues. We envision that this approach may be suitable for treating the infarcted heart and may open up new opportunities in the broader field of tissue engineering and personalized regenerative medicine.

  15. The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwisler AD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ann-Dorthe Zwisler,1 Henriette Knold Rossau,1 Anne Nakano,2,3 Sussie Foghmar,4 Regina Eichhorst,5 Eva Prescott,6 Charlotte Cerqueira,7 Anne Merete Boas Soja,4 Gunnar H Gislason,8–10 Mogens Lytken Larsen,5 Ulla Overgaard Andersen,11 Ida Gustafsson,4 Kristian K Thomsen,12 Lene Boye Hansen,13 Signe Hammer,14 Lone Viggers,15 Bo Christensen,16 Birgitte Kvist,17 Cecilie Lindström Egholm,18 Ole May19 On behalf of the Working Group of Preventive Cardiology and Rehabilitation, Danish Society of Cardiology, and the Working Group of Cardiac Clinical Registries, Danish Society of Cardiology 1Danish Centre for Rehabilitation and Palliative Care, Odense University Hospital and University of Southern Denmark, Odense, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, 3Registry Support Centre (West – Clinical Quality Improvement & Health Informatics, Aarhus, 4Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, 5Department of Cardiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, 6Department of Cardiology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, 7Registry Support Centre (East – Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Research Centre for Prevention and Health, the Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup, 8Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Hellerup, 9The Danish Heart Foundation, Copenhagen, 10The National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, 11Department of Cardiology, Holbaek Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, 12Department of Cardiology, Hospital of Southwest Jutland, Esbjerg, 13Department of Cardiology, Gentofte Hospital, Gentofte, 14Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Herlev Hospital, Herlev, 15Department of Nutrition, Regional Hospital West Jutland, Holstebro, 16Department of General Medicine, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, 17Department of Health Care and Prevention, Municipality of Frederikshavn, Frederikshavn, 18

  16. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac progenitors differentiate to cardiomyocytes and form biosynthetic tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Christoforou

    Full Text Available The mammalian heart has little capacity to regenerate, and following injury the myocardium is replaced by non-contractile scar tissue. Consequently, increased wall stress and workload on the remaining myocardium leads to chamber dilation, dysfunction, and heart failure. Cell-based therapy with an autologous, epigenetically reprogrammed, and cardiac-committed progenitor cell source could potentially reverse this process by replacing the damaged myocardium with functional tissue. However, it is unclear whether cardiac progenitor cell-derived cardiomyocytes are capable of attaining levels of structural and functional maturity comparable to that of terminally-fated cardiomyocytes. Here, we first describe the derivation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells, which once differentiated allow for the enrichment of Nkx2-5(+ cardiac progenitors, and the cardiomyocyte-specific expression of the red fluorescent protein. We show that the cardiac progenitors are multipotent and capable of differentiating into endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. Moreover, cardiac progenitor selection corresponds to cKit(+ cell enrichment, while cardiomyocyte cell-lineage commitment is concomitant with dual expression of either cKit/Flk1 or cKit/Sca-1. We proceed to show that the cardiac progenitor-derived cardiomyocytes are capable of forming electrically and mechanically coupled large-scale 2D cell cultures with mature electrophysiological properties. Finally, we examine the cell progenitors' ability to form electromechanically coherent macroscopic tissues, using a physiologically relevant 3D culture model and demonstrate that following long-term culture the cardiomyocytes align, and form robust electromechanical connections throughout the volume of the biosynthetic tissue construct. We conclude that the iPS cell-derived cardiac progenitors are a robust cell source for tissue engineering applications and a 3D culture platform for pharmacological

  17. Human cardiac-derived adherent proliferating cells reduce murine acute Coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapka Miteva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Under conventional heart failure therapy, inflammatory cardiomyopathy typically has a progressive course, indicating a need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term outcomes. We recently isolated and identified novel cardiac-derived cells from human cardiac biopsies: cardiac-derived adherent proliferating cells (CAPs. They have similarities with mesenchymal stromal cells, which are known for their anti-apoptotic and immunomodulatory properties. We explored whether CAPs application could be a novel strategy to improve acute Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3-induced myocarditis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate the safety of our approach, we first analyzed the expression of the coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR and the co-receptor CD55 on CAPs, which are both required for effective CVB3 infectivity. We could demonstrate that CAPs only minimally express both receptors, which translates to minimal CVB3 copy numbers, and without viral particle release after CVB3 infection. Co-culture of CAPs with CVB3-infected HL-1 cardiomyocytes resulted in a reduction of CVB3-induced HL-1 apoptosis and viral progeny release. In addition, CAPs reduced CD4 and CD8 T cell proliferation. All CAPs-mediated protective effects were nitric oxide- and interleukin-10-dependent and required interferon-γ. In an acute murine model of CVB3-induced myocarditis, application of CAPs led to a decrease of cardiac apoptosis, cardiac CVB3 viral load and improved left ventricular contractility parameters. This was associated with a decline in cardiac mononuclear cell activity, an increase in T regulatory cells and T cell apoptosis, and an increase in left ventricular interleukin-10 and interferon-γ mRNA expression. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that CAPs are a unique type of cardiac-derived cells and promising tools to improve acute CVB3-induced myocarditis.

  18. Cardiac channelopathies: genetic and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriel, Hugues; Zaklyazminskaya, Elena V

    2013-03-15

    Channelopathies are diseases caused by dysfunctional ion channels, due to either genetic or acquired pathological factors. Inherited cardiac arrhythmic syndromes are among the most studied human disorders involving ion channels. Since seminal observations made in 1995, thousands of mutations have been found in many of the different genes that code for cardiac ion channel subunits and proteins that regulate the cardiac ion channels. The main phenotypes observed in patients carrying these mutations are congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS), Brugada syndrome (BrS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT), short QT syndrome (SQTS) and variable types of conduction defects (CD). The goal of this review is to present an update of the main genetic and molecular mechanisms, as well as the associated phenotypes of cardiac channelopathies as of 2012. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Air medical transport of cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essebag, Vidal; Halabi, Abdul R; Churchill-Smith, Michael; Lutchmedial, Sohrab

    2003-11-01

    The air medical transport of cardiac patients is a rapidly expanding practice. For various medical, social, and economic indications, patients are being flown longer distances at commercial altitudes, including international and intercontinental flights. There are data supporting the use of short-distance helicopter flights early in the course of a cardiac event for patients needing emergent transfer for percutaneous coronary intervention or aortocoronary bypass. When considering elective long-distance air medical transport of cardiac patients for social or economic reasons, it is necessary to weigh the benefits against the potential risks of flight. A few recent studies suggest that long-distance air medical transport is safe under certain circumstances. Current guidelines for air travel after myocardial infarction do not address the use of medical escorts or air ambulances equipped with intensive care facilities. Further research using larger prospective studies is needed to better define criteria for safe long-distance air medical transport of cardiac patients.

  20. Interactions between antiarrhythmic drugs and cardiac memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plotnikov, A. N.; Shvilkin, A.; Xiong, W.; de Groot, J. R.; Rosenshtraukh, L.; Feinmark, S.; Gainullin, R.; Danilo, P.; Rosen, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    Ventricular pacing or arrhythmias can induce cardiac memory (CM). We hypothesized that clinically administered antiarrhythmic drugs alter the expression of CM, and that the repolarization changes characteristic of CM can modulate the effects of antiarrhythmic drugs. We studied conscious,

  1. Cardiac Rehabilitation in the Mid-1980s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, John D.

    1986-01-01

    The author describes a state-of-the-art cardiac rehabilitation program consisting of training and supervision in exercise, nutrition, and stress management. Inpatient, postdischarge, and late postdischarge regimens are presented. (MT)

  2. Targeting sodium channels in cardiac arrhythmia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remme, Carol Ann; Wilde, Arthur A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for proper electrical conduction in the heart. During acquired pathological conditions and inherited sodium channelopathies, altered sodium channel function causes conduction disturbances and ventricular arrhythmias. Although the clinical,

  3. Cardiac, Skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I

    2014-01-01

    in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle suggest all mitochondria are created equal, the contrasting RCR and non-phosphorylating respiration highlight the existence of intrinsic functional differences between these muscle mitochondria. This likely influences the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation...

  4. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...... is based on determination of the left-ventricular endocardial and epicardial borders. Since manual border detection is laborious, automated segmentation is highly desirable as a fast, objective and reproducible alternative. Automated segmentation will thus enhance comparability between and within cardiac...... studies and increase accuracy by allowing acquisition of thinner MRI-slices. This abstract demonstrates that statistical models of shape and appearance, namely the deformable models: Active Appearance Models, can successfully segment cardiac MRIs....

  5. National Cardiac Device Surveillance Program Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The National Cardiac Device Surveillance Program Database supports the Eastern Pacemaker Surveillance Center (EPSC) staff in its function of monitoring some 11,000...

  6. Spatiotemporal Stability of Public Cardiac Arrests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demirtas, Derya; Brooks, Steven C.; Morrison, Laurie J.; Chan, Timothy C.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Public access automated external defibrillator (AED) deployment and community cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) programs should target geographical areas with high risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Although these long-term, location-based interventions implicitly assume

  7. Incidental Cardiac Findings on Thoracic Imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kok, Hong Kuan

    2013-02-07

    The cardiac structures are well seen on nongated thoracic computed tomography studies in the investigation and follow-up of cardiopulmonary disease. A wide variety of findings can be incidentally picked up on careful evaluation of the pericardium, cardiac chambers, valves, and great vessels. Some of these findings may represent benign variants, whereas others may have more profound clinical importance. Furthermore, the expansion of interventional and surgical practice has led to the development and placement of new cardiac stents, implantable pacemaker devices, and prosthetic valves with which the practicing radiologist should be familiar. We present a collection of common incidental cardiac findings that can be readily identified on thoracic computed tomography studies and briefly discuss their clinical relevance.

  8. An update on insertable cardiac monitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming J; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Krieger, Derk W

    2015-01-01

    Continuous cardiac rhythm monitoring has undergone compelling progress over the past decades. Cardiac monitoring has emerged from 12-lead electrocardiograms being performed at the discretion of the treating physician to in-hospital telemetry, Holter monitoring, prolonged external event monitoring...... turning point in the field of arrhythmia management. However, their role in the detection of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation after cryptogenic strokes has yet to evolve. This will be the main focus of this review. Issues surrounding patient selection, clinical relevance and determination of cost......-effectiveness for prolonged cardiac monitoring require further studies. Furthermore, insertable cardiac monitoring has not only the potential to augment diagnostic capabilities but also to improve the management of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation....

  9. Therapeutic Utilities of Pediatric Cardiac Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Giannis A.; Kolokythas, Argyrios; Charitakis, Konstantinos; Avgerinos, Dimitrios 
V.

    2016-01-01

    In an era when less invasive techniques are favored, therapeutic cardiac catheterization constantly evolves and widens its spectrum of usage in the pediatric population. The advent of sophisticated devices and well-designed equipment has made the management of many congenital cardiac lesions more efficient and safer, while providing more comfort to the patient. Nowadays, a large variety of heart diseases are managed with transcatheter techniques, such as patent foramen ovale, atrial and ventricular septal defects, valve stenosis, patent ductus arteriosus, aortic coarctation, pulmonary artery and vein stenosis and arteriovenous malformations. Moreover, hybrid procedures and catheter ablation have opened new paths in the treatment of complex cardiac lesions and arrhythmias, respectively. In this article, the main therapeutic utilities of cardiac catheterization in children are discussed. PMID:26926291

  10. Cardiac transplantation: 15 years experience Cardiology Institute of Child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceruti, B; Chiesa, P.; Tambasco, J.; Anzibar, R.; Gutierrez, C.; Barboza, S.; Manfredi, A.; Leone, R.

    2012-01-01

    The cardiac transplant is the treatment of choice for the cardiac insufficiency when there is not another therapeutic alternative that prolongs the life expectancy. On December 1996 The Cardiology Institute of child begin the program of Cardiac Insufficiency and Transplants of the Institute of Pediatric Cardiology, achieving the first cardiac transplant in a 14-year-old child in Uruguay. Three years later they put in practice the program of cardiac transplant in adults

  11. Wavelet analysis of cardiac optical mapping data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Feng; Qi, Xiaoyan; Nattel, Stanley; Comtois, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    Optical mapping technology is an important tool to study cardiac electrophysiology. Transmembrane fluorescence signals from voltage-dependent dyes need to be preprocessed before analysis to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Fourier analysis, based on spectral properties of stationary signals, cannot directly provide information on the spectrum changes with respect to time. Fourier filtering has the disadvantage of causing degradation of abrupt waveform changes such as those in action potential signals. Wavelet analysis has the ability to offer simultaneous localization in time and frequency domains, suitable for the analysis and reconstruction of irregular, non-stationary signals like the fast action-potential upstroke, and better than conventional filters for denoising. We applied discrete wavelet transformation for temporal processing of optical mapping signals and wavelet packet analysis approaches to process activation maps from simulated and experimental optical mapping data from canine right atrium. We compared the results obtained with the wavelet approach to a variety of other methods (Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) with finite or infinite response filtering, and Gaussian filters). Temporal wavelet analysis improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) better than FFT filtering for 5-10dB SNR, and caused less distortion of the action potential waveform over the full range of simulated noise (5-20dB). Spatial wavelet filtering produced more efficient denoising and/or more accurate conduction velocity estimates than Gaussian filtering. Propagation patterns were also best revealed by wavelet filtering. Wavelet analysis is a promising tool, facilitating accurate action potential characterization, activation map formation, and conduction velocity estimation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Unsuspected Widespread Cardiac Sarcoma in a Child

    OpenAIRE

    Spieth, Michael E.; Kasner, Darcy I.; Prasannan, Latha

    2003-01-01

    The case of a patient with an undifferentiated metastatic cardiac sarcoma is presented. A thallium-201 tumor study was performed to evaluate lung nodules. Thallium-201 chloride was injected intravenously and whole body images, as well as single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) imaging of the chest, were obtained and reconstructed. They were displayed in three planes and then reconstructed again in cardiac planes. Multiple unsuspected metastases were found in the lower extremities. ...

  13. [Cardiac rehabilitation: current status and future challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahmann, H W

    2012-02-01

    The goal of cardiac rehabilitation is to support heart patients using a multidisciplinary team in order to obtain the best possible physical and mental health and achieve long-term social reintegration. In addition to improving physical fitness, cardiac rehabilitation restores self-confidence, thus better equipping patients to deal with mental illness and improving their social reintegration ("participation"). Once the causes of disease have been identified and treated as effectively as possible, drug and lifestyle changes form the focus of cardiac rehabilitation measures. In particular diseases, rehabilitation offers the opportunity for targeted educational courses for diabetics or drug dose escalation, as well as special training for heart failure patients. A nationwide network of outpatient heart groups is available for targeted follow-up. Cardiac patients predominantly rehabilitated in follow-up rehabilitation are older and have greater morbidity than in the past; moreover, they generally come out of acute clinical care earlier and are discharged from hospital more quickly. The proportion of severely ill and multimorbid patients presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in cardiac rehabilitation, although cardiac rehabilitation was not initially conceived for this patient group. The benefit of cardiac rehabilitation has been a well documented reduction in morbidity and mortality. However, hurdles remain, partly due to the patients themselves, partly due to the health insurers. Some insurance providers still refuse rehabilitation for non-ST-segment elevation infarction. In principle rehabilitation can be carried out in an inpatient or an outpatient setting. Specific allocation criteria have not yet been established, but the structure and process quality of outpatient rehabilitation should correspond to that of the inpatient setting. The choice between the two settings should be based on pragmatic criteria. Both settings should be possible for an individual

  14. Blunt cardiac rupture in a toddler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peep Talving

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Blunt cardiac rupture is typically a fatal injury with overall mortality exceeding 90%. Most of the patients never reach the hospital alive. In pediatric patients, only 0.03% of cases following blunt trauma admissions have a cardiac injury. This report presents a rare survivor of 16-months old toddler injured in a domestic accident suffering a right atrial rupture repaired through a median sternotomy. To the best of our knowledge this is the youngest case reported in the literature.

  15. Computer graphic display of cardiac CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.; Carlsson, E.

    1982-01-01

    In order to improve spatial conception and quantitative assessment of the cardiac structures based on cardiac computed tomography, methods for computer graphic display were developed. Excised hearts and living dogs with myocardial infarctions were subjected to CT scanning. The data on the scanner tapes were processed to provide isodensity plots, linear section plots, time-weighted integrated isodensity plots as well as topographical density displays and three-dimensional spatial reconstructions of single and multi-layer scans. (orig.)

  16. Textile-templated electrospun anisotropic scaffolds for regenerative cardiac tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şenel Ayaz, H Gözde; Perets, Anat; Ayaz, Hasan; Gilroy, Kyle D; Govindaraj, Muthu; Brookstein, David; Lelkes, Peter I

    2014-10-01

    For patients with end-stage heart disease, the access to heart transplantation is limited due to the shortage of donor organs and to the potential for rejection of the donated organ. Therefore, current studies focus on bioengineering approaches for creating biomimetic cardiac patches that will assist in restoring cardiac function, by repairing and/or regenerating the intrinsically anisotropic myocardium. In this paper we present a simplified, straightforward approach for creating bioactive anisotropic cardiac patches, based on a combination of bioengineering and textile-manufacturing techniques in concert with nano-biotechnology based tissue-engineering stratagems. Using knitted conventional textiles, made of cotton or polyester yarns as template targets, we successfully electrospun anisotropic three-dimensional scaffolds from poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA), and thermoplastic polycarbonate-urethane (PCU, Bionate(®)). The surface topography and mechanical properties of textile-templated anisotropic scaffolds significantly differed from those of scaffolds electrospun from the same materials onto conventional 2-D flat-target electrospun scaffolds. Anisotropic textile-templated scaffolds electrospun from both PLGA and PCU, supported the adhesion and proliferation of H9C2 cardiac myoblasts cell line, and guided the cardiac tissue-like anisotropic organization of these cells in vitro. All cell-seeded PCU scaffolds exhibited mechanical properties comparable to those of a human heart, but only the cells on the polyester-templated scaffolds exhibited prolonged spontaneous synchronous contractility on the entire engineered construct for 10 days in vitro at a near physiologic frequency of ∼120 bpm. Taken together, the methods described here take advantage of straightforward established textile manufacturing strategies as an efficient and cost-effective approach to engineering 3D anisotropic, elastomeric PCU scaffolds that can serve as a cardiac patch. Copyright

  17. Role of pharmacotherapy in cardiac ion channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sherif, Nabil; Boutjdir, Mohamed

    2015-11-01

    In the last decade, there have been considerable advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT) and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Over 80% of SCD occurs in patients with organic heart disease. However, approximately 10%-15% of SCD occurs in the presence of structurally normal heart, and the majority of these patients are young. In this group of patients, changes in genes encoding cardiac ion channels produce modifications of the function of the channel resulting in an electrophysiological substrate of VT and SCD. Collectively, these disorders are referred to as cardiac ion channelopathies. The four major syndromes in this group are: the long QT syndrome (LQTS), the Brugada syndrome (BrS), the short QT syndrome (SQTS), and the catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). Each of these syndromes includes multiple subtypes with different and sometimes complex cardiac ion channel genetic abnormalities. Many are associated with other somatic and neurological abnormalities besides the risk of VT and SCD. The current management of cardiac ion channelopathies can be summarized as follows: (1) in symptomatic patients, the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is the only viable option; (2) in asymptomatic patients, risk stratification is necessary, followed by either the ICD, pharmacotherapy, or a combination of both. A genotype-specific approach to pharmacotherapy requires a thorough understanding of the molecular-cellular basis of arrhythmogenesis in cardiac ion channelopathies as well as the specific drug profile. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Ion Channel Disorders and Sudden Cardiac Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Garcia-Elias

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia are inherited primary electrical disorders that predispose to sudden cardiac death in the absence of structural heart disease. Also known as cardiac channelopathies, primary electrical disorders respond to mutations in genes encoding cardiac ion channels and/or their regulatory proteins, which result in modifications in the cardiac action potential or in the intracellular calcium handling that lead to electrical instability and life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. These disorders may have low penetrance and expressivity, making clinical diagnosis often challenging. However, because sudden cardiac death might be the first presenting symptom of the disease, early diagnosis becomes essential. Genetic testing might be helpful in this regard, providing a definite diagnosis in some patients. Yet important limitations still exist, with a significant proportion of patients remaining with no causative mutation identifiable after genetic testing. This review aims to provide the latest knowledge on the genetic basis of cardiac channelopathies and discuss the role of the affected proteins in the pathophysiology of each one of these diseases.

  19. Role of Circulating Fibrocytes in Cardiac Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Rong-Jie; Su, Zi-Zhuo; Liang, Shu-Min; Chen, Yu-Yang; Shu, Xiao-Rong; Nie, Ru-Qiong; Wang, Jing-Feng; Xie, Shuang-Lun

    2016-02-05

    It is revealed that circulating fibrocytes are elevated in patients/animals with cardiac fibrosis, and this review aims to provide an introduction to circulating fibrocytes and their role in cardiac fibrosis. This review is based on the data from 1994 to present obtained from PubMed. The search terms were "circulating fibrocytes " and "cardiac fibrosis ". Articles and critical reviews, which are related to circulating fibrocytes and cardiac fibrosis, were selected. Circulating fibrocytes, which are derived from hematopoietic stem cells, represent a subset of peripheral blood mononuclear cells exhibiting mixed morphological and molecular characteristics of hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells (CD34+/CD45+/collagen I+). They can produce extracellular matrix and many cytokines. It is shown that circulating fibrocytes participate in many fibrotic diseases, including cardiac fibrosis. Evidence accumulated in recent years shows that aging individuals and patients with hypertension, heart failure, coronary heart disease, and atrial fibrillation have more circulating fibrocytes in peripheral blood and/or heart tissue, and this elevation of circulating fibrocytes is correlated with the degree of fibrosis in the hearts. Circulating fibrocytes are effector cells in cardiac fibrosis.

