WorldWideScience

Sample records for cardiac sodium channel

  1. Lidocaine block of cardiac sodium channels

    OpenAIRE

    Bean, BP; Cohen, CJ; Tsien, RW

    1983-01-01

    Lidocaine block of cardiac sodium channels was studied in voltage-clamped rabbit purkinje fibers at drug concentrations ranging from 1 mM down to effective antiarrhythmic doses (5-20 μM). Dose-response curves indicated that lidocaine blocks the channel by binding one-to-one, with a voltage-dependent K(d). The half-blocking concentration varied from more than 300 μM, at a negative holding potential where inactivation was completely removed, to approximately 10 μM, at a depolarized holding pote...

  2. Sodium Channel (Dys)Function and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Remme; C.R. Bezzina

    2010-01-01

    P>Cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels are transmembrane proteins located in the cell membrane of cardiomyocytes. Influx of sodium ions through these ion channels is responsible for the initial fast upstroke of the cardiac action potential. This inward sodium current thus triggers the initiation an

  3. Lidocaine block of cardiac sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, B P; Cohen, C J; Tsien, R W

    1983-05-01

    Lidocaine block of cardiac sodium channels was studied in voltage-clamped rabbit purkinje fibers at drug concentrations ranging from 1 mM down to effective antiarrhythmic doses (5-20 muM). Dose-response curves indicated that lidocaine blocks the channel by binding one-to-one, with a voltage-dependent K(d). The half-blocking concentration varied from more than 300 muM, at a negative holding potential where inactivation was completely removed, to approximately 10 muM, at a depolarized holding potential where inactivation was nearly complete. Lidocaine block showed prominent use dependence with trains of depolarizing pulses from a negative holding potential. During the interval between pulses, repriming of I (Na) displayed two exponential components, a normally recovering component (tauless than 0.2 s), and a lidocaine-induced, slowly recovering fraction (tau approximately 1-2 s at pH 7.0). Raising the lidocaine concentration magnified the slowly recovering fraction without changing its time course; after a long depolarization, this fraction was one-half at approximately 10 muM lidocaine, just as expected if it corresponded to drug-bound, inactivated channels. At less than or equal to 20 muM lidocaine, the slowly recovering fraction grew exponentially to a steady level as the preceding depolarization was prolonged; the time course was the same for strong or weak depolarizations, that is, with or without significant activation of I(Na). This argues that use dependence at therapeutic levels reflects block of inactivated channels, rather than block of open channels. Overall, these results provide direct evidence for the "modulated-receptor hypothesis" of Hille (1977) and Hondeghem and Katzung (1977). Unlike tetrodotoxin, lidocaine shows similar interactions with Na channels of heart, nerve, and skeletal muscle.

  4. A sodium-channel mutation causes isolated cardiac conduction disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, HL; Bink-Boelkens, MTE; Bezzina, CR; Viswanathan, PC; Beaufort-Krol, GCM; van Tintelen, PJ; van den Berg, MP; Wilde, AAM; Balser, [No Value

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac conduction disorders slow the heart rhythm and cause disability in millions of people worldwide. Inherited mutations in SCN5A, the gene encoding the human cardiac sodium (Na+) channel, have been associated with rapid heart rhythms that occur suddenly and are life-threatening(1-3); however, a

  5. Genetic and environmental factors in cardiac sodium channel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mizusawa, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac sodium channelopathies, such as long QT syndrome type3 (LQT3), Brugada syndrome (BrS) and cardiac conduction disease (CCD), are heritable diseases associated with mutations in the SCN5A gene and sudden cardiac death. They were classically thought to be a monogenic disease. However, while LQT

  6. Molecular basis for class Ib anti-arrhythmic inhibition of cardiac sodium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Galpin, Jason D; Frankel, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac sodium channels are established therapeutic targets for the management of inherited and acquired arrhythmias by class I anti-arrhythmic drugs (AADs). These drugs share a common target receptor bearing two highly conserved aromatic side chains, and are subdivided by the Vaughan...... the inhibition of cardiac sodium channels by clinically relevant drugs and provide information for the directed design of AADs....

  7. Role of Sodium Channel on Cardiac Action Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Sabzpoushan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death is a major cause of death worldwide. In most cases, it's caused by abnormal action potential propagation that leads to cardiac arrhythmia. The aim of this article is to study the abnormal action potential propagation through sodium ion concentration variations. We use a new electrophysiological model that is both detailed and computationally efficient. This efficient model is based on the partial differential equation method. The central finite difference method is used for numerical solving of the two-dimensional (2D wave propagation equation. Simulations are implemented in two stages, as a single cardiac cell and as a two-dimensional grid of cells. In both stages, the normal action potential formation in case of a single cell and it's normal propagation in case of a two-dimensional grid of cells were simulated with nominal sodium ion conductance. Then, the effect of sodium ion concentration on the action potential signal was studied by reducing the sodium ion conductance. It is concluded that reducing the sodium ion conductance, decreases both passing ability and conduction velocity of the action potential wave front.

  8. Inherited Cardiac Diseases Caused by Mutations in the Nav1.5 Sodium Channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Grunnet, Morten;

    2009-01-01

    propagation is the depolarizing sodium current, responsible for the initial depolarization of the cardiomyocytes. Recent research has shown that mutations in the SCN5A gene, encoding the cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5, are associated with both rare forms of ventricular arrhythmia, as well as the most frequent...

  9. Cardiac sodium channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, A.S.; Asghari-Roodsari, A.; Tan, H.L.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac sodium channel are protein complexes that are expressed in the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes to carry a large inward depolarizing current (I-Na) during phase 0 of the cardiac action potential. The importance of I-Na for normal cardiac electrical activity is reflected by the high incidence of

  10. Use-dependent block of cardiac sodium channels by quaternary derivatives of lidocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gintant, G A; Hoffman, B F

    1984-02-01

    Modulation of the reduction of fast inward sodium current by local anesthetics due to changes in electrical activity has been termed use-dependent block ( Courtney 1975). To determine the mechanisms responsible for use-dependent block of cardiac sodium channels and to compare use-dependent block in cardiac and nerve preparations, we investigated use-dependent block of cardiac sodium channels by the quaternary lidocaine analogues QX -314 and QX -222 (two agents previously studied in nerve). We used canine cardiac Purkinje fibers, and assessed changes in the fast inward sodium current using changes in the maximum rate of rise of the action potential upstroke (Vmax). Two microelectrode voltage clamp and current clamp techniques were used to control membrane potential prior to stimulated upstrokes . Use-dependent block was not affected by shortening the action potential duration during rapid stimulation. Partial recovery from use-dependent block was observed during rapid stimulation with brief depolarizing prepulses terminating immediately prior to the upstroke. Similar prepulses also prevented the development of use-dependent block following an abrupt increase in the stimulation rate. Hyperpolarizing prepulses during rapid stimulation caused recovery from use-dependent block; recovery was greater and more rapid with increasingly negative prepulses . Hyperpolarization during periods of electrical quiescence also caused greater recovery. These results, interpreted using the modulated receptor hypothesis ( Hille 1977; Hondeghem and Katzung 1977), suggest that use-dependent block of cardiac sodium channels by quaternary local anesthetics is due to drug association with the inactivated sodium channel receptor which occurs only after these drugs gain access to the receptor site through open sodium channels.

  11. A novel LQT3 mutation implicates the human cardiac sodium channel domain IVS6 in inactivation kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, WA; Bezzina, CR; van Tintelen, JP; Hoorntje, TM; Mannens, MMAM; Wilde, AAM; Jongsma, HJ; Rook, MB

    2003-01-01

    The Long QT3 syndrome is associated with mutations in the cardiac sodium channel gene SCN5A. Objective: The aim of the present study was the identification and functional characterization of a mutation in a family with the long QT3 syndrome. Methods: The human cardiac sodium channel gene SCN5A was s

  12. Phenotypical Manifestations of Mutations in the Genes Encoding Subunits of the Cardiac Sodium Channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Brugada, Ramon

    2011-01-01

    Variations in the gene encoding for the major sodium channel (Na(v)1.5) in the heart, SCN5A, has been shown to cause a number of arrhythmia syndromes (with or without structural changes in the myocardium), including the long-QT syndrome (type 3), Brugada syndrome, (progressive) cardiac conduction di

  13. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive α-subunits of voltage-gated sodium channels are relevant for inhibition of cardiac sodium currents by local anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoetzer, C; Doll, T; Stueber, T; Herzog, C; Echtermeyer, F; Greulich, F; Rudat, C; Kispert, A; Wegner, F; Leffler, A

    2016-06-01

    The sodium channel α-subunit (Nav) Nav1.5 is regarded as the most prevalent cardiac sodium channel required for generation of action potentials in cardiomyocytes. Accordingly, Nav1.5 seems to be the main target molecule for local anesthetic (LA)-induced cardiotoxicity. However, recent reports demonstrated functional expression of several "neuronal" Nav's in cardiomyocytes being involved in cardiac contractility and rhythmogenesis. In this study, we examined the relevance of neuronal tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive Nav's for inhibition of cardiac sodium channels by the cardiotoxic LAs ropivacaine and bupivacaine. Effects of LAs on recombinant Nav1.2, 1.3, 1.4, and 1.5 expressed in human embryonic kidney cell line 293 (HEK-293) cells, and on sodium currents in murine, cardiomyocytes were investigated by whole-cell patch clamp recordings. Expression analyses were performed by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Cultured cardiomyocytes from neonatal mice express messenger RNA (mRNA) for Nav1.2, 1.3, 1.5, 1.8, and 1.9 and generate TTX-sensitive sodium currents. Tonic and use-dependent block of sodium currents in cardiomyocytes by ropivacaine and bupivacaine were enhanced by 200 nM TTX. Inhibition of recombinant Nav1.5 channels was similar to that of TTX-resistant currents in cardiomyocytes but stronger as compared to inhibition of total sodium current in cardiomyocytes. Recombinant Nav1.2, 1.3, 1.4, and 1.5 channels displayed significant differences in regard to use-dependent block by ropivacaine. Finally, bupivacaine blocked sodium currents in cardiomyocytes as well as recombinant Nav1.5 currents significantly stronger in comparison to ropivacaine. Our data demonstrate for the first time that cardiac TTX-sensitive sodium channels are relevant for inhibition of cardiac sodium currents by LAs.

  14. Bisphenol A binds to the local anesthetic receptor site to block the human cardiac sodium channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrias O O'Reilly

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA has attracted considerable public attention as it leaches from plastic used in food containers, is detectable in human fluids and recent epidemiologic studies link BPA exposure with diseases including cardiovascular disorders. As heart-toxicity may derive from modified cardiac electrophysiology, we investigated the interaction between BPA and hNav1.5, the predominant voltage-gated sodium channel subtype expressed in the human heart. Electrophysiology studies of heterologously-expressed hNav1.5 determined that BPA blocks the channel with a K(d of 25.4±1.3 µM. By comparing the effects of BPA and the local anesthetic mexiletine on wild type hNav1.5 and the F1760A mutant, we demonstrate that both compounds share an overlapping binding site. With a key binding determinant thus identified, an homology model of hNav1.5 was generated based on the recently-reported crystal structure of the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NavAb. Docking predictions position both ligands in a cavity delimited by F1760 and contiguous with the DIII-IV pore fenestration. Steered molecular dynamics simulations used to assess routes of ligand ingress indicate that the DIII-IV pore fenestration is a viable access pathway. Therefore BPA block of the human heart sodium channel involves the local anesthetic receptor and both BPA and mexiletine may enter the closed-state pore via membrane-located side fenestrations.

  15. Negative-dominance phenomenon with genetic variants of the cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottas, Valentin; Abriel, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    During the past two decades, many pathological genetic variants in SCN5A, the gene encoding the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac (monomeric) sodium channel Na(v)1.5, have been described. Negative dominance is a classical genetic concept involving a "poison" mutant peptide that negatively interferes with the co-expressed wild-type protein, thus reducing its cellular function. This phenomenon has been described for genetic variants of multimeric K(+) channels, which mechanisms are well understood. Unexpectedly, several pathologic SCN5A variants that are linked to Brugada syndrome also demonstrate such a dominant-negative (DN) effect. The molecular determinants of these observations, however, are not yet elucidated. This review article summarizes recent findings that describe the mechanisms underlying the DN phenomenon of genetic variants of K(+), Ca(2+), Cl(-) and Na(+) channels, and in particular Brugada syndrome variants of Na(v)1.5. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  16. Distinct functional defect of three novel Brugada syndrome related cardiac sodium channel mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juang Jyh-Ming

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Brugada syndrome is characterized by ST segment elevation in the right precodial leads V1-V3 on surface ECG accompanied by episodes of ventricular fibrillation causing syncope or even sudden death. The molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to Brugada syndrome are not yet completely understood. However, SCN5A is the most well known responsible gene that causes Brugada syndrome. Until now, more than a hundred mutations in SCN5A responsible for Brugada syndrome have been described. Functional studies of some of the mutations have been performed and show that a reduction of human cardiac sodium current accounts for the pathogenesis of Brugada syndrome. Here we reported three novel SCN5A mutations identified in patients with Brugada syndrome in Taiwan (p.I848fs, p.R965C, and p.1876insM. Their electrophysiological properties were altered by patch clamp analysis. The p.I848fs mutant generated no sodium current. The p.R965C and p.1876insM mutants produced channels with steady state inactivation shifted to a more negative potential (9.4 mV and 8.5 mV respectively, and slower recovery from inactivation. Besides, the steady state activation of p.1876insM was altered and was shifted to a more positive potential (7.69 mV. In conclusion, the SCN5A channel defect related to Brugada syndrome might be diverse but all resulted in a decrease of sodium current.

  17. Cardiac sodium channel Na(v)1.5 interacts with and is regulated by the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPH1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Thomas; Gavillet, Bruno; van Bemmelen, Miguel X;

    2006-01-01

    In order to identify proteins interacting with the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.5, we used the last 66 amino acids of the C-terminus of the channel as bait to screen a human cardiac cDNA library. We identified the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPH1 as an interacting protein. Pull...

  18. Nav1.5 cardiac sodium channels, regulation and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Humberto León-Ariza

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels constitute a group of membrane proteins widely distributed thought the body. In the heart, there are at least six different isoforms, being the Nav1.5 the most abundant. The channel is composed of an α subunit that is formed by four domains of six segments each, and four much smaller β subunits that provide stability and integrate other channels into the α subunit. The function of the Nav1.5 channel is modulated by intracellular cytoskeleton proteins, extracellular proteins, calcium concentration, free radicals, and medications, among other things. The study of the channel and its alterations has grown thanks to its association with pathogenic conditions such as Long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, atrial fibrillation, arrhythmogenic ventricular dysplasia and complications during ischemic processes.

  19. Statistical Metamodeling and Sequential Design of Computer Experiments to Model Glyco-Altered Gating of Sodium Channels in Cardiac Myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dongping; Yang, Hui; Ednie, Andrew R; Bennett, Eric S

    2016-09-01

    Glycan structures account for up to 35% of the mass of cardiac sodium ( Nav ) channels. To question whether and how reduced sialylation affects Nav activity and cardiac electrical signaling, we conducted a series of in vitro experiments on ventricular apex myocytes under two different glycosylation conditions, reduced protein sialylation (ST3Gal4(-/-)) and full glycosylation (control). Although aberrant electrical signaling is observed in reduced sialylation, realizing a better understanding of mechanistic details of pathological variations in INa and AP is difficult without performing in silico studies. However, computer model of Nav channels and cardiac myocytes involves greater levels of complexity, e.g., high-dimensional parameter space, nonlinear and nonconvex equations. Traditional linear and nonlinear optimization methods have encountered many difficulties for model calibration. This paper presents a new statistical metamodeling approach for efficient computer experiments and optimization of Nav models. First, we utilize a fractional factorial design to identify control variables from the large set of model parameters, thereby reducing the dimensionality of parametric space. Further, we develop the Gaussian process model as a surrogate of expensive and time-consuming computer models and then identify the next best design point that yields the maximal probability of improvement. This process iterates until convergence, and the performance is evaluated and validated with real-world experimental data. Experimental results show the proposed algorithm achieves superior performance in modeling the kinetics of Nav channels under a variety of glycosylation conditions. As a result, in silico models provide a better understanding of glyco-altered mechanistic details in state transitions and distributions of Nav channels. Notably, ST3Gal4(-/-) myocytes are shown to have higher probabilities accumulated in intermediate inactivation during the repolarization and yield a

  20. The β1-subunit of Na(v1.5 cardiac sodium channel is required for a dominant negative effect through α-α interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Mercier

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome (BrS is an inherited autosomal dominant cardiac channelopathy. Several mutations on the cardiac sodium channel Na(v1.5 which are responsible for BrS lead to misfolded proteins that do not traffic properly to the plasma membrane. In order to mimic patient heterozygosity, a trafficking defective mutant, R1432G was co-expressed with Wild Type (WT Na(v1.5 channels in HEK293T cells. This mutant significantly decreased the membrane Na current density when it was co-transfected with the WT channel. This dominant negative effect did not result in altered biophysical properties of Na(v1.5 channels. Luminometric experiments revealed that the expression of mutant proteins induced a significant reduction in membrane expression of WT channels. Interestingly, we have found that the auxiliary Na channel β(1-subunit was essential for this dominant negative effect. Indeed, the absence of the β(1-subunit prevented the decrease in WT sodium current density and surface proteins associated with the dominant negative effect. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated a physical interaction between Na channel α-subunits. This interaction occurred only when the β(1-subunit was present. Our findings reveal a new role for β(1-subunits in cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels by promoting α-α subunit interaction which can lead to a dominant negative effect when one of the α-subunits shows a trafficking defective mutation.

  1. Cardiac potassium channel subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Nicole; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2014-01-01

    About 10 distinct potassium channels in the heart are involved in shaping the action potential. Some of the K(+) channels are primarily responsible for early repolarization, whereas others drive late repolarization and still others are open throughout the cardiac cycle. Three main K(+) channels...

  2. Block of Human Cardiac Sodium Channels by Lacosamide: Evidence for Slow Drug Binding along the Activation Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ging Kuo; Wang, Sho-Ya

    2014-01-01

    Lacosamide is an anticonvulsant hypothesized to enhance slow inactivation of neuronal Na+ channels for its therapeutic action. Cardiac Na+ channels display less and incomplete slow inactivation, but their sensitivity toward lacosamide remains unknown. We therefore investigated the action of lacosamide in human cardiac Nav1.5 and Nav1.5-CW inactivation-deficient Na+ channels. Lacosamide showed little effect on hNav1.5 Na+ currents at 300 µM when cells were held at −140 mV. With 30-second condi...

  3. A proton leak current through the cardiac sodium channel is linked to mixed arrhythmia and the dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Gosselin-Badaroudine

    Full Text Available Cardiac Na(+ channels encoded by the SCN5A gene are essential for initiating heart beats and maintaining a regular heart rhythm. Mutations in these channels have recently been associated with atrial fibrillation, ventricular arrhythmias, conduction disorders, and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM.We investigated a young male patient with a mixed phenotype composed of documented conduction disorder, atrial flutter, and ventricular tachycardia associated with DCM. Further family screening revealed DCM in the patient's mother and sister and in three of the mother's sisters. Because of the complex clinical phenotypes, we screened SCN5A and identified a novel mutation, R219H, which is located on a highly conserved region on the fourth helix of the voltage sensor domain of Na(v1.5. Three family members with DCM carried the R219H mutation.The wild-type (WT and mutant Na(+ channels were expressed in a heterologous expression system, and intracellular pH (pHi was measured using a pH-sensitive electrode. The biophysical characterization of the mutant channel revealed an unexpected selective proton leak with no effect on its biophysical properties. The H(+ leak through the mutated Na(v1.5 channel was not related to the Na(+ permeation pathway but occurred through an alternative pore, most probably a proton wire on the voltage sensor domain.We propose that acidification of cardiac myocytes and/or downstream events may cause the DCM phenotype and other electrical problems in affected family members. The identification of this clinically significant H(+ leak may lead to the development of more targeted treatments.

  4. Block of human cardiac sodium channels by lacosamide: evidence for slow drug binding along the activation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ging Kuo; Wang, Sho-Ya

    2014-05-01

    Lacosamide is an anticonvulsant hypothesized to enhance slow inactivation of neuronal Na(+) channels for its therapeutic action. Cardiac Na(+) channels display less and incomplete slow inactivation, but their sensitivity toward lacosamide remains unknown. We therefore investigated the action of lacosamide in human cardiac Nav1.5 and Nav1.5-CW inactivation-deficient Na(+) channels. Lacosamide showed little effect on hNav1.5 Na(+) currents at 300 µM when cells were held at -140 mV. With 30-second conditioning pulses from -90 to -50 mV; however, hNav1.5 Na(+) channels became sensitive to lacosamide with IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) around 70-80 µM. Higher IC50 values were found at -110 and -30 mV. The development of lacosamide block at -70 mV was slow in wild-type Na(+) channels (τ; 8.04 ± 0.39 seconds, n = 8). This time constant was significantly accelerated in hNav1.5-CW inactivation-deficient counterparts. The recovery from lacosamide block at -70 mV for 10 seconds was relatively rapid in wild-type Na(+) channels (τ; 639 ± 90 milliseconds, n = 8). This recovery was accelerated further in hNav1.5-CW counterparts. Unexpectedly, lacosamide elicited a time-dependent block of persistent hNav1.5-CW Na(+) currents with an IC50 of 242 ± 19 µM (n = 5). Furthermore, both hNav1.5-CW/F1760K mutant and batrachotoxin-activated hNav1.5 Na(+) channels became completely lacosamide resistant, indicating that the lacosamide receptor overlaps receptors for local anesthetics and batrachotoxin. Our results together suggest that lacosamide targets the intermediate preopen and open states of hNav1.5 Na(+) channels. Lacosamide may thus track closely the conformational changes at the hNav1.5-F1760 region along the activation pathway.

  5. Structure and function of splice variants of the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeter, Annett; Walzik, Stefan; Blechschmidt, Steve; Haufe, Volker; Benndorf, Klaus; Zimmer, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels mediate the rapid upstroke of the action potential in excitable tissues. The tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistant isoform Na(v)1.5, encoded by the SCN5A gene, is the predominant isoform in the heart. This channel plays a key role for excitability of atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes and for rapid impulse propagation through the specific conduction system. During recent years, strong evidence has been accumulated in support of the expression of several Na(v)1.5 splice variants in the heart, and in various other tissues and cell lines including brain, dorsal root ganglia, breast cancer cells and neuronal stem cell lines. This review summarizes our knowledge on the structure and putative function of nine Na(v)1.5 splice variants detected so far. Attention will be paid to the distinct biophysical properties of the four functional splice variants, to the pronounced tissue- and species-specific expression, and to the developmental regulation of Na(v)1.5 splicing. The implications of alternative splicing for SCN5A channelopathies, and for a better understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations, are discussed.

  6. Human SCN5A gene mutations alter cardiac sodium channel kinetics and are associated with the Brugada syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rook, Martin B.; Alshinawi, CB; Groenewegen, WA; van Gelder, IC; van Ginneken, ACG; Jongsma, Habo J.; Mannens, MMAM; Wilde, AAM

    1999-01-01

    Background: Primary dysrhythmias other than those associated with the long QT syndrome, are increasingly recognized. One of these are represented by patients with a history of resuscitation from cardiac arrest but without any structural heart disease. These patients exhibit a distinct electrocardiog

  7. Ion selectivity strategies of sodium channel selectivity filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudev, Todor; Lim, Carmay

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Sodium ion channels selectively transport Na(+) cations across the cell membrane. These integral parts of the cell machinery are implicated in regulating the cardiac, skeletal and smooth muscle contraction, nerve impulses, salt and water homeostasis, as well as pain and taste perception. Their malfunction often results in various channelopathies of the heart, brain, skeletal muscles, and lung; thus, sodium channels are key drug targets for various disorders including cardiac arrhythmias, heart attack, stroke, migraine, epilepsy, pain, cancer, and autoimmune disorders. The ability of sodium channels to discriminate the native Na(+) among other competing ions in the surrounding fluids is crucial for proper cellular functions. The selectivity filter (SF), the narrowest part of the channel's open pore, lined with amino acid residues that specifically interact with the permeating ion, plays a major role in determining Na(+) selectivity. Different sodium channels have different SFs, which vary in the symmetry, number, charge, arrangement, and chemical type of the metal-ligating groups and pore size: epithelial/degenerin/acid-sensing ion channels have generally trimeric SFs lined with three conserved neutral serines and/or backbone carbonyls; eukaryotic sodium channels have EKEE, EEKE, DKEA, and DEKA SFs with an invariant positively charged lysine from the second or third domain; and bacterial voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels exhibit symmetrical EEEE SFs, reminiscent of eukaryotic voltage-gated calcium channels. How do these different sodium channel SFs achieve high selectivity for Na(+) over its key rivals, K(+) and Ca(2+)? What factors govern the metal competition in these SFs and which of these factors are exploited to achieve Na(+) selectivity in the different sodium channel SFs? The free energies for replacing K(+) or Ca(2+) bound inside different model SFs with Na(+), evaluated by a combination of density functional theory and continuum dielectric

  8. Discovery of triazolopyridinone GS-462808, a late sodium current inhibitor (Late INai) of the cardiac Nav1.5 channel with improved efficacy and potency relative to ranolazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltun, Dmitry O; Parkhill, Eric Q; Elzein, Elfatih; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Jiang, Robert H; Li, Xiaofen; Perry, Thao D; Avila, Belem; Wang, Wei-Qun; Hirakawa, Ryoko; Smith-Maxwell, Catherine; Wu, Lin; Dhalla, Arvinder K; Rajamani, Sridharan; Mollova, Nevena; Stafford, Brian; Tang, Jennifer; Belardinelli, Luiz; Zablocki, Jeff A

    2016-07-01

    Previously we disclosed the discovery of potent Late INa current inhibitor 2 (GS-458967, IC50 of 333nM) that has a good separation of late versus peak Nav1.5 current, but did not have a favorable CNS safety window due to high brain penetration (3-fold higher partitioning into brain vs plasma) coupled with potent inhibition of brain sodium channel isoforms (Nav1.1, 1.2, 1.3). We increased the polar surface area from 50 to 84Å(2) by adding a carbonyl to the core and an oxadiazole ring resulting in 3 GS-462808 that had lower brain penetration and serendipitously lower activity at the brain isoforms. Compound 3 has an improved CNS window (>20 rat and dog) relative to 2, and improved anti-ischemic potency relative to ranolazine. The development of 3 was not pursued due to liver lesions in 7day rat toxicology studies.

  9. Neuronal Sodium Channels in Neurodegeneration and Neuroprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    NIL) of the Univ Michigan. Ann Arbor Mr, USA. rat pituitary gland exhibit a 40-50% decrease in sodium current density from postnatal day 3 (P3) to...that deleted all residues beyond the tyr (gIL182STOP). Ankyrin rec of channel production may underlie the suppression of sodium current density. To...subunits con- 11 critical is for ankyrin association. Homophilic cell adhesion through 81 subunits m tributes to the suppression of melanotrope sodium

  10. 表达心脏SCN5A基因的人胚肾细胞钠电流特性及其对钠通道阻滞剂的反应性%Features of Cardiac Sodium Channel Expressed in Human Embryonic Kidney Cells and Its Response to Sodium Channel Blockers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洋; Hector Barajas-Martinez; 阮磊; 全小庆; 张存泰; 王琳; 胡丹; 白融

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the features of the cardiac sodium channel (SCN5A) expressed in the human embryonic kidney cells,and to test its response to the sodium channel blockers. Methods Wild-type SCN5A gene was co-expressed with SCN1B gene in human embryonic kidney cells and the membrane currents were measured using a whole-cell patch clamp technique in the absence or presence of flecainide and lidocaine. Results The transfection efficiency of SCN5A gene was about 60%. The peak sodium current amplitude recorded at a test pulse of -40 mV was -8 nA;the peak sodium current amplitude was decreased by (21. 1 + 4. 6)% [C - 435. 8± 30. 5) pA/pF vs. ( — 343. 9 ± 27. 1) pA/pF,P<0. 01] in the presence of 100 jumol/L flecainide. The treatment with flecainide resulted in a negative shift of both curves of the voltage dependence of activation [ - 6. 08 mV,( -51. 88 + 1. 20) mV vs. C - 57. 96 + 0. 79) mV,P<0. 05] and of inactivation [ - 9. 08 mV, ( -94. 12 + 0.13) mV vs. ( -103.20 + 0.11) mV, P<0. 05]. At stimulus frequencies of 1 Hz and 10 Hz, flecainide produced (64.5 + 10. 7) % and (83. 5 + 12. 2) % (P<0. 01) reduction in sodium current,respectively. The presence of 30 jumol/Llidocaine led to a 2-fold prolongation of the constant of fast recovery time and a 3-fold prolongation of the constant of slow recovery time from the inactivation status of the sodium channel. Conclusion The human embryonic kidney cells which express the cardiac sodium channel can be used to screen the safety and pharmacodynamics of gene-specific sodium channel blockers.%目的 利用人胚肾293细胞表达心脏钠通道SCN5A基因并研究其钠电流特性和对钠通道阻滞剂的反应性.方法 野生型SCN5A基因和SCN1B基因共表达于人胚肾293细胞,应用全细胞膜片钳技术记录给药(氟卡尼与利多卡因)前后的钠电流.结果 SCN5A基因转染效率约为60%;测试电压为-40 mV时记录到钠电流峰值大小约为-8 nA;100 μmol/L的氟卡尼轻度抑制钠

  11. Analysis of the action of lidocaine on insect sodium channels

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Weizhong; Silver, Kristopher S.; Du, Yuzhe; Liu, Zhiqi; Dong, Ke

    2010-01-01

    A new class of sodium channel blocker insecticides (SCBIs), which include indoxacarb, its active metabolite, DCJW, and metaflumizone, preferably block inactivated states of both insect and mammalian sodium channels in a manner similar to that by which local anesthetic (LA) drugs block mammalian sodium channels. A recent study showed that two residues in the cockroach sodium channel, F1817 and Y1824, corresponding to two key LA-interacting residues identified in mammalian sodium channels are n...

  12. Epithelial Sodium and Chloride Channels and Asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Wang; Hong-Long Ji

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To focus on the asthmatic pathogenesis and clinical manifestations related to epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)/chlorine ion channel.Data Sources:The data analyzed in this review were the English articles from 1980 to 2015 from journal databases,primarily PubMed and Google Scholar.The terms used in the literature search were:(1) ENaCs;cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR);asthma/asthmatic,(2) ENaC/sodium salt;CF;asthma/asthmatic,(3) CFTR/chlorine ion channels;asthma/asthmatic,(4) ENaC/sodium channel/scnn1a/scnn1b/scnn1g/scnn1d/amiloride-sensitive/amiloride-inhibtable sodium channels/sodium salt;asthma/asthmatic,lung/pulmonary/respiratory/tracheal/alveolar,and (5) CFTR;CF;asthma/asthmatic (ti).Study Selection:These studies included randomized controlled trials or studies covering asthma pathogenesis and clinical manifestations related to ENaC/chlorine ion channels within the last 25 years (from 1990 to 2015).The data involving chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and CF obtained from individual studies were also reviewed by the authors.Results:Airway surface liquid dehydration can cause airway inflammation and obstruction.ENaC and CFTR are closely related to the airway mucociliary clearance.Ion transporters may play a critical role in pathogenesis of asthmatic exacerbations.Conclusions:Ion channels have been the center of many studies aiming to understand asthmatic pathophysiological mechanisms or to identify therapeutic targets for better control of the disease.

  13. Electrophysiological properties of mouse and epitope-tagged human cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5 expressed in HEK293 cells [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/10d

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Reinhard

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pore-forming subunit of the cardiac sodium channel, Nav1.5, has been previously found to be mutated in genetically determined arrhythmias. Nav1.5 associates with many proteins that regulate its function and cellular localisation. In order to identify more in situ Nav1.5 interacting proteins, genetically-modified mice with a high-affinity epitope in the sequence of Nav1.5 can be generated. Methods: In this short study, we (1 compared the biophysical properties of the sodium current (INa generated by the mouse Nav1.5 (mNav1.5 and human Nav1.5 (hNav1.5 constructs that were expressed in HEK293 cells, and (2 investigated the possible alterations of the biophysical properties of the human Nav1.5 construct that was modified with specific epitopes. Results: The biophysical properties of mNav1.5 were similar to the human homolog. Addition of epitopes either up-stream of the N-terminus of hNav1.5 or in the extracellular loop between the S5 and S6 transmembrane segments of domain 1, significantly decreased the amount of INa and slightly altered its biophysical properties. Adding green fluorescent protein (GFP to the N-terminus did not modify any of the measured biophysical properties of hNav1.5. Conclusions: These findings have to be taken into account when planning to generate genetically-modified mouse models that harbour specific epitopes in the gene encoding mNav1.5.

  14. Cardiac ion channels in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Ahmad S; Tan, Hanno L; Wilde, Arthur A M

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac electrical activity depends on the coordinated propagation of excitatory stimuli through the heart and, as a consequence, the generation of action potentials in individual cardiomyocytes. Action potential formation results from the opening and closing (gating) of ion channels that are expressed within the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes. Ion channels possess distinct genetic, molecular, pharmacologic, and gating properties and exhibit dissimilar expression levels within different cardiac regions. By gating, ion channels permit ion currents across the sarcolemma, thereby creating the different phases of the action potential (e.g., resting phase, depolarization, repolarization). The importance of ion channels in maintaining normal heart rhythm is reflected by the increased incidence of arrhythmias in inherited diseases that are linked to mutations in genes encoding ion channels or their accessory proteins and in acquired diseases that are associated with changes in ion channel expression levels or gating properties. This review discusses ion channels that contribute to action potential formation in healthy hearts and their role in inherited and acquired diseases.

  15. A computational investigation of cardiac caveolae as a source of persistent sodium current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M. Besse

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains, called caveolae, reveal that caveolae are reservoirs of recruitable sodium ion channels. Caveolar channels constitute a substantial and previously unrecognized source of sodium current in cardiac cells. In this paper we model for the first time caveolar sodium currents and their contributions to cardiac action potential morphology. We show that the beta-agonist-induced opening of caveolae may have substantial impacts on peak overshoot, maximum upstroke velocity, and ultimately conduction velocity. Additionally, we show that prolonged action potentials and the formation of potentially arrhythmogenic afterdepolarizations, can arise if caveolae open intermittently throughout the action potential. Our simulations suggest that there may exist routes to delayed repolarization, and the arrhythmias associated with such delays, that are independent of channelopathies.

  16. Sodium ion channel mutations in glioblastoma patients correlate with shorter survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velculescu Victor E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM is the most common and invasive astrocytic tumor associated with dismal prognosis. Treatment for GBM patients has advanced, but the median survival remains a meager 15 months. In a recent study, 20,000 genes from 21 GBM patients were sequenced that identified frequent mutations in ion channel genes. The goal of this study was to determine whether ion channel mutations have a role in disease progression and whether molecular targeting of ion channels is a promising therapeutic strategy for GBM patients. Therefore, we compared GBM patient survival on the basis of presence or absence of mutations in calcium, potassium and sodium ion transport genes. Cardiac glycosides, known sodium channel inhibitors, were then tested for their ability to inhibit GBM cell proliferation. Results Nearly 90% of patients showed at least one mutation in ion transport genes. GBM patients with mutations in sodium channels showed a significantly shorter survival compared to patients with no sodium channel mutations, whereas a similar comparison based on mutational status of calcium or potassium ion channel mutations showed no survival differences. Experimentally, targeting GBM cells with cardiac glycosides such as digoxin and ouabain demonstrated preferential cytotoxicity against U-87 and D54 GBM cells compared to non-tumor astrocytes (NTAs. Conclusions These pilot studies of GBM patients with sodium channel mutations indicate an association with a more aggressive disease and significantly shorter survival. Moreover, inhibition of GBM cells by ion channel inhibitors such as cardiac glycosides suggest a therapeutic strategy with relatively safe drugs for targeting GBM ion channel mutations. Key Words: glioblastoma multiforme, ion channels, mutations, small molecule inhibitors, cardiac glycosides.

  17. Analysis of the action of lidocaine on insect sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weizhong; Silver, Kristopher S; Du, Yuzhe; Liu, Zhiqi; Dong, Ke

    2011-01-01

    A new class of sodium channel blocker insecticides (SCBIs), which include indoxacarb, its active metabolite, DCJW, and metaflumizone, preferably block inactivated states of both insect and mammalian sodium channels in a manner similar to that by which local anesthetic (LA) drugs block mammalian sodium channels. A recent study showed that two residues in the cockroach sodium channel, F1817 and Y1824, corresponding to two key LA-interacting residues identified in mammalian sodium channels are not important for the action of SCBIs on insect sodium channels, suggesting unique interactions of SCBIs with insect sodium channels. However, the mechanism of action of LAs on insect sodium channels has not been investigated. In this study, we examined the effects of lidocaine on a cockroach sodium channel variant, BgNa(v)1-1a, and determined whether F1817 and Y1824 are also critical for the action of LAs on insect sodium channels. Lidocaine blocked BgNa(v)1-1a channels in the resting state with potency similar to that observed in mammalian sodium channels. Lidocaine also stabilized both fast-inactivated and slow-inactivated states of BgNa(v)1-1a channels, and caused a limited degree of use- and frequency-dependent block, major characteristics of LA action on mammalian sodium channels. Alanine substitutions of F1817 and Y1824 reduced the sensitivity of the BgNa(v)1-1a channel to the use-dependent block by lidocaine, but not to tonic blocking and inactivation stabilizing effects of lidocaine. Thus, similar to those on mammalian sodium channels, F1817 and Y1824 are important for the action of lidocaine on cockroach sodium channels. Our results suggest that the receptor sites for lidocaine and SCBIs are different on insect sodium channels.

  18. Sodium channel biophysics, late sodium current and genetic arrhythmic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadda, Karan R; Jeevaratnam, Kamalan; Lei, Ming; Huang, Christopher L-H

    2017-03-06

    Arrhythmias arise from breakdown of orderly action potential (AP) activation, propagation and recovery driven by interactive opening and closing of successive voltage-gated ion channels, in which one or more Na(+) current components play critical parts. Early peak, Na(+) currents (I Na) reflecting channel activation drive the AP upstroke central to cellular activation and its propagation. Sustained late Na(+) currents (I Na-L) include contributions from a component with a delayed inactivation timecourse influencing AP duration (APD) and refractoriness, potentially causing pro-arrhythmic phenotypes. The magnitude of I Na-L can be analysed through overlaps or otherwise in the overall voltage dependences of the steady-state properties and kinetics of activation and inactivation of the Na(+) conductance. This was useful in analysing repetitive firing associated with paramyotonia congenita in skeletal muscle. Similarly, genetic cardiac Na(+) channel abnormalities increasing I Na-L are implicated in triggering phenomena of automaticity, early and delayed afterdepolarisations and arrhythmic substrate. This review illustrates a wide range of situations that may accentuate I Na-L. These include (1) overlaps between steady-state activation and inactivation increasing window current, (2) kinetic deficiencies in Na(+) channel inactivation leading to bursting phenomena associated with repetitive channel openings and (3) non-equilibrium gating processes causing channel re-opening due to more rapid recoveries from inactivation. All these biophysical possibilities were identified in a selection of abnormal human SCN5A genotypes. The latter presented as a broad range of clinical arrhythmic phenotypes, for which effective therapeutic intervention would require specific identification and targeting of the diverse electrophysiological abnormalities underlying their increased I Na-L.

  19. Inhibition of collagen synthesis by select calcium and sodium channel blockers can be mitigated by ascorbic acid and ascorbyl palmitate

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, Vadim; Ivanova, Svetlana; KALINOVSKY, TATIANA; NIEDZWIECKI, ALEKSANDRA; Rath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Calcium, sodium and potassium channel blockers are widely prescribed medications for a variety of health problems, most frequently for cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, angina pectoris and other disorders. However, chronic application of channel blockers is associated with numerous side effects, including worsening cardiac pathology. For example, nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker was found to be associated with increased mortality and increased risk for myocardial infarction. In addition...

  20. Molecular biology of insect sodium channels and pyrethroid resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ke; Du, Yuzhe; Rinkevich, Frank; Nomura, Yoshiko; Xu, Peng; Wang, Lingxin; Silver, Kristopher; Zhorov, Boris S

    2014-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the initiation and propagation of the action potential in neurons and other excitable cells. Because of their critical roles in electrical signaling, sodium channels are targets of a variety of naturally occurring and synthetic neurotoxins, including several classes of insecticides. This review is intended to provide an update on the molecular biology of insect sodium channels and the molecular mechanism of pyrethroid resistance. Although mammalian and insect sodium channels share fundamental topological and functional properties, most insect species carry only one sodium channel gene, compared to multiple sodium channel genes found in each mammalian species. Recent studies showed that two posttranscriptional mechanisms, alternative splicing and RNA editing, are involved in generating functional diversity of sodium channels in insects. More than 50 sodium channel mutations have been identified to be responsible for or associated with knockdown resistance (kdr) to pyrethroids in various arthropod pests and disease vectors. Elucidation of molecular mechanism of kdr led to the identification of dual receptor sites of pyrethroids on insect sodium channels. Many of the kdr mutations appear to be located within or close to the two receptor sites. The accumulating knowledge of insect sodium channels and their interactions with insecticides provides a foundation for understanding the neurophysiology of sodium channels in vivo and the development of new and safer insecticides for effective control of arthropod pests and human disease vectors.

  1. On conduction in a bacterial sodium channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Furini

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Na⁺-channels are transmembrane proteins that are responsible for the fast depolarizing phase of the action potential in nerve and muscular cells. Selective permeability of Na⁺ over Ca²⁺ or K⁺ ions is essential for the biological function of Na⁺-channels. After the emergence of the first high-resolution structure of a Na⁺-channel, an anionic coordination site was proposed to confer Na⁺ selectivity through partial dehydration of Na⁺ via its direct interaction with conserved glutamate side chains. By combining molecular dynamics simulations and free-energy calculations, a low-energy permeation pathway for Na⁺ ion translocation through the selectivity filter of the recently determined crystal structure of a prokaryotic sodium channel from Arcobacter butzleri is characterised. The picture that emerges is that of a pore preferentially occupied by two ions, which can switch between different configurations by crossing low free-energy barriers. In contrast to K⁺-channels, the movements of the ions appear to be weakly coupled in Na⁺-channels. When the free-energy maps for Na⁺ and K⁺ ions are compared, a selective site is characterised in the narrowest region of the filter, where a hydrated Na⁺ ion, and not a hydrated K⁺ ion, is energetically stable.

  2. Distribution and function of sodium channel subtypes in human atrial myocardium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaufmann, Susann G.; Westenbroek, Ruth E.; Maass, Alexander H.; Lange, Volkmar; Renner, Andre; Wischmeyer, Erhard; Bonz, Andreas; Muck, Jenny; Ertl, Georg; Catterall, William A.; Scheuer, Todd; Maier, Sebastian K. G.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels composed of a pore-forming alpha subunit and auxiliary beta subunits are responsible for the upstroke of the action potential in cardiac muscle. However, their localization and expression patterns in human myocardium have not yet been clearly defined. We used immunohist

  3. Effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on cardiac ion channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eMoreno

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs have been reported to exhibit antiarrhythmic properties, attributed to their capability to modulate ion channels. In the present review, we will focus on the effects of PUFAs on cardiac sodium channel (Nav1.5 and two potassium channels (Kv (Kv1.5 and Kv11.1. n-3 marine (docohexaenoic and eicohexapentaenoic acid and plant origin (alpha-linolenic acid PUFAs block Kv1.5 and Kv11.1 channels at physiological concentrations. Also, DHA and EPA decreased Nav1.5 and calcium channels. These effects on Na and Ca channels theoretically should shorten the cardiac APD, whereas the blocking actions of n-3 PUFAs of Kv channels should lengthen the cardiac action potential. Experiments performed in female rabbits fed with a diet rich in n-3 PUFAs show a longer cardiac action potential and effective refractory period. This study was performed to analyze if their antiarrhythmic effects are due to a reduction of triangulation, reverse use-dependence, instability and dispersion of the cardiac action potential (TRIaD as a measure of proarrhythmic effects. Dietary n-3 PUFAs supplementation markedly reduced dofetilide-induced TRIaD and abolished dofetilide-induced torsades de pointes (TdP. Ultrafast sodium channel block by DHA may account for the antiarrhythmic protection of dietary supplements of n-3 PUFAs against dofetilide induced proarrhythmia observed in this animal model. The cardiac effects of n-3 PUFAs resemble those of amiodarone: both block sodium, calcium and potassium channels, have anti-adrenergic properties, can prolong the cardiac action potential, reverse TRIaD and suppress TdP. The main difference is that sodium channel block by n-3 PUFAs has a much faster onset and offset kinetics. Therefore, the electrophysiological profile of n-3 PUFAs appears more desirable: the duration of reduced sodium current (facilitates re-entry is much shorter. The n-3 PUFAs appear as a safer alternative to other antiarrhythmic

  4. DDESC: Dragon database for exploration of sodium channels in human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanovic Aleksandar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium channels are heteromultimeric, integral membrane proteins that belong to a superfamily of ion channels. The mutations in genes encoding for sodium channel proteins have been linked with several inherited genetic disorders such as febrile epilepsy, Brugada syndrome, ventricular fibrillation, long QT syndrome, or channelopathy associated insensitivity to pain. In spite of these significant effects that sodium channel proteins/genes could have on human health, there is no publicly available resource focused on sodium channels that would support exploration of the sodium channel related information. Results We report here Dragon Database for Exploration of Sodium Channels in Human (DDESC, which provides comprehensive information related to sodium channels regarding different entities, such as "genes and proteins", "metabolites and enzymes", "toxins", "chemicals with pharmacological effects", "disease concepts", "human anatomy", "pathways and pathway reactions" and their potential links. DDESC is compiled based on text- and data-mining. It allows users to explore potential associations between different entities related to sodium channels in human, as well as to automatically generate novel hypotheses. Conclusion DDESC is first publicly available resource where the information related to sodium channels in human can be explored at different levels. This database is freely accessible for academic and non-profit users via the worldwide web http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/ddesc.

  5. Cardiac Repolarization Abnormalities and Potential Evidence for Loss of Cardiac Sodium Currents on ECGs of Patients with Chagas' Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Nunez, T. J.; Borrego, A.; Arellano, E.; Arenare, B.; DePalma, J. L.; Greco, E. C.; Starc, V.

    2007-01-01

    Some individuals with Chagas disease develop right precordial lead ST segment elevation in response to an ajmaline challenge test, and the prevalence of right bundle branch block (RBBB) is also high in Chagas disease. Because these same electrocardiographic abnormalities occur in the Brugada syndrome, which involves genetically defective cardiac sodium channels, acquired damage to cardiac sodium channels may also occur in Chagas disease. We studied several conventional and advanced resting 12-lead/derived Frank-lead ECG parameters in 34 patients with Chagas -related heart disease (mean age 39 14 years) and in 34 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. All ECG recordings were of 5-10 min duration, obtained in the supine position using high fidelity hardware/software (CardioSoft, Houston, TX). Even after excluding those Chagas patients who had resting BBBs, tachycardia and/or pathologic arrhythmia (n=8), significant differences remained in multiple conventional and advanced ECG parameters between the Chagas and control groups (n=26/group), especially in their respective QT interval variability indices, maximal spatial QRS-T angles and low frequency HRV powers (p=0.0006, p=0.0015 and p=0.0314 respectively). In relation to the issue of potential damage to cardiac sodium channels, the Chagas patients had: 1) greater than or equal to twice the incidence of resting ST segment elevation in leads V1-V3 (n=10/26 vs. n=5/26) and of both leftward (n=5/26 versus n=0/26) and rightward (n=7/26 versus n=3/26) QRS axis deviation than controls; 2) significantly increased filtered (40-250 Hz) QRS interval durations (92.1 8.5 versus 85.3 plus or minus 9.0 ms, p=0.022) versus controls; and 3) significantly decreased QT and especially JT interval durations versus controls (QT interval: 387.5 plus or minus 26.4 versus 408.9 plus or minus 34.6 ms, p=0.013; JT interval: 290.5 plus or minus 26.3 versus 314.8 plus or minus 31.3 ms; p=0.0029). Heart rates and Bazett-corrected QTc/JTc intervals

  6. Interaction of cardiac sodium current with other ion channel currents and its clinical significance%心脏钠电流与其他离子流的相互作用及其临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴志娟; 李泱

    2014-01-01

    Various ion currents on the myocardial cell membranetakepart in cardiac electric activity under both physiological and pathological conditions. Cardiac sodiumcurrent (INa)is involved in thedepolarization and repolarizationof cardiomyocyte action potential (AP), and exerts an important effect onthe conduction ofAP. So, it is of great importance to explore the interactions, effects, and especially, clinical significance ofINawith other ion channel currents. This studyreviewedthe interaction ofINa with other cardiac currents, andelucidated the mechanism of cardiac arrhythmias fromthe perspective of ion flow interaction.%心肌细胞膜上的离子流共同参与心脏在生理及病理下的电活动。钠离子流(INa)参与心肌细胞动作电位(AP)的除极和复极过程,对AP的传导有重要作用。故研究心脏钠通道与各离子通道的离子流相互关系及影响,意义尤为重要。本文综述了钠离子流与心脏其他离子流间的相互作用关系,试图从离子流相互作用的角度解释心律失常的发生机制。

  7. Functional protein expression of multiple sodium channel alpha- and beta-subunit isoforms in neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Susann G; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Zechner, Christoph; Maass, Alexander H; Bischoff, Sebastian; Muck, Jenny; Wischmeyer, Erhard; Scheuer, Todd; Maier, Sebastian K G

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are composed of pore-forming alpha- and auxiliary beta-subunits and are responsible for the rapid depolarization of cardiac action potentials. Recent evidence indicates that neuronal tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive sodium channel alpha-subunits are expressed in the heart in addition to the predominant cardiac TTX-resistant Na(v)1.5 sodium channel alpha-subunit. These TTX-sensitive isoforms are preferentially localized in the transverse tubules of rodents. Since neonatal cardiomyocytes have yet to develop transverse tubules, we determined the complement of sodium channel subunits expressed in these cells. Neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were stained with antibodies specific for individual isoforms of sodium channel alpha- and beta-subunits. alpha-actinin, a component of the z-line, was used as an intracellular marker of sarcomere boundaries. TTX-sensitive sodium channel alpha-subunit isoforms Na(v)1.1, Na(v)1.2, Na(v)1.3, Na(v)1.4 and Na(v)1.6 were detected in neonatal rat heart but at levels reduced compared to the predominant cardiac alpha-subunit isoform, Na(v)1.5. Each of the beta-subunit isoforms (beta1-beta4) was also expressed in neonatal cardiac cells. In contrast to adult cardiomyocytes, the alpha-subunits are distributed in punctate clusters across the membrane surface of neonatal cardiomyocytes; no isoform-specific subcellular localization is observed. Voltage clamp recordings in the absence and presence of 20 nM TTX provided functional evidence for the presence of TTX-sensitive sodium current in neonatal ventricular myocardium which represents between 20 and 30% of the current, depending on membrane potential and experimental conditions. Thus, as in the adult heart, a range of sodium channel alpha-subunits are expressed in neonatal myocytes in addition to the predominant TTX-resistant Na(v)1.5 alpha-subunit and they contribute to the total sodium current.

  8. Epithelial sodium channel modulates platelet collagen activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Alonso-Rangel, Lea; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia; Ortega, Arturo

    2014-03-01

    Activated platelets adhere to the exposed subendothelial extracellular matrix and undergo a rapid cytoskeletal rearrangement resulting in shape change and release of their intracellular dense and alpha granule contents to avoid hemorrhage. A central step in this process is the elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration through its release from intracellular stores and on throughout its influx from the extracellular space. The Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a highly selective Na(+) channel involved in mechanosensation, nociception, fluid volume homeostasis, and control of arterial blood pressure. The present study describes the expression, distribution, and participation of ENaC in platelet migration and granule secretion using pharmacological inhibition with amiloride. Our biochemical and confocal analysis in suspended and adhered platelets suggests that ENaC is associated with Intermediate filaments (IF) and with Dystrophin-associated proteins (DAP) via α-syntrophin and β-dystroglycan. Migration assays, quantification of soluble P-selectin, and serotonin release suggest that ENaC is dispensable for migration and alpha and dense granule secretion, whereas Na(+) influx through this channel is fundamental for platelet collagen activation.

  9. Deletion of PDK1 causes cardiac sodium current reduction in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonglin Han

    Full Text Available The AGC protein kinase family regulates multiple cellular functions. 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1 is involved in the pathogenesis of arrhythmia, and its downstream factor, Forkhead box O1 (Foxo1, negatively regulates the expression of the cardiac sodium channel, Nav1.5. Mice are known to die suddenly after PDK1 deletion within 11 weeks, but the underlying electrophysiological bases are unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential mechanisms between PDK1 signaling pathway and cardiac sodium current.Using patch clamp and western blotting techniques, we investigated the role of the PDK1-Foxo1 pathway in PDK1 knockout mice and cultured cardiomyocytes. We found that PDK1 knockout mice undergo slower heart rate, prolonged QRS and QTc intervals and abnormal conduction within the first few weeks of birth. Furthermore, the peak sodium current is decreased by 33% in cells lacking PDK1. The phosphorylation of Akt (308T and Foxo1 (24T and the expression of Nav1.5 in the myocardium of PDK1-knockout mice are decreased, while the nuclear localization of Foxo1 is increased. The role of the PDK1-Foxo1 pathway in regulating Nav1.5 levels and sodium current density was verified using selective PDK1, Akt and Foxo1 inhibitors and isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.These results indicate that PDK1 participates in the dysregulation of electrophysiological basis by regulating the PDK1-Foxo1 pathway, which in turn regulates the expression of Nav1.5 and cardiac sodium channel function.

  10. Sodium Channel Mutations and Pyrethroid Resistance in Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzhe Du

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control insect pests and human disease vectors. Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary targets of pyrethroid insecticides. Mutations in the sodium channel have been shown to be responsible for pyrethroid resistance, known as knockdown resistance (kdr, in various insects including mosquitoes. In Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the principal urban vectors of dengue, zika, and yellow fever viruses, multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms in the sodium channel gene have been found in pyrethroid-resistant populations and some of them have been functionally confirmed to be responsible for kdr in an in vitro expression system, Xenopus oocytes. This mini-review aims to provide an update on the identification and functional characterization of pyrethroid resistance-associated sodium channel mutations from Aedes aegypti. The collection of kdr mutations not only helped us develop molecular markers for resistance monitoring, but also provided valuable information for computational molecular modeling of pyrethroid receptor sites on the sodium channel.

  11. Sodium Channel Mutations and Pyrethroid Resistance in Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Zhorov, Boris S.; Dong, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control insect pests and human disease vectors. Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary targets of pyrethroid insecticides. Mutations in the sodium channel have been shown to be responsible for pyrethroid resistance, known as knockdown resistance (kdr), in various insects including mosquitoes. In Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the principal urban vectors of dengue, zika, and yellow fever viruses, multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms in the sodium channel gene have been found in pyrethroid-resistant populations and some of them have been functionally confirmed to be responsible for kdr in an in vitro expression system, Xenopus oocytes. This mini-review aims to provide an update on the identification and functional characterization of pyrethroid resistance-associated sodium channel mutations from Aedes aegypti. The collection of kdr mutations not only helped us develop molecular markers for resistance monitoring, but also provided valuable information for computational molecular modeling of pyrethroid receptor sites on the sodium channel. PMID:27809228

  12. Cardiac potassium channels in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A M

    1997-05-01

    Cardiac K(+)currents regulate resting membrane potential and action potential duration. These tasks are accomplished for the most part by four membrane currents: an inwardly rectifying current (I(K1)), a transient outward current (I(To)), and rapid (I(Kr)), and slow (I(Ks)) delayed rectifier currents. Recent studies have revealed far greater complexity at the molecular level. I(K1) may be produced by at least three genes from the Kir 2 subfamily of the supergene Kir family. The remaining currents appear to be produced by the supergene Kvα family, sometimes in association with the cytoplasmic protein Kvβ family. I(To) may be produced by the Kv4 subfamily, but members of the Kv1 subfamily could contribute, particularly if associated with Kvβ genes. Very rapid currents could be produced by Kv1.5, but Kvs 1.2 and 2.1 might also participate. Additional levels of complexity are possible because members within a Kv subfamily may form heterotetramers, and these, in turn, may associate with different Kvβs. The situation may be simpler for I(Kr) and I(Ks), which at present appear to be produced by the Kv HER gene and the KvLQT1 gene, respectively. Mutations of these two genes have been linked to two forms of hereditary long QT syndrome, and heterologous expression of mutant HERGs has reproduced the pathophysiological phenotype satisfactorily. Sporadic mutations in these and other cardiac K(+)channel genes may provide a basis for hypersensitivity to cardioactive or cardiotoxic drugs. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:118-124). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  13. The sodium-leak channel, NALCN, in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud eCochet-Bissuel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels are crucial components of cellular excitability and are involved in many neurological diseases. This review focuses on the sodium leak, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs-activated NALCN channel that is predominantly expressed in neurons where it regulates the resting membrane potential and neuronal excitability. NALCN is part of a complex that includes not only GPCRs, but also UNC-79, UNC-80, NLF-1 and src family of Tyrosine kinases (SFKs. There is growing evidence that the NALCN channelosome critically regulates its ion conduction. Both in mammals and invertebrates, animal models revealed an involvement in many processes such as locomotor behaviours, sensitivity to volatile anesthetics, and respiratory rhythms. There is also evidence that alteration in this NALCN channelosome can cause a wide variety of diseases. Indeed, mutations in the NALCN gene were identified in Infantile Neuroaxonal Dystrophy (INAD patients, as well as in patients with an Autosomal Recessive Syndrome with severe hypotonia, speech impairment, and cognitive delay. Deletions in NALCN gene were also reported in diseases such as 13q syndrome. In addition, genes encoding NALCN, NLF- 1, UNC-79 and UNC-80 proteins may be susceptibility loci for several diseases including bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, autism, epilepsy, alcoholism, cardiac diseases and cancer. Although the physiological role of the NALCN channelosome is poorly understood, its involvement in human diseases should foster interest for drug development in the near future. Towards this goal, we review here the current knowledge on the NALCN channelosome in physiology and diseases.

  14. NALCN ion channels have alternative selectivity filters resembling calcium channels or sodium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Senatore

    Full Text Available NALCN is a member of the family of ion channels with four homologous, repeat domains that include voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels. NALCN is a highly conserved gene from simple, extant multicellular organisms without nervous systems such as sponges and placozoans and mostly remains a single gene compared to the calcium and sodium channels which diversified into twenty genes in humans. The single NALCN gene has alternatively-spliced exons at exons 15 or exon 31 that splices in novel selectivity filter residues that resemble calcium channels (EEEE or sodium channels (EKEE or EEKE. NALCN channels with alternative calcium, (EEEE and sodium, (EKEE or EEKE -selective pores are conserved in simple bilaterally symmetrical animals like flatworms to non-chordate deuterostomes. The single NALCN gene is limited as a sodium channel with a lysine (K-containing pore in vertebrates, but originally NALCN was a calcium-like channel, and evolved to operate as both a calcium channel and sodium channel for different roles in many invertebrates. Expression patterns of NALCN-EKEE in pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis suggest roles for NALCN in secretion, with an abundant expression in brain, and an up-regulation in secretory organs of sexually-mature adults such as albumen gland and prostate. NALCN-EEEE is equally abundant as NALCN-EKEE in snails, but is greater expressed in heart and other muscle tissue, and 50% less expressed in the brain than NALCN-EKEE. Transfected snail NALCN-EEEE and NALCN-EKEE channel isoforms express in HEK-293T cells. We were not able to distinguish potential NALCN currents from background, non-selective leak conductances in HEK293T cells. Native leak currents without expressing NALCN genes in HEK-293T cells are NMDG(+ impermeant and blockable with 10 µM Gd(3+ ions and are indistinguishable from the hallmark currents ascribed to mammalian NALCN currents expressed in vitro by Lu et al. in Cell. 2007 Apr 20;129(2:371-83.

  15. Vinculin variant M94I identified in sudden unexplained nocturnal death syndrome decreases cardiac sodium current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jianding; Kyle, John W; Wiedmeyer, Brandi; Lang, Di; Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Makielski, Jonathan C

    2017-02-20

    Sudden unexplained nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS) remains an autopsy negative disorder with unclear etiology. Vinculin (VCL) was linked to sudden arrhythmia death in VCL knockout mice prior to the appearance of cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized VCL mutations underlie risk for SUNDS. A rare heterozygous variant VCL-M94I was found in a SUNDS victim who suffered sudden nocturnal tachypnea and lacked pathogenic variants in known arrhythmia-causing genes. VCL was identified to interact with SCN5A in vitro/vivo. The VCL-M94I was co-expressed with the cardiac sodium channel in HEK293 cells and also overexpressed in induced pluripotent stem cells derived cardiomyocytes (iPSCs-CM). In HEK293 cells with pH 7.4, VCL-M94I caused ~30% decrease in peak sodium current (INa) amplitude compared to WT; under acidotic conditions (pH 7.0) typically found with hypoxia during sleep apnea, M94I resulted in 37% reduction in peak INa compared to WT and the combination of VCL-M94I and pH 7.0 decreased peak INa by ~56% compared to WT at pH 7.4. In iPSCs-CM, similar effects of M94I on reduction of peak INa were observed. This study initially shows both physical and functional interaction between VCL and cardiac sodium channel, and suggests an important role for respiratory acidosis in triggering the fatal arrhythmia underlying SUNDS.

  16. Comparative study of lacosamide and classical sodium channel blocking antiepileptic drugs on sodium channel slow inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niespodziany, Isabelle; Leclère, Nathalie; Vandenplas, Catherine; Foerch, Patrik; Wolff, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exert their therapeutic activity by modifying the inactivation properties of voltage-gated sodium (Na(v) ) channels. Lacosamide is unique among AEDs in that it selectively enhances the slow inactivation component. Although numerous studies have investigated the effects of AEDs on Na(v) channel inactivation, a direct comparison of results cannot be made because of varying experimental conditions. In this study, the effects of different AEDs on Na(v) channel steady-state slow inactivation were investigated under identical experimental conditions using whole-cell patch-clamp in N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. All drugs were tested at 100 μM, and results were compared with those from time-matched control groups. Lacosamide significantly shifted the voltage dependence of Na(v) current (I(Na) ) slow inactivation toward more hyperpolarized potentials (by -33 ± 7 mV), whereas the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels and the curve slope did not differ significantly. Neither SPM6953 (lacosamide inactive enantiomer), nor carbamazepine, nor zonisamide affected the voltage dependence of I(Na) slow inactivation, the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels, or the curve slope. Phenytoin significantly increased the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels (by 28% ± 9%) in a voltage-independent manner but did not affect the curve slope. Lamotrigine slightly increased the fraction of inactivated currents (by 15% ± 4%) and widened the range of the slow inactivation voltage dependence. Lamotrigine and rufinamide induced weak, but significant, shifts of I(Na) slow inactivation toward more depolarized potentials. The effects of lacosamide on Na(v) channel slow inactivation corroborate previous observations that lacosamide has a unique mode of action among AEDs that act on Na(v) channels.

  17. Regulation of sodium channel function by bilayer elasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbaek, Jens A; Birn, Pia; Hansen, Anker J

    2004-01-01

    be a general mechanism regulating membrane protein function, we examined whether voltage-dependent skeletal-muscle sodium channels, expressed in HEK293 cells, are regulated by bilayer elasticity, as monitored using gramicidin A (gA) channels. Nonphysiological amphiphiles (beta-octyl-glucoside, Genapol X-100......, Triton X-100, and reduced Triton X-100) that make lipid bilayers less "stiff", as measured using gA channels, shift the voltage dependence of sodium channel inactivation toward more hyperpolarized potentials. At low amphiphile concentration, the magnitude of the shift is linearly correlated to the change...... in gA channel lifetime. Cholesterol-depletion, which also reduces bilayer stiffness, causes a similar shift in sodium channel inactivation. These results provide strong support for the notion that bilayer-protein hydrophobic coupling allows the bilayer elastic properties to regulate membrane protein...

  18. Simultaneous modifications of sodium channel gating by two scorpion toxins.

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    The effects of purified scorpion toxins from two different species on the kinetics of sodium currents were evaluated in amphibian myelinated nerves under voltage clamp. A toxin from Leiurus quinquestriatus slowed and prevented sodium channel inactivation, exclusively, and a toxin from Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing reduced transient sodium currents during a maintained depolarization, and induced a novel inward current that appeared following repolarization, as previously reported by Cahalan ...

  19. JZTX-IV, a unique acidic sodium channel toxin isolated from the spider Chilobrachys jingzhao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meichi; Diao, Jianbo; Li, Jiang; Tang, Jianzhou; Lin, Yin; Hu, Weijun; Zhang, Yongqun; Xiao, Yucheng; Liang, Songping

    2008-12-15

    Neurotoxins are important tools to explore the structure and function relationship of different ion channels. From the venom of Chinese spider Chilobrachys jingzhao, a novel toxin, Jingzhaotoxin-IV (JZTX-IV), is isolated and characterized. It consists of 34 amino acid residues including six acidic residues clustered with negative charge (pI=4.29). The full-length cDNA of JZTX-IV encodes an 86-amino acid precursor containing a signal peptide of 21 residues, a mature peptide of 34 residues and an intervening sequence of 29 residues with terminal Lys-Gly as the signal of amidation. Under whole-cell patch clamp conditions, JZTX-IV inhibits current and slows the inactivation of sodium channels by shifting the voltage dependence of activation to more depolarized potentials on DRG neurons, therefore, differs from the classic site 4 toxins that shift voltage dependence of activation in the opposite direction. In addition, JZTX-IV shows a slowing inactivation of sodium channel with a hyperpolarizing shift of the steady-state inactivation on acutely isolated rat cardiac cell and DRG neurons, differs from the classic site 3 toxins that do not affect the steady-state of inactivation. At high concentration, JZTX-IV has no significant effect on tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channels on rat DRG neurons and tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium channels on hippocampal neurons. Our data establish that, contrary to known toxins, JZTX-IV neither binds to the previously characterized classic site 4, nor site 3 by modifying channel gating, thus making it a novel probe of channel gating in sodium channels with potential to shed new light on this process.

  20. Functional role of anion channels in cardiac diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-yue DUAN; Luis LH LIU; Nathan BOZEAT; Z Maggie HUANG; Sunny Y XIANG; Guan-lei WANG; Linda YE; Joseph R HUME

    2005-01-01

    In comparison to cation (K+, Na+, and Ca2+) channels, much less is currently known about the functional role of anion (Cl-) channels in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology. Over the past 15 years, various types of Cl- currents have been recorded in cardiac cells from different species including humans. All cardiac Cl- channels described to date may be encoded by five different Cl- channel genes: the PKA- and PKC-activated cystic fibrosis tansmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the volume-regulated ClC-2 and ClC-3, and the Ca2+-activated CLCA or Bestrophin. Recent studies using multiple approaches to examine the functional role of Cl- channels in the context of health and disease have demonstrated that Cl- channels might contribute to: 1) arrhythmogenesis in myocardial injury; 2) cardiac ischemic preconditioning; and 3) the adaptive remodeling of the heart during myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure. Therefore,anion channels represent very attractive novel targets for therapeutic approaches to the treatment of heart diseases. Recent evidence suggests that Cl- channels,like cation channels, might function as a multiprotein complex or functional module.In the post-genome era, the emergence of functional proteomics has necessitated a new paradigm shift to the structural and functional assessment of integrated Cl- channel multiprotein complexes in the heart, which could provide new insight into our understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for heart disease and protection.

  1. Physiological regulation of epithelial sodium channel by proteolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Per; Friis, Ulla G; Bistrup, Claus

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Activation of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by proteolysis appears to be relevant for day-to-day physiological regulation of channel activity in kidney and other epithelial tissues. Pathophysiogical, proteolytic activation of ENaC in kidney has been demonstrated in proteinuric...

  2. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels: Effects on Neurotoxin Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    sodium inhibitory effect of ethanol on channel - mediated sodium influx channels ...Exprnmantal Trherpeutics Ped in I.SA. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels : Effects on Neurotoxin Binding1 MICHAEL J. MULLIN 2 and... sodium channels . This indirect allosteric mechanism for inhibition of [H]BTX-B binding. effect orethanol was concentration-dependent and was

  3. Abnormal sodium current properties contribute to cardiac electrical and contractile dysfunction in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algalarrondo, Vincent; Wahbi, Karim; Sebag, Frédéric; Gourdon, Geneviève; Beldjord, Chérif; Azibi, Kamel; Balse, Elise; Coulombe, Alain; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Eymard, Bruno; Duboc, Denis; Hatem, Stéphane N

    2015-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common neuromuscular disorder and is associated with cardiac conduction defects. However, the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias in DM1 are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that abnormalities in the cardiac sodium current (INa) are involved, and used a transgenic mouse model reproducing the expression of triplet expansion observed in DM1 (DMSXL mouse). The injection of the class-I antiarrhythmic agent flecainide induced prominent conduction abnormalities and significantly lowered the radial tissular velocities and strain rate in DMSXL mice compared to WT. These abnormalities were more pronounced in 8-month-old mice than in 3-month-old mice. Ventricular action potentials recorded by standard glass microelectrode technique exhibited a lower maximum upstroke velocity [dV/dt](max) in DMSXL. This decreased [dV/dt](max) was associated with a 1.7 fold faster inactivation of INa in DMSXL myocytes measured by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Finally in the DMSXL mouse, no mutation in the Scn5a gene was detected and neither cardiac fibrosis nor abnormalities of expression of the sodium channel protein were observed. Therefore, alterations in the sodium current markedly contributed to electrical conduction block in DM1. This result should guide pharmaceutical and clinical research toward better therapy for the cardiac arrhythmias associated with DM1.

  4. The Epithelial Sodium Channel and the Processes of Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Chifflet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC mediates passive sodium transport across the apical membranes of sodium absorbing epithelia, like the distal nephron, the intestine, and the lung airways. Additionally, the channel has been involved in the transduction of mechanical stimuli, such as hydrostatic pressure, membrane stretch, and shear stress from fluid flow. Thus, in vascular endothelium, it participates in the control of the vascular tone via its activity both as a sodium channel and as a shear stress transducer. Rather recently, ENaC has been shown to participate in the processes of wound healing, a role that may also involve its activities as sodium transporter and as mechanotransducer. Its presence as the sole channel mediating sodium transport in many tissues and the diversity of its functions probably underlie the complexity of its regulation. This brief review describes some aspects of ENaC regulation, comments on evidence about ENaC participation in wound healing, and suggests possible regulatory mechanisms involved in this participation.

  5. Rate-dependent activation failure in isolated cardiac cells and tissue due to Na+ channel block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Anthony; Spindler, Anthony J; Paterson, David; Noble, Denis

    2015-11-15

    While it is well established that class-I antiarrhythmics block cardiac sodium channels, the mechanism of action of therapeutic levels of these drugs is not well understood. Using a combination of mathematical modeling and in vitro experiments, we studied the failure of activation of action potentials in single ventricular cells and in tissue caused by Na(+) channel block. Our computations of block and unblock of sodium channels by a theoretical class-Ib antiarrhythmic agent predict differences in the concentrations required to cause activation failure in single cells as opposed to multicellular preparations. We tested and confirmed these in silico predictions with in vitro experiments on isolated guinea-pig ventricular cells and papillary muscles stimulated at various rates (2-6.67 Hz) and exposed to various concentrations (5 × 10(-6) to 500 × 10(-6) mol/l) of lidocaine. The most salient result was that whereas large doses (5 × 10(-4) mol/l or higher) of lidocaine were required to inhibit action potentials temporarily in single cells, much lower doses (5 × 10(-6) mol/l), i.e., therapeutic levels, were sufficient to have the same effect in papillary muscles: a hundredfold difference. Our experimental results and mathematical analysis indicate that the syncytial nature of cardiac tissue explains the effects of clinically relevant doses of Na(+) channel blockers.

  6. Sodium Channels, Mitochondria, and Axonal Degeneration in Peripheral Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Anna-Karin; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Estacion, Mark; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy results from damage to peripheral nerves and is often accompanied by pain in affected limbs. Treatment represents an unmet medical need and a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying axonal injury is needed. Longer nerve fibers tend to degenerate first (length-dependence), and patients carrying pathogenic mutations throughout life usually become symptomatic in mid- or late-life (time-dependence). The activity of voltage-gated sodium channels can contribute to axonal injury and sodium channel gain-of-function mutations have been linked to peripheral neuropathy. Recent studies have implicated sodium channel activity, mitochondrial compromise, and reverse-mode Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange in time- and length-dependent axonal injury. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying axonal injury in peripheral neuropathy may provide new therapeutic strategies for this painful and debilitating condition.

  7. Cardiac ion channels and mechanisms for protection against atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Sørensen, Ulrik S;

    2011-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is recognised as the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice. Ongoing drug development is aiming at obtaining atrial specific effects in order to prevent pro-arrhythmic, devastating ventricular effects. In principle, this is possible due to a different...... to the recent discovery that Ca(2+)-activated small conductance K(+) channels (SK channels) are important for the repolarisation of atrial action potentials. Finally, an overview of current pharmacological treatment of AF is included....

  8. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels. Effects on Neurotoxin-Stimulated Sodium Uptake in Synaptosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    concentration in the nonaqueuus (membrane) phase (Lyon et aL, 1981). Concentration- effect summarized in table 1 . When sodium channels were activated curves were...Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels : Effects on Neurotoxin-Stimulated Sodium Uptake in DT (7 Synaptosomes E L C MICHAEL J. MULLIN’ and WALTER A. HUNT...1984). At the present time, the 8 1 structural and functional properties of the voltage-sensitive sodium channels are understood most completely

  9. Sodium-calcium exchanger and multiple sodium channel isoforms in intra-epidermal nerve terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasser Andreas

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nociception requires transduction and impulse electrogenesis in nerve fibers which innervate the body surface, including the skin. However, the molecular substrates for transduction and action potential initiation in nociceptors are incompletely understood. In this study, we examined the expression and distribution of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX and voltage-gated sodium channel isoforms in intra-epidermal free nerve terminals. Results Small diameter DRG neurons exhibited robust NCX2, but not NCX1 or NCX3 immunolabeling, and virtually all PGP 9.5-positive intra-epidermal free nerve terminals displayed NCX2 immunoreactivity. Sodium channel NaV1.1 was not detectable in free nerve endings. In contrast, the majority of nerve terminals displayed detectable levels of expression of NaV1.6, NaV1.7, NaV1.8 and NaV1.9. Sodium channel immunoreactivity in the free nerve endings extended from the dermal boundary to the terminal tip. A similar pattern of NCX and sodium channel immunolabeling was observed in DRG neurons in vitro. Conclusions NCX2, as well as NaV1.6, NaV1.7, NaV1.8 and NaV1.9, are present in most intra-epidermal free nerve endings. The presence of NCX2, together with multiple sodium channel isoforms, in free nerve endings may have important functional implications.

  10. Lasting alterations of the sodium current by short-term hyperlipidemia as a mechanism for initiation of cardiac remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biet, M; Morin, N; Benrezzak, O; Naimi, F; Bellanger, S; Baillargeon, J P; Chouinard, L; Gallo-Payet, N; Carpentier, A C; Dumaine, R

    2014-01-15

    Clinical and animal studies indicate that increased fatty acid delivery to lean tissues induces cardiac electrical remodeling and alterations of cellular calcium homeostasis. Since this may represent a mechanism initiating cardiac dysfunction during establishment of insulin resistance and diabetes or anaerobic cardiac metabolism (ischemia), we sought to determine if short-term exposure to high plasma concentration of fatty acid in vivo was sufficient to alter the cardiac sodium current (INa) in dog ventricular myocytes. Our results show that delivery of triglycerides and nonesterified fatty acids by infusion of Intralipid + heparin (IH) for 8 h increased the amplitude of INa by 43% and shifted its activation threshold by -5 mV, closer to the resting membrane potential. Steady-state inactivation (availability) of the channels was reduced by IH with no changes in recovery from inactivation. As a consequence, INa "window" current, a strong determinant of intracellular Na+ and Ca2+ concentrations, was significantly increased. The results indicate that increased circulating fatty acids alter INa gating in manners consistent with an increased cardiac excitability and augmentation of intracellular calcium. Moreover, these changes could still be measured after the dogs were left to recover for 12 h after IH perfusion, suggesting lasting changes in INa. Our results indicate that fatty acids rapidly induce cardiac remodeling and suggest that this process may be involved in the development of cardiac dysfunctions associated to insulin resistance and diabetes.

  11. Cellular hyper-excitability caused by mutations that alter the activation process of voltage-gated sodium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed-Yassine eAMAROUCH

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav are widely expressed as macro-molecular complexes in both excitable and non-excitable tissues. In excitable tissues, the upstroke of the action potential is the result of the passage of a large and rapid influx of sodium ions through these channels. NaV dysfunction has been associated with an increasingly wide range of neurological, muscular and cardiac disorders. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recently identified sodium channel mutations that are linked to hyper-excitability phenotypes and associated with the alteration of the activation process of voltage gated sodium channels. Indeed, several clinical manifestations that demonstrate an alteration of tissue excitability were recently shown to be strongly associated with the presence of mutations that affect the activation process of the voltage-gated sodium channels. These emerging genotype-phenotype correlations have expanded the clinical spectrum of sodium channelopathies to include disorders which feature a hyper-excitability phenotype that may or may not be associated with a cardiomyopathy. The p.I141V mutation in SCN4A and SCN5A, as well as its homologous p.I136V mutation in SCN9A, are interesting examples of mutations that have been linked to inherited hyperexcitability myotonia, exercise-induced polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias and erythromelalgia, respectively. Regardless of which sodium channel isoform is investigated, the substitution of the isoleucine to valine in the locus 141 induces similar modifications in the biophysical properties of the voltage-gated sodium channels by shifting the voltage-dependence of steady state activation towards more negative potentials.

  12. Sodium restriction modulates innate immunity and prevents cardiac remodeling in a rat model of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jover, Bernard; Reynes, Christelle; Rugale, Caroline; Reboul, Cyril; Jeanson, Laura; Tournier, Michel; Lajoix, Anne Dominique; Desmetz, Caroline

    2017-02-27

    In the view of the relationships between excessive sodium intake, immunity and target organ damage, we hypothesized that reduction in dietary sodium would be beneficial in the prevention of cardiac alterations through a restrained local immunity response in a rat model of metabolic syndrome. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a 60% fructose diet with either a normal sodium (0.64% NaCl) or a low sodium content (<0.01% NaCl) for 8weeks. After 4weeks, rats were infused or not with angiotensin II (200ng.kg(-1).min(-1), sc) for 4weeks. Tail-cuff blood pressure was determined in conscious rats. Heart and left ventricle weight, cardiomyocyte size, and cardiac fibrosis were evaluated. We performed a transcriptomic analysis in order to identify differentially regulated cardiac mRNAs between normal and low sodium diets. We validated those results using qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Angiotensin II-induced blood pressure rise was blunted (~ 50%) in the low-sodium fed rats while cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis were prevented. Transcriptomic analysis revealed 66 differentially regulated genes including 13 downregulated genes under the low sodium diet and implicated in the innate immune response. This was confirmed by reduced cardiac macrophages infiltration under the low sodium diet. Dietary sodium restriction prevents structural alterations of the heart of rats with fructose-induced insulin resistance and angiotensin II-hypertension. The reduction of cardiac inflammation and macrophage infiltration suggests that innate immunity has an important role in the beneficial effect of sodium restriction on cardiac remodeling.

  13. [Mechanically gated cardiac ion channels and their regulation by cytokines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamkin, A G; Makarenko, E Iu

    2012-01-01

    The publication presents discussion of the modern vision of mechanisms of mechanoelectric feedback in heart as well as most recent findings regarding possible regulation of cardiomyocyte mechanically gated ion channels by endogenous compounds of immune origin--cytokines. Special attention is devoted to description of cytokine action on cardiac cells, in particular to nitrogen oxide effects on ionic currents, which contribute to generation of the action potential of the cardiomyocyte. We hypothesize that cytokines can potentially trigger such mechano-dependent cardiac pathologies as arrhythmias and fibrillation.

  14. Gain-of-function mutation in TASK-4 channels and severe cardiac conduction disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Corinna; Rinné, Susanne; Zumhagen, Sven; Kiper, Aytug K; Silbernagel, Nicole; Netter, Michael F; Stallmeyer, Birgit; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Decher, Niels

    2014-07-01

    Analyzing a patient with progressive and severe cardiac conduction disorder combined with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF), we identified a splice site mutation in the sodium channel gene SCN5A. Due to the severe phenotype, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) and identified an additional mutation in the KCNK17 gene encoding the K2P potassium channel TASK-4. The heterozygous change (c.262G>A) resulted in the p.Gly88Arg mutation in the first extracellular pore loop. Mutant TASK-4 channels generated threefold increased currents, while surface expression was unchanged, indicating enhanced conductivity. When co-expressed with wild-type channels, the gain-of-function by G88R was conferred in a dominant-active manner. We demonstrate that KCNK17 is strongly expressed in human Purkinje cells and that overexpression of G88R leads to a hyperpolarization and strong slowing of the upstroke velocity of spontaneously beating HL-1 cells. Thus, we propose that a gain-of-function by TASK-4 in the conduction system might aggravate slowed conductivity by the loss of sodium channel function. Moreover, WES supports a second hit-hypothesis in severe arrhythmia cases and identified KCNK17 as a novel arrhythmia gene.

  15. Diltiazem and verapamil preferentially block inactivated cardiac calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, S; Arlock, P; Katzung, B G; Hondeghem, L M

    1983-02-01

    Diltiazem has been proposed to act by blocking calcium channels of cardiac and smooth muscle since it has pharmacological [12-14] and clinical [10] effects that resemble those of verapamil, an agent that has been shown to block these channels [3]. However, block of the slow inward current by diltiazem has not been directly demonstrated. In fact, it has been suggested that diltiazem has an entirely different mechanism of action [7]. We therefore studied the blocking effects of diltiazem and verapamil on cardiac calcium channels by measuring the slow inward current in voltage-clamped ferret myocardium. Both drugs blocked the slow inward current in a use-dependent fashion, i.e. the block was enhanced by increased frequency of activating clamps and by more positive holding potentials. However, we found that short single activating clamps resulted in minimal block, whereas prolonging the clamp step progressively enhanced the blockade. Thus, a single long clamp caused as much blockade as a train of shorter pulses. These results demonstrate that diltiazem and verapamil block the slow inward current by binding to calcium channels in a state-dependent fashion, i.e. inactivated channels have a high affinity for the drugs, while rested and open channels have a lower affinity.

  16. Voltage-gated sodium channels in taste bud cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Mark E

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste bud cells transmit information regarding the contents of food from taste receptors embedded in apical microvilli to gustatory nerve fibers innervating basolateral membranes. In particular, taste cells depolarize, activate voltage-gated sodium channels, and fire action potentials in response to tastants. Initial cell depolarization is attributable to sodium influx through TRPM5 in sweet, bitter, and umami cells and an undetermined cation influx through an ion channel in sour cells expressing PKD2L1, a candidate sour taste receptor. The molecular identity of the voltage-gated sodium channels that sense depolarizing signals and subsequently initiate action potentials coding taste information to gustatory nerve fibers is unknown. Results We describe the molecular and histological expression profiles of cation channels involved in electrical signal transmission from apical to basolateral membrane domains. TRPM5 was positioned immediately beneath tight junctions to receive calcium signals originating from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation, while PKD2L1 was positioned at the taste pore. Using mouse taste bud and lingual epithelial cells collected by laser capture microdissection, SCN2A, SCN3A, and SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channel transcripts were expressed in taste tissue. SCN2A, SCN3A, and SCN9A were expressed beneath tight junctions in subsets of taste cells. SCN3A and SCN9A were expressed in TRPM5 cells, while SCN2A was expressed in TRPM5 and PKD2L1 cells. HCN4, a gene previously implicated in sour taste, was expressed in PKD2L1 cells and localized to cell processes beneath the taste pore. Conclusion SCN2A, SCN3A and SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channels are positioned to sense initial depolarizing signals stemming from taste receptor activation and initiate taste cell action potentials. SCN2A, SCN3A and SCN9A gene products likely account for the tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium currents in taste receptor cells.

  17. p.D1690N sodium voltage-gated channel α subunit 5 mutation reduced sodium current density and is associated with Brugada syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhipeng; Xie, Qiang; Huang, Yuan; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Li, Weihua; Huang, Zhengrong

    2016-06-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited primary arrhythmia disorder, leading to sudden cardiac death due to ventricular tachyarrhythmia, but does not exhibit clinical cardiac abnormalities. The sodium voltage-gated channel α subunit 5 (SCN5A) gene, which encodes the α subunit of the cardiac sodium channel, Nav1.5, is the most common pathogenic gene, although ≥22 BrS‑susceptibility genes have previously been identified. In the present study, a novel genetic variant (p.D1690N) localized in the S5‑S6 linker of domain IV of the Nav1.5 channels was identified in a Chinese Han family. Wild‑type (WT) and p.D1690N Nav1.5 channels were transiently over‑expressed in HEK293 cells and analyzed via the whole-cell patch clamp technique. The p.D1690N mutation significantly reduced the peak sodium current density to 23% of WT (at ‑20 mV; P<0.01), shifted steady‑state activation by 7 mV to increasingly positive potentials (P<0.01). Furthermore, prolonging of the recovery from inactivation was observed in the p.D1690N mutant. No significant change was identified in steady‑state inactivation. Thus, the mutant‑induced changes contributed to the loss of function of Nav1.5 channels, which indicates that the p.D1690N variant may have a pathogenic role in BrS.

  18. Locating the route of entry and binding sites of benzocaine and phenytoin in a bacterial voltage gated sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lewis J; Corry, Ben

    2014-07-01

    Sodium channel blockers are used to control electrical excitability in cells as a treatment for epileptic seizures and cardiac arrhythmia, and to provide short term control of pain. Development of the next generation of drugs that can selectively target one of the nine types of voltage-gated sodium channel expressed in the body requires a much better understanding of how current channel blockers work. Here we make use of the recently determined crystal structure of the bacterial voltage gated sodium channel NavAb in molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the position at which the sodium channel blocking drugs benzocaine and phenytoin bind to the protein as well as to understand how these drugs find their way into resting channels. We show that both drugs have two likely binding sites in the pore characterised by nonspecific, hydrophobic interactions: one just above the activation gate, and one at the entrance to the the lateral lipid filled fenestrations. Three independent methods find the same sites and all suggest that binding to the activation gate is slightly more favourable than at the fenestration. Both drugs are found to be able to pass through the fenestrations into the lipid with only small energy barriers, suggesting that this can represent the long posited hydrophobic entrance route for neutral drugs. Our simulations highlight the importance of a number of residues in directing drugs into and through the fenestration, and in forming the drug binding sites.

  19. Locating the route of entry and binding sites of benzocaine and phenytoin in a bacterial voltage gated sodium channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis J Martin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sodium channel blockers are used to control electrical excitability in cells as a treatment for epileptic seizures and cardiac arrhythmia, and to provide short term control of pain. Development of the next generation of drugs that can selectively target one of the nine types of voltage-gated sodium channel expressed in the body requires a much better understanding of how current channel blockers work. Here we make use of the recently determined crystal structure of the bacterial voltage gated sodium channel NavAb in molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the position at which the sodium channel blocking drugs benzocaine and phenytoin bind to the protein as well as to understand how these drugs find their way into resting channels. We show that both drugs have two likely binding sites in the pore characterised by nonspecific, hydrophobic interactions: one just above the activation gate, and one at the entrance to the the lateral lipid filled fenestrations. Three independent methods find the same sites and all suggest that binding to the activation gate is slightly more favourable than at the fenestration. Both drugs are found to be able to pass through the fenestrations into the lipid with only small energy barriers, suggesting that this can represent the long posited hydrophobic entrance route for neutral drugs. Our simulations highlight the importance of a number of residues in directing drugs into and through the fenestration, and in forming the drug binding sites.

  20. Voltage-gated sodium channels: biophysics, pharmacology, and related channelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora eSavio Galimberti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC are multi-molecular protein complexes expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells. They are primarily formed by a pore-forming multi-spanning integral membrane glycoprotein (α-subunit that can be associated with one or more regulatory β-subunits. The latter are single-span integral membrane proteins that modulate the sodium current (INa and can also function as cell-adhesion molecules (CAMs. In-vitro some of the cell-adhesive functions of the β-subunits may play important physiological roles independently of the α-subunits. Other endogenous regulatory proteins named channel partners or channel interacting proteins (ChiPs like caveolin-3 and calmodulin/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII can also interact and modulate the expression and/or function of VGSC. In addition to their physiological roles in cell excitability and cell adhesion, VGSC are the site of action of toxins (like tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin, and pharmacologic agents (like antiarrhythmic drugs, local anesthetics, antiepileptic drugs, and newly developed analgesics. Mutations in genes that encode α- and/or β-subunits as well as the ChiPs can affect the structure and biophysical properties of VGSC, leading to the development of diseases termed sodium channelopathies. This review will outline the structure, function and biophysical properties of VGSC as well as their pharmacology and associated channelopathies and highlight some of the recent advances in this field

  1. Discovery of triazolopyridine GS-458967, a late sodium current inhibitor (Late INai) of the cardiac NaV 1.5 channel with improved efficacy and potency relative to ranolazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltun, Dmitry O; Parkhill, Eric Q; Elzein, Elfatih; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Notte, Gregory T; Kalla, Rao; Jiang, Robert H; Li, Xiaofen; Perry, Thao D; Avila, Belem; Wang, Wei-Qun; Smith-Maxwell, Catherine; Dhalla, Arvinder K; Rajamani, Sridharan; Stafford, Brian; Tang, Jennifer; Mollova, Nevena; Belardinelli, Luiz; Zablocki, Jeff A

    2016-07-01

    We started with a medium throughput screen of heterocyclic compounds without basic amine groups to avoid hERG and β-blocker activity and identified [1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyridine as an early lead. Optimization of substituents for Late INa current inhibition and lack of Peak INa inhibition led to the discovery of 4h (GS-458967) with improved anti-arrhythmic activity relative to ranolazine. Unfortunately, 4h demonstrated use dependent block across the sodium isoforms including the central and peripheral nervous system isoforms that is consistent with its low therapeutic index (approximately 5-fold in rat, 3-fold in dog). Compound 4h represents our initial foray into a 2nd generation Late INa inhibitor program and is an important proof-of-concept compound. We will provide additional reports on addressing the CNS challenge in a follow-up communication.

  2. Molecular Mechanism that Leads to Development of Epilepsy by a Sodium Channel Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Velazquez, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The number of mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.1, encoded by SCN1A, that have been associated with genetic epilepsy is extremely high compared to the other sodium channel genes. The crucial function of the voltage-gated sodium channels in the central nervous system (CNS) is to regulate the influx of sodium or sodium current into the neurons. Sodium currents are required for the generation and propagation of action potentials. Subsequently the action potentials cause the rele...

  3. The complete structure of an activated open sodium channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sula, Altin; Booker, Jennifer; Ng, Leo C. T.; Naylor, Claire E.; DeCaen, Paul G.; Wallace, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) play essential roles in excitable tissues, with their activation and opening resulting in the initial phase of the action potential. The cycling of Navs through open, closed and inactivated states, and their closely choreographed relationships with the activities of other ion channels lead to exquisite control of intracellular ion concentrations in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here we present the 2.45 Å resolution crystal structure of the complete NavMs prokaryotic sodium channel in a fully open conformation. A canonical activated conformation of the voltage sensor S4 helix, an open selectivity filter leading to an open activation gate at the intracellular membrane surface and the intracellular C-terminal domain are visible in the structure. It includes a heretofore unseen interaction motif between W77 of S3, the S4–S5 interdomain linker, and the C-terminus, which is associated with regulation of opening and closing of the intracellular gate. PMID:28205548

  4. Docking Studies of Phthalimide Pharmacophore as a Sodium Channel Blocker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Iman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Recently, phthalimide derivatives were designed based on ameltolide and thalidomide as they possess a similar degree of anticonvulsant potency due to their phenytoin-like profile. The ability of phthalimide pharmacophore to interact with neuronal voltage-dependent sodium channels was studied in the batrachotoxin affinity assay. Therefore, in the present study, a series of 19 compounds of phthalimide pharmacophore possessing a variety of substituents (NO2, NH2 , Me, Cl, COOH, MeO at 2-, 3-, and 4- position of the N-phenyl ring and N-(3-amino-2-methylphenyl succinimide, were subjected to docking studies in order to inhibit voltage-gated sodium channels.   Materials and Methods : Chemical structures of all compounds were designed using HYPERCHEM program and Conformational studies were performed through semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations method followed by PM3 force field. Total energy gradient calculated as a root mean square (RMS value, until the RMS gradient was 0.01 kcal mol-1. Among all energy minima conformers, the global minimum of compounds was used in docking calculations. Using a model of the open pore of Na channels, docking study was performed by AUTODOCK4.2 program. Results : Docking studies have revealed that these types of ligands interacted mainly with II-S6 residues of NaV1.2 through making hydrogen bonds and have additional hydrophobic interactions with domain I, II, III and IV in the channel's inner pore. Conclusion   : These computational studies have displayed that these compounds are capable of inhibiting Na channel, efficiently.

  5. Marine Toxins That Target Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. French

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Eukaryotic, voltage-gated sodium (NaV channels are large membrane proteins which underlie generation and propagation of rapid electrical signals in nerve, muscle and heart. Nine different NaV receptor sites, for natural ligands and/or drugs, have been identified, based on functional analyses and site-directed mutagenesis. In the marine ecosystem, numerous toxins have evolved to disrupt NaV channel function, either by inhibition of current flow through the channels, or by modifying the activation and inactivation gating processes by which the channels open and close. These toxins function in their native environment as offensive or defensive weapons in prey capture or deterrence of predators. In composition, they range from organic molecules of varying size and complexity to peptides consisting of ~10-70 amino acids. We review the variety of known NaV-targeted marine toxins, outlining, where known, their sites of interaction with the channel protein and their functional effects. In a number of cases, these natural ligands have the potential applications as drugs in clinical settings, or as models for drug development.

  6. Adaptive evolution of the vertebrate skeletal muscle sodium channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrodotoxin (TTX is a highly potent neurotoxin that blocks the action potential by selectively binding to voltage-gated sodium channels (Na v. The skeletal muscle Na v (Na v1.4 channels in most pufferfish species and certain North American garter snakes are resistant to TTX, whereas in most mammals they are TTX-sensitive. It still remains unclear as to whether the difference in this sensitivity among the various vertebrate species can be associated with adaptive evolution. In this study, we investigated the adaptive evolution of the vertebrate Na v1.4 channels. By means of the CODEML program of the PAML 4.3 package, the lineages of both garter snakes and pufferfishes were denoted to be under positive selection. The positively selected sites identified in the p-loop regions indicated their involvement in Na v1.4 channel sensitivity to TTX. Most of these sites were located in the intracellular regions of the Na v1.4 channel, thereby implying the possible association of these regions with the regulation of voltage-sensor movement.

  7. Morphine decreases enteric neuron excitability via inhibition of sodium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tricia H Smith

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal peristalsis is significantly dependent on the enteric nervous system. Constipation due to reduced peristalsis is a major side-effect of morphine, which limits the chronic usefulness of this excellent pain reliever in man. The ionic basis for the inhibition of enteric neuron excitability by morphine is not well characterized as previous studies have mainly utilized microelectrode recordings from whole mount myenteric plexus preparations in guinea pigs. Here we have developed a Swiss-Webster mouse myenteric neuron culture and examined their electrophysiological properties by patch-clamp techniques and determined the mechanism for morphine-induced decrease in neuronal excitability. Isolated neurons in culture were confirmed by immunostaining with pan-neuronal marker, β-III tubulin and two populations were identified by calbindin and calretinin staining. Distinct neuronal populations were further identified based on the presence and absence of an afterhyperpolarization (AHP. Cells with AHP expressed greater density of sodium currents. Morphine (3 µM significantly reduced the amplitude of the action potential, increased the threshold for spike generation but did not alter the resting membrane potential. The decrease in excitability resulted from inhibition of sodium currents. In the presence of morphine, the steady-state voltage dependence of Na channels was shifted to the left with almost 50% of channels unavailable for activation from hyperpolarized potentials. During prolonged exposure to morphine (two hours, action potentials recovered, indicative of the development of tolerance in single enteric neurons. These results demonstrate the feasibility of isolating mouse myenteric neurons and establish sodium channel inhibition as a mechanism for morphine-induced decrease in neuronal excitability.

  8. Proteasome inhibitor (MG132 rescues Nav1.5 protein content and the cardiac sodium current in dystrophin-deficient mdx5cv mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Sebastien eRougier

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel, Nav1.5, plays a central role in cardiac excitability and impulse propagation and associates with the dystrophin multiprotein complex (DMC at the lateral membrane of cardiomyocytes. It was previously shown that Nav1.5 protein content and the sodium current (INa were both decreased in cardiomyocytes of dystrophin-deficient mdx5cv mice. In this study, wild-type (WT and mdx5cv mice were treated for 7 days with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 (10 µg/Kg/24 h using implanted osmotic mini pumps. MG132 rescued both the total amount of Nav1.5 protein and INa but, unlike in previous studies, de novo expression of dystrophin was not observed in skeletal or cardiac muscle. This study suggests that the reduced expression of Nav1.5 in dystrophin-deficient cells is dependent on proteasomal degradation.

  9. Fibrinolytic Regulation of Pulmonary Epithelial Sodium Channels: a Critical Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Hong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Luminal fluid homeostasis in the respiratory system is crucial to maintain the gas-\\ud blood exchange in normal lungs and mucociliary clearance in the airways. Epithelial\\ud sodium channels (ENaC) govern ~70% of alveolar fluid clearance. Four ENaC subunits\\ud have been cloned, namely, α, β, γ, and δ ENaC subunits in mammalian cells. This\\ud critical review focuses on the expression and function of ENaC in human and murine\\ud lungs, and the post-translational regulation by fibrinolysins. Nebul...

  10. The sodium channel as a target for local anesthetic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry A Fozzard

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Na channels are the source of excitatory currents for the nervous system and muscle. They are the target for a class of drugs called local anesthetics (LA, which have been used for local and regional anesthesia and for excitatory dysfunction problems such as epilepsy and cardiac arrhythmia. LA drugs are prototypes for new analgesic drugs. The LA drug binding site has been localized to the inner pore of the channel, where drugs interact mainly with a phenylalanine in domain IV S6. Drug affinity is both voltage- and use-dependent. Voltage-dependency is the result of changes in the conformation of the inner pore during channel activation and opening, allowing high energy interaction of drugs with the phenylalanine. LA drugs also reduce the gating current of Na channels, which represents the movement of charged residues in the voltage sensors. Specifically, drug binding to phenylalanine locks the domain III S4 in its outward (activated position, and slows recovery of the domain IV S4. Although strongly affecting gating, LA drugs almost certainly also block by steric occlusion of the pore. Molecular definition of the binding and blocking interactions may help in new drug development.

  11. SODIUM BICARBONATE INFUSION: TO PREVENT CARDIAC SURGERY - ASSOCIATED ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The incidence of cardiac surgery – associated acute kidney injury is 50% of patients and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. This study aimed to determine if perioperative urinary and plasma alkalization with sodium bicarbonate infusion re duces the incidence of cardiac surgery – associated acute kidney injury. SETTING AND DESIGN: This study is double blind randomized control trial conducted at U N Mehta Institute of Cardiology and Research Center , India. METHOD S AND RESULT: A total of 140 pat ients scheduled to undergo elective cardiac surgery , who were at increased risk of development of cardiac surgery – associated acute kidney injury using recognized risk factors. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either sodium bicarbonate (n = 70 o r sodium chloride (n = 70 infusion , commencing at the start of anesthesia , in a dose of 4 mmol/kg over 24 hour. The primary outcome measure was the number of patients with development of CSA - AKI , defined as an increase in creatinine greater than 25% from baseline to peak value within the first three postoperative days. Significant differences among the groups in both plasma and urinary pH were achieved 6 hours after commencement of the infusion , and these changes persisted for more than 24 hours. A total o f 7 out of 70(10% patients in the sodium bicarbonate group and 16 out of 70(22.85% patients in the sodium chloride group developed acute kidney injury within the first three postoperative days with p value of 0.06 which is statistically not significant . There were also no significant differences in ventilation hours , ICU or hospital length of stay , or mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Perioperative alkalization of blood and urine using an infusion of sodium bicarbonate did not result in a decrease in the incidence of acute kidney injury in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. KEYWORDS: Acute kidney injury; Cardiac surgery; Cardiopulmonary bypass; Creatinine

  12. Cardiac Mechano-Gated Ion Channels and Arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyronnet, Rémi; Nerbonne, Jeanne M; Kohl, Peter

    2016-01-22

    Mechanical forces will have been omnipresent since the origin of life, and living organisms have evolved mechanisms to sense, interpret, and respond to mechanical stimuli. The cardiovascular system in general, and the heart in particular, is exposed to constantly changing mechanical signals, including stretch, compression, bending, and shear. The heart adjusts its performance to the mechanical environment, modifying electrical, mechanical, metabolic, and structural properties over a range of time scales. Many of the underlying regulatory processes are encoded intracardially and are, thus, maintained even in heart transplant recipients. Although mechanosensitivity of heart rhythm has been described in the medical literature for over a century, its molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. Thanks to modern biophysical and molecular technologies, the roles of mechanical forces in cardiac biology are being explored in more detail, and detailed mechanisms of mechanotransduction have started to emerge. Mechano-gated ion channels are cardiac mechanoreceptors. They give rise to mechano-electric feedback, thought to contribute to normal function, disease development, and, potentially, therapeutic interventions. In this review, we focus on acute mechanical effects on cardiac electrophysiology, explore molecular candidates underlying observed responses, and discuss their pharmaceutical regulation. From this, we identify open research questions and highlight emerging technologies that may help in addressing them.

  13. A sodium channel mutation identified in Aedes aegypti selectively reduces cockroach sodium channel sensitivity to type I, but not type II pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhaonong; Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Dong, Ke

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroid insecticides. Numerous point mutations in sodium channel genes have been identified in pyrethroid-resistant insect species, and many have been confirmed to reduce or abolish sensitivity of channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes to pyrethroids. Recently, several novel mutations were reported in sodium channel genes of pyrethroid-resistant Aedes mosquito populations. One of the mutations is a phenylalanine (F) to cysteine (C) change in segment 6 of domain III (IIIS6) of the Aedes mosquito sodium channel. Curiously, a previous study showed that alanine substitution of this F did not alter the action of deltamethrin, a type II pyrethroid, on a cockroach sodium channel. In this study, we changed this F to C in a pyrethroid-sensitive cockroach sodium channel and examined mutant channel sensitivity to permethrin as well as five other type I or type II pyrethroids in Xenopus oocytes. Interestingly, the F to C mutation drastically reduced channel sensitivity to three type I pyrethroids, permethrin, NRDC 157 (a deltamethrin analogue lacking the α-cyano group) and bioresemthrin, but not to three type II pyrethroids, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and cyhalothrin. These results confirm the involvement of the F to C mutation in permethrin resistance, and raise the possibility that rotation of type I and type II pyrethroids might be considered in the control of insect pest populations where this particular mutation is present.

  14. Epithelial Sodium and Acid-Sensing Ion Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellenberger, Stephan

    The epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are non-voltage-gated Na+ channels that form their own subfamilies within the ENaC/degenerin ion channel family. ASICs are sensors of extracellular pH, and ENaC, whose main function is trans-epithelial Na+ transport, can sense extra- and intra-cellular Na+. In aldosterone-responsive epithelial cells of the kidney, ENaC plays a critical role in the control of sodium balance, blood volume and blood pressure. In airway epithelia, ENaC has a distinct role in controlling fluid reabsorption at the air-liquid interface, thereby determining the rate of mucociliary transport. In taste receptor cells of the tongue, ENaC is involved in salt taste sensation. ASICs have emerged as key sensors for extracellular protons in central and peripheral neurons. Although not all of their physiological and pathological functions are firmly established yet, there is good evidence for a role of ASICs in the brain in learning, expression of fear, and in neurodegeneration after ischaemic stroke. In sensory neurons, ASICs are involved in nociception and mechanosensation. ENaC and ASIC subunits share substantial sequence homology and the conservation of several functional domains. This chapter summarises our current understanding of the physiological functions and of the mechanisms of ion permeation, gating and regulation of ENaC and ASICs.

  15. Controlling epithelial sodium channels with light using photoswitchable amilorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönberger, Matthias; Althaus, Mike; Fronius, Martin; Clauss, Wolfgang; Trauner, Dirk

    2014-08-01

    Amiloride is a widely used diuretic that blocks epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs). These heterotrimeric transmembrane proteins, assembled from β, γ and α or δ subunits, effectively control water transport across epithelia and sodium influx into non-epithelial cells. The functional role of δβγENaC in various organs, including the human brain, is still poorly understood and no pharmacological tools are available for the functional differentiation between α- and δ-containing ENaCs. Here we report several photoswitchable versions of amiloride. One compound, termed PA1, enables the optical control of ENaC channels, in particular the δβγ isoform, by switching between blue and green light, or by turning on and off blue light. PA1 was used to modify functionally δβγENaC in amphibian and mammalian cells. We also show that PA1 can be used to differentiate between δβγENaC and αβγENaC in a model for the human lung epithelium.

  16. Non-specific activation of the epithelial sodium channel by the CFTR chloride channel

    OpenAIRE

    Nagel, Georg; Szellas, Tanjef; Riordan, John R.; Friedrich, Thomas; Hartung, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    The genetic disease cystic fibrosis is caused by mutation of the gene coding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Controversial studies reported regulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by CFTR. We found that uptake of 22Na+ through ENaC is modulated by activation of CFTR in oocytes, coexpressing CFTR and ENaC, depending on extracellular chloride concentration. Furthermore we found that the effect of CFTR activation could be mimicked by other chloride ...

  17. Plasmin in nephrotic urine activates the epithelial sodium channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Per; Bistrup, Claus; Friis, Ulla G;

    2008-01-01

    Proteinuria and increased renal reabsorption of NaCl characterize the nephrotic syndrome. Here, we show that protein-rich urine from nephrotic rats and from patients with nephrotic syndrome activate the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in cultured M-1 mouse collecting duct cells and in Xenopus...... laevis oocytes heterologously expressing ENaC. The activation depended on urinary serine protease activity. We identified plasmin as a urinary serine protease by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of-flight mass spectrometry. Purified plasmin activated ENaC currents, and inhibitors...... of plasmin abolished urinary protease activity and the ability to activate ENaC. In nephrotic syndrome, tubular urokinase-type plasminogen activator likely converts filtered plasminogen to plasmin. Consistent with this, the combined application of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen...

  18. Blood pressure and amiloride-sensitive sodium channels in vascular and renal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, David G; Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina; Tarjus, Antoine; Sheng, Shaohu; Oberleithner, Hans; Kleyman, Thomas R; Jaisser, Frederic

    2014-03-01

    Sodium transport in the distal nephron is mediated by epithelial sodium channel activity. Proteolytic processing of external domains and inhibition with increased sodium concentrations are important regulatory features of epithelial sodium channel complexes expressed in the distal nephron. By contrast, sodium channels expressed in the vascular system are activated by increased external sodium concentrations, which results in changes in the mechanical properties and function of endothelial cells. Mechanosensitivity and shear stress affect both epithelial and vascular sodium channel activity. Guyton's hypothesis stated that blood pressure control is critically dependent on vascular tone and fluid handling by the kidney. The synergistic effects, and complementary regulation, of the epithelial and vascular systems are consistent with the Guytonian model of volume and blood pressure regulation, and probably reflect sequential evolution of the two systems. The integration of vascular tone, renal perfusion and regulation of renal sodium reabsorption is the central underpinning of the Guytonian model. In this Review, we focus on the expression and regulation of sodium channels, and we outline the emerging evidence that describes the central role of amiloride-sensitive sodium channels in the efferent (vascular) and afferent (epithelial) arms of this homeostatic system.

  19. Gap-junction channels inhibit transverse propagation in cardiac muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramasamy Lakshminarayanan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The effect of adding many gap-junctions (g-j channels between contiguous cells in a linear chain on transverse propagation between parallel chains was examined in a 5 × 5 model (5 parallel chains of 5 cells each for cardiac muscle. The action potential upstrokes were simulated using the PSpice program for circuit analysis. Either a single cell was stimulated (cell A1 or the entire chain was stimulated simultaneously (A-chain. Transverse velocity was calculated from the total propagation time (TPT from when the first AP crossed a Vm of -20 mV and the last AP crossed -20 mV. The number of g-j channels per junction was varied from zero to 100, 1,000 and 10,000 (Rgj of ∞, 100 MΩ, 10 MΩ, 1.0 MΩ, respectively. The longitudinal resistance of the interstitial fluid (ISF space between the parallel chains (Rol2 was varied between 200 KΩ (standard value and 1.0, 5.0, and 10 MΩ. The higher the Rol2 value, the tighter the packing of the chains. It was found that adding many g-j channels inhibited transverse propagation by blocking activation of all 5 chains, unless Rol2 was greatly increased above the standard value of 200 KΩ. This was true for either method of stimulation. This was explained by, when there is strong longitudinal coupling between all 5 cells of a chain awaiting excitation, there must be more transfer energy (i.e., more current to simultaneously excite all 5 cells of a chain.

  20. Sodium-level-sensitive sodium channel Na(x) is expressed in glial laminate processes in the sensory circumventricular organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Eiji; Hiyama, Takeshi Y; Shimizu, Hidetada; Kodama, Ryuji; Hayashi, Noriko; Miyata, Seiji; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Noda, Masaharu

    2006-03-01

    Na(x) is an atypical sodium channel that is assumed to be a descendant of the voltage-gated sodium channel family. Our recent studies on the Na(x)-gene-targeting mouse revealed that Na(x) channel is localized to the circumventricular organs (CVOs), the central loci for the salt and water homeostasis in mammals, where the Na(x) channel serves as a sodium-level sensor of the body fluid. To understand the cellular mechanism by which the information sensed by Na(x) channels is transferred to the activity of the organs, we dissected the subcellular localization of Na(x) in the present study. Double-immunostaining and immunoelectron microscopic analyses revealed that Na(x) is exclusively localized to perineuronal lamellate processes extended from ependymal cells and astrocytes in the organs. In addition, glial cells isolated from the subfornical organ, one of the CVOs, were sensitive to an increase in the extracellular sodium level, as analyzed by an ion-imaging method. These results suggest that glial cells bearing the Na(x) channel are the first to sense a physiological increase in the level of sodium in the body fluid, and they regulate the neural activity of the CVOs by enveloping neurons. Close communication between inexcitable glial cells and excitable neural cells thus appears to be the basis of the central control of the salt homeostasis.

  1. Small-conductance Ca2+ -activated K+ channels and cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Lieu, Deborah K; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2015-08-01

    Small-conductance Ca2+ -activated K+ (SK, KCa2) channels are unique in that they are gated solely by changes in intracellular Ca2+ and, hence, function to integrate intracellular Ca2+ and membrane potentials on a beat-to-beat basis. Recent studies have provided evidence for the existence and functional significance of SK channels in the heart. Indeed, our knowledge of cardiac SK channels has been greatly expanded over the past decade. Interests in cardiac SK channels are further driven by recent studies suggesting the critical roles of SK channels in human atrial fibrillation, the SK channel as a possible novel therapeutic target in atrial arrhythmias, and upregulation of SK channels in heart failure in animal models and in human heart failure. However, there remain critical gaps in our knowledge. Specifically, blockade of SK channels in cardiac arrhythmias has been shown to be both antiarrhythmic and proarrhythmic. This contemporary review provides an overview of the literature on the role of cardiac SK channels in cardiac arrhythmias and serves as a discussion platform for the current clinical perspectives. At the translational level, development of SK channel blockers as a new therapeutic strategy in the treatment of atrial fibrillation and the possible proarrhythmic effects merit further considerations and investigations.

  2. δ-opioid Receptor Induced Inhibition of Sodium Channel Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康学智; 顾全保; 丁光宏; 晁东满; 王英伟; G Balboni; LH Lazarus; 夏萤

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the precise role of DOR in the regulation of sodium channels at present. Methods: With Xenopus oocytes co-expressing sodium channel subtype 2 (Nav1.2) and DOR. Results: 1) Nav1.2 expression induced tetrodotoxin-sensitive inward currents; 2) DOR expression reduced the inward currents; 3) activation of DOR reduced the amplitude of the current and rightly shifted the activation curve of the current in the oocytes with both Nav1.2 and DOR, but not in ones with Nav1.2 alone; 4) the DOR agonist-induced inhibition of Nav1.2 currents was in a dose-dependent manner and saturable; 5) the DOR agonist had no effect on naive oocytes. Conclusion: These data represent the first demonstration that activation of DOR inhibits Na+ channel function by decreasing the amplitude of sodium currents and increasing its threshold of activation. This novel finding has far-reaching impacts on novel solutions of certain neurological disorders such as hypoxic/ischemic injury, epilepsy and pain. Also, our data may improve the understanding of the mechanisms underlying acupuncture since acupuncture is known to activate the brain opioid system.%目的:研究δ-阿片受体表达和激活对钠通道1.2亚型的电流特性的影响.方法:用双电极电压钳技术,在δ-阿片受体和钠通道亚型1.2共表达的非洲爪蟾第V期卵母细胞上,观察δ-阿片受体表达和/或激活后,钠通道1.2亚型电流特性的变化.结果:1)钠通道1.2亚型的表达产生河豚毒素(tetrodotoxin,TTX)敏感的内向电流;2)δ-阿片受体的表达减少钠通道激活电流的幅度;3)δ-阿片受体和钠通道1.2亚型共表达的卵母细胞中,δ-阿片受体激动剂可以抑制钠通道激活电流的幅度和电导,而只有钠通道1.2亚型表达的卵母细胞则无此现象;4)δ-阿片受体激动剂抑制钠电流的作用具有剂量依赖关系,并能达到饱和状态;5)δ-阿片受体激动剂对未表达外派陛蛋白的卵母细胞无影响.结论:本结

  3. Action of the pyrethroid insecticide cypermethrin on rat brain IIa sodium channels expressed in xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T J; Soderlund, D M

    1998-12-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides bind to a unique site on voltage-dependent sodium channels and prolong sodium currents, leading to repetitive bursts of action potentials or use-dependent nerve block. To further characterize the site and mode of action of pyrethroids on sodium channels, we injected synthetic mRNA encoding the rat brain IIa sodium channel alpha subunit, either alone or in combination with synthetic mRNA encoding the rat sodium channel beta1 subunit, into oocytes of the frog Xenopus laevis and assessed the actions of the pyrethroid insecticide [1R,cis,alphaS]-cypermethrin on expressed sodium currents by two-electrode voltage clamp. In oocytes expressing only the rat brain IIa alpha subunit, cypermethrin produced a slowly-decaying sodium tail current following a depolarizing pulse. In parallel experiments using oocytes expressing the rat brain IIa alpha subunit in combination with the rat beta1 subunit, cypermethrin produced qualitatively similar tail currents following a depolarizing pulse and also induced a sustained component of the sodium current measured during a step depolarization of the oocyte membrane. The voltage dependence of activation and steady-state inactivation of the cypermethrin-dependent sustained current were identical to those of the peak transient sodium current measured in the absence of cypermethrin. Concentration-response curves obtained using normalized tail current amplitude as an index of the extent of sodium channel modification by cypermethrin revealed that coexpression of the rat brain IIa alpha subunit with the rat beta1 subunit increased the apparent affinity of the sodium channel binding site for cypermethrin by more than 20-fold. These results confirm that the pyrethroid binding site is intrinsic to the sodium channel alpha subunit and demonstrate that coexpression of the rat brain IIa alpha subunit with the rat beta1 subunit alters the apparent affinity of this site for pyrethroids.