  20. Physiologic stress interventions in cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buda, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    Physiologic stress interventions are designed to assess the reserve capability of coronary flow and myocardial function. In the normal individual, a sufficiently intense physiologic stress may increase coronary flow and cardiac output by 500% to 600%. However, in patients with cardiac disease, these reserve responses may be absent, or considerably blunted. Thus, physiologic stress testing has proved extremely helpful in detecting cardiac abnormalities when resting cardiac function appears normal. Although dynamic exercise remains the standard approach to physiologic stress testing, a number of other interventions have been used, including: (1) isometric exercise, (2) atrial pacing, (3) cold pressor testing, (4) postextrasystolic potentiation, (5) volume loading, and (6) negative intrathoracic pressure. Each of these may be considered an alternative physiologic intervention whenever dynamic exercise is not feasible. These alternative approaches are important since, in our experience, 20% to 30% of subjects are unable to perform dynamic exercise, or exercise inadequately to produce a sufficiently intense cardiac stress. This chapter reviews physiologic considerations, indications, contraindications, protocols, and results of these physiologic stress interventions when used in combination with cardiac radionuclide procedures

  1. Diabetic cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Parasympathetic versus sympathetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, Akihiko; Kurata, Chinori; Sugi, Toshihiko; Mikami, Tadashi; Shouda, Sakae [Hamamatsu Univ. School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    Diabetic cardiac autonomic dysfunction often causes lethal arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. {sup 123}I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) can evaluate cardiac sympathetic dysfunction, and analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) can reflect cardiac parasympathetic activity. We examined whether cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction assessed by HRV may correlate with sympathetic dysfunction assessed by MIBG in diabetic patients. In 24-hour electrocardiography, we analyzed 4 HRV parameters: high-frequency power (HF), HF in the early morning (EMHF), rMSSD and pNN50. MIBG planar images and SPECT were obtained 15 minutes (early) and 150 minutes (late) after injection and the heart washout rate was calculated. The defect score in 9 left ventricular regions was scored on a 4 point scale (0=normal - 3=severe defect). In 20 selected diabetic patients without congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease and renal failure, parasympathetic HRV parameters had a negative correlation with the sum of defect scores (DS) in the late images (R=-0.47 to -0.59, p<0.05) and some parameters had a negative correlation with the washout rate (R=-0.50 to -0.55, p<0.05). In a total of 64 diabetic patients also, these parameters had a negative correlation with late DS (R=-0.28 to -0.35, p<0.05) and early DS (R=-0.27 to -0.32, p<0.05). The progress of diabetic cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction may parallel the sympathetic one. (author)

  2. Impaired Cardiac Function and Cognitive Brain Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velpen, Isabelle F; Yancy, Clyde W; Sorond, Farzaneh A; Sabayan, Behnam

    2017-12-01

    It is well established that patients with heart failure are at a greater risk for dementia. Recent evidence suggests that the heart-brain link goes beyond advanced heart failure, and even suboptimal cardiac function is associated with brain structural and functional changes leading to cognitive impairment. In this review, we address several pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this association, including hemodynamic stress and cerebral hypoperfusion, neuroinflammation, cardiac arrhythmias, and hypercoagulation. The close link between cardiac function and brain health has numerous clinical and public health implications. Cardiac dysfunction and cognitive impairment are both common in older adults. However, in our current clinical practice, these medical conditions are generally evaluated and treated in isolation. Emerging evidence on the significance of the heart-brain link calls for comprehensive cardiovascular risk assessment in patients with cognitive impairment and a neurocognitive workup in patients with impaired cardiac function. A multidisciplinary approach by cardiologists, neurologists, and geriatricians would benefit the diagnostic process and disease management and ultimately improve the quality of life for patients with cardiac and cognitive dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiac ankyrins in health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Seyed M.; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Ankyrins are critical components of ion channel and transporter signaling complexes in the cardiovascular system. Over the past five years, ankyrin dysfunction has been linked with abnormal ion channel and transporter membrane organization and fatal human arrhythmias. Loss-of-function variants in the ankyrin-B gene (ANK2) cause “ankyrin-B syndrome” (previously called type 4 long QT syndrome), manifested by a complex cardiac phenotype including ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. More recently, dysfunction in the ankyrin-B-based targeting pathway has been linked with a highly penetrant and severe form of human sinus node disease. Ankyrin-G (a second ankyrin gene product) is required for normal expression, membrane localization, and biophysical function of the primary cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel, Nav1.5. Loss of the ankyrin-G/Nav1.5 interaction is associated with human cardiac arrhythmia (Brugada syndrome). Finally, in the past year ankyrin dysfunction has been associated with more common arrhythmia and cardiovascular disease phenotypes. Specifically, large animal studies reveal striking remodeling of ankyrin-B and associated proteins following myocardial infarction. Additionally, the ANK2 locus has been linked with QTc interval variability in the general human population. Together, these findings identify a host of unanticipated and exciting roles for ankyrin polypeptides in cardiac function. More broadly, these findings illustrate the importance of local membrane organization for normal cardiac physiology. PMID:19394342

  4. Cardiac changes in horses with atypical myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyen, T; Decloedt, A; De Clercq, D; van Loon, G

    2012-01-01

    Atypical myopathy (AM) is an acute, fatal rhabdomyolysis in grazing horses that mainly affects skeletal muscles. Postmortem examinations have shown that myocardial damage also occurs. Limited information is available on the effect of AM on cardiac function in affected and surviving horses. To describe electrocardiographic and echocardiographic changes associated with AM in the acute stage of the disease and after follow-up. Horses (n = 12) diagnosed with AM in which cardiac ultrasound examination and ECG recording were available. All horses underwent clinical examinations, serum biochemistry, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. Four surviving horses underwent the same examinations after 2-10 weeks. All but 1 horse had increased cardiac troponin I concentrations and 10 horses had ventricular premature depolarizations (VPDs). All horses had prolonged corrected QT (QT(cf) ) intervals on the day of admission and abnormal myocardial wall motion on echocardiography. One of the surviving horses still had VPDs and prolonged QT(cf) at follow-up after 10 weeks. The AM results in characteristic electrocardiographic and echocardiographic changes and may be associated with increased cardiac troponin I concentrations and VPDs. In survivors, abnormal cardiac function still may be found at follow-up after 10 weeks. Additional research in a larger group of horses is necessary to identify the long-term effects of AM on cardiac function. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  5. Genetic variation for cardiac dysfunction in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A Ocorr

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Common diseases may be attributed to combinations of variant alleles, but there are few model systems where the interactions among such variants can be studied in controlled genetic crosses. While association studies are designed to detect common polymorphisms of moderate effect, new approaches are required to characterize the impact on disease of interactions among rare alleles. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that wild populations of Drosophila melanogaster harbor rare polymorphisms of major effect (RAME that predispose flies to a specific disease phenotype, age-dependent cardiac dysfunction. A screen of fifty inbred wild-type lines revealed a continuous spectrum of pacing-induced heart failure that generally increases in frequency with age. High-speed video analysis of the inbred lines with high rates of inducible heart failure indicates specific defects in cardiac function, including arrhythmias and contractile disorders ('cardiomyopathies'. A combination of bulked segregant analysis and single feature polymorphism (SFP detection localizes one of the cardiac susceptibility loci to the 97C interval on the fly genome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Wild-type Drosophila, like humans, are predisposed to cardiac dysfunction. Identification of factors associated with these naturally occurring cardiac traits promises to provide important insights into the epidemiology of cardiac disease.

  6. The Role of Levosimendan in Patients with Decreased Left Ventricular Function Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Bozhinovska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The postoperative low cardiac output is one of the most important complications following cardiac surgery and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The condition requires inotropic support to achieve adequate hemodynamic status and tissue perfusion. While catecholamines are utilised as a standard therapy in cardiac surgery, their use is limited due to increased oxygen consumption. Levosimendan is calcium sensitising inodilatator expressing positive inotropic effect by binding with cardiac troponin C without increasing oxygen demand. Furthermore, the drug opens potassium ATP (KATP channels in cardiac mitochondria and in the vascular muscle cells, showing cardioprotective and vasodilator properties, respectively. In the past decade, levosimendan demonstrated promising results in treating patients with reduced left ventricular function when administered in peri- or post- operative settings. In addition, pre-operative use of levosimendan in patients with severely reduced left ventricular ejection fraction may reduce the requirements for postoperative inotropic support, mechanical support, duration of intensive care unit stay as well as hospital stay and a decrease in post-operative mortality. However, larger studies are needed to clarify clinical advantages of levosimendan versus conventional inotropes.

  7. Novel peptidylated surfaces for interference-free electrochemical detection of cardiac troponin I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Sameer; Sadanandan, Sandhya; Haridas, V; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Prieto-Simón, Beatriz

    2018-01-15

    Novel peptidylated surfaces were designed to minimise interferences when electrochemically detecting cardiac troponin I in complex biological samples. Disulfide-cored peptide dendrons featuring carbomethoxy groups were self-assembled on gold electrodes. The carbomethoxy groups were deprotected to obtain carboxylic groups used to immobilise antibodies for cardiac troponin I marker. The chemisorption of two types of peptides, one containing triazole and the other with native peptide bonds, on a gold substrate was studied by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Peptides formed ordered self-assembled monolayers, contributing to a more efficient display of the subsequently immobilised antibodies towards their binding to the antigen. As a result, electrochemical immunosensors prepared by self-assembly of peptides afforded higher sensitivities for cardiac troponin I than those prepared by the chemisorption of alkane thiolated compounds. Triazolic peptide-modified immunosensors showed extraordinary sensitivity towards cardiac troponin I [1.7µA/(ng/mL) in phosphate buffer], but suffered from surface fouling in 10% serum. Modification with non-triazolic peptides gave rise to anti-fouling properties and still enabled the detection of cardiac troponin I at pg/mL concentrations in 10% serum without significant matrix effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The paediatrician and cardiac auscultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Douglas L

    2003-11-01

    The cardiac auscultation (CA) skills of paediatric residents and office-based paediatricians have recently been shown to be suboptimal. CA is known to have a high degree of specificity and sensitivity, and is inexpensive. New teaching aids and availability of surrogate patient heart sounds and murmurs now allow most physicians to acquire CA skills. These teaching aids should be available in all medical schools and in all postgraduate paediatric training programs. While the relationship between musicality and CA skill has not been proven, the author assumes this relationship to be valid. Specific learning objectives in CA should be established. Recognizing that the current trend is away from clinical examinations, students frequently are unaware that a CA learning deficit exists. Therefore, students' CA skills should be evaluated before medical school graduation and at the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons specialty examination. Students with amusia (inability to distinguish pitch of sound) should be identified and consideration should be given to directing them away from a clinical specialty in which CA is important. Further study is required in the physiology of learning of CA. Appropriate action by medical school and paediatric postgraduate program directors and the Royal College will effect a higher standard of patient care by increasing CA skills, resulting in a more financially efficient system - something everyone is trying to achieve in these times of increasing medical care costs.

  9. Outcomes analysis in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, R C; Morton, J R; Lefrak, E A

    1997-07-01

    Outcomes research is a quantitative assessment of the results of care. Outcomes analysis provides information that benefits the physician, the patient, the institution and the health care purchasers. It provides relevant and timely information for the assessment of the heart centre's performance. Outcomes data have proven to be useful to the attending physicians by providing a basis for clinical decision making. Patients may be appraised of the usual results and the risks of various treatment strategies and make informed decisions on their care. The purchasers of health care will be better informed regarding the costs and effectiveness of the care being delivered. O'Connor et al. have stated that methods of improving care are often discussed but are difficult to achieve due to processes of care being hidden from view. Outcomes research is a comprehensive performance evaluation strategy that may be used to discover the impact of these hidden aspects of care. This technology of the patient's experience is bringing cardiac surgery to a new level of excellence.

  10. Atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Once considered as nothing more than a nuisance after cardiac surgery, the importance of postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF has been realized in the last decade, primarily because of the morbidity associated with the condition. Numerous causative factors have been described without any single factor being singled out as the cause of this complication. POAF has been associated with stroke, renal failure and congestive heart failure, although it is difficult to state whether POAF is directly responsible for these complications. Guidelines have been formulated for prevention of POAF. However, very few cardiothoracic centers follow any form of protocol to prevent POAF. Routine use of prophylaxis would subject all patients to the side effects of anti-arrhythmic drugs, while only a minority of the patients do actually develop this problem postoperatively. Withdrawal of beta blockers in the postoperative period has been implicated as one of the major causes of POAF. Amiodarone, calcium channel blockers and a variety of other pharmacological agents have been used for the prevention of POAF. Atrial pacing is a non-pharmacological measure which has gained popularity in the prevention of POAF. There is considerable controversy regarding whether rate control is superior to rhythm control in the treatment of established atrial fibrillation (AF. Amiodarone plays a central role in both rate control and rhythm control in postoperative AF. Newer drugs like dronedarone and ranazoline are likely to come into the market in the coming years.

  11. Cardiac MRI for myocardial ischemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Daly, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Proper assessment of the physiologic impact of coronary artery stenosis on the LV myocardium can affect patient prognosis and treatment decisions. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) assesses myocardial perfusion by imaging the myocardium during a first-pass transit of an intravenous gadolinium bolus, with spatial and temporal resolution substantially higher than nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging. Coupled with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging for infarction during the same imaging session, CMR with vasodilating stress perfusion imaging can qualitatively and quantitatively assess the myocardial extent of hypoperfusion from coronary stenosis independent of infarcted myocardium. This approach has been validated experimentally, and multiple clinical trials have established its diagnostic robustness when compared to stress single-photon emission computed tomography. In specialized centers, dobutamine stress CMR has been shown to have incremental diagnostic value above stress echocardiography due to its high imaging quality and ability to image the heart with no restriction of imaging window. This paper reviews the technical aspects, diagnostic utility, prognostic values, challenges to clinical adaptation, and future developments of stress CMR imaging.

  12. Sedation in cardiac arrhythmias management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Federico; Stronati, Giulia; Capucci, Alessandro

    2018-03-01

    Procedural sedation is of paramount importance for a plethora of electrophysiological procedures. From electrical cardioversion to electrophysiology studies, device implantations, and catheter ablations, intraprocedural sedation and anesthesia have a pivotal role in allowing procedural success while ensuring patient safety and avoiding discomfort. Areas covered: The present review will discuss the current state-of-the-art in sedation and anesthesia during electrical cardioversion, cardiac implantable electronic device implantation, catheter ablation and electrophysiology studies. Specific information will be provided for each procedure in order to reach the core of this important clinical issue, and specific protocols will be compared. The main pro-arrhythmic and anti-arrhythmic effects of the most commonly used sedatives will also be discussed. Expert commentary: According to much recent evidence, the cardiologist can be the only person responsible for sedation administration in many settings, highlighting few safety issues associated with the absence of a dedicated anesthesiologist thus a concomitant reduction in costs. However, many concerns have been raised in allowing non-anesthesiologists to manage sedatives, as adverse events, while rare, could have catastrophic consequences. The present paper will highlight when a cardiologist-directed sedation is considered safe, how it should be performed, and the pros and cons related to this strategy.

  13. Polymer microfiber meshes facilitate cardiac differentiation of c-kit{sup +} human cardiac stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, Lijuan [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Thayer, Patrick [Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Fan, Huimin [Research Institute of Heart Failure, Shanghai East Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Ledford, Benjamin; Chen, Miao [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Goldstein, Aaron [Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Cao, Guohua [School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); He, Jia-Qiang, E-mail: jiahe@vt.edu [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2016-09-10

    Electrospun microfiber meshes have been shown to support the proliferation and differentiation of many types of stem cells, but the phenotypic fate of c-kit{sup +} human cardiac stem cells (hCSCs) have not been explored. To this end, we utilized thin (~5 µm) elastomeric meshes consisting of aligned 1.7 µm diameter poly (ester-urethane urea) microfibers as substrates to examine their effect on hCSC viability, morphology, proliferation, and differentiation relative to cells cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). The results showed that cells on microfiber meshes displayed an elongated morphology aligned in the direction of fiber orientation, lower proliferation rates, but increased expressions of genes and proteins majorly associated with cardiomyocyte phenotype. The early (NK2 homeobox 5, Nkx2.5) and late (cardiac troponin I, cTnI) cardiomyocyte genes were significantly increased on meshes (Nkx=2.5 56.2±13.0, cTnl=2.9±0.56,) over TCPS (Nkx2.5=4.2±0.9, cTnl=1.6±0.5, n=9, p<0.05 for both groups) after differentiation. In contrast, expressions of smooth muscle markers, Gata6 and myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC), were decreased on meshes. Immunocytochemical analysis with cardiac antibody exhibited the similar pattern of above cardiac differentiation. We conclude that aligned microfiber meshes are suitable for guiding cardiac differentiation of hCSCs and may facilitate stem cell-based therapies for treatment of cardiac diseases. - Highlights: • First study to characterize c-kit{sup +} human cardiac stem cells on microfiber meshes. • Microfiber meshes seem reducing cell proliferation, but no effect on cell viability. • Microfiber meshes facilitate the elongation of human cardiac stem cells in culture. • Cardiac but not smooth muscle differentiation were enhanced on microfiber meshes. • Microfiber meshes may be used as cardiac patches in cell-based cardiac therapy.

  14. A universal system for highly efficient cardiac differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells that eliminates interline variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W Burridge

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The production of cardiomyocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC holds great promise for patient-specific cardiotoxicity drug testing, disease modeling, and cardiac regeneration. However, existing protocols for the differentiation of hiPSC to the cardiac lineage are inefficient and highly variable. We describe a highly efficient system for differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC and hiPSC to the cardiac lineage. This system eliminated the variability in cardiac differentiation capacity of a variety of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC, including hiPSC generated from CD34(+ cord blood using non-viral, non-integrating methods.We systematically and rigorously optimized >45 experimental variables to develop a universal cardiac differentiation system that produced contracting human embryoid bodies (hEB with an improved efficiency of 94.7±2.4% in an accelerated nine days from four hESC and seven hiPSC lines tested, including hiPSC derived from neonatal CD34(+ cord blood and adult fibroblasts using non-integrating episomal plasmids. This cost-effective differentiation method employed forced aggregation hEB formation in a chemically defined medium, along with staged exposure to physiological (5% oxygen, and optimized concentrations of mesodermal morphogens BMP4 and FGF2, polyvinyl alcohol, serum, and insulin. The contracting hEB derived using these methods were composed of high percentages (64-89% of cardiac troponin I(+ cells that displayed ultrastructural properties of functional cardiomyocytes and uniform electrophysiological profiles responsive to cardioactive drugs.This efficient and cost-effective universal system for cardiac differentiation of hiPSC allows a potentially unlimited production of functional cardiomyocytes suitable for application to hPSC-based drug development, cardiac disease modeling, and the future generation of clinically-safe nonviral human cardiac cells for regenerative medicine.

  15. Non-cardiac QTc-prolonging drugs and the risk of sudden cardiac death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straus, SMJM; Sturkenboom, MCJM; Bleumink, GS; van der Lei, J; de Graeff, PA; Kingma, JH; Stricker, BHC

    2005-01-01

    Aims To assess the association between the use of non-cardiac QTc-prolonging drugs and the risk of sudden cardiac death. Methods and results A population-based case-control study was performed in the Integrated Primary Care Information (IPCI) project, a longitudinal observational database with

  16. the pattern of cardiac diseases at the cardiac clinic of jimma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatic heart disease is the commonest cardiac disease in most sub-Saharan. African countries, followed by hypertensive heart disease which is rising along with the other non- communicable diseases. However the pattern in our setting is not known. This study aimed to determine the pattern of cardiac ...

  17. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.49 Cardiac rehabilitation program... and self-reported measures of exertion and behavior. Physician means a doctor of medicine or... basic life support or advanced cardiac life support. (3) Be licensed to practice medicine in the State...

  18. Comparison of 4 Cardiac Risk Calculators in Predicting Postoperative Cardiac Complications After Noncardiac Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Steven L; Fernandez Ros, Nerea

    2018-01-01

    The 2014 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Perioperative Guidelines suggest using the Revised Cardiac Risk Index, myocardial infarction or cardiac arrest, or American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program calculators for combined patient-surgical risk assessment. There are no published data comparing their performance. This study compared these risk calculators and a reconstructed Revised Cardiac Risk Index in predicting postoperative cardiac complications, both during hospitalization and 30 days after operation, in a patient cohort who underwent select surgical procedures in various risk categories. Cardiac complications occurred in 14 of 663 patients (2.1%), of which 11 occurred during hospitalization. Only 3 of 663 patients (0.45%) had a myocardial infarction or cardiac arrest. Because these calculators used different risk factors, different outcomes, and different durations of observation, a true direct comparison is not possible. We found that all 4 risk calculators performed well in the setting they were originally studied but were less accurate when applied in a different manner. In conclusion, all calculators were useful in defining low-risk patients in whom further cardiac testing was unnecessary, and the myocardial infarction or cardiac arrest may be the most reliable in selecting higher risk patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of prolonged walking exercise on cardiac structure and function in cardiac patients versus healthy controls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benda, N.M.M.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Oxborough, D.; George, K.P.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Eijsvogels, T.M.H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND DESIGN: Previous studies have demonstrated that endurance exercise can cause an acute transient decrease in cardiac function in healthy subjects. Whether this also occurs in cardiac patients is unknown. We investigated the impact of prolonged single day and three-day walking exercise

  20. Cardiac and extra-cardiac flow velocity waveforms in the growth-retarded human fetus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A.L. Groenenberg (Irene)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractThe central theme in this thesis is the documentation of Doppler flow velocity waveforms in a number of cardiac and extra-cardiac arterial vessels with emphasis on changes in the flow velocity waveforms relative to intrauterine growth retardation and fetal and neonatal condition. The

  1. The Pattern of Cardiac Diseases at the Cardiac Clinic of Jimma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatic heart disease is the commonest cardiac disease in most sub-Saharan African countries, followed by hypertensive heart disease which is rising along with the other non-communicable diseases. However the pattern in our setting is not known. This study aimed to determine the pattern of cardiac ...

  2. Incorporating inductances in tissue-scale models of cardiac electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Simone; Griffith, Boyce E.