  4. Targeting voltage-gated sodium channels for treatment for chronic visceral pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei-Hu Qi; You-Lang Zhou; Guang-Yin Xu

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a fundamental role in controlling cellular excitability, and their abnormal activity is related to several pathological processes, including cardiac arrhythmias, epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, spasticity and chronic pain. In particular, chronic visceral pain, the central symptom of functional gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, is a serious clinical problem that affects a high percentage of the world population. In spite of intense research efforts and after the dedicated decade of pain control and research, there are not many options to treat chronic pain conditions. However, there is a wealth of evidence emerging to give hope that a more refined approach may be achievable. By using electronic databases, available data on structural and functional properties of VGSCs in chronic pain, particularly functional gastrointestinal hypersensitivity, were reviewed. We summarize the involvement and molecular bases of action of VGSCs in the pathophysiology of several organic and functional gastrointestinal disorders. We also describe the efficacy of VGSC blockers in the treatment of these neurological diseases, and outline future developments that may extend the therapeutic use of compounds that target VGSCs. Overall, clinical and experimental data indicate that isoform-specific blockers of these channels or targeting of their modulators may provide effective and novel approaches for visceral pain therapy.

  5. Could a defective epithelial sodium channel lead to bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Dominique

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bronchiectasis is defined as a permanent dilation of the airways arising from chronic bronchial inflammation/infection. In 50% of cases, no etiology can be identified. Recently, the role of the epithelial sodium channel ENaC has been pointed out in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis, a disease due to mutations in the CFTR gene and causing bronchiectasis in the airways. Moreover, it was found that transgenic mice overexpressing ENaCβ present cystic fibrosis-like lung disease symptoms. Our aim was to evaluate if a defective ENaC protein could be involved in the development of bronchiectasis. Methods We extensively analysed ENaCβ and γ genes in 55 patients with idiopathic bronchiectasis and without two mutations in the coding regions of CFTR. Thirty-eight patients presented functional abnormalities suggesting impaired sodium transport (abnormal sweat chloride concentration or nasal potential difference measurement, and 17 had no such evidence. Results Sequencing of the exons and flanking introns of the ENaCβ and γ gene identified five different amino-acid changes (p.Ser82Cys, p.Pro369Thr, p.Asn288Ser in ENaCβ ; and p.Gly183Ser, p.Glu197Lys in ENaCγ in heterozygous state in 8 patients. The p.Ser82Cys amino-acid change was found in 3 unrelated patients who were also heterozygous for a CFTR mutation or variant (1 p.F508del, 1 IVS8-5T, and 1 IVS8-5T:1716G>A (p.E528E. The other mutations were found in patients without CFTR mutation, the p.Glu197Lys mutation in 2 patients and the other variants in single patients. Among the 8 patients bearing an ENaC mutation, 5 had functional abnormalities suggesting impaired sodium transport. Conclusion Our results suggest that several variants in ENaCβ and γ genes might be deleterious for ENaC function and lead to bronchiectasis, especially in patients who are trans-heterozygotes for ENaCβ/CFTR mutations or variants.

  6. Difference of Sodium Currents between Pediatric and Adult Human Atrial Myocytes: Evidence for Developmental Changes of Sodium Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benzhi Cai, Xiaoqin Mu, Dongmei Gong, Shulin Jiang, Jianping Li, Qingxin Meng, Yunlong Bai, Yanju Liu, Xinyue Wang, Xueying Tan, Baofeng Yang, Yanjie Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated calcium currents and potassium currents were shown to undergo developmental changes in postnatal human and animal cardiomocytes. However, so far, there is no evidence whether sodium currents also presented the developmental changes in postnatal human atrial cells. The aim of this study was to observe age-related changes of sodium currents between pediatric and adult atrial myocytes. Human atrial myocytes were acutely isolated and the whole-cell patch clamp technique was used to record sodium currents isolated from pediatric and adult atrial cardiomocytes. The peak amplitude of sodium currents recorded in adult atrial cells was significantly larger than that in pediatric atrial myocytes. However, there was no significant difference of the activation voltage for peak sodium currents between two kinds of atrial myocytes. The time constants for the activation and inactivation of sodium currents were smaller in adult atria than pediatric atria. The further study revealed that the voltage-dependent inactivation of sodium currents were more slow in adult atrial cardiomyocytes than pediatric atrial cells. A significant difference was also observed in the recovery process of sodium channel from inactivation. In summary, a few significant differences were demonstrated in sodium currents characteristics between pediatric and adult atrial myocytes, which indicates that sodium currents in human atria also undergo developmental changes.

  7. Action of insecticidal N-alkylamides at site 2 of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottea, J.A.; Payne, G.T.; Soderlund, D.M. (Cornell Univ., Geneva, NY (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Nine synthetic N-alkylamides were examined as inhibitors of the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)batrachotoxinin A 20{alpha}-benzoate (({sup 3}H)BTX-B) to sodium channels and as activators of sodium uptake in mouse brain synaptoneurosomes. In the presence of scorpion (Leiurus quinquestriatus) venom, the six insecticidal analogues were active as both inhibitors of ({sup 3}H)BTX-B binding and stimulators of sodium uptake. These findings are consistent with an action of these compounds at the alkaloid activator recognition site (site 2) of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel. The three noninsecticidal N-alkylamides also inhibited ({sup 3}H)BTX-B binding but were ineffective as activators of sodium uptake. Concentration-response studies revealed that some of the insecticidal amides also enhanced sodium uptake through a second, high-affinity interaction that does not involve site 2, but this secondary effect does not appear to be correlated with insecticidal activity. The activities of N-alkylamides as sodium channel activators were influenced by the length of the alkenyl chain and the location of unsaturation within the molecule. These results further define the actions of N-alkylamides on sodium channels and illustrate the significance of the multiple binding domains of the sodium channel as target sites for insect control agents.

  8. Cloning and molecular characterization of a putative voltage-gated sodium channel gene in the crayfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Cagil; Purali, Nuhan

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channel genes and associated proteins have been cloned and studied in many mammalian and invertebrate species. However, there is no data available about the sodium channel gene(s) in the crayfish, although the animal has frequently been used as a model to investigate various aspects of neural cellular and circuit function. In the present work, by using RNA extracts from crayfish abdominal ganglia samples, the complete open reading frame of a putative sodium channel gene has firstly been cloned and molecular properties of the associated peptide have been analyzed. The open reading frame of the gene has a length of 5793 bp that encodes for the synthesis of a peptide, with 1930 amino acids, that is 82% similar to the α-peptide of a sodium channel in a neighboring species, Cancer borealis. The transmembrane topology analysis of the crayfish peptide indicated a pattern of four folding domains with several transmembrane segments, as observed in other known voltage-gated sodium channels. Upon analysis of the obtained sequence, functional regions of the putative sodium channel responsible for the selectivity filter, inactivation gate, voltage sensor, and phosphorylation have been predicted. The expression level of the putative sodium channel gene, as defined by a qPCR method, was measured and found to be the highest in nervous tissue.

  9. Sodium channel gene expression in mosquitoes, Aedes albopictus (S.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NANNAN LIU; QIANG XU; LEE ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    A mosquito strain of Aerdes albopictus,HAmAalG0,from Huntsville,Alabama,USA,showed a normal susceptibility and low tolerance to permethrin and resmethrin (pyrethroid insecticides) compared to a susceptible Ikaken strain,even though these pyrethroid insecticides have been used in the field for a long period of time in Alabama.Recently,we treated HAmAalG0 in the laboratory with permethrin for five generations and detected no significant change in the level of resistance to permethrin in the selected mosquitoes,HAmAalG5,compared with the parental strain HAmAalG0. We then examined the allelic expression at the L-to-F kdr site of the sodium channel gene in the Aedes mosquitoes to address our hypothesis that the L-to-F kdr mutation was not present in HAmAalG0 and HAmAalG5 mosquitoes. We found that every tested individual in Ikaken,HAmAalG0,and HAmAalG5 populations expressed a codon of CTA at the L-to-F kdr site encoding Leu,strongly corresponding to their susceptibility to insecticides.

  10. The Sodium-Activated Potassium Channel Slack Is Required for Optimal Cognitive Flexibility in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausch, Anne E.; Dieter, Rebekka; Nann, Yvette; Hausmann, Mario; Meyerdierks, Nora; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.; Ruth, Peter; Lukowski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    "Kcnt1" encoded sodium-activated potassium channels (Slack channels) are highly expressed throughout the brain where they modulate the firing patterns and general excitability of many types of neurons. Increasing evidence suggests that Slack channels may be important for higher brain functions such as cognition and normal intellectual…

  11. Seeing the forest through the trees: towards a unified view on physiological calcium regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Petegem, Filip; Lobo, Paolo A; Ahern, Christopher A

    2012-12-05

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) underlie the upstroke of the action potential in the excitable tissues of nerve and muscle. After opening, Na(V)s rapidly undergo inactivation, a crucial process through which sodium conductance is negatively regulated. Disruption of inactivation by inherited mutations is an established cause of lethal cardiac arrhythmia, epilepsy, or painful syndromes. Intracellular calcium ions (Ca(2+)) modulate sodium channel inactivation, and multiple players have been suggested in this process, including the cytoplasmic Na(V) C-terminal region including two EF-hands and an IQ motif, the Na(V) domain III-IV linker, and calmodulin. Calmodulin can bind to the IQ domain in both Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free conditions, but only to the DIII-IV linker in a Ca(2+)-loaded state. The mechanism of Ca(2+) regulation, and its composite effect(s) on channel gating, has been shrouded in much controversy owing to numerous apparent experimental inconsistencies. Herein, we attempt to summarize these disparate data and propose a novel, to our knowledge, physiological mechanism whereby calcium ions promote sodium current facilitation due to Ca(2+) memory at high-action-potential frequencies where Ca(2+) levels may accumulate. The available data suggest that this phenomenon may be disrupted in diseases where cytoplasmic calcium ion levels are chronically high and where targeted phosphorylation may decouple the Ca(2+) regulatory machinery. Many Na(V) disease mutations associated with electrical dysfunction are located in the Ca(2+)-sensing machinery and misregulation of Ca(2+)-dependent channel modulation is likely to contribute to disease phenotypes.

  12. UCP3 Regulates Single-Channel Activity of the Cardiac mCa1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motloch, Lukas J; Gebing, Tina; Reda, Sara; Schwaiger, Astrid; Wolny, Martin; Hoppe, Uta C

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake (mCa(2+) uptake) is thought to be mediated by the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU). UCP2 and UCP3 belong to a superfamily of mitochondrial ion transporters. Both proteins are expressed in the inner mitochondrial membrane of the heart. Recently, UCP2 was reported to modulate the function of the cardiac MCU related channel mCa1. However, the possible role of UCP3 in modulating cardiac mCa(2+) uptake via the MCU remains inconclusive. To understand the role of UCP3, we analyzed cardiac mCa1 single-channel activity in mitoplast-attached single-channel recordings from isolated murine cardiac mitoplasts, from adult wild-type controls (WT), and from UCP3 knockout mice (UCP3(-/-)). Single-channel registrations in UCP3(-/-) confirmed a murine voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel, i.e., mCa1, which was inhibited by Ru360. Compared to WT, mCa1 in UCP3(-/-) revealed similar single-channel characteristics. However, in UCP3(-/-) the channel exhibited decreased single-channel activity, which was insensitive to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) inhibition. Our results suggest that beyond UCP2, UCP3 also exhibits regulatory effects on cardiac mCa1/MCU function. Furthermore, we speculate that UCP3 might modulate previously described inhibitory effects of ATP on mCa1/MCU activity as well.

  13. Characterization and influence of cardiac background sodium current in the atrioventricular node.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hongwei; Li, Jue; James, Andrew F; Inada, Shin; Choisy, Stéphanie C M; Orchard, Clive H; Zhang, Henggui; Boyett, Mark R; Hancox, Jules C

    2016-08-01

    Background inward sodium current (IB,Na) that influences cardiac pacemaking has been comparatively under-investigated. The aim of this study was to determine for the first time the properties and role of IB,Na in cells from the heart's secondary pacemaker, the atrioventricular node (AVN). Myocytes were isolated from the AVN of adult male rabbits and mice using mechanical and enzymatic dispersion. Background current was measured using whole-cell patch clamp and monovalent ion substitution with major voltage- and time-dependent conductances inhibited. In the absence of a selective pharmacological inhibitor of IB,Na, computer modelling was used to assess the physiological contribution of IB,Na. Net background current during voltage ramps was linear, reversing close to 0mV. Switching between Tris- and Na(+)-containing extracellular solution in rabbit and mouse AVN cells revealed an inward IB,Na, with an increase in slope conductance in rabbit cells at -50mV from 0.54±0.03 to 0.91±0.05nS (mean±SEM; n=61 cells). IB,Na magnitude varied in proportion to [Na(+)]o. Other monovalent cations could substitute for Na(+) (Rb(+)>K(+)>Cs(+)>Na(+)>Li(+)). The single-channel conductance with Na(+) as charge carrier estimated from noise-analysis was 3.2±1.2pS (n=6). Ni(2+) (10mM), Gd(3+) (100μM), ruthenium red (100μM), or amiloride (1mM) produced modest reductions in IB,Na. Flufenamic acid was without significant effect, whilst La(3+) (100μM) or extracellular acidosis (pH6.3) inhibited the current by >60%. Under the conditions of our AVN cell simulations, removal of IB,Na arrested spontaneous activity and, in a simulated 1D-strand, reduced conduction velocity by ~20%. IB,Na is carried by distinct low conductance monovalent non-selective cation channels and can influence AVN spontaneous activity and conduction.

  14. Molecular determinants on the insect sodium channel for the specific action of type II pyrethroid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo, Ningguang; Liu, Zhiqi; Lee, Jung-Eun; Khambay, Bhupinder; Dong, Ke

    2009-01-15

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as type I or type II based on their distinct symptomology and effects on sodium channel gating. Structurally, type II pyrethroids possess an alpha-cyano group at the phenylbenzyl alcohol position, which is lacking in type I pyrethroids. Both type I and type II pyrethroids inhibit deactivation consequently prolonging the opening of sodium channels. However, type II pyrethroids inhibit the deactivation of sodium channels to a greater extent than type I pyrethroids inducing much slower decaying of tail currents upon repolarization. The molecular basis of a type II-specific action, however, is not known. Here we report the identification of a residue G(1111) and two positively charged lysines immediately downstream of G(1111) in the intracellular linker connecting domains II and III of the cockroach sodium channel that are specifically involved in the action of type II pyrethroids, but not in the action of type I pyrethroids. Deletion of G(1111), a consequence of alternative splicing, reduced the sodium channel sensitivity to type II pyrethroids, but had no effect on channel sensitivity to type I pyrethroids. Interestingly, charge neutralization or charge reversal of two positively charged lysines (Ks) downstream of G(1111) had a similar effect. These results provide the molecular insight into the type II-specific interaction of pyrethroids with the sodium channel at the molecular level.

  15. Hapalindoles from the cyanobacterium fischerella: potential sodium channel modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagide, Eva; Becher, Paul G; Louzao, M Carmen; Espiña, Begoña; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Jüttner, Friedrich; Botana, Luis M

    2014-10-20

    Hapalindoles make up a large group of bioactive metabolites of the cyanobacterial order Stigonematales. 12-epi-Hapalindole E isonitrile, 12-epi-hapalindole C isonitrile, 12-epi-hapalindole J isonitrile, and hapalindole L from Fischerella are acutely toxic for insect larvae; however, the biochemical targets responsible for the biological activities of hapalindoles are not understood. We describe here the electron impact mass spectra of these four hapalindole congeners; their structures were confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In combination with the presented mass spectra of (15)N-labeled species and their retention times on a gas chromatography capillary column, a rapid and reliable determination should be possible in future research. The bioactivity of these hapalindoles was tested on mammalian cells focusing on their effects in the BE(2)-M17 excitable human neuroblastoma cell line. The fluorescent dye Alamar Blue was applied to monitor cytotoxicity, fura-2 to evaluate changes in the cytosolic calcium concentrations, and bis-oxonol to detect effects on membrane potential. Data showed that the hapalindoles did not affect cell viability of the neuroblastoma cells, even when they were incubated for 72 h. Neither depolarization nor initiation of calcium influx was observed in the cells upon hapalindole treatment. However, the data provide evidence that hapalindoles are sodium channel-modulating neurotoxins. They inhibited veratridine-induced depolarization in a manner similar to that of neosaxitoxin. Our data suggest hapalindoles should be added to the growing number of neurotoxic secondary metabolites, such as saxitoxins and anatoxins, already known in freshwater cyanobacteria. As stable congeners, hapalindoles may be a risk in freshwater ecosystems or agricultural water usage and should therefore be considered in water quality assessment.

  16. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: A study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K.; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Todt, Hannes [Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Department of Neurophysiology and -pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Hilber, Karlheinz, E-mail: karlheinz.hilber@meduniwien.ac.at [Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Department of Neurophysiology and -pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sandtner, Walter [Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Institute of Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-12-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licenced as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Na{sub v}1.5 sodium and Ca{sub v}1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (≥ 10 μM) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias. - Highlights: • We study effects of anti-addiction drug ibogaine on ionic currents in cardiomyocytes. • We assess the cardiac ion channel profile of ibogaine. • Ibogaine inhibits hERG potassium, sodium and calcium channels. • Ibogaine’s effects on

  17. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 activation by dietary capsaicin promotes urinary sodium excretion by inhibiting epithelial sodium channel α subunit-mediated sodium reabsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Wang, Fei; Wei, Xing; Liang, Yi; Cui, Yuanting; Gao, Feng; Zhong, Jian; Pu, Yunfei; Zhao, Yu; Yan, Zhencheng; Arendshorst, William J; Nilius, Bernd; Chen, Jing; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2014-08-01

    High salt (HS) intake contributes to the development of hypertension. Epithelial sodium channels play crucial roles in regulating renal sodium reabsorption and blood pressure. The renal transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) cation channel can be activated by its agonist capsaicin. However, it is unknown whether dietary factors can act on urinary sodium excretion and renal epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) function. Here, we report that TRPV1 activation by dietary capsaicin increased urinary sodium excretion through reducing sodium reabsorption in wild-type (WT) mice on a HS diet but not in TRPV1(-/-) mice. The effect of capsaicin on urinary sodium excretion was involved in inhibiting αENaC and its related with-no-lysine kinase 1/serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase 1 pathway in renal cortical collecting ducts of WT mice. Dietary capsaicin further reduced the increased αENaC activity in WT mice attributed to the HS diet. In contrast, this capsaicin effect was absent in TRPV1(-/-) mice. Immunoprecipitation study indicated αENaC specifically coexpressed and functionally interact with TRPV1 in renal cortical collecting ducts of WT mice. Additionally, ENaC activity and expression were suppressed by capsaicin-mediated TRPV1 activation in cultured M1-cortical collecting duct cells. Long-term dietary capsaicin prevented the development of high blood pressure in WT mice on a HS diet. It concludes that TRPV1 activation in the cortical collecting ducts by capsaicin increases urinary sodium excretion and avoids HS diet-induced hypertension through antagonizing αENaC-mediated urinary sodium reabsorption. Dietary capsaicin may represent a promising lifestyle intervention in populations exposed to a high dietary salt intake.

  18. Antiepileptic drugs targeting sodium channels: subunit and neuron-type specific interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiao, X.

    2013-01-01

    Certain antiepileptic drugs (e.g. carbamazepine and lamotrigine) block sodium channels in an use-dependent manner and this mechanism contributes to the anti-convulsant properties of these drugs. There are, however, subtle differences in sodium current blocking properties of the antiepileptic drugs w

  19. Polyunsaturated fatty acid analogs act antiarrhythmically on the cardiac IKs channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liin, Sara I.; Silverå Ejneby, Malin; Barro-Soria, Rene;

    2015-01-01

    charge at neutral pH, restore the sensitivity to open IKs channels. PUFA analogs with a positively charged head group inhibit IKs channels. These different PUFA analogs could be developed into drugs to treat cardiac arrhythmias. In support of this possibility, we show that PUFA analogs act...

  20. Design of a specific activator for skeletal muscle sodium channels uncovers channel architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lior; Ilan, Nitza; Gur, Maya; Stühmer, Walter; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael

    2007-10-05

    Gating modifiers of voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)s) are important tools in neuroscience research and may have therapeutic potential in medicinal disorders. Analysis of the bioactive surface of the scorpion beta-toxin Css4 (from Centruroides suffusus suffusus) toward rat brain (rNa(v)1.2a) and skeletal muscle (rNa(v)1.4) channels using binding studies revealed commonality but also substantial differences, which were used to design a specific activator, Css4(F14A/E15A/E28R), of rNa(v)1.4 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The therapeutic potential of Css4(F14A/E15A/E28R) was tested using an rNa(v)1.4 mutant carrying the same mutation present in the genetic disorder hypokalemic periodic paralysis. The activator restored the impaired gating properties of the mutant channel expressed in oocytes, thus offering a tentative new means for treatment of neuromuscular disorders with reduced muscle excitability. Mutant double cycle analysis employing toxin residues involved in the construction of Css4(F14A/E15A/E28R) and residues whose equivalents in the rat brain channel rNa(v)1.2a were shown to affect Css4 binding revealed significant coupling energy (>1.3 kcal/mol) between F14A and E592A at Domain-2/voltage sensor segments 1-2 (D2/S1-S2), R27Q and E1251N at D3/SS2-S6, and E28R with both E650A at D2/S3-S4 and E1251N at D3/SS2-S6. These results show that despite the differences in interactions with the rat brain and skeletal muscle Na(v)s, Css4 recognizes a similar region on both channel subtypes. Moreover, our data indicate that the S3-S4 loop of the voltage sensor module in Domain-2 is in very close proximity to the SS2-S6 segment of the pore module of Domain-3 in rNa(v)1.4. This is the first experimental evidence that the inter-domain spatial organization of mammalian Na(v)s resembles that of voltage-gated potassium channels.

  1. Mutations in the Kv1.5 channel gene KCNA5 in cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nathalie H; Winkel, Bo G; Kanters, Jørgen K

    2007-01-01

    identified the point mutations P91L and E33V in the KCNA5 gene encoding the Kv1.5 potassium channel that has not previously been associated with arrhythmia. We functionally characterized the mutations in HEK293 cells. The mutated channels behaved similarly to the wild-type with respect to biophysical......Mutations in one of the ion channels shaping the cardiac action potential can lead to action potential prolongation. However, only in a minority of cardiac arrest cases mutations in the known arrhythmia-related genes can be identified. In two patients with arrhythmia and cardiac arrest, we...... characteristics and drug sensitivity. Both patients also carried a D85N polymorphism in KCNE1, which was neither found to influence the Kv1.5 nor the Kv7.1 channel activity. We conclude that although the two N-terminal Kv1.5 mutations did not show any apparent electrophysiological phenotype, it is possible...

  2. Dysfunctional Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-gated Ion Channels in Cardiac Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqi Zhao

    Full Text Available Abstract Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels are reverse voltage-dependent, and their activation depends on the hyperpolarization of the membrane and may be directly or indirectly regulated by the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP or other signal-transduction cascades. The distribution, quantity and activation states of HCN channels differ in tissues throughout the body. Evidence exhibits that HCN channels play critical roles in the generation and conduction of the electrical impulse and the physiopathological process of some cardiac diseases. They may constitute promising drug targets in the treatment of these cardiac diseases. Pharmacological treatment targeting HCN channels is of benefit to these cardiac conditions.

  3. The effects of paeoniflorin monomer of a Chinese herb on cardiac ion channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rong-rong; LI Ning; ZHANG Yin-hui; RAN Yu-qin; PU Jie-lin

    2011-01-01

    Background Because of the potential proarrhythmic effect of current antiarrhythmic drugs, it is still desirable to find safer antiarrhythmic drugs worldwide. Paeoniflorin is one of the Chinese herb monomers that have different effects on many ion channels. The present study aimed to determine the effects of paeoniflorin on cardiac ion channels.Methods Whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record ion channel currents. L-type calcium current (/Ca-L),inward rectifier potassium current (/K1), and transient outward potassium current (/to1) were studied in rat ventricular myocytes and sodium current (/Na), slow delayed rectifier current (/Ks), and HERG current (/Kr) were investigated in transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells.Results One hundred μmol/L paeoniflorin reduced the peak /ca-L by 40.29% at the test potential of ±10 mV (from (-9.78±0.52) pA/pF to (-5.84±0.89) pA/pF, n=5, P=0.028). The steady-state activation curve was shifted to more positive potential in the presence of the drug. The half activation potentials were (-11.22±0.27) mV vs. (-5.95±0.84) mV (n=5,P=0.007), respectively. However, the steady-state inactivation and the time course of recovery from inactivation were not changed. One hundred μmol/L paeoniflorin completely inhibited the peak /Na and the effect was reversible. Moreover,paeoniflorin inhibited the /K1 by 30.13% at the test potential of -100 mV (from (-25.26±8.21) pA/pF to (-17.65±6.52)pA/pF, n=6, F=0.015) without effects on the reversal potential and the rectification property. By contrast, 100 μmol/L paeoniflorin had no effects on/to1, /Ks or /Kr channels.Conclusions The study demonstrated that paeoniflorin blocked /Ca-L, /Na, and /Kf without affecting /to1, /Ks, or /Kr. The multi-channel block effect may account for its antiarrhythmic effects with less proarrhythmic potential.

  4. Regression of cardiac hypertrophy in the SHR by combined renin-angiotensin system blockade and dietary sodium restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Abro

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Altered operation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS and dietary sodium intake have been identified as independent risk factors for cardiac hypertrophy. The way in which sodium intake and the operation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system interact in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy is poorly understood. The aims of this study were to investigate the cardiac effects of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS blockade in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR, using co-treatment with an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB and an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor with different sodium intakes. Our experiments with SHR show that, at high levels of sodium intake (4.0%, aggressive RAS blockade treatment with candesartan (3 mg/kg and perindopril (6 mg/kg does not result in regression of cardiac hypertrophy. In contrast, RAS blockade coupled with reduced sodium diet (0.2% significantly regresses cardiac hypertrophy, impairs animal growth and is associated with elevated plasma renin and dramatically suppressed plasma angiotensinogen levels. Histological analyses indicate that the differential effect of reduced sodium on heart growth during RAS blockade is not associated with any change in myocardial interstitial collagen, but reflects modification of cellular geometry. Dimensional measurements of enzymatically-isolated ventricular myocytes show that, in the RAS blocked, reduced sodium group, myocyte length and width were decreased by about 16—19% compared with myocytes from the high sodium treatment group. Our findings highlight the importance of `titrating' sodium intake with combined RAS blockade in the clinical setting to optimise therapeutic benefit.

  5. [Myotonia and cardiac conduction defects in myotonic dystrophy and defect in ion channels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Tomoya; Nakamori, Masayuki; Takahashi, Masanori P

    2014-03-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM), the most common hereditary muscle disease in adults, is caused by the unstable genomic expansion of simple sequence repeats. This disease is characterized by myotonia and various multisystemic complications, most commonly those of the cardiac, endocrine, and central nervous systems. The cardiac abnormalities, especially cardiac conduction defects, significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality in DM patients. Therefore, understanding the pathophysiology of cardiac conduction defects in DM is important. The pathomechanism of DM has been thoroughly investigated. The mutant RNA transcripts containing the expanded repeat give rise to a toxic gain-of-function by perturbing splicing factors in the nucleus, leading to the misregulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing. In particular, several studies, including ours, have shown that myotonia is caused by alternative splicing of the CLCN1 gene coding the voltage-gated chloride channel in skeletal muscle through an "RNA-dominant mechanism". Since the aberrantly spliced isoform does not seem to form a functional channel, the feature of skeletal muscle in DM can be interpreted as a "channelopathy" caused by reduced chloride channel protein. Similarly, we recently identified a misregulation of alternative splicing in an ion channel gene which is known to be responsible for arrhythmic disease showing Mendelian inheritance. Here, we review the cardiac manifestation and RNA-dominant mechanism of DM, and discuss the possible pathophysiology of cardiac conduction defects by referring to hereditary arrhythmic diseases, such as long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome.

  6. Functional Alterations of Ion Channels From Cardiac Fibroblasts in Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracious R. Ross

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In an aged population, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of fatality and morbidity. Age-related fibrotic remodeling of the heart contributes to progressive myocardial dysfunction. Cardiac fibroblasts (CF, responsible for the maintenance of extracellular matrix and fibrosis process, play an important role in cardiac health and disease. CFs influence myocardial function by their chemical, electrical and mechanical interactions with cardiomyocytes through extracellular matrix deposition or secretion of cytokines and growth factors. These, in turn, are modulated by ion channels, macromolecular pores in the plasma membrane that allow selective ionic fluxes of major ions like K+, Ca2+, Na+ or Cl-, which affect membrane potential and cellular signal transduction. The importance of ion channels in modulating various functions of CFs, including proliferation, differentiation, secretion and apoptosis, is being recognized from recent studies of CFs from animal models and tissue from patients with various cardiac pathologies. Understanding the role of ion channels in CFs under physiological conditions and their alterations in age-related cardiac diseases may help facilitate development of novel therapeutic strategies to limit cardiac fibrosis and its adverse effect on myocardial function. This narrative review summarizes the knowledge gained thus far on ion channels in CFs and their relationship with cardiac diseases in human and experimental animal models.

  7. Identification of sodium channel isoforms that mediate action potential firing in lamina I/II spinal cord neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Paula L

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voltage-gated sodium channels play key roles in acute and chronic pain processing. The molecular, biophysical, and pharmacological properties of sodium channel currents have been extensively studied for peripheral nociceptors while the properties of sodium channel currents in dorsal horn spinal cord neurons remain incompletely understood. Thus far, investigations into the roles of sodium channel function in nociceptive signaling have primarily focused on recombinant channels or peripheral nociceptors. Here, we utilize recordings from lamina I/II neurons withdrawn from the surface of spinal cord slices to systematically determine the functional properties of sodium channels expressed within the superficial dorsal horn. Results Sodium channel currents within lamina I/II neurons exhibited relatively hyperpolarized voltage-dependent properties and fast kinetics of both inactivation and recovery from inactivation, enabling small changes in neuronal membrane potentials to have large effects on intrinsic excitability. By combining biophysical and pharmacological channel properties with quantitative real-time PCR results, we demonstrate that functional sodium channel currents within lamina I/II neurons are predominantly composed of the NaV1.2 and NaV1.3 isoforms. Conclusions Overall, lamina I/II neurons express a unique combination of functional sodium channels that are highly divergent from the sodium channel isoforms found within peripheral nociceptors, creating potentially complementary or distinct ion channel targets for future pain therapeutics.

  8. Modification of sodium and potassium channel kinetics by diethyl ether and studies on sodium channel inactivation in the crayfish giant axon membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bean, Bruce Palmer

    1979-01-01

    The effects of ether and halothane on membrane currents in the voltage clamped crayfish giant axon membrane were investigated. Concentrations of ether up to 300 mM and of halothane up to 32 mM had no effect on resting potential or leakage conductance. Ether and halothane reduced the size of sodium currents without changing the voltage dependence of the peak currents or their reversal potential. Ether and halothane also produced a reversible, dose-dependent speeding of sodium current decay at all membrane potentials. Ether reduced the time constants for inactivation, and also shifted the midpoint of the steady-state inactivation curve in the hyperpolarizing direction. Potassium currents were smaller with ether present, with no change in the voltage dependence of steady-state currents. The activation of potassium channels was faster with ether present. There was no apparent change in the capacitance of the crayfish giant axon membrane with ether concentrations of up to 100 mM. Experiments on sodium channel inactivation kinetics were performed using 4-aminopyridine to block potassium currents. Sodium currents decayed with a time course generally fit well by a single exponential. The time constant of decay was a steep function of voltage, especially in the negative resistance region of the peak current vs voltage relation.The time course of inactivation was very similar to that of the decay of the current at the same potential. The measurement of steady-state inactivation curves with different test pulses showed no shifts along the voltage asix. The voltage-dependence of the integral of sodium conductance was measured to test models of sodium channel inactivation in which channels must open before inactivating; the results appear inconsistent with some of the simplest cases of such models.

  9. Neurotoxins and their binding areas on voltage-gated sodium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke eStevens

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Sodium Channels (VGSCs are large transmembrane proteins that conduct sodium ions across the membrane and by doing so they generate signals of communication between many kinds of tissues. They are responsible for the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells, in close collaboration with other channels like potassium channels. Genetic defects in sodium channel genes therefore can cause a wide variety of diseases, generally called ‘channelopathies’.The first insights into the mechanism of action potentials and the involvement of sodium channels originated from Hodgkin and Huxley for which they were awarded the Nobel Prize in 1963. Until now, these concepts still form the basis for understanding the functioning of VGSCs. When VGSCs sense a sufficient change in membrane potential, they are activated and will generate a massive influx of sodium ions. Immediately after, channels will start inactivating and currents decrease. In the inactivated state channels stay refractory for any new stimulus and they must return to the closed state before being susceptible to any new depolarization. On the other hand, studies with neurotoxins like tetrodotoxin (TTX and saxitoxin (STX also contributed largely to our today’s understanding of the structure and function of ion channels and specifically of VGSCs. Moreover, neurotoxins acting on ion channels turned out to be valuable tools in the development of new drugs for the enormous range of diseases in which ion channels are involved. A recent example of a synthetic neurotoxin that made it to the market is ziconotide (Prialt®, Elan. The original peptide, -MVIIA, is derived from the cone snail Conus magus and now FDA/EMEA-approved for the management of severe chronic pain by blocking the N-type voltage-gated calcium channels in neurons.This review focuses on the current status of research on neurotoxins acting on VGSC, their contribution to further unravel the

  10. Molecular Basis of Paraltyic Neurotoxin Action on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-14

    of 9,700 daltons isolated from the coral Goni2oora gy. (1). The toxin enhances neurally mediated contraction of blood vessels and taenia coli of the...sites on the solium channel and to identify the site of GPT action within the structure of the sodium channel protein. 2. Site of Action of Brvyetoxin

  11. An update on transcriptional and post-translational regulation of brain voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwuli, Donatus O; Beltran-Alvarez, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential proteins in brain physiology, as they generate the sodium currents that initiate neuronal action potentials. Voltage-gated sodium channels expression, localisation and function are regulated by a range of transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. Here, we review our understanding of regulation of brain voltage-gated sodium channels, in particular SCN1A (NaV1.1), SCN2A (NaV1.2), SCN3A (NaV1.3) and SCN8A (NaV1.6), by transcription factors, by alternative splicing, and by post-translational modifications. Our focus is strongly centred on recent research lines, and newly generated knowledge.

  12. Inhibitors of arachidonate-regulated calcium channel signaling suppress triggered activity induced by the late sodium current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkowicz, Paul; Umeda, Patrick K; Sharifov, Oleg F; White, C Roger; Huang, Jian; Mahtani, Harry; Urthaler, Ferdinand

    2014-02-05

    Disturbances in myocyte calcium homeostasis are hypothesized to be one cause for cardiac arrhythmia. The full development of this hypothesis requires (i) the identification of all sources of arrhythmogenic calcium and (ii) an understanding of the mechanism(s) through which calcium initiates arrhythmia. To these ends we superfused rat left atria with the late sodium current activator type II Anemonia sulcata toxin (ATXII). This toxin prolonged atrial action potentials, induced early afterdepolarization, and provoked triggered activity. The calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN-93 (N-[2-[[[3-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-propenyl]methylamino]methyl]phenyl]-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methoxybenzenesulphon-amide) suppressed ATXII triggered activity but its inactive congener KN-92 (2-[N-(4-methoxy benzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine) did not. Neither drug affected normal atrial contractility. Calcium entry via L-type channels or calcium leakage from sarcoplasmic reticulum stores are not critical for this type of ectopy as neither verapamil ((RS)-2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5-{[2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl]-(methyl)amino}-2-prop-2-ylpentanenitrile) nor ryanodine affected ATXII triggered activity. By contrast, inhibitors of the voltage independent arachidonate-regulated calcium (ARC) channel and the store-operated calcium channel specifically suppressed ATXII triggered activity without normalizing action potentials or affecting atrial contractility. Inhibitors of cytosolic calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 also suppressed triggered activity suggesting that this lipase, which generates free arachidonate, plays a key role in ATXII ectopy. Thus, increased left atrial late sodium current appears to activate atrial Orai-linked ARC and store operated calcium channels, and these voltage-independent channels may be unexpected sources for the arrhythmogenic calcium that underlies triggered activity.

  13. Modulation of neuronal sodium channels by the sea anemone peptide BDS-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pin; Jo, Sooyeon; Bean, Bruce P

    2012-06-01

    Blood-depressing substance I (BDS-I), a 43 amino-acid peptide from sea anemone venom, is used as a specific inhibitor of Kv3-family potassium channels. We found that BDS-I acts with even higher potency to modulate specific types of voltage-dependent sodium channels. In rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, 3 μM BDS-I strongly enhanced tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive sodium current but weakly inhibited TTX-resistant sodium current. In rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons, which express only TTX-sensitive sodium current, BDS-I enhanced current elicited by small depolarizations and slowed decay of currents at all voltages (EC(50) ∼ 300 nM). BDS-I acted with exceptionally high potency and efficacy on cloned human Nav1.7 channels, slowing inactivation by 6-fold, with an EC(50) of approximately 3 nM. BDS-I also slowed inactivation of sodium currents in N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells (mainly from Nav1.3 channels), with an EC(50) ∼ 600 nM. In hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons (mouse) and cerebellar Purkinje neurons (mouse and rat), BDS-I had only small effects on current decay (slowing inactivation by 20-50%), suggesting relatively weak sensitivity of Nav1.1 and Nav1.6 channels. The biggest effect of BDS-I in central neurons was to enhance resurgent current in Purkinje neurons, an effect reflected in enhancement of sodium current during the repolarization phase of Purkinje neuron action potentials. Overall, these results show that BDS-I acts to modulate sodium channel gating in a manner similar to previously known neurotoxin receptor site 3 anemone toxins but with different isoform sensitivity. Most notably, BDS-I acts with very high potency on human Nav1.7 channels.

  14. The Structural Basis and Functional Consequences of Interactions Between Tetrodotoxin and Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ruben

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Tetrodotoxin (TTX is a highly specific blocker of voltage-gated sodium channels. The dissociation constant of block varies with different channel isoforms. Until recently, channel resistance was thought to be primarily imparted by amino acid substitutions at a single position in domain I. Recent work reveals a novel site for tetrodotoxin resistance in the P-region of domain IV.

  15. Hypertonic saline does not reverse the sodium channel blocking actions of lidocaine: evidence from electrophysiologic and defibrillation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujhelyi, M R; Schur, M; Frede, T; Bottorff, M B; Gabel, M; Markel, M L

    1997-01-01

    Studies have shown that increasing extracellular sodium concentration can partially reverse sodium channel blockade. However, there is conflicting in vitro evidence in this regard for lidocaine. The effects of lidocaine on cardiac electrophysiology and defibrillation were studied in a basal and hypernatremic state to determine reversibility of sodium channel blockade. Electrophysiologic studies measured right ventricular effective refractory period at 350 ms pacing cycle length and QRS interval, JT interval, and monophasic action potential duration during sinus rhythm and right ventricular pacing (350 ms cycle length) in 14 pentobarbital-anesthetized swine (25-30 kg). Defibrillation threshold (DFT) was measured by quantitating successful conversion of sustained ventricular fibrillation to normal sinus rhythm. Each pig was randomly assigned to a treatment group with three study phases; group 1 = baseline, lidocaine (20 mg/kg/h), and lidocaine plus placebo (D5W; n = 7); and group 2 = baseline, lidocaine, and lidocaine plus hypertonic saline (2-3 mM/kg/h; n = 7). In groups 1 and 2, lidocaine infused alone significantly (p Lidocaine alone reduced right ventricular action potential duration (APD) in groups 1 and 2 (214 +/- 18 to 206 +/- 20 ms; p lidocaine, DFT and QRS duration values were unaffected (14.7 +/- 5.4 to 16.1 +/- 3.7 J and 103 +/- 12 to 100 +/- 11 ms, respectively). However, APD and JT intervals returned to basal values when hypertonic saline was added to lidocaine (212 +/- 8 to 225 +/- 13; p Lidocaine slowed ventricular conduction velocity and reduced APD. The administration of hypertonic saline to increase extracellular sodium concentrations failed to reverse the effect of lidocaine on conduction-velocity slowing or elevated DFT values. Hypertonic saline did reverse the effects of lidocaine on repolarization parameters. These data suggest that shortening of repolarization is not a mechanism by which lidocaine makes it more difficult to defibrillate the

  16. Rescue of mutated cardiac ion channels in inherited arrhythmia syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balijepalli, Sadguna Y; Anderson, Corey L; Lin, Eric C; January, Craig T

    2010-08-01

    Inherited arrhythmia syndromes comprise an increasingly complex group of diseases involving mutations in multiple genes encoding ion channels, ion channel accessory subunits and channel interacting proteins, and various regulatory elements. These mutations serve to disrupt normal electrophysiology in the heart, leading to increased arrhythmogenic risk and death. These diseases have added impact as they often affect young people, sometimes without warning. Although originally thought to alter ion channel function, it is now increasingly recognized that mutations may alter ion channel protein and messenger RNA processing, to reduce the number of channels reaching the surface membrane. For many of these mutations, it is also known that several interventions may restore protein processing of mutant channels to increase their surface membrane expression toward normal. In this article, we reviewed inherited arrhythmia syndromes, focusing on long QT syndrome type 2, and discuss the complex biology of ion channel trafficking and pharmacological rescue of disease-causing mutant channels. Pharmacological rescue of misprocessed mutant channel proteins, or their transcripts providing appropriate small molecule drugs can be developed, has the potential for novel clinical therapies in some patients with inherited arrhythmia syndromes.

  17. Digoxin activates sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-release channels: a possible role in cardiac inotropy.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    1. The effect of digoxin on rapid 45Ca2+ efflux from cardiac and skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles was investigated. Additionally the interaction of digoxin with single cardiac and skeletal muscle SR Ca(2+)-release channels incorporated into planar phospholipid bilayers and held under voltage clamp was determined. 2. Digoxin (1 nM) increased the initial rate and amount of Ca(2+)-induced release of 45Ca2+ from cardiac SR vesicles, passively loaded with 45CaCl2, at an extravesicular...

  18. Flufenamic acid decreases neuronal excitability through modulation of voltage-gated sodium channel gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Hau-Jie; Baranauskas, Gytis; Martina, Marco

    2010-10-15

    The electrophysiological phenotype of individual neurons critically depends on the biophysical properties of the voltage-gated channels they express. Differences in sodium channel gating are instrumental in determining the different firing phenotypes of pyramidal cells and interneurons; moreover, sodium channel modulation represents an important mechanism of action for many widely used CNS drugs. Flufenamic acid (FFA) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been long used as a blocker of calcium-dependent cationic conductances. Here we show that FFA inhibits voltage-gated sodium currents in hippocampal pyramidal neurons; this effect is dose-dependent with IC(50) = 189 μm. We used whole-cell and nucleated patch recordings to investigate the mechanisms of FFA modulation of TTX-sensitive voltage-gated sodium current. Our data show that flufenamic acid slows down the inactivation process of the sodium current, while shifting the inactivation curve ~10 mV toward more hyperpolarized potentials. The recovery from inactivation is also affected in a voltage-dependent way, resulting in slower recovery at hyperpolarized potentials. Recordings from acute slices demonstrate that FFA reduces repetitive- and abolishes burst-firing in CA1 pyramidal neurons. A computational model based on our data was employed to better understand the mechanisms of FFA action. Simulation data support the idea that FFA acts via a novel mechanism by reducing the voltage dependence of the sodium channel fast inactivation rates. These effects of FFA suggest that it may be an effective anti-epileptic drug.

  19. Selective alteration of sodium channel gating by Australian funnel-web spider toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, G M; Little, M J; Tyler, M; Narahashi, T

    1996-01-01

    The actions of potent mammalian neurotoxins isolated from the venom of two Australian funnel-web spiders were investigated using both electrophysiological and neurochemical techniques. Whole-cell patch clamp recording of sodium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons revealed that versutoxin (VTX), isolated from the venom of Hadronyche versuta, produced a concentration-dependent slowing or removal of tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium current inactivation and a reduction in peak TTX-S sodium current. In contrast, VTX had no effect on tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium currents or potassium currents. VTX also shifted the voltage dependence of sodium channel activation in the hyperpolarizing direction and increased the rate of recovery from inactivation. Ion flux studies performed in rat brain synaptosomes also revealed that robustoxin (RTX), from the venom of Atrax robustus, and VTX both produced a partial activation of 22Na+ flux and an inhibition of batrachotoxin-activated 22Na+ flux. This inhibition of flux through batrachotoxin-activated channels was not due to an interaction with neurotoxin receptor site 1 since [3H]saxitoxin binding was unaffected. In addition, the partial activation of 22Na+ flux was not enhanced in the presence of alpha-scorpion toxin and further experiments suggest that VTX also enhances [3H]batrachotoxin binding. These selective actions of funnel-web spider toxins on sodium channel function are comparable to those of alpha-scorpion and sea anemone toxins which bind to neurotoxin receptor site 3 on the channel to slow channel inactivation profoundly. Also, these modifications of sodium channel gating and kinetics are consistent with actions of the spider toxins to produce repetitive firing of action potentials.

  20. Sodium channel expression in the ventral posterolateral nucleus of the thalamus after peripheral nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waxman Stephen G

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Peripheral nerve injury is known to up-regulate the expression of rapidly-repriming Nav1.3 sodium channel within first-order dorsal root ganglion neurons and second-order dorsal horn nociceptive neurons, but it is not known if pain-processing neurons higher along the neuraxis also undergo changes in sodium channel expression. In this study, we hypothesized that after peripheral nerve injury, third-order neurons in the ventral posterolateral (VPL nucleus of the thalamus undergo changes in expression of sodium channels. To test this hypothesis, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent chronic constriction injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve. Ten days after CCI, when allodynia and hyperalgesia were evident, in situ hybridization and immunocytochemical analysis revealed up-regulation of Nav1.3 mRNA, but no changes in expression of Nav1.1, Nav1.2, or Nav1.6 in VPL neurons, and unit recordings demonstrated increased background firing, which persisted after spinal cord transection, and evoked hyperresponsiveness to peripheral stimuli. These results demonstrate that injury to the peripheral nervous system induces alterations in sodium channel expression within higher-order VPL neurons, and suggest that misexpression of the Nav1.3 sodium channel increases the excitability of VPL neurons injury, contributing to neuropathic pain.

  1. Nav1.7 is the predominant sodium channel in rodent olfactory sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Black Joel A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 is preferentially expressed in dorsal root ganglion (DRG and sympathetic neurons within the peripheral nervous system. Homozygous or compound heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in SCN9A, the gene which encodes Nav1.7, cause congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP accompanied by anosmia. Global knock-out of Nav1.7 in mice is neonatal lethal reportedly from starvation, suggesting anosmia. These findings led us to hypothesize that Nav1.7 is the main sodium channel in the peripheral olfactory sensory neurons (OSN, also known as olfactory receptor neurons. Methods We used multiplex PCR-restriction enzyme polymorphism, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to determine the identity of sodium channels in rodent OSNs. Results We show here that Nav1.7 is the predominant sodium channel transcript, with low abundance of other sodium channel transcripts, in olfactory epithelium from rat and mouse. Our in situ hybridization data show that Nav1.7 transcripts are present in rat OSNs. Immunostaining of Nav1.7 and Nav1.6 channels in rat shows a complementary accumulation pattern with Nav1.7 in peripheral presynaptic OSN axons, and Nav1.6 primarily in postsynaptic cells and their dendrites in the glomeruli of the olfactory bulb within the central nervous system. Conclusions Our data show that Nav1.7 is the dominant sodium channel in rat and mouse OSN, and may explain anosmia in Nav1.7 null mouse and patients with Nav1.7-related CIP.

  2. Potential Roles of Amiloride-Sensitive Sodium Channels in Cancer Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siguang Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ENaC/degenerin ion channel superfamily includes the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC and acid sensitive ionic channel (ASIC. ENaC is a multimeric ion channel formed by heteromultimeric membrane glycoproteins, which participate in a multitude of biological processes by mediating the transport of sodium (Na+ across epithelial tissues such as the kidney, lungs, bladder, and gut. Aberrant ENaC functions contribute to several human disease states including pseudohypoaldosteronism, Liddle syndrome, cystic fibrosis, and salt-sensitive hypertension. Increasing evidence suggests that ion channels not only regulate ion homeostasis and electric signaling in excitable cells but also play important roles in cancer cell behaviors such as proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and migration. Indeed, ENaCs/ASICs had been reported to be associated with cancer characteristics. Given their cell surface localization and pharmacology, pharmacological strategies to target ENaC/ASIC family members may be promising cancer therapeutics.

  3. Protection of Coronary Endothelial Function during Cardiac Surgery: Potential of Targeting Endothelial Ion Channels in Cardioprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelium plays a critical role in the control of blood flow by producing vasoactive factors to regulate vascular tone. Ion channels, in particular, K+ channels and Ca2+-permeable channels in endothelial cells, are essential to the production and function of endothelium-derived vasoactive factors. Impairment of coronary endothelial function occurs in open heart surgery that may result in reduction of coronary blood flow and thus in an inadequate myocardial perfusion. Hyperkalemic exposure and concurrent ischemia-reperfusion during cardioplegic intervention compromise NO and EDHF-mediated function and the impairment involves alterations of K+ channels, that is, KATP and KCa, and Ca2+-permeable TRP channels in endothelial cells. Pharmacological modulation of these channels during ischemia-reperfusion and hyperkalemic exposure show promising results on the preservation of NO and EDHF-mediated endothelial function, which suggests the potential of targeting endothelial K+ and TRP channels for myocardial protection during cardiac surgery.

  4. Digoxin activates sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-release channels: a possible role in cardiac inotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, S J; Williams, A J

    1993-04-01

    1. The effect of digoxin on rapid 45Ca2+ efflux from cardiac and skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles was investigated. Additionally the interaction of digoxin with single cardiac and skeletal muscle SR Ca(2+)-release channels incorporated into planar phospholipid bilayers and held under voltage clamp was determined. 2. Digoxin (1 nM) increased the initial rate and amount of Ca(2+)-induced release of 45Ca2+ from cardiac SR vesicles, passively loaded with 45CaCl2, at an extravesicular [Ca2+] of 0.1 microM. The efflux in the presence and absence of digoxin was inhibited at pM extravesicular Ca2+ and blocked by 5 mM Mg2+. 3. To elucidate the mechanism of action of digoxin, single-channel recording was used. Digoxin (1-20 nM) increased single-channel open probability (Po) when added to the cytosolic but not the luminal face of the cardiac channel in the presence of sub-maximally activating Ca2+ (0.1 microM-10 microM) with an EC50 of 0.91 nM at 10 microM Ca2+. The mechanisms underlying the action of digoxin appear to be concentration-dependent. The activation observed at 1 nM digoxin appears to be consistent with the sensitization of the channel to the effects of Ca2+. At higher concentrations the drug appears to interact synergistically with Ca2+ to produce values of Po considerably greater than those seen with Ca2+ as the sole activating ligand. 4. Digoxin had no effect on single-channel conductance or the Ca2+/Tris permeability ratio. In channels activated by digoxin the Po was decreased by Mg2+. Single-channels were characteristically modified to along lasting open, but reduced, conductance state when 100 nM ryanodine was added to the cytosolic side of the channel.5. Activation of the cardiac SR Ca2+-release channel was observed with similar concentrations of digitoxin, however, higher concentrations of ouabain were required to increase PO. In contrast, a steroid which is not positively inotropic, chlormadinone acetate, had no effect on either cardiac or

  5. The study of sodium channels involved in pain responses using specific modulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Yong-Hua; LIU Tong

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are transmembrane proteins responsible for generation and conduction of action potentials in excitable cells. Physiological and pharmacological studies have demonstrated that VGSCs play a critical role in chronic pain associated with tissue or nerve injury. Many long-chain peptide toxins (60-76 amino acid residues) purified from the venom of Asian scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch (BmK) axe investigated to be sodium channel-specific modulators. The α-like neurotoxins that can bind to receptor site 3 of sodium channels, named as BmK I and BmK abT, could induce nociceptive effects in rats. On the contrast, the β-like neurotoxins that can bind to receptor site 4 of sodium channels, named as BmK AS, BmK AS-1 and BmK IT2, could produce potent anti-nociceptive effects in animal pain models. BmK I could strongly prolong the fast inactivation of tetrodotoxin (TTX)- sensitive Na+ currents on the rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons together with the augmentation of peak current amplitude. Howevor BmK IT2 and BmK ASs, potently suppressed both the peak TTX-resistant and TTX-sensitive Na+ currents on rat small DRG neurons. Moreover, BmK ASs could decrease the excitability of small DRG neurons. Thus, the nociception/anti-nociception induced by scorpion neurotoxins may attribute to their distinct modulation on sodium channels in primary afferent sensory neurons. Therefore, the sodium channel-specific modulators from BmK venom could be used as not only pharmacological tools for better understanding the roles of VGSCs in pain signal conduction, but also lead molecules in the development of ideal analgesics targetingVGSCs.

  6. Comparative effects of sodium channel blockers in short term rat whole embryo culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Mats F, E-mail: Mats.Nilsson@farmbio.uu.se [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Uppsala University (Sweden); Sköld, Anna-Carin; Ericson, Ann-Christin; Annas, Anita; Villar, Rodrigo Palma [AstraZeneca R and D Södertälje (Sweden); Cebers, Gvido [AstraZeneca R and D, iMed, 141 Portland Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hellmold, Heike; Gustafson, Anne-Lee [AstraZeneca R and D Södertälje (Sweden); Webster, William S [Department of Anatomy and Histology, University of Sydney (Australia)

    2013-10-15

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect on the rat embryonic heart of two experimental drugs (AZA and AZB) which are known to block the sodium channel Nav1.5, the hERG potassium channel and the L-type calcium channel. The sodium channel blockers bupivacaine, lidocaine, and the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine were used as reference substances. The experimental model was the gestational day (GD) 13 rat embryo cultured in vitro. In this model the embryonic heart activity can be directly observed, recorded and analyzed using computer assisted image analysis as it responds to the addition of test drugs. The effect on the heart was studied for a range of concentrations and for a duration up to 3 h. The results showed that AZA and AZB caused a concentration-dependent bradycardia of the embryonic heart and at high concentrations heart block. These effects were reversible on washout. In terms of potency to cause bradycardia the compounds were ranked AZB > bupivacaine > AZA > lidocaine > nifedipine. Comparison with results from previous studies with more specific ion channel blockers suggests that the primary effect of AZA and AZB was sodium channel blockage. The study shows that the short-term rat whole embryo culture (WEC) is a suitable system to detect substances hazardous to the embryonic heart. - Highlights: • Study of the effect of sodium channel blocking drugs on embryonic heart function • We used a modified method rat whole embryo culture with image analysis. • The drugs tested caused a concentration dependent bradycardia and heart block. • The effect of drugs acting on multiple ion channels is difficult to predict. • This method may be used to detect cardiotoxicity in prenatal development.