    2017-09-01

    In standard models of cardiac electrophysiology, including the bidomain and monodomain models, local perturbations can propagate at infinite speed. We address this unrealistic property by developing a hyperbolic bidomain model that is based on a generalization of Ohm's law with a Cattaneo-type model for the fluxes. Further, we obtain a hyperbolic monodomain model in the case that the intracellular and extracellular conductivity tensors have the same anisotropy ratio. In one spatial dimension, the hyperbolic monodomain model is equivalent to a cable model that includes axial inductances, and the relaxation times of the Cattaneo fluxes are strictly related to these inductances. A purely linear analysis shows that the inductances are negligible, but models of cardiac electrophysiology are highly nonlinear, and linear predictions may not capture the fully nonlinear dynamics. In fact, contrary to the linear analysis, we show that for simple nonlinear ionic models, an increase in conduction velocity is obtained for small and moderate values of the relaxation time. A similar behavior is also demonstrated with biophysically detailed ionic models. Using the Fenton-Karma model along with a low-order finite element spatial discretization, we numerically analyze differences between the standard monodomain model and the hyperbolic monodomain model. In a simple benchmark test, we show that the propagation of the action potential is strongly influenced by the alignment of the fibers with respect to the mesh in both the parabolic and hyperbolic models when using relatively coarse spatial discretizations. Accurate predictions of the conduction velocity require computational mesh spacings on the order of a single cardiac cell. We also compare the two formulations in the case of spiral break up and atrial fibrillation in an anatomically detailed model of the left atrium, and we examine the effect of intracellular and extracellular inductances on the virtual electrode phenomenon.

  3. Cardiac mitochondria exhibit dynamic functional clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Tobias Kurz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-oscillatory behavior of mitochondrial inner membrane potential ΔΨm in self-organized cardiac mitochondrial networks can be triggered by metabolic or oxidative stress. Spatio-temporal analyses of cardiac mitochondrial networks have shown that mitochondria are heterogeneously organized in synchronously oscillating clusters in which the mean cluster frequency and size are inversely correlated, thus suggesting a modulation of cluster frequency through local inter-mitochondrial coupling. In this study, we propose a method to examine the mitochondrial network's topology through quantification of its dynamic local clustering coefficients. Individual mitochondrial ΔΨm oscillation signals were identified for each cardiac myocyte and cross-correlated with all network mitochondria using previously described methods (Kurz et al., 2010. Time-varying inter-mitochondrial connectivity, defined for mitochondria in the whole network whose signals are at least 90% correlated at any given time point, allowed considering functional local clustering coefficients. It is shown that mitochondrial clustering in isolated cardiac myocytes changes dynamically and is significantly higher than for random mitochondrial networks that are constructed using the Erdös-Rényi model based on the same sets of vertices. The network's time-averaged clustering coefficient for cardiac myocytes was found to be 0.500 ± 0.051 (N=9 versus 0.061 ± 0.020 for random networks, respectively. Our results demonstrate that cardiac mitochondria constitute a network with dynamically connected constituents whose topological organization is prone to clustering. Cluster partitioning in networks of coupled oscillators has been observed in scale-free and chaotic systems and is therefore in good agreement with previous models of cardiac mitochondrial networks (Aon et al., 2008.

  4. Surface Mesh Reconstruction from Cardiac MRI Contours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Villard

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a tool to build a surface mesh able to deal with sparse, heterogeneous, non-parallel, cross-sectional, non-coincidental contours and show its application to reconstruct surfaces of the heart. In recent years, much research has looked at creating personalised 3D anatomical models of the heart. These models usually incorporate a geometrical reconstruction of the anatomy in order to better understand cardiovascular functions as well as predict different cardiac processes. As MRIs are becoming the standard for cardiac medical imaging, we tested our methodology on cardiac MRI data from standard acquisitions. However, the ability to accurately reconstruct heart anatomy in three dimensions commonly comes with fundamental challenges—notably, the trade-off between data fitting and expected visual appearance. Most current techniques can either require contours from parallel slices or, if multiple slice orientations are used, require an exact match between these contours. In addition, some methods introduce a bias by the use of prior shape models or by trade-offs between the data matching terms and the smoothing terms. Our approach uses a composition of smooth approximations towards the maximization of the data fitting, ensuring a good matching to the input data as well as pleasant interpolation characteristics. To assess our method in the task of cardiac mesh generations, we evaluated its performance on synthetic data obtained from a cardiac statistical shape model as well as on real data. Using a statistical shape model, we simulated standard cardiac MRI acquisitions planes and contour data. We performed a multi-parameter evaluation study using plausible cardiac shapes generated from the model. We also show that long axes contours as well as the most extremal slices (basal and apical contain the most amount of structural information, and thus should be taken into account when generating anatomically relevant geometrical cardiovascular

  5. Detecting early cardiac dysfunction with radionuclide cardiac blood-pool imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Kegui; Chen Daguang; Lin Haoxue

    1992-01-01

    Cardiac function was measured by radionuclide cardiac blood-pool imaging in 15 normal persons, 19 cases of hypertension, 32 cases of coronary heart disease, 35 cases of coronary heart disease combined with hypertension and 44 cases of myocardial infarction. Significant differences have been found in indices of cardiac function between normal subjects and patients with coronary heart disease and coronary heart disease combined with hypertension, even though the patients were without any clinical sin of cardiac failure. Lowered regional EF and decreased ventricular was motion were found in 38.8% of patients, while 65.7%of patients revealed marked abnormality in MFR. The results indicate that latent cardiac dysfunction is common in patients with coronary heart disease. The earliest change is diastolic function abnormalities

  6. Cardiac Biomarkers and Cycling Race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Le Goff, Jean-François Kaux, Sébastien Goffaux, Etienne Cavalier

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In cycling as in other types of strenuous exercise, there exists a risk of sudden death. It is important both to understand its causes and to see if the behavior of certain biomarkers might highlight athletes at risk. Many reports describe changes in biomarkers after strenuous exercise (Nie et al., 2011, but interpreting these changes, and notably distinguishing normal physiological responses from pathological changes, is not easy. Here we have focused on the kinetics of different cardiac biomarkers: creatin kinase (CK, creating kinase midbrain (CK-MB, myoglobin (MYO, highly sensitive troponin T (hs-TnT and N-terminal brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP. The population studied was a group of young trained cyclists participating in a 177-km cycling race. The group of individuals was selected for maximal homogeneity. Their annual training volume was between 10,000 and 16,000 kilometers. The rhythm of races is comparable and averages 35 km/h, depending on the race’s difficulty. The cardiac frequency was recorded via a heart rate monitor. Three blood tests were taken. The first blood test, T0, was taken approximately 2 hours before the start of the race and was intended to gather values which would act as references for the following tests. The second blood test, T1, was realized within 5 minutes of their arrival. The third and final blood test, T3, was taken 3 hours following their arrival. The CK, CK-MB, MYO, hs-TnT and NT-proBNP were measured on the Roche Diagnostic modular E (Manhein, Germany. For the statistical analysis, an ANOVA and post hoc test of Scheffé were calculated with the Statistica Software version 9.1. We noticed an important significant variation in the cardiac frequency between T0 and T1 (p < 0.0001, T0 and T3 (p < 0.0001, and T1 and T3 (p < 0.01. Table 1 shows the results obtained for the different biomarkers. CK and CK-MB showed significant variation between T0-T1 and T0-T3 (p < 0.0001. Myoglobin increased significantly

  7. Computing effective dose in cardiac CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Walter; Tipnis, Sameer; Sterzik, Alexander; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2010-07-01

    We present a method of estimating effective doses in cardiac CT that accounts for selected techniques (kV mAs-1), anatomical location of the scan and patient size. A CT dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator) was used to estimate effective doses (E) using ICRP 103 weighting factors for a 70 kg patient undergoing cardiac CT examinations. Using dose length product (DLP) for the same scans, we obtained values of E/DLP for three CT scanners used in cardiac imaging from two vendors. E/DLP ratios were obtained as a function of the anatomical location in the chest and for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV. We also computed the ratio of the average absorbed dose in a water cylinder modeling a patient weighing W kg to the corresponding average absorbed dose in a water cylinder equivalent to a 70 kg patient. The average E/DLP for a 16 cm cardiac heart CT scan was 26 µSv (mGy cm)-1, which is about 70% higher than the current E/DLP values used for chest CT scans (i.e. 14-17 µSv (mGy cm)-1). Our cardiac E/DLP ratios are higher because the cardiac region is ~30% more radiosensitive than the chest, and use of the ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors increases cardiac CT effective doses by ~30%. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increases the E/DLP conversion factor for cardiac CT by 17%. For the same incident radiation at 120 kV, doses in 45 kg adults were ~22% higher than those in 70 kg adults, whereas doses in 120 kg adults were ~28% lower. Accurate estimates of the patient effective dose in cardiac CT should use ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors, and account for a choice of scan techniques (kV mAs-1), exposed scan region, as well as patient size.

  8. Cardioprotection and lifespan extension by the natural polyamine spermidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Tobias; Abdellatif, Mahmoud; Schroeder, Sabrina; Primessnig, Uwe; Stekovic, Slaven; Pendl, Tobias; Harger, Alexandra; Schipke, Julia; Zimmermann, Andreas; Schmidt, Albrecht; Tong, Mingming; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Dammbrueck, Christopher; Gross, Angelina S.; Herbst, Viktoria; Magnes, Christoph; Trausinger, Gert; Narath, Sophie; Meinitzer, Andreas; Hu, Zehan; Kirsch, Alexander; Eller, Kathrin; Gutierrez, Didac-Carmona; Büttner, Sabrina; Pietrocola, Federico; Knittelfelder, Oskar; Schrepfer, Emilie; Rockenfeller, Patrick; Simonini, Corinna; Rahn, Alexandros; Horsch, Marion; Moreth, Kristin; Beckers, Johannes; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Neff, Frauke; Janik, Dirk; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Moustafa, Tarek; Haemmerle, Guenter; Mayr, Manuel; Willeit, Peter; von Frieling-Salewsky, Marion; Pieske, Burkert; Scorrano, Luca; Pieber, Thomas; Pechlaner, Raimund; Willeit, Johann; Sigrist, Stephan J.; Linke, Wolfgang A.; Mühlfeld, Christian; Sadoshima, Junichi; Dengjel, Joern; Kiechl, Stefan; Kroemer, Guido; Sedej, Simon; Madeo, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Aging is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. Here we show that oral supplementation of the natural polyamine spermidine extends the lifespan of mice and exerts cardioprotective effects, reducing cardiac hypertrophy and preserving diastolic function in old mice. Spermidine feeding enhanced cardiac autophagy, mitophagy and mitochondrial respiration, and it also improved the mechano-elastical properties of cardiomyocytes in vivo, coinciding with increased titin phosphorylation and suppressed subclinical inflammation. Spermidine feeding failed to provide cardioprotection in mice that lack the autophagy-related protein Atg5 in cardiomyocytes. In Dahl salt-sensitive rats that were fed a high-salt diet, a model for hypertension-induced congestive heart failure, spermidine feeding reduced systemic blood pressure, increased titin phosphorylation and prevented cardiac hypertrophy and a decline in diastolic function, thus delaying the progression to heart failure. In humans, high levels of dietary spermidine, as assessed from food questionnaires, correlated with reduced blood pressure and a lower incidence of cardiovascular disease. Our results suggest a new and feasible strategy for the protection from cardiovascular disease. PMID:27841876

  9. Infected Cardiac Myxoma: an Updated Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to present an updated clinical picture of the infected cardiac myxoma. Revankar & Clark made a systematic review of infected cardiac myxoma based on the literature before 1998. Since then, there has not been any updated information describing its recent changing trends. A comprehensive literature search of infected cardiac myxoma was conducted on MEDLINE, Highwire Press and Google between 1998 and 2014. In comparison with Revankar & Clark's series, the present series disclosed a significantly decreased overall mortality. It is believed that refinement of the prompt diagnosis and timely management (use of sensitive antibiotics and surgical resection of the infected myxoma) have resulted in better outcomes of such patients. The present series of infected cardiac myxoma illustrated some aggravated clinical manifestations (relative more occasions of high-grade fever, multiple embolic events and the presence of refractory microorganisms), which should draw enough attention to careful diagnosis and treatment. In general, the prognosis of infected cardiac myxoma is relatively benign and the long-term survival is always promising.

  10. [Extracorporeal life support for treating cardiac arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehot, Jean-Jacques; Long-Him-Nam, Nelly; Bastien, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    Percutaneous extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is now widespread for treating acute cardiac failure. ECLS has been used for treating in-hospital and out of hospital cardiac arrests. A systematic review of literature was performed in order to assess the results. Nine studies of in-hospital cardiac arrests were published between 2003 and January 31, 2011. They included 724 patients, 208 of which survived without significant neurological sequelae (28.7 %). In the other patients, the initial disease and the consequences of low flow brought multiorgan failure, or ECLS resulted in haemorrhage and ischaemia. Low flow lasted between 42 and 105 min (mean 54min). ECLS was used after out of hospital cardiac arrests in 3 studies published between 2008 and January 31, 2011. They included 110 patients of which only 6 survived (4.4 %) despite strict inclusion criteria. Low flow lasted between 60 and 120 min (mean 98 min.) According to these results the use of ECLS should be encouraged after in-hospital cardiac arrest and training in cardiorespiratory resuscitation should be improved in global population and health professionals.

  11. Practical textbook of cardiac CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Tae-Hwan (ed.) [ASAN Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2015-04-01

    Guide to the interpretation of cardiac CT and MRI for the purposes of diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. Emphasis on applications in a wide range of real clinical situations. Numerous informative illustrations. Summarizing sections permitting rapid retrieval of information. QR codes allowing access to references, additional figures, and motion pictures from the internet. This up-to-date textbook comprehensively reviews all aspects of cardiac CT and MRI and demonstrates the value of these techniques in clinical practice. A wide range of applications are considered, including imaging of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, coronary revascularization, ischemic heart disease, non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease, cardiac tumors, and pericardial disease. The numerous high-quality images illustrate how to interpret cardiac CT and MRI correctly for the purposes of diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. Helpful summarizing sections in every chapter will facilitate rapid retrieval of information. This book will be of great value to radiologists and cardiologists seeking a reliable guide to the optimal use of cardiac CT and MRI in real clinical situations.

  12. Practical textbook of cardiac CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Tae-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Guide to the interpretation of cardiac CT and MRI for the purposes of diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. Emphasis on applications in a wide range of real clinical situations. Numerous informative illustrations. Summarizing sections permitting rapid retrieval of information. QR codes allowing access to references, additional figures, and motion pictures from the internet. This up-to-date textbook comprehensively reviews all aspects of cardiac CT and MRI and demonstrates the value of these techniques in clinical practice. A wide range of applications are considered, including imaging of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, coronary revascularization, ischemic heart disease, non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease, cardiac tumors, and pericardial disease. The numerous high-quality images illustrate how to interpret cardiac CT and MRI correctly for the purposes of diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. Helpful summarizing sections in every chapter will facilitate rapid retrieval of information. This book will be of great value to radiologists and cardiologists seeking a reliable guide to the optimal use of cardiac CT and MRI in real clinical situations.

  13. Infected Cardiac Myxoma: an Updated Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: This study aims to present an updated clinical picture of the infected cardiac myxoma. Revankar & Clark made a systematic review of infected cardiac myxoma based on the literature before 1998. Since then, there has not been any updated information describing its recent changing trends. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search of infected cardiac myxoma was conducted on MEDLINE, Highwire Press and Google between 1998 and 2014. RESULTS: In comparison with Revankar & Clark's series, the present series disclosed a significantly decreased overall mortality. It is believed that refinement of the prompt diagnosis and timely management (use of sensitive antibiotics and surgical resection of the infected myxoma have resulted in better outcomes of such patients. CONCLUSION: The present series of infected cardiac myxoma illustrated some aggravated clinical manifestations (relative more occasions of high-grade fever, multiple embolic events and the presence of refractory microorganisms, which should draw enough attention to careful diagnosis and treatment. In general, the prognosis of infected cardiac myxoma is relatively benign and the long-term survival is always promising.

  14. [Histopathological and immunohistochemical features of cardiac myxomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Bringas, Omar; Ortiz-Hidalgo, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Mixomas are the most common primary cardiac tumors with an estimate incidence of 0,5-1 per 10(6) individuals per year. These tumors have generated interest due to their unique location (left side of the atrial septum near the fossa ovalis), variable clinical presentation and undefined histogenesis. Most cardiac myxomas occur sporadically while approximately 10% of diagnosed cases develop as part of Carney complex. This neoplasm is of uncertain histogenesis, however, endothelial, neurogenic, fibroblastic, and cardiac and smooth muscle cells differentiation has been proposed, and rarely glandular differentiation has been observed. Recently, due to the expression of certain cardiomyocyte-specific factors, an origin of mesenchymal cardiomyocytes progenitor cells has been suggested. Histologically cardiac myxomas are mainly composed of stellated, fusiform and polygonal cells, immersed in an amorphous myxoid matrix. Immunohistochemically some endothelial markers, such as CD31, CD34, FVIIIAg, are present. Positive staining has also been reported for S-100 protein, calretinin, vimentin, desmin, smooth muscle myosin, CD56, α1 antitrypsin and α 1antichymotrypsin. Surgical resection is currently the only treatment of choice. We present in this article a histopathological and immunohistochemical review of cardiac myxomas. Copyright © 2012 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  15. Simulation data mapping in virtual cardiac model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiquan, Liu; Jingyi, Feng; Duan, Huilong; Siping, Chen

    2004-01-01

    Although 3D heart and torso model with realistic geometry are basis of simulation computation in LFX virtual cardiac model, the simulation results are mostly output in 2D format. To solve such a problem and enhance the virtual reality of LFX virtual cardiac model, the methods of voxel mapping and vertex project mapping were presented. With these methods, excitation isochrone map (EIM) was mapped from heart model with realistic geometry to real visible man heart model, and body surface potential map (BSPM) was mapped from torso model with realistic geometry to real visible man body surface. By visualizing in the 4Dview, which is a real-time 3D medical image visualization platform, the visualization results of EIM and BSPM simulation data before and after mapping were also provided. According to the visualization results, the output format of EIM and BSPM simulation data of LFX virtual cardiac model were extended from 2D to 4D (spatio-temporal) and from cardiac model with realistic geometry to real cardiac model, and more realistic and effective simulation was achieved.

  16. Biomarkers for cardiac cachexia: reality or utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Telma; Vitorino, Rui; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Ferreira, Rita

    2014-09-25

    Cardiac cachexia is a serious complication of chronic heart failure, characterized by significant weight loss and body wasting. Chronic heart failure-related muscle wasting results from a chronic imbalance in the activation of anabolic or catabolic pathways, caused by a series of immunological, metabolic, and neurohormonal processes. In spite of the high morbidity and mortality associated to this condition, there is no universally accepted definition or specific biomarkers for cardiac cachexia, which makes its diagnosis and treatment difficult. Several hormonal, inflammatory and oxidative stress molecules have been proposed as serological markers of prognosis in cardiac cachexia but with doubtful success. As individual biomarkers may have limited sensitivity and specificity, multimarker strategies involving mediators of the biological processes modulated by cardiac cachexia will strongly contribute for the diagnosis and management of the disease, as well as for the establishment of new therapeutic targets. An integrated analysis of the biomarkers proposed so far for cardiac cachexia is made in the present review, highlighting the biological processes to which they are related. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiac involvement in canine babesiosis : review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.G. Lobetti

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac dysfunction in canine babesiosis has traditionally been regarded as a rare complication, with the majority of lesions reported as incidental findings at post-mortem examination. Recent studies have, however, demonstrated cardiac lesions in canine babesiosis. Cardiac troponins, especially troponin I, are sensitive markers of myocardial injury in canine babesiosis, and the magnitude of elevation of plasma troponin I concentrations appears to be proportional to the severity of the disease. ECG changes in babesiosis are similar to the pattern described for myocarditis and myocardial ischaemia and together with histopathological findings indicate that the heart suffers from the same pathological processes described in other organs in canine babesiosis, namely inflammation and hypoxia. The clinical application of the ECG appears to be limited and thus cardiovascular assessment should be based on functional monitoring rather than an ECG tracing. On cardiac histopathology from dogs that succumbed to babesiosis, haemorrhage, necrosis, inflammation and fibrin microthrombi in the myocardium were documented, all of which would have resulted in ECG changes and elevations in cardiac troponin. Myocardial damage causes left ventricular failure, which will result in hypotension and an expansion of the plasma volume due to homeostatic mechanisms.

  18. Succinct history of Greek cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolakis, Efstratios; Koletsis, Efstratios; Dougenis, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    The development and evolution of Greek Cardiac Surgery (GCS) has followed the international cardiothoracic surgery after the invention of cardiopulmonary bypass machine by John Gibbon in 1953. Chronologically, the development of GCS could be divided in four periods: (a) the first or essay period (1950-1960) characterized by the lack of organization, the experimentation and hesitation from the surgeons' side, and the reluctance from the patients' side to have an operation in Greece. (b) The second or stabilization period (1960-1970) is the period during which several separate cardiovascular departments were organized and performed the first valve replacement in 1964. (c) The third or "strengthening" period (1970-1985), during which Greek surgeons were trained abroad and adopted new methods and techniques of surgical therapy. The first operations of coronary artery bypass grafting and aortic aneurysm were performed (1973-1975). Various purely Cardiothoracic Centers were founded in Athens and Thessalonica and cardiac surgery became a routine operation. However, these centers were numerically not enough to cover the demand of patients in need of cardiac surgery. (d) The fourth or maturity period (1985 till today). It is characterized by the creation of private cardiac surgery departments and the gradual establishment of new university centers at the periphery, which along with the Onassis Cardiac Center, eliminated any need for patients to leave the country.

  19. Preoperative Feeding Neonates With Cardiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scahill, Carly J; Graham, Eric M; Atz, Andrew M; Bradley, Scott M; Kavarana, Minoo N; Zyblewski, Sinai C

    2017-01-01

    The potential for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in neonates requiring cardiac surgery has contributed largely to wide feeding practice variations and a hesitation to initiate enteral feeding during the preoperative period, specifically those patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. A retrospective chart review of neonates undergoing cardiac surgery at a single institution between July 2011 and July 2013 was performed. The primary objective of this study was to determine if preoperative feeding was associated with NEC in neonates requiring cardiac surgery. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between preoperative feeding and NEC. Secondary outcomes including growth failure, total ventilator days, total length of stay, and tube-assisted feeds at discharge were analyzed. One hundred thirty consecutive neonates who required cardiac surgery were included in the analysis. Preoperative feeding occurred in 61% (n = 79). The overall prevalence of NEC was 9% (12/130), including three neonates with surgical NEC. There was no difference in the prevalence of NEC between the preoperative feeding and nil per os (NPO) groups. Preoperative NPO status was associated with longer ventilator-dependent days ( P = .01) but was not associated with worsened growth failure, longer length of stay, or increased prevalence of tube-assisted feeds at discharge. In this study cohort, preoperative feeding was associated with a low prevalence of NEC. Larger prospective studies evaluating the safety and benefits of preoperative feeding in cardiac neonates are warranted.

  20. Omentin functions to attenuate cardiac hypertrophic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kazuhiro; Shibata, Rei; Ohashi, Koji; Kambara, Takahiro; Uemura, Yusuke; Hiramatsu-Ito, Mizuho; Enomoto, Takashi; Yuasa, Daisuke; Joki, Yusuke; Ito, Masanori; Hayakawa, Satoko; Ogawa, Hayato; Kihara, Shinji; Murohara, Toyoaki; Ouchi, Noriyuki

    2015-02-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy occurs in many obesity-related conditions. Omentin is an adipose-derived plasma protein that is downregulated under obese conditions. Here, we investigated whether omentin modulates cardiac hypertrophic responses in vivo and in vitro. Systemic administration of an adenoviral vector expressing human omentin (Ad-OMT) to wild-type (WT) mice led to the attenuation of cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and ERK phosphorylation induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or angiotensin II infusion. In cultured cardiomyocytes, stimulation with phenylephrine (PE) led to an increase in myocyte size, which was prevented by pretreatment with human omentin protein. Pretreatment of cardiomyocytes with omentin protein also reduced ERK phosphorylation in response to PE stimulation. Ad-OMT enhanced phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the heart of WT mice after TAC operation. Blockade of AMPK activation by transduction with dominant-negative mutant forms of AMPK reversed the inhibitory effect of omentin on myocyte hypertrophy and ERK phosphorylation following PE stimulation. Moreover, fat-specific transgenic mice expressing human omentin showed reduced cardiac hypertrophy and ERK phosphorylation following TAC surgery compared to littermate controls. These data suggest that omentin functions to attenuate the pathological process of myocardial hypertrophy via the activation of AMPK in the heart, suggesting that omentin may represent a target molecule for the treatment of cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Living Scar – Cardiac Fibroblasts and the Injured Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rog-Zielinska, Eva A; Norris, Russell A; Kohl, Peter; Markwald, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac scars, often perceived as “dead” tissue, are very much alive, with heterocellular activity ensuring the maintenance of structural and mechanical integrity following heart injury. To form a scar, non-myocytes such as fibroblasts, proliferate and are recruited from intra- and extra-cardiac sources. Fibroblasts perform important autocrine and paracrine signalling functions. They also establish mechanical and, as is increasingly evident, electrical junctions with other cells. While fibroblasts were previously thought to act simply as electrical insulators, they may be electrically connected among themselves and, under certain circumstances, to other cells, including cardiomyocytes. A better understanding of these interactions will help target scar structure and function and facilitate the development of novel therapies aimed at modifying scar properties for patient benefit. This review explores available insight and recent concepts on fibroblast integration in the heart, and highlights potential avenues for harnessing their roles to optimise scar function following heart injury such as infarction, and therapeutic interventions such as ablation. PMID:26776094

  2. Nursing Considerations in Pediatric Cardiac Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Melissa B; Tucker, Dawn

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of this review are to describe the education and critical thinking skills that characterize pediatric critical care nursing and how these skills impact patient care and outcomes in pediatric cardiac critical care. MEDLINE and PubMed. Pediatric cardiac critical care nurses manage complex and vulnerable patients requiring various levels of support. Effective care of these patients requires knowledge about the complex anatomy and physiology associated with congenital and acquired heart disease, as well as the effects of mechanical ventilation, mechanical circulatory support, and vasoactive medications. Strong physical examination skills, accurate interpretation of hemodynamic and laboratory data, active participation in bedside rounds, excellent communication skills, meticulous care of invasive monitoring catheters and tubes, and compassionate support of families are among the skills that distinguish a cardiac critical care nurse.

  3. Cardiac abnormality prediction using HMLP network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Ja'afar; Ahmad, K. A.; Mat, Muhamad Hadzren; Rizman, Zairi Ismael; Ahmad, Shahril

    2018-02-01

    Cardiac abnormality often occurs regardless of gender, age and races but depends on the lifestyle. This problem sometimes does not show any symptoms and usually detected once it already critical which lead to a sudden death to the patient. Basically, cardiac abnormality is the irregular electrical signal that generate by the pacemaker of the heart. This paper attempts to develop a program that can detect cardiac abnormality activity through implementation of Hybrid Multilayer Perceptron (HMLP) network. A certain amount of data of the heartbeat signals from the electrocardiogram (ECG) will be used in this project to train the MLP and HMLP network by using Modified Recursive Prediction Error (MRPE) algorithm and to test the network performance.

  4. Scalable BDDC Algorithms for Cardiac Electromechanical Coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Pavarino, L. F.

    2017-03-17

    The spread of electrical excitation in the cardiac muscle and the subsequent contraction-relaxation process is quantitatively described by the cardiac electromechanical coupling model. The electrical model consists of the Bidomain system, which is a degenerate parabolic system of two nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) of reaction-diffusion type, describing the evolution in space and time of the intra- and extracellular electric potentials. The PDEs are coupled through the reaction term with a stiff system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs), the membrane model, which describes the flow of the ionic currents through the cellular membrane and the dynamics of the associated gating variables. The mechanical model consists of the quasi-static finite elasticity system, modeling the cardiac tissue as a nearly-incompressible transversely isotropic hyperelastic material, and coupled with a system of ODEs accounting for the development of biochemically generated active force.

  5. Renal-sparing strategies in cardiac transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Ross, Heather J

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Renal dysfunction due to calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) toxicity is a major clinical problem in cardiac transplantation. The aim of the article is to review the efficacy and safety of various renal sparing strategies in cardiac transplantation. RECENT FINDINGS: Small studies have...... documented that late initiation of CNI is safe in patients treated with induction therapy at the time of transplantation. Use of mycophenolate is superior when compared with azathioprine to allow for CNI reduction. More substantial reduction in CNI levels is safe and effective with the introduction...... of sirolimus or everolimus. However, studies that use very early CNI discontinuation have found an increased risk of allograft rejection, and this strategy requires further study before it can be routinely recommended. CNI discontinuation late after cardiac transplantation seems more effective than CNI...

  6. Cardiac arrhythmias associated with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hector, Sven Magnus; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Krassioukov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT/OBJECTIVES: To review the current literature to reveal the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and its relation to spinal cord injury (SCI). METHODS: Data source: MEDLINE database, 304 hits, and 32 articles were found to be relevant. The relevant articles all met the inclusion criteria: (1......) contained original data (2) on cardiac arrhythmias (3) in humans with (4) traumatic SCI. RESULTS: In the acute phase of SCI (1-14 days after injury) more cranial as well as more severe injuries seemed to increase the incidence of bradycardia. Articles not covering the first 14 days after injury, thus...... as during procedures such as penile vibro-stimulation and tracheal suction. These episodes of bradycardia were seen more often in individuals with cervical injuries. Longitudinal studies with continuous electrocardiogram recordings are needed to uncover the true relation between cardiac arrhythmias and SCI....

  7. Spectrum of cardiac involvement in neonatal lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, L K; Al Rajaa, N

    2010-09-01

    'Neonatal' lupus erythematosus (NLE) describes a clinical spectrum of cardiac and non-cardiac abnormalities observed in neonates and foetuses whose mothers have the auto-antibodies anti-SSA/Ro (anti-Ro) and anti-SSB/La (anti-La). Of the cardiac abnormalities, congenital AVB is the most common cardiovascular abnormality found in affected foetuses and infants. Many other cardiovascular manifestations of NLE have been more recently recognized including atrial and ventricular arrhythmias and other conduction abnormalities, myocarditis, cardiomyopathy often with endocardiofibroelastosis and structural heart disease, particularly valvar lesions. In this report, the spectrum of cardiovascular manifestations observed in foetuses and infants with NLE are reviewed and the pathogenesis, diagnosis and clinical outcomes are briefly discussed.

  8. Extracorporeal life support in pediatric cardiac patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Di NARDO

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal Life Support (ECLS is a valuable tool in the management of neonates and older children with severe cardiac or respiratory failure. In this review, we focus on ECLS when used for neonatal and pediatric cardiac disease. Strict selection of patients and timely deployment are necessary to optimize outcomes. Although every attempt should be made to deploy ECLS urgently rather than emergently, extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR is being increasingly used and reasonable survival rates have been achieved after initiation of ECLS during active compressions of the chest following in-hospital cardiac arrest. Contraindications to ECLS are falling over time, although lethal chromosomal abnormalities, severe irreversible brain injury, and extremely low gestational age and weight (<32 weeks gestation or <1.5 kg remain firm contraindications.

  9. Kaempferol Attenuates Cardiac Hypertrophy via Regulation of ASK1/MAPK Signaling Pathway and Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hong; Cao, Jianlei; Zhang, Guangyu; Wang, Yanggan

    2017-07-01

    Kaempferol has been demonstrated to provide benefits for the treatment of atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, its role in cardiac hypertrophy remains to be elucidated. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of kaempferol on cardiac hypertrophy and the underlying mechanism. Mice subjected to aorta banding were treated with or without kaempferol (100 mg/kg/d, p. o.) for 6 weeks. Echocardiography was performed to evaluate cardiac function. Mice hearts were collected for pathological observation and molecular mechanism investigation. H9c2 cardiomyocytes were stimulated with or without phenylephrine for in vitro study. Kaempferol significantly attenuated cardiac hypertrophy induced by aorta banding as evidenced by decreased cardiomyocyte areas and interstitial fibrosis, accompanied with improved cardiac functions and decreased apoptosis. The ASK1/MAPK signaling pathways (JNK1/2 and p38) were markedly activated in the aorta banding mouse heart but inhibited by kaempferol treatment. In in vitro experiments, kaempferol also inhibited the activity of ASK1/JNK1/2/p38 signaling pathway and the enlargement of H9c2 cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, our study revealed that kaempferol could protect the mouse heart and H9c2 cells from pathological oxidative stress. Our investigation indicated that treatment with kaempferol protects against cardiac hypertrophy, and its cardioprotection may be partially explained by the inhibition of the ASK1/MAPK signaling pathway and the regulation of oxidative stress. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Na/K pump regulation of cardiac repolarization: insights from a systems biology approach

    KAUST Repository

    Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso

    2013-05-15

    The sodium-potassium pump is widely recognized as the principal mechanism for active ion transport across the cellular membrane of cardiac tissue, being responsible for the creation and maintenance of the transarcolemmal sodium and potassium gradients, crucial for cardiac cell electrophysiology. Importantly, sodium-potassium pump activity is impaired in a number of major diseased conditions, including ischemia and heart failure. However, its subtle ways of action on cardiac electrophysiology, both directly through its electrogenic nature and indirectly via the regulation of cell homeostasis, make it hard to predict the electrophysiological consequences of reduced sodium-potassium pump activity in cardiac repolarization. In this review, we discuss how recent studies adopting the systems biology approach, through the integration of experimental and modeling methodologies, have identified the sodium-potassium pump as one of the most important ionic mechanisms in regulating key properties of cardiac repolarization and its rate dependence, from subcellular to whole organ levels. These include the role of the pump in the biphasic modulation of cellular repolarization and refractoriness, the rate control of intracellular sodium and calcium dynamics and therefore of the adaptation of repolarization to changes in heart rate, as well as its importance in regulating pro-arrhythmic substrates through modulation of dispersion of repolarization and restitution. Theoretical findings are consistent across a variety of cell types and species including human, and widely in agreement with experimental findings. The novel insights and hypotheses on the role of the pump in cardiac electrophysiology obtained through this integrative approach could eventually lead to novel therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  11. Na/K pump regulation of cardiac repolarization: insights from a systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Sánchez, Carlos; Pueyo, Esther; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2014-02-01

    The sodium-potassium pump is widely recognized as the principal mechanism for active ion transport across the cellular membrane of cardiac tissue, being responsible for the creation and maintenance of the transarcolemmal sodium and potassium gradients, crucial for cardiac cell electrophysiology. Importantly, sodium-potassium pump activity is impaired in a number of major diseased conditions, including ischemia and heart failure. However, its subtle ways of action on cardiac electrophysiology, both directly through its electrogenic nature and indirectly via the regulation of cell homeostasis, make it hard to predict the electrophysiological consequences of reduced sodium-potassium pump activity in cardiac repolarization. In this review, we discuss how recent studies adopting the systems biology approach, through the integration of experimental and modeling methodologies, have identified the sodium-potassium pump as one of the most important ionic mechanisms in regulating key properties of cardiac repolarization and its rate dependence, from subcellular to whole organ levels. These include the role of the pump in the biphasic modulation of cellular repolarization and refractoriness, the rate control of intracellular sodium and calcium dynamics and therefore of the adaptation of repolarization to changes in heart rate, as well as its importance in regulating pro-arrhythmic substrates through modulation of dispersion of repolarization and restitution. Theoretical findings are consistent across a variety of cell types and species including human, and widely in agreement with experimental findings. The novel insights and hypotheses on the role of the pump in cardiac electrophysiology obtained through this integrative approach could eventually lead to novel therapeutic and diagnostic strategies.

  12. A Cell-Based Framework for Numerical Modeling of Electrical Conduction in Cardiac Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslak Tveito

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study a mathematical model of cardiac tissue based on explicit representation of individual cells. In this EMI model, the extracellular (E space, the cell membrane (M, and the intracellular (I space are represented as separate geometrical domains. This representation introduces modeling flexibility needed for detailed representation of the properties of cardiac cells including their membrane. In particular, we will show that the model allows ion channels to be non-uniformly distributed along the membrane of the cell. Such features are difficult to include in classical homogenized models like the monodomain and bidomain models frequently used in computational analyses of cardiac electrophysiology. The EMI model is solved using a finite difference method (FDM and two variants of the finite element method (FEM. We compare the three schemes numerically, reporting on CPU-efforts and convergence rates. Finally, we illustrate the distinctive capabilities of the EMI model compared to classical models by simulating monolayers of cardiac cells with heterogeneous distributions of ionic channels along the cell membrane. Because of the detailed representation of every cell, the computational problems that result from using the EMI model are much larger than for the classical homogenized models, and thus represent a computational challenge. However, our numerical simulations indicate that the FDM scheme is optimal in the sense that the computational complexity increases proportionally to the number of cardiac cells in the model. Moreover, we present simulations, based on systems of equations involving ~117 million unknowns, representing up to ~16,000 cells. We conclude that collections of cardiac cells can be simulated using the EMI model, and that the EMI model enable greater modeling flexibility than the classical monodomain and bidomain models.

  13. Improving health professionals' self-efficacy to support cardiac patients' emotional recovery: the 'Cardiac Blues Project'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Barbara M; Higgins, Rosemary O; Shand, Lyndel; Page, Karen; Holloway, Elizabeth; Le Grande, Michael R; Jackson, Alun C

    2017-02-01

    Many patients experience the 'cardiac blues' at the time of an acute cardiac event, and one in five go on to develop severe depression. These emotional responses often go undetected and unacknowledged. We initiated the 'Cardiac Blues Project' in order to help support patients' emotional recovery. As part of the project, we developed online training in order to support health professionals in the identification and management of the cardiac blues and depression. The aim of this study was to assess the acceptability of the training and its impacts on health professionals' self-efficacy. In July 2014, a 'cardiac blues' pack of patient resources, including access to health professional online training, was mailed to 606 centres across Australia. In the first 3 months after distribution, 140 health professionals registered to undertake the online training and participated in the present study. Participants provided information via a six-item pre- and post-training self-efficacy scale and on 10 post-training acceptability items. Health professionals' self-efficacy improved significantly after undertaking the online training across the six domains assessed and for the total score. Acceptability of the training was high across all 10 items assessed. Ratings of usefulness of the training in clinical practice were particularly favourable amongst those who worked directly with cardiac patients. The health professional training significantly improves health professionals' confidence in identifying and managing the 'cardiac blues' and depression. Monitoring of uptake is ongoing and future studies will investigate patient outcomes.

  14. Cardiac Involvement is Underdiagnosed in Patients with Biopsy-Proven Systemic AL Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyi Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis based on presence of heart failure symptoms led to underdiagnosis of cardiac involvement defined by the NCCN criteria. Guideline recommended assessment of cardiac involvement and cardiac response to treatment was not routinely implemented in our cohort.

  15. Stroke of a cardiac myxoma origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shi-Min; Humuruola, Gulimila

    2015-01-01

    The clinical features of cardiac myxoma stroke have not been sufficiently described. Debates remain concerning the options and timing of treatment and the clinical outcomes are unknown. This article aims to highlight the pertinent aspects of this rare condition. Data source of the present study came from a comprehensive literature collection of cardiac myxoma stroke in PubMed, Google search engine and Highwire Press for the year range 2000-2014. Young adults, female predominance, single cerebral vessel (mostly the middle cerebral artery), multiple territory involvements and solitary left atrial myxoma constituted the outstanding characteristics of this patient setting. The most common affected cerebral vessel (the middle cerebral artery) and areas (the basal ganglion, cerebellum and parietal and temporal regions) corresponded well to the common manifestations of this patient setting, such as conscious alteration, ataxia, hemiparesis and hemiplegia, aphasia and dysarthria. Initial computed tomography scan carried a higher false negative rate for the diagnosis of cerebral infarction than magnetic resonance imaging did. A delayed surgical resection of cardiac myxoma was associated with an increased risk of potential consequences in particular otherwise arterial embolism. The mortality rate of this patient population was 15.3%. Cardiac myxoma stroke is rare. Often does it affect young females. For an improved diagnostic accuracy, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and echocardiography are imperative for young stroke patients in identifying the cerebral infarct and determining the stroke of a cardiac origin. Immediate thrombolytic therapy may completely resolve the cerebral stroke and improve the neurologic function of the patients. An early surgical resection of cardiac myxoma is recommended in patients with not large territory cerebral infarct.

  16. Economic and biological costs of cardiac imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picano Eugenio

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Medical imaging market consists of several billion tests per year worldwide. Out of these, at least one third are cardiovascular procedures. Keeping in mind that each test represents a cost, often a risk, and a diagnostic hypothesis, we can agree that every unnecessary and unjustifiable test is one test too many. Small individual costs, risks, and wastes multiplied by billions of examinations per year represent an important population, society and environmental burden. Unfortunately, the appropriateness of cardiac imaging is extra-ordinarily low and there is little awareness in patients and physicians of differential costs, radiological doses, and long term risks of different imaging modalities. For a resting cardiac imaging test, being the average cost (not charges of an echocardiogram equal to 1 (as a cost comparator, the cost of a CT is 3.1x, of a SPECT 3.27x, of a Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance imaging 5.51x, of a PET 14.03x, and of a right and left heart catheterization 19.96x. For stress cardiac imaging, compared with the treadmill exercise test equal to 1 (as a cost comparator, the cost of stress echocardiography is 2.1x and of a stress SPECT scintigraphy is 5.7x. Biohazards and downstream long-term costs linked to radiation-induced oncogenesis should also be considered. The radiation exposure is absent in echo and magnetic resonance, and corresponds to 500 chest x rays for a sestamibi cardiac stress scan and to 1150 chest x rays for a thallium scan. The corresponding extra-risk in a lifetime of fatal cancer is 1 in 2000 exposed patients for a sestamibi stress and 1 in 1000 for a thallium scan. Increased awareness of economic, biologic, and environmental costs of cardiac imaging will hopefully lead to greater appropriateness, wisdom and prudence from both the prescriber and the practitioner. In this way, the sustainability of cardiac imaging will eventually improve.

  17. Stroke of a cardiac myxoma origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:The clinical features of cardiac myxoma stroke have not been sufficiently described. Debates remain concerning the options and timing of treatment and the clinical outcomes are unknown. This article aims to highlight the pertinent aspects of this rare condition.Methods:Data source of the present study came from a comprehensive literature collection of cardiac myxoma stroke in PubMed, Google search engine and Highwire Press for the year range 2000-2014.Results:Young adults, female predominance, single cerebral vessel (mostly the middle cerebral artery, multiple territory involvements and solitary left atrial myxoma constituted the outstanding characteristics of this patient setting. The most common affected cerebral vessel (the middle cerebral artery and areas (the basal ganglion, cerebellum and parietal and temporal regions corresponded well to the common manifestations of this patient setting, such as conscious alteration, ataxia, hemiparesis and hemiplegia, aphasia and dysarthria. Initial computed tomography scan carried a higher false negative rate for the diagnosis of cerebral infarction than magnetic resonance imaging did. A delayed surgical resection of cardiac myxoma was associated with an increased risk of potential consequences in particular otherwise arterial embolism. The mortality rate of this patient population was 15.3%.Conclusion:Cardiac myxoma stroke is rare. Often does it affect young females. For an improved diagnostic accuracy, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and echocardiography are imperative for young stroke patients in identifying the cerebral infarct and determining the stroke of a cardiac origin. Immediate thrombolytic therapy may completely resolve the cerebral stroke and improve the neurologic function of the patients. An early surgical resection of cardiac myxoma is recommended in patients with not large territory cerebral infarct.