  7. Effects of BKCa and Kir2.1 Channels on Cell Cycling Progression and Migration in Human Cardiac c-kit+ Progenitor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Ying Zhang

    Full Text Available Our previous study demonstrated that a large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ current (BKCa, a voltage-gated TTX-sensitive sodium current (INa.TTX, and an inward rectifier K+ current (IKir were heterogeneously present in most of human cardiac c-kit+ progenitor cells. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of these ion channels on cell cycling progression and migration of human cardiac c-kit+ progenitor cells with approaches of cell proliferation and mobility assays, siRNA, RT-PCR, Western blots, flow cytometry analysis, etc. It was found that inhibition of BKCa with paxilline, but not INa.TTX with tetrodotoxin, decreased both cell proliferation and migration. Inhibition of IKir with Ba2+ had no effect on cell proliferation, while enhanced cell mobility. Silencing KCa.1.1 reduced cell proliferation by accumulating the cells at G0/G1 phase and decreased cell mobility. Interestingly, silencing Kir2.1 increased the cell migration without affecting cell cycling progression. These results demonstrate the novel information that blockade or silence of BKCa channels, but not INa.TTX channels, decreases cell cycling progression and mobility, whereas inhibition of Kir2.1 channels increases cell mobility without affecting cell cycling progression in human cardiac c-kit+ progenitor cells.

  8. Effects of BKCa and Kir2.1 Channels on Cell Cycling Progression and Migration in Human Cardiac c-kit+ Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Li, Gang; Che, Hui; Sun, Hai-Ying; Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Yan; Li, Gui-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that a large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ current (BKCa), a voltage-gated TTX-sensitive sodium current (INa.TTX), and an inward rectifier K+ current (IKir) were heterogeneously present in most of human cardiac c-kit+ progenitor cells. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of these ion channels on cell cycling progression and migration of human cardiac c-kit+ progenitor cells with approaches of cell proliferation and mobility assays, siRNA, RT-PCR, Western blots, flow cytometry analysis, etc. It was found that inhibition of BKCa with paxilline, but not INa.TTX with tetrodotoxin, decreased both cell proliferation and migration. Inhibition of IKir with Ba2+ had no effect on cell proliferation, while enhanced cell mobility. Silencing KCa.1.1 reduced cell proliferation by accumulating the cells at G0/G1 phase and decreased cell mobility. Interestingly, silencing Kir2.1 increased the cell migration without affecting cell cycling progression. These results demonstrate the novel information that blockade or silence of BKCa channels, but not INa.TTX channels, decreases cell cycling progression and mobility, whereas inhibition of Kir2.1 channels increases cell mobility without affecting cell cycling progression in human cardiac c-kit+ progenitor cells.

  9. Metabolic alterations derived from absence of Two-Pore Channel 1 at cardiac level

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    VANESSA GARCÍA-RÚA; SANDRA FEIJÓO-BANDÍN; MARÍA GARCÍA-VENCE; ALANA ARAGÓN-HERRERA; SUSANA B BRAVO; DIEGO RODRÍGUEZ-PENAS; ANA MOSQUERA-LEAL; PAMELA V LEAR; JOHN PARRINGTON; JANA ALONSO; ESTHER ROSELLÓ-LLETÍ; MANUEL PORTOLÉS; MIGUEL RIVERA; JOSÉ RAMÓN GONZÁLEZ-JUANATEY; FRANCISCA LAGO

    2016-12-01

    Two-pore channels (TPCs or TPCNs) are novel voltage-gated ion channels that have been postulated to act as Ca2+ and/orNa+ channels expressed exclusively in acidic organelles such as endosomes and lysosomes. TPCNs participate in theregulation of diverse biological processes and recently have been proposed to be involved in the pathophysiology ofmetabolic disorders such as obesity, fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Due to the importance of thesepathologies in the development of cardiovascular diseases, we aimed to study the possible role of two-pore channel 1(TPCN1) in the regulation of cardiac metabolism. To explore the cardiac function of TPCN1, we developed proteomicapproaches as 2-DE-MALDI-MS and LC-MALDI-MS in the cardiac left ventricle of TPCN1 KO and WT mice, and foundalterations in several proteins implicated in glucose and fatty acid metabolism in TPCN1 KO vs. WT mice. The resultsconfirmed the altered expression of HFABP, a key fatty acid transport protein, and of enolase and PGK1, the key enzymes inthe glycolytic process. Finally, in vitro experiments performed in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, in which TPCN1 was silencedusing siRNAs, confirmed that the downregulation of TPCN1 gene expression increased 2-deoxy-D-[3H]-glucose uptake andGLUT4 mobilization into cell peripherals in cardiac cells. Our results are the first to suggest a potential role for TPCNs incardiac metabolism regulation.

  10. The antimalarial drug mefloquine inhibits cardiac inward rectifier K+ channels: evidence for interference in PIP2-channel interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Izquierdo, Angélica; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela; Moreno-Galindo, Eloy G; Aréchiga-Figueroa, Iván A; Rodríguez-Martínez, Martín; Ferrer, Tania; Rodríguez-Menchaca, Aldo A; Sánchez-Chapula, José A

    2011-04-01

    The antimalarial drug mefloquine was found to inhibit the KATP channel by an unknown mechanism. Because mefloquine is a Cationic amphiphilic drug and is known to insert into lipid bilayers, we postulate that mefloquine interferes with the interaction between PIP2 and Kir channels resulting in channel inhibition. We studied the inhibitory effects of mefloquine on Kir2.1, Kir2.3, Kir2.3(I213L), and Kir6.2/SUR2A channels expressed in HEK-293 cells, and on IK1 and IKATP from feline cardiac myocytes. The order of mefloquine inhibition was Kir6.2/SUR2A ≈ Kir2.3 (IC50 ≈ 2 μM) > Kir2.1 (IC50 > 30 μM). Similar results were obtained in cardiac myocytes. The Kir2.3(I213L) mutant, which enhances the strength of interaction with PIP2 (compared to WT), was significantly less sensitive (IC50 = 9 μM). In inside-out patches, continuous application of PIP2 strikingly prevented the mefloquine inhibition. Our results support the idea that mefloquine interferes with PIP2-Kir channels interactions.

  11. Molecular Action of Lidocaine on the Voltage Sensors of Sodium Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Sheets, Michael F.; Hanck, Dorothy A

    2003-01-01

    Block of sodium ionic current by lidocaine is associated with alteration of the gating charge-voltage (Q-V) relationship characterized by a 38% reduction in maximal gating charge (Qmax) and by the appearance of additional gating charge at negative test potentials. We investigated the molecular basis of the lidocaine-induced reduction in cardiac Na channel–gating charge by sequentially neutralizing basic residues in each of the voltage sensors (S4 segments) in the four domains of the human hea...

  12. Studies of multimodal gating of the sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keynes, Richard D

    2002-01-01

    Chandler and Meves found that in squid axons perfused with NaF a small flow of Na+ ions persisted in the inactivated state, and that the Na+ channel therefore has more than one open state. Studies by Correa and Bezanilla on single patches in squid axons showed that such steady currents arose from reopening of the channel at a relatively low frequency. Currents with comparable properties are generated in mammalian brain cells and elsewhere. The existence of a third mode of gating was established by Patlak and Ortiz when they showed that in frog muscle fibres there were occasionally quite large bursts of late openings. Again, similar behaviour has been observed in other types of muscle and in brain cells. It is suggested that the voltage gating of all ionic channels involves a screw-helical mechanism, operating in steps each transferring unit charge. For segment S4 in domain IV of Na+ channels, three charges have to be transferred to reach the initial open state, and a fourth for fast inactivation to take place. The single late openings in the inactivated steady state may be explained by the transfer of a fifth charge in IVS4, while the larger bursts of reopening involve a modulation of the mechanism of fast inactivation.

  13. Effect of Sodium Tanshinone Ⅱ A Sulfonate on Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophy and Its Underlying Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of sodium tanshinone Ⅱ A sulfonate (STS) on the hypertrophy induced by angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ) in primary cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocytes.Methods:The effect of STS on cytotoxicity was evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) assay.As indexes for cardiocyte hypertrophy,cell size was determined by phase contrast microscopy and protein synthesis rate was measured by 3H-leucine incorporation.The proto-oncogene c-fos mRNA expression of cardiocytes was assessed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results:STS could inhibit cardiocyte hypertrophy,increase the protein synthesis rate and enhance proto-oncogene c-los mRNA expression in cardiocytes induced by Ang Ⅱ (P<0.01),with an effect similar to that of Valsartan,the Ang Ⅱ receptor antagonist.Conclusion:STS can prevent the hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes induced by Ang Ⅱ,which may be related to its inhibition of the expression of proto-oncogene c-fos mRNA.

  14. Protective and biogenesis effects of sodium hydrosulfide on brain mitochondria after cardiac arrest and resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hao; Xie, Xuemeng; Chen, Di; Zhang, Jincheng; Zhou, Yaguang; Yang, Guangtian

    2014-10-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in brain injury after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Recent studies demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donor compounds preserve mitochondrial morphology and function during ischemia-reperfusion injury. In this study, we sought to explore the effects of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) on brain mitochondria 24h after cardiac arrest and resuscitation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 6min cardiac arrest and then resuscitated successfully. Rats received NaHS (0.5mg/kg) or vehicle (0.9% NaCl, 1.67ml/kg) 1min before the start of CPR intravenously, followed by a continuous infusion of NaHS (1.5mg/kg/h) or vehicle (5ml/kg/h) for 3h. Neurological deficit was evaluated 24h after resuscitation and then cortex was collected for assessments. As a result, we found that rats treated with NaHS revealed an improved neurological outcome and cortex mitochondrial morphology 24h after resuscitation. We also observed that NaHS therapy reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and calcium overload, inhibited mitochondrial permeability transition pores, preserved mitochondrial membrane potential, elevated ATP level and ameliorated the cytochrome c abnormal distribution. Further studies indicated that NaHS administration increased mitochondrial biogenesis in cortex at the same time. Our findings suggested that administration of NaHS 1min prior CPR and followed by a continuous infusion ameliorated neurological dysfunction 24h after resuscitation, possibly through mitochondria preservation as well as by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis.

  15. Sodium hydrosulfide attenuates hyperhomocysteinemia rat myocardial injury through cardiac mitochondrial protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwen; Shi, Sa; Dong, Shiyun; Wu, Jichao; Song, Mowei; Zhong, Xin; Liu, Yanhong

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) plays an important role during rat myocardial injury. However, little is known about the role of H2S in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy)-induced cardiac dysfunction as well as the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we investigated whether sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, a H2S donor) influences methionine-induced HHcy rat myocardial injury in intact rat hearts and primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. HHcy rats were induced by methionine (2.0 g/kg) and the daily administration of 80 μmol/L NaHS in the HHcy + NaHS treatment group. At the end of 4, 8, and 12 weeks, the ultrastructural alterations and functions of the hearts were observed using transmission electron microscopy and echocardiography system. The percentage of apoptotic cardiomyocytes, the mitochondrial membrane potential, and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured. The expressions of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), Bax and Bcl-2, caspase-3, phospho-endothelial nitric oxide synthase and the mitochondrial NOX4 and cytochrome c were analyzed by Western blotting. The results showed the cardiac dysfunction, the ultrastructural changes, and the apoptotic rate increase in the HHcy rat hearts. In the primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes of HHcy group, ROS production was increased markedly, whereas the expression of CSE was decreased. However, treatment with NaHS significantly improved the HHcy rat hearts function, the ultrastructural changes, and decreased the levels of ROS in the primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes administrated with HHcy group. Furthermore, NaHS down-regulated the expression of mitochondrial NOX4 and caspase-3 and Bax and inhibited the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. In conclusion, H2S is involved in the attenuation of HHcy myocardial injury through the protection of cardiac mitochondria.

  16. Sodium channel genes in pain-related disorders: phenotype-genotype associations and recommendations for clinical use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waxman, S.G.; Merkies, I.S.; Gerrits, M.M.; Dib-Hajj, S.D.; Lauria, G.; Cox, J.J.; Wood, J.N.; Woods, C.G.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Faber, C.G.

    2014-01-01

    Human studies have firmly implicated voltage-gated sodium channels in human pain disorders, and targeted and massively parallel genomic sequencing is beginning to be used in clinical practice to determine which sodium channel variants are involved. Missense substitutions of SCN9A, the gene encoding

  17. Expression of mRNA coding voltage - gated sodium channel α-subunit in spontaneously epileptic rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUWa; CAIJi-Qun

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Subtypes Ⅰ,Ⅱ and Ⅲ of sodium channel α- subunit mRNA were analyzed in adult rat brain of spontaneously epileptic rats, and investigated the relationship between sodium channel expression and epilepsy. METHODS Tissue samples were microdissected from occipital neocortex, CA1 and CA3 hippocampus areas and dentate gyms, observe

  18. SCN9A mutations define primary erythermalgia as a neuropathic disorder of voltage gated sodium channels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth, J.P.H.; Morsche, R.H.M. te; Guillet, G.; Taieb, A.; Kirby, R.L.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Primary erythermalgia is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of red, warm and painful hands, and/or feet. We previously localized the gene for primary erythermalgia to a 7.94 cM region on chromosome 2q. Recently, Yang et al identified two missense mutations of the sodium channel alpha

  19. Amiloride blocks lithium entry through the sodium channel thereby attenuating the resultant nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortenoeven, M.L.A.; Li, Yuedan; Shaw, S.M.; Gaeggeler, H.P.; Rossier, B.C.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Deen, P.M.T.

    2009-01-01

    Lithium therapy frequently induces nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; amiloride appears to prevent its occurrence in some clinical cases. Amiloride blocks the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) located in the apical membrane of principal cells; hence one possibility is that ENaC is the main entry site fo

  20. Cardiac mechanosensitivity and stretch-activated ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bett, G C; Sachs, F

    1997-01-01

    Mechanosensitivity is a ubiquitous property of cells, and mechanosensitive ion channels (MSCs) are hypothesized to be the transducers. In the heart, MSCs are likely to account for changes in beating rate as a function of filling and for initiating stretch-induced arrhythmias (for example, following a myocardial infarction). Pharmacological agents that affect MSCs may provide a new class of antiarrhythmic drugs. © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:4-8).

  1. Mutations in Sodium Channel Gene SCN9A and the Pain Perception Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Marković, Danica; Janković, Radmilo; Veselinović, Ines

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) play a crucial role in development and propagation of action potentials in neurons and muscle cells. NaV1.7 channels take a special place in modern science since it is believed that they contribute to nerve hyperexcitability. Mutations of the gene SCN9A, which codes the α subunit of NaV1.7 channels, are associated with pain perception disorders (primary erythermalgia, congenital analgesia, and paroxysmal pain disorder). It is considered that the SCN9A gene ...

  2. Cardiac specific ATP-sensitive K+ channel (KATP) overexpression results in embryonic lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toib, Amir; Zhang, Hai Xia; Broekelmann, Thomas J; Hyrc, Krzysztof L; Guo, Qiusha; Chen, Feng; Remedi, Maria S; Nichols, Colin G

    2012-09-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing SUR1 and gain of function Kir6.2[∆N30, K185Q] K(ATP) channel subunits, under cardiac α-myosin heavy chain (αMHC) promoter control, demonstrate arrhythmia susceptibility and premature death. Pregnant mice, crossed to carry double transgenic progeny, which harbor high levels of both overexpressed subunits, exhibit the most extreme phenotype and do not deliver any double transgenic pups. To explore the fetal lethality and embryonic phenotype that result from K(ATP) overexpression, wild type (WT) and K(ATP) overexpressing embryonic cardiomyocytes were isolated, cultured and voltage-clamped using whole cell and excised patch clamp techniques. Whole mount embryonic imaging, Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) and α smooth muscle actin (αSMA) immunostaining were used to assess anatomy, histology and cardiac development in K(ATP) overexpressing and WT embryos. Double transgenic embryos developed in utero heart failure and 100% embryonic lethality by 11.5 days post conception (dpc). K(ATP) currents were detectable in both WT and K(ATP)-overexpressing embryonic cardiomyocytes, starting at early stages of cardiac development (9.5 dpc). In contrast to adult cardiomyocytes, WT and K(ATP)-overexpressing embryonic cardiomyocytes exhibit basal and spontaneous K(ATP) current, implying that these channels may be open and active under physiological conditions. At 9.5 dpc, live double transgenic embryos demonstrated normal looping pattern, although all cardiac structures were collapsed, probably representing failed, non-contractile chambers. In conclusion, K(ATP) channels are present and active in embryonic myocytes, and overexpression causes in utero heart failure and results in embryonic lethality. These results suggest that the K(ATP) channel may have an important physiological role during early cardiac development.

  3. Inhibition of collagen synthesis by select calcium and sodium channel blockers can be mitigated by ascorbic acid and ascorbyl palmitate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Vadim; Ivanova, Svetlana; Kalinovsky, Tatiana; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Calcium, sodium and potassium channel blockers are widely prescribed medications for a variety of health problems, most frequently for cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, angina pectoris and other disorders. However, chronic application of channel blockers is associated with numerous side effects, including worsening cardiac pathology. For example, nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker was found to be associated with increased mortality and increased risk for myocardial infarction. In addition to the side effects mentioned above by different channel blockers, these drugs can cause arterial wall damage, thereby contributing to vascular wall structure destabilization and promoting events facilitating rupture of plaques. Collagen synthesis is regulated by ascorbic acid, which is also essential for its optimum structure as a cofactor in lysine and proline hydroxylation, a precondition for optimum crosslinking of collagen and elastin. Therefore, the main objective in this study was to evaluate effects of various types of channel blockers on intracellular accumulation and cellular functions of ascorbate, specifically in relation to formation and extracellular deposition of major collagen types relevant for vascular function. Effects of select Na- and Ca- channel blockers on collagen synthesis and deposition were evaluated in cultured human dermal fibroblasts and aortic smooth muscle cells by immunoassay. All channel blockers tested demonstrated inhibitory effects on collagen type I deposition to the ECM by fibroblasts, each to a different degree. Ascorbic acid significantly increased collagen I ECM deposition. Nifedipine (50 µM), a representative of channel blockers tested, significantly reduced ascorbic acid and ascorbyl palmitate-dependent ECM deposition of collagen type l and collagen type lV by cultured aortic smooth muscle cells. In addition, nifedipine (50 µM) significantly reduced ascorbate-dependent collagen type l and type lV synthesis by cultured aortic smooth

  4. Fetal cardiac activity analysis during twin pregnancy using a multi-channel SQUID system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Monteiro, E.; Schleussner, E.; Kausch, S.; Grimm, B.; Schneider, A.; Hall Barbosa, C.; Haueisen, J.

    2001-05-01

    The use of SQUID magnetometers for non-invasive in utero assessment of cardiac electrical disturbances has already been shown to be a valuable clinical tool. In this way, its applicability also for the complicated case of twin pregnancy, in which the proximity of the cardiac magnetic source of each fetus can hamper the individual analysis of cardiac electrical activity, is of clinical interest. In this paper, we present fetal magnetocardiography performed on a mother pregnant of twins with 26 weeks gestational age, measured inside a magnetically shielded room, by using two identical 31-channel low- Tc SQUID magnetometer systems. Each sensor array has been positioned over one of the fetuses, according to its heart position previously assessed with the aid of ultrasound measurements. The raw data is initially averaged in time and, afterwards, analyzed by means of time plots and isofield maps. The time recordings allow the study of the morphology of each fetus’ cardiac signal and the cardiac time intervals. The resultant equivalent dipole obtained from the isofield maps indicates the position and orientation of each fetus heart. The results agree with the ultrasound analysis performed immediately before the measurements and used to obtain the approximate location of the fetuses’ hearts. Since a distinct analysis of the cardiac electrical activity of each fetus could be achieved, the results indicate the potential of the fetal magnetocardiography in the individual antenatal diagnosis of each one of the fetuses of a twin pregnancy.

  5. Asymmetric functional contributions of acidic and aromatic side chains in sodium channel voltage-sensor domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Elstone, Fisal D; Niciforovic, Ana P

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels mediate electrical excitability in animals. Despite strong sequence conservation among the voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) of closely related voltage-gated potassium (KV) and NaV channels, the functional contributions of individual side chains in Nav VSDs remain...... largely enigmatic. To this end, natural and unnatural side chain substitutions were made in the S2 hydrophobic core (HC), the extracellular negative charge cluster (ENC), and the intracellular negative charge cluster (INC) of the four VSDs of the skeletal muscle sodium channel isoform (NaV1.......4). The results show that the highly conserved aromatic side chain constituting the S2 HC makes distinct functional contributions in each of the four NaV domains. No obvious cation-pi interaction exists with nearby S4 charges in any domain, and natural and unnatural mutations at these aromatic sites produce...

  6. Biophysical characterisation of the persistent sodium current of the Nav1.6 neuronal sodium channel: a single-channel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelier, Aurélien; Zhao, Juan; Bois, Patrick; Chahine, Mohamed

    2010-06-01

    Na(v)1.6 is the major voltage-gated sodium channel at nodes of Ranvier. This channel has been shown to produce a robust persistent inward current in whole-cell experiments. Na(v)1.6 plays an important role in axonal conduction and may significantly contribute to the pathophysiology of the injured nervous system through this persistent current. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and regulation of the persistent current are not well understood. Using the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique, we investigated the Na(v)1.6 transient and persistent currents in HEK-293. Previous studies have shown that the persistent current depended on the content of the patch electrode. Therefore, we characterised the single-channel properties of the persistent current with an intact intracellular medium using the cell-attached configuration of the patch-clamp technique. In HEK-293 cells, the Na(v)1.6 persistent current recorded in the whole-cell configuration was 3-5% of the peak transient current. In single-channel recording, the ratio between peak and persistent open probability confirmed the magnitude of the persistent current observed in the whole-cell configuration. The cell-attached configuration revealed that the molecular mechanism of the whole-cell persistent current is a consequence of single Na(v)1.6 channels reopening.

  7. Automated Electrophysiology Makes the Pace for Cardiac Ion Channel Safety Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens eMoeller

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The field of automated patch-clamp electrophysiology has emerged from the tension between the pharmaceutical industry’s need for high-throughput compound screening versus its need to be conservative due to regulatory requirements. On the one hand, hERG channel screening was increasingly requested for new chemical entities, as the correlation between blockade of the ion channel coded by hERG and Torsades de Pointes cardiac arrhythmia gained increasing attention. On the other hand, manual patch-clamping, typically quoted as the gold-standard for understanding ion channel function and modulation, was far too slow (and, consequently, too expensive for keeping pace with the numbers of compounds submitted for hERG channel investigations from pharmaceutical R&D departments. In consequence it became more common for some pharmaceutical companies to outsource safety pharmacological investigations, with a focus on hERG channel interactions. This outsourcing has allowed those pharmaceutical companies to build up operational flexibility and greater independence from internal resources, and allowed them to obtain access to the latest technological developments that emerged in automated patch-clamp electrophysiology – much of which arose in specialized biotech companies. Assays for nearly all major cardiac ion channels are now available by automated patch-clamping using heterologous expression systems, and recently, automated action potential recordings from stem-cell derived cardiomyocytes have been demonstrated. Today, most of the large pharmaceutical companies have acquired automated electrophysiology robots and have established various automated cardiac ion channel safety screening assays on these, in addition to outsourcing parts of their needs for safety screening.

  8. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: a study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz; Sandtner, Walter

    2013-12-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licensed as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Nav1.5 sodium and Cav1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (≥ 10 μM) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias.

  9. Effects of stochastic channel gating and distribution on the cardiac action potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Mathieu; de Lange, Enno; Kucera, Jan P

    2011-07-21

    Ion channels exhibit stochastic conformational changes determining their gating behavior. In addition, the process of protein turnover leads to a natural variability of the number of membrane and gap junctional channels. Nevertheless, in computational models, these two aspects are scarcely considered and their impacts are largely unknown. We investigated the effects of stochastic current fluctuations and channel distributions on action potential duration (APD), intercellular conduction delays (ICDs) and conduction blocks using a modified ventricular cell model (Rudy et al.) with Markovian formulations of the principal ion currents (to simulate their stochastic open-close gating behavior) and with channel counts drawn from Poisson distributions (to simulate their natural variability). In single cells, APD variability (coefficient of variation: 1.6% at BCL=1000ms) was essentially caused by stochastic channel gating of I(Ks), persistent I(Na) and I(Ca,L). In cell strands, ICD variability induced by stochastic channel gating and Poissonian channel distributions was low under normal conditions. Nonetheless, at low intercellular coupling levels, Poissonian gap junctional channel distribution resulted in a large ICD variability (coefficient of variation >20%), highly heterogeneous conduction patterns and conduction blocks. Therefore, the stochastic behavior of current fluctuations and channel distributions can contribute to the heterogeneity of conduction patterns and to conduction block, as observed previously in experiments in cardiac tissue with altered intercellular coupling.

  10. Effect of silymarin on sodium fluoride-induced toxicity and oxidative stress in rat cardiac tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed M. Nabavi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aim to evaluate the protective effect of silymarin on sodium fluoride-induced oxidative stress in rat cardiac tissues. Animals were pretreated with silymarin at 20 and 10 mg/kg prior to sodium fluoride consumption (600 ppm through drinking water. Vitamin C at 10 mg/kg was used as standard antioxidant. There was a significant increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances level (59.36 ± 2.19 nmol MDA eq/g tissue along with a decrease in antioxidant enzymes activity (64.27 ± 1.98 U/g tissue for superoxide dismutase activity and 29.17 ± 1.01 µmol/min/mg protein for catalase activity and reduced glutathione level (3.8 ± 0.15 µg/mg protein in the tissues homogenates of the sodium fluoride-intoxicated rats. Silymarin administration to animals before sodium fluoride consumption modified the levels of biochemical parameters.Este estudo objetiva avaliar o efeito protetor da silimarina em fluoreto de sódio induzida por estresse oxidativo em tecido cardíaco de ratos. Os animais foram pré-tratados com silimarina a 20 e 10 mg/kg antes do consumo de fluoreto de sódio (600 ppm através da água de beber. A vitamina C a 10 mg/kg foi utilizada como antioxidante padrão. Houve um aumento significativo no nível de substâncias tiobarbitúrico reativo de ácido (59,36 ± 2.19 nmol MDA eq/g tecido, juntamente com uma diminuição da atividade de enzimas antioxidantes (64,27 ± 1,98 U/g tecido para a atividade de superóxido dismutase e 29,7 ± 1,01 mmol/min/mg de proteína para a atividade da catalase e nível de glutationa reduzida (3,8 ± 0,15 mg/mg de proteína nos homogeneizados de tecidos dos fluoreto de sódio-intoxicados ratos. Administração de silimarina a animais, antes do consumo de fluoreto de sódio modifou os níveis de parâmetros bioquímicos.

  11. BK channels regulate sinoatrial node firing rate and cardiac pacing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Michael H; Wu, Yuejin; Gao, Zhan; Anderson, Mark E; Dalziel, Julie E; Meredith, Andrea L

    2014-11-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels play prominent roles in shaping muscle and neuronal excitability. In the cardiovascular system, BK channels promote vascular relaxation and protect against ischemic injury. Recently, inhibition of BK channels has been shown to lower heart rate in intact rodents and isolated hearts, suggesting a novel role in heart function. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. In the present study, we recorded ECGs from mice injected with paxilline (PAX), a membrane-permeable BK channel antagonist, and examined changes in cardiac conduction. ECGs revealed a 19 ± 4% PAX-induced reduction in heart rate in wild-type but not BK channel knockout (Kcnma1(-/-)) mice. The heart rate decrease was associated with slowed cardiac pacing due to elongation of the sinus interval. Action potential firing recorded from isolated sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) was reduced by 55 ± 15% and 28 ± 9% by application of PAX (3 μM) and iberiotoxin (230 nM), respectively. Furthermore, baseline firing rates from Kcnma1(-/-) SANCs were 33% lower than wild-type SANCs. The slowed firing upon BK current inhibition or genetic deletion was due to lengthening of the diastolic depolarization phase of the SANC action potential. Finally, BK channel immunoreactivity and PAX-sensitive currents were identified in SANCs with HCN4 expression and pacemaker current, respectively, and BK channels cloned from SANCs recapitulated similar activation as the PAX-sensitive current. Together, these data localize BK channels to SANCs and demonstrate that loss of BK current decreases SANC automaticity, consistent with slowed sinus pacing after PAX injection in vivo. Furthermore, these findings suggest BK channels are potential therapeutic targets for disorders of heart rate.

  12. The hitchhiker's guide to the voltage-gated sodium channel galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Christopher A; Payandeh, Jian; Bosmans, Frank; Chanda, Baron

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels contribute to the rising phase of action potentials and served as an early muse for biophysicists laying the foundation for our current understanding of electrical signaling. Given their central role in electrical excitability, it is not surprising that (a) inherited mutations in genes encoding for Nav channels and their accessory subunits have been linked to excitability disorders in brain, muscle, and heart; and (b) Nav channels are targeted by various drugs and naturally occurring toxins. Although the overall architecture and behavior of these channels are likely to be similar to the more well-studied voltage-gated potassium channels, eukaryotic Nav channels lack structural and functional symmetry, a notable difference that has implications for gating and selectivity. Activation of voltage-sensing modules of the first three domains in Nav channels is sufficient to open the channel pore, whereas movement of the domain IV voltage sensor is correlated with inactivation. Also, structure-function studies of eukaryotic Nav channels show that a set of amino acids in the selectivity filter, referred to as DEKA locus, is essential for Na(+) selectivity. Structures of prokaryotic Nav channels have also shed new light on mechanisms of drug block. These structures exhibit lateral fenestrations that are large enough to allow drugs or lipophilic molecules to gain access into the inner vestibule, suggesting that this might be the passage for drug entry into a closed channel. In this Review, we will synthesize our current understanding of Nav channel gating mechanisms, ion selectivity and permeation, and modulation by therapeutics and toxins in light of the new structures of the prokaryotic Nav channels that, for the time being, serve as structural models of their eukaryotic counterparts.

  13. EFFECTS OF GLUTAMATE ON SODIUM CHANNEL IN ACUTELY DISSOCIATED HIPPOCAMPAL CA1 PYRAMIDAL NEURONS OF RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高宾丽; 伍国锋; 杨艳; 刘智飞; 曾晓荣

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of glutamate on sodium channel in acutely dissociated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons of rats.Methods Voltage-dependent sodium currents (INa) in acutely dissociated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons of neonate rats were recorded by whole-cell patchclamp of the brain slice technique when a series of doses of glutamate (100-1000μmol/L) were applied.Results Different concentrations of glutamate could inhibit INa,and higher concentration of glutamate affected greater inhibitio...

  14. Venus Flytrap HKT1-Type Channel Provides for Prey Sodium Uptake into Carnivorous Plant Without Conflicting with Electrical Excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, J; Scherzer, S; Shabala, S; Krol, E; Neher, E; Mueller, T D; Hedrich, R

    2016-03-01

    The animal diet of the carnivorous Venus flytrap, Dionaea muscipula, contains a sodium load that enters the capture organ via an HKT1-type sodium channel, expressed in special epithelia cells on the inner trap lobe surface. DmHKT1 expression and sodium uptake activity is induced upon prey contact. Here, we analyzed the HKT1 properties required for prey sodium osmolyte management of carnivorous Dionaea. Analyses were based on homology modeling, generation of model-derived point mutants, and their functional testing in Xenopus oocytes. We showed that the wild-type HKT1 and its Na(+)- and K(+)-permeable mutants function as ion channels rather than K(+) transporters driven by proton or sodium gradients. These structural and biophysical features of a high-capacity, Na(+)-selective ion channel enable Dionaea glands to manage prey-derived sodium loads without confounding the action potential-based information management of the flytrap.

  15. Modification of sodium and potassium channel gating kinetics by ether and halothane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bean, B.P.; Shrager, P.; Goldstein, D.A.

    1981-03-01

    The effects of ether and halothane on the kinetics of sodium and potassium currents were investigated in the crayfish giant axon. Both general anesthetics produced a reversible, dose-dependent speeding up of sodium current inactivation at all membrane potentials, with no change in the rising phase of the currents. Double-pulse inactivation experiments with ether also showed faster inactivation, but the rate of recovery from inactivation at negative potentials was not affected. Ether shifted the midpoint of the steady-state fast inactivation curve in the hyperpolarizing direction and made the curve steeper. The activation of potassium currents was faster with ether present, with no change in the voltage dependence of steady-state potassium currents. Ether and halothane are known to perturb the structure of lipid bilayer membranes; the alterations in sodium and potassium channel gating kinetics are consistent with the hypothesis that the rats of the gating processes of the channels can be affected by the state of the lipids surrounding the channels, but a direct effect of ether and halothane on the protein part of the channels cannot be ruled out.

  16. Conduction velocity is regulated by sodium channel inactivation in unmyelinated axons innervating the rat cranial meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Col, Roberto; Messlinger, Karl; Carr, Richard W

    2008-02-15

    Axonal conduction velocity varies according to the level of preceding impulse activity. In unmyelinated axons this typically results in a slowing of conduction velocity and a parallel increase in threshold. It is currently held that Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-dependent axonal hyperpolarization is responsible for this slowing but this has long been equivocal. We therefore examined conduction velocity changes during repetitive activation of single unmyelinated axons innervating the rat cranial meninges. In direct contradiction to the currently accepted postulate, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase blockade actually enhanced activity-induced conduction velocity slowing, while the degree of velocity slowing was curtailed in the presence of lidocaine (10-300 microm) and carbamazepine (30-500 microm) but not tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10-80 nm). This suggests that a change in the number of available sodium channels is the most prominent factor responsible for activity-induced changes in conduction velocity in unmyelinated axons. At moderate stimulus frequencies, axonal conduction velocity is determined by an interaction between residual sodium channel inactivation following each impulse and the retrieval of channels from inactivation by a concomitant Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-mediated hyperpolarization. Since the process is primarily dependent upon sodium channel availability, tracking conduction velocity provides a means of accessing relative changes in the excitability of nociceptive neurons.

  17. Pyrethroids differentially alter voltage-gated sodium channels from the honeybee central olfactory neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aklesso Kadala

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of neurons from the honey bee olfactory system to pyrethroid insecticides was studied using the patch-clamp technique on central 'antennal lobe neurons' (ALNs in cell culture. In these neurons, the voltage-dependent sodium currents are characterized by negative potential for activation, fast kinetics of activation and inactivation, and the presence of cumulative inactivation during train of depolarizations. Perfusion of pyrethroids on these ALN neurons submitted to repetitive stimulations induced (1 an acceleration of cumulative inactivation, and (2 a marked slowing of the tail current recorded upon repolarization. Cypermethrin and permethrin accelerated cumulative inactivation of the sodium current peak in a similar manner and tetramethrin was even more effective. The slow-down of channel deactivation was markedly dependent on the type of pyrethroid. With cypermethrin, a progressive increase of the tail current amplitude along with successive stimulations reveals a traditionally described use-dependent recruitment of modified sodium channels. However, an unexpected decrease in this tail current was revealed with tetramethrin. If one considers the calculated percentage of modified channels as an index of pyrethroids effects, ALNs are significantly more susceptible to tetramethrin than to permethrin or cypermethrin for a single depolarization, but this difference attenuates with repetitive activity. Further comparison with peripheral neurons from antennae suggest that these modifications are neuron type specific. Modeling the sodium channel as a multi-state channel with fast and slow inactivation allows to underline the effects of pyrethroids on a set of rate constants connecting open and inactivated conformations, and give some insights to their specificity. Altogether, our results revealed a differential sensitivity of central olfactory neurons to pyrethroids that emphasize the ability for these compounds to impair detection and

  18. Differential sensitivity of rat voltage-sensitive sodium channel isoforms to pyrazoline-type insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Kristopher S; Soderlund, David M

    2006-07-15

    Pyrazoline-type insecticides are potent inhibitors of insect and mammalian voltage-sensitive sodium channels. In mammals, there are nine sodium channel alpha subunit isoforms that have unique distributions and pharmacological properties, but no published data exist that compare the relative sensitivity of these different mammalian sodium channel isoforms to inhibition by pyrazoline-type insecticides. This study employed the Xenopus oocyte expression system to examine the relative sensitivity of rat Na(v)1.2a, Na(v)1.4, Na(v)1.5, and Na(v)1.8 sodium channel alpha subunit isoforms to the pyrazoline-type insecticides indoxacarb, DCJW, and RH 3421. Additionally, we assessed the effect of coexpression with the rat beta1 auxiliary subunit on the sensitivity of the Na(v)1.2a and Na(v)1.4 isoforms to these compounds. The relative sensitivity of the four sodium channel alpha subunits differed for each of the three compounds we examined. With DCJW, the order of sensitivity was Na(v)1.4 > Na(v)1.2a > Na(v)1.5 > Na(v)1.8. In contrast, the relative sensitivity of these isoforms to indoxacarb differed from that to DCJW: the Na(v)1.8 isoform was most sensitive, the Na(v)1.4 isoform was completely insensitive, and the sensitivities of the Na(v)1.5 and Na(v)1.2a isoforms were intermediate between these two extremes. Moreover, the pattern of sensitivity to RH 3421 among these four isoforms was different from that for either indoxacarb or DCJW: the Na(v)1.4 isoform was most sensitive to RH 3421, whereas the sensitivities of the remaining three isoforms were substantially less than that of the Na(v)1.4 isoform and were approximately equivalent. The only statistically significant effect of coexpression of either the Na(v)1.2a or Na(v)1.4 isoforms with the beta1 subunit was the modest reduction in the sensitivity of the Na(v)1.2a isoform to RH 3421. These results demonstrate that mammalian sodium channel isoforms differ in their sensitivities to pyrazoline-type insecticides.

  19. Sudden infant death syndrome caused by cardiac arrhythmias: only a matter of genes encoding ion channels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Campuzano, Oscar; Cesar, Sergi; Iglesias, Anna; Fernandez, Anna; Brugada, Josep; Brugada, Ramon

    2016-03-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome is the unexpected demise of a child younger than 1 year of age which remains unexplained after a complete autopsy investigation. Usually, it occurs during sleep, in males, and during the first 12 weeks of life. The pathophysiological mechanism underlying the death is unknown, and the lethal episode is considered multifactorial. However, in cases without a conclusive post-mortem diagnosis, suspicious of cardiac arrhythmias may also be considered as a cause of death, especially in families suffering from any cardiac disease associated with sudden cardiac death. Here, we review current understanding of sudden infant death, focusing on genetic causes leading to lethal cardiac arrhythmias, considering both genes encoding ion channels as well as structural proteins due to recent association of channelopathies and desmosomal genes. We support a comprehensive analysis of all genes associated with sudden cardiac death in families suffering of infant death. It allows the identification of the most plausible cause of death but also of family members at risk, providing cardiologists with essential data to adopt therapeutic preventive measures in families affected with this lethal entity.

  20. Scorpion beta-toxins and voltage-gated sodium channels: interactions and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza Escalona, Martha; Possani, Lourival D

    2013-01-01

    Scorpion beta-toxins (beta-ScTxs) modify the activity of voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels, thereby producing neurotoxic effects in diverse organisms. For this reason, beta-ScTxs are essential tools not only for discriminating among different channel sub-types but also for studying the mechanisms of channel gating and the structure-function relationship involved in this process. This review considers both the structural and the functional implications of the beta-ScTxs after they bind to their receptor sites, in accord with their classification into a) anti-mammalian beta-ScTxs, b) anti-insect selective excitatory beta-ScTxs, c) anti-insect selective depressant beta-ScTxs and d) beta-ScTxs active on both insect and mammals Nav channels. Additionally, the molecular mechanism of toxin action by the "voltage sensor trapping" model is discussed, and the systemic effects produced by these toxins are reviewed.

  1. Exercise-induced expression of cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium channels promotes action potential shortening and energy conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingman, Leonid V.; Zhu, Zhiyong; Sierra, Ana; Stepniak, Elizabeth; Burnett, Colin M-L.; Maksymov, Gennadiy; Anderson, Mark E.; Coetzee, William A.; Hodgson-Zingman, Denice M.

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity is one of the most important determinants of cardiac function. The ability of the heart to increase delivery of oxygen and metabolic fuels relies on an array of adaptive responses necessary to match bodily demand while avoiding exhaustion of cardiac resources. The ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel has the unique ability to adjust cardiac membrane excitability in accordance with ATP and ADP levels, and up-regulation of its expression that occurs in response to exercise could represent a critical element of this adaption. However, the mechanism by which KATP channel expression changes result in a beneficial effect on cardiac excitability and function remains to be established. Here, we demonstrate that an exercise-induced rise in KATP channel expression enhanced the rate and magnitude of action potential shortening in response to heart rate acceleration. This adaptation in membrane excitability promoted significant reduction in cardiac energy consumption under escalating workloads. Genetic disruption of normal KATP channel pore function abolished the exercise-related changes in action potential duration adjustment and caused increased cardiac energy consumption. Thus, an expression-driven enhancement in the KATP channel-dependent membrane response to alterations in cardiac workload represents a previously unrecognized mechanism for adaptation to physical activity and a potential target for cardioprotection. PMID:21439969

  2. Endurance Exercise Training Reduces Cardiac Sodium/Calcium Exchanger Expression in Animals Susceptible to Ventricular Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica eKukielka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Increased sodium/calcium exchanger activity (NCX1, an important regulator of cardiomyocyte cystolic calcium may provoke arrhythmias. Exercise training can decrease NCX1 expression in animals with heart failure improving cytosolic calcium regulation, and could thereby reduce the risk for ventricular fibrillation (VF. Methods: To test this hypothesis, a 2-min coronary occlusion was made during the last min. of exercise in dogs with healed myocardial infarctions; 23 had VF (S, susceptible and 13 did not (R, resistant. The animals were randomly assigned to either 10-wk exercise training (progressively increasing treadmill running (S n = 9; R n = 8 or 10-wk sedentary (S n = 14; R n = 5 groups. At the end of the 10-wk period, the exercise + ischemia test provoked VF in sedentary but not trained susceptible dogs. On a subsequent day, cardiac tissue was harvested and NCX1 protein expression was determined by Western blot. Results: In the sedentary group, NCX1 expression was significantly (ANOVA, P<0.05 higher in susceptible compared to resistant dogs. In contrast, NCX1 levels were similar in the exercise trained resistant and susceptible animals. Conclusion: These data suggest that exercise training can restore a more normal NCX1 level in dogs susceptible to ventricular fibrillation, improving cystolic calcium regulation and could thereby reduce the risk for sudden death following myocardial infarction.

  3. SCN9A mutations define primary erythermalgia as a neuropathic disorder of voltage gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenth, Joost P H; te Morsche, Rene H M; Guillet, Gerard; Taieb, Alain; Kirby, R Lee; Jansen, Jan B M J

    2005-06-01

    Primary erythermalgia is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of red, warm and painful hands, and/or feet. We previously localized the gene for primary erythermalgia to a 7.94 cM region on chromosome 2q. Recently, Yang et al identified two missense mutations of the sodium channel alpha subunit SCN9A in patients with erythermalgia. The presence of voltage-gated sodium channels in sensory neurons is thought to play a crucial role in several chronic painful neuropathies. We examined four different families and two sporadic cases and detected missense sequence variants in SCN9A to be present in primary erythermalgia patients. A total of five of six mutations were located in highly conserved regions. One family with autosomal dominantly inherited erythermalgia was double heterozygous for two separate SCN9A mutations. These data establish primary erythermalgia as a neuropathic disorder and offers hope for treatment of this incapacitating painful disorder.

  4. Photoaffinity labeling of alpha- and beta- scorpion toxin receptors associated with rat brain sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbon, H; Jover, E; Couraud, F; Rochat, H

    1983-09-15

    Azido nitrophenylaminoacetyl [125I]iodo derivative of toxin II from Centruroides suffusus suffusus, a beta-toxin, and azido nitrophenylaminoacetyl [125I]iodo derivative of toxin V from Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus, an alpha-toxin, have been covalently linked after binding to their receptor sites that are related to the voltage sensitive sodium channel present in rat brain synaptosomes. Both derivatives labeled two polypeptides of 253000 +/- 20000 and 35000 +/- 2000 mol. wt. Labeling was blocked for each derivative by a large excess of the corresponding native toxin but no cross inhibition was obtained. These results suggest that both alpha - and beta - scorpion toxin receptors are located on or near the same two membrane polypeptides which may be part of the voltage dependent sodium channel.

  5. Comparison of electrophysiological effects of calcium channel blockers on cardiac repolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyang-Ae; Hyun, Sung-Ae; Park, Sung-Gurl; Kim, Ki-Suk; Kim, Sung Joon

    2016-01-01

    Dihydropyridine (DHP) calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have been widely used to treat of several cardiovascular diseases. An excessive shortening of action potential duration (APD) due to the reduction of Ca(2+) channel current (I Ca) might increase the risk of arrhythmia. In this study we investigated the electrophysiological effects of nicardipine (NIC), isradipine (ISR), and amlodipine (AML) on the cardiac APD in rabbit Purkinje fibers, voltage-gated K(+) channel currents (I Kr, I Ks) and voltage-gated Na(+) channel current (I Na). The concentration-dependent inhibition of Ca(2+) channel currents (I Ca) was examined in rat cardiomyocytes; these CCBs have similar potency on I Ca channel blocking with IC50 (the half-maximum inhibiting concentration) values of 0.142, 0.229, and 0.227 nM on NIC, ISR, and AML, respectively. However, ISR shortened both APD50 and APD90 already at 1 µM whereas NIC and AML shortened APD50 but not APD90 up to 30 µM. According to ion channel studies, NIC and AML concentration-dependently inhibited I Kr and I Ks while ISR had only partial inhibitory effects (NIC and AML could compensate for the AP shortening effects due to the block of I Ca.

  6. Effects of sodium tanshinone II A sulfonate on hemodynamics and cardiac function in patients with senile pulmonary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-Hong Liu; Yong Zhang; Yang Zhang; Tao Xue; Cai-Ping Tang; Xiao-Ming Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of sodium tanshinone II A sulfonate on hemodynamics and cardiac function in patients with senile pulmonary heart disease.Methods:A total of 110 cases that had been diagnosed with senile pulmonary heart disease in our hospital during January 2013 to July 2015 were selected as research objects. In accordance with the random number table, they were randomly divided into observation group and control group, with 55 cases each. Conventional therapy was given to the control group, while observation group received extra sodium tanshinone II A sulfonate administration on a conventional therapy basis. Hemodynamic indexes and cardiac function were compared between the two groups.Results:After treatment, whole blood viscosity, fibrinogen and plasma viscosity were significantly decreased in observation group compared with before treatment (P<0.05), which were also significantly lower compared with control group (P<0.05); the post-treatment levels of PASP, PEP/RVET and VA/VE notably declined in both groups compared with before treatment (P<0.05), and all these post-treatment indexes in observation group were even lower compared with control group (P<0.05).Conclusions:Using sodium tanshinone II A sulfonate to treat senile pulmonary heart disease can actively and effectively improve hemodynamics and cardiac function, which is worthy of clinical promotion.

  7. Partial Agonist and Antagonist Activities of a Mutant Scorpion β-Toxin on Sodium Channels*

    OpenAIRE

    Karbat, Izhar; Ilan, Nitza; Zhang, Joel Z.; Cohen, Lior; Kahn, Roy; Benveniste, Morris; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A.; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Scorpion β-toxin 4 from Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css4) enhances the activation of voltage-gated sodium channels through a voltage sensor trapping mechanism by binding the activated state of the voltage sensor in domain II and stabilizing it in its activated conformation. Here we describe the antagonist and partial agonist properties of a mutant derivative of this toxin. Substitution of seven different amino acid residues for Glu15 in Css4 yielded toxin derivatives with both increased a...

  8. Prevention of Paralytic Neurotoxin Action on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-10

    of a- scorpion toxins to sodium channels by interacting with the active site on the toxin . The effects of these reagents on the binding of a- scorpion ...whose effects did not reach statistical significance. For some peptides, the level of a- scorpion toxin binding was increased after preincubation with...developed a different assay to measure peptide effects on scorpion toxin binding. This assay took advantage of the CNaHA-1 cells which express Type hA

  9. Effect of Gamma Radiation on Sodium Channels in Different Conformations in Neuroblastoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    rads). selectively sulphonic acid : Tris. 2-amino-2-hydroxymethylprepane-l.3- reduce sodium currents in isolated frog sciatic dial. nerves under...similar ful in demonstrating structural and functional spectrum of radiosensitivity. A large body of bio- properties of biological membrane macromole...channel function 12-41. One might expect that quences than does disruption of nucleic acids , ionizing radiation, comprising a higher energy spectrum than

  10. A novel anticonvulsant modulates voltage-gated sodium channel inactivation and prevents kindling-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Muhammad N; Gavrilovici, Cezar; Shah, Syed U Ali; Shaheen, Farzana; Choudhary, Muhammad I; Rahman, Atta-ur; Fahnestock, Margaret; Simjee, Shabana U; Poulter, Michael O

    2013-09-01

    Here, we explore the mechanism of action of isoxylitone (ISOX), a molecule discovered in the plant Delphinium denudatum, which has been shown to have anticonvulsant properties. Patch-clamp electrophysiology assayed the activity of ISOX on voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) in both cultured neurons and brain slices isolated from controls and rats with experimental epilepsy(kindling model). Quantitative transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) (QPCR) assessed brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression in kindled rats, and kindled rats treated with ISOX. ISOX suppressed sodium current (I(Na)) showing an IC50 value of 185 nM in cultured neurons. ISOX significantly slowed the recovery from inactivation (ISOX τ = 18.7 ms; Control τ = 9.4 ms; p kindled cortical neurons, the IC50 for sodium current block was identical to that found in cultured neurons. ISOX prevented kindled stage 5 seizures and decreased the enhanced BDNF mRNA expression that is normally associated with kindling (p kindling is likely a secondary outcome that nevertheless would suppress epileptogenesis. These data show a new class of anti-seizure compound that inhibits sodium channel function and prevents the development of epileptic seizures.

  11. Lidocaine stabilizes the open state of CNS voltage-dependent sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Castellanos, David R; Nikonorov, Igor; Kallen, Roland G; Recio-Pinto, E

    2002-03-28

    We have previously reported that the lidocaine action is different between CNS and muscle batrachotoxin-modified Na+ channels [Salazar et al., J. Gen. Physiol. 107 (1996) 743-754; Brain Res. 699 (1995) 305-314]. In this study we examined lidocaine action on CNS Na+ currents, to investigate the mechanism of lidocaine action on this channel isoform and to compare it with that proposed for muscle Na+ currents. Na+ currents were measured with the whole cell voltage clamp configuration in stably transfected cells expressing the brain alpha-subunit (type IIA) by itself (alpha-brain) or together with the brain beta(1)-subunit (alphabeta(1)-brain), or the cardiac alpha-subunit (hH1) (alpha-cardiac). Lidocaine (100 microM) produced comparable levels of Na+ current block at positive potentials and of hyperpolarizing shift of the steady-state inactivation curve in alpha-brain and alphabeta(1)-brain Na+ currents. Lidocaine accelerated the rates of activation and inactivation, produced an hyperpolarizing shift in the steady-state activation curve and increased the current magnitude at negative potentials in alpha-brain but not in alphabeta(1)-brain Na+ currents. The lidocaine action in alphabeta(1)-brain resembled that observed in alpha-cardiac Na+ currents. The lidocaine-induced increase in current magnitude at negative potentials and the hyperpolarizing shift in the steady-state activation curve of alpha-brain, are novel effects and suggest that lidocaine treatment does not always lead to current reduction/block when it interacts with Na+ channels. The data are explained by using a modified version of the model proposed by Vedantham and Cannon [J. Gen. Physiol., 113 (1999) 7-16] in which we postulate that the difference in lidocaine action between alpha-brain and alphabeta(1)-brain Na+ currents could be explained by differences in the lidocaine action on the open channel state.

  12. Alterations in plasma membrane promote overexpression and increase of sodium influx through epithelial sodium channel in hypertensive platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, D; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Sosa-Peinado, Alejandro; Cornejo-Garrido, Jorge; Ordaz-Pichardo, Cynthia; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Platelets are small, anucleated cell fragments that activate in response to a wide variety of stimuli, triggering a complex series of intracellular pathways leading to a hemostatic thrombus formation at vascular injury sites. However, in essential hypertension, platelet activation contributes to causing myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. Reported abnormalities in platelet functions, such as platelet hyperactivity and hyperaggregability to several agonists, contribute to the pathogenesis and complications of thrombotic events associated with hypertension. Platelet membrane lipid composition and fluidity are determining for protein site accessibility, structural arrangement of platelet surface, and response to appropriate stimuli. The present study aimed to demonstrate whether structural and biochemical abnormalities in lipid membrane composition and fluidity characteristic of platelets from hypertensive patients influence the expression of the Epithelial Sodium Channel (ENaC), fundamental for sodium influx during collagen activation. Wb, cytometry and quantitative Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) assays demonstrated ENaC overexpression in platelets from hypertensive subjects and in relation to control subjects. Additionally, our results strongly suggest a key role of β-dystroglycan as a scaffold for the organization of ENaC and associated proteins. Understanding of the mechanisms of platelet alterations in hypertension should provide valuable information for the pathophysiology of hypertension.

  13. Modulation of voltage-gated sodium channels hyperpolarizes the voltage threshold for activation in spinal motoneurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Kevin E; Carlin, Kevin P; Fedirchuk, Brent

    2012-03-01

    Previous work has shown that motoneurone excitability is enhanced by a hyperpolarization of the membrane potential at which an action potential is initiated (V(th)) at the onset, and throughout brainstem-evoked fictive locomotion in the adult decerebrate cat and neonatal rat. Modeling work has suggested the modulation of Na(+) conductance as a putative mechanism underlying this state-dependent change in excitability. This study sought to determine whether modulation of voltage-gated sodium channels could induce V(th) hyperpolarization. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from antidromically identified lumbar spinal motoneurones in an isolated neonatal rat spinal cord preparation. Recordings were made with and without the bath application of veratridine, a plant alkaloid neurotoxin that acts as a sodium channel modulator. As seen in HEK 293 cells expressing Nav1.2 channels, veratridine-modified channels demonstrated a hyperpolarizing shift in their voltage-dependence of activation and a slowing of inactivation that resulted in an enhanced inward current in response to voltage ramp stimulations. In the native rat motoneurones, veratridine-modified sodium channels induced a hyperpolarization of V(th) in all 29 neonatal rat motoneurones examined (mean hyperpolarization: -6.6 ± 4.3 mV). V(th) hyperpolarization was not due to the effects on Ca(2+) and/or K(+) channels as blockade of these currents did not alter V(th). Veratridine also significantly increased the amplitude of persistent inward currents (PICs; mean increase: 72.5 ± 98.5 pA) evoked in response to slow depolarizing current ramps. However, the enhancement of the PIC amplitude had a slower time course than the hyperpolarization of V(th), and the PIC onset voltage could be either depolarized or hyperpolarized, suggesting that PIC facilitation did not mediate the V(th) hyperpolarization. We therefore suggest that central neuronal circuitry in mammals could affect V(th) in a mechanism similar to that of

  14. Designing a C84 fullerene as a specific voltage-gated sodium channel blocker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2013-07-01

    Fullerene derivatives demonstrate considerable potential for numerous biological applications, such as the effective inhibition of HIV protease. Recently, they were identified for their ability to indiscriminately block biological ion channels. A fullerene derivative which specifically blocks a particular ion channel could lead to a new set of drug leads for the treatment of various ion channel-related diseases. Here, we demonstrate their extraordinary potential by designing a fullerene which mimics some of the functions of μ-conotoxin, a peptide derived from cone snail venom which potently binds to the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel (NavAb). We show, using molecular dynamics simulations, that the C84 fullerene with six lysine derivatives uniformly attached to its surface is selective to NavAb over a voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv1.3). The side chain of one of the lysine residues protrudes into the selectivity filter of the channel, while the methionine residues located just outside of the channel form hydrophobic contacts with the carbon atoms of the fullerene. The modified C84 fullerene strongly binds to the NavAb channel with an affinity of 46 nM but binds weakly to Kv1.3 with an affinity of 3 mM. This potent blocker of NavAb may serve as a structural template from which potent compounds can be designed for the targeting of mammalian Nav channels. There is a genuine need to target mammalian Nav channels as a form of treatment of various diseases which have been linked to their malfunction, such as epilepsy and chronic pain.

  15. Current view on regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels by calcium and auxiliary proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Geoffrey S; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2016-09-01

    In cardiac and skeletal myocytes, and in most neurons, the opening of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV channels) triggers action potentials, a process that is regulated via the interactions of the channels' intercellular C-termini with auxiliary proteins and/or Ca(2+) . The molecular and structural details for how Ca(2+) and/or auxiliary proteins modulate NaV channel function, however, have eluded a concise mechanistic explanation and details have been shrouded for the last decade behind controversy about whether Ca(2+) acts directly upon the NaV channel or through interacting proteins, such as the Ca(2+) binding protein calmodulin (CaM). Here, we review recent advances in defining the structure of NaV intracellular C-termini and associated proteins such as CaM or fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) to reveal new insights into how Ca(2+) affects NaV function, and how altered Ca(2+) -dependent or FHF-mediated regulation of NaV channels is perturbed in various disease states through mutations that disrupt CaM or FHF interaction.