  18. Effects of local cardiac denervation on cardiac innervation and ventricular arrhythmia after chronic myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Liu

    Full Text Available Modulation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS has already been demonstrated to display antiarrhythmic effects in patients and animals with MI. In this study, we investigated whether local cardiac denervation has any beneficial effects on ventricular electrical stability and cardiac function in the chronic phase of MI.Twenty-one anesthetized dogs were randomly assigned into the sham-operated, MI and MI-ablation groups, respectively. Four weeks after local cardiac denervation, LSG stimulation was used to induce VPCs and VAs. The ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT and the incidence of inducible VPCs were measured with electrophysiological protocol. Cardiac innervation was determined with immunohistochemical staining of growth associated protein-43 (GAP43 and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH. The global cardiac and regional ventricular function was evaluated with doppler echocardiography in this study.Four weeks after operation, the incidence of inducible VPC and VF in MI-ablation group were significantly reduced compared to the MI dogs (p<0.05. Moreover, local cardiac denervation significantly improved VFT in the infarcted border zone (p<0.05. The densities of GAP43 and TH-positive nerve fibers in the infarcted border zone in the MI-ablation group were lower than those in the MI group (p<0.05. However, the local cardiac denervation did not significantly improve cardiac function in the chronic phase of MI, determined by the left ventricle diameter (LV, left atrial diameter (LA, ejection fraction (EF.Summarily, in the chronic phase of MI, local cardiac denervation reduces the ventricular electrical instability, and attenuates spatial heterogeneity of sympathetic nerve reconstruction. Our study suggests that this methodology might decrease malignant ventricular arrhythmia in chronic MI, and has a great potential for clinical application.

  19. Swimming training increases cardiac vagal activity and induces cardiac hypertrophy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Medeiros

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of swimming training (ST on vagal and sympathetic cardiac effects was investigated in sedentary (S, N = 12 and trained (T, N = 12 male Wistar rats (200-220 g. ST consisted of 60-min swimming sessions 5 days/week for 8 weeks, with a 5% body weight load attached to the tail. The effect of the autonomic nervous system in generating training-induced resting bradycardia (RB was examined indirectly after cardiac muscarinic and adrenergic receptor blockade. Cardiac hypertrophy was evaluated by cardiac weight and myocyte morphometry. Plasma catecholamine concentrations and citrate synthase activity in soleus muscle were also determined in both groups. Resting heart rate was significantly reduced in T rats (355 ± 16 vs 330 ± 20 bpm. RB was associated with a significantly increased cardiac vagal effect in T rats (103 ± 25 vs 158 ± 40 bpm, since the sympathetic cardiac effect and intrinsic heart rate were similar for the two groups. Likewise, no significant difference was observed for plasma catecholamine concentrations between S and T rats. In T rats, left ventricle weight (13% and myocyte dimension (21% were significantly increased, suggesting cardiac hypertrophy. Skeletal muscle citrate synthase activity was significantly increased by 52% in T rats, indicating endurance conditioning. These data suggest that RB induced by ST is mainly mediated parasympathetically and differs from other training modes, like running, that seems to mainly decrease intrinsic heart rate in rats. The increased cardiac vagal activity associated with ST is of clinical relevance, since both are related to increased life expectancy and prevention of cardiac events.

  20. Predictive Models for Normal Fetal Cardiac Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Anita; Pike, Jodi I; McCarter, Robert; Fulgium, Amanda L; Wilson, Emmanuel; Donofrio, Mary T; Sable, Craig A

    2016-12-01

    Clinicians rely on age- and size-specific measures of cardiac structures to diagnose cardiac disease. No universally accepted normative data exist for fetal cardiac structures, and most fetal cardiac centers do not use the same standards. The aim of this study was to derive predictive models for Z scores for 13 commonly evaluated fetal cardiac structures using a large heterogeneous population of fetuses without structural cardiac defects. The study used archived normal fetal echocardiograms in representative fetuses aged 12 to 39 weeks. Thirteen cardiac dimensions were remeasured by a blinded echocardiographer from digitally stored clips. Studies with inadequate imaging views were excluded. Regression models were developed to relate each dimension to estimated gestational age (EGA) by dates, biparietal diameter, femur length, and estimated fetal weight by the Hadlock formula. Dimension outcomes were transformed (e.g., using the logarithm or square root) as necessary to meet the normality assumption. Higher order terms, quadratic or cubic, were added as needed to improve model fit. Information criteria and adjusted R 2 values were used to guide final model selection. Each Z-score equation is based on measurements derived from 296 to 414 unique fetuses. EGA yielded the best predictive model for the majority of dimensions; adjusted R 2 values ranged from 0.72 to 0.893. However, each of the other highly correlated (r > 0.94) biometric parameters was an acceptable surrogate for EGA. In most cases, the best fitting model included squared and cubic terms to introduce curvilinearity. For each dimension, models based on EGA provided the best fit for determining normal measurements of fetal cardiac structures. Nevertheless, other biometric parameters, including femur length, biparietal diameter, and estimated fetal weight provided results that were nearly as good. Comprehensive Z-score results are available on the basis of highly predictive models derived from gestational

  1. Postmortem cardiac imaging in fetuses and children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Andrew M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Cardiorespiratory Division, Level 7, Old Nurses Home, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, London (United Kingdom); Arthurs, Owen J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, London (United Kingdom); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Fetal and pediatric cardiac autopsies have a crucial role in the counseling of parents with regard to both the cause of death of their child and the implications of such findings for future pregnancies, as well as for quality assurance of antenatal screening programs and antemortem diagnostic procedures. Postmortem imaging allows an opportunity to investigate the heart in situ prior to dissection, and both postmortem CT and postmortem MRI have shown excellent accuracy in detecting the majority of clinically significant cardiac lesions in the perinatal and pediatric population. As less-invasive autopsy becomes increasingly popular, clinical guidelines for maximal diagnostic yield in specific circumstances can be developed. (orig.)

  2. Postmortem cardiac imaging in fetuses and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Andrew M.; Arthurs, Owen J.; Sebire, Neil J.

    2015-01-01

    Fetal and pediatric cardiac autopsies have a crucial role in the counseling of parents with regard to both the cause of death of their child and the implications of such findings for future pregnancies, as well as for quality assurance of antenatal screening programs and antemortem diagnostic procedures. Postmortem imaging allows an opportunity to investigate the heart in situ prior to dissection, and both postmortem CT and postmortem MRI have shown excellent accuracy in detecting the majority of clinically significant cardiac lesions in the perinatal and pediatric population. As less-invasive autopsy becomes increasingly popular, clinical guidelines for maximal diagnostic yield in specific circumstances can be developed. (orig.)

  3. Conditional shape models for cardiac motion estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metz, Coert; Baka, Nora; Kirisli, Hortense

    2010-01-01

    We propose a conditional statistical shape model to predict patient specific cardiac motion from the 3D end-diastolic CTA scan. The model is built from 4D CTA sequences by combining atlas based segmentation and 4D registration. Cardiac motion estimation is, for example, relevant in the dynamic...... alignment of pre-operative CTA data with intra-operative X-ray imaging. Due to a trend towards prospective electrocardiogram gating techniques, 4D imaging data, from which motion information could be extracted, is not commonly available. The prediction of motion from shape information is thus relevant...

  4. Acquired valvar disease and cardiac tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruttley, M.

    1985-01-01

    Investigation must determine the severity of the valve fault or faults, the effect on cardiac function and the significance of any associated cardiac disease in order that surgical referral can be made when appropriate with knowledge of operative risk and prognosis; radiology plays an important part in this. Radiological features will depend on the valve or valves affected, the type and severity of the haemodynamic disturbance and its time scale of development and duration. They may be modified by embolism or infection and there may be specific radiological manifestations of the underlying disease

  5. Cardiac biomarkers in neonatal hypoxic ischaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweetman, D

    2012-04-01

    Following a perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic insult, term infants commonly develop cardiovascular dysfunction. Troponin-T, troponin-I and brain natriuretic peptide are sensitive indicators of myocardial compromise. The long-term effects of cardiovascular dysfunction on neurodevelopmental outcome following perinatal hypoxic ischaemia remain controversial. Follow-up studies are warranted to ensure optimal cardiac function in adulthood. CONCLUSION: Cardiac biomarkers may improve the diagnosis of myocardial injury, help guide management, estimate mortality risk and may also aid in longterm neurodevelopmental outcome prediction following neonatal hypoxic-ischaemia.

  6. Supravalvular aortic stenosis with sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Vaideeswar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death (SCD most commonly results from previously undiagnosed congenital, acquired, or hereditary cardiac diseases. Congenital aortic valvular, subvalvular, and supravalvular disease with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is an important preventable cause of sudden death. This report documents sudden death presumably due to acute myocardial ischemia in a young male with an undiagnosed supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS due to a rare association of isolation of coronary sinuses of Valsalva. Congenital supravalvular pulmonary stenosis and mitral valvular dysplasia were also present.

  7. Prediction and Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Daniel P; Homoud, Munther K; Estes, N A Mark

    2017-12-01

    Sudden death is a major problem, with significant impact on public health. Many conditions predispose to sudden cardiac death and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), foremost among them coronary artery disease, and an effective therapy exists in the form of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator. Risk stratification for SCA remains imperfect, especially for patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Ongoing trials may make it easier to identify those at high risk, and potentially those at very low risk, in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Update on arrhythmias and cardiac pacing 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendral, Jesús; Pombo, Marta; Martínez-Alday, Jesús; González-Rebollo, José M; Rodríguez-Font, Enrique; Martínez-Ferrer, José; Castellanos, Eduardo; García-Fernández, F Javier; Ruiz-Mateas, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    This report discusses a selection of the most relevant articles on cardiac arrhythmias and pacing published in 2013. The first section discusses arrhythmias, classified as regular paroxysmal supraventricular tachyarrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, and ventricular arrhythmias, together with their treatment by means of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. The next section reviews cardiac pacing, subdivided into resynchronization therapy, remote monitoring of implantable devices, and pacemakers. The final section discusses syncope. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamic NMR cardiac imaging in a piglet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, M.; Rzedzian, R.; Mansfield, P. (Nottingham Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics); Coupland, R.E. (Nottingham Univ. (UK). Queen' s Medical Centre)

    1983-12-01

    NMR echo-planar imaging (EPI) has been used in a real-time mode to visualise the thorax of a live piglet. Moving pictures are available on an immediate image display system which demonstrates dynamic cardiac function. Frame rates vary from one per cardiac cycle in a prospective stroboscopic mode with immediate visual output to a maximum of 10 frames per second yielding up to six looks in one piglet heart cycle, but using a visual playback mode. A completely new system has been used to obtain these images, features of which include a probe assembly with 22 cm access and an AP400 array processor for real-time data processing.

  10. Gravity Reception and Cardiac Function in the Spider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, A.

    1985-01-01

    The following features of the arachnid gravity system were studied. (1) the absolute threshold to hyper-gz is quite low indicating fine proprioreceptive properties of the lyriform organ, the Gz/vibration detector; (2) the neurogenic heart of the spider is a good dependent variable for assessing its behavior to Gz and other stimuli which produce mechanical effects on the exoskeleton; (3) Not only is the cardiac response useful but it is now understood to be an integral part of the system which compensates for the consequences of gravity in the spider (an hydraulic leg extension); and (4) a theoretical model was proposed in which a mechanical amplifier, the leg lever, converts a weak force (at the tarsus) to a strong force (at the patella), capable of compressing the exoskeleton and consequently the lyriform receptor.

  11. Implantable magnetic relaxation sensors measure cumulative exposure to cardiac biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yibo; Pong, Terrence; Vassiliou, Christophoros C; Huang, Paul L; Cima, Michael J

    2011-03-01

    Molecular biomarkers can be used as objective indicators of pathologic processes. Although their levels often change over time, their measurement is often constrained to a single time point. Cumulative biomarker exposure would provide a fundamentally different kind of measurement to what is available in the clinic. Magnetic resonance relaxometry can be used to noninvasively monitor changes in the relaxation properties of antibody-coated magnetic particles when they aggregate upon exposure to a biomarker of interest. We used implantable devices containing such sensors to continuously profile changes in three clinically relevant cardiac biomarkers at physiological levels for up to 72 h. Sensor response differed between experimental and control groups in a mouse model of myocardial infarction and correlated with infarct size. Our prototype for a biomarker monitoring device also detected doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity and can be adapted to detect other molecular biomarkers with a sensitivity as low as the pg/ml range.

  12. Interpolation of vector fields from human cardiac DT-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F.; Zhu, Y. M.; Rapacchi, S.; Luo, J. H.; Robini, M.; Croisille, P.

    2011-03-01

    There has recently been increased interest in developing tensor data processing methods for the new medical imaging modality referred to as diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI). This paper proposes a method for interpolating the primary vector fields from human cardiac DT-MRI, with the particularity of achieving interpolation and denoising simultaneously. The method consists of localizing the noise-corrupted vectors using the local statistical properties of vector fields, removing the noise-corrupted vectors and reconstructing them by using the thin plate spline (TPS) model, and finally applying global TPS interpolation to increase the resolution in the spatial domain. Experiments on 17 human hearts show that the proposed method allows us to obtain higher resolution while reducing noise, preserving details and improving direction coherence (DC) of vector fields as well as fiber tracking. Moreover, the proposed method perfectly reconstructs azimuth and elevation angle maps.

  13. Interpolation of vector fields from human cardiac DT-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, F; Zhu, Y M; Rapacchi, S; Robini, M; Croisille, P; Luo, J H

    2011-01-01

    There has recently been increased interest in developing tensor data processing methods for the new medical imaging modality referred to as diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI). This paper proposes a method for interpolating the primary vector fields from human cardiac DT-MRI, with the particularity of achieving interpolation and denoising simultaneously. The method consists of localizing the noise-corrupted vectors using the local statistical properties of vector fields, removing the noise-corrupted vectors and reconstructing them by using the thin plate spline (TPS) model, and finally applying global TPS interpolation to increase the resolution in the spatial domain. Experiments on 17 human hearts show that the proposed method allows us to obtain higher resolution while reducing noise, preserving details and improving direction coherence (DC) of vector fields as well as fiber tracking. Moreover, the proposed method perfectly reconstructs azimuth and elevation angle maps.

  14. Prenatal diagnosis of cardiac defects: accuracy and benefit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clur, S. A.; van Brussel, P. M.; Ottenkamp, J.; Bilardo, C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The prenatal diagnosis of cardiac defects can potentially reduce postnatal morbidity and mortality. We wanted to evaluate prenatal cardiac diagnosis accuracy in a population referred for echocardiography. Methods Single centre retrospective study of echocardiography referrals between April

  15. Preoperative physical therapy for elective cardiac surgery patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, E.H.J.; Smit, Y.; Helders, P.P.J.M.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After cardiac surgery, physical therapy is a routine procedure delivered with the aim of preventing postoperative pulmonary complications. OBJECTIVES: To determine if preoperative physical therapy with an exercise component can prevent postoperative pulmonary complications in cardiac

  16. Cardiac resynchronisation therapy and the role of optimal device utilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buck, S.; Maass, A. H.; van Veldhuisen, D. J.; Van Gelder, I. C.

    Despite established selection criteria, 30 to 40% of patients do not respond to cardiac resynchronisation therapy. By optimising programming of the device response to cardiac resynchronisation, therapy can be improved. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:354-7.)

  17. Cardiac and lung complication probabilities after breast cancer irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkmans, C. W.; Borger, J. H.; Bos, L. J.; van der Horst, A.; Pieters, B. R.; Lebesque, J. V.; Mijnheer, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess for locoregional irradiation of breast cancer patients, the dependence of cardiac (cardiac mortality) and lung (radiation pneumonitis) complications on treatment technique and individual patient anatomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three-dimensional treatment planning was performed for

  18. Theory of arrhythmia based on mechano-electric feedback between cardiac myocytes and cardiac fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Kolmakow

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available When analyzing the articles submitted to our current issue, we involved into the preparation processing some relevant papers deserving special attention. The papers reveal the mechano-electric mechanism of the feedback between cardiac myocytes and cardiac fibroblasts that is capable of directly initiating cardiac arrhythmia. In the meantime, unfortunately, direct communication with Russian researchers Kamkin A.G., Kiseleva I.S. and Yarygin V.N. was not possible, but nevertheless, we are of the opinion that it is reasonable to review their articles, which discuss this interesting and logically justified mechanism of arrhythmia.

  19. Cardiac MRI and CT features of inheritable and congenital conditions associated with sudden cardiac death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparrow, Patrick; Merchant, Naeem; Provost, Yves; Doyle, Deirdre; Nguyen, Elsie; Paul, Narinder [University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, Division of Cardiothoracic Imaging, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    Cardiac MRI (CMR) and electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) are increasingly important tools in the identification and assessment of cardiac-related disease processes, including those associated with sudden cardiac death (SCD). While the commonest cause of SCD is coronary artery disease (CAD), in patients under 35 years inheritable cardiomyopathies such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy are important aetiologies. CMR in particular offers both accurate delineation of the morphological abnormalities associated with these and other conditions and the possibility for risk stratification for development of ventricular arrhythmias with demonstration of macroscopic scar by delayed enhancement imaging with intravenous gadolinium. (orig.)

  20. An in silico framework to analyze the anisotropic shear wave mechanics in cardiac shear wave elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caenen, Annette; Pernot, Mathieu; Peirlinck, Mathias; Mertens, Luc; Swillens, Abigail; Segers, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is a potential tool to non-invasively assess cardiac muscle stiffness. This study focused on the effect of the orthotropic material properties and mechanical loading on the performance of cardiac SWE, as it is known that these factors contribute to complex 3D anisotropic shear wave propagation. To investigate the specific impact of these complexities, we constructed a finite element model with an orthotropic material law subjected to different uniaxial stretches to simulate SWE in the stressed cardiac wall. Group and phase speed were analyzed in function of tissue thickness and virtual probe rotation angle. Tissue stretching increased the group and phase speed of the simulated shear wave, especially in the direction of the muscle fiber. As the model provided access to the true fiber orientation and material properties, we assessed the accuracy of two fiber orientation extraction methods based on SWE. We found a higher accuracy (but lower robustness) when extracting fiber orientations based on the location of maximal shear wave speed instead of the angle of the major axis of the ellipsoidal group speed surface. Both methods had a comparable performance for the center region of the cardiac wall, and performed less well towards the edges. Lastly, we also assessed the (theoretical) impact of pathology on shear wave physics and characterization in the model. It was found that SWE was able to detect changes in fiber orientation and material characteristics, potentially associated with cardiac pathologies such as myocardial fibrosis. Furthermore, the model showed clearly altered shear wave patterns for the fibrotic myocardium compared to the healthy myocardium, which forms an initial but promising outcome of this modeling study.

  1. Exercise training prior to myocardial infarction attenuates cardiac deterioration and cardiomyocyte dysfunction in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Marchesi Bozi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The present study was performed to investigate 1 whether aerobic exercise training prior to myocardial infarction would prevent cardiac dysfunction and structural deterioration and 2 whether the potential cardiac benefits of aerobic exercise training would be associated with preserved morphological and contractile properties of cardiomyocytes in post-infarct remodeled myocardium. METHODS: Male Wistar rats underwent an aerobic exercise training protocol for eight weeks. The rats were then assigned to sham surgery (SHAM, sedentary lifestyle and myocardial infarction or exercise training and myocardial infarction groups and were evaluated 15 days after the surgery. Left ventricular tissue was analyzed histologically, and the contractile function of isolated myocytes was measured. Student's t-test was used to analyze infarct size and ventricular wall thickness, and the other parameters were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn's test or a one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (p<0.05. RESULTS: Myocardial infarctions in exercise-trained animals resulted in a smaller myocardial infarction extension, a thicker infarcted wall and less collagen accumulation as compared to myocardial infarctions in sedentary animals. Myocardial infarction-induced left ventricular dilation and cardiac dysfunction, as evaluated by +dP/dt and -dP/dt, were both prevented by previous aerobic exercise training. Moreover, aerobic exercise training preserved cardiac myocyte shortening, improved the maximum shortening and relengthening velocities in infarcted hearts and enhanced responsiveness to calcium. CONCLUSION: Previous aerobic exercise training attenuated the cardiac dysfunction and structural deterioration promoted by myocardial infarction, and such benefits were associated with preserved cardiomyocyte morphological and contractile properties.

  2. Liénard-type models for the simulation of the action potential of cardiac nodal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podziemski, P.; Żebrowski, J. J.

    2013-10-01

    Existing models of cardiac cells which include multi-variable cardiac transmembrane current are too complex to simulate the long time dynamical properties of the heart rhythm. The large number of parameters that need to be defined and set for such models make them not only cumbersome to use but also require a large computing power. Consequently, the application of such models for the bedside analysis of heart rate of a specific patient may be difficult. Other ways of modelling need to be investigated. We consider the general problem of developing a model of cardiac pacemaker tissue that allows to combine the investigation of phenomena at a time scale of thousands of heart beats with the ability to reproduce realistic tissue-level characteristics of cell dynamics. We propose a modified van der Pol-Duffing equation-a Liénard-type oscillator-as a phenomenological model for cardiac nodal tissue, with certain important physiological similarities to ion-channel models of cardiac pacemaker cells. The model presented here is specifically designed to qualitatively reproduce mesoscopic characteristics of cell dynamics, including action potential duration (APD) restitution properties, phase response characteristics, and phase space structure. We show that these characteristics agree qualitatively with the extensive ionic models and experimental results in the literature [Anumonwo et al., 1991, [33], Cao et al., 1999, [49], Coster and Celler, 2003, [31], Qu, 2004, [45], Tsalikakis et al., 2007, [32], Inada et al., 2009, [14], Qu et al., 2010, [50

  3. Regression of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy: Signaling Pathways and Therapeutic Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Jianglong; Kang, Y. James

    2012-01-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy is a key risk factor for heart failure. It is associated with increased interstitial fibrosis, cell death and cardiac dysfunction. The progression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy has long been considered as irreversible. However, recent clinical observations and experimental studies have produced evidence showing the reversal of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Left ventricle assist devices used in heart failure patients for bridging to transplantation no...

  4. Cardiac syndrome X. Diagnosis, pathogenesis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaski, Juan Carlos; Aldama, Guillermo; Cosín-Sales, Juan

    2004-01-01

    Patients with cardiac syndrome X (typical chest pain and normal coronary arteriograms) represent a heterogeneous syndrome, which encompasses different pathogenic mechanisms. Although symptoms in most patients with cardiac syndrome X are non-cardiac, a sizable proportion of them have angina pectoris due to transient myocardial ischemia. Thus radionuclide myocardial perfusion defects, coronary sinus oxygen saturation abnormalities and pH changes, myocardial lactate production and stress-induced alterations of cardiac high energy phosphate suggest an ischemic origin of symptoms in at least a proportion of patients with cardiac syndrome X. Microvascular abnormalities, caused by endothelial dysfunction, appear to be responsible for myocardial ischemia in patients with cardiac syndrome X. Endothelial dysfunction is likely to be multifactorial in these patients and it is conceivable that risk factors such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus and smoking can contribute to its development. Most patients with cardiac syndrome X are postmenopausal women and estrogen deficiency has been therefore proposed as a pathogenic factor in female patients. Additional factors such as abnormal pain perception may contribute to the pathogenesis of chest pain in patients with angina pectoris and normal coronary angiograms. Although prognosis is good regarding survival, patients with cardiac syndrome X have an impaired quality of life. Management of this syndrome represents a major challenge to the treating physician. Understanding the mechanism underlying the condition is of vital importance for patient management. Thus diagnostic tests should aim at identifying the cause of the symptoms in the individual patient, i.e. myocardial ischemia, increased pain perception, abnormalities of adrenergic tone, non-cardiac mechanisms, etc. Moreover, it is important to bear in mind that treatment of cardiac syndrome X should be mainly directed towards improving quality of life, as

  5. Tough and flexible CNT-polymeric hybrid scaffolds for engineering cardiac constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaziha, Mahshid; Shin, Su Ryon; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Topkaya, Seda Nur; Masoumi, Nafiseh; Annabi, Nasim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-08-01

    In the past few years, a considerable amount of effort has been devoted toward the development of biomimetic scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering. However, most of the previous scaffolds have been electrically insulating or lacked the structural and mechanical robustness to engineer cardiac tissue constructs with suitable electrophysiological functions. Here, we developed tough and flexible hybrid scaffolds with enhanced electrical properties composed of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded aligned poly(glycerol sebacate):gelatin (PG) electrospun nanofibers. Incorporation of varying concentrations of CNTs from 0 to 1.5% within the PG nanofibrous scaffolds (CNT-PG scaffolds) notably enhanced fiber alignment and improved the electrical conductivity and toughness of the scaffolds while maintaining the viability, retention, alignment, and contractile activities of cardiomyocytes (CMs) seeded on the scaffolds. The resulting CNT-PG scaffolds resulted in stronger spontaneous and synchronous beating behavior (3.5-fold lower excitation threshold and 2.8-fold higher maximum capture rate) compared to those cultured on PG scaffold. Overall, our findings demonstrated that aligned CNT-PG scaffold exhibited superior mechanical properties with enhanced CM beating properties. It is envisioned that the proposed hybrid scaffolds can be useful for generating cardiac tissue constructs with improved organization and maturation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A spectral approach for the quantitative description of cardiac collagen network from nonlinear optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masè, Michela; Cristoforetti, Alessandro; Avogaro, Laura; Tessarolo, Francesco; Piccoli, Federico; Caola, Iole; Pederzolli, Carlo; Graffigna, Angelo; Ravelli, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of collagen structure in cardiac pathology, such as atrial fibrillation (AF), is essential for a complete understanding of the disease. This paper introduces a novel methodology for the quantitative description of collagen network properties, based on the combination of nonlinear optical microscopy with a spectral approach of image processing and analysis. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy was applied to atrial tissue samples from cardiac surgery patients, providing label-free, selective visualization of the collagen structure. The spectral analysis framework, based on 2D-FFT, was applied to the SHG images, yielding a multiparametric description of collagen fiber orientation (angle and anisotropy indexes) and texture scale (dominant wavelength and peak dispersion indexes). The proof-of-concept application of the methodology showed the capability of our approach to detect and quantify differences in the structural properties of the collagen network in AF versus sinus rhythm patients. These results suggest the potential of our approach in the assessment of collagen properties in cardiac pathologies related to a fibrotic structural component.

  7. Sudden cardiac arrest risk in young athletes | Gradidge | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Underlying cardiac abnormalities are the main cause of unexpected death in athletes on field. These abnormalities have been associated with a previous history of syncope, a family history of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), cardiac murmur, a history of over-exhaustion post exercise and ventricular tachyarrhythmia during ...

  8. An Audit Of Perioperative Cardiac Arrest At Lagos University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Intraoperative cardiac arrests are not uncommon and are related to both surgical and anaesthetic factors. This study aimed to examine the factors which predispose to a periopeartive cardiac arrest, to assess the appropriateness of therapy and the outcome. Materials and Methods: All perioperative cardiac arrests ...

  9. Genetic and environmental factors in cardiac sodium channel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mizusawa, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac sodium channelopathies, such as long QT syndrome type3 (LQT3), Brugada syndrome (BrS) and cardiac conduction disease (CCD), are heritable diseases associated with mutations in the SCN5A gene and sudden cardiac death. They were classically thought to be a monogenic disease. However, while

  10. Primary cardiac tumours in a paediatric population: An experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Benign cardiac tumours were much more common (15 cases) than the malignant tumours. Among these, myxoma was the most frequent (13 cases). The other benign cardiac tumours were rhabdomyoma (one case) and fi broma (one case). A primary malignant cardiac tumour was diagnosed in one case and was ...

  11. Prediction of cardiac arrest recurrence using ensemble classifiers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nachiket Tapas

    Abstract. Inability of a heart to contract effectually or its failure to contract prevents blood from circulating efficiently, causing circulatory arrest or cardiac arrest or cardiopulmonary arrest. The unexpected cardiac arrest is medically referred to as sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Poor survival rate of patients with SCA is one of the.

  12. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker... § 870.5550 External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive). (a) Identification. An external transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive) is a device used to supply a periodic electrical pulse intended to...

  13. Cardiac arrhythmia as initial presentation of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kleij, FGH; Henselmans, JML; van de Loosdrecht, AA

    1999-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death are most frequently caused by preexisting heart disease. Rarely, cardiac arrhythmia is a first symptom of an acute neurological event. We describe a patient with asystole and other cardiac arrhythmias, as initial symptoms of acute aneurysmal subarachnoid

  14. Automatic segmentation and disease classification using cardiac cine MR images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterink, Jelmer M.; Leiner, Tim; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2018-01-01

    Segmentation of the heart in cardiac cine MR is clinically used to quantify cardiac function. We propose a fully automatic method for segmentation and disease classification using cardiac cine MR images. A convolutional neural network (CNN) was designed to simultaneously segment the left ventricle

  15. Chronic rejection in DLA identical dogs after orthotopic cardiac transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.C.K.M. Penn

    1979-01-01

    textabstractThe justification for clinical cardiac transplantation is that it should solve end-stage cardiac disease when no other medical or surgical treatment is available (76). However, after cardiac transplantation the main barriers to long-term survival and complete rehabilitation include the

  16. A Puzzle Used to Teach the Cardiac Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcondes, Fernanda K.; Moura, Maria J. C. S.; Sanches, Andrea; Costa, Rafaela; Oliveira de Lima, Patricia; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Amaral, Maria E. C.; Zeni, Paula; Gaviao, Kelly Cristina; Montrezor, Luís H.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present article is to describe a puzzle developed for use in teaching cardiac physiology classes. The puzzle presents figures of phases of the cardiac cycle and a table with five columns: phases of cardiac cycle, atrial state, ventricular state, state of atrioventricular valves, and pulmonary and aortic valves. Chips are provided…

  17. Congestive Cardiac Failure in a patient with Systemic Sclerosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    disease and hypertension, with pulmonary arterial hypertension, renal complications, ILD and cardiac complications as the major primary causes of death. 3. The prevalence and ... contribution of cardiac-related deaths from primary cardiac causes .... involves all levels of the myocardium bears no direct relation to large or ...

  18. Effect of angiotensin II blockade on cardiac hypertrophy and remodelling: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlöf, B

    1995-11-01

    hypertension is a serious prognostic indicator and selective angiotensin II blockade is a new anti-hypertensive treatment modality with promising properties, especially for prevention and reversal of cardiac hypertrophy including pathological fibrosis and cardiac remodelling after myocardial infarction. Thus, taking into account the shortcomings of today's anti-hypertensive treatment to achieve normalisation of excessive cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, as well as the seemingly great importance of the renin-angiotensin system for hypertension-induced functional and structural abnormalities, a therapy based on a specific All antagonist could offer obvious advantages in a high risk hypertensive patient with cardiovascular hypertrophy. This hypothesis will be investigated in a large prospective trial (Losartan Intervention For End-point reduction in hypertension: The LIFE Study).

  19. [Use of a temporal cardiac pacemaker in patients undergoing a major non-cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles González, L; Vázquez Cabrales, A; Chiw Castillo, G; Sánchez Ibarra, J H; Pérez Redondo, H

    1978-01-01

    This is a report of the use of transvenous temporal pacemaker in 18 patients, with an average age of 59.3 years, that under want non cardiac major surgery. They did not have cardiac simptoms but had conduction abnormalities in the preoperative electrocardiogram. A pacemaker was implanted as a prophylaxis against arrythmia during the transoperative and postoperative periods. There was no incidence of transoperative arrythmia. Three patients died in the immediate postoperative period, two due to duffuse carcinomatosis and one due to diabetic acidosis. The average duration of the implanted pacemaker was 12.7 days, and three patients required a permanent pacemaker. Case five is exemplificative of the benefits of the temporal pacemaker, he had a preoperative electrocardiogram showing trifascicular block, he was taken to the operating room and anesthesia was induced, the patient had a cardiac arrest but recovered without secuela; latter on a temporal pacemaker was inserted and the patient had surgery without cardiac problems.

  20. Current role of cardiac and extra-cardiac pathologies in clinically indicated cardiac computed tomography with emphasis on status before pulmonary vein isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohns, J.M.; Lotz, J. [Goettingen University Medical Center (Germany). Inst. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Goettingen (Germany); Menke, J.; Staab, W.; Fasshauer, M.; Kowallick, J.T.; Zwaka, P.A.; Schwarz, A. [Goettingen University Medical Center (Germany). Inst. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Spiro, J. [Koeln University Hospital (Germany). Radiology; Bergau, L.; Unterberg-Buchwald, C. [Goettingen University Medical Center (Germany). Cardiology and Pneumology

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of cardiac and significant extra-cardiac findings in clinical computed tomography of the heart in patients with atrial fibrillation before pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). Materials and Methods: 224 patients (64 ± 10 years; male 63%) with atrial fibrillation were examined by cardiac 64-slice multidetector CT before PVI. Extra-cardiac findings were classified as 'significant' if they were recommended to additional diagnostics or therapy, and otherwise as 'non-significant'. Additionally, cardiac findings were documented in detail. Results: A total of 724 cardiac findings were identified in 203 patients (91% of patients). Additionally, a total of 619 extra-cardiac findings were identified in 179 patients (80% of patients). Among these extra-cardiac findings 196 (32%) were 'significant', and 423 (68%) were 'non-significant'. In 2 patients (1%) a previously unknown malignancy was detected (esophageal cancer and lung cancer, local stage, no metastasis). 203 additional imaging diagnostics followed to clarify the 'significant' findings (124 additional CT, costs 38,314.69 US dollars). Overall, there were 3.2 cardiac and 2.8 extra-cardiac findings per patient. Extra-cardiac findings appear significantly more frequently in patients over 60 years old, in smokers and in patients with a history of cardiac findings (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Cardiac CT scans before PVI should be screened for extracardiac incidental findings that could have important clinical implications for each patient. (orig.)

  1. Sleep restriction progress to cardiac autonomic imbalance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since it's more difficult to maintain adequate sleep duration among night watchmen during their working schedule, hence the purpose of our present study was to investigate whether mental stress or fatigue over restricted sleep period in night shift, affects HRV, in order to elucidate on cardiac autonomic modulation among ...

  2. PROBLEMS OF CARDIAC PATIENTS IN EARLY RECOVERY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JAARSMA, T; KASTERMANS, M; DASSEN, T; PHILIPSEN, H

    Most studies of the problems and information needs of patients describe these only for the period of hospitalization. In this study, however, the authors focused on the first 6 months after discharge. Eighty-two cardiac patients, admitted to a university hospital with a myocardial infarction (MI) or

  3. Functional cardiac imaging: positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullani, N.A.; Gould, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Dynamic cardiovascular imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease by providing information about the function of the heart. During the past 30 years, cardiovascular imaging has evolved from the simple chest x-ray and fluoroscopy to such sophisticated techniques as invasive cardiac angiography and cinearteriography and, more recently, to noninvasive cardiac CT scanning, nuclear magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography, which reflect more complex physiologic functions. As research tools, CT, NMR, and PET provide quantitative information on global as well as regional ventricular function, coronary artery stenosis, myocardial perfusion, glucose and fatty acid metabolism, or oxygen utilization, with little discomfort or risk to the patient. As imaging modalities become more sophisticated and more oriented toward clinical application, the prospect of routinely obtaining such functional information about the heart is becoming realistic. However, these advances are double-edged in that the interpretation of functional data is more complex than that of the anatomic imaging familiar to most physicians. They will require an enhanced understanding of the physiologic and biochemical processes, as well as of the instrumentation and techniques for analyzing the data. Of the new imaging modalities that provide functional information about the heart, PET is the most useful because it quantitates the regional distribution of radionuclides in vivo. Clinical applications, interpretation of data, and the impact of PET on our understanding of cardiac pathophysiology are discussed. 5 figures

  4. Cardiac Arrhythmias in Recently Diagnosed Hypertensive Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various forms of cardiac arrhythmias have been documented in hypertensive subjects, and hypertension is an important risk factor for the development of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. Electrocardiography at rest easily documents significant arrhythmias in patients, and this study was carried out to ...

  5. Effectiveness of lactulose syrup after cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaaf, Marike; Vermeulen, Hester; Storm-Versloot, Marja N.; Goossens, Astrid; Simons, Robert; Eijsman, Léon

    2004-01-01

    Dutch cardiac surgery centers lack consistency in management with respect to the prevention of postoperative constipation. Although not based on any evidence, the administration of lactulose syrup is widely used. Because it often causes intestinal discomfort such as abdominal pain, bowel cramps, and

  6. CYTOGENETICS OF A CASE OF CARDIAC MYXOMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIJKHUIZEN, T; VANDENBERG, E; MOLENAAR, WM; MEUZELAAR, JJ; DEJONG, B

    1992-01-01

    The cytogenetic study of a case of cardiac myxoma revealed a 46,XY,der(7)t(7;17) (p21;p11),+der(10)t(10;?)(q22;?),+der(12)t(12;?)(p12;?),del(17)(p11) chromosomal pattern. This case adds a new example of chromosomal abnormalities in benign neoplasms.

  7. Cardiac Arrest After Submucosal Infiltration With Lignocaine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marinda

    excitation like perioral twitching or tinnitus, seizures in our case. The occurrence of cardiac arrest was within a ten minute period after submucosal infiltration of 6 ml lignocaine 2% (120 mg) and. 1:200,000 epinephrine (30 μg). Further, the rapid onset and offset of symptoms would likely correlate with epinephrine and not ...

  8. Electromechanical vortex filaments during cardiac fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoph, J.; Chebbok, M.; Richter, C.; Schröder-Schetelig, J.; Bittihn, P.; Stein, S.; Uzelac, I.; Fenton, F. H.; Hasenfuß, G.; Gilmour, R. F., Jr.; Luther, S.

    2018-03-01

    The self-organized dynamics of vortex-like rotating waves, which are also known as scroll waves, are the basis of the formation of complex spatiotemporal patterns in many excitable chemical and biological systems. In the heart, filament-like phase singularities that are associated with three-dimensional scroll waves are considered to be the organizing centres of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. The mechanisms that underlie the onset, maintenance and control of electromechanical turbulence in the heart are inherently three-dimensional phenomena. However, it has not previously been possible to visualize the three-dimensional spatiotemporal dynamics of scroll waves inside cardiac tissues. Here we show that three-dimensional mechanical scroll waves and filament-like phase singularities can be observed deep inside the contracting heart wall using high-resolution four-dimensional ultrasound-based strain imaging. We found that mechanical phase singularities co-exist with electrical phase singularities during cardiac fibrillation. We investigated the dynamics of electrical and mechanical phase singularities by simultaneously measuring the membrane potential, intracellular calcium concentration and mechanical contractions of the heart. We show that cardiac fibrillation can be characterized using the three-dimensional spatiotemporal dynamics of mechanical phase singularities, which arise inside the fibrillating contracting ventricular wall. We demonstrate that electrical and mechanical phase singularities show complex interactions and we characterize their dynamics in terms of trajectories, topological charge and lifetime. We anticipate that our findings will provide novel perspectives for non-invasive diagnostic imaging and therapeutic applications.

  9. The European cardiac resynchronization therapy survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickstein, Kenneth; Bogale, Nigussie; Priori, Silvia; Auricchio, Angelo; Cleland, John G.; Gitt, Anselm; Limbourg, Tobias; Linde, Cecilia; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Brugada, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Aims The European cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) survey is a joint initiative taken by the Heart Failure Association and the European Heart Rhythm Association of the European Society of Cardiology. The primary aim of this survey is to describe current European practice associated with CRT

  10. Dermatoglyphic’s in Congenital Cardiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Brijendra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Various dermatoglyphic parameters like finger print pattern, atd angle, absolute ridge count & ab, bc ,cd, and ad ridge counts were observed in 150 cases of congenital cardiac disease, comprising of 72 cases of Ventricular Septal Defects (VSD, 60 cases of Atrial Septal Defects (ASD, 9 cases of Coarctation of Aorta (COA & 9 cases of Tetralogy of Fallot’s (TOF. Same dermatoglyphic parameters were also studied in 300 controls and statistical comparison of cases and controls was done. In our study it was observed that the congenital cardiac disease cases exhibited preponderance of whorls (55.8% with decrease in loop pattern (36.2% as compared to those of controls and the difference was highly significant (P<0.001. The difference in the mean total finger ridge count (TFRC of the controls and of the cases of Congenital Cardiac Diseases (CCD was found to be highly significant (P<0.001, while the  mean atd angle in the cases of Congenital Cardiac Disease (CCD was widen up and was statistically significant too. The mean ab, the mean bc ridge, the mean cd ridge and the mean ad ridge counts were also higher in the various type of CCD as compared to that controls and on statistical comparison, the difference was found to be highly significant.

  11. Cardiac rehabilitation: an effective secondary prevention intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Fiona

    A combination of quantitative and qualitative research was used to determine the effectiveness of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme in a cohort of patients referred to the service at a London hospital. Quantitative data analysis provided evidence of effectiveness of participation in CR in reduced hospital readmission rates and use of recognised pharmacological management strategies. Self-reported physical activity levels and quality of life (QOL) in individuals who participated in the cardiac rehabilitation programme were qualitatively measured with questionnaires. Results provided evidence of benefit in continued participation in exercise. However, there was no evidence of benefit to QOL status post participation at 1 year. A p-value of 0.001 provided significant statistical evidence supporting the hypothesis of benefit in continued participation in exercise in participants following attendance at a cardiac rehabilitation programme. QOL status; a statistically significant p-value of 0.001 rejected the hypothesis (H1) of benefit. This would imply that participation CR programmes does not appear to provide sustained benefits in QOL. A number of moderating variables were suggested as explaining the finding such as homogeneity of respondents, age, mood bias and the timeframe of 1 year between participation in rehabilitation and self-reporting. CR appears to be an effective but time-limited intervention in relation to improvements in QOL. Collaborative working partnerships between specialist interventions, such as CR with chronic disease management strategies may provide greater sustainability of benefits gained from participation in cardiac rehabilitation programmes.

  12. Value of radionuclide studies in cardiac transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flotats, A.; Carrio, I.

    2006-01-01

    Effective noninvasive evaluation of acute and chronic allograft rejection remains an important challenge in patients with cardiac transplantation. Radionuclide studies have demonstrated utility because of their ease of use, giving relevant information about the pathophysiology of the transplanted heart, along with valuable diagnostic and prognostic indicators. This article focuses on reviewing the pathophysiological changes of the transplanted heart and implications for radionuclide studies. (author)

  13. Endothelial dysfunction after non-cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, E S; Fonnes, S; Gögenur, I

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: More than 50% of patients with increased troponin levels after non-cardiac surgery have an impaired endothelial function pre-operatively. Non-invasive markers of endothelial function have been developed for the assessment of endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this paper was to system......BACKGROUND: More than 50% of patients with increased troponin levels after non-cardiac surgery have an impaired endothelial function pre-operatively. Non-invasive markers of endothelial function have been developed for the assessment of endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this paper...... was to systematically review the literature to evaluate the association between non-cardiac surgery and non-invasive markers of endothelial function. METHODS: A systematic search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library Database according to the PRISMA guidelines. Endothelial dysfunction was described only...... with non-invasive measurements done both pre- and post-operatively and published in English. All types of non-cardiac surgery and both men and women of all ages were included. RESULTS: We found 1722 eligible studies in our search, and of these, five studies fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria...

  14. Lentiginosis, Deafness and Cardiac Abnormalities | Cronje | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three members of a family with features of the 'leopard' syndrome are described. The important findings were generalized lentigo, deafness, and cardiac and electrocardiographic abnormalities. Progressive obstructive cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias are features of the condition which may be present, and are potentially ...

  15. Antimyosin imaging in cardiac transplant rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.L.; Cannon, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    Fab fragments of antibodies specific for cardiac myosin have been labeled with indium-111 and injected intravenously into animals and into patients with heart transplants. The antibodies, developed by Khaw, Haber, and co-workers, localize in cardiac myocytes that have been damaged irreversibly by ischemia, myocarditis, or the rejection process. After clearance of the labeled antibody from the cardiac blood pool, planar imaging or single photon emission computed tomography is performed. Scintigrams reveal the uptake of the labeled antimyosin in areas of myocardium undergoing transplant rejection. In animal studies, the degree of antimyosin uptake appears to correlate significantly with the degree of rejection assessed at necropsy. In patients, the correlation between scans and pathologic findings from endomyocardial biopsy is not as good, possibly because of sampling error in the endomyocardial biopsy technique. The scan results at 1 year correlate with either late complications (positive) or benign course (negative). Current limitations of the method include slow blood clearance, long half-life of indium-111, and hepatic uptake. Overcoming these limitations represents a direction for current research. It is possible that from these efforts a noninvasive approach to the diagnosis and evaluation of cardiac transplantation may evolve that will decrease the number of endomyocardial biopsies required to evaluate rejection. This would be particularly useful in infants and children. 31 references

  16. A cardiac contouring atlas for radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duane, Frances; Aznar, Marianne C; Bartlett, Freddie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The heart is a complex anatomical organ and contouring the cardiac substructures is challenging. This study presents a reproducible method for contouring left ventricular and coronary arterial segments on radiotherapy CT-planning scans. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Segments were...