  16. Partial Agonist and Antagonist Activities of a Mutant Scorpion β-Toxin on Sodium Channels*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbat, Izhar; Ilan, Nitza; Zhang, Joel Z.; Cohen, Lior; Kahn, Roy; Benveniste, Morris; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A.; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Scorpion β-toxin 4 from Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css4) enhances the activation of voltage-gated sodium channels through a voltage sensor trapping mechanism by binding the activated state of the voltage sensor in domain II and stabilizing it in its activated conformation. Here we describe the antagonist and partial agonist properties of a mutant derivative of this toxin. Substitution of seven different amino acid residues for Glu15 in Css4 yielded toxin derivatives with both increased and decreased affinities for binding to neurotoxin receptor site 4 on sodium channels. Css4E15R is unique among this set of mutants in that it retained nearly normal binding affinity but lost its functional activity for modification of sodium channel gating in our standard electrophysiological assay for voltage sensor trapping. More detailed analysis of the functional effects of Css4E15R revealed weak voltage sensor trapping activity, which was very rapidly reversed upon repolarization and therefore was not observed in our standard assay of toxin effects. This partial agonist activity of Css4E15R is observed clearly in voltage sensor trapping assays with brief (5 ms) repolarization between the conditioning prepulse and the test pulse. The effects of Css4E15R are fit well by a three-step model of toxin action involving concentration-dependent toxin binding to its receptor site followed by depolarization-dependent activation of the voltage sensor and subsequent voltage sensor trapping. Because it is a partial agonist with much reduced efficacy for voltage sensor trapping, Css4E15R can antagonize the effects of wild-type Css4 on sodium channel activation and can prevent paralysis by Css4 when injected into mice. Our results define the first partial agonist and antagonist activities for scorpion toxins and open new avenues of research toward better understanding of the structure-function relationships for toxin action on sodium channel voltage sensors and toward potential toxin

  17. Partial agonist and antagonist activities of a mutant scorpion beta-toxin on sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbat, Izhar; Ilan, Nitza; Zhang, Joel Z; Cohen, Lior; Kahn, Roy; Benveniste, Morris; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Scorpion β-toxin 4 from Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css4) enhances the activation of voltage-gated sodium channels through a voltage sensor trapping mechanism by binding the activated state of the voltage sensor in domain II and stabilizing it in its activated conformation. Here we describe the antagonist and partial agonist properties of a mutant derivative of this toxin. Substitution of seven different amino acid residues for Glu(15) in Css4 yielded toxin derivatives with both increased and decreased affinities for binding to neurotoxin receptor site 4 on sodium channels. Css4(E15R) is unique among this set of mutants in that it retained nearly normal binding affinity but lost its functional activity for modification of sodium channel gating in our standard electrophysiological assay for voltage sensor trapping. More detailed analysis of the functional effects of Css4(E15R) revealed weak voltage sensor trapping activity, which was very rapidly reversed upon repolarization and therefore was not observed in our standard assay of toxin effects. This partial agonist activity of Css4(E15R) is observed clearly in voltage sensor trapping assays with brief (5 ms) repolarization between the conditioning prepulse and the test pulse. The effects of Css4(E15R) are fit well by a three-step model of toxin action involving concentration-dependent toxin binding to its receptor site followed by depolarization-dependent activation of the voltage sensor and subsequent voltage sensor trapping. Because it is a partial agonist with much reduced efficacy for voltage sensor trapping, Css4(E15R) can antagonize the effects of wild-type Css4 on sodium channel activation and can prevent paralysis by Css4 when injected into mice. Our results define the first partial agonist and antagonist activities for scorpion toxins and open new avenues of research toward better understanding of the structure-function relationships for toxin action on sodium channel voltage sensors and toward

  18. Energetics of discrete selectivity bands and mutation-induced transitions in the calcium-sodium ion channels family

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, I; Tindjong, R; McClintock, P V E; Eisenberg, R S

    2013-01-01

    We use Brownian dynamics simulations to study the permeation properties of a generic electrostatic model of a biological ion channel as a function of the fixed charge Q_f at its selectivity filter. We reconcile the recently-discovered discrete calcium conduction bands M0 (Q_f=1e), M1 (3e), M2 (5e) with the set of sodium conduction bands L0 (0.5-0.7e), L1 (1.5-2e) thereby obtaining a completed pattern of conduction and selectivity bands v Q_f for the sodium-calcium channels family. An increase of Q_f leads to an increase of calcium selectivity: L0 (sodium selective, non-blocking channel) -> M0 (non-selective channel) -> L1 (sodium selective channel with divalent block) -> M1 (calcium selective channel exhibiting the anomalous mole fraction effect). We create a consistent identification scheme where the L1 band is identified with the eukaryotic (DEKA) sodium channel, and L0 (speculatively) with the bacterial NaChBac channel. The scheme created is able to account for the experimentally observed mutation-induced ...

  19. Mapping of voltage sensor positions in resting and inactivated mammalian sodium channels by LRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Tomoya; Durek, Thomas; Dang, Bobo; Finol-Urdaneta, Rocio K; Craik, David J; Kent, Stephen B H; French, Robert J; Bezanilla, Francisco; Correa, Ana M

    2017-03-07

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) play crucial roles in excitable cells. Although vertebrate Nav function has been extensively studied, the detailed structural basis for voltage-dependent gating mechanisms remain obscure. We have assessed the structural changes of the Nav voltage sensor domain using lanthanide-based resonance energy transfer (LRET) between the rat skeletal muscle voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav1.4) and fluorescently labeled Nav1.4-targeting toxins. We generated donor constructs with genetically encoded lanthanide-binding tags (LBTs) inserted at the extracellular end of the S4 segment of each domain (with a single LBT per construct). Three different Bodipy-labeled, Nav1.4-targeting toxins were synthesized as acceptors: β-scorpion toxin (Ts1)-Bodipy, KIIIA-Bodipy, and GIIIA-Bodipy analogs. Functional Nav-LBT channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes were voltage-clamped, and distinct LRET signals were obtained in the resting and slow inactivated states. Intramolecular distances computed from the LRET signals define a geometrical map of Nav1.4 with the bound toxins, and reveal voltage-dependent structural changes related to channel gating.

  20. The sorting receptor Rer1 controls Purkinje cell function via voltage gated sodium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkova, Christina; Liebmann, Lutz; Krämer, Andreas; Hübner, Christian A.; Kaether, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Rer1 is a sorting receptor in the early secretory pathway that controls the assembly and the cell surface transport of selected multimeric membrane protein complexes. Mice with a Purkinje cell (PC) specific deletion of Rer1 showed normal polarization and differentiation of PCs and normal development of the cerebellum. However, PC-specific loss of Rer1 led to age-dependent motor deficits in beam walk, ladder climbing and gait. Analysis of brain sections revealed a specific degeneration of PCs in the anterior cerebellar lobe in old animals. Electrophysiological recordings demonstrated severe deficits in spontaneous action potential generation. Measurements of resurgent currents indicated decreased surface densities of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav), but not changes in individual channels. Analysis of mice with a whole brain Rer1-deletion demonstrated a strong down-regulation of Nav1.6 and 1.1 in the absence of Rer1, whereas protein levels of the related Cav2.1 and of Kv3.3 and 7.2 channels were not affected. The data suggest that Rer1 controls the assembly and transport of Nav1.1 and 1.6, the principal sodium channels responsible for recurrent firing, in PCs. PMID:28117367

  1. Mapping of voltage sensor positions in resting and inactivated mammalian sodium channels by LRET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Tomoya; Durek, Thomas; Dang, Bobo; Finol-Urdaneta, Rocio K.; Craik, David J.; Kent, Stephen B. H.; French, Robert J.; Bezanilla, Francisco; Correa, Ana M.

    2017-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) play crucial roles in excitable cells. Although vertebrate Nav function has been extensively studied, the detailed structural basis for voltage-dependent gating mechanisms remain obscure. We have assessed the structural changes of the Nav voltage sensor domain using lanthanide-based resonance energy transfer (LRET) between the rat skeletal muscle voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav1.4) and fluorescently labeled Nav1.4-targeting toxins. We generated donor constructs with genetically encoded lanthanide-binding tags (LBTs) inserted at the extracellular end of the S4 segment of each domain (with a single LBT per construct). Three different Bodipy-labeled, Nav1.4-targeting toxins were synthesized as acceptors: β-scorpion toxin (Ts1)-Bodipy, KIIIA-Bodipy, and GIIIA-Bodipy analogs. Functional Nav-LBT channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes were voltage-clamped, and distinct LRET signals were obtained in the resting and slow inactivated states. Intramolecular distances computed from the LRET signals define a geometrical map of Nav1.4 with the bound toxins, and reveal voltage-dependent structural changes related to channel gating. PMID:28202723

  2. Functional characterization of two novel scorpion sodium channel toxins from Lychas mucronatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingna; Li, Tian; Liu, Honglian; Yang, Fan; Liang, Songping; Cao, Zhijian; Li, Wenxin; Wu, Yingliang

    2014-11-01

    The diverse α-scorpion toxins are invaluable pharmacological tools and potential drugs targeting sodium channels, but the pharmacological profiles of most toxins remains unknown so far. Here, we reported pharmacological activities of two novel α-scorpion toxins LmαTX3 and LmαTX5 from the Lychas mucronatus. Using the expression vector pET-28a, the recombinant LmαTX3 and LmαTX5 were separated by RP-HPLC and identified by MALDI-TOF-MS. Subsequently, sodium channels rNav1.2, mNav1.4, hNav1.5 and hNav1.7 were used for evaluating the pharmacological activities of LmαTX3 and LmαTX5 toxins. The electrophysiological experiments showed that both 10 μM recombinant LmαTX3 and LmαTX5 seriously inhibited the fast inactivation of mNav1.4 and hNav1.5 channels, moderately affected hNav1.7 channel, and hardly modulated rNav1.2 channel. The dose-response experiments further indicated the EC50 values of LmαTX3 were 4.98 ± 0.79 μM for mNav1.4, 1.23 ± 0.31 μM for hNav1.5 and 31.46 ± 2.32 μM for hNav1.7 channels, respectively. Similar pharmacological profiles of recombinant LmαTX5 were also observed, and its EC50 values were 4.53 ± 1.38 μM, 1.03 ± 0.43 μM and 67.62 ± 2.31 μM for mNav1.4, hNav1.5 and hNav1.7, respectively. In addition, the recombinant LmαTX3 from the vector pET-14b had much less effect on the fast inactivation of mNav1.4, hNav1.5 and hNav1.7 channels, which indicated that the expression vector pET-14b likely played a critical role in toxin function. Together, these findings first highlighted that scorpion toxins from L. mucronatus were a new molecular resource of discovering pharmacological probes and prospective drugs targeting sodium channels in the future.

  3. A comparative study of the action of tolperisone on seven different voltage dependent sodium channel isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Doris; Lohberger, Birgit; Steinecker, Bibiane; Schmidt, Kurt; Quasthoff, Stefan; Schreibmayer, Wolfgang

    2006-05-24

    The specific, acute interaction of tolperisone, an agent used as a muscle relaxant and for the treatment of chronic pain conditions, with the Na(v1.2), Na(v1.3), Na(v1.4), Na(v1.5), Na(v1.6), Na(v1.7), and Na(v1.8) isoforms of voltage dependent sodium channels was investigated and compared to that of lidocaine. Voltage dependent sodium channels were expressed in the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system and sodium currents were recorded with the two electrode voltage clamp technique. Cumulative dose response relations revealed marked differences in IC(50) values between the two drugs on identical isoforms, as well as between isoforms. A detailed kinetic analysis uncovered that tolperisone as well as lidocaine exhibited their blocking action not only via state dependent association/dissociation with voltage dependent sodium channels, but a considerable fraction of inhibition is tonic, i.e. permanent and basic in nature. Voltage dependent activation was affected to a minor extent only. A shift in steady-state inactivation to more negative potentials could be observed for most drug/isoform combinations. The contribution of this shift to overall block was, however, small at drug concentrations resulting in considerable overall block. Recovery from inactivation was affected notably by both drugs. Lidocaine application led to a pronounced prolongation of the time constant of the fast recovery process for the Na(v1.3), Na(v1.5), and Na(v1.7) isoforms, indicating common structural properties in the local anesthetic receptor site of these three proteins. Interestingly, this characteristic drug action was not observed for tolperisone.

  4. Energetics of ion competition in the DEKA selectivity filter of neuronal sodium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Boda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The energetics of ionic selectivity in the neuronal sodium channels is studied. A simple model constructed for the selectivity filter of the channel is used. The selectivity filter of this channel type contains aspartate (D, glutamate (E, lysine (K, and alanine (A residues (the DEKA locus. We use Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations to compute equilibrium binding selectivity in the selectivity filter and to obtain various terms of the excess chemical potential from a particle insertion procedure based on Widom's method. We show that K+ ions in competition with Na+ are efficiently excluded from the selectivity filter due to entropic hard sphere exclusion. The dielectric constant of protein has no effect on this selectivity. Ca2+ ions, on the other hand, are excluded from the filter due to a free energetic penalty which is enhanced by the low dielectric constant of protein.

  5. The voltage-gated sodium channel nav1.8 is expressed in human sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cejudo-Roman

    Full Text Available The role of Na(+ fluxes through voltage-gated sodium channels in the regulation of sperm cell function remains poorly understood. Previously, we reported that several genes encoding voltage-gated Na(+ channels were expressed in human testis and mature spermatozoa. In this study, we analyzed the presence and function of the TTX-resistant VGSC α subunit Nav1.8 in human capacitated sperm cells. Using an RT-PCR assay, we found that the mRNA of the gene SCN10A, that encode Na v1.8, was abundantly and specifically expressed in human testis and ejaculated spermatozoa. The Na v1.8 protein was detected in capacitated sperm cells using three different specific antibodies against this channel. Positive immunoreactivity was mainly located in the neck and the principal piece of the flagellum. The presence of Na v1.8 in sperm cells was confirmed by Western blot. Functional studies demonstrated that the increases in progressive motility produced by veratridine, a voltage-gated sodium channel activator, were reduced in sperm cells preincubated with TTX (10 μM, the Na v1.8 antagonist A-803467, or a specific Na v1.8 antibody. Veratridine elicited similar percentage increases in progressive motility in sperm cells maintained in Ca(2+-containing or Ca(2+-free solution and did not induce hyperactivation or the acrosome reaction. Veratridine caused a rise in sperm intracellular Na(+, [Na(+]i, and the sustained phase of the response was inhibited in the presence of A-803467. These results verify that the Na(+ channel Na v1.8 is present in human sperm cells and demonstrate that this channel participates in the regulation of sperm function.

  6. Interaction between the sodium channel inactivation linker and domain III S4-S5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M R; Goldin, A L

    1997-10-01

    The III-IV linker (L(III-IV)) of the rat brain sodium channel is critical for fast inactivation, possibly forming a fast inactivation particle. Inactivation can be disrupted by mutation of a conserved alanine at position 1329 in the S4-S5 loop of domain III. Combination of a charged mutation at 1329 with a compensatory (opposite) charge mutation at position 1489 in L(III-IV) partially restores inactivation of the channel. The compensatory charge mutant channel has a single-channel mean open time that is similar to that of the wild-type channel and is approximately 50 times shorter than that of the L(III-IV) mutant channel. The results of thermodynamic cycle analysis indicate that the mutations in domain III S4-S5 and L(III-IV) have a coupling energy of 2.8 kcal/mol, indicating that the two mutations act interdependently. These data suggest that L(III-IV) interacts directly with A1329, which may form part of the docking site if L(III-IV) is a fast inactivation particle.

  7. Down regulation of sodium channels in the central nervous system of hibernating snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, T; Battonyai, I; Pirger, Z

    2014-05-28

    Hibernation, as behavior, is an evolutionary mode of adaptation of animal species to unfavorable environmental conditions. It is generally characterized by suppressed metabolism, which also includes down regulation of the energy consuming ion-channel functioning. Experimental data regarding decreased ion-channel function are scarce. Therefore, our goal was to study the possible down regulation of voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) subtypes in the neurons of hibernating snails. Our immunohistochemical experiments revealed that the expression of NaV1.8-like channels in the central nervous system was substantially down regulated in hibernating animals. In contrast to NaV1.8-like, the NaV1.9-like channels were present in neurons independently from hibernating and non-hibernating states. Our western blot data supported the immunohistochemical results according to which the band of the NaV1.8-like channel protein was less intensively labeled in the homogenate of the hibernating snails. The NaV1.9-like immunoreactivity was equally present both in hibernating and active snails. Micro-electrophysiological experiments show that in hibernating snails both NaV1.8- and NaV1.9-like currents are substantially decreased compared to that of the active snails. The contradictory electrophysiological and immunohistochemical or western blot data suggest that the molecular mechanisms of the "channel arrest" could be different in diverse NaV channel subtypes. Climate changes will affect temperature extremes and a question is how different species beyond their physiological tolerance will or able to adapt to changing environment. Hibernation is an important mode of adaptation to extreme climatic variations, and pursuant to this the present results may contribute to the study of the behavioral ecology.

  8. Functional unit size of the neurotoxin receptors on the voltage-dependent sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelides, K J; Nutter, T J; Elmer, L W; Kempner, E S

    1985-03-25

    Radiation inactivation was used in situ to determine the functional unit sizes of the neurotoxin receptors of the voltage-dependent sodium channel from rat brain. Frozen or lyophilized synaptosomes were irradiated with high energy electrons generated by a linear accelerator and assayed for [3H]saxitoxin, 125I-Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus (alpha-scorpion toxin), 125I-Centruroides suffusus suffusus (beta-scorpion toxin), and batrachotoxinin-A 20 alpha-[3H]benzoate binding activity. The functional unit size of the neurotoxin receptors determined in situ by target analysis are 220,000 for saxitoxin, 263,000 for alpha-scorpion toxin, and 45,000 for beta-scorpion toxin. Analysis of the inactivation curve for batrachotoxinin-A 20 alpha-benzoate binding to the channel yields two target sizes of Mr approximately 287,000 (50%) and approximately 51,000 (50%). The results are independent of the purity of the membrane preparation. Comparison of the radiation inactivation data with the protein composition of the rat brain sodium channel indicates that there are at least two functional components.

  9. Kinetic changes and modulation by carbamazepine on voltage-gated sodium channels in rat CA1 neurons after epilepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Sun; T.R. Werkman; W.J. Wadman

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study whether the functional properties of sodium channels, and subsequently the channel modulation by carbamazepine (CBZ) in hippocampal CA1 neurons can be changed after epileptic seizures. METHODS: We used the acutely dissociated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells from epilepsy model rats 3 w

  10. PROPERTIES OF VOLTAGE-GATED SODIUM CHANNELS IN DEVELOPING AUDITORY NEURONS OF THE MOUSE IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the properties of voltage-gated sodium (Na+) channels in developing auditoryneurons during early postnatal stages in the mammalian central nervous system.Methods. Using the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique, we have studied changes in the electrophysi-ological properties of Na+ channels in the principal neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB).Results. We found that MNTB neurons already express functional Na+ channels at postnatal day 1 (P1),and that channel density begins to increase at P5 when the neurons receive synaptic innervation andreach its maximum (~3 fold) at P11 when functional hearing onsets. These changes were paralleled byan age-dependent acceleration in both inactivation and recovery from inactivation. In contrast, there wasvery little alteration in the voltage-dependence of inactivation.Conclusion. These profound changes in the properties of voltage-gated Na+ channels may increase theexcitability of MNTB neurons and enhance their phase-locking fidelity and capacity during high-frequencysynaptic transmission.

  11. Sodium Butyrate Protects Against High Fat Diet-induced Cardiac Dysfunction and Metabolic Disorders in Type II Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Du, Jianfeng; Yano, Naohiro; Wang, Hao; Zhao, Yu Tina; Patricia, Dubielecka-Szczerba; Zhuang, Shougang; Chin, Eugene Y; Qin, Gangjian; Zhao, Ting C

    2017-01-21

    Histone deacetylases are recently identified to act as key regulators for cardiac pathophysiology and metabolic disorders. However, the function of histone deacetylase (HDAC) in controlling cardiac performance in type II diabetes and obesity remains unknown. Here we determine whether HDAC inhibition attenuates high fat diet (HFD)-induced cardiac dysfunction and improves metabolic features. Adult mice were fed with either HFD or standard chow food for 24 weeks. Starting at 12 weeks, mice were divided into four groups randomly, in which sodium butyrate (1%), a potent HDAC inhibitor, was provided to chow and HFD-fed mice in drinking water, respectively. Glucose intolerance, metabolic parameters, cardiac function, and remodeling were assessed. Histological analysis and cellular signaling were examined at 24 weeks following euthanization of mice. HFD-fed mice demonstrated myocardial dysfunction and profound interstitial fibrosis, which were attenuated by HDAC inhibition. HFD-induced metabolic syndrome features insulin resistance, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, lipid accumulations, and cardiac hypertrophy, these effects were prevented by HDAC inhibition. Furthermore, HDAC inhibition attenuated myocyte apoptosis, reduced production of reactive oxygen species, and increased angiogenesis in the HFD-fed myocardium. Notably, HFD induced decreases in MKK3, p38, p38 regulated/activated protein kinase (PRAK) and Akt-1, but not p44/42 phosphorylation, which were prevented by HDAC inhibition. These results suggest that HDAC inhibition plays a critical role to preserve cardiac performance and mitigate metabolic disorders in obesity and diabetes, which is associated with MKK3/p38/PRAK pathway. The study holds promise in developing a new therapeutic strategy in the treatment of type II diabetic-induced heart failure and metabolic disorders. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Allosteric modulation of neurotoxin binding to voltage-sensitive sodium channels by Ptychodiscus brevis toxin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, R G; Jover, E; Couraud, F; Baden, D G; Catterall, W A

    1987-03-01

    The effects of Ptychodiscus brevis toxin 2 (PbTx-2) on the binding of neurotoxins at four different neurotoxin receptor sites on voltage-sensitive sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes were examined. Binding of saxitoxin at neurotoxin receptor site 1 and Leiurus quinquestriatus alpha-scorpion toxin (LqTx) at neurotoxin receptor site 3 was unaffected. PbTx-2 enhanced binding of batrachotoxinin A 20-alpha-benzoate (BTX-B) to neurotoxin receptor site 2 and Centruroides suffusus suffusus beta-scorpion toxin (CsTx II) to site 4 on sodium channels. These results support the proposal that PbTx-2 and related toxins act at a new receptor site (site 5) that has not been previously analyzed in binding experiments. Half-maximal effects of PbTx-2 were observed in the range of 20-50 nM PbTx-2. The enhancement of BTX-B binding was reduced by depolarization. Saturating concentrations of PbTx-2 reduced KD values for binding of BTX-B and CsTx-II 2.9-fold and 2.6-fold, respectively. The effects of PbTx-2 and LqTx in enhancing BTX-B binding were synergistic. A model involving both preferential binding of BTX-B, PbTx-2, LqTx, and CsTx II to active states of sodium channels and allosteric interactions among the four receptor sites at which these toxins act accommodates these and previous results.

  13. Clopidogrel attenuates lithium-induced alterations in renal water and sodium channels/transporters in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Peti-Peterdi, János; Heiney, Kristina M; Riquier-Brison, Anne; Carlson, Noel G; Müller, Christa E; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M; Kishore, Bellamkonda K

    2015-12-01

    Lithium (Li) administration causes deranged expression and function of renal aquaporins and sodium channels/transporters resulting in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Extracellular nucleotides (ATP/ADP/UTP), via P2 receptors, regulate these transport functions. We tested whether clopidogrel bisulfate (CLPD), an antagonist of ADP-activated P2Y(12) receptor, would affect Li-induced alterations in renal aquaporins and sodium channels/transporters. Adult mice were treated for 14 days with CLPD and/or Li and euthanized. Urine and kidneys were collected for analysis. When administered with Li, CLPD ameliorated polyuria, attenuated the rise in urine prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and resulted in significantly higher urinary arginine vasopressin (AVP) and aldosterone levels as compared to Li treatment alone. However, urine sodium excretion remained elevated. Semi-quantitative immunoblotting revealed that CLPD alone increased renal aquaporin 2 (AQP2), Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2), Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC), and the subunits of the epithelial Na channel (ENaC) in medulla by 25-130 %. When combined with Li, CLPD prevented downregulation of AQP2, Na-K-ATPase, and NKCC2 but was less effective against downregulation of cortical α- or γ-ENaC (70 kDa band). Thus, CLPD primarily attenuated Li-induced downregulation of proteins involved in water conservation (AVP-sensitive), with modest effects on aldosterone-sensitive proteins potentially explaining sustained natriuresis. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy revealed strong labeling for P2Y(12)-R in proximal tubule brush border and blood vessels in the cortex and less intense labeling in medullary thick ascending limb and the collecting ducts. Therefore, there is the potential for CLPD to be directly acting at the tubule sites to mediate these effects. In conclusion, P2Y(12)-R may represent a novel therapeutic target for Li-induced NDI.

  14. Zebrafish: a novel research tool for cardiac (patho)electrophysiology and ion channel disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkerk, Arie O; Remme, Carol Ann

    2012-01-01

    The zebrafish is a cold-blooded tropical freshwater teleost with two-chamber heart morphology. A major advantage of the zebrafish for heart studies is that the embryo is transparent, allowing for easy assessment of heart development, heart rate analysis and phenotypic characterization. Moreover, rapid and effective gene-specific knockdown can be achieved using morpholino oligonucleotides. Lastly, zebrafish are small in size, are easy to maintain and house, grow fast, and have large offspring size, making them a cost-efficient research model. Zebrafish embryonic and adult heart rates as well as action potential (AP) shape and duration and electrocardiogram morphology closely resemble those of humans. However, whether the zebrafish is truly an attractive alternative model for human cardiac electrophysiology depends on the presence and gating properties of the various ion channels in the zebrafish heart, but studies into the latter are as yet limited. The rapid component of the delayed rectifier K(+) current (I(Kr)) remains the best characterized and validated ion current in zebrafish myocytes, and zebrafish may represent a valuable model to investigate human I(Kr) channel-related disease, including long QT syndrome. Arguments against the use of zebrafish as model for human cardiac (patho)electrophysiology include its cold-bloodedness and two-chamber heart morphology, absence of t-tubuli, sarcoplamatic reticulum function, and a different profile of various depolarizing and repolarizing ion channels, including a limited Na(+) current density. Based on the currently available literature, we propose that zebrafish may constitute a relevant research model for investigating ion channel disorders associated with abnormal repolarization, but may be less suitable for studying depolarization disorders or Ca(2+)-modulated arrhythmias.

  15. Zebrafish: a novel research tool for cardiac (pathoelectrophysiology and ion channel disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie O Verkerk

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The zebrafish is a cold-blooded tropical freshwater teleost with a two-chamber heart morphology, typical for non-mammalian vertebrates. A major advantage of the zebrafish for heart studies is that the embryo is transparent, allowing for easy assessment of heart development, heart rate analysis and phenotypic characterization. Moreover, rapid and effective gene-specific knockdown can be achieved using morpholino oligonucleotides. Lastly, zebrafish are small in size, are easy to maintain and house, grow fast, and have large offspring size, making them a cost-efficient research model. Zebrafish embryonic and adult heart rates as well as action potential shape and duration and electrocardiogram morphology closely resemble those of humans. However, whether the zebrafish is truly an attractive alternative model for human cardiac electrophysiology depends on the presence and gating properties of the various ion channels in the zebrafish heart, but studies into the latter are as yet limited. The rapid component of the delayed rectifier K+ current (IKr remains the best characterized and validated ion current in zebrafish myocytes, and zebrafish may represent a valuable model to investigate human IKr channel related disease, including long QT syndrome. Arguments against the use of zebrafish as model for human cardiac (pathoelectrophysiology include its cold-bloodedness and two-chamber heart morphology, absence of t-tubuli, sarcoplamatic reticulum function, and a different profile of various depolarizing and repolarizing ion channels, including a limited Na+ current density. Based on the currently available literature, we propose that zebrafish may constitute a relevant research model for investigating ion channel disorders associated with abnormal repolarization, but may be less suitable for studying depolarization disorders or Ca2+-modulated arrhythmias.

  16. Kinetic changes and modulation by carbamazepine on voltage-gated sodium channels in rat CA1 neurons after epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-chun SUN; Taco WERKMAN; Wytse J WADMAN

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To study whether the functional properties of sodium channels, and subsequently the channel modulation by carbamazepine (CBZ) in hippocampal CA1 neurons can be changed after epileptic seizures. Methods: We used the acutely dissociated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells from epilepsy model rats 3 weeks and 3 months respectively after kainate injection, and whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques. Results: After long-term epileptic seizures, both sodium channel voltage-dependence of activation and steady-state inactivation shifted to more hyperpolarizing potentials, which resulted in the enlarged window current; the membrane density of sodium current decreased and the time constant of recovery from inactivation increased. CBZ displayed unchanged efficacy on sodium channels, with a similar binding rate to them, except that at higher concentrations, the voltage shift of inactivation was reduced. For the short-term kainate model rats, no differences were detected between the control and epilepsy groups. Conclusion: These results indicate that the properties of sodium channels in acutely dissociated hippocampal neurons could be changed following long-term epilepsy, but the alternation might not be enough to induce the channel resistance to CBZ.

  17. Temperature dependence of erythromelalgia mutation L858F in sodium channel Nav1.7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rush Anthony M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The disabling chronic pain syndrome erythromelalgia (also termed erythermalgia is characterized by attacks of burning pain in the extremities induced by warmth. Pharmacological treatment is often ineffective, but the pain can be alleviated by cooling of the limbs. Inherited erythromelalgia has recently been linked to mutations in the gene SCN9A, which encodes the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. Nav1.7 is preferentially expressed in most nociceptive DRG neurons and in sympathetic ganglion neurons. It has recently been shown that several disease-causing erythromelalgia mutations alter channel-gating behavior in a manner that increases DRG neuron excitability. Results Here we tested the effects of temperature on gating properties of wild type Nav1.7 and mutant L858F channels. Whole-cell voltage-clamp measurements on wild type or L858F channels expressed in HEK293 cells revealed that cooling decreases current density, slows deactivation and increases ramp currents for both mutant and wild type channels. However, cooling differentially shifts the midpoint of steady-state activation in a depolarizing direction for L858F but not for wild type channels. Conclusion The cooling-dependent shift of the activation midpoint of L858F to more positive potentials brings the threshold of activation of the mutant channels closer to that of wild type Nav1.7 at lower temperatures, and is likely to contribute to the alleviation of painful symptoms upon cooling in affected limbs in patients with this erythromelalgia mutation.

  18. Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Nicole A; Kearney, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in voltage-gated sodium channel genes cause several types of human epilepsies. Often, individuals with the same sodium channel mutation exhibit diverse phenotypes. This suggests that factors beyond the primary mutation influence disease severity, including genetic modifiers. Mouse epilepsy models with voltage-gated sodium channel mutations exhibit strain-dependent phenotype variability, supporting a contribution of genetic modifiers in epilepsy. The Scn2a(Q54) (Q54) mouse model has a strain-dependent epilepsy phenotype. Q54 mice on the C57BL/6J (B6) strain exhibit delayed seizure onset and improved survival compared to [B6xSJL/J]F1.Q54 mice. We previously mapped two dominant modifier loci that influence Q54 seizure susceptibility and identified Hlf (hepatic leukemia factor) as a candidate modifier gene at one locus. Hlf and other PAR bZIP transcription factors had previously been associated with spontaneous seizures in mice thought to be caused by down-regulation of the pyridoxine pathway. An Hlf targeted knockout mouse model was used to evaluate the effect of Hlf deletion on Q54 phenotype severity. Hlf(KO/KO);Q54 double mutant mice exhibited elevated frequency and reduced survival compared to Q54 controls. To determine if direct modulation of the pyridoxine pathway could alter the Q54 phenotype, mice were maintained on a pyridoxine-deficient diet for 6 weeks. Dietary pyridoxine deficiency resulted in elevated seizure frequency and decreased survival in Q54 mice compared to control diet. To determine if Hlf could modify other epilepsies, Hlf(KO/+) mice were crossed with the Scn1a(KO/+) Dravet syndrome mouse model to examine the effect on premature lethality. Hlf(KO/+);Scn1a(KO/+) offspring exhibited decreased survival compared to Scn1a(KO/+) controls. Together these results demonstrate that Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations and that modulation of the pyridoxine pathway can also influence phenotype

  19. The epithelial sodium channel γ-subunit is processed proteolytically in human kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Rikke Zachar; Skjødt, Karsten; Marcussen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) of the kidney is necessary for extracellular volume homeostasis and normal arterial BP. Activity of ENaC is enhanced by proteolytic cleavage of the gamma-subunit and putative release of a 43-amino acid inhibitory tract from the gamma-subunit ectodomain. We......ENaC was detected consistently only in tissue from patients with proteinuria and observed in collecting ducts. In conclusion, human kidney gammaENaC is subject to proteolytic cleavage, yielding fragments compatible with furin cleavage, and proteinuria is associated with cleavage at the putative prostasin...

  20. Screening for cardiac HERG potassium channel interacting proteins using the yeast two-hybrid technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingyan; Yu, Hong; Lin, Jijin; Sun, Yifan; Shen, Xinyuan; Ren, Li

    2014-02-01

    The human ERG protein (HERG or Kv 11.1) encoded by the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (herg) is the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac delayed rectifier potassium current (IKr) responsible for action potential (AP) repolarization. Mutations in HERG lead to long-QT syndrome, a major cause of arrhythmias. Protein-protein interactions are fundamental for ion channel trafficking, membrane localization, and functional modulation. To identify proteins involved in the regulation of the HERG channel, we conducted a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human heart cDNA library using the C-terminus or N-terminus of HERG as bait. Fifteen proteins were identified as HERG amino terminal (HERG-NT)-interacting proteins, including Caveolin-1 (a membrane scaffold protein with multiple interacting partners, including G-proteins, kinases and NOS), the zinc finger protein, FHL2 and PTPN12 (a non-receptor tyrosine phosphatase). Eight HERG carboxylic terminal (HERG-CT)-interacting proteins were also identified, including the NF-κB-interacting protein myotrophin, We have identified multiple potential interacting proteins that may regulate cardiac IKr through cytoskeletal interactions, G-protein modulation, phosphorylation and downstream second messenger and transcription cascades. These findings provide further insight into dynamic modulation of HERG under physiological conditions and arrhythmogenesis.

  1. Voltage-gated sodium channels: pharmaceutical targets via anticonvulsants to treat epileptic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsayed, Mena; Sokolov, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder characterized by seizures and convulsions. The basis of epilepsy is an increase in neuronal excitability that, in some cases, may be caused by functional defects in neuronal voltage gated sodium channels, Nav1.1 and Nav1.2. The effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as effective therapies for epilepsy have been characterized by extensive research. Most of the classic AEDs targeting Nav share a common mechanism of action by stabilizing the channel's fast-inactivated state. In contrast, novel AEDs, such as lacosamide, stabilize the slow-inactivated state in neuronal Nav1.1 and Nav1.7 isoforms. This paper reviews the different mechanisms by which this stabilization occurs to determine new methods for treatment.

  2. Molecular insights into the local anesthetic receptor within voltage-gated sodium channels using hydroxylated analogues of mexiletine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François eDesaphy

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We previously showed that the β-adrenoceptor modulators, clenbuterol and propranolol, directly blocked voltage-gated sodium channels, whereas salbutamol and nadolol did not (Desaphy et al., 2003, suggesting the presence of two hydroxyl groups on the aromatic moiety of the drugs as a molecular requisite for impeding sodium channel block. To verify such an hypothesis, we synthesized five new mexiletine analogues by adding one or two hydroxyl groups to the aryl moiety of the sodium channel blocker and tested these compounds on hNav1.4 channels expressed in HEK293 cells. Concentration-response relationships were constructed using an holding potential of -120 mV at 0.1 Hz (tonic block and 10 Hz (use-dependent block stimulation frequencies. The half-maximum inhibitory concentrations (IC50 were linearly correlated to drug lipophilicity: the less lipophilic the drug, minor was the block. The same compounds were also tested on F1586C and Y1593C hNav1.4 channel mutants, to gain further information on the molecular interactions of mexiletine with its receptor within the sodium channel pore. Alteration of tonic block suggests that the aryl moiety of mexiletine may interact either directly or indirectly with Phe1586 in the closed sodium channel to produce low-affinity binding block, and that this interaction depends on the electrostatic potential of the drug aromatic tail. Alteration of use-dependent block suggests that addition of hydroxyl groups to the aryl moiety may modify high-affinity binding of the drug ammine terminal to Phe1586 through cooperativity between the two pharmacophores, this effect being mainly related to drug lipophilicity. Mutation of Tyr1593 further impaired such cooperativity. In conclusion, these results confirm our former hypothesis showing that the presence of hydroxyl groups to the aryl moiety of mexiletine greatly reduced sodium channel block, and provide molecular insights into the intimate interaction of local anesthetics with

  3. T-type channels become highly permeable to sodium ions using an alternative extracellular turret region (S5-P) outside the selectivity filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senatore, Adriano; Guan, Wendy; Boone, Adrienne N; Spafford, J David

    2014-04-25

    T-type (Cav3) channels are categorized as calcium channels, but invertebrate ones can be highly sodium-selective channels. We illustrate that the snail LCav3 T-type channel becomes highly sodium-permeable through exon splicing of an extracellular turret and descending helix in domain II of the four-domain Cav3 channel. Highly sodium-permeable T-type channels are generated without altering the invariant ring of charged residues in the selectivity filter that governs calcium selectivity in calcium channels. The highly sodium-permeant T-type channel expresses in the brain and is the only splice isoform expressed in the snail heart. This unique splicing of turret residues offers T-type channels a capacity to serve as a pacemaking sodium current in the primitive heart and brain in lieu of Nav1-type sodium channels and to substitute for voltage-gated sodium channels lacking in many invertebrates. T-type channels would also contribute substantially to sodium leak conductances at rest in invertebrates because of their large window currents.

  4. BIN1 localizes the L-type calcium channel to cardiac T-tubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting Hong

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The BAR domain protein superfamily is involved in membrane invagination and endocytosis, but its role in organizing membrane proteins has not been explored. In particular, the membrane scaffolding protein BIN1 functions to initiate T-tubule genesis in skeletal muscle cells. Constitutive knockdown of BIN1 in mice is perinatal lethal, which is associated with an induced dilated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, the functional role of BIN1 in cardiomyocytes is not known. An important function of cardiac T-tubules is to allow L-type calcium channels (Cav1.2 to be in close proximity to sarcoplasmic reticulum-based ryanodine receptors to initiate the intracellular calcium transient. Efficient excitation-contraction (EC coupling and normal cardiac contractility depend upon Cav1.2 localization to T-tubules. We hypothesized that BIN1 not only exists at cardiac T-tubules, but it also localizes Cav1.2 to these membrane structures. We report that BIN1 localizes to cardiac T-tubules and clusters there with Cav1.2. Studies involve freshly acquired human and mouse adult cardiomyocytes using complementary immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy with dual immunogold labeling, and co-immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, we use surface biotinylation and live cell confocal and total internal fluorescence microscopy imaging in cardiomyocytes and cell lines to explore delivery of Cav1.2 to BIN1 structures. We find visually and quantitatively that dynamic microtubules are tethered to membrane scaffolded by BIN1, allowing targeted delivery of Cav1.2 from the microtubules to the associated membrane. Since Cav1.2 delivery to BIN1 occurs in reductionist non-myocyte cell lines, we find that other myocyte-specific structures are not essential and there is an intrinsic relationship between microtubule-based Cav1.2 delivery and its BIN1 scaffold. In differentiated mouse cardiomyocytes, knockdown of BIN1 reduces surface Cav1.2 and delays development of the calcium transient

  5. Biophysics and Molecular Biology of Cardiac Ion Channels for the Safety Pharmacologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugsley, Michael K; Curtis, Michael J; Hayes, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac safety pharmacology is a continuously evolving discipline that uses the basic principles of pharmacology in a regulatory-driven process to generate data to inform risk/benefit assessment of a new chemical entity (NCE). The aim of cardiac safety pharmacology is to characterise the pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic (PK/PD) relationship of a drug's adverse effects on the heart using continuously evolving methodology. Unlike Toxicology, safety pharmacology includes within its remit a regulatory requirement to predict the risk of rare cardiotoxic (potentially lethal) events such as torsades de pointes (TdP), which is statistically associated with drug-induced changes in the QT interval of the ECG due to blockade of I Kr or K v11.1 current encoded by hERG. This gives safety pharmacology its unique character. The key issues for the safety pharmacology assessment of a drug on the heart are detection of an adverse effect liability, projection of the data into safety margin calculation and clinical safety monitoring. This chapter will briefly review the current cardiac safety pharmacology paradigm outlined in the ICH S7A and ICH S7B guidance documents and the non-clinical models and methods used in the evaluation of new chemical entities in order to define the integrated risk assessment for submission to regulatory authorities. An overview of how the present cardiac paradigm was developed will be discussed, explaining how it was based upon marketing authorisation withdrawal of many non-cardiovascular compounds due to unanticipated proarrhythmic effects. The role of related biomarkers (of cardiac repolarisation, e.g. prolongation of the QT interval of the ECG) will be considered. We will also provide an overview of the 'non-hERG-centric' concepts utilised in the evolving comprehensive in vitro proarrhythmia assay (CIPA) that details conduct of the proposed ion channel battery test, use of human stem cells and application of in silico models to early cardiac safety

  6. Sudden cardiac death and inherited channelopathy: the basic electrophysiology of the myocyte and myocardium in ion channel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Claire A; Matthews, Gareth D K; Huang, Christopher L-H

    2012-04-01

    Mutations involving cardiac ion channels result in abnormal action potential formation or propagation, leading to cardiac arrhythmias. Despite the large impact on society of sudden cardiac death resulting from such arrhythmias, understanding of the underlying cellular mechanism is poor and clinical risk stratification and treatment consequently limited. Basic research using molecular techniques, as well as animal models, has proved extremely useful in improving our knowledge of inherited arrhythmogenic syndromes. This offers the practitioner tools to accurately diagnose rare disorders and provides novel markers for risk assessment and a basis for new strategies of treatment.

  7. Analysis of the selectivity filter of the voltage-gated sodium channel NavRh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Zhang; Mengdie Xia; Yang Li; Huihui Liu; Xin Jiang; Wenlin Ren; Jianping Wu

    2013-01-01

    NaChBac is a bacterial voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channel that shows sequence similarity to voltage-gated calcium channels.To understand the ion-permeation mechanism of Nav channels,we combined molecular dynamics simulation,structural biology and electrophysiological approaches to investigate the recently determined structure of NavRh,a marine bacterial NaChBac ortholog.Two Na+ binding sites are identified in the selectivity filter (SF) in our simulations:The extracellular Na+ ion first approaches site 1 constituted by the side groups of Ser181 and Glu183,and then spontaneously arrives at the energetically more favorable site 2 formed by the carbonyi oxygens of Leu179 and Thr178.In contrast,Ca2+ ions are prone to being trapped by Glu183 at site 1,which then blocks the entrance of both Na+ and Ca2+ to the vestibule of the SF.In addition,Na+ permeates through the selective filter in an asymmetrical manner,a feature that resembles that of the mammalian Nav orthologs.The study reported here provides insights into the mechanism of ion selectivity on Na+ over Ca2+ in mammalian Nav channels.

  8. A sodium channel gene SCN9A polymorphism that increases nociceptor excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estacion, Mark; Harty, T Patrick; Choi, Jin-Sung; Tyrrell, Lynda; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2009-12-01

    Sodium channel Na(V)1.7, encoded by the SCN9A gene, is preferentially expressed in nociceptive primary sensory neurons, where it amplifies small depolarizations. In studies on a family with inherited erythromelalgia associated with Na(V)1.7 gain-of-function mutation A863P, we identified a nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism within SCN9A in the affected proband and several unaffected family members; this polymorphism (c. 3448C&T, Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms database rs6746030, which produces the amino acid substitution R1150W in human Na(V)1.7 [hNa(V)1.7]) is present in 1.1 to 12.7% of control chromosomes, depending on ethnicity. In this study, we examined the effect of the R1150W substitution on function of the hNa(V)1.7 channel, and on the firing of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in which this channel is normally expressed. We show that this polymorphism depolarizes activation (7.9-11mV in different assays). Current-clamp analysis shows that the 1150W allele depolarizes (6mV) resting membrane potential and increases ( approximately 2-fold) the firing frequency in response to depolarization in DRG neurons in which it is present. Our results suggest that polymorphisms in the Na(V)1.7 channel may influence susceptibility to pain.

  9. Amyloid precursor protein modulates Nav1.6 sodium channel currents through a Go-coupled JNK pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shao; Wang, Xi; Ma, Quan-Hong; Yang, Wu-lin; Zhang, Xiao-Gang; Dawe, Gavin S.; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP), commonly associated with Alzheimer’s disease, also marks axonal degeneration. In the recent studies, we demonstrated that APP aggregated at nodes of Ranvier (NORs) in myelinated central nervous system (CNS) axons and interacted with Nav1.6. However, the physiological function of APP remains unknown. In this study, we described reduced sodium current densities in APP knockout hippocampal neurons. Coexpression of APP or its intracellular domains containing a VTPEER motif with Nav1.6 sodium channels in Xenopus oocytes resulted in an increase in peak sodium currents, which was enhanced by constitutively active Go mutant and blocked by a dominant negative mutant. JNK and CDK5 inhibitor attenuated increases in Nav1.6 sodium currents induced by overexpression of APP. Nav1.6 sodium currents were increased by APPT668E (mutant Thr to Glu) and decreased by T668A (mutant Thr to ALa) mutant, respectively. The cell surface expression of Nav1.6 sodium channels in the white matter of spinal cord and the spinal conduction velocity is decreased in APP, p35 and JNK3 knockout mice. Therefore, APP modulates Nav1.6 sodium channels through a Go-coupled JNK pathway, which is dependent on phosphorylation of APP at Thr668. PMID:28008944

  10. Can robots patch-clamp as well as humans? Characterization of a novel sodium channel mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estacion, M; Choi, J S; Eastman, E M; Lin, Z; Li, Y; Tyrrell, L; Yang, Y; Dib-Hajj, S D; Waxman, S G

    2010-06-01

    Ion channel missense mutations cause disorders of excitability by changing channel biophysical properties. As an increasing number of new naturally occurring mutations have been identified, and the number of other mutations produced by molecular approaches such as in situ mutagenesis has increased, the need for functional analysis by patch-clamp has become rate limiting. Here we compare a patch-clamp robot using planar-chip technology with human patch-clamp in a functional assessment of a previously undescribed Nav1.7 sodium channel mutation, S211P, which causes erythromelalgia. This robotic patch-clamp device can increase throughput (the number of cells analysed per day) by 3- to 10-fold. Both modes of analysis show that the mutation hyperpolarizes activation voltage dependence (8 mV by manual profiling, 11 mV by robotic profiling), alters steady-state fast inactivation so that it requires an additional Boltzmann function for a second fraction of total current (approximately 20% manual, approximately 40% robotic), and enhances slow inactivation (hyperpolarizing shift--15 mV by human,--13 mV robotic). Manual patch-clamping demonstrated slower deactivation and enhanced (approximately 2-fold) ramp response for the mutant channel while robotic recording did not, possibly due to increased temperature and reduced signal-to-noise ratio on the robotic platform. If robotic profiling is used to screen ion channel mutations, we recommend that each measurement or protocol be validated by initial comparison to manual recording. With this caveat, we suggest that, if results are interpreted cautiously, robotic patch-clamp can be used with supervision and subsequent confirmation from human physiologists to facilitate the initial profiling of a variety of electrophysiological parameters of ion channel mutations.

  11. Contribution of sodium channel neuronal isoform Nav1.1 to late sodium current in ventricular myocytes from failing hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sudhish; Reznikov, Vitaliy; Maltsev, Victor A; Undrovinas, Nidas A; Sabbah, Hani N; Undrovinas, Albertas

    2015-01-01

    Late Na+ current (INaL) contributes to action potential (AP) duration and Ca2+ handling in cardiac cells. Augmented INaL was implicated in delayed repolarization and impaired Ca2+ handling in heart failure (HF). We tested if Na+ channel (Nav) neuronal isoforms contribute to INaL and Ca2+ cycling defects in HF in 17 dogs in which HF was achieved via sequential coronary artery embolizations. Six normal dogs served as control. Transient Na+ current (INaT) and INaL in left ventricular cardiomyocytes (VCMs) were recorded by patch clamp while Ca2+ dynamics was monitored using Fluo-4. Virally delivered short interfering RNA (siRNA) ensured Nav1.1 and Nav1.5 post-transcriptional silencing. The expression of six Navs was observed in failing VCMs as follows: Nav1.5 (57.3%) > Nav1.2 (15.3%) > Nav1.1 (11.6%) > Nav2.1 (10.7%) > Nav1.3 (4.6%) > Nav1.6 (0.5%). Failing VCMs showed up-regulation of Nav1.1 expression, but reduction of Nav1.6 mRNA. A similar Nav expression pattern was found in samples from human hearts with ischaemic HF. VCMs with silenced Nav1.5 exhibited residual INaT and INaL (∼30% of control) with rightwardly shifted steady-state activation and inactivation. These currents were tetrodotoxin sensitive but resistant to MTSEA, a specific Nav1.5 blocker. The amplitude of the tetrodotoxin-sensitive INaL was 0.1709 ± 0.0299 pA pF–1 (n = 7 cells) and the decay time constant was τ = 790 ± 76 ms (n = 5). This INaL component was lacking in VCMs with a silenced Nav1.1 gene, indicating that, among neuronal isoforms, Nav1.1 provides the largest contribution to INaL. At –10 mV this contribution is ∼60% of total INaL. Our further experimental and in silico examinations showed that this new Nav1.1 INaL component contributes to Ca2+ accumulation in failing VCMs and modulates AP shape and duration. In conclusion, we have discovered an Nav1.1-originated INaL component in dog heart ventricular cells. This component is physiologically relevant to

  12. Expression patterns, mutation detection and RNA interference of Rhopalosiphum padi voltage-gated sodium channel genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yayun; Peng, Xiong; Wang, Kang; Lin, Fangfei; Li, Yuting; Chen, Maohua

    2016-07-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of sodium-channel-blocking insecticides. Traditionally, animals were thought to have only one VGSC gene comprising a α-subunit with four homologous domains (DI-DIV). The present study showed that Rhopalosiphum padi, an economically important crop pest, owned a unique heterodimeric VGSC (H1 and H2 subunits) encoded by two genes (Rpvgsc1 and Rpvgsc2), which is unusual in insects and other animals. The open reading frame (ORF) of Rpvgsc1 consisted 1150 amino acids, and the ORF of Rpvgsc2 had 957 amino acids. Rpvgsc1 showed 64.1% amino acid identity to DI-DII of Drosophila melanogaster VGSC and Rpvgsc2 showed 64.0% amino acid identity to DIII-DIV of D. melanogaster VGSC. A M918L mutation previously reported in pyrethroids-resistant strains of other insects was found in the IIS4-S6 region of R. padi field sample. The two R. padi VGSC genes were expressed at all developmental stages and showed similar expression patterns after treatment with beta-cypermethrin. Knockdown of Rpvgsc1 or Rpvgsc2 caused significant reduction in mortality rate of R. padi after exposure to beta-cypermethrin. These findings suggest that the two R. padi VGSC genes are both functional genes.

  13. Predictably Convergent Evolution of Sodium Channels in the Arms Race between Predators and Prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Edmund D; Brodie, Edmund D

    2015-09-01

    Evolution typically arrives at convergent phenotypic solutions to common challenges of natural selection. However, diverse molecular and physiological mechanisms may generate phenotypes that appear similar at the organismal level. How predictable are the molecular mechanisms of adaptation that underlie adaptive convergence? Interactions between toxic prey and their predators provide an excellent avenue to investigate the question of predictability because both taxa must adapt to the presence of defensive poisons. The evolution of resistance to tetrodotoxin (TTX), which binds to and blocks voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV1) in nerves and muscle, has been remarkably parallel across deep phylogenetic divides. In both predators and prey, representing three major vertebrate groups, TTX resistance has arisen through structural changes in NaV1 proteins. Fish, amphibians and reptiles, though they differ in the total number of NaV1 paralogs in their genomes, have each evolved common amino acid substitutions in the orthologous skeletal muscle NaV1.4. Many of these substitutions involve not only the same positions in the protein, but also the identical amino acid residues. Similarly, predictable convergence is observed across the family of sodium channel genes expressed in different tissues in puffer fish and in garter snakes. Trade-offs between the fundamental role of NaV1 proteins in selective permeability of Na+ and their ability to resist binding by TTX generate a highly constrained adaptive landscape at the level of the protein.

  14. MDIMP, a novel cardiac Ca(2+) channel blocker with atrial selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria-Herrera, Mireille Aline; Ríos-Pérez, Erick Benjamín; de la Rosa, Juan Antonio Manuel; García-Castañeda, Maricela; Osornio-Garduño, Diana Stephanie; Ramos-Mondragón, Roberto; Mancilla-Percino, Teresa; Avila, Guillermo

    2016-06-15

    In cardiac muscle cells both T-and L-type Ca(2+) channels (TTCCs and LTCCs, respectively) are expressed, and the latter are relevant to a process known as excitation-contraction coupling (ECC). Evidence obtained from docking studies suggests that isoindolines derived from α-amino acids bind to the LTCC CaV1.2. In the present study, we investigated whether methyl (S)-2-(1,3-dihydroisoindol-2-yl)-4-methylpentanoate (MDIMP), which is derived from L-leucine, modulates both Ca(2+) channels and ECC. To this end, mechanical properties, as well as Ca(2+) transients and currents, were all investigated in isolated cardiac myocytes. The effects of MDIMP on CaV1.2 (transiently expressed in 293T/17 cells) were also studied. In this system, evidence was found for an inhibitory action that develops and recovers in min, with an IC50 of 450µM. With respect to myocytes: atrial-TTCCs, atrial-LTCCs, and ventricular-LTCCs were also inhibited, in that order of potency. Accordingly, Ca(2+) transients, contractions, and window currents of LTCCs were all reduced more strongly in atrial cells. Interestingly, while the modulation of LTCCs was state-independent in these cells, it was state-dependent, and dual, on the ventricular ones. Furthermore, practically all of the ventricular LTCCs were closed at resting membrane potentials. This could explain their resistance to MDIMP, as they were affected in only open or inactivated states. All these features in turn explain the preferential down-regulation of the atrial ECC. Thus, our results support the view that isoindolines bind to Ca(2+) channels, improve our knowledge of the corresponding structure-function relationship, and may be relevant for conditions where decreased atrial activity is desired.

  15. An emerging antiarrhythmic target: late sodium current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyasz, T; Szentandrássy, N; Magyar, J; Szabo, Z; Nánási, P P; Chen-Izu, Y; Izu, L T

    2015-01-01

    The cardiac late sodium current (INa,L) has been in the focus of research in the recent decade. The first reports on the sustained component of voltage activated sodium current date back to the seventies, but early studies interpreted this tiny current as a product of a few channels that fail to inactivate, having neither physiologic nor pathologic implications. Recently, the cardiac INa,L has emerged as a potentially major arrhythmogenic mechanism in various heart diseases, attracting the attention of clinicians and researchers. Research activity on INa,L has exponentially increased since Ranolazine, an FDA-approved antianginal drug was shown to successfully suppress cardiac arrhythmias by inhibiting INa,L. This review aims to summarize and discuss a series of papers focusing on the cardiac late sodium current and its regulation under physiological and pathological conditions. We will discuss critical evidences implicating INa,L as a potential target for treating myocardial dysfunction and cardiac arrhythmias.

  16. Epithelial Sodium Channel-Mediated Sodium Transport Is Not Dependent on the Membrane-Bound Serine Protease CAP2/Tmprss4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Keppner

    Full Text Available The membrane-bound serine protease CAP2/Tmprss4 has been previously identified in vitro as a positive regulator of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC. To study its in vivo implication in ENaC-mediated sodium absorption, we generated a knockout mouse model for CAP2/Tmprss4. Mice deficient in CAP2/Tmprss4 were viable, fertile, and did not show any obvious histological abnormalities. Unexpectedly, when challenged with sodium-deficient diet, these mice did not develop any impairment in renal sodium handling as evidenced by normal plasma and urinary sodium and potassium electrolytes, as well as normal aldosterone levels. Despite minor alterations in ENaC mRNA expression, we found no evidence for altered proteolytic cleavage of ENaC subunits. In consequence, ENaC activity, as monitored by the amiloride-sensitive rectal potential difference (ΔPD, was not altered even under dietary sodium restriction. In summary, ENaC-mediated sodium balance is not affected by lack of CAP2/Tmprss4 expression and thus, does not seem to directly control ENaC expression and activity in vivo.

  17. Neuroprotective activity of stiripentol with a possible involvement of voltage-dependent calcium and sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verleye, Marc; Buttigieg, Dorothée; Steinschneider, Rémy

    2016-02-01

    A growing body of data has shown that recurrent epileptic seizures may be caused by an excessive release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in the brain. Glutamatergic overstimulation results in massive neuronal influxes of calcium and sodium through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, and kainic acid glutamate subtype receptors and also through voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels. These persistent and abnormal sodium and calcium entry points have deleterious consequences (neurotoxicity) for neuronal function. The therapeutic value of an antiepileptic drug would include not only control of seizure activity but also protection of neuronal tissue. The present study examines the in vitro neuroprotective effects of stiripentol, an antiepileptic compound with γ-aminobutyric acidergic properties, on neuronal-astroglial cultures from rat cerebral cortex exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) or to glutamate (40 µM for 20 min), two in vitro models of brain injury. In addition, the affinity of stiripentol for the different glutamate receptor subtypes and the interaction with the cell influx of Na(+) and of Ca(2+) enhanced by veratridine and NMDA, respectively, are assessed. Stiripentol (10-100 µM) included in the culture medium during OGD or with glutamate significantly increased the number of surviving neurons relative to controls. Stiripentol displayed no binding affinity for different subtypes of glutamate receptors (IC50  >100 µM) but significantly blocked the entry of Na(+) and Ca(2+) activated by veratridine and NMDA, respectively. These results suggest that Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels could contribute to the neuroprotective properties of sitiripentol.