  17. Minimally invasive cardiac surgery and transesophageal echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Jha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Improved cosmetic appearance, reduced pain and duration of post-operative stay have intensified the popularity of minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS; however, the increased risk of stroke remains a concern. In conventional cardiac surgery, surgeons can visualize and feel the cardiac structures directly, which is not possible with MICS. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE is essential during MICS in detecting problems that require immediate correction. Comprehensive evaluation of the cardiac structures and function helps in the confirmation of not only the definitive diagnosis, but also the success of surgical treatment. Venous and aortic cannulations are not under the direct vision of the surgeon and appropriate positioning of the cannulae is not possible during MICS without the aid of TEE. Intra-operative TEE helps in the navigation of the guide wire and correct placement of the cannulae and allows real-time assessment of valvular pathologies, ventricular filling, ventricular function, intracardiac air, weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass and adequacy of the surgical procedure. Early detection of perioperative complications by TEE potentially enhances the post-operative outcome of patients managed with MICS.

  18. Neurohumoral indicators of efficacy radiofrequency cardiac denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evtushenko, A. V., E-mail: ave@cardio-tomsk.ru; Evtushenko, V. V. [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution “Research Institute for Cardiology”, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Saushkina, Yu. V.; Gusakova, A. M.; Suslova, T. E.; Dymbrylova, O. N.; Smyshlyaev, K. A.; Kurlov, I. O. [Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution “Research Institute for Cardiology”, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Lishmanov, Yu. B.; Anfinogenova, Ya. D. [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution “Research Institute for Cardiology”, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Sergeevichev, D. S. [Academician E.N. Meshalkin State Research Institute of Circulation Pathology, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bykov, A. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Kistenev, Yu. V. [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Lotkov, A. I. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science of the Siberian Branch of the RAS, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Pokushalov, E. A.

    2015-11-17

    In this study, we compared pre- and postoperative parameters of the cardiac sympathetic innervation. The aim of the study was to examine the approaches to evaluating the quality of radiofrequency (RF)-induced cardiac denervation by using non-invasive and laboratory methods. The study included 32 people with long-lasting persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the objectives of the study: group 1 (main) - 21 patients with mitral valve diseases, which simultaneously with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) AF carried out on the effects of the paraganglionic nervous plexuses by C. Pappone (2004) and N. Doll (2008) schemes. The second group (control) contained 11 patients with heart diseases in sinus rhythm (the RF denervation not been performed). All patients, who underwent surgical treatment, were received examination of cardiac sympathetic tone by using {sup 123}I-MIBG. All of them made blood analysis from ascending aorta and coronary sinus to determine the level of norepinephrine and its metabolites before and after cardiac denervation. Data of radionuclide examination are correlating with laboratory data.

  19. Basic Concepts in Metastatic Cardiac Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J.; Daliani, Danai D.; Papandreou, Christos N.

    2012-01-01

    The involvement of the heart in metastatic cancer is a rare clinical diagnosis, as it may be asymptomatic or symptoms, when present, may be attributed to other causes. Issues regarding incidence, intracardiac location, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cardiac tumors will be discussed here.

  20. The role of fibrinogen in cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilecen, S

    2016-01-01

    Excessive bleeding is one of the most common complications in cardiac surgery and is caused most frequently by insufficient surgical hemostasis or impairments of the coagulation system or a combination of both. A substantial number of patients consume disproportionately high amounts of blood

  1. Cardiac function in trisomy 21 fetuses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clur, S. A. B.; Oude Rengerink, K.; Ottenkamp, J.; Bilardo, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Trisomy 21 is associated with an increased nuchal translucency thickness (NT), abnormal ductus venosus (DV) flow at 11-14 weeks' gestation and congenital heart defects (CHD), and cardiac dysfunction has been hypothesized as the link between them. We therefore aimed to investigate whether

  2. Strategies to Improve Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Everdingen, W.M.

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an established therapy for patients with heart failure and left ventricular (LV) conduction delay, characterized by a left bundle branch block. Unfortunately, a considerable amount of patients who are eligible according to recent guidelines, do not benefit

  3. Minimally invasive cardiac surgery and transesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Ajay Kumar; Malik, Vishwas; Hote, Milind

    2014-01-01

    Improved cosmetic appearance, reduced pain and duration of post-operative stay have intensified the popularity of minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS); however, the increased risk of stroke remains a concern. In conventional cardiac surgery, surgeons can visualize and feel the cardiac structures directly, which is not possible with MICS. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is essential during MICS in detecting problems that require immediate correction. Comprehensive evaluation of the cardiac structures and function helps in the confirmation of not only the definitive diagnosis, but also the success of surgical treatment. Venous and aortic cannulations are not under the direct vision of the surgeon and appropriate positioning of the cannulae is not possible during MICS without the aid of TEE. Intra-operative TEE helps in the navigation of the guide wire and correct placement of the cannulae and allows real-time assessment of valvular pathologies, ventricular filling, ventricular function, intracardiac air, weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass and adequacy of the surgical procedure. Early detection of perioperative complications by TEE potentially enhances the post-operative outcome of patients managed with MICS.

  4. Keeping the Rhythm : Cardiac Pacemaker Cell Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burkhard, Silja

    2017-01-01

    The heart is the first organ to form and function in the developing vertebrate embryo. Its proper morphogenesis and function is crucial for survival. Here we focus on the development and characterization of a highly specialized subset of cardiac cells, the pacemaker cells. In the mammalian heart,

  5. On the Evolution of the Cardiac Pacemaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhard, Silja; van Eif, Vincent; Garric, Laurence; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Bakkers, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    The rhythmic contraction of the heart is initiated and controlled by an intrinsic pacemaker system. Cardiac contractions commence at very early embryonic stages and coordination remains crucial for survival. The underlying molecular mechanisms of pacemaker cell development and function are still not fully understood. Heart form and function show high evolutionary conservation. Even in simple contractile cardiac tubes in primitive invertebrates, cardiac function is controlled by intrinsic, autonomous pacemaker cells. Understanding the evolutionary origin and development of cardiac pacemaker cells will help us outline the important pathways and factors involved. Key patterning factors, such as the homeodomain transcription factors Nkx2.5 and Shox2, and the LIM-homeodomain transcription factor Islet-1, components of the T-box (Tbx), and bone morphogenic protein (Bmp) families are well conserved. Here we compare the dominant pacemaking systems in various organisms with respect to the underlying molecular regulation. Comparative analysis of the pathways involved in patterning the pacemaker domain in an evolutionary context might help us outline a common fundamental pacemaker cell gene programme. Special focus is given to pacemaker development in zebrafish, an extensively used model for vertebrate development. Finally, we conclude with a summary of highly conserved key factors in pacemaker cell development and function. PMID:29367536

  6. Cardiac tamponade in acute rheumatic carditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, A T; Mah, P K; Chia, B L

    1983-01-01

    In patients with valvular heart disease, fever, and cardiomegaly echocardiography is an invaluable noninvasive tool. In this report we describe a young female presenting with cardiac tamponade due to acute rheumatic carditis. Echocardiography showed an exudative pericardial effusion which was haemorrhagic on pericardiocentesis. She responded to steroid therapy with resolution of carditis and pericardial effusion.

  7. Cardiac Hydatid Disease in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.E. Sukhareva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article describes hydatid disease involving the heart and own clinical observation of hydatid disease of rare localization — multiple organ echinococcosis with lesion of the heart, liver and kidneys in 11-year-old child, successfully operated in the cardiac surgery center. Postoperative catamnesis was 12 years.

  8. Improved cardiac function after renal transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, S. J.; Caplin, J. L.; Banim, S. O.; Baker, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    There are few reports of the outcome of renal transplantation in patients with severe left ventricular (LV) impairment. We describe three men with chronic disabling heart failure associated with LV dysfunction in whom a remarkable improvement in cardiac function followed renal transplantation. Transplantation may offer the prospect of successful rehabilitation in these circumstances. Undue pessimism as to the prognosis in such patients is unwarranted.

  9. Multiscale Characterization of Engineered Cardiac Tissue Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Nancy K; Johnsen, Nicholas E; Core, Jason Q; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-11-01

    In a properly contracting cardiac muscle, many different subcellular structures are organized into an intricate architecture. While it has been observed that this organization is altered in pathological conditions, the relationship between length-scales and architecture has not been properly explored. In this work, we utilize a variety of architecture metrics to quantify organization and consistency of single structures over multiple scales, from subcellular to tissue scale as well as correlation of organization of multiple structures. Specifically, as the best way to characterize cardiac tissues, we chose the orientational and co-orientational order parameters (COOPs). Similarly, neonatal rat ventricular myocytes were selected for their consistent architectural behavior. The engineered cells and tissues were stained for four architectural structures: actin, tubulin, sarcomeric z-lines, and nuclei. We applied the orientational metrics to cardiac cells of various shapes, isotropic cardiac tissues, and anisotropic globally aligned tissues. With these novel tools, we discovered: (1) the relationship between cellular shape and consistency of self-assembly; (2) the length-scales at which unguided tissues self-organize; and (3) the correlation or lack thereof between organization of actin fibrils, sarcomeric z-lines, tubulin fibrils, and nuclei. All of these together elucidate some of the current mysteries in the relationship between force production and architecture, while raising more questions about the effect of guidance cues on self-assembly function. These types of metrics are the future of quantitative tissue engineering in cardiovascular biomechanics.

  10. Sports preparticipation cardiac screening: what about children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wolf, Daniel; Matthys, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    Sudden cardiac death in young athletes is a devastating event. Screening programs have been proposed to prevent sudden cardiac death in young athletes. Mortality rates and causes of death differ among young adults and children. Children have a considerably lower incidence of sudden cardiac death. Data lack to compare athletes and non-athletes in childhood, but 40-50 % of sudden cardiac death in this age group seems to be related to exercise. Screening programs including history and physical exam are not very sensitive or specific and will result in important numbers of false-positives and false-negatives. Especially, interpretation of ECG in children is different from ECG in adults, with less accurate diagnoses as a consequence. Secondary prevention by widespread education of simple resuscitation techniques and use of automatic external defibrillators if available will probably save as many lives as any screening program. Sufficient data are lacking to support general preparticipation screening with history, physical exam, and ECG in competitive children. Nevertheless, the impact of such a program, together with secondary preventive measures, should be evaluated in large prospective studies.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance in cardiology: cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Claudio C.

    2003-01-01

    As a new gold standard for mass, volume and flow, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is probably the most rapidly evolving technique in the cardiovascular diagnosis. An integrated cardiac MRI examination allows the evaluation of morphology, global and regional function, coronary anatomy, perfusion, viability and myocardial metabolism, all of them in only one diagnostic test and in a totally noninvasive manner. The surgeons can obtain relevant information on all aspects of diseases of the heart and great vessels, which include anatomical details and relationships with the greatest field of view, and may help to reduce the number of invasive procedures required in pre and postoperative evaluation. However, despite these excellent advantages the present clinical utilization of MRI is still too often restricted to few pathologies or case studies in which other techniques fail to identify the cardiac or cardiovascular abnormalities. If magnetic resonance is an excellent method for diagnosing so many different cardiac conditions, why is so little it used in routine cardiac practice? Cardiologists are still not very familiar with the huge possibilities or cardiovascular MRI utilities. Our intention is to give a comprehensive survey of many of the clinical applications of this challenger technique in the study of the heart and great vessels. Those who continue to ignore this important and mature imaging technique will rightly fail to benefit. (author) [es

  12. On the Evolution of the Cardiac Pacemaker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burkhard, Silja; van Eif, Vincent; Garric, Laurence; Christoffels, Vincent M; Bakkers, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    The rhythmic contraction of the heart is initiated and controlled by an intrinsic pacemaker system. Cardiac contractions commence at very early embryonic stages and coordination remains crucial for survival. The underlying molecular mechanisms of pacemaker cell development and function are still not

  13. Legal Aspects of Cardiac Rehabilitation Exercise Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, William; Herbert, David L.

    1988-01-01

    A medical model is used to examine liability issues related to cardiac rehabilitation programs. Obtaining effective informed consent from patients, standardizing policies and procedures, and exercise prescription and monitoring are among the proposed elements of a risk management model for developing safe and legally defensible programs. (IAH)

  14. Ultraminiature manometer-tipped cardiac catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, G. W.

    1967-01-01

    Miniature diaphragm-type capacitance transducer capable of being mounted on the end of a cardiac catheter has been developed for measurement of intravascular pressures. The transducer can be inserted in small ducts /arteries and veins/ without disturbing the flow characteristics. It is very useful for making measurements in babies.

  15. Cardiac image segmentation for contrast agent videodensitometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischi, Massimo; Kalker, Antonius A C M; Korsten, Hendrikus H M

    2005-02-01

    Indicator dilution techniques are widely used in the intensive care unit and operating room for cardiac parameter measurements. However, the invasiveness of current techniques represents a limitation for their clinical use. The development of stable ultrasound contrast agents allows new applications of the indicator dilution method. Ultrasound contrast agent dilutions permit an echographic noninvasive measurement of cardiac output, ejection fraction, and blood volumes. The indicator dilution curves are measured by videodensitometry of specific regions of interest and processed for the cardiac parameter assessment. Therefore, the major indicator dilution imaging issue is the detection of proper contrast videodensitometry regions that maximize the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured indicator dilution curves. This paper presents an automatic contour detection algorithm for indicator dilution videodensitometry. The algorithm consists of a radial filter combined with an outlier correction. It maximizes the region of interest by excluding cardiac structures that act as interference to the videodensitometric analysis. It is fast, projection independent, and allows the simultaneous detection of multiple contours in real time. The system is compared to manual contour definition on both echographic and magnetic resonance images.

  16. Cardiac function in trisomy 21 fetuses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clur, S. A. B.; Rengerink, K. Oude; Ottenkamp, J.; Bilardo, C. M.

    Objectives Trisomy 21 is associated with an increased nuchal translucency thickness (NT), abnormal ductus venosus (DV) flow at 11-14 weeks' gestation and congenital heart defects (CHD), and cardiac dysfunction has been hypothesized as the link between them. We therefore aimed to investigate whether

  17. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 9 Reduces Cardiac Fibrosis and Improves Cardiac Function in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morine, Kevin J; Qiao, Xiaoying; York, Sam; Natov, Peter S; Paruchuri, Vikram; Zhang, Yali; Aronovitz, Mark J; Karas, Richard H; Kapur, Navin K

    2018-02-27

    Background -Heart failure is a growing cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1) promotes cardiac fibrosis, but also activates counter-regulatory pathways that serve to regulate TGF-β1 activity in heart failure. Bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9) is a member of the TGFβ family of cytokines and signals via the downstream effector protein Smad1. Endoglin is a TGFβ co-receptor that promotes TGF-β1 signaling via Smad3 and binds BMP9 with high affinity. We hypothesized that BMP9 limits cardiac fibrosis by activating Smad1 and attenuating Smad3 and further that neutralizing endoglin activity promotes BMP9 activity. Methods -We examined BMP9 expression and signaling in human cardiac fibroblasts and human subjects with heart failure. We utilized the thoracic aortic constriction (TAC) induced model of heart failure to evaluate the functional effect of BMP9 signaling on cardiac remodeling. Results -BMP9 expression is increased in the circulation and left ventricle (LV) of human subjects with heart failure and is expressed by cardiac fibroblasts. Next, we observed that BMP9 attenuates Type I collagen synthesis in human cardiac fibroblasts using recombinant human BMP9 and an siRNA approach. In BMP9 -/- mice subjected to TAC, loss of BMP9 activity promotes cardiac fibrosis, impairs LV function, and increases LV levels of phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3), not pSmad1. In contrast, treatment of wild-type mice subjected to TAC with recombinant BMP9 limits progression of cardiac fibrosis, improves LV function, enhances myocardial capillary density, and increases LV levels of pSmad1, not pSmad3 compared to vehicle treated controls. Since endoglin binds BMP9 with high affinity, we explored the effect of reduced endoglin activity on BMP9 activity. Neutralizing endoglin activity in human cardiac fibroblasts or in wild-type mice subjected to TAC induced heart failure limits collagen production, increases BMP9 protein levels, and increases

  18. Perceptions of cardiac rehabilitation patients, specialists and rehabilitation programs regarding cardiac rehabilitation wait times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Sherry L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2006, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS Access to Care Working Group recommended a 30-day wait time benchmark for cardiac rehabilitation (CR. The objectives of the current study were to: (1 describe cardiac patient perceptions of actual and ideal CR wait times, (2 describe and compare cardiac specialist and CR program perceptions of wait times, as well as whether the recommendations are appropriate and feasible, and (3 investigate actual wait times and factors that CR programs perceive to affect these wait times. Methods Postal and online surveys to assess perceptions of CR wait times were administered to CR enrollees at intake into 1 of 8 programs, all CCS member cardiac specialists treating patients indicated for CR, and all CR programs listed in Canadian directories. Actual wait times were ascertained from the Canadian Cardiac Rehabilitation Registry. The design was cross-sectional. Responses were described and compared. Results Responses were received from 163 CR enrollees, 71 cardiac specialists (9.3% response rate, and 92 CR programs (61.7% response rate. Patients reported that their wait time from hospital discharge to CR initiation was 65.6 ± 88.4 days (median, 42 days, while their ideal median wait time was 28 days. Most patients (91.5% considered their wait to be acceptable, but ideal wait times varied significantly by the type of cardiac indication for CR. There were significant differences between specialist and program perceptions of the appropriate number of days to wait by most indications, with CR programs perceiving shorter waits as appropriate (p  Conclusions Wait times following access to cardiac rehabilitation are prolonged compared with consensus recommendations, and yet are generally acceptable to most patients. Wait times following percutaneous coronary intervention in particular may need to be shortened. Future research is required to provide an evidence base for wait time

  19. Cardiac rehabilitation in Europe: results from the European Cardiac Rehabilitation Inventory Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna; McGee, Hannah; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes support patients to achieve professionally recommended cardiovascular prevention targets and thus good clinical status and improved quality of life and prognosis. Information on CR service delivery in Europe is sketchy.......Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes support patients to achieve professionally recommended cardiovascular prevention targets and thus good clinical status and improved quality of life and prognosis. Information on CR service delivery in Europe is sketchy....

  20. A systemic evaluation of cardiac differentiation from mRNA reprogrammed human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ashish; Verma, Vinod; Nandihalli, Manasi; Ramachandra, Chrishan J A; Sequiera, Glen L; Sudibyo, Yuliansa; Chung, Yingying; Sun, William; Shim, Winston

    2014-01-01

    Genetically unmodified cardiomyocytes mandated for cardiac regenerative therapy is conceivable by "foot-print free" reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). In this study, we report generation of foot-print free hiPSC through messenger RNA (mRNA) based reprograming. Subsequently, we characterize cardiomyocytes derived from these hiPSC using molecular and electrophysiological methods to characterize their applicability for regenerative medicine. Our results demonstrate that mRNA-iPSCs differentiate ontogenetically into cardiomyocytes with increased expression of early commitment markers of mesoderm, cardiac mesoderm, followed by cardiac specific transcriptional and sarcomeric structural and ion channel genes. Furthermore, these cardiomyocytes stained positively for sarcomeric and ion channel proteins. Based on multi-electrode array (MEA) recordings, these mRNA-hiPSC derived cardiomyocytes responded predictably to various pharmacologically active drugs that target adrenergic, sodium, calcium and potassium channels. The cardiomyocytes responded chronotropically to isoproterenol in a dose dependent manner, inotropic activity of nifidipine decreased spontaneous contractions. Moreover, Sotalol and E-4031 prolonged QT intervals, while TTX reduced sodium influx. Our results for the first time show a systemic evaluation based on molecular, structural and functional properties of cardiomyocytes differentiated from mRNA-iPSC. These results, coupled with feasibility of generating patient-specific iPSCs hold great promise for the development of large-scale generation of clinical grade cardiomyocytes for cardiac regenerative medicine.

  1. A systemic evaluation of cardiac differentiation from mRNA reprogrammed human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Mehta

    Full Text Available Genetically unmodified cardiomyocytes mandated for cardiac regenerative therapy is conceivable by "foot-print free" reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC. In this study, we report generation of foot-print free hiPSC through messenger RNA (mRNA based reprograming. Subsequently, we characterize cardiomyocytes derived from these hiPSC using molecular and electrophysiological methods to characterize their applicability for regenerative medicine. Our results demonstrate that mRNA-iPSCs differentiate ontogenetically into cardiomyocytes with increased expression of early commitment markers of mesoderm, cardiac mesoderm, followed by cardiac specific transcriptional and sarcomeric structural and ion channel genes. Furthermore, these cardiomyocytes stained positively for sarcomeric and ion channel proteins. Based on multi-electrode array (MEA recordings, these mRNA-hiPSC derived cardiomyocytes responded predictably to various pharmacologically active drugs that target adrenergic, sodium, calcium and potassium channels. The cardiomyocytes responded chronotropically to isoproterenol in a dose dependent manner, inotropic activity of nifidipine decreased spontaneous contractions. Moreover, Sotalol and E-4031 prolonged QT intervals, while TTX reduced sodium influx. Our results for the first time show a systemic evaluation based on molecular, structural and functional properties of cardiomyocytes differentiated from mRNA-iPSC. These results, coupled with feasibility of generating patient-specific iPSCs hold great promise for the development of large-scale generation of clinical grade cardiomyocytes for cardiac regenerative medicine.