  18. Characterization of Disopyramide derivative ADD424042 as a non-cardiotoxic neuronal sodium channel blocker with broad-spectrum anticonvulsant activity in rodent seizure models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Król, Marek; Ufnal, Marcin; Szulczyk, Bartłomiej; Podsadni, Piotr; Drapała, Adrian; Turło, Jadwiga; Dawidowski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    It was reported that antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) can be useful in controlling refractory seizures in humans or in enhancing the action of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in animal models. Disopyramide phosphate (DISO) is an AAD that blocks sodium channels in cardiac myocytes. We evaluated a DISO derivative, 2-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-(pyridin-2-yl)acetamide (ADD424042) for its anticonvulsant activity in a battery of rodent models of epileptic seizures. The compound displayed a broad spectrum of activity in the 'classical' models as well as in the models of pharmacoresistant seizures. Furthermore, ADD424042 showed good therapeutic indices between the anticonvulsant activity and the motor impairment. On the contrary, no anticonvulsant effects but severe lethality were observed in the primary anticonvulsant testing of the parent DISO. By performing the whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments in dispersed cortical neurons we demonstrated that ADD424042 decreased the maximal amplitude of voltage-gated sodium channels with an IC50 value in nM range. Moreover, the compound enhanced use-dependent block and decreased excitability in pyramidal neurons in the current-clamp experiments in cortical slices. Importantly, we found that ADD424042 possessed either no, or very small cardiotoxic effect. In contrast to DISO, ADD424042 did not produce any apparent changes in electrocardiogram (ECG) and arterial blood pressure recordings. ADD424042 had no effect on QT and corrected QT intervals, at a dose which was 15 times higher than ED50 for the anticonvulsant effect in the MES model. Taken together, these data suggest that ADD424042 has the potential to become a lead structure for novel broadly acting AEDs with wide margin of cardiac safety.

  19. A remarkably stable TipE gene cluster: evolution of insect Para sodium channel auxiliary subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jia

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background First identified in fruit flies with temperature-sensitive paralysis phenotypes, the Drosophila melanogaster TipE locus encodes four voltage-gated sodium (NaV channel auxiliary subunits. This cluster of TipE-like genes on chromosome 3L, and a fifth family member on chromosome 3R, are important for the optional expression and functionality of the Para NaV channel but appear quite distinct from auxiliary subunits in vertebrates. Here, we exploited available arthropod genomic resources to trace the origin of TipE-like genes by mapping their evolutionary histories and examining their genomic architectures. Results We identified a remarkably conserved synteny block of TipE-like orthologues with well-maintained local gene arrangements from 21 insect species. Homologues in the water flea, Daphnia pulex, suggest an ancestral pancrustacean repertoire of four TipE-like genes; a subsequent gene duplication may have generated functional redundancy allowing gene losses in the silk moth and mosquitoes. Intronic nesting of the insect TipE gene cluster probably occurred following the divergence from crustaceans, but in the flour beetle and silk moth genomes the clusters apparently escaped from nesting. Across Pancrustacea, TipE gene family members have experienced intronic nesting, escape from nesting, retrotransposition, translocation, and gene loss events while generally maintaining their local gene neighbourhoods. D. melanogaster TipE-like genes exhibit coordinated spatial and temporal regulation of expression distinct from their host gene but well-correlated with their regulatory target, the Para NaV channel, suggesting that functional constraints may preserve the TipE gene cluster. We identified homology between TipE-like NaV channel regulators and vertebrate Slo-beta auxiliary subunits of big-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BKCa channels, which suggests that ion channel regulatory partners have evolved distinct lineage

  20. Sodium valproate-induced congenital cardiac abnormalities in mice are associated with the inhibition of histone deacetylase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rollo Johnathon C

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Valproic acid, a widely used anticonvulsant drug, is a potent teratogen resulting in various congenital abnormalities. However, the mechanisms underlying valproic acid induced teratogenesis are nor clear. Recent studies indicate that histone deacetylase is a direct target of valproic acid. Methods In the present study, we have used histological analysis and RT-PCR assays to examine the cardiac abnormalities in mice treated with sodium valproate (NaVP and determined the effects of NaVP on histone deacetylase activity and the expression of heart development-related genes in mouse myocardial cells. Results The experimental data show that NaVP can induce cardiac abnormalities in fetal mice in a dose-dependent manner. NaVP causes a dose-dependent inhibition of hitone deacetylase (HDAC activity in mouse myocardial cells. However, the expression levels of HDAC (both HDAC1 and HDAC2 are not significantly changed in fetal mouse hearts after administration of NaVP in pregnant mice. The transcriptional levels of other heart development-related genes, such as CHF1, Tbx5 and MEF2, are significantly increased in fetal mouse hearts treated with NaVP. Conclusions The study indicates that administration of NaVP in pregnant mice can result in various cardiac abnormalities in fetal hearts, which is associated with an inhibition of histone deacetylase without altering the transcription of this enzyme.

  1. The Effect of a Novel Highly Selective Inhibitor of the Sodium/Calcium Exchanger (NCX) on Cardiac Arrhythmias in In Vitro and In Vivo Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Kohajda, Zsófia; Farkas-Morvay, Nikolett; Jost, Norbert; Nagy, Norbert; Geramipour, Amir; Horváth, András; Varga, Richárd S.; Hornyik, Tibor; Corici, Claudia; Acsai, Károly; Horváth, Balázs; Prorok, János; Ördög, Balázs; Déri, Szilvia; Tóth, Dániel

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study the effects of a new, highly selective sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX) inhibitor, ORM-10962 were investigated on cardiac NCX current, Ca2+ transients, cell shortening and in experimental arrhythmias. The level of selectivity of the novel inhibitor on several major transmembrane ion currents (L-type Ca2+ current, major repolarizing K+ currents, late Na+ current, Na+/K+ pump current) was also determined. Methods Ion currents in single dog ventricular cells (cardiac myocy...

  2. Acid-sensing ion channel 3 matches the acid-gated current in cardiac ischemia-sensing neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Sutherland, Stephani P.; Christopher J. Benson; Adelman, John P.; McCleskey, Edwin W.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac afferents are sensory neurons that mediate angina, pain that occurs when the heart receives insufficient blood supply for its metabolic demand (ischemia). These neurons display enormous acid-evoked depolarizing currents, and they fire action potentials in response to extracellular acidification that accompanies myocardial ischemia. Here we show that acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3), but no other known acid-sensing ion channel, reproduces the functional featur...

  3. Role of the epithelial sodium channel in salt-sensitive hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan SUN; Jia-ning ZHANG; Dan ZHAO; Qiu-shi WANG; Yu-chun GU; He-ping MA; Zhi-ren ZHANG

    2011-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a heteromeric channel composed of three similar but distinct subunits, a, β and Y. This channel is an end-effector in the rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and resides in the apical plasma membrane of the renal cortical collecting ducts, where reabsorption of Na+ through ENaC is the final renal adjustment step for Na+ balance. Because of its regulation and function, the ENaC plays a critical role in modulating the homeostasis of Na+ and thus chronic blood pressure. The development of most forms of hypertension requires an increase in Na+ and water retention. The role of ENaC in developing high blood pressure is exemplified in the gain-of-function mutations in ENaC that cause Liddle's syndrome, a severe but rare form of inheritable hypertension.The evidence obtained from studies using animal models and in human patients indicates that improper Na+ retention by the kidney elevates blood pressure and induces salt-sensitive hypertension.

  4. Molecular pharmacology of cell receptors for cardiac glycosides, opiates, ACTH and ion channel modulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnatowich, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of light and oxygen on molecular interactions between the artificial food dye, erythrosine (ERY), and (/sup 3/H)ouabain ((/sup 3/H)OUA) binding sites on (Na/sup +/ + K/sup +/)-ATPase in rat brain and guinea pig heart was investigated. Putative endogenous digitalis-like factors (DLF's) were studied in four in vitro assays for cardiac glycosides. (/sup 3/H)Etorphine binding was characterized in rat brain homogenates, depleted of opioids, from animals acutely and chronically treated with morphine and naloxone, and either unstressed or cold-restraint-stressed. Binding sites for the ion channel modulators (/sup 3/H)verapamil ((/sup 3/H)VER) and (/sup 3/H) phencyclidine ((/sup 3/H)PCP) were characterized in rat brain.

  5. Actions of Tefluthrin on Rat Nav1.7 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels Expressed in Xenopus Oocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Jianguo; Soderlund, David M.

    2011-01-01

    In rats expression of the Nav1.7 voltage-gated sodium channel isoform is restricted to the peripheral nervous system and is abundant in the sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion. We expressed the rat Nav1.7 sodium channel α subunit together with the rat auxiliary β1 and β2 subunits in Xenopus laevis oocytes and assessed the effects of the pyrethroid insecticide tefluthrin on the expressed currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp method. Tefluthrin at 100 µM modified of Nav1.7 chan...

  6. A novel mutation in the sodium channel α1 subunit gene in a child with Dravet syndrome in Turkey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mutluay Arslan; Ulu(c) Yi(s); Hande (C)a(g)layan; R1dvan Akin

    2013-01-01

    Dravet syndrome is a rare epileptic encephalopathy characterized by frequent seizures beginning in the first year of life and behavioral disorders. Mutations in the sodium channel α1 subunit gene are the main cause of this disease. We report two patients with refractory seizures and psychomotor retardation in whom the final diagnosis was Dravet syndrome with confirmed mutations in the sodium channel α1 subunit gene. The mutation identified in the second patient was a novel frame shift mutation, which resulted from the deletion of five nucleotides in exon 24.

  7. Identification of BACE1 cleavage sites in human voltage-gated sodium channel beta 2 subunit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovacs Dora M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The voltage-gated sodium channel β2 subunit (Navβ2 is a physiological substrate of BACE1 (β-site APP cleaving enzyme and γ-secretase, two proteolytic enzymes central to Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Previously, we have found that the processing of Navβ2 by BACE1 and γ-secretase regulates sodium channel metabolism in neuronal cells. In the current study we identified the BACE1 cleavage sites in human Navβ2. Results We found a major (147-148 L↓M, where ↓ indicates the cleavage site and a minor (144145 L↓Q BACE1 cleavage site in the extracellular domain of human Navβ2 using a cell-free BACE1 cleavage assay followed by mass spectrometry. Next, we introduced two different double mutations into the identified major BACE1 cleavage site in human Navβ2: 147LM/VI and 147LM/AA. Both mutations dramatically decreased the cleavage of human Navβ2 by endogenous BACE1 in cell-free BACE1 cleavage assays. Neither of the two mutations affected subcellular localization of Navβ2 as confirmed by confocal fluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation of cholesterol-rich domains. Finally, wildtype and mutated Navβ2 were expressed along BACE1 in B104 rat neuroblastoma cells. In spite of α-secretase still actively cleaving the mutant proteins, Navβ2 cleavage products decreased by ~50% in cells expressing Navβ2 (147LM/VI and ~75% in cells expressing Navβ2 (147LM/AA as compared to cells expressing wildtype Navβ2. Conclusion We identified a major (147-148 L↓M and a minor (144-145 L↓Q BACE1 cleavage site in human Navβ2. Our in vitro and cell-based results clearly show that the 147-148 L↓M is the major BACE1 cleavage site in human Navβ2. These findings expand our understanding of the role of BACE1 in voltage-gated sodium channel metabolism.

  8. Mapping of scorpion toxin receptor sites at voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevitz, Michael

    2012-09-15

    Scorpion alpha and beta toxins interact with voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)s) at two pharmacologically distinct sites. Alpha toxins bind at receptor site-3 and inhibit channel inactivation, whereas beta toxins bind at receptor site-4 and shift the voltage-dependent activation toward more hyperpolarizing potentials. The two toxin classes are subdivided to distinct pharmacological groups according to their binding preferences and ability to compete for the receptor sites at Na(v) subtypes. To elucidate the toxin-channel surface of interaction at both receptor sites and clarify the molecular basis of varying toxin preferences, an efficient bacterial system for their expression in recombinant form was established. Mutagenesis accompanied by toxicity, binding and electrophysiological assays, in parallel to determination of the three-dimensional structure using NMR and X-ray crystallography uncovered a bipartite bioactive surface in toxin representatives of all pharmacological groups. Exchange of external loops between the mammalian brain channel rNa(v)1.2a and the insect channel DmNa(v)1 highlighted channel regions involved in the varying sensitivity to assorted toxins. In parallel, thorough mutagenesis of channel external loops illuminated points of putative interaction with the toxins. Amino acid substitutions at external loops S1-S2 and S3-S4 of the voltage sensor module in domain II of rNa(v)1.2a had prominent impact on the activity of the beta-toxin Css4 (from Centruroides suffusus suffusus), and substitutions at external loops S1-S2 and S3-S4 of the voltage sensor module in domain IV affected the activity of the alpha-toxin Lqh2 (from Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus). Rosetta modeling of toxin-Na(v) interaction using the voltage sensor module of the potassium channel as template raises commonalities in the way alpha and beta toxins interact with the channel. Css4 interacts with rNa(v)1.2a at a crevice between S1-S2 and S3-S4 transmembrane segments in domain

  9. S1-S3 counter charges in the voltage sensor module of a mammalian sodium channel regulate fast inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groome, James R; Winston, Vern

    2013-05-01

    The movement of positively charged S4 segments through the electric field drives the voltage-dependent gating of ion channels. Studies of prokaryotic sodium channels provide a mechanistic view of activation facilitated by electrostatic interactions of negatively charged residues in S1 and S2 segments, with positive counterparts in the S4 segment. In mammalian sodium channels, S4 segments promote domain-specific functions that include activation and several forms of inactivation. We tested the idea that S1-S3 countercharges regulate eukaryotic sodium channel functions, including fast inactivation. Using structural data provided by bacterial channels, we constructed homology models of the S1-S4 voltage sensor module (VSM) for each domain of the mammalian skeletal muscle sodium channel hNaV1.4. These show that side chains of putative countercharges in hNaV1.4 are oriented toward the positive charge complement of S4. We used mutagenesis to define the roles of conserved residues in the extracellular negative charge cluster (ENC), hydrophobic charge region (HCR), and intracellular negative charge cluster (INC). Activation was inhibited with charge-reversing VSM mutations in domains I-III. Charge reversal of ENC residues in domains III (E1051R, D1069K) and IV (E1373K, N1389K) destabilized fast inactivation by decreasing its probability, slowing entry, and accelerating recovery. Several INC mutations increased inactivation from closed states and slowed recovery. Our results extend the functional characterization of VSM countercharges to fast inactivation, and support the premise that these residues play a critical role in domain-specific gating transitions for a mammalian sodium channel.

  10. New aspects of HERG K⁺ channel function depending upon cardiac spatial heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pen Zhang

    Full Text Available HERG K(+ channel, the genetic counterpart of rapid delayed rectifier K(+ current in cardiac cells, is responsible for many cases of inherited and drug-induced long QT syndromes. HERG has unusual biophysical properties distinct from those of other K(+ channels. While the conventional pulse protocols in patch-clamp studies have helped us elucidate these properties, their limitations in assessing HERG function have also been progressively noticed. We employed AP-clamp techniques using physiological action potential waveforms recorded from various regions of canine heart to study HERG function in HEK293 cells and identified several novel aspects of HERG function. We showed that under AP-clamp IHERG increased gradually with membrane repolarization, peaked at potentials around 20-30 mV more negative than revealed by pulse protocols and at action potential duration (APD to 60%-70% full repolarization, and fell rapidly at the terminal phase of repolarization. We found that the rising phase of IHERG was conferred by removal of inactivation and the decaying phase resulted from a fall in driving force, which were all determined by the rate of membrane repolarization. We identified regional heterogeneity and transmural gradient of IHERG when quantified with the area covered by IHERG trace. In addition, we observed regional and transmural differences of IHERG in response to dofetilide blockade. Finally, we characterized the influence of HERG function by selective inhibition of other ion currents. Based on our results, we conclude that the distinct biophysical properties of HERG reported by AP-clamp confer its unique function in cardiac repolarization thereby in antiarrhythmia and arrhythmogenesis.

  11. hERG (KCNH2 or Kv11.1) K+ channels: screening for cardiac arrhythmia risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlby, Mark R; Peri, Ravi; Zhang, Howard; Dunlop, John

    2008-11-01

    Testing new compounds for pro-arrhythmic potential has focused in recent years on avoiding activity at the hERG K+ channel, as hERG block is a common feature of many pro-arrhythmic compounds associated with Torsades de Pointes in humans. Blockers of hERG are well known to prolong cardiac action potentials and lead to long QT syndrome, and activators, although rarer, can lead to short QT syndrome. The most reliable assays of hERG utilize stable cell lines, and include ligand binding, Rb+ flux and electrophysiology (both automated and manual). These assays can be followed by measurement of activity at other ion channels contributing to cardiac contractility and detailed action potential/repolarization measurements in cardiac tissue. An integrated risk assessment for pro-arrhythmic potential is ultimately required, as the constellation of ion channel activities and potencies, along with the mechanism/kinetics of ion channel block, may ultimately be the best predictor of cardiac risk in vivo.

  12. Neuropathic pain in two-generation twins carrying the sodium channel Nav1.7 functional variant R1150W.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrer, Judith U; Uçeyler, Nurcan; Doppler, Kathrin; Fischer, Tanya Z; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-10-01

    We present clinical, neuropathological, and molecular genetic findings of a family with a new pain phenotype of the sodium channel gene SCN9A polymorphism R1150W. A 46-year-old woman presented with a 5-year history of episodic temperature- and exercise-dependent burning pain of the feet and lower legs associated with numbness of the distal upper and lower limbs. Her monozygotic twin sister and their mother and her twin presented similar symptoms. Clinical evaluation was normal except for a mild distal sensory deficit in fingers and feet. Electrophysiological testing was unremarkable, as were serum and cerebrospinal fluid laboratory findings. Skin biopsies of the distal lower limbs revealed an epidermal nerve fiber density at the lower limit of normal. Myelinated dermal nerve fibers showed elongated nodes of Ranvier, but normal distribution of nodal and paranodal proteins. Genetic testing for ion channel-associated pain disorders revealed an amino acid R1150W substitution of the Nav1.7 sodium channel. The combination of a Nav1.7 polymorphism with dysmyelinating features in small-caliber peripheral nerves has not been described before and may suggest an explanation for the clinical syndrome in our patients. Treatment with the sodium channel blocker lamotrigine provided some relief, consistent with a role of sodium channel dysfunction in the pain syndrome of this family.

  13. Mechanisms of adaptation in a predator-prey arms race: TTX-resistant sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffeney, Shana; Brodie, Edmund D; Ruben, Peter C; Brodie, Edmund D

    2002-08-23

    Populations of the garter snake Thamnophis sirtalis have evolved geographically variable resistance to tetrodotoxin (TTX) in a coevolutionary arms race with their toxic prey, newts of the genus Taricha. Here, we identify a physiological mechanism, the expression of TTX-resistant sodium channels in skeletal muscle, responsible for adaptive diversification in whole-animal resistance. Both individual and population differences in the ability of skeletal muscle fibers to function in the presence of TTX correlate closely with whole-animal measures of TTX resistance. Demonstration of individual variation in an essential physiological function responsible for the adaptive differences among populations is a step toward linking the selective consequences of coevolutionary interactions to geographic and phylogenetic patterns of diversity.

  14. Multiple mutations and mutation combinations in the sodium channel of permethrin resistant mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Lee; Reid, William R.; Xu, Qiang; Dong, Ke; Liu, Nannan

    2012-10-01

    A previous study identified 3 nonsynonymous and 6 synonymous mutations in the entire mosquito sodium channel of Culex quinquefasciatus, the prevalence of which were strongly correlated with levels of resistance and increased dramatically following insecticide selection. However, it is unclear whether this is unique to this specific resistant population or is a common mechanism in field mosquito populations in response to insecticide pressure. The current study therefore further characterized these mutations and their combinations in other field and permethrin selected Culex mosquitoes, finding that the co-existence of all 9 mutations was indeed correlated with the high levels of permethrin resistance in mosquitoes. Comparison of mutation combinations revealed several common mutation combinations presented across different field and permethrin selected populations in response to high levels of insecticide resistance, demonstrating that the co-existence of multiple mutations is a common event in response to insecticide resistance across different Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquito populations.

  15. Exponential integrators for a Markov chain model of the fast sodium channel of cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starý, Tomás; Biktashev, Vadim N

    2015-04-01

    The modern Markov chain models of ionic channels in excitable membranes are numerically stiff. The popular numerical methods for these models require very small time steps to ensure stability. Our objective is to formulate and test two methods addressing this issue, so that the timestep can be chosen based on accuracy rather than stability. Both proposed methods extend Rush-Larsen technique, which was originally developed to Hogdkin-Huxley type gate models. One method, "matrix Rush-Larsen" (MRL) uses a matrix reformulation of the Rush-Larsen scheme, where the matrix exponentials are calculated using precomputed tables of eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The other, "hybrid operator splitting" (HOS) method exploits asymptotic properties of a particular Markov chain model, allowing explicit analytical expressions for the substeps. We test both methods on the Clancy and Rudy (2002) I(Na)Markov chain model. With precomputed tables for functions of the transmembrane voltage, both methods are comparable to the forward Euler method in accuracy and computational cost, but allow longer time steps without numerical instability. We conclude that both methods are of practical interest. MRL requires more computations than HOS, but is formulated in general terms which can be readily extended to other Markov chain channel models, whereas the utility of HOS depends on the asymptotic properties of a particular model. The significance of the methods is that they allow a considerable speed-up of large-scale computations of cardiac excitation models by increasing the time step, while maintaining acceptable accuracy and preserving numerical stability.

  16. Solution structure and alanine scan of a spider toxin that affects the activation of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corzo, Gerardo; Sabo, Jennifer K; Bosmans, Frank; Billen, Bert; Villegas, Elba; Tytgat, Jan; Norton, Raymond S

    2007-02-16

    Magi 5, from the hexathelid spider Macrothele gigas, is a 29-residue polypeptide containing three disulfide bridges. It binds specifically to receptor site 4 on mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels and competes with scorpion beta-toxins, such as Css IV from Centruroides suffusus suffusus. As a consequence, Magi 5 shifts the activation voltage of the mammalian rNav1.2a channel to more hyperpolarized voltages, whereas the insect channel, DmNav1, is not affected. To gain insight into toxin-channel interactions, Magi 5 and 23 analogues were synthesized. The three-dimensional structure of Magi 5 in aqueous solution was determined, and its voltage-gated sodium channel-binding surfaces were mapped onto this structure using data from electrophysiological measurements on a series of Ala-substituted analogues. The structure clearly resembles the inhibitor cystine knot structural motif, although the triple-stranded beta-sheet typically found in that motif is partially distorted in Magi 5. The interactive surface of Magi 5 toward voltage-gated sodium channels resembles in some respects the Janus-faced atracotoxins, with functionally important charged residues on one face of the toxin and hydrophobic residues on the other. Magi 5 also resembles the scorpion beta-toxin Css IV, which has distinct nonpolar and charged surfaces that are critical for channel binding and has a key Glu involved in voltage sensor trapping. These two distinct classes of toxin, with different amino acid sequences and different structures, may utilize similar groups of residues on their surface to achieve the common end of modifying voltage-gated sodium channel function.

  17. Effect of orphanin FQ and morphine on sodium channel current in somatosensory area of rat cerebral cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Yang; Yurong Li; Shuwei Jia; Yunhong Zhang; Lanwei Cui; Lihui Qu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some experiments have demonstrated that injecting orphanin FQ (OFQ) into lateral ventricle, which can obviously decrease the pain threshold. It is indicated that OFQ is an anti-opiate substance. However, whether OFQ has effects on sensory neuron ion channel in cerebral cortex needs to be further studied.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of OFQ, morphine or their combination on sodium channel current of somatosensory neurons in rat cerebral cortex.DESIGN: Repeated measurement trial.SETTING: Department of Physiology, Harbin Medical University.MATERIALS: Fifty healthy Wistar rats, aged 12-16 days, of either gender, were provided by the Experimental Animal Center, Second Hospital Affiliated to Harbin Medical University. OFQ was purchased from Sigma-Aldrich Company, and morphine was provided by the Shenyang First Pharmaceutical Factory.PC2C patch clamp amplifier and LabmasterTLlwere purchased from Yibo Life Science Instrument Co.,Ltd.of Huazhong University of Science and Techgnology.METHODS: This experiment was carried out in the Department of Physiology (provincial laboratory),Harbin Medical University between January 2005 and May 2006. Cortical neurons were acutely isolated from rats, and prepared into cell suspension following culture. ①Sodium channel current of somatosensory neurons in rat cerebral cortex was recorded before and after administration by whole-cell Patch clamptechnique after 50 nmol/L OFQ being added to extracellular fluid.②The amplitude of sodium channel current of somatosensory neurons in rat cerebral cortex was recorded before and after administration by the same method after 20 I mol/L morphine being added to extracellular fluid, and then the change of sodium channel current was recorded after 50 nmol/L OFQ being added.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The amplitude of sodium channel current of somatosensory neurons in rat cerebral cortex following the administration of OFQ, morphine separately or their combination

  18. Modulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC by bacterial metalloproteases and protease inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Butterworth

    Full Text Available The serralysin family of metalloproteases is associated with the virulence of multiple gram-negative human pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens. The serralysin proteases share highly conserved catalytic domains and show evolutionary similarity to the mammalian matrix metalloproteases. Our previous studies demonstrated that alkaline protease (AP from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of activating the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC, leading to an increase in sodium absorption in airway epithelia. The serralysin proteases are often co-expressed with endogenous, intracellular or periplasmic inhibitors, which putatively protect the bacterium from unwanted or unregulated protease activities. To evaluate the potential use of these small protein inhibitors in regulating the serralysin induced activation of ENaC, proteases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens were purified for characterization along with a high affinity inhibitor from Pseudomonas. Both proteases showed activity against in vitro substrates and could be blocked by near stoichiometric concentrations of the inhibitor. In addition, both proteases were capable of activating ENaC when added to the apical surfaces of multiple epithelial cells with similar slow activation kinetics. The high-affinity periplasmic inhibitor from Pseudomonas effectively blocked this activation. These data suggest that multiple metalloproteases are capable of activating ENaC. Further, the endogenous, periplasmic bacterial inhibitors may be useful for modulating the downstream effects of the serralysin virulence factors under physiological conditions.

  19. Modulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by bacterial metalloproteases and protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, Michael B; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Xiaoning; Shanks, Robert M; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    The serralysin family of metalloproteases is associated with the virulence of multiple gram-negative human pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens. The serralysin proteases share highly conserved catalytic domains and show evolutionary similarity to the mammalian matrix metalloproteases. Our previous studies demonstrated that alkaline protease (AP) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of activating the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), leading to an increase in sodium absorption in airway epithelia. The serralysin proteases are often co-expressed with endogenous, intracellular or periplasmic inhibitors, which putatively protect the bacterium from unwanted or unregulated protease activities. To evaluate the potential use of these small protein inhibitors in regulating the serralysin induced activation of ENaC, proteases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens were purified for characterization along with a high affinity inhibitor from Pseudomonas. Both proteases showed activity against in vitro substrates and could be blocked by near stoichiometric concentrations of the inhibitor. In addition, both proteases were capable of activating ENaC when added to the apical surfaces of multiple epithelial cells with similar slow activation kinetics. The high-affinity periplasmic inhibitor from Pseudomonas effectively blocked this activation. These data suggest that multiple metalloproteases are capable of activating ENaC. Further, the endogenous, periplasmic bacterial inhibitors may be useful for modulating the downstream effects of the serralysin virulence factors under physiological conditions.

  20. Anesthetic drug midazolam inhibits cardiac human ether-à-go-go-related gene channels: mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonderlin, Nadine; Fischer, Fathima; Zitron, Edgar; Seyler, Claudia; Scherer, Daniel; Thomas, Dierk; Katus, Hugo A; Scholz, Eberhard P

    2015-01-01

    Midazolam is a short-acting benzodiazepine that is in wide clinical use as an anxiolytic, sedative, hypnotic, and anticonvulsant. Midazolam has been shown to inhibit ion channels, including calcium and potassium channels. So far, the effects of midazolam on cardiac human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels have not been analyzed. The inhibitory effects of midazolam on heterologously expressed hERG channels were analyzed in Xenopus oocytes using the double-electrode voltage clamp technique. We found that midazolam inhibits hERG channels in a concentration-dependent manner, yielding an IC50 of 170 μM in Xenopus oocytes. When analyzed in a HEK 293 cell line using the patch-clamp technique, the IC50 was 13.6 μM. Midazolam resulted in a small negative shift of the activation curve of hERG channels. However, steady-state inactivation was not significantly affected. We further show that inhibition is state-dependent, occurring within the open and inactivated but not in the closed state. There was no frequency dependence of block. Using the hERG pore mutants F656A and Y652A we provide evidence that midazolam uses a classical binding site within the channel pore. Analyzing the subacute effects of midazolam on hERG channel trafficking, we further found that midazolam does not affect channel surface expression. Taken together, we show that the anesthetic midazolam is a low-affinity inhibitor of cardiac hERG channels without additional effects on channel surface expression. These data add to the current understanding of the pharmacological profile of the anesthetic midazolam.

  1. Modulatory effect of auxiliary β1 subunit on Nav1.3 voltage-gated sodium channel expressed in Xenopus oocyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying-wei; CHENG Zhi-jun; TAN Hong; XIA Yi-meng; REN Rong-rong; DING Yu-qiang

    2007-01-01

    @@ Voltage-gated sodium channels play an important role in the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells. They are composed of a pore-forming α subunit and auxiliary β subunits. To date,nine subtypes of the α subunit, designated Nav 1.1 to Nav1.9, have been shown to form functional sodium channels.

  2. Conotoxins Targeting Neuronal Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Subtypes: Potential Analgesics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R. McArthur

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC are the primary mediators of electrical signal amplification and propagation in excitable cells. VGSC subtypes are diverse, with different biophysical and pharmacological properties, and varied tissue distribution. Altered VGSC expression and/or increased VGSC activity in sensory neurons is characteristic of inflammatory and neuropathic pain states. Therefore, VGSC modulators could be used in prospective analgesic compounds. VGSCs have specific binding sites for four conotoxin families: μ-, μO-, δ- and ί-conotoxins. Various studies have identified that the binding site of these peptide toxins is restricted to well-defined areas or domains. To date, only the μ- and μO-family exhibit analgesic properties in animal pain models. This review will focus on conotoxins from the μ- and μO-families that act on neuronal VGSCs. Examples of how these conotoxins target various pharmacologically important neuronal ion channels, as well as potential problems with the development of drugs from conotoxins, will be discussed.

  3. The N-terminal domain allosterically regulates cleavage and activation of the epithelial sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Pradeep; Buchner, Ginka; Chakraborty, Hirak; Dang, Yan L; He, Hong; Garcia, Guilherme J M; Kubelka, Jan; Gentzsch, Martina; Stutts, M Jackson; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2014-08-15

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is activated upon endoproteolytic cleavage of specific segments in the extracellular domains of the α- and γ-subunits. Cleavage is accomplished by intracellular proteases prior to membrane insertion and by surface-expressed or extracellular soluble proteases once ENaC resides at the cell surface. These cleavage events are partially regulated by intracellular signaling through an unknown allosteric mechanism. Here, using a combination of computational and experimental techniques, we show that the intracellular N terminus of γ-ENaC undergoes secondary structural transitions upon interaction with phosphoinositides. From ab initio folding simulations of the N termini in the presence and absence of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), we found that PIP2 increases α-helical propensity in the N terminus of γ-ENaC. Electrophysiology and mutation experiments revealed that a highly conserved cluster of lysines in the γ-ENaC N terminus regulates accessibility of extracellular cleavage sites in γ-ENaC. We also show that conditions that decrease PIP2 or enhance ubiquitination sharply limit access of the γ-ENaC extracellular domain to proteases. Further, the efficiency of allosteric control of ENaC proteolysis is dependent on Tyr(370) in γ-ENaC. Our findings provide an allosteric mechanism for ENaC activation regulated by the N termini and sheds light on a potential general mechanism of channel and receptor activation.

  4. The N-terminal Domain Allosterically Regulates Cleavage and Activation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Pradeep; Buchner, Ginka; Chakraborty, Hirak; Dang, Yan L.; He, Hong; Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Kubelka, Jan; Gentzsch, Martina; Stutts, M. Jackson; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is activated upon endoproteolytic cleavage of specific segments in the extracellular domains of the α- and γ-subunits. Cleavage is accomplished by intracellular proteases prior to membrane insertion and by surface-expressed or extracellular soluble proteases once ENaC resides at the cell surface. These cleavage events are partially regulated by intracellular signaling through an unknown allosteric mechanism. Here, using a combination of computational and experimental techniques, we show that the intracellular N terminus of γ-ENaC undergoes secondary structural transitions upon interaction with phosphoinositides. From ab initio folding simulations of the N termini in the presence and absence of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), we found that PIP2 increases α-helical propensity in the N terminus of γ-ENaC. Electrophysiology and mutation experiments revealed that a highly conserved cluster of lysines in the γ-ENaC N terminus regulates accessibility of extracellular cleavage sites in γ-ENaC. We also show that conditions that decrease PIP2 or enhance ubiquitination sharply limit access of the γ-ENaC extracellular domain to proteases. Further, the efficiency of allosteric control of ENaC proteolysis is dependent on Tyr370 in γ-ENaC. Our findings provide an allosteric mechanism for ENaC activation regulated by the N termini and sheds light on a potential general mechanism of channel and receptor activation. PMID:24973914

  5. Sodium channels as gateable non-photonic sensors for membrane-delimited reactive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Navin K; Nematian-Ardestani, Ehsan; Neugebauer, Sophie; Borowski, Benjamin; El-Hussein, Ahmed; Hoshi, Toshinori; Leipold, Enrico; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2014-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) play crucial roles in physiological processes. While excessive ROS damages cells, small fluctuations in ROS levels represent physiological signals important for vital functions. Despite the physiological importance of ROS, many fundamental questions remain unanswered, such as which types of ROS occur in cells, how they distribute inside cells, and how long they remain in an active form. The current study presents a ratiometric sensor of intracellular ROS levels based on genetically engineered voltage-gated sodium channels (roNaV). roNaV can be used for detecting oxidative modification that occurs near the plasma membrane with a sensitivity similar to existing fluorescence-based ROS sensors. Moreover, roNaV has several advantages over traditional sensors because it does not need excitation light for sensing, and thus, can be used to detect phototoxic cellular modifications. In addition, the ROS dynamic range of roNaV is easily manipulated in real time by means of the endogenous channel inactivation mechanism. Measurements on ROS liberated from intracellular Lucifer Yellow and genetically encoded KillerRed have revealed an assessment of ROS lifetime in individual mammalian cells. Flashlight-induced ROS concentration decayed with two major time constants of about 10 and 1000 ms.

  6. Mutations in sodium channel {beta}-subunit SCN3B are associated with early-onset lone atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Morten Salling; Jespersen, Thomas; Nielsen, Jonas Bille

    2011-01-01

    across species. Electrophysiological studies on the SCN3B mutation were carried out and all three SCN3B mutations caused a functionally reduced sodium channel current. One synonymous variant was found in SCN4B. CONCLUSION: In 192 young lone AF patients, we found three patients with suspected disease...

  7. A gain-of-function mutation in the sodium channel gene Scn2a results in seizures and behavioral abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, J A; Plummer, N W; Smith, M R; Kapur, J; Cummins, T R; Waxman, S G; Goldin, A L; Meisler, M H

    2001-01-01

    The GAL879-881QQQ mutation in the cytoplasmic S4-S5 linker of domain 2 of the rat brain IIA sodium channel (Na(v)1.2) results in slowed inactivation and increased persistent current when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The neuron-specific enolase promoter was used to direct in vivo expression of the mutated channel in transgenic mice. Three transgenic lines exhibited seizures, and line Q54 was characterized in detail. The seizures in these mice began at two months of age and were accompanied by behavioral arrest and stereotyped repetitive behaviors. Continuous electroencephalogram monitoring detected focal seizure activity in the hippocampus, which in some instances generalized to involve the cortex. Hippocampal CA1 neurons isolated from presymptomatic Q54 mice exhibited increased persistent sodium current which may underlie hyperexcitability in the hippocampus. During the progression of the disorder there was extensive cell loss and gliosis within the hippocampus in areas CA1, CA2, CA3 and the hilus. The lifespan of Q54 mice was shortened and only 25% of the mice survived beyond six months of age. Four independent transgenic lines expressing the wild-type sodium channel were examined and did not exhibit any abnormalities. The transgenic Q54 mice provide a genetic model that will be useful for testing the effect of pharmacological intervention on progression of seizures caused by sodium channel dysfunction. The human ortholog, SCN2A, is a candidate gene for seizure disorders mapped to chromosome 2q22-24.

  8. Mutations in sodium-channel gene SCN9A cause a spectrum of human genetic pain disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth, J.P.H.; Waxman, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium-channel type IX alpha subunit, known as Na(v)1.7 and encoded by the gene SCN9A, is located in peripheral neurons and plays an important role in action potential production in these cells. Recent genetic studies have identified Na(v)1.7 dysfunction in three different human pa

  9. De-novo mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN1A in alleged vaccine encephalopathy : a retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkovic, SF; Harkin, L; McMahon, JM; Pelekanos, JT; Zuberi, SM; Wirrell, EC; Gill, DS; Iona, [No Value; Mulley, JC; Scheffer, IE

    2006-01-01

    Background Vaccination, particularly for pertussis, has been implicated as a direct cause of an encephalopathy with refractory seizures and intellectual impairment. We postulated that cases of so-called vaccine encephalopathy could have mutations in the neuronal sodium channel alpha 1 subunit gene (

  10. TGF-β1, released by myofibroblasts, differentially regulates transcription and function of sodium and potassium channels in adult rat ventricular myocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuljeet Kaur

    Full Text Available Cardiac injury promotes fibroblasts activation and differentiation into myofibroblasts, which are hypersecretory of multiple cytokines. It is unknown whether any of such cytokines are involved in the electrophysiological remodeling of adult cardiomyocytes. We cultured adult cardiomyocytes for 3 days in cardiac fibroblast conditioned medium (FCM from adult rats. In whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments, FCM-treated myocytes had 41% more peak inward sodium current (I(Na density at -40 mV than myocytes in control medium (p3 fold greater in FCM than control, which suggested that FCM effects could be mediated by TGF-β1. This was confirmed by pre-treatment with TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody, which abolished the FCM-induced changes in both I(Na and I(to. In current-clamp experiments TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml prolonged the action potential duration at 30, 50, and 90 repolarization (p<0.05; at 50 ng/ml it gave rise to early afterdepolarizations. In voltage-clamp experiments, TGF-β1 increased I(Na density in a dose-dependent manner without affecting voltage dependence of activation or inactivation. I(Na density was -36.25±2.8 pA/pF in control, -59.17±6.2 pA/pF at 0.1 ng/ml (p<0.01, and -58.22±6.6 pA/pF at 1 ng/ml (p<0.01. In sharp contrast, I(to density decreased from 22.2±1.2 pA/pF to 12.7±0.98 pA/pF (p<0.001 at 10 ng/ml. At 1 ng/ml TGF-β1 significantly increased SCN5A (Na(V1.5 (+73%; p<0.01, while reducing KCNIP2 (Kchip2; -77%; p<0.01 and KCND2 (K(V4.2; -50% p<0.05 mRNA levels. Further, the TGF-β1-induced increase in I(Na was mediated through activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway via phosphorylation of FOXO1 (a negative regulator of SCN5A. TGF-β1 released by myofibroblasts differentially regulates transcription and function of the main cardiac sodium channel and of the channel responsible for the transient outward current. The results provide new mechanistic insight into the electrical remodeling associated with myocardial injury.

  11. TGF-β1, Released by Myofibroblasts, Differentially Regulates Transcription and Function of Sodium and Potassium Channels in Adult Rat Ventricular Myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Kuljeet; Zarzoso, Manuel; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela; Guerrero-Serna, Guadalupe; Hou, Luqia; Musa, Hassan; Jalife, José

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac injury promotes fibroblasts activation and differentiation into myofibroblasts, which are hypersecretory of multiple cytokines. It is unknown whether any of such cytokines are involved in the electrophysiological remodeling of adult cardiomyocytes. We cultured adult cardiomyocytes for 3 days in cardiac fibroblast conditioned medium (FCM) from adult rats. In whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments, FCM-treated myocytes had 41% more peak inward sodium current (INa) density at −40 mV than myocytes in control medium (p3 fold greater in FCM than control, which suggested that FCM effects could be mediated by TGF-β1. This was confirmed by pre-treatment with TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody, which abolished the FCM-induced changes in both INa and Ito. In current-clamp experiments TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml) prolonged the action potential duration at 30, 50, and 90 repolarization (p<0.05); at 50 ng/ml it gave rise to early afterdepolarizations. In voltage-clamp experiments, TGF-β1 increased INa density in a dose-dependent manner without affecting voltage dependence of activation or inactivation. INa density was −36.25±2.8 pA/pF in control, −59.17±6.2 pA/pF at 0.1 ng/ml (p<0.01), and −58.22±6.6 pA/pF at 1 ng/ml (p<0.01). In sharp contrast, Ito density decreased from 22.2±1.2 pA/pF to 12.7±0.98 pA/pF (p<0.001) at 10 ng/ml. At 1 ng/ml TGF-β1 significantly increased SCN5A (NaV1.5) (+73%; p<0.01), while reducing KCNIP2 (Kchip2; −77%; p<0.01) and KCND2 (KV4.2; −50% p<0.05) mRNA levels. Further, the TGF-β1-induced increase in INa was mediated through activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway via phosphorylation of FOXO1 (a negative regulator of SCN5A). TGF-β1 released by myofibroblasts differentially regulates transcription and function of the main cardiac sodium channel and of the channel responsible for the transient outward current. The results provide new mechanistic insight into the electrical remodeling associated with myocardial injury. PMID:23393573

  12. Splice variants of Na(V1.7 sodium channels have distinct β subunit-dependent biophysical properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Farmer

    Full Text Available Genes encoding the α subunits of neuronal sodium channels have evolutionarily conserved sites of alternative splicing but no functional differences have been attributed to the splice variants. Here, using Na(V1.7 as an exemplar, we show that the sodium channel isoforms are functionally distinct when co-expressed with β subunits. The gene, SCN9A, encodes the α subunit of the Na(V1.7 channel, and contains both sites of alternative splicing that are highly conserved. In conditions where the intrinsic properties of the Na(V1.7 splice variants were similar when expressed alone, co-expression of β1 subunits had different effects on channel availability that were determined by splicing at either site in the α subunit. While the identity of exon 5 determined the degree to which β1 subunits altered voltage-dependence of activation (P = 0.027, the length of exon 11 regulated how far β1 subunits depolarised voltage-dependence of inactivation (P = 0.00012. The results could have a significant impact on channel availability, for example with the long version of exon 11, the co-expression of β1 subunits could lead to nearly twice as large an increase in channel availability compared to channels containing the short version. Our data suggest that splicing can change the way that Na(V channels interact with β subunits. Because splicing is conserved, its unexpected role in regulating the functional impact of β subunits may apply to multiple voltage-gated sodium channels, and the full repertoire of β subunit function may depend on splicing in α subunits.

  13. Significant natriuretic and antihypertensive action of the epithelial sodium channel blocker amiloride in diabetic patients with and without nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik; Hansen, Pernille B L; Bistrup, Claus;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Diabetic nephropathy is associated with aberrant glomerular filtration of serine proteases. The study was designed to test the hypothesis that the epithelial sodium channel is activated proteolytically by urine plasmin in diabetic nephropathy and mediates renal sodium retention. METHODS......: In an open-label intervention study on type 1 diabetes patients on standardized NaCl intake (200 mmol/day) with (n = 15) and without diabetic nephropathy (control, n = 12), urinary Na excretion in response to oral amiloride (20 or 40 mg/day for 2 days) was compared. RESULTS: A total of 27 patients completed...... renal Na excretion, reduced blood pressure, albuminuria, and total and active plasmin in urine. It is concluded that epithelial sodium channel is an attractive target to attain blood pressure control in long-term type I diabetes with no enhanced activity associated with nephropathy....

  14. Possible roles of exceptionally conserved residues around the selectivity filters of sodium and calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Denis B; Zhorov, Boris S

    2011-01-28

    In the absence of x-ray structures of sodium and calcium channels their homology models are used to rationalize experimental data and design new experiments. A challenge is to model the outer-pore region that folds differently from potassium channels. Here we report a new model of the outer-pore region of the NaV1.4 channel, which suggests roles of highly conserved residues around the selectivity filter. The model takes from our previous study (Tikhonov, D. B., and Zhorov, B. S. (2005) Biophys. J. 88, 184-197) the general disposition of the P-helices, selectivity filter residues, and the outer carboxylates, but proposes new intra- and inter-domain contacts that support structural stability of the outer pore. Glycine residues downstream from the selectivity filter are proposed to participate in knob-into-hole contacts with the P-helices and S6s. These contacts explain the adapted tetrodotoxin resistance of snakes that feed on toxic prey through valine substitution of isoleucine in the P-helix of repeat IV. Polar residues five positions upstream from the selectivity filter residues form H-bonds with the ascending-limb backbones. Exceptionally conserved tryptophans are engaged in inter-repeat H-bonds to form a ring whose π-electrons would facilitate passage of ions from the outer carboxylates to the selectivity filter. The outer-pore model of CaV1.2 derived from the NaV1.4 model is also stabilized by the ring of exceptionally conservative tryptophans and H-bonds between the P-helices and ascending limbs. In this model, the exceptionally conserved aspartate downstream from the selectivity-filter glutamate in repeat II facilitates passage of calcium ions to the selectivity-filter ring through the tryptophan ring. Available experimental data are discussed in view of the models.

  15. Chronic ciguatoxin treatment induces synaptic scaling through voltage gated sodium channels in cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Víctor; Vale, Carmen; Rubiolo, Juan A; Roel, Maria; Hirama, Masahiro; Yamashita, Shuji; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luís M

    2015-06-15

    Ciguatoxins are sodium channels activators that cause ciguatera, one of the most widespread nonbacterial forms of food poisoning, which presents with long-term neurological alterations. In central neurons, chronic perturbations in activity induce homeostatic synaptic mechanisms that adjust the strength of excitatory synapses and modulate glutamate receptor expression in order to stabilize the overall activity. Immediate early genes, such as Arc and Egr1, are induced in response to activity changes and underlie the trafficking of glutamate receptors during neuronal homeostasis. To better understand the long lasting neurological consequences of ciguatera, it is important to establish the role that chronic changes in activity produced by ciguatoxins represent to central neurons. Here, the effect of a 30 min exposure of 10-13 days in vitro (DIV) cortical neurons to the synthetic ciguatoxin CTX 3C on Arc and Egr1 expression was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction approaches. Since the toxin increased the mRNA levels of both Arc and Egr1, the effect of CTX 3C in NaV channels, membrane potential, firing activity, miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and glutamate receptors expression in cortical neurons after a 24 h exposure was evaluated using electrophysiological and western blot approaches. The data presented here show that CTX 3C induced an upregulation of Arc and Egr1 that was prevented by previous coincubation of the neurons with the NaV channel blocker tetrodotoxin. In addition, chronic CTX 3C caused a concentration-dependent shift in the activation voltage of NaV channels to more negative potentials and produced membrane potential depolarization. Moreover, 24 h treatment of cortical neurons with 5 nM CTX 3C decreased neuronal firing and induced synaptic scaling mechanisms, as evidenced by a decrease in the amplitude of mEPSCs and downregulation in the protein level of glutamate receptors that was also prevented by tetrodotoxin

  16. Functional coupling between sodium-activated potassium channels and voltage-dependent persistent sodium currents in cricket Kenyon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Izumi; Yoshino, Masami

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we examined the functional coupling between Na(+)-activated potassium (KNa) channels and Na(+) influx through voltage-dependent Na(+) channels in Kenyon cells isolated from the mushroom body of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Single-channel activity of KNa channels was recorded with the cell-attached patch configuration. The open probability (Po) of KNa channels increased with increasing Na(+) concentration in a bath solution, whereas it decreased by the substitution of Na(+) with an equimolar concentration of Li(+). The Po of KNa channels was also found to be reduced by bath application of a high concentration of TTX (1 μM) and riluzole (100 μM), which inhibits both fast (INaf) and persistent (INaP) Na(+) currents, whereas it was unaffected by a low concentration of TTX (10 nM), which selectively blocks INaf. Bath application of Cd(2+) at a low concentration (50 μM), as an inhibitor of INaP, also decreased the Po of KNa channels. Conversely, bath application of the inorganic Ca(2+)-channel blockers Co(2+) and Ni(2+) at high concentrations (500 μM) had little effect on the Po of KNa channels, although Cd(2+) (500 μM) reduced the Po of KNa channels. Perforated whole cell clamp analysis further indicated the presence of sustained outward currents for which amplitude was dependent on the amount of Na(+) influx. Taken together, these results indicate that KNa channels could be activated by Na(+) influx passing through voltage-dependent persistent Na(+) channels. The functional significance of this coupling mechanism was discussed in relation to the membrane excitability of Kenyon cells and its possible role in the formation of long-term memory.

  17. Native pyroglutamation of huwentoxin-IV: a post-translational modification that increases the trapping ability to the sodium channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingqiang Rong

    Full Text Available Huwentoxin-IV (HWTX-IV, a tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-s sodium channel antagonist, is found in the venom of the Chinese spider Ornithoctonus huwena. A naturally modified HWTX-IV (mHWTX-IV, having a molecular mass 18 Da lower than HWTX-IV, has also been isolated from the venom of the same spider. By a combination of enzymatic fragmentation and MS/MS de novo sequencing, mHWTX-IV has been shown to have the same amino acid sequence as that of HWTX-IV, except that the N-terminal glutamic acid replaced by pyroglutamic acid. mHWTX-IV inhibited tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channels of dorsal root ganglion neurons with an IC50 nearly equal to native HWTX-IV. mHWTX-IV showed the same activation and inactivation kinetics seen for native HWTX-IV. In contrast with HWTX-IV, which dissociates at moderate voltage depolarization voltages (+50 mV, 180000 ms, mHWTX-IV inhibition of TTX-sensitive sodium channels is not reversed by strong depolarization voltages (+200 mV, 500 ms. Recovery of Nav1.7current was voltage-dependent and was induced by extreme depolarization in the presence of HWTX-IV, but no obvious current was elicited after application of mHWTX-IV. Our data indicate that the N-terminal modification of HWTX-IV gives the peptide toxin a greater ability to trap the voltage sensor in the sodium channel. Loss of a negative charge, caused by cyclization at the N-terminus, is a possible reason why the modified toxin binds much stronger. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a pyroglutamic acid residue in a spider toxin; this modification seems to increase the trapping ability of the voltage sensor in the sodium channel.

  18. Spontaneous and CRH-Induced Excitability and Calcium Signaling in Mice Corticotrophs Involves Sodium, Calcium, and Cation-Conducting Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemkova, Hana; Tomić, Melanija; Kucka, Marek; Aguilera, Greti; Stojilkovic, Stanko S

    2016-04-01

    Transgenic mice expressing the tdimer2(12) form of Discosoma red fluorescent protein under control of the proopiomelanocortin gene's regulatory elements are a useful model for studying corticotrophs. Using these mice, we studied the ion channels and mechanisms controlling corticotroph excitability. Corticotrophs were either quiescent or electrically active, with a 22-mV difference in the resting membrane potential (RMP) between the 2 groups. In quiescent cells, CRH depolarized the membrane, leading to initial single spiking and sustained bursting; in active cells, CRH further facilitated or inhibited electrical activity and calcium spiking, depending on the initial activity pattern and CRH concentration. The stimulatory but not inhibitory action of CRH on electrical activity was mimicked by cAMP independently of the presence or absence of arachidonic acid. Removal of bath sodium silenced spiking and hyperpolarized the majority of cells; in contrast, the removal of bath calcium did not affect RMP but reduced CRH-induced depolarization, which abolished bursting electrical activity and decreased the spiking frequency but not the amplitude of single spikes. Corticotrophs with inhibited voltage-gated sodium channels fired calcium-dependent action potentials, whereas cells with inhibited L-type calcium channels fired sodium-dependent spikes; blockade of both channels abolished spiking without affecting the RMP. These results indicate that the background voltage-insensitive sodium conductance influences RMP, the CRH-depolarization current is driven by a cationic conductance, and the interplay between voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels plays a critical role in determining the status and pattern of electrical activity and calcium signaling.

  19. Roles of HDAC2 and HDAC8 in Cardiac Remodeling in Renovascular Hypertensive Rats and the Effects of Valproic Acid Sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui-Fang; Cao, Shan-Shan; Fang, Wei-Jin; Song, Ying; Luo, Xue-Ting; Wang, Hong-Yun; Wang, Jian-Gang

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that histone deacetylases (HDACs) activity is associated with the development and progression of cardiac hypertrophy. In this study, we investigated the effects of a HDACs inhibitor, valproic acid sodium (VPA), on cardiac remodeling and the differential expression of HDACs in left ventricles (LVs) of renovascular hypertensive rats. Renovascular hypertension was induced in rats by the two-kidney two-clip (2K2C) method. Cardiac remodeling, heart function and the differential expression of HDACs were examined at different weeks after 2K2C operation. The effects of VPA on cardiac remodeling, the expressions of HDACs, transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in LV were investigated. The expressions of atrial natriuretic factor, β-myosin heavy chain, HDAC2 and HDAC8 increased in LV of 2K2C rats at 4, 8, 12 weeks after operation. Cardiac dysfunction, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis were markedly attenuated by VPA treatment in 2K2C rats. Further studies revealed that VPA inhibited the expressions of HDAC2, HDAC8, TGF-β1 and CTGF in LV of 2K2C rats. In summary, these data indicate that HDAC2 and HDAC8 play a key role in cardiac remodeling in renovascular hypertensive rats and that VPA attenuates hypertension and cardiac remodeling. The effect of VPA is possibly exerted via decreasing HDAC2, HDAC8, TGF-β1 and CTGF expressions in LV of 2K2C rats.

  20. Evolutionary diversification of Mesobuthus α-scorpion toxins affecting sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shunyi; Peigneur, Steve; Gao, Bin; Lu, Xiuxiu; Cao, Chunyang; Tytgat, Jan

    2012-01-01

    α-Scorpion toxins constitute a family of peptide modulators that induce a prolongation of the action potential of excitable cells by inhibiting voltage-gated sodium channel inactivation. Although they all adopt a conserved structural scaffold, the potency and phylogentic preference of these toxins largely vary, which render them an intriguing model for studying evolutionary diversification among family members. Here, we report molecular characterization of a new multigene family of α-toxins comprising 13 members (named MeuNaTxα-1 to MeuNaTxα-13) from the scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus. Of them, five native toxins (MeuNaTxα-1 to -5) were purified to homogeneity from the venom and the solution structure of MeuNaTxα-5 was solved by nuclear magnetic resonance. A systematic functional evaluation of MeuNaTxα-1, -2, -4, and -5 was conducted by two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings on seven cloned mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)1.2 to Na(v)1.8) and the insect counterpart DmNa(v)1 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Results show that all these four peptides slow inactivation of DmNa(v)1 and are inactive on Na(v)1.8 at micromolar concentrations. However, they exhibit differential specificity for the other six channel isoforms (Na(v)1.2 to Na(v)1.7), in which MeuNaTxα-4 shows no activity on these isoforms and thus represents the first Mesobuthus-derived insect-selective α-toxin identified so far with a half maximal effective concentration of 130 ± 2 nm on DmNa(v)1 and a half maximal lethal dose of about 200 pmol g(-1) on the insect Musca domestica; MeuNaTxα-2 only affects Na(v)1.4; MeuNaTxα-1 and MeuNaTxα-5 have a wider range of channel spectrum, the former active on Na(v)1.2, Na(v)1.3, Na(v)1.6, and Na(v)1.7, whereas the latter acting on Na(v)1.3-Na(v)1.7. Remarkably, MeuNaTxα-4 and MeuNaTxα-5 are two nearly identical peptides differing by only one point mutation at site 50 (A50V) but exhibit rather different channel subtype selectivity, highlighting a

  1. The up-regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels subtypes coincides with an increased sodium current in hippocampal neuronal culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Xu, Xiaoxue; Cai, Jiqun; Hu, Huiyuan; Sun, Wei; He, Guilin; Shao, Dongxue; Wang, Lei; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris; Zhu, Tong; Hao, Liying

    2013-02-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) have been linked to inherited forms of epilepsy. The expression and biophysical properties of VGSC in the hippocampal neuronal culture model have not been clarified. In order to evaluate mechanisms of epileptogenesis that are related to VGSC, we examined the expression and function of VGSC in the hippocampal neuronal culture model in vitro and spontaneously epileptic rats (SER) in vivo. Our data showed that the peak amplitude of transient, rapidly-inactivating Na(+) current (I(Na,T)) in model neurons was significantly increased compared with control neurons, and the activation curve was shifted to the negative potentials in model neurons in whole cell recording by patch-clamp. In addition, channel activity of persistent, non-inactivating Na(+) current (I(Na,P)) was obviously increased in the hippocampal neuronal culture model as judged by single-channel patch-clamp recording. Furthermore, VGSC subtypes Na(V)1.1, Na(V)1.2 and Na(V)1.3 were up-regulated at the protein expression level in model neurons and SER as assessed by Western blotting. Four subtypes of VGSC proteins in SER were clearly present throughout the hippocampus, including CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus regions, and neurons expressing VGSC immunoreactivity were also detected in hippocampal neuronal culture model by immunofluorescence. These findings suggested that the up-regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels subtypes in neurons coincided with an increased sodium current in the hippocampal neuronal culture model, providing a possible explanation for the observed seizure discharge and enhanced excitability in epilepsy.

  2. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4-Induced Modulation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels in Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zhiwen; Jie, Pinghui; Tian, Yujing; Chen, Tingting; Chen, Lei; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to control the resting membrane potential and increase excitability in many types of cells. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play an important role in initiating action potentials in neurons. However, whether VGSCs can be modulated by the activation of TRPV4 in hippocampal pyramidal neurons remains unknown. In this study, we tested the effect of TRPV4 agonists (GSK1016790A and 4α-PDD) on voltage-gated sodium current (I Na) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and the protein levels of α/β-subunit of VGSCs in the hippocampus of mice subjected to intracerebroventricular (icv.) injection of GSK1016790A (GSK-injected mice). Herein, we report that I Na was inhibited by acute application of GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD. In the presence of TRPV4 agonists, the voltage-dependent inactivation curve shifted to the hyperpolarization, whereas the voltage-dependent activation curve remained unchanged. The TRPV4 agonist-induced inhibition of I Na was blocked by the TRPV4 antagonist or tetrodotoxin. Moreover, blocking protein kinase A (PKA) markedly attenuated the GSK1016790A-induced inhibition of I Na, whereas antagonism of protein kinase C or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase did not change GSK1016790A action. Finally, the protein levels of Nav1.1, Nav1.2, and Nav1.6 in the hippocampus increased in GSK-injected mice, whereas those of Nav1.3 and Navβ1 remained nearly unchanged. We conclude that I Na is inhibited by the acute activation of TRPV4 through PKA signaling pathway in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, but protein expression of α-subunit of VGSCs is increased by sustained TRPV4 activation, which may compensate for the acute inhibition of I Na and provide a possibility for hyper-excitability upon sustained TRPV4 activation.

  3. An increase in [Ca2+]i activates basolateral chloride channels and inhibits apical sodium channels in frog skin epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodin, Birger; Rytved, K A; Nielsen, R

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which increases in free cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) cause a decrease in macroscopic sodium absorption across principal cells of the frog skin epithelium. [Ca2+]i was measured with fura-2 in an epifluorescence microscope set-up, sodium...

  4. A novel SCN9A mutation responsible for primary erythromelalgia and is resistant to the treatment of sodium channel blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min-Tzu; Huang, Po-Yuan; Yen, Chen-Tung; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Ming-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Primary erythromelalgia (PE) is an autosomal dominant neurological disorder characterized by severe burning pain and erythema in the extremities upon heat stimuli or exercise. Mutations in human SCN9A gene, encoding the α-subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel, Na(v)1.7, were found to be responsible for PE. Three missense mutations of SCN9A gene have recently been identified in Taiwanese patients including a familial (I136V) and two sporadic mutations (I848T, V1316A). V1316A is a novel mutation and has not been characterized yet. Topologically, I136V is located in DI/S1 segment and both I848T and V1316A are located in S4-S5 linker region of DII and DIII domains, respectively. To characterize the elelctrophysiological manifestations, the channel conductance with whole-cell patch clamp was recorded on the over-expressed Chinese hamster overy cells. As compared with wild type, the mutant channels showed a significant hyperpolarizing shift in voltage dependent activation and a depolarizing shift in steady-state fast inactivation. The recovery time from channel inactivation is faster in the mutant than in the wild type channels. Since warmth can trigger and exacerbate symptoms, we then examine the influence of tempearture on the sodium channel conduction. At 35°C, I136V and V1316A mutant channels exhibit a further hyperpolarizing shift at activation as compared with wild type channel, even though wild type channel also produced a significant hyperpolarizing shift compared to that of 25°C. High temperature caused a significant depolarizing shift in steady-state fast inactivation in all three mutant channels. These findings may confer to the hyperexcitability of sensory neurons, especially at high temperature. In order to identifying an effective treatment, we tested the IC₅₀ values of selective sodium channel blockers, lidocaine and mexiletine. The IC₅₀ for mexiletine is lower for I848T mutant channel as compared to that of the wild type and other two

  5. A novel SCN9A mutation responsible for primary erythromelalgia and is resistant to the treatment of sodium channel blockers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Tzu Wu

    Full Text Available Primary erythromelalgia (PE is an autosomal dominant neurological disorder characterized by severe burning pain and erythema in the extremities upon heat stimuli or exercise. Mutations in human SCN9A gene, encoding the α-subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel, Na(v1.7, were found to be responsible for PE. Three missense mutations of SCN9A gene have recently been identified in Taiwanese patients including a familial (I136V and two sporadic mutations (I848T, V1316A. V1316A is a novel mutation and has not been characterized yet. Topologically, I136V is located in DI/S1 segment and both I848T and V1316A are located in S4-S5 linker region of DII and DIII domains, respectively. To characterize the elelctrophysiological manifestations, the channel conductance with whole-cell patch clamp was recorded on the over-expressed Chinese hamster overy cells. As compared with wild type, the mutant channels showed a significant hyperpolarizing shift in voltage dependent activation and a depolarizing shift in steady-state fast inactivation. The recovery time from channel inactivation is faster in the mutant than in the wild type channels. Since warmth can trigger and exacerbate symptoms, we then examine the influence of tempearture on the sodium channel conduction. At 35°C, I136V and V1316A mutant channels exhibit a further hyperpolarizing shift at activation as compared with wild type channel, even though wild type channel also produced a significant hyperpolarizing shift compared to that of 25°C. High temperature caused a significant depolarizing shift in steady-state fast inactivation in all three mutant channels. These findings may confer to the hyperexcitability of sensory neurons, especially at high temperature. In order to identifying an effective treatment, we tested the IC₅₀ values of selective sodium channel blockers, lidocaine and mexiletine. The IC₅₀ for mexiletine is lower for I848T mutant channel as compared to that of the wild type

  6. Down-regulation of the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum ryanodine channel in severely food-restricted rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Vizotto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have shown that myocardial dysfunction induced by food restriction is related to calcium handling. Although cardiac function is depressed in food-restricted animals, there is limited information about the molecular mechanisms that lead to this abnormality. The present study evaluated the effects of food restriction on calcium cycling, focusing on sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2, phospholamban (PLB, and ryanodine channel (RYR2 mRNA expressions in rat myocardium. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats, 60 days old, were submitted to ad libitum feeding (control rats or 50% diet restriction for 90 days. The levels of left ventricle SERCA2, PLB, and RYR2 were measured using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Body and ventricular weights were reduced in 50% food-restricted animals. RYR2 mRNA was significantly decreased in the left ventricle of the food-restricted group (control = 5.92 ± 0.48 vs food-restricted group = 4.84 ± 0.33, P < 0.01. The levels of SERCA2 and PLB mRNA were similar between groups (control = 8.38 ± 0.44 vs food-restricted group = 7.96 ± 0.45, and control = 1.52 ± 0.06 vs food-restricted group = 1.53 ± 0.10, respectively. Down-regulation of RYR2 mRNA expressions suggests that chronic food restriction promotes abnormalities in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release.

  7. Convergent Substitutions in a Sodium Channel Suggest Multiple Origins of Toxin Resistance in Poison Frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarvin, Rebecca D; Santos, Juan C; O'Connell, Lauren A; Zakon, Harold H; Cannatella, David C

    2016-04-01

    Complex phenotypes typically have a correspondingly multifaceted genetic component. However, the genotype-phenotype association between chemical defense and resistance is often simple: genetic changes in the binding site of a toxin alter how it affects its target. Some toxic organisms, such as poison frogs (Anura: Dendrobatidae), have defensive alkaloids that disrupt the function of ion channels, proteins that are crucial for nerve and muscle activity. Using protein-docking models, we predict that three major classes of poison frog alkaloids (histrionicotoxins, pumiliotoxins, and batrachotoxins) bind to similar sites in the highly conserved inner pore of the muscle voltage-gated sodium channel, Nav1.4. We predict that poison frogs are somewhat resistant to these compounds because they have six types of amino acid replacements in the Nav1.4 inner pore that are absent in all other frogs except for a distantly related alkaloid-defended frog from Madagascar, Mantella aurantiaca. Protein-docking models and comparative phylogenetics support the role of these replacements in alkaloid resistance. Taking into account the four independent origins of chemical defense in Dendrobatidae, phylogenetic patterns of the amino acid replacements suggest that 1) alkaloid resistance in Nav1.4 evolved independently at least seven times in these frogs, 2) variation in resistance-conferring replacements is likely a result of differences in alkaloid exposure across species, and 3) functional constraint shapes the evolution of the Nav1.4 inner pore. Our study is the first to demonstrate the genetic basis of autoresistance in frogs with alkaloid defenses.

  8. Primary erythromelalgia in a 12-year-old boy: positive response to sodium channel blockers despite negative SCN9A mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, A; Creutzfeldt, R; Staszewski, O; Winterpacht, A; Berner, R; Hufnagel, M

    2012-09-01

    Erythromelalgia is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent pain attacks, swelling and redness in the distal extremities. The primary forms of the disorder are caused by mutations in voltage-gated sodium channels. Treatment is difficult and controlled therapeutic studies offer little to no guidance. We report on a 12-year-old boy and his first occurrence of primary erythromelalgia. Genetic findings for mutations in the SCN9A gene, which encodes for the α-subunit of sodium channel NaV1.7, were negative. Although initial treatment with sodium nitroprusside was ineffective, subsequent medication with lidocaine and mexiletine, in combination with gabapentin, was successful. Despite negative findings for mutations in the sodium channels, the use of sodium channel blockers should be considered in these patients.

  9. Multiple sodium channel isoforms mediate the pathological effects of Pacific ciguatoxin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inserra, Marco C; Israel, Mathilde R; Caldwell, Ashlee; Castro, Joel; Deuis, Jennifer R; Harrington, Andrea M; Keramidas, Angelo; Garcia-Caraballo, Sonia; Maddern, Jessica; Erickson, Andelain; Grundy, Luke; Rychkov, Grigori Y; Zimmermann, Katharina; Lewis, Richard J; Brierley, Stuart M; Vetter, Irina

    2017-02-22

    Human intoxication with the seafood poison ciguatoxin, a dinoflagellate polyether that activates voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV), causes ciguatera, a disease characterised by gastrointestinal and neurological disturbances. We assessed the activity of the most potent congener, Pacific ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1), on NaV1.1-1.9 using imaging and electrophysiological approaches. Although P-CTX-1 is essentially a non-selective NaV toxin and shifted the voltage-dependence of activation to more hyperpolarising potentials at all NaV subtypes, an increase in the inactivation time constant was observed only at NaV1.8, while the slope factor of the conductance-voltage curves was significantly increased for NaV1.7 and peak current was significantly increased for NaV1.6. Accordingly, P-CTX-1-induced visceral and cutaneous pain behaviours were significantly decreased after pharmacological inhibition of NaV1.8 and the tetrodotoxin-sensitive isoforms NaV1.7 and NaV1.6, respectively. The contribution of these isoforms to excitability of peripheral C- and A-fibre sensory neurons, confirmed using murine skin and visceral single-fibre recordings, reflects the expression pattern of NaV isoforms in peripheral sensory neurons and their contribution to membrane depolarisation, action potential initiation and propagation.

  10. Lacosamide neurotoxicity associated with concomitant use of sodium channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs: a pharmacodynamic interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novy, Jan; Patsalos, Philip N; Sander, Josemir W; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2011-01-01

    Lacosamide is a new antiepileptic drug (AED) apparently devoid of major pharmacokinetic interactions. Data from a small postmarketing assessment suggest people who had lacosamide co-prescribed with a voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC)-blocking AED seemed more likely to discontinue lacosamide because of tolerability problems. Among 39 people with refractory epilepsy who developed neurotoxicity (diplopia, dizziness, drowsiness) on lacosamide treatment given in combination with VGSC-blocking AEDs, we identified 7 (17.9%) without any changes in serum levels of other AEDs in whom the symptoms were ameliorated by dose reduction of the concomitant VGSC-blocking AED. Symptoms in these people seem to have arisen from a pharmacodynamic interaction between lacosamide and other VGSC-blocking AEDs. Slow-inactivated VGSCs targeted by lacosamide might be more sensitive to the effects of conventional VGSC-blocking AEDs. Advising people to reduce concomitantly the conventional VGSC-blocking AEDs during lacosamide uptitration in cases of neurotoxicity might improve the tolerability of combination treatment.

  11. Epithelial sodium channel is involved in H2S-induced acute pulmonary edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; Wang, Yixin; Su, Chenglei; Sun, Hao; Zhang, Huazhong; Zhu, Baoli; Zhang, Hengdong; Xiao, Hang; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jinsong

    2015-01-01

    Acute pulmonary edema is one of the major outcomes of exposure to high levels of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). However, the mechanisms involved in H2S-induced acute pulmonary edema are still poorly understood. Therefore, the present study is designed to evaluate the role of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in H2S-induced acute pulmonary edema. The Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to sublethal concentrations of inhaled H2S, then the pulmonary histological and lung epithelial cell injury were evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin staining and electron microscopy, respectively. In addition to morphological investigation, our results also revealed that H2S exposure significantly decreased the alveolar fluid clearance and increased the lung tissue wet-dry ratio. These changes were demonstrated to be associated with decreased ENaC expression. Furthermore, the extracellular-regulated protein kinases 1/2 pathway was demonstrated to be implicated in H2S-mediated ENaC expression, because PD98059, an ERK1/2 antagonist, significantly mitigated H2S-mediated ENaC down-regulation. Therefore, our results show that ENaC might represent a novel pharmacological target for the treatment of acute pulmonary edema induced by H2S and other hazardous gases.

  12. Mutations in SCN9A, encoding a sodium channel alpha subunit, in patients with primary erythermalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Wang, Y; Li, S; Xu, Z; Li, H; Ma, L; Fan, J; Bu, D; Liu, B; Fan, Z; Wu, G; Jin, J; Ding, B; Zhu, X; Shen, Y

    2004-03-01

    Primary erythermalgia is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterised by intermittent burning pain with redness and heat in the extremities. A previous study established the linkage of primary erythermalgia to a 7.94 cM interval on chromosome 2q, but the causative gene was not identified. We performed linkage analysis in a Chinese family with primary erythermalgia, and screened the mutations in the two candidate genes, SCN9A and GCA, in the family and a sporadic patient. Linkage analysis yielded a maximum lod score of 2.11 for both markers D2S2370 and D2S2330. Based on critical recombination events in two patients in the family, we further limited the genetic region to 5.98 cM between D2S2370 and D2S2345. We then identified two missense mutations in SCN9A in the family (T2573A) and the sporadic patient (T2543C). Our data suggest that mutations in SCN9A cause primary erythermalgia. SCN9A, encoding a voltage-gated sodium channel alpha subunit predominantly expressed in sensory and sympathetic neurones, may play an important role in nociception and vasomotor regulation.

  13. Loss-of-function mutations in sodium channel Nav1.7 cause anosmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jan; Pyrski, Martina; Jacobi, Eric; Bufe, Bernd; Willnecker, Vivienne; Schick, Bernhard; Zizzari, Philippe; Gossage, Samuel J; Greer, Charles A; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Woods, C Geoffrey; Wood, John N; Zufall, Frank

    2011-04-14

    Loss of function of the gene SCN9A, encoding the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.7, causes a congenital inability to experience pain in humans. Here we show that Na(v)1.7 is not only necessary for pain sensation but is also an essential requirement for odour perception in both mice and humans. We examined human patients with loss-of-function mutations in SCN9A and show that they are unable to sense odours. To establish the essential role of Na(v)1.7 in odour perception, we generated conditional null mice in which Na(v)1.7 was removed from all olfactory sensory neurons. In the absence of Na(v)1.7, these neurons still produce odour-evoked action potentials but fail to initiate synaptic signalling from their axon terminals at the first synapse in the olfactory system. The mutant mice no longer display vital, odour-guided behaviours such as innate odour recognition and avoidance, short-term odour learning, and maternal pup retrieval. Our study creates a mouse model of congenital general anosmia and provides new strategies to explore the genetic basis of the human sense of smell.

  14. Multiple sodium channel isoforms mediate the pathological effects of Pacific ciguatoxin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inserra, Marco C.; Israel, Mathilde R.; Caldwell, Ashlee; Castro, Joel; Deuis, Jennifer R.; Harrington, Andrea M.; Keramidas, Angelo; Garcia-Caraballo, Sonia; Maddern, Jessica; Erickson, Andelain; Grundy, Luke; Rychkov, Grigori Y.; Zimmermann, Katharina; Lewis, Richard J.; Brierley, Stuart M.; Vetter, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Human intoxication with the seafood poison ciguatoxin, a dinoflagellate polyether that activates voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV), causes ciguatera, a disease characterised by gastrointestinal and neurological disturbances. We assessed the activity of the most potent congener, Pacific ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1), on NaV1.1–1.9 using imaging and electrophysiological approaches. Although P-CTX-1 is essentially a non-selective NaV toxin and shifted the voltage-dependence of activation to more hyperpolarising potentials at all NaV subtypes, an increase in the inactivation time constant was observed only at NaV1.8, while the slope factor of the conductance-voltage curves was significantly increased for NaV1.7 and peak current was significantly increased for NaV1.6. Accordingly, P-CTX-1-induced visceral and cutaneous pain behaviours were significantly decreased after pharmacological inhibition of NaV1.8 and the tetrodotoxin-sensitive isoforms NaV1.7 and NaV1.6, respectively. The contribution of these isoforms to excitability of peripheral C- and A-fibre sensory neurons, confirmed using murine skin and visceral single-fibre recordings, reflects the expression pattern of NaV isoforms in peripheral sensory neurons and their contribution to membrane depolarisation, action potential initiation and propagation. PMID:28225079

  15. Spider-venom peptides that target voltage-gated sodium channels: pharmacological tools and potential therapeutic leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klint, Julie K; Senff, Sebastian; Rupasinghe, Darshani B; Er, Sing Yan; Herzig, Volker; Nicholson, Graham M; King, Glenn F

    2012-09-15

    Voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)) channels play a central role in the propagation of action potentials in excitable cells in both humans and insects. Many venomous animals have therefore evolved toxins that modulate the activity of Na(V) channels in order to subdue their prey and deter predators. Spider venoms in particular are rich in Na(V) channel modulators, with one-third of all known ion channel toxins from spider venoms acting on Na(V) channels. Here we review the landscape of spider-venom peptides that have so far been described to target vertebrate or invertebrate Na(V) channels. These peptides fall into 12 distinct families based on their primary structure and cysteine scaffold. Some of these peptides have become useful pharmacological tools, while others have potential as therapeutic leads because they target specific Na(V) channel subtypes that are considered to be important analgesic targets. Spider venoms are conservatively predicted to contain more than 10 million bioactive peptides and so far only 0.01% of this diversity been characterised. Thus, it is likely that future research will reveal additional structural classes of spider-venom peptides that target Na(V) channels.

  16. Simulating the Activation of Voltage Sensing Domain for a Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Using Polarizable Force Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui-Ning; Gong, Haipeng

    2017-03-02

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels play vital roles in the signal transduction of excitable cells. Upon activation of a NaV channel, the change of transmembrane voltage triggers conformational change of the voltage sensing domain, which then elicits opening of the pore domain and thus allows an influx of Na(+) ions. Description of this process with atomistic details is in urgent demand. In this work, we simulated the partial activation process of the voltage sensing domain of a prokaryotic NaV channel using a polarizable force field. We not only observed the conformational change of the voltage sensing domain from resting to preactive state, but also rigorously estimated the free energy profile along the identified reaction pathway. Comparison with the control simulation using an additive force field indicates that voltage-gating thermodynamics of NaV channels may be inaccurately described without considering the electrostatic polarization effect.

  17. Amino acid substitutions in the FXYD motif enhance phospholemman-induced modulation of cardiac L-type calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kai; Wang, Xianming; Gao, Guofeng; Huang, Congxin; Elmslie, Keith S; Peterson, Blaise Z

    2010-11-01

    We have found that phospholemman (PLM) associates with and modulates the gating of cardiac L-type calcium channels (Wang et al., Biophys J 98: 1149-1159, 2010). The short 17 amino acid extracellular NH(2)-terminal domain of PLM contains a highly conserved PFTYD sequence that defines it as a member of the FXYD family of ion transport regulators. Although we have learned a great deal about PLM-dependent changes in calcium channel gating, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying the observed changes. Therefore, we investigated the role of the PFTYD segment in the modulation of cardiac calcium channels by individually replacing Pro-8, Phe-9, Thr-10, Tyr-11, and Asp-12 with alanine (P8A, F9A, T10A, Y11A, D12A). In addition, Asp-12 was changed to lysine (D12K) and cysteine (D12C). As expected, wild-type PLM significantly slows channel activation and deactivation and enhances voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI). We were surprised to find that amino acid substitutions at Thr-10 and Asp-12 significantly enhanced the ability of PLM to modulate Ca(V)1.2 gating. T10A exhibited a twofold enhancement of PLM-induced slowing of activation, whereas D12K and D12C dramatically enhanced PLM-induced increase of VDI. The PLM-induced slowing of channel closing was abrogated by D12A and D12C, whereas D12K and T10A failed to impact this effect. These studies demonstrate that the PFXYD motif is not necessary for the association of PLM with Ca(V)1.2. Instead, since altering the chemical and/or physical properties of the PFXYD segment alters the relative magnitudes of opposing PLM-induced effects on Ca(V)1.2 channel gating, PLM appears to play an important role in fine tuning the gating kinetics of cardiac calcium channels and likely plays an important role in shaping the cardiac action potential and regulating Ca(2+) dynamics in the heart.

  18. Effects of post-resuscitation administration with sodium hydrosulfide on cardiac recovery in hypoxia-reoxygenated newborn piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Po-Yin; Miedzyblocki, Margaret; Lee, Tze-Fun; Bigam, David L

    2013-10-15

    Hydrogen sulfide may protect multiple organ systems against ischemic-reperfusion injuries. It is unknown if treatment with sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, a hydrogen sulfide donor) will improve myocardial function and minimize oxidative stress in hypoxic-reoxygenated newborn piglets. Mixed breed piglets (1-5 day, 1.5-2.5 kg) were anesthetized and acutely instrumented for the measurement of systemic, pulmonary and regional (carotid, superior mesenteric and renal) hemodynamics and blood gas parameters. The piglets were induced with normocapnic alveolar hypoxia (10-15% oxygen, 2h) followed by reoxygenation with 100% (1h) then 21% oxygen (3h). At 10 min of reoxygenation, either NaHS (10mg/kg, 5 ml) or saline (5 ml) was administered intravenously for 30 min (5 min bolus followed by 25 min of continuous infusion) in a blinded, block-randomized fashion (n = 7/group). Plasma lactate and troponin I levels and tissue markers of myocardial oxidative stress were also determined. Two hours hypoxia caused cardiogenic shock (45 ± 3% of respective normoxic baseline), reduced regional perfusion with metabolic acidosis (pH 6.94 ± 0.02). NaHS infusion significantly improved recovery of cardiac index (84 ± 3% vs. 72 ± 5% in controls), systemic oxygen delivery (84 ± 3% vs. 72 ± 5% in controls) and systemic oxygen consumption (102 ± 5% vs. 84 ± 6% in controls) at 4h of reoxygenation. NaHS had no significant effect on systemic and pulmonary blood pressures, regional blood flows, plasma lactate and troponin I levels. The myocardial glutathionine ratio was reduced in piglets treated with NaHS (vs. controls, P<0.05). Post-resuscitation administration of NaHS improves cardiac function and systemic perfusion and attenuates myocardial oxidative stress in newborn piglets following hypoxia-reoxygenation.

  19. Alternative splicing modulates inactivation of type 1 voltage-gated sodium channels by toggling an amino acid in the first S3-S4 linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Emily V; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Schorge, Stephanie

    2011-10-21

    Voltage-gated sodium channels underlie the upstroke of action potentials and are fundamental to neuronal excitability. Small changes in the behavior of these channels are sufficient to change neuronal firing and trigger seizures. These channels are subject to highly conserved alternative splicing, affecting the short linker between the third transmembrane segment (S3) and the voltage sensor (S4) in their first domain. The biophysical consequences of this alternative splicing are incompletely understood. Here we focus on type 1 sodium channels (Nav1.1) that are implicated in human epilepsy. We show that the functional consequences of alternative splicing are highly sensitive to recording conditions, including the identity of the major intracellular anion and the recording temperature. In particular, the inactivation kinetics of channels containing the alternate exon 5N are more sensitive to intracellular fluoride ions and to changing temperature than channels containing exon 5A. Moreover, Nav1.1 channels containing exon 5N recover from inactivation more rapidly at physiological temperatures. Three amino acids differ between exons 5A and 5N. However, the changes in sensitivity and stability of inactivation were reproduced by a single conserved change from aspartate to asparagine in channels containing exon 5A, which was sufficient to make them behave like channels containing the complete exon 5N sequence. These data suggest that splicing at this site can modify the inactivation of sodium channels and reveal a possible interaction between splicing and anti-epileptic drugs that stabilize sodium channel inactivation.

  20. New diterpenoid alkaloids from Aconitum coreanum and their anti-arrhythmic effects on cardiac sodium current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Bei-Ni; Jin, Si-Si; Wang, Hao; Tang, Qing-Fa; Liu, Jing-Han; Li, Rui-Yang; Liang, Jing-Yu; Tang, Yi-Qun; Yang, Chun-Hua

    2014-04-01

    Two new diterpenoid alkaloids, Guan-Fu base J (GFJ, 1) and Guan-Fu base N (GFN, 2) along with nineteen known alkaloids (3-21) were isolated from the roots of Aconitum coreanum (Lèvl.) Rapaics, which is the raw material of a new approval anti-arrhythmia drug "Acehytisine Hydrochloride". The structures of isolated compounds were established by means of 1D, 2D NMR spectroscopic and chemical methods. All isolates obtained in the present study were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on blocking the ventricular specific sodium current using a whole-cell patch voltage-clamp technique. Among these 21 compounds, Guan-Fu base S (GFS, 3) showed the strongest inhibitory effect with an IC50 value of 3.48 μM, and only hetisine-type C20 diterpenoid alkaloids showed promising IC50 values for further development.

  1. Anticonvulsant and sodium channel blocking activity of higher doses of clenbuterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, W; Kittner, H; Regenthal, R; Malinowska, B; Schlicker, E

    2001-02-01

    of clenbuterol against generalized tonic-clonic and complex partial seizures seem to be related to the inhibition of voltage-dependent sodium channels and not to the modulation of beta-adrenoceptors.

  2. 980-nm infrared laser modulation of sodium channel kinetics in a neuron cell linearly mediated by photothermal effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyu; Liu, Jia; Liang, Shanshan; Sun, Changsen

    2014-10-01

    Photothermal effect (PE) plays a major role in the near-infrared laser interaction with biological tissue. But, quite few interactions can be quantitatively depicted. Here, a two-step model is proposed to describe a 980-nm infrared laser interaction with neuron cell in vitro. First, the laser-induced temperature rises in the cell surrounding area were measured by using an open pipette method and also calculated by solving the heat conduction equation. Second, we recorded the modifications on sodium (Na) channel current in neuron cells directly by using a patch clamp to synchronize the 980-nm laser irradiation and obtained how the electrophysiological function of neuron cells respond to the temperature rise. Then, the activation time constants, τm, were extracted by fitting the sodium currents with the Hodgkin-Huxley model. The infrared laser modulation effect on sodium currents kinetics was examined by taking a ratio between the time constants with and without the laser irradiations. The analysis revealed that the averaged ratio at a specific laser exposure could be well related to the temperature properties of the Na channel protein. These results proved that the modulation of sodium current kinetics of a neuron cell in vitro by 980-nm laser with different-irradiation levels was linearly mediated corresponding to the laser-induced PE.

  3. Uncertainty quantification of fast sodium current steady-state inactivation for multi-scale models of cardiac electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathmanathan, Pras; Shotwell, Matthew S; Gavaghan, David J; Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Gray, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps the most mature area of multi-scale systems biology is the modelling of the heart. Current models are grounded in over fifty years of research in the development of biophysically detailed models of the electrophysiology (EP) of cardiac cells, but one aspect which is inadequately addressed is the incorporation of uncertainty and physiological variability. Uncertainty quantification (UQ) is the identification and characterisation of the uncertainty in model parameters derived from experimental data, and the computation of the resultant uncertainty in model outputs. It is a necessary tool for establishing the credibility of computational models, and will likely be expected of EP models for future safety-critical clinical applications. The focus of this paper is formal UQ of one major sub-component of cardiac EP models, the steady-state inactivation of the fast sodium current, INa. To better capture average behaviour and quantify variability across cells, we have applied for the first time an 'individual-based' statistical methodology to assess voltage clamp data. Advantages of this approach over a more traditional 'population-averaged' approach are highlighted. The method was used to characterise variability amongst cells isolated from canine epi and endocardium, and this variability was then 'propagated forward' through a canine model to determine the resultant uncertainty in model predictions at different scales, such as of upstroke velocity and spiral wave dynamics. Statistically significant differences between epi and endocardial cells (greater half-inactivation and less steep slope of steady state inactivation curve for endo) was observed, and the forward propagation revealed a lack of robustness of the model to underlying variability, but also surprising robustness to variability at the tissue scale. Overall, the methodology can be used to: (i) better analyse voltage clamp data; (ii) characterise underlying population variability; (iii) investigate

  4. Characterisation of the effects of robustoxin, the lethal neurotoxin from the Sydney funnel-web spider Atrax robustus, on sodium channel activation and inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, G M; Walsh, R; Little, M J; Tyler, M I

    1998-06-01

    The present study investigates the actions of robustoxin (atracotoxin-Ar1) purified from the venom of the male Sydney funnel-web spider Atrax robustus on sodium channel gating. Using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques the study assessed the actions of robustoxin on tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) and tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion cells. Similar to the closely related funnel-web spider toxin versutoxin (delta-atracotoxin-Hv1) from Hadronyche versuta, robustoxin had no effect on TTX-R sodium currents but exerted potent effects on TTX-S sodium currents. The main action of robustoxin was a concentration-dependent slowing or removal of TTX-S sodium current inactivation. This steady-state current was maintained during long-lasting depolarisations at all test potentials. Robustoxin (30 nM) also caused a 13-mV hyperpolarising shift in the voltage midpoint of steady-state sodium channel inactivation (h infinity) leading to a reduced peak current at a holding potential of -80 mV. Moreover there was a steady-state or non-inactivating component present (18% of maximal sodium current) at prepulse potentials that normally inactivate all TTX-S sodium channels (more depolarised than -40 mV). In addition robustoxin produced a significant increase in the repriming kinetics of the sodium channel when channels returned to the resting state following activation. This increase in the rate of recovery of sodium current appears to explain the use-dependent effects on peak sodium current amplitude at high stimulation frequencies. Finally 30 nM robustoxin caused an 11-mV hyperpolarising shift in the voltage dependence of the channel but did not markedly modify tail current kinetics. These actions suggest that robustoxin inhibits conversion of the open state to the inactivated state of TTX-S sodium channels, thus allowing a fraction of the sodium current to remain at membrane potentials at which inactivation is normally complete. Given the recent

  5. Tetrodotoxin Blockade on Canine Cardiac L-Type Ca2+ Channels Depends on pH and Redox Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Bence; Komáromi, István; Kistamás, Kornél; Ruzsnavszky, Ferenc; Váczi, Krisztina; Horváth, Balázs; Magyar, János; Bányász, Tamás; Nánási, Péter P.; Szentandrássy, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is believed to be one of the most selective inhibitors of voltage-gated fast Na+ channels in excitable tissues. Recently, however, TTX has been shown to block L-type Ca2+ current (ICa) in canine cardiac cells. In the present study, the TTX-sensitivity of ICa was studied in isolated canine ventricular myocytes as a function of (1) channel phosphorylation, (2) extracellular pH and (3) the redox potential of the bathing medium using the whole cell voltage clamp technique. Fifty-five micromoles of TTX (IC50 value obtained under physiological conditions) caused 60% ± 2% inhibition of ICa in acidic (pH = 6.4), while only a 26% ± 2% block in alkaline (pH = 8.4) milieu. Similarly, the same concentration of TTX induced 62% ± 6% suppression of ICa in a reductant milieu (containing glutathione + ascorbic acid + dithiothreitol, 1 mM each), in contrast to the 31% ± 3% blockade obtained in the presence of a strong oxidant (100 μM H2O2). Phosphorylation of the channel protein (induced by 3 μM forskolin) failed to modify the inhibiting potency of TTX; an IC50 value of 50 ± 4 μM was found in forskolin. The results are in a good accordance with the predictions of our model, indicating that TTX binds, in fact, to the selectivity filter of cardiac L-type Ca channels. PMID:23771047

  6. Tetrodotoxin Blockade on Canine Cardiac L-Type Ca2+ Channels Depends on pH and Redox Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bence Hegyi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tetrodotoxin (TTX is believed to be one of the most selective inhibitors of voltage-gated fast Na+ channels in excitable tissues. Recently, however, TTX has been shown to block L-type Ca2+ current (ICa in canine cardiac cells. In the present study, the TTX-sensitivity of ICa was studied in isolated canine ventricular myocytes as a function of (1 channel phosphorylation, (2 extracellular pH and (3 the redox potential of the bathing medium using the whole cell voltage clamp technique. Fifty-five micromoles of TTX (IC50 value obtained under physiological conditions caused 60% ± 2% inhibition of ICa in acidic (pH = 6.4, while only a 26% ± 2% block in alkaline (pH = 8.4 milieu. Similarly, the same concentration of TTX induced 62% ± 6% suppression of ICa in a reductant milieu (containing glutathione + ascorbic acid + dithiothreitol, 1 mM each, in contrast to the 31% ± 3% blockade obtained in the presence of a strong oxidant (100 μM H2O2. Phosphorylation of the channel protein (induced by 3 μM forskolin failed to modify the inhibiting potency of TTX; an IC50 value of 50 ± 4 μM was found in forskolin. The results are in a good accordance with the predictions of our model, indicating that TTX binds, in fact, to the selectivity filter of cardiac L-type Ca channels.

  7. Molecular basis of the remarkable species selectivity of an insecticidal sodium channel toxin from the African spider Augacephalus ezendami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig, Volker; Ikonomopoulou, Maria; Smith, Jennifer J.; Dziemborowicz, Sławomir; Gilchrist, John; Kuhn-Nentwig, Lucia; Rezende, Fernanda Oliveira; Moreira, Luciano Andrade; Nicholson, Graham M.; Bosmans, Frank; King, Glenn F.

    2016-07-01

    The inexorable decline in the armament of registered chemical insecticides has stimulated research into environmentally-friendly alternatives. Insecticidal spider-venom peptides are promising candidates for bioinsecticide development but it is challenging to find peptides that are specific for targeted pests. In the present study, we isolated an insecticidal peptide (Ae1a) from venom of the African spider Augacephalus ezendami (family Theraphosidae). Injection of Ae1a into sheep blowflies (Lucilia cuprina) induced rapid but reversible paralysis. In striking contrast, Ae1a was lethal to closely related fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) but induced no adverse effects in the recalcitrant lepidopteran pest Helicoverpa armigera. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that Ae1a potently inhibits the voltage-gated sodium channel BgNaV1 from the German cockroach Blattella germanica by shifting the threshold for channel activation to more depolarized potentials. In contrast, Ae1a failed to significantly affect sodium currents in dorsal unpaired median neurons from the American cockroach Periplaneta americana. We show that Ae1a interacts with the domain II voltage sensor and that sensitivity to the toxin is conferred by natural sequence variations in the S1–S2 loop of domain II. The phyletic specificity of Ae1a provides crucial information for development of sodium channel insecticides that target key insect pests without harming beneficial species.

  8. Molecular basis of the remarkable species selectivity of an insecticidal sodium channel toxin from the African spider Augacephalus ezendami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig, Volker; Ikonomopoulou, Maria; Smith, Jennifer J.; Dziemborowicz, Sławomir; Gilchrist, John; Kuhn-Nentwig, Lucia; Rezende, Fernanda Oliveira; Moreira, Luciano Andrade; Nicholson, Graham M.; Bosmans, Frank; King, Glenn F.

    2016-01-01

    The inexorable decline in the armament of registered chemical insecticides has stimulated research into environmentally-friendly alternatives. Insecticidal spider-venom peptides are promising candidates for bioinsecticide development but it is challenging to find peptides that are specific for targeted pests. In the present study, we isolated an insecticidal peptide (Ae1a) from venom of the African spider Augacephalus ezendami (family Theraphosidae). Injection of Ae1a into sheep blowflies (Lucilia cuprina) induced rapid but reversible paralysis. In striking contrast, Ae1a was lethal to closely related fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) but induced no adverse effects in the recalcitrant lepidopteran pest Helicoverpa armigera. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that Ae1a potently inhibits the voltage-gated sodium channel BgNaV1 from the German cockroach Blattella germanica by shifting the threshold for channel activation to more depolarized potentials. In contrast, Ae1a failed to significantly affect sodium currents in dorsal unpaired median neurons from the American cockroach Periplaneta americana. We show that Ae1a interacts with the domain II voltage sensor and that sensitivity to the toxin is conferred by natural sequence variations in the S1–S2 loop of domain II. The phyletic specificity of Ae1a provides crucial information for development of sodium channel insecticides that target key insect pests without harming beneficial species. PMID:27383378

  9. Pharmacological kinetics of BmK AS, a sodium channel site 4-specific modulator on Nav1.3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Rui Liu; Jie Tao; Bang-Qian Dong; Gang Ding; Zhi-Jun Cheng; Hui-Qiong He; Yong-Hua Ji

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] In this study,the pharmacological kinetics of Buthus martensi Karsch (BmK) AS,a specific modulator of voltage-gated sodium channel site 4,was investigated on Nav1.3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.[Methods] Twoelectrode voltage clamp was used to record the whole-cell sodium current.[Results] The peak currents of Nav1.3 were depressed by BmK AS over a wide range of concentrations (10,100,and 500 nmol/L).Most remarkably,BmK AS at 100 nmol/L hyperpolarized the voltage-dependence and increased the voltage-sensitivity of steady-state activation/inactivation.In addition,BmK AS was capable of hyperpolarizing not only the fast inactivation but also the slow inactivation,with a greater preference for the latter.Moreover,BmK AS accelerated the time constant and increased the ratio of recovery in Nav1.3 at all concentrations.[Conclusion]This study provides direct evidence that BmK AS facilitates steady-state activation and inhibits slow inactivation by stabilizing both the closed and open states of the Nav 1.3 channel,which might Result from an integrative binding to two receptor sites on the voltage-gated sodium channels.These [Results]may shed light on therapeutics against Nav1.3-targeted pathology.

  10. Small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels regulate firing properties and excitability in parasympathetic cardiac motoneurons in the nucleus ambiguus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Min; Hatcher, Jeff T; Chen, Qin-Hui; Wurster, Robert D; Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2010-12-01

    Small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (SK) regulate action potential (AP) firing properties and excitability in many central neurons. However, the functional roles of SK channels of parasympathetic cardiac motoneurons (PCMNs) in the nucleus ambiguus have not yet been well characterized. In this study, the tracer X-rhodamine-5 (and 6)-isothiocyanate (XRITC) was injected into the pericardial sac to retrogradely label PCMNs in FVB mice at postnatal days 7-9. Two days later, XRITC-labeled PCMNs in brain stem slices were identified. With the use of whole cell current clamp, single APs and spike trains of different frequencies were evoked by current injections. We found that 1) PCMNs have two different firing patterns: the majority of PCMNs (90%) exhibited spike frequency adaptation (SFA) and the rest (10%) showed less or no adaptation; 2) application of the specific SK channel blocker apamin significantly increased spike half-width in single APs and trains and reduced the spike frequency-dependent AP broadening in trains; 3) SK channel blockade suppressed afterhyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude following single APs and trains and abolished spike-frequency dependence of AHP in trains; and 4) SK channel blockade increased the spike frequency but did not alter the pattern of SFA. Using whole cell voltage clamp, we measured outward currents and afterhyperpolarization current (I(AHP)). SK channel blockade revealed that SK-mediated outward currents had both transient and persistent components. After bath application of apamin and Ca(2+)-free solution, we found that apamin-sensitive and Ca(2+)-sensitive I(AHP) were comparable, confirming that SK channels may contribute to a major portion of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel-mediated I(AHP). These results suggest that PCMNs have SK channels that significantly regulate AP repolarization, AHP, and spike frequency but do not affect SFA. We conclude that activation of SK channels underlies one of the mechanisms for negative

  11. Differential effects of TipE and a TipE-homologous protein on modulation of gating properties of sodium channels from Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingxin Wang

    Full Text Available β subunits of mammalian sodium channels play important roles in modulating the expression and gating of mammalian sodium channels. However, there are no orthologs of β subunits in insects. Instead, an unrelated protein, TipE in Drosophila melanogaster and its orthologs in other insects, is thought to be a sodium channel auxiliary subunit. In addition, there are four TipE-homologous genes (TEH1-4 in D. melanogaster and three to four orthologs in other insect species. TipE and TEH1-3 have been shown to enhance the peak current of various insect sodium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. However, limited information is available on how these proteins modulate the gating of sodium channels, particularly sodium channel variants generated by alternative splicing and RNA editing. In this study, we compared the effects of TEH1 and TipE on the function of three Drosophila sodium channel splice variants, DmNav9-1, DmNav22, and DmNav26, in Xenopus oocytes. Both TipE and TEH1 enhanced the amplitude of sodium current and accelerated current decay of all three sodium channels tested. Strikingly, TEH1 caused hyperpolarizing shifts in the voltage-dependence of activation, fast inactivation and slow inactivation of all three variants. In contrast, TipE did not alter these gating properties except for a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation of DmNav26. Further analysis of the gating kinetics of DmNav9-1 revealed that TEH1 accelerated the entry of sodium channels into the fast inactivated state and slowed the recovery from both fast- and slow-inactivated states, thereby, enhancing both fast and slow inactivation. These results highlight the differential effects of TipE and TEH1 on the gating of insect sodium channels and suggest that TEH1 may play a broader role than TipE in regulating sodium channel function and neuronal excitability in vivo.

  12. Molecular determinants of voltage-gated sodium channel regulation by the Nedd4/Nedd4-like proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; van Bemmelen, Miguel X; Bruce, M Christine

    2004-01-01

    -ubiquitin ligases of the Nedd4 family. We recently reported that cardiac Na(v)1.5 is regulated by Nedd4-2. In this study, we further investigated the molecular determinants of regulation of Na(v) proteins. When expressed in HEK-293 cells and studied using whole cell voltage clamping, the neuronal Na(v)1.2 and Na......The voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Na(v)) form a family composed of 10 genes. The COOH termini of Na(v) contain a cluster of amino acids that are nearly identical among 7 of the 10 members. This COOH-terminal sequence, PPSYDSV, is a PY motif known to bind to WW domains of E3 protein...... that Nedd4-dependent ubiquitination of Na(v) channels may represent a general mechanism regulating the excitability of neurons and myocytes via modulation of channel density at the plasma membrane....

  13. Late Na+ current produced by human cardiac Na+ channel isoform Nav1.5 is modulated by its beta1 subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Victor A; Kyle, John W; Undrovinas, Albertas

    2009-05-01

    Experimental data accumulated over the past decade show the emerging importance of the late sodium current (I(NaL)) for the function of both normal and, especially, failing myocardium, in which I(NaL) is reportedly increased. While recent molecular studies identified the cardiac Na(+) channel (NaCh) alpha subunit isoform (Na(v)1.5) as a major contributor to I (NaL), the molecular mechanisms underlying alterations of I(NaL) in heart failure (HF) are still unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that I(NaL) is modulated by the NaCh auxiliary beta subunits. tsA201 cells were transfected simultaneously with human Na(v)1.5 (former hH1a) and cardiac beta(1) or beta(2) subunits, and whole-cell patch-clamp experiments were performed. We found that I(NaL) decay kinetics were significantly slower in cells expressing alpha + beta(1) (time constant tau = 0.73 +/- 0.16 s, n = 14, mean +/- SEM, P < 0.05) but remained unchanged in cells expressing alpha + beta(2) (tau = 0.52 +/- 0.09 s, n = 5), compared with cells expressing Na(v)1.5 alone (tau = 0.54 +/- 0.09 s, n = 20). Also, beta(1), but not beta(2), dramatically increased I(NaL) relative to the maximum peak current, I(NaT) (2.3 +/- 0.48%, n = 14 vs. 0.48 +/- 0.07%, n = 6, P < 0.05, respectively) and produced a rightward shift of the steady-state availability curve. We conclude that the auxiliary beta(1) subunit modulates I(NaL), produced by the human cardiac Na(+) channel Na(v)1.5 by slowing its decay and increasing I(NaL) amplitude relative to I(NaT). Because expression of Na(v)1.5 reportedly decreases but beta(1) remains unchanged in chronic HF, the relatively higher expression of beta(1) may contribute to the known I(NaL) increase in HF via the modulation mechanism found in this study.

  14. Calmodulin is essential for cardiac IKS channel gating and assembly: impaired function in long-QT mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shamgar, Liora; Ma, Lijuan; Schmitt, Nicole;

    2006-01-01

    The slow IKS K+ channel plays a major role in repolarizing the cardiac action potential and consists of the assembly of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 subunits. Mutations in either KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes produce the long-QT syndrome, a life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia. Here, we show that long-QT mutations...... located in the KCNQ1 C terminus impair calmodulin (CaM) binding, which affects both channel gating and assembly. The mutations produce a voltage-dependent macroscopic inactivation and dramatically alter channel assembly. KCNE1 forms a ternary complex with wild-type KCNQ1 and Ca(2+)-CaM that prevents...... the risk of ventricular arrhythmias. Udgivelsesdato: 2006-Apr-28...

  15. Effect of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide combined with sodium nitroprusside therapy on hemodynamics and cardiac in patients with acute decompensated heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao-Li Xing; Xian-Hong Ma; Lu Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effect of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide combined with sodium nitroprusside therapy on hemodynamics and cardiac function levels in patients with acute decompensated heart failure.Methods:A total of 118 patients with acute decompensated heart failure were randomly divided into observation group and the control group (n=59). Control group received clinical conventional therapy for heart failure, observation group received recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide combined with sodium nitroprusside therapy, and the differences in hemodynamics, cardiac function and circulation factor levels were compared between two groups after 12 hours of treatment. Results: After 12 hours of treatment, central venous pressure, right atrial pressure and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure values as well as circulating blood IL-6, hsCRP, ST2, NT-proBNP and cTnⅠlevels of observation group were lower than those of control group, and left heart GLS, GCS, GSRs, GSRe, GSRa, ROT and ROTR levels were higher than those of control group (P<0.05).Conclusions:Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide combined with sodium nitroprusside therapy for patients with acute decompensated heart failure has significant advantages in optimizing hemodynamics, cardiac function and other aspects.

  16. A new classifier-based strategy for in-silico ion-channel cardiac drug safety assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh eMistry

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is currently a strong interest in using high-throughput in-vitro ion-channel screening data to make predictions regarding the cardiac toxicity potential of a new compound in both animal and human studies. A recent FDA think tank encourages the use of biophysical mathematical models of cardiac myocytes for this prediction task. However, it remains unclear whether this approach is the most appropriate. Here we examine five literature data-sets that have been used to support the use of four different biophysical models and one statistical model for predicting cardiac toxicity in numerous species using various endpoints. We propose a simple model that represents the balance between repolarisation and depolarisation forces and compare the predictive power of the model against the original results (leave-one-out cross-validation. Our model showed equivalent performance when compared to the four biophysical models and one statistical model. We therefore conclude that this approach should be further investigated in the context of early cardiac safety screening when in-vitro potency data is generated.

  17. A distinct sodium channel voltage-sensor locus determines insect selectivity of the spider toxin Dc1a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bende, Niraj S.; Dziemborowicz, Sławomir; Mobli, Mehdi; Herzig, Volker; Gilchrist, John; Wagner, Jordan; Nicholson, Graham M.; King, Glenn F.; Bosmans, Frank

    2014-07-01

    β-Diguetoxin-Dc1a (Dc1a) is a toxin from the desert bush spider Diguetia canities that incapacitates insects at concentrations that are non-toxic to mammals. Dc1a promotes opening of German cockroach voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels (BgNav1), whereas human Nav channels are insensitive. Here, by transplanting commonly targeted S3b-S4 paddle motifs within BgNav1 voltage sensors into Kv2.1, we find that Dc1a interacts with the domain II voltage sensor. In contrast, Dc1a has little effect on sodium currents mediated by PaNav1 channels from the American cockroach even though their domain II paddle motifs are identical. When exploring regions responsible for PaNav1 resistance to Dc1a, we identified two residues within the BgNav1 domain II S1-S2 loop that when mutated to their PaNav1 counterparts drastically reduce toxin susceptibility. Overall, our results reveal a distinct region within insect Nav channels that helps determine Dc1a sensitivity, a concept that will be valuable for the design of insect-selective insecticides.

  18. Sodium channel genes and the evolution of diversity in communication signals of electric fishes: convergent molecular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakon, Harold H; Lu, Ying; Zwickl, Derrick J; Hillis, David M

    2006-03-07

    We investigated whether the evolution of electric organs and electric signal diversity in two independently evolved lineages of electric fishes was accompanied by convergent changes on the molecular level. We found that a sodium channel gene (Na(v)1.4a) that is expressed in muscle in nonelectric fishes has lost its expression in muscle and is expressed instead in the evolutionarily novel electric organ in both lineages of electric fishes. This gene appears to be evolving under positive selection in both lineages, facilitated by its restricted expression in the electric organ. This view is reinforced by the lack of evidence for selection on this gene in one electric species in which expression of this gene is retained in muscle. Amino acid replacements occur convergently in domains that influence channel inactivation, a key trait for shaping electric communication signals. Some amino acid replacements occur at or adjacent to sites at which disease-causing mutations have been mapped in human sodium channel genes, emphasizing that these replacements occur in functionally important domains. Selection appears to have acted on the final step in channel inactivation, but complementarily on the inactivation "ball" in one lineage, and its receptor site in the other lineage. Thus, changes in the expression and sequence of the same gene are associated with the independent evolution of signal complexity.

  19. Voltage-gated ion channel dysfunction precedes cardiomyopathy development in the dystrophic heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xaver Koenig

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, is associated with severe cardiac complications including cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrhythmias. Recent research suggests that impaired voltage-gated ion channels in dystrophic cardiomyocytes accompany cardiac pathology. It is, however, unknown if the ion channel defects are primary effects of dystrophic gene mutations, or secondary effects of the developing cardiac pathology.To address this question, we first investigated sodium channel impairments in cardiomyocytes derived from dystrophic neonatal mice prior to cardiomyopahty development, by using the whole cell patch clamp technique. Besides the most common model for DMD, the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse, we also used mice additionally carrying an utrophin mutation. In neonatal cardiomyocytes, dystrophin-deficiency generated a 25% reduction in sodium current density. In addition, extra utrophin-deficiency significantly altered sodium channel gating parameters. Moreover, also calcium channel inactivation was considerably reduced in dystrophic neonatal cardiomyocytes, suggesting that ion channel abnormalities are universal primary effects of dystrophic gene mutations. To assess developmental changes, we also studied sodium channel impairments in cardiomyocytes derived from dystrophic adult mice, and compared them with the respective abnormalities in dystrophic neonatal cells. Here, we found a much stronger sodium current reduction in adult cardiomyocytes. The described sodium channel impairments slowed the upstroke of the action potential in adult cardiomyocytes, and only in dystrophic adult mice, the QRS interval of the electrocardiogram was prolonged.Ion channel impairments precede pathology development in the dystrophic heart, and may thus be considered potential cardiomyopathy triggers.

  20. Sodium channel cleavage is associated with aberrant neuronal activity and cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Brian F; Leiser, Steven C; Ling, Huai-Ping; Nagy, Reka; Breysse, Nathalie; Zhang, Xiaohong; Hazra, Anupam; Brown, Jon T; Randall, Andrew D; Wood, Andrew; Pangalos, Menelas N; Reinhart, Peter H; Chin, Jeannie

    2013-04-17

    BACE1 is the rate-limiting enzyme that cleaves amyloid precursor protein (APP) to produce the amyloid β peptides that accumulate in Alzheimer's disease (AD). BACE1, which is elevated in AD patients and APP transgenic mice, also cleaves the β2-subunit of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navβ2). Although increased BACE1 levels are associated with Navβ2 cleavage in AD patients, whether Navβ2 cleavage occurs in APP mice had not yet been examined. Such a finding would be of interest because of its potential impact on neuronal activity: previous studies demonstrated that BACE1-overexpressing mice exhibit excessive cleavage of Navβ2 and reduced sodium current density, but the phenotype associated with loss of function mutations in either Navβ-subunits or pore-forming α-subunits is epilepsy. Because mounting evidence suggests that epileptiform activity may play an important role in the development of AD-related cognitive deficits, we examined whether enhanced cleavage of Navβ2 occurs in APP transgenic mice, and whether it is associated with aberrant neuronal activity and cognitive deficits. We found increased levels of BACE1 expression and Navβ2 cleavage fragments in cortical lysates from APP transgenic mice, as well as associated alterations in Nav1.1α expression and localization. Both pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons exhibited evidence of increased Navβ2 cleavage. Moreover, the magnitude of alterations in sodium channel subunits was associated with aberrant EEG activity and impairments in the Morris water maze. Together, these results suggest that altered processing of voltage-gated sodium channels may contribute to aberrant neuronal activity and cognitive deficits in AD.

  1. Tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels in sensory neurons generate slow resurgent currents that are enhanced by inflammatory mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhi-Yong; Piekarz, Andrew D; Priest, Birgit T; Knopp, Kelly L; Krajewski, Jeffrey L; McDermott, Jeff S; Nisenbaum, Eric S; Cummins, Theodore R

    2014-05-21

    Resurgent sodium currents contribute to the regeneration of action potentials and enhanced neuronal excitability. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) resurgent currents have been described in many different neuron populations, including cerebellar and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. In most cases, sodium channel Nav1.6 is the major contributor to these TTX-S resurgent currents. Here we report a novel TTX-resistant (TTX-R) resurgent current recorded from rat DRG neurons. The TTX-R resurgent currents are similar to classic TTX-S resurgent currents in many respects, but not all. As with TTX-S resurgent currents, they are activated by membrane repolarization, inhibited by lidocaine, and enhanced by a peptide-mimetic of the β4 sodium channel subunit intracellular domain. However, the TTX-R resurgent currents exhibit much slower kinetics, occur at more depolarized voltages, and are sensitive to the Nav1.8 blocker A803467. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation experiments from rat DRG lysates indicate the endogenous sodium channel β4 subunits associate with Nav1.8 in DRG neurons. These results suggest that slow TTX-R resurgent currents in DRG neurons are mediated by Nav1.8 and are generated by the same mechanism underlying TTX-S resurgent currents. We also show that both TTX-S and TTX-R resurgent currents in DRG neurons are enhanced by inflammatory mediators. Furthermore, the β4 peptide increased excitability of small DRG neurons in the presence of TTX. We propose that these slow TTX-R resurgent currents contribute to the membrane excitability of nociceptive DRG neurons under normal conditions and that enhancement of both types of resurgent currents by inflammatory mediators could contribute to sensory neuronal hyperexcitability associated with inflammatory pain.

  2. Quantum entanglement in the voltage dependent sodium channel can reproduce the salient features of neuronal action potential initiation

    CERN Document Server

    Summhammer, Johann

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the effects of a quantum entanglement regime within an ion conducting molecule (ion channel) of the neuronal plasma membrane on the onset dynamics of propagating nerve pulses (action potentials). In particular, we model the onset parameters of the sodium current in the Hodgkin Huxley equation as three similar but independent probabilistic mechanisms which become quantum entangled. The underlying physics is general and can involve entanglement between various degrees of freedom underlaying ion transition states or 'gating states' during conduction, e.g. Na$^+$ ions in different channel locations, or different 'affinity' states of ions with atoms lining the sub-regions of the channel protein ('filter-states'). We find that the 'quantum corrected' Hodgkin Huxley equation incorporating entangled systems states can reproduce action potential pulses with the critical onset dynamics observed recently in neocortical neurons in vivo by Naundorf et al. [Nature {\\bf 440}, 1060 (20 April 2006)]. Interestin...