  2. Protective Effect of Momordica charantia Fruit Extract on Hyperglycaemia-Induced Cardiac Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razif Abas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In diabetes mellitus, cardiac fibrosis is characterized by increase in the deposition of collagen fibers. The present study aimed to observe the effect of Momordica charantia (MC fruit extract on hyperglycaemia-induced cardiac fibrosis. Diabetes was induced in the male Sprague-Dawley rats with a single intravenous injection of streptozotocin (STZ. Following 4 weeks of STZ induction, the rats were subdivided (n = 6 into control group (Ctrl, control group treated with MC (Ctrl-MC, diabetic untreated group (DM-Ctrl, diabetic group treated with MC (DM-MC, and diabetic group treated with 150 mg/kg of metformin (DM-Met. Administration of MC fruit extract (1.5 g/kg body weight in diabetic rats for 28 days showed significant increase in the body weight and decrease in the fasting blood glucose level. Significant increase in cardiac tissues superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione contents (GSH, and catalase (CAT was observed following MC treatment. Hydroxyproline content was significantly reduced and associated morphological damages reverted to normal. The decreased expression of type III and type IV collagens was observed under immunohistochemical staining. It is concluded that MC fruit extract possesses antihyperglycemic, antioxidative, and cardioprotective properties which may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetic cardiac fibrosis.

  3. Role of TGF-β on cardiac structural and electrical remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Ramos-Mondragón

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Ramos-Mondragón, Carlos A Galindo, Guillermo AvilaDepartamento de Bioquímica, Cinvestav-IPN, MéxicoAbstract: The type β transforming growth factors (TGF-βs are involved in a number of human diseases, including heart failure and myocardial arrhythmias. In fact, during the last 20 years numerous studies have demonstrated that TGF-β affects the architecture of the heart under both normal and pathological conditions. Moreover, TGF-β signaling is currently under investigation, with the aim of discovering potential therapeutic roles in human disease. In contrast, only few studies have investigated whether TGF-β affects electrophysiological properties of the heart. This fact is surprising since electrical remodeling represents an important substrate for cardiac disease. This review discusses the potential role of TGF-β on cardiac excitation-contraction (EC coupling, action potentials, and ion channels. We also discuss the effects of TGF-β on cardiac development and disease from structural and electrophysiological points of view.Keywords: transforming growth factor, ion channel, cardiac electrophysiology

  4. Fibroblast proliferation alters cardiac excitation conduction and contraction: a computational study*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, He-qing; Xia, Ling; Shou, Guo-fa; Zang, Yun-liang; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effects of cardiac fibroblast proliferation on cardiac electric excitation conduction and mechanical contraction were investigated using a proposed integrated myocardial-fibroblastic electromechanical model. At the cellular level, models of the human ventricular myocyte and fibroblast were modified to incorporate a model of cardiac mechanical contraction and cooperativity mechanisms. Cellular electromechanical coupling was realized with a calcium buffer. At the tissue level, electrical excitation conduction was coupled to an elastic mechanics model in which the finite difference method (FDM) was used to solve electrical excitation equations, and the finite element method (FEM) was used to solve mechanics equations. The electromechanical properties of the proposed integrated model were investigated in one or two dimensions under normal and ischemic pathological conditions. Fibroblast proliferation slowed wave propagation, induced a conduction block, decreased strains in the fibroblast proliferous tissue, and increased dispersions in depolarization, repolarization, and action potential duration (APD). It also distorted the wave-front, leading to the initiation and maintenance of re-entry, and resulted in a sustained contraction in the proliferous areas. This study demonstrated the important role that fibroblast proliferation plays in modulating cardiac electromechanical behaviour and which should be considered in planning future heart-modeling studies. PMID:24599687

  5. Protective effect of Momordica charantia fruit extract on hyperglycaemia-induced cardiac fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abas, Razif; Othman, Faizah; Thent, Zar Chi

    2014-01-01

    In diabetes mellitus, cardiac fibrosis is characterized by increase in the deposition of collagen fibers. The present study aimed to observe the effect of Momordica charantia (MC) fruit extract on hyperglycaemia-induced cardiac fibrosis. Diabetes was induced in the male Sprague-Dawley rats with a single intravenous injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Following 4 weeks of STZ induction, the rats were subdivided (n = 6) into control group (Ctrl), control group treated with MC (Ctrl-MC), diabetic untreated group (DM-Ctrl), diabetic group treated with MC (DM-MC), and diabetic group treated with 150 mg/kg of metformin (DM-Met). Administration of MC fruit extract (1.5 g/kg body weight) in diabetic rats for 28 days showed significant increase in the body weight and decrease in the fasting blood glucose level. Significant increase in cardiac tissues superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione contents (GSH), and catalase (CAT) was observed following MC treatment. Hydroxyproline content was significantly reduced and associated morphological damages reverted to normal. The decreased expression of type III and type IV collagens was observed under immunohistochemical staining. It is concluded that MC fruit extract possesses antihyperglycemic, antioxidative, and cardioprotective properties which may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetic cardiac fibrosis.

  6. High-sensitive cardiac troponin T measurements in prediction of non-cardiac complications after major abdominal surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordzij, P. G.; van Geffen, O.; Dijkstra, I. M.; Boerma, D.; Meinders, A. J.; Rettig, T. C D; Eefting, F. D.; van Loon, D.; van de Garde, E. M W; van Dongen, E. P A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative non-cardiac complication rates are as high as 11-28% after high-risk abdominal procedures. Emerging evidence indicates that postoperative cardiac troponin T elevations are associated with adverse outcome in non-cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the

  7. Emergency room thoracotomy for acute traumatic cardiac tamponade caused by a blunt cardiac injury: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Ishida

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: A prompt diagnosis using FAST and treatment can be lifesaving in traumatic acute cardiac tamponade. A pericardiotomy via a thoracotomy is mandatory for lifesaving cardiac decompression in acute traumatic cardiac tamponade in cases of ineffective drainage due to clot formation within the pericardial space.

  8. Reduced Right Ventricular Function Predicts Long-Term Cardiac Re-Hospitalization after Cardiac Surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leela K Lella

    Full Text Available The significance of right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF, independent of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, following isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG and valve procedures remains unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the significance of abnormal RVEF by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR, independent of LVEF in predicting outcomes of patients undergoing isolated CABG and valve surgery.From 2007 to 2009, 109 consecutive patients (mean age, 66 years; 38% female were referred for pre-operative CMR. Abnormal RVEF and LVEF were considered 30 days outcomes included, cardiac re-hospitalization, worsening congestive heart failure and mortality. Mean clinical follow up was 14 months.Forty-eight patients had reduced RVEF (mean 25% and 61 patients had normal RVEF (mean 50% (p<0.001. Fifty-four patients had reduced LVEF (mean 30% and 55 patients had normal LVEF (mean 59% (p<0.001. Patients with reduced RVEF had a higher incidence of long-term cardiac re-hospitalization vs. patients with normal RVEF (31% vs.13%, p<0.05. Abnormal RVEF was a predictor for long-term cardiac re-hospitalization (HR 3.01 [CI 1.5-7.9], p<0.03. Reduced LVEF did not influence long-term cardiac re-hospitalization.Abnormal RVEF is a stronger predictor for long-term cardiac re-hospitalization than abnormal LVEF in patients undergoing isolated CABG and valve procedures.

  9. Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant Prevents Cardiac Dysfunction Induced by Tafazzin Gene Knockdown in Cardiac Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tafazzin, a mitochondrial acyltransferase, plays an important role in cardiolipin side chain remodeling. Previous studies have shown that dysfunction of tafazzin reduces cardiolipin content, impairs mitochondrial function, and causes dilated cardiomyopathy in Barth syndrome. Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been implicated in the development of cardiomyopathy and are also the obligated byproducts of mitochondria. We hypothesized that tafazzin knockdown increases ROS production from mitochondria, and a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant prevents tafazzin knockdown induced mitochondrial and cardiac dysfunction. We employed cardiac myocytes transduced with an adenovirus containing tafazzin shRNA as a model to investigate the effects of the mitochondrial antioxidant, mito-Tempo. Knocking down tafazzin decreased steady state levels of cardiolipin and increased mitochondrial ROS. Treatment of cardiac myocytes with mito-Tempo normalized tafazzin knockdown enhanced mitochondrial ROS production and cellular ATP decline. Mito-Tempo also significantly abrogated tafazzin knockdown induced cardiac hypertrophy, contractile dysfunction, and cell death. We conclude that mitochondria-targeted antioxidant prevents cardiac dysfunction induced by tafazzin gene knockdown in cardiac myocytes and suggest mito-Tempo as a potential therapeutic for Barth syndrome and other dilated cardiomyopathies resulting from mitochondrial oxidative stress.

  10. Reduced Right Ventricular Function Predicts Long-Term Cardiac Re-Hospitalization after Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lella, Leela K; Sales, Virna L; Goldsmith, Yulia; Chan, Jacqueline; Iskandir, Marina; Gulkarov, Iosif; Tortolani, Anthony; Brener, Sorin J; Sacchi, Terrence J; Heitner, John F

    2015-01-01

    The significance of right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF), independent of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), following isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and valve procedures remains unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the significance of abnormal RVEF by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), independent of LVEF in predicting outcomes of patients undergoing isolated CABG and valve surgery. From 2007 to 2009, 109 consecutive patients (mean age, 66 years; 38% female) were referred for pre-operative CMR. Abnormal RVEF and LVEF were considered hospitalizations and early mortaility; long-term (> 30 days) outcomes included, cardiac re-hospitalization, worsening congestive heart failure and mortality. Mean clinical follow up was 14 months. Forty-eight patients had reduced RVEF (mean 25%) and 61 patients had normal RVEF (mean 50%) (plong-term cardiac re-hospitalization vs. patients with normal RVEF (31% vs.13%, plong-term cardiac re-hospitalization (HR 3.01 [CI 1.5-7.9], plong-term cardiac re-hospitalization. Abnormal RVEF is a stronger predictor for long-term cardiac re-hospitalization than abnormal LVEF in patients undergoing isolated CABG and valve procedures.

  11. Cardiac arrest leadership: in need of resuscitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip S; Shall, Emma; Rakhit, Roby

    2016-12-01

    Leadership skills directly correlate with the quality of technical performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and clinical outcomes. Despite an improved focus on non-technical skills in CPR training, the leadership of cardiac arrests is often variable. To assess the perceptions of leadership and team working among members of a cardiac arrest team and to evaluate future training needs. Cross-sectional survey of 102 members of a cardiac arrest team at an Acute Hospital Trust in the UK with 892 inpatient beds. Responses sought from doctors, nurses and healthcare assistants to 12 rated statements and 4 dichotomous questions. Of 102 responses, 81 (79%) were from doctors and 21 (21%) from nurses. Among specialist registrars 90% agreed or strongly agreed that there was clear leadership at all arrests compared with between 28% and 49% of nurses and junior doctors respectively. Routine omission of key leadership tasks was reported by as many as 80% of junior doctors and 50% of nurses. Almost half of respondents reported non-adherence with Advanced Life Support (ALS) guidelines. Among junior members of the team, 36% felt confident to lead an arrest and 75% would welcome further dedicated cardiac arrest leadership training. Leadership training is integrated into the ALS (Resus Council, UK) qualification. However, this paper found that in spite of this training; standards of leadership are variable. The findings suggest a pressing need for further dedicated cardiac arrest leadership training with a focus on improving key leadership tasks such as role assignment, team briefing and debriefing. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Establishing a clinical cardiac MRI service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Regan, D.P.; Schmitz, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    After several years of research development cardiovascular MRI has evolved into a widely accepted clinical tool. It offers important diagnostic and prognostic information for a variety of clinical indications, which include ischaemic heart disease, cardiomyopathies, valvular dysfunction and congenital heart disorders. It is a safe non-invasive technique that employs a variety of imaging sequences optimized for temporal or spatial resolution, tissue-specific contrast, flow quantification or angiography. Cardiac MRI offers specific advantages over conventional imaging techniques for a significant number of patients. The demand for cardiac MRI studies from cardiothoracic surgeons, cardiologists and other referrers is likely to continue to rise with pressure for more widespread local service provision. Setting up a cardiac MRI service requires careful consideration regarding funding issues and how it will be integrated with existing service provision. The purchase of cardiac phased array coils, monitoring equipment and software upgrades must also be considered, as well as the training needs of those involved. The choice of appropriate imaging protocols will be guided by operator experience, clinical indication and equipment capability, and is likely to evolve as the service develops. Post-processing and offline analysis form a significant part of the time taken to report studies and an efficient method of providing quantitative reports is an important requirement. Collaboration between radiologists and cardiologists is needed to develop a successful service and multi-disciplinary meetings are key component of this. This review will explore these issues from our perspective of a new clinical cardiac MRI service operating over its first year in a teaching hospital imaging department

  13. Measuring cardiac efficiency using PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, Grand; Aparici, Carina Mari; Brooks, Gabriel; Liu, Jing; Guccione, Julius; Saloner, David; Seo, Adam Youngho; Ordovas, Karen Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex syndrome that is projected by the American Heart Association to cost $160 billion by 2030. In HF, significant metabolic changes and structural remodeling lead to reduced cardiac efficiency. A normal heart is approximately 20-25% efficient measured by the ratio of work to oxygen utilization (1 ml oxygen = 21 joules). The heart requires rapid production of ATP where there is complete turnover of ATP every 10 seconds with 90% of ATP produced by mitochondrial oxidative metabolism requiring substrates of approximately 30% glucose and 65% fatty acids. In our preclinical PET/MRI studies in normal rats, we showed a negative correlation between work and the influx rate constant for 18FDG, confirming that glucose is not the preferred substrate at rest. However, even though fatty acid provides 9 kcal/gram compared to 4 kcal/gram for glucose, in HF the preferred energy source is glucose. PET/MRI offers the potential to study this maladapted mechanism of metabolism by measuring work in a region of myocardial tissue simultaneously with the measure of oxygen utilization, glucose, and fatty acid metabolism and to study cardiac efficiency in the etiology of and therapies for HF. MRI is used to measure strain and a finite element mechanical model using pressure measurements is used to estimate myofiber stress. The integral of strain times stress provides a measure of work which divided by energy utilization, estimated by the production of 11CO2 from intravenous injection of 11C-acetate, provides a measure of cardiac efficiency. Our project involves translating our preclinical research to the clinical application of measuring cardiac efficiency in patients. Using PET/MRI to develop technologies for studying myocardial efficiency in patients, provides an opportunity to relate cardiac work of specific tissue regions to metabolic substrates, and measure the heterogeneity of LV efficiency.

  14. Measuring cardiac efficiency using PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullberg, Grand [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Aparici, Carina Mari; Brooks, Gabriel [University of California San Francisco (United States); Liu, Jing; Guccione, Julius; Saloner, David; Seo, Adam Youngho; Ordovas, Karen Gomes [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States)

    2015-05-18

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex syndrome that is projected by the American Heart Association to cost $160 billion by 2030. In HF, significant metabolic changes and structural remodeling lead to reduced cardiac efficiency. A normal heart is approximately 20-25% efficient measured by the ratio of work to oxygen utilization (1 ml oxygen = 21 joules). The heart requires rapid production of ATP where there is complete turnover of ATP every 10 seconds with 90% of ATP produced by mitochondrial oxidative metabolism requiring substrates of approximately 30% glucose and 65% fatty acids. In our preclinical PET/MRI studies in normal rats, we showed a negative correlation between work and the influx rate constant for 18FDG, confirming that glucose is not the preferred substrate at rest. However, even though fatty acid provides 9 kcal/gram compared to 4 kcal/gram for glucose, in HF the preferred energy source is glucose. PET/MRI offers the potential to study this maladapted mechanism of metabolism by measuring work in a region of myocardial tissue simultaneously with the measure of oxygen utilization, glucose, and fatty acid metabolism and to study cardiac efficiency in the etiology of and therapies for HF. MRI is used to measure strain and a finite element mechanical model using pressure measurements is used to estimate myofiber stress. The integral of strain times stress provides a measure of work which divided by energy utilization, estimated by the production of 11CO2 from intravenous injection of 11C-acetate, provides a measure of cardiac efficiency. Our project involves translating our preclinical research to the clinical application of measuring cardiac efficiency in patients. Using PET/MRI to develop technologies for studying myocardial efficiency in patients, provides an opportunity to relate cardiac work of specific tissue regions to metabolic substrates, and measure the heterogeneity of LV efficiency.

  15. Influence of cardiac decentralization on cardioprotection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G Kingma

    Full Text Available The role of cardiac nerves on development of myocardial tissue injury after acute coronary occlusion remains controversial. We investigated whether acute cardiac decentralization (surgical modulates coronary flow reserve and myocardial protection in preconditioned dogs subject to ischemia-reperfusion. Experiments were conducted on four groups of anesthetised, open-chest dogs (n = 32: 1- controls (CTR, intact cardiac nerves, 2- ischemic preconditioning (PC; 4 cycles of 5-min IR, 3- cardiac decentralization (CD and 4- CD+PC; all dogs underwent 60-min coronary occlusion and 180-min reperfusion. Coronary blood flow and reactive hyperemic responses were assessed using a blood volume flow probe. Infarct size (tetrazolium staining was related to anatomic area at risk and coronary collateral blood flow (microspheres in the anatomic area at risk. Post-ischemic reactive hyperemia and repayment-to-debt ratio responses were significantly reduced for all experimental groups; however, arterial perfusion pressure was not affected. Infarct size was reduced in CD dogs (18.6 ± 4.3; p = 0.001, data are mean ± 1 SD compared to 25.2 ± 5.5% in CTR dogs and was less in PC dogs as expected (13.5 ± 3.2 vs. 25.2 ± 5.5%; p = 0.001; after acute CD, PC protection was conserved (11.6 ± 3.4 vs. 18.6 ± 4.3%; p = 0.02. In conclusion, our findings provide strong evidence that myocardial protection against ischemic injury can be preserved independent of extrinsic cardiac nerve inputs.

  16. Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling during Cardiac Development and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan W. Buikema

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Active Wnt/β-catenin signaling is essential for proper cardiac specification, progenitor expansion and myocardial growth. During development, the mass of the embryonic heart increases multiple times to achieve the dimensions of adult ventricular chambers. Cell division in the embryonic heart is fairly present, whereas cell turnover in the adult myocardium is extremely low. Understanding of embryonic cardiomyocyte cell-replication, therefore, could improve strategies for cardiac regenerative therapeutics. Here, we review which role Wnt signaling plays in cardiac development and highlight a selection of attempts that have been made to modulate Wnt signaling after cardiac ischemic injury to improve cardiac function and reduce infarct size.

  17. Ischemic Stroke Due to Cardiac Involvement: Emery Dreifuss Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Kasım Ulusoy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD is a hereditary disease. It is characterized by early-onset contractures, slowly progressive weakness, fatigue related to skapulo-humero-peroneal muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy which develops in adulthood and cardiac conduction system block. Cardiac involvement has a prognostic significance in patients with EDMD and even sudden cardiac death may be the first clinical presentation. In this article, an EDMD patient with ischemic stroke clinic who didn’t have regular cardiac follow-up was reported and the importance of the treatment of cardiac diseases which could play a role in ischemic stroke etiology and the implantation of pace-maker was mentioned.

  18. A Case of Primary Bacterial Pericarditis with Recurrent Cardiac Tamponade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizane, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Hayashi, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Mitsunobu; Miyachi, Hideki; Hosokawa, Yusuke; Akutsu, Koichi; Shimizu, Wataru

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade is an important and potentially lethal complication of acute pericarditis. However, recurrence of cardiac tamponade is rare when it is treated appropriately. We present a 49-year-old man with bacterial pericarditis and recurrent cardiac tamponade, which was caused by the rupture of an upper part of the left atrium (LA). According to the autopsy findings, bacteremia from Staphylococcus aureus developed on a substrate of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and spread to the pericardium via the blood. Subsequently, tissue necrosis developed from the pulmonary trunk and aorta to the LA, leading to recurrence of cardiac rupture and cardiac tamponade.

  19. The temperature challenges on cardiac performance in winter-quiescent and migration-stage eels Anguilla anguilla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Methling, C.; Steffensen, J. F.; Skov, Peter Vilhelm

    2012-01-01

    °C-acclimated, which suggests that at low temperatures, eels secure cardiac output by heart enlargement. Inhibition of specific sarcolemmal Ca 2 + channels by selective drug treatment revealed that, depending on temperature, L-type channels is the major entry site, but also that reverse-mode Na +/Ca......The present study was undertaken to examine cardiac responses to some of the temperature challenges that eels encounter in their natural environment. The contractile properties of ventricular muscle was studied on electrically paced tissue strips after long term acclimation at 0 °C, 10 °C, or 20 °C...

  20. Three versions of Perceived Stress Scale: validation in a sample of Chinese cardiac patients who smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Doris Yp; Lam, Tai-Hing; Chan, Sophia Sc

    2010-08-25

    Smoking causes heart disease, the major cause of death in China and Hong Kong. Stress is one major trigger of smoking and relapse, and understanding stress among smoking cardiac patients can therefore help in designing effective interventions to motivate them to quit. The objective of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and to compare the appropriateness of the three versions of the scale (PSS-14, PSS-10, and PSS-4) among Chinese cardiac patients who were also smokers. From March 2002 to December 2004, 1860 cardiac patients who smoked were recruited at the cardiac outpatient clinics of ten acute hospitals in Hong Kong, and 1800 questionnaires were analysed. Participants completed a questionnaire including the PSS, nicotine dependence and certain demographic variables. The psychometric properties of the PSS were investigated: construct validity using confirmatory factor analysis, reliability using Cronbach's alpha and concurrent validity by examining the relationship with smoking- and health-related variables. For all the three versions of the PSS, confirmatory factor analyses corroborated the 2-factor structure of the scale, with the positive and negative factors correlating significantly and negatively to a moderate extent (r 0.5). All the correlations of the two subscales and the smoking- and health-related variables were statistically significant and in the expected directions although of small magnitudes, except daily cigarette consumption. The findings confirmed the satisfactory psychometric properties of all three Chinese versions of PSS. We recommend the use of PSS-10 for research which focuses on the two components of perceived stress, as it shows a higher reliability; and the use of PSS-4 if such partition is not essential and space for multiple measures is limited.