  3. Sodium Channel Gene Mutations in Children with GEFS+ and Dravet Syndrome: A Cross Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan TONEKABONI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available  How to Cite This Article: Tonekaboni SH, Ebrahimi A, Bakhshandeh Bali MK, Houshmand M, Moghaddasi M, Taghdiri MM, Nasehi MM. Sodium Channel Gene Mutations in Children with GEFS+ and Dravet Syndrome: A Cross Sectional Study. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Winter; 7 (1:25-29. Objective Dravet syndrome or severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI is a baleful epileptic encephalopathy that begins in the first year of life. This syndrome specified by febrile seizures followed by intractable epilepsy, disturbed psychomotor development, and ataxia. Clinical similarities between Dravet syndrome and generalized epilepsy with febrile seizure plus (GEFS+ includes occurrence of febrile seizures and joint molecular genetic etiology. Shared features of these two diseases support the idea that these two disorders represent a severity spectrum of the same illness. Nowadays, more than 60 heterozygous pattern SCN1A mutations, which many are de novo mutations, have been detected in Dravet syndrome. Materials & Methods From May 2008 to August 2012, 35 patients who referred to Pediatric Neurology Clinic of Mofid Children Hospital in Tehran were enrolled in this study. Entrance criterion of this study was having equal or more than four criteria for Dravet syndrome. We compared clinical features and genetic findings of the patients diagnosed as Dravet syndrome or GEFS+. Results 35 patients (15 girls and 20 boys underwent genetic testing. Mean age of them was 7.7 years (a range of 13 months to 15 years. Three criteria that were best evident in SCN1A mutation positive patients are as follows: Normal development before the onset of seizures, onset of seizure before age of one year, and psychomotor retardation after onset of seizures. Our genetic testing showed that 1 of 3 (33.3% patients with clinical Dravet syndrome and 3 of 20 (15% patients that diagnosed as GEFS+, had SCN1A mutation. Conclusion In this study, normal development before seizure onset, seizures beginning

  4. Aberrant Splicing Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of L-type Ca v 1.2 Calcium Channels by Competitive Binding for CaV β Subunits in Cardiac Hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Zhenyu; Wang, Jiong Wei; Yu, Dejie; Soon, Jia Lin; De Kleijn, Dominique P V; Foo, Roger; Liao, Ping; Colecraft, Henry M.; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2016-01-01

    Decreased expression and activity of Ca V1.2 calcium channels has been reported in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here we identified in rodents a splice variant of Ca V1.2 channel, named Ca V1.2 e21+22, that contain

  5. Tolperisone-type drugs inhibit spinal reflexes via blockade of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, Pál; Farkas, Sándor; Fodor, László; Bielik, Norbert; Thán, Márta; Kolok, Sándor; Gere, Anikó; Csejtei, Mónika; Tarnawa, István

    2005-12-01

    The spinal reflex depressant mechanism of tolperisone and some of its structural analogs with central muscle relaxant action was investigated. Tolperisone (50-400 microM), eperisone, lanperisone, inaperisone, and silperisone (25-200 microM) dose dependently depressed the ventral root potential of isolated hemisected spinal cord of 6-day-old rats. The local anesthetic lidocaine (100-800 microM) produced qualitatively similar depression of spinal functions in the hemicord preparation, whereas its blocking effect on afferent nerve conduction was clearly stronger. In vivo, tolperisone and silperisone as well as lidocaine (10 mg/kg intravenously) depressed ventral root reflexes and excitability of motoneurons. However, in contrast with lidocaine, the muscle relaxant drugs seemed to have a more pronounced action on the synaptic responses than on the excitability of motoneurons. Whole-cell measurements in dorsal root ganglion cells revealed that tolperisone and silperisone depressed voltage-gated sodium channel conductance at concentrations that inhibited spinal reflexes. Results obtained with tolperisone and its analogs in the [3H]batrachotoxinin A 20-alpha-benzoate binding in cortical neurons and in a fluorimetric membrane potential assay in cerebellar neurons further supported the view that blockade of sodium channels may be a major component of the action of tolperisone-type centrally acting muscle relaxant drugs. Furthermore, tolperisone, eperisone, and especially silperisone had a marked effect on voltage-gated calcium channels, whereas calcium currents were hardly influenced by lidocaine. These data suggest that tolperisone-type muscle relaxants exert their spinal reflex inhibitory action predominantly via a presynaptic inhibition of the transmitter release from the primary afferent endings via a combined action on voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels.

  6. Lacosamide Inhibition of Nav1.7 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Slow Binding to Fast-Inactivated States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sooyeon; Bean, Bruce P

    2017-04-01

    Lacosamide is an antiseizure agent that targets voltage-dependent sodium channels. Previous experiments have suggested that lacosamide is unusual in binding selectively to the slow-inactivated state of sodium channels, in contrast to drugs like carbamazepine and phenytoin, which bind tightly to fast-inactivated states. Using heterologously expressed human Nav1.7 sodium channels, we examined the state-dependent effects of lacosamide. Lacosamide induced a reversible shift in the voltage dependence of fast inactivation studied with 100-millisecond prepulses, suggesting binding to fast-inactivated states. Using steady holding potentials, lacosamide block was very weak at -120 mV (3% inhibition by 100 µM lacosamide) but greatly enhanced at -80 mV (43% inhibition by 100 µM lacosamide), where there is partial fast inactivation but little or no slow inactivation. During long depolarizations, lacosamide slowly (over seconds) put channels into states that recovered availability slowly (hundreds of milliseconds) at -120 mV. This resembles enhancement of slow inactivation, but the effect was much more pronounced at -40 mV, where fast inactivation is complete, but slow inactivation is not, than at 0 mV, where slow inactivation is maximal, more consistent with slow binding to fast-inactivated states than selective binding to slow-inactivated states. Furthermore, inhibition by lacosamide was greatly reduced by pretreatment with 300 µM lidocaine or 300 µM carbamazepine, suggesting that lacosamide, lidocaine, and carbamazepine all bind to the same site. The results suggest that lacosamide binds to fast-inactivated states in a manner similar to other antiseizure agents but with slower kinetics of binding and unbinding.

  7. Methylene blue counteracts H2S toxicity-induced cardiac depression by restoring L-type Ca channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judenherc-Haouzi, Annick; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Sonobe, Takashi; Song, Jianliang; Rannals, Matthew D; Wang, JuFang; Tubbs, Nicole; Cheung, Joseph Y; Haouzi, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    We have previously reported that methylene blue (MB) can counteract hydrogen sulfide (H2S) intoxication-induced circulatory failure. Because of the multifarious effects of high concentrations of H2S on cardiac function, as well as the numerous properties of MB, the nature of this interaction, if any, remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to clarify 1) the effects of MB on H2S-induced cardiac toxicity and 2) whether L-type Ca(2+) channels, one of the targets of H2S, could transduce some of the counteracting effects of MB. In sedated rats, H2S infused at a rate that would be lethal within 5 min (24 μM·kg(-1)·min(-1)), produced a rapid fall in left ventricle ejection fraction, determined by echocardiography, leading to a pulseless electrical activity. Blood concentrations of gaseous H2S reached 7.09 ± 3.53 μM when cardiac contractility started to decrease. Two to three injections of MB (4 mg/kg) transiently restored cardiac contractility, blood pressure, and V̇o2, allowing the animals to stay alive until the end of H2S infusion. MB also delayed PEA by several minutes following H2S-induced coma and shock in unsedated rats. Applying a solution containing lethal levels of H2S (100 μM) on isolated mouse cardiomyocytes significantly reduced cell contractility, intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) transient amplitudes, and L-type Ca(2+) currents (ICa) within 3 min of exposure. MB (20 mg/l) restored the cardiomyocyte function, ([Ca(2+)]i) transient, and ICa The present results offer a new approach for counteracting H2S toxicity and potentially other conditions associated with acute inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels.

  8. Kif5b is an essential forward trafficking motor for the Kv1.5 cardiac potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadeh, Alireza Dehghani; Cheng, Yvonne; Xu, Hongjian; Wong, Nathan; Wang, Zhuren; Goonasekara, Charitha; Steele, David F; Fedida, David

    2009-10-01

    We have investigated the role of the kinesin I isoform Kif5b in the trafficking of a cardiac voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv1.5. In Kv1.5-expressing HEK293 cells and H9c2 cardiomyoblasts, current densities were increased from control levels of 389 +/- 50.0 and 317 +/- 50.3 pA pF(1), respectively, to 614 +/- 74.3 and 580 +/- 90.9 pA pF(1) in cells overexpressing the Kif5b motor. Overexpression of the Kif5b motor increased Kv1.5 expression additively with several manipulations that reduce channel internalization, suggesting that it is involved in the delivery of the channel to the cell surface. In contrast, expression of a Kif5b dominant negative (Kif5bDN) construct increased Kv1.5 expression non-additively with these manipulations. Thus, the dominant negative acts by indirectly inhibiting endocytosis. The increase in Kv1.5 currents induced by wild-type Kif5b was dependent on Golgi function; a 6 h treatment with Brefeldin A reduced Kv1.5 currents to control levels in Kif5b-overexpressing cells but had little effect on the increase associated with Kif5bDN expression. Finally, expression of the Kif5bDN prior to induction of Kv1.5 in a tetracycline inducible system blocked surface expression of the channel in both HEK293 cells and H9c2 cardiomyoblasts. Thus, Kif5b is essential to anterograde trafficking of a cardiac voltage-gated potassium channel.

  9. State-dependent block of rat Nav1.4 sodium channels expressed in xenopus oocytes by pyrazoline-type insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Kristopher; Soderlund, David M

    2005-06-01

    Insecticidal pyrazolines inhibit voltage-sensitive sodium channels of both insect and mammalian neurons in a voltage-dependent manner. Studies on the effects of pyrazoline insecticides on mammalian sodium channels have been limited to experimentation on the tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) and tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channel populations of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. In this study, we examined the effects of the insecticidal pyrazolines indoxacarb, the N-decarbomethoxyllated metabolite of indoxacarb (DCJW), and RH 3421 on rat Na(v)1.4 sodium channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Both DCJW and RH 3421 were ineffective inhibitors of rat Na(v)1.4 sodium channels at a membrane potential of -120 mV, but depolarization to -60 mV or -30 mV during insecticide exposure resulted in substantial block. Inhibition by pyrazoline insecticides was nearly irreversible with washout, but repolarization of the membrane relieved block. DCJW and RH 3421 also caused hyperpolarizing shifts in the voltage dependence of slow inactivation without affecting the voltage dependence of activation or fast inactivation. These results suggest that DCJW and RH 3421 interact specifically with the slow inactivated state of the sodium channel. Indoxacarb did not cause block at any potential, yet it interfered with the ability of DCJW, but not RH 3421, to inhibit sodium current. Phenytoin, an anticonvulsant, reduced the efficacy of both DCJW and RH 3421. These data imply that the binding site for pyrazoline insecticides overlaps with that for therapeutic sodium channel blockers.

  10. Treatment of cardiac arrhythmias in a mouse model of Rett syndrome with Na+-channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, José A; Ward, Christopher S; Pitcher, Meagan R; Percy, Alan K; Skinner, Steven; Kaufmann, Walter E; Glaze, Daniel G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Neul, Jeffrey L

    2015-04-01

    One quarter of deaths associated with Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder, are sudden and unexpected. RTT is associated with prolonged QTc interval (LQT), and LQT-associated cardiac arrhythmias are a potential cause of unexpected death. The standard of care for LQT in RTT is treatment with β-adrenergic antagonists; however, recent work indicates that acute treatment of mice with RTT with a β-antagonist, propranolol, does not prevent lethal arrhythmias. In contrast, acute treatment with the Na(+) channel blocker phenytoin prevented arrhythmias. Chronic dosing of propranolol may be required for efficacy; therefore, we tested the efficacy of chronic treatment with either propranolol or phenytoin on RTT mice. Phenytoin completely abolished arrhythmias, whereas propranolol showed no benefit. Surprisingly, phenytoin also normalized weight and activity, but worsened breathing patterns. To explore the role of Na(+) channel blockers on QT in people with RTT, we performed a retrospective analysis of QT status before and after Na(+) channel blocker antiepileptic therapies. Individuals with RTT and LQT significantly improved their QT interval status after being started on Na(+) channel blocker antiepileptic therapies. Thus, Na(+) channel blockers should be considered for the clinical management of LQT in individuals with RTT.

  11. Post-translational modifications of voltage-gated sodium channels in chronic pain syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric James Laedermann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the peripheral sensory nervous system the neuronal expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs is a very important for the transmission of nociceptive information since they give rise to the upstroke of the action potential. Navs are composed of 9 different isoforms with distinct biophysical properties. Studying the mutations associated with the increase or absence of pain sensitivity in humans, as well as other expression studies, have highlighted Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 as being the most important contributors to the control of nociceptive neuronal electrogenesis. Modulating their expression and/or function can impact the shape of the action potential and consequently modify pain transmission, a process that is observed in persistent pain conditions.Post-translational modification (PTM of Navs is a well-known process that modifies their expression and function. In chronic pain syndromes, the release of inflammatory molecules into the direct environment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG sensory neurons leads to an abnormal activation of enzymes that induce Navs PTM. The addition of small molecules, i.e. peptides, phosphoryl groups, ubiquitin moieties and/or carbohydrates, can modify the function of Navs in two different ways: via direct physical interference with the subunit of Nav gating, or via the control of Nav trafficking. Both mechanisms have a profound impact on neuronal excitability. In this review we will discuss the role of Protein Kinase A, B and C, Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases and Ca++/Calmodulin-dependent Kinase II in peripheral chronic pain syndromes. We will also discuss more recent findings that the ubiquitination of Nav1.7 by Nedd4-2 and the effect of methylglyoxal on Nav1.8 are also implicated in the development of experimental neuropathic pain. We will address the potential roles of other PTMs in chronic pain and highlight the need for further investigation of PTMs of Navs in order to develop new pharmacological

  12. Conducting and voltage-dependent behaviors of potassium ion channels reconstituted from diaphragm sarcoplasmic reticulum: comparison with the cardiac isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picher, M; Decrouy, A; Rousseau, E

    1996-02-21

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) K+ channels from canine diaphragm were studied upon fusion of longitudinal and junctional membrane vesicles into planar lipid bilayers (PLB). The large-conductance cation selective channel (gamma(max) = 250 pS; Km = 33 mM) displays long-lasting open events which are much more frequent at positive than at negative voltages. A major subconducting state about 45% of the fully-open state current amplitude was occasionally observed at all voltages. The voltage-dependence of the open probability displays a sigmoid relationship that was fitted by the Boltzmann equation and expressed in terms of thermodynamic parameters, namely the free energy (delta Gi) and the effective gating charge (Zs): delta Gi = 0.27 kcal/mol and Zs = -1.19 in 250 mM potassium gluconate (K-gluconate). Kinetic analyses also confirmed the voltage-dependent gating behavior of this channel, and indicate the implication of at least two open and three closed states. The diaphragm SR K+ channel shares several biophysical properties with the cardiac isoform: g = 180 pS, delta Gi = 0.75 kcal/mol, Zs = -1.45 in 150 mM K-gluconate, and a similar sigmoid P(o)/voltage relationship. Little is known about the regulation of the diaphragm and cardiac SR K+ channels. The conductance and gating of these channels were not influenced by physiological concentrations of Ca2+ (0.1 microM-1 mM) or Mg2+ (0.25-1 mM), as well as by cGMP (25-100 microM), lemakalim (1-100 microM), glyburide (up to 10 microM) or charybdotoxin (45-200 nM), added either to the cis or to the trans chamber. The apparent lack of biochemical or pharmacological modulation of these channels implies that they are not related to any of the well characterized surface membrane K+ channels. On the other hand, their voltage sensitivity strongly suggests that their activity could be modulated by putative changes in SR membrane potential that might occur during calcium fluxes.

  13. RNAi-mediated knockdown of the voltage gated sodium ion channel TcNav causes mortality in Tribolium castaneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Halim, Hesham M.; Alshukri, Baida M. H.; Ahmad, Munawar S.; Nakasu, Erich Y. T.; Awwad, Mohammed H.; Salama, Elham M.; Gatehouse, Angharad M. R.; Edwards, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium ion channel (VGSC) belongs to the largest superfamily of ion channels. Since VGSCs play key roles in physiological processes they are major targets for effective insecticides. RNA interference (RNAi) is widely used to analyse gene function, but recently, it has shown potential to contribute to novel strategies for selectively controlling agricultural insect pests. The current study evaluates the delivery of dsRNA targeted to the sodium ion channel paralytic A (TcNav) gene in Tribolium castaneum as a viable means of controlling this insect pest. Delivery of TcNav dsRNA caused severe developmental arrest with larval mortalities up to 73% post injection of dsRNA. Injected larvae showed significant (p < 0.05) knockdown in gene expression between 30–60%. Expression was also significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in pupae following injection causing 30% and 42% knockdown for early and late pupal stages, respectively. Oral delivery of dsRNA caused dose-dependant mortalities of between 19 and 51.34%; this was accompanied by significant (p < 0.05) knockdown in gene expression following 3 days of continuous feeding. The majority of larvae injected with, or fed, dsRNA died during the final larval stage prior to pupation. This work provides evidence of a viable RNAi-based strategy for insect control. PMID:27411529

  14. Pertussis toxin modulation of sodium channels in the central neurons of cyhalothrin-resistant and cyhalothrin-susceptible cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANG ZHAO; DE-LING KONG; BING-JUN HE; YAN-QIANG LIU; XIAN-LIN FAN; AN-XI LIU

    2007-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PTX) inhibits the activation of the α-subunit of the inhibitory heterotrimeric G-proteins (Gαi/o) and modulates voltage-gated sodium channels, which may be one of the primary targets of pyrethroids. To investigate the potential mechanisms of agricultural pests resistance to pyrethroid insecticides, we examined the modulations by PTX on sodium channels in the central neurons of the 3rd-4th instar larvae of cyhalothrin-resistant (Cy-R) and cyhalothrin-susceptible (Cy-S) Helicoverpa armigera by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique.The isolated neurons were cultured for 12-16 h in an improved L15 insect culture medium with or without PTX (400 ng/mL). The results showed that both the Cy-R and Cy-S sodium channels exhibited fast kinetics and tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitivity. The Cy-R sodium channels exhibited not only altered gating properties, including a 8.88-mV right shift in voltage-dependent activation (V0.5act) and a 6.54-mV right shift in voltage-dependent inactivation (V0.5inact), but also a reduced peak in sodium channel density (Idensity) (55.2% of that in Cy-S neurons). Cy-R sodium channels also showed low excitability, as evidenced by right shift of activation potential (Vacti) by 5-10 mV and peak potential (Vpeak) by 20 mV. PTX exerted significant effects on Cy-S sodium channels,reducing sodium channel density by 70.04%, right shifting V0.5act by 14.41 mV and V0.5inact by 9.38 mV. It did not cause any significant changes of the parameters mentioned above in the Cy-R sodium channels. The activation time (Tpeak) from latency to peak at peak voltage and the fast inactivation time constant (τinact) in both Cy-S and Cy-R neurons were not affected. The results suggest that cotton bollworm resistant to pyrethroid insecticides involves not only mutations and allosteric alterations of voltage-gated sodium channels, but also might implicate perturbation of PTX-sensitive Gαi/o-coupled signaling transduction pathways.

  15. Structural basis of slow activation gating in the cardiac IKs channel complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strutz-Seebohm, Nathalie; Pusch, Michael; Wolf, Steffen;

    2011-01-01

    Accessory ß-subunits of the KCNE gene family modulate the function of various cation channel a-subunits by the formation of heteromultimers. Among the most dramatic changes of biophysical properties of a voltage-gated channel by KCNEs are the effects of KCNE1 on KCNQ1 channels. KCNQ1 and KCNE1 ar...

  16. Roles of store-operated Ca2+ channels in regulating cell cycling and migration of human cardiac c-kit+ progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Hui; Li, Gang; Sun, Hai-Ying; Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Yan; Li, Gui-Rong

    2015-11-15

    Cardiac c-kit(+) progenitor cells are important for maintaining cardiac homeostasis and can potentially contribute to myocardial repair. However, cellular physiology of human cardiac c-kit(+) progenitor cells is not well understood. The present study investigates the functional store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) channels and the potential role in regulating cell cycling and migration using confocal microscopy, RT-PCR, Western blot, coimmunoprecipitation, cell proliferation, and migration assays. We found that SOCE channels mediated Ca(2+) influx, and TRPC1, STIM1, and Orai1 were involved in the formation of SOCE channels in human cardiac c-kit(+) progenitor cells. Silencing TRPC1, STIM1, or Orai1 with the corresponding siRNA significantly reduced the Ca(2+) signaling through SOCE channels, decreased cell proliferation and migration, and reduced expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, and/or p-Akt. Our results demonstrate the novel information that Ca(2+) signaling through SOCE channels regulates cell cycling and migration via activating cyclin D1, cyclin E, and/or p-Akt in human cardiac c-kit(+) cells.

  17. [Development of multi-channels cardiac electrophysiological polygraph with LabVIEW as software platform and its clinical application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shounian; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Chenxi; Yang, Tianhe; Zhang, Chengyun; Liu, Junshi; Wu, Qiang; Zheng, Yaxi; Liu, Xiaoqiao

    2004-10-01

    Polygraph has become a necessary instrument in interventional cardiology and fundamental research of medicine up to the present. In this study, a LabView development system (DS) (developed by NI in U.S.) used as software platform, a DAQ data acquisition module and universal computer used as hardware platform, were creatively coupled with our self-made low noise multi-channels preamplifier to develop Multi-channels electrocardiograph. The device possessed the functions such as real time display of physiological process, digit highpass and lowpass, 50Hz filtered and gain adjustment, instant storing, random playback and printing, and process control stimulation. Besides, it was small-sized, economically practical and easy to operate. It could advance the spread of cardiac intervention treatment in hospitals.

  18. Expression of AmphiNaC, a new member of the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel related to degenerins and epithelial sodium channels in amphioxus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Degenerins and amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels form a new family of cationic ion channels (DEG/NaC. DEG/NaC family emerged as common denominator within a metazoan mechanosensory apparatus. In this study, we characterized a new member of such family in amphioxus, Branchiostoma floridae. The AmphiNaC cDNA sequence encodes a protein showing amino acid residues characteristic of DEG/NaC family, such as two hydrophobic domains surrounding a large extracellular loop that includes cystein-rich domains; nevertheless its predicted sequence is quite divergent from other family members. AmphiNaC is expressed at early larval stage in some putative sensory epidermal cells in the middle of the body and in neurons of the posterior cerebral vesicle, as well as in some ventrolateral and mediolateral neurons of the neural tube. In late larvae, AmphiNaC expression is maintained in some neurons of the neural tube, and it is expressed in putative sensory epidermal cells of rostrum and mouth. The analysis of AmphiNaC gene expression pattern suggests that it might be involved in neurotransmission and sensory modulation.

  19. Motor disturbances in mice with deficiency of the sodium channel gene Scn8a show features of human dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Melanie; Meisler, Miriam H; Richter, Angelika

    2003-12-01

    The med(J) mouse with twisting movements related to deficiency of the sodium channel Scn8a has been proposed as a model of kinesiogenic dystonia. This prompted us to examine the phenotype of these mice in more detail. By cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings, we could not detect any changes, demonstrating that the motor disturbances are not epileptic in nature, an important similarity to human dystonia. The significantly decreased body weight of med(J) mice was related to reduced food intake. Observations in the open field and by video recordings revealed that the mice exhibit sustained abnormal postures and movements of limbs, trunk and tail not only during locomotor activity but also at rest. With the exception of the head tremor, the other motor impairments were persistent rather than paroxysmal. When several neurological reflexes were tested, alterations were restricted to the posture and righting reflexes. Results of the wire hang test confirmed the greatly reduced muscle strength in the med(J) mouse. In agreement with different types of human dystonia, biperiden, haloperidol and diazepam moderately reduced the severity of motor disturbances in med(J) mice. In view of the sodium channel deficiency in med(J) mice, the beneficial effects of the sodium channel blocker phenytoin was an unexpected finding. By immunohistochemical examinations, the density of nigral dopaminergic neurons was found to be unaltered, substantiating the absence of pathomorphological abnormalities within the brain of med(J) mice shown by previous studies. With the exception of muscle weakness, many of the features of the med(J) mouse are similar to human idiopathic dystonia.

  20. A SCN9A gene-encoded dorsal root ganglia sodium channel polymorphism associated with severe fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargas-Alarcon Gilberto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A consistent line of investigation suggests that autonomic nervous system dysfunction may explain the multi-system features of fibromyalgia (FM; and that FM is a sympathetically maintained neuropathic pain syndrome. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG are key sympathetic-nociceptive short-circuit sites. Sodium channels located in DRG (particularly Nav1.7 act as molecular gatekeepers for pain detection. Nav1.7 is encoded in gene SCN9A of chromosome 2q24.3 and is predominantly expressed in the DRG pain-sensing neurons and sympathetic ganglia neurons. Several SCN9A sodium channelopathies have been recognized as the cause of rare painful dysautonomic syndromes such as paroxysmal extreme pain disorder and primary erythromelalgia. The aim of this study was to search for an association between fibromyalgia and several SCN9A sodium channels gene polymorphisms. Methods We studied 73 Mexican women suffering from FM and 48 age-matched women who considered themselves healthy. All participants filled out the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ. Genomic DNA from whole blood containing EDTA was extracted by standard techniques. The following SCN9A single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP were determined by 5' exonuclease TaqMan assays: rs4371369; rs4387806; rs4453709; rs4597545; rs6746030; rs6754031; rs7607967; rs12620053; rs12994338; and rs13017637. Results The frequency of the rs6754031 polymorphism was significantly different in both groups (P = 0.036 mostly due to an absence of the GG genotype in controls. Interestingly; patients with this rs6754031 GG genotype had higher FIQ scores (median = 80; percentile 25/75 = 69/88 than patients with the GT genotype (median = 63; percentile 25/75 = 58/73; P = 0.002 and the TT genotype (median = 71; percentile 25/75 = 64/77; P = 0.001. Conclusion In this ethnic group; a disabling form of FM is associated to a particular SCN9A sodium channel gene variant. These preliminary results raise the possibility that

  1. Functional upregulation of nav1.8 sodium channels on the membrane of dorsal root Ganglia neurons contributes to the development of cancer-induced bone pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dan Liu

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that enhanced excitability of dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons contributes to the development of bone cancer pain, which severely decreases the quality of life of cancer patients. Nav1.8, a tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R sodium channel, contributes most of the sodium current underlying the action potential upstroke and accounts for most of the current in later spikes in a train. We speculate that the Nav1.8 sodium channel is a potential candidate responsible for the enhanced excitability of DRG neurons in rats with bone cancer pain. Here, using electrophysiology, Western blot and behavior assays, we documented that the current density of TTX-R sodium channels, especially the Nav1.8 channel, increased significantly in DRG neurons of rats with cancer-induced bone pain. This increase may be due to an increased expression of Nav1.8 on the membrane of DRG neurons. Accordantly, blockade of Nav1.8 sodium channels by its selective blocker A-803467 significantly alleviated the cancer-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in rats. Taken together, these results suggest that functional upregulation of Nav1.8 channels on the membrane of DRG neurons contributes to the development of cancer-induced bone pain.

  2. Mutations in sodium-channel gene SCN9A cause a spectrum of human genetic pain disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Drenth, J.P.H.; Waxman, S G

    2007-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium-channel type IX alpha subunit, known as Na(v)1.7 and encoded by the gene SCN9A, is located in peripheral neurons and plays an important role in action potential production in these cells. Recent genetic studies have identified Na(v)1.7 dysfunction in three different human pain disorders. Gain-of-function missense mutations in Na(v)1.7 have been shown to cause primary erythermalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, while nonsense mutations in Na(v)1.7 result in los...

  3. A SCN9A gene-encoded dorsal root ganglia sodium channel polymorphism associated with severe fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas-Alarcon Gilberto; Alvarez-Leon Edith; Fragoso Jose-Manuel; Vargas Angelica; Martinez Aline; Vallejo Maite; Martinez-Lavin Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background A consistent line of investigation suggests that autonomic nervous system dysfunction may explain the multi-system features of fibromyalgia (FM); and that FM is a sympathetically maintained neuropathic pain syndrome. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are key sympathetic-nociceptive short-circuit sites. Sodium channels located in DRG (particularly Nav1.7) act as molecular gatekeepers for pain detection. Nav1.7 is encoded in gene SCN9A of chromosome 2q24.3 and is predominantly expre...

  4. Role of the sodium channel SCN9A in genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus and Dravet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulley, John C; Hodgson, Bree; McMahon, Jacinta M; Iona, Xenia; Bellows, Susannah; Mullen, Saul A; Farrell, Kevin; Mackay, Mark; Sadleir, Lynette; Bleasel, Andrew; Gill, Deepak; Webster, Richard; Wirrell, Elaine C; Harbord, Michael; Sisodiya, Sanyjay; Andermann, Eva; Kivity, Sara; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Dibbens, Leanne M

    2013-09-01

    Mutations of the SCN1A subunit of the sodium channel is a cause of genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS(+) ) in multiplex families and accounts for 70-80% of Dravet syndrome (DS). DS cases without SCN1A mutation inherited have predicted SCN9A susceptibility variants, which may contribute to complex inheritance for these unexplained cases of DS. Compared with controls, DS cases were significantly enriched for rare SCN9A genetic variants. None of the multiplex febrile seizure or GEFS(+) families could be explained by highly penetrant SCN9A mutations.

  5. Cloning of Partial Sodium Channel Gene From Strains of Fenvalerate-Resistant and Susceptible Cotton Aphid(Aphis gossypii Glover)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Lu-juan; GAO Xi-wu; ZHENG Bing-zong

    2003-01-01

    The strain of fenvalerate-resistant cotton aphids was selected using fenvalerate insecticide in the laboratory, the resistance factor of the strain was 199.54. Three degenerate primers were designed and used to perform PCR amplification. A cDNA encoding partial sodium channel gene was cloned from the fenvalerate-resistant and -susceptible strains. There were two nucleotide acid differences between fenvalerate-resistant strain and -susceptible strain, resulting in an amino acid mutation, Met→Leu. It is predicted that the mutation is related to the cotton aphid resistance to fenvalerate.

  6. Influence of hypertonic sodium chloride hydroxyethyl starch 40 injection on cardiac and pulmonary function state of patients with radical surgery of esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Wang; Wen-Yun Xu; Juan Pu; Qing-Qing Zhang; Mou-Li Tian

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the influence degree of hypertonic sodium chloride hydroxyethyl starch 40 injection (HSH 40) for the cardiac and pulmonary function state of patients with radical surgery of esophageal cancer.Methods:A total of 60 patients with radical surgery of esophageal cancer in our hospital from January 2014 to January 2016 were divided into the control group and the observation group, and 30 cases in each group according to the method of random number table. The control group was treated with conventional treatment, and the observation group was treated with HSH 40 on the treatment of the control group. The cardiac and pulmonary function indexes of two groups before and after the treatment at different time after the treatment were compared.Results:The hemodynamic indexes, pulmonary circulation indexes, right heart function indexes and oxygenation indexes of the two groups before the treatment had no significant differences (allP>0.05), while the hemodynamic indexes, pulmonary circulation indexes, right heart function indexes and oxygenation indexes of the observation group at different time after treatment were all significantly better than those of the control group(allP>0.05).Conclusions:The influence of hypertonic sodium chloride hydroxyethyl starch 40 injection for the cardiac and pulmonary function state of patients with radical surgery of esophageal cancer is better, and the application effect for the surgical patients is better.

  7. Reconstitution of high-affinity binding of a beta-scorpion toxin to neurotoxin receptor site 4 on purified sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, W; Martin-Eauclaire, M F; Rochat, H; Catterall, W A

    1995-09-01

    Reconstitution of purified sodium channels into phospholipid vesicles restores many aspects of sodium channel function including high-affinity neurotoxin binding and action at neurotoxin receptor sites 1-3 and 5, but neurotoxin binding and action at receptor site 4 has not previously been demonstrated in purified and reconstituted preparations. Toxin IV from the venom of the American scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css IV), a beta-scorpion toxin, shifts the voltage dependence of sodium channel activation by binding with high affinity to neurotoxin receptor site 4. Sodium channels were purified from rat brain and reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine (65:35). 125I-Css IV, purified by reversed-phase HPLC, bound rapidly and specifically to reconstituted sodium channels. Dissociation of the bound toxin was biphasic with half-times of 0.22 min-1 and 0.015 min-1. At equilibrium, the toxin bound to two classes of specific high-affinity sites, a variable minor class with KD of approximately 0.1 nM and a major class with a KD of approximately 5 nM. Approximately 0.8 mol 125I-Css IV was bound per mole of reconstituted, right-side-out sodium channels, as assessed from comparison of binding of saxitoxin and Css IV. Binding of Css IV was unaffected by membrane potential or by neurotoxins that bind at sites 1-3 or 5, consistent with the characteristics of binding of beta-scorpion toxins to sodium channels in cells and membrane preparations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Activation of the Endogenous Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System or Aldosterone Administration Increases Urinary Exosomal Sodium Channel Excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ying; Wang, Xiaojing; Rose, Kristie L; MacDonald, W Hayes; Zhang, Bing; Schey, Kevin L; Luther, James M

    2016-02-01

    Urinary exosomes secreted by multiple cell types in the kidney may participate in intercellular signaling and provide an enriched source of kidney-specific proteins for biomarker discovery. Factors that alter the exosomal protein content remain unknown. To determine whether endogenous and exogenous hormones modify urinary exosomal protein content, we analyzed samples from 14 mildly hypertensive patients in a crossover study during a high-sodium (HS, 160 mmol/d) diet and low-sodium (LS, 20 mmol/d) diet to activate the endogenous renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. We further analyzed selected exosomal protein content in a separate cohort of healthy persons receiving intravenous aldosterone (0.7 μg/kg per hour for 10 hours) versus vehicle infusion. The LS diet increased plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentration, whereas aldosterone infusion increased only aldosterone concentration. Protein analysis of paired urine exosome samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based multidimensional protein identification technology detected 2775 unique proteins, of which 316 exhibited significantly altered abundance during LS diet. Sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) and α- and γ-epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) subunits from the discovery set were verified using targeted multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry quantified with isotope-labeled peptide standards. Dietary sodium restriction or acute aldosterone infusion similarly increased urine exosomal γENaC[112-122] peptide concentrations nearly 20-fold, which correlated with plasma aldosterone concentration and urinary Na/K ratio. Urine exosomal NCC and αENaC concentrations were relatively unchanged during these interventions. We conclude that urinary exosome content is altered by renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation. Urinary measurement of exosomal γENaC[112-122] concentration may provide a useful biomarker of ENaC activation in future clinical studies.

  9. Towards a Unified Theory of Calmodulin Regulation (Calmodulation) of Voltage-Gated Calcium and Sodium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Johny, Manu; Dick, Ivy E; Sang, Lingjie; Limpitikul, Worawan B; Kang, Po Wei; Niu, Jacqueline; Banerjee, Rahul; Yang, Wanjun; Babich, Jennifer S; Issa, John B; Lee, Shin Rong; Namkung, Ho; Li, Jiangyu; Zhang, Manning; Yang, Philemon S; Bazzazi, Hojjat; Adams, Paul J; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yue, Daniel N; Yue, David T

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na and Ca(2+) channels represent two major ion channel families that enable myriad biological functions including the generation of action potentials and the coupling of electrical and chemical signaling in cells. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of these ion channels comprises a vital feedback mechanism with distinct physiological implications. Though long-sought, a shared understanding of the channel families remained elusive for two decades as the functional manifestations and the structural underpinnings of this modulation often appeared to diverge. Here, we review recent advancements in the understanding of calmodulation of Ca(2+) and Na channels that suggest a remarkable similarity in their regulatory scheme. This interrelation between the two channel families now paves the way towards a unified mechanistic framework to understand vital calmodulin-dependent feedback and offers shared principles to approach related channelopathic diseases. An exciting era of synergistic study now looms.

  10. Antagonist action of progesterone at σ-receptors in the modulation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, Molly; Fontanilla, Dominique; Mavlyutov, Timur; Ruoho, Arnold E; Jackson, Meyer B

    2011-02-01

    σ-Receptors are integral membrane proteins that have been implicated in a number of biological functions, many of which involve the modulation of ion channels. A wide range of synthetic ligands activate σ-receptors, but endogenous σ-receptor ligands have proven elusive. One endogenous ligand, dimethyltryptamine (DMT), has been shown to act as a σ-receptor agonist. Progesterone and other steroids bind σ-receptors, but the functional consequences of these interactions are unclear. Here we investigated progesterone binding to σ(1)- and σ(2)-receptors and evaluated its effect on σ-receptor-mediated modulation of voltage-gated Na(+) channels. Progesterone binds both σ-receptor subtypes in liver membranes with comparable affinities and blocks photolabeling of both subtypes in human embryonic kidney 293 cells that stably express the human cardiac Na(+) channel Na(v)1.5. Patch-clamp recording in this cell line tested Na(+) current modulation by the σ-receptor ligands ditolylguanidine, PB28, (+)SKF10047, and DMT. Progesterone inhibited the action of these ligands to varying degrees, and some of these actions were reduced by σ(1)-receptor knockdown with small interfering RNA. Progesterone inhibition of channel modulation by drugs was consistent with stronger antagonism of σ(2)-receptors. By contrast, progesterone inhibition of channel modulation by DMT was consistent with stronger antagonism of σ(1)-receptors. Progesterone binding to σ-receptors blocks σ-receptor-mediated modulation of a voltage-gated ion channel, and this novel membrane action of progesterone may be relevant to changes in brain and cardiovascular function during endocrine transitions.

  11. Differential effects of the recombinant toxin PnTx4(5-5) from the spider Phoneutria nigriventer on mammalian and insect sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Ana L B; Matavel, Alessandra; Peigneur, Steve; Cordeiro, Marta N; Tytgat, Jan; Diniz, Marcelo R V; de Lima, Maria Elena

    2016-02-01

    The toxin PnTx4(5-5) from the spider Phoneutria nigriventer is extremely toxic/lethal to insects but has no macroscopic behavioral effects observed in mice after intracerebral injection. Nevertheless, it was demonstrated that it inhibits the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) - subtype of glutamate receptors of cultured rat hippocampal neurons. PnTx4(5-5) has 63% identity to PnTx4(6-1), another insecticidal toxin from P. nigriventer, which can slow down the sodium current inactivation in insect central nervous system, but has no effect on Nav1.2 and Nav1.4 rat sodium channels. Here, we have cloned and heterologous expressed the toxin PnTx4(5-5) in Escherichia coli. The recombinant toxin rPnTx4(5-5) was tested on the sodium channel NavBg from the cockroach Blatella germanica and on mammalian sodium channels Nav1.2-1.6, all expressed in Xenopus leavis oocytes. We showed that the toxin has different affinity and mode of action on insect and mammalian sodium channels. The most remarkable effect was on NavBg, where rPnTx4(5-5) strongly slowed down channel inactivation (EC50 = 212.5 nM), and at 1 μM caused an increase on current peak amplitude of 105.2 ± 3.1%. Interestingly, the toxin also inhibited sodium current on all the mammalian channels tested, with the higher current inhibition on Nav1.3 (38.43 ± 8.04%, IC50 = 1.5 μM). Analysis of activation curves on Nav1.3 and Nav1.5 showed that the toxin shifts channel activation to more depolarized potentials, which can explain the sodium current inhibition. Furthermore, the toxin also slightly slowed down sodium inactivation on Nav1.3 and Nav1.6 channels. As far as we know, this is the first araneomorph toxin described which can shift the sodium channel activation to more depolarized potentials and also slows down channel inactivation.

  12. Developmental regulation of voltage-sensitive sodium channels in rat skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The developmental regulation of the voltage-sensitive Na/sup +/ channel in rat skeletal muscle was studied in vivo and in vitro. In triceps surae muscle developing in vivo the development of TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channel occurred primarily during the first three postnatal weeks as determined by the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)saxitoxin. This development proceeded in two separate phases. The first phase occurs independently of continuing motor neuron innervation and accounts for 60% of the adult density of TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channels. The second phase, which begins about day 11, requires innervation. Muscle cells in primary culture were found to have both TTX-sensitive and insensitive Na/sup +/ channels. The development of the TTX-sensitive channel, in vitro, paralleled the initial innervation-independent phase of development observed in vivo. The density of TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channels in cultured muscle cells was regulated by electrical activity and cytosolic Ca/sup + +/ levels. Pharmacological blockade of the spontaneous electrical activity present in these cells lead to a nearly 2-fold increase in the surface density of TTX-sensitive channels. The turnover time of the TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channel was measured by blocking the incorporation of newly synthesized channels with tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-linked protein glycosylation. The regulation of channel density by electrical activity, cytosolic Ca/sup + +/levels, and agents affecting cyclic neucleotide levels had no effect on the turnover time of the TTX-sensitive Na/sup +/ channel, indicating that these regulatory agents instead affect the synthesis of the channel.

  13. Modulation of the transient outward current (Ito) in rat cardiac myocytes and human Kv4.3 channels by mefloquine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cortes, E J; Islas, A A; Arevalo, J P; Mancilla, C; Monjaraz, E; Salinas-Stefanon, E M

    2015-10-15

    The antimalarial drug mefloquine, is known to be a potassium channel blocker, although its mechanism of action has not being elucidated and its effects on the transient outward current (Ito) and the molecular correlate, the Kv4.3 channel has not being studied. Here, we describe the mefloquine-induced inhibition of the rat ventricular Ito and of CHO cells co-transfected with human Kv4.3 and its accessory subunit hKChIP2C by whole-cell voltage-clamp. Mefloquine inhibited rat Ito and hKv4.3+KChIP2C currents in a concentration-dependent manner with a limited voltage dependence and similar potencies (IC50=8.9μM and 10.5μM for cardiac myocytes and Kv4.3 channels, respectively). In addition, mefloquine did not affect the activation of either current but significantly modified the hKv4.3 steady-state inactivation and recovery from inactivation. The effects of this drug was compared with that of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a well-known potassium channel blocker and its binding site does not seem to overlap with that of 4-AP.

  14. Basolateral potassium channels of rabbit colon epithelium: role in sodium absorption and chloride secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnheim, Klaus; Plass, Herbert; Wyskovsky, Wolfgang

    2002-02-18

    In order to assess the role of different classes of K(+) channels in recirculation of K(+) across the basolateral membrane of rabbit distal colon epithelium, the effects of various K(+) channel inhibitors were tested on the activity of single K(+) channels from the basolateral membrane, on macroscopic basolateral K(+) conductance, and on the rate of Na(+) absorption and Cl(-) secretion. In single-channel measurements using the lipid bilayer reconstitution system, high-conductance (236 pS), Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channels were most frequently detected; the second most abundant channel was a low-conductance K(+) channel (31 pS) that exhibited channel rundown. In addition to Ba(2+) and charybdotoxin (ChTX), the BK(Ca) channels were inhibited by quinidine, verapamil and tetraethylammonium (TEA), the latter only when present on the side of the channel from which K(+) flow originates. Macroscopic basolateral K(+) conductance, determined in amphotericin-permeabilised epithelia, was also markedly reduced by quinidine and verapamil, TEA inhibited only from the lumen side, and serosal ChTX was without effect. The chromanol 293B and the sulphonylurea tolbutamide did not affect BK(Ca) channels and had no or only a small inhibitory effect on macroscopic basolateral K(+) conductance. Transepithelial Na(+) absorption was partly inhibited by Ba(2+), quinidine and verapamil, suggesting that BK(Ca) channels are involved in basolateral recirculation of K(+) during Na(+) absorption in rabbit colon. The BK(Ca) channel inhibitors TEA and ChTX did not reduce Na(+) absorption, probably because TEA does not enter intact cells and ChTX is 'knocked off' its extracellular binding site by K(+) outflow from the cell interior. Transepithelial Cl(-) secretion was inhibited completely by Ba(2+) and 293B, partly by quinidine but not by the other K(+) channel blockers, indicating that the small (<3 pS) K(V)LQT1 channels are responsible for basolateral K(+) exit during Cl(-) secretion. Hence

  15. Sodium channel SCN8A (Nav1.6: properties and de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathy and intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle Elizabeth O'Brien

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The sodium channel Nav1.6, encoded by the gene SCN8A, is one of the major voltage-gated channels in human brain. The sequences of sodium channels have been highly conserved during evolution, and minor changes in biophysical properties can have a major impact in vivo. Insight into the role of Nav1.6 has come from analysis of spontaneous and induced mutations of mouse Scn8a during the past 18 years. Only within the past year has the role of SCN8A in human disease become apparent from whole exome and genome sequences of patients with sporadic disease. Unique features of Nav1.6 include its contribution to persistent current, resurgent current, repetitive neuronal firing, and subcellular localization at the axon initial segment and nodes of Ranvier. Loss of Nav1.6 activity results in reduced neuronal excitability, while gain-of-function mutations can increase neuronal excitability. Mouse Scn8a (med mutants exhibit movement disorders including ataxia, tremor and dystonia. Thus far, more than ten human de novo mutations have been identified in patients with two types of disorders, epileptic encephalopathy and intellectual disability. We review these human mutations as well as the unique features of Nav1.6 that contribute to its role in determining neuronal excitability in vivo. A supplemental figure illustrating the positions of amino acid residues within the 4 domains and 24 transmembrane segments of Nav1.6 is provided to facilitate the location of novel mutations within the channel protein.

  16. Beta-scorpion toxin effects suggest electrostatic interactions in domain II of voltage-dependent sodium channels. : Electrostatic interactions between segments IIS2, IIS3 and IIS4 of Na+ channel.

    OpenAIRE

    Mantegazza, Massimo; Cestèle, Sandrine

    2005-01-01

    International audience; Beta-scorpion toxins specifically modulate the voltage dependence of sodium channel activation by acting through a voltage-sensor trapping model. We used mutagenesis, functional analysis and the action of beta-toxin as tools to investigate the existence and role in channel activation of molecular interactions between the charged residues of the S2, S3 and S4 segments in domain II of sodium channels. Mutating to arginine the acidic residues of the S2 and S3 transmembran...

  17. Molecular cloning and analysis of zebrafish voltage-gated sodium channel beta subunit genes: implications for the evolution of electrical signaling in vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Tao P

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Action potential generation in excitable cells such as myocytes and neurons critically depends on voltage-gated sodium channels. In mammals, sodium channels exist as macromolecular complexes that include a pore-forming alpha subunit and 1 or more modulatory beta subunits. Although alpha subunit genes have been cloned from diverse metazoans including flies, jellyfish, and humans, beta subunits have not previously been identified in any non-mammalian species. To gain further insight into the evolution of electrical signaling in vertebrates, we investigated beta subunit genes in the teleost Danio rerio (zebrafish. Results We identified and cloned single zebrafish gene homologs for beta1-beta3 (zbeta1-zbeta3 and duplicate genes for beta4 (zbeta4.1, zbeta4.2. Sodium channel beta subunit loci are similarly organized in fish and mammalian genomes. Unlike their mammalian counterparts, zbeta1 and zbeta2 subunit genes display extensive alternative splicing. Zebrafish beta subunit genes and their splice variants are differentially-expressed in excitable tissues, indicating tissue-specific regulation of zbeta1-4 expression and splicing. Co-expression of the genes encoding zbeta1 and the zebrafish sodium channel alpha subunit Nav1.5 in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells increased sodium current and altered channel gating, demonstrating functional interactions between zebrafish alpha and beta subunits. Analysis of the synteny and phylogeny of mammalian, teleost, amphibian, and avian beta subunit and related genes indicated that all extant vertebrate beta subunits are orthologous, that beta2/beta4 and beta1/beta3 share common ancestry, and that beta subunits are closely related to other proteins sharing the V-type immunoglobulin domain structure. Vertebrate sodium channel beta subunit genes were not identified in the genomes of invertebrate chordates and are unrelated to known subunits of the para sodium channel in Drosophila. Conclusion The

  18. Inhibition of rat hippocampal excitability by the plant alkaloid 3-acetylaconitine mediated by interaction with voltage-dependent sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, A

    1997-02-01

    The effects of the Aconitum alkaloid 3-acetylaconitine on neuronal activity were investigated in the slice preparation and on cultivated neurons of rat hippocampus by extracellular and patch-clamp recordings, respectively. 3-Acetylaconitine (0.01-1 microM) diminished the orthodromic and antidromic population spike in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of the drug was preceded by a transiently enhanced excitability. The latency of onset of the inhibition was accelerated by increased stimulation frequency, whereas recovery during washout of the alkaloid was accelerated by decreased stimulation frequency. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of 3-acetylaconitine was evaluated in two different models of epileptiform activity induced either by blockade of GABA receptors by bicuculline (10 microM) or by a nominal Mg(2+)-free bathing medium. In accordance with the activity-dependent mode of action, this compound abolished the synaptically evoked population spikes in the presence of bicuculline or nominal Mg(2+)-free bathing medium, respectively. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings revealed an interaction of 3-acetylaconitine with the voltage-dependent sodium channel. At a concentration of 1 microM, 3-acetylaconitine did not affect the peak amplitude of the sodium current, but shifted the current-voltage relationship in the hyperpolarized direction such that sodium currents were already activated at the resting potential.

  19. Diphenytoin, riluzole and lidocaine: three sodium channel blockers, with different mechanisms of action, decrease hippocampal epileptiform activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Lihong; Hellier, Jennifer L; Uskert-Newsom, Jessica; Williams, Philip A; Staley, Kevin J; Yee, Audrey S

    2013-10-01

    Epilepsy is a condition affecting 1-2% of the population, characterized by the presence of spontaneous, recurrent seizures. The most common type of acquired epilepsy is temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Up to 30% of patients with TLE are refractory to currently available compounds, and there is an urgent need to identify novel targets for therapy. Here, we utilized the in-vitro CA3 burst preparation to examine alterations in network excitability, characterized by changes in interburst interval. Specifically, we show that bath application of three different sodium channel blockers-diphenytoin, riluzole, and lidocaine-slow spontaneous CA3 bursts. This in turn, decreased the epileptiform activity. These compounds work at different sites on voltage-gated sodium channels, but produce a similar network phenotype of decreased excitability. In the case of diphenytoin and riluzole, the change in network activity (i.e., increased interburst intervals) was persistent following drug washout. Lidocaine application, however, only increased the CA3 interburst interval when it was in the bath solution. Thus, its action was not permanent and resulted in returning CA3 bursting to baseline levels. These data demonstrate that the CA3 burst preparation provides a relatively easy and quick platform for identifying compounds that can decrease network excitability, providing the initial screen for further and more complex in-vivo, freely-behaving animal studies.

  20. KCNMA1 encoded cardiac BK channels afford protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltysinska, Ewa; Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Barthmes, Maria;

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial potassium channels have been implicated in myocardial protection mediated through pre-/postconditioning. Compounds that open the Ca2+- and voltage-activated potassium channel of big-conductance (BK) have a pre-conditioning-like effect on survival of cardiomyocytes after ischemia/rep...

  1. Interactions of drugs and toxins with permeant ions in potassium, sodium, and calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhorov, B S

    2011-07-01

    Ion channels in cell membranes are targets for a multitude of ligands including naturally occurring toxins, illicit drugs, and medications used to manage pain and treat cardiovascular, neurological, autoimmune, and other health disorders. In the past decade, the x-ray crystallography revealed 3D structures of several ion channels in their open, closed, and inactivated states, shedding light on mechanisms of channel gating, ion permeation and selectivity. However, atomistic mechanisms of the channel modulation by ligands are poorly understood. Increasing evidence suggest that cationophilic groups in ion channels and in some ligands may simultaneously coordinate permeant cations, which form indispensible (but underappreciated) components of respective receptors. This review describes ternary ligand-metal-channel complexes predicted by means of computer-based molecular modeling. The models rationalize a large body of experimental data including paradoxes in structure-activity relationships, effects of mutations on the ligand action, sensitivity of the ligand action to the nature of current-carrying cations, and action of ligands that bind in the ion-permeation pathway but increase rather than decrease the current. Recent mutational and ligand-binding experiments designed to test the models have confirmed the ternary-complex concept providing new knowledge on physiological roles of metal ions and atomistic mechanisms of action of ion channel ligands.

  2. Intron retention in mRNA encoding ancillary subunit of insect voltage-gated sodium channel modulates channel expression, gating regulation and drug sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdin, Céline M; Moignot, Bénédicte; Wang, Lingxin; Murillo, Laurence; Juchaux, Marjorie; Quinchard, Sophie; Lapied, Bruno; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Dong, Ke; Legros, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Insect voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are formed by a well-known pore-forming α-subunit encoded by para-like gene and ancillary subunits related to TipE from the mutation "temperature-induced-paralysis locus E." The role of these ancillary subunits in the modulation of biophysical and pharmacological properties of Na(+) currents are not enough documented. The unique neuronal ancillary subunit TipE-homologous protein 1 of Drosophila melanogaster (DmTEH1) strongly enhances the expression of insect Nav channels when heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Here we report the cloning and functional expression of two neuronal DmTEH1-homologs of the cockroach, Periplaneta americana, PaTEH1A and PaTEH1B, encoded by a single bicistronic gene. In PaTEH1B, the second exon encoding the last 11-amino-acid residues of PaTEH1A is shifted to 3'UTR by the retention of a 96-bp intron-containing coding-message, thus generating a new C-terminal end. We investigated the gating and pharmacological properties of the Drosophila Nav channel variant (DmNav1-1) co-expressed with DmTEH1, PaTEH1A, PaTEH1B or a truncated mutant PaTEH1Δ(270-280) in Xenopus oocytes. PaTEH1B caused a 2.2-fold current density decrease, concomitant with an equivalent α-subunit incorporation decrease in the plasma membrane, compared to PaTEH1A and PaTEH1Δ(270-280). PaTEH1B positively shifted the voltage-dependences of activation and slow inactivation of DmNav1-1 channels to more positive potentials compared to PaTEH1A, suggesting that the C-terminal end of both proteins may influence the function of the voltage-sensor and the pore of Nav channel. Interestingly, our findings showed that the sensitivity of DmNav1-1 channels to lidocaine and to the pyrazoline-type insecticide metabolite DCJW depends on associated TEH1-like subunits. In conclusion, our work demonstrates for the first time that density, gating and pharmacological properties of Nav channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes can be modulated by an

  3. Mechanism of functional interaction between potassium channel Kv1.3 and sodium channel NavBeta1 subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Tomoya; Correa, Ana M.; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel subfamily A member 3 (Kv1.3) dominantly expresses on T cells and neurons. Recently, the interaction between Kv1.3 and NavBeta1 subunits has been explored through ionic current measurements, but the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated yet. We explored the functional interaction between Kv1.3 and NavBeta1 through gating current measurements using the Cut-open Oocyte Voltage Clamp (COVC) technique. We showed that the N-terminal 1–52 sequence of hKv1.3 disrupts the channel expression on the Xenopus oocyte membrane, suggesting a potential role as regulator of hKv1.3 expression in neurons and lymphocytes. Our gating currents measurements showed that NavBeta1 interacts with the voltage sensing domain (VSD) of Kv1.3 through W172 in the transmembrane segment and modifies the gating operation. The comparison between G-V and Q-V with/without NavBeta1 indicates that NavBeta1 may strengthen the coupling between hKv1.3-VSD movement and pore opening, inducing the modification of kinetics in ionic activation and deactivation. PMID:28349975

  4. High salt intake down-regulates colonic mineralocorticoid receptors, epithelial sodium channels and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lienhard

    Full Text Available Besides the kidneys, the gastrointestinal tract is the principal organ responsible for sodium homeostasis. For sodium transport across the cell membranes the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC is of pivotal relevance. The ENaC is mainly regulated by mineralocorticoid receptor mediated actions. The MR activation by endogenous 11β-hydroxy-glucocorticoids is modulated by the 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2. Here we present evidence for intestinal segment specific 11β-HSD2 expression and hypothesize that a high salt intake and/or uninephrectomy (UNX affects colonic 11β-HSD2, MR and ENaC expression. The 11β-HSD2 activity was measured by means of 3H-corticosterone conversion into 3H-11-dehydrocorticosterone in Sprague Dawley rats on a normal and high salt diet. The activity increased steadily from the ileum to the distal colon by a factor of about 3, an observation in line with the relevance of the distal colon for sodium handling. High salt intake diminished mRNA and protein of 11β-HSD2 by about 50% (p<0.001 and reduced the expression of the MR (p<0.01. The functionally relevant ENaC-β and ENaC-γ expression, a measure of mineralocorticoid action, diminished by more than 50% by high salt intake (p<0.001. The observed changes were present in rats with and without UNX. Thus, colonic epithelial cells appear to contribute to the protective armamentarium of the mammalian body against salt overload, a mechanism not modulated by UNX.

  5. Mathematical analysis of depolarization block mediated by slow inactivation of fast sodium channels in midbrain dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kun; Yu, Na; Tucker, Kristal R; Levitan, Edwin S; Canavier, Carmen C

    2014-12-01

    Dopamine neurons in freely moving rats often fire behaviorally relevant high-frequency bursts, but depolarization block limits the maximum steady firing rate of dopamine neurons in vitro to ∼10 Hz. Using a reduced model that faithfully reproduces the sodium current measured in these neurons, we show that adding an additional slow component of sodium channel inactivation, recently observed in these neurons, qualitatively changes in two different ways how the model enters into depolarization block. First, the slow time course of inactivation allows multiple spikes to be elicited during a strong depolarization prior to entry into depolarization block. Second, depolarization block occurs near or below the spike threshold, which ranges from -45 to -30 mV in vitro, because the additional slow component of inactivation negates the sodium window current. In the absence of the additional slow component of inactivation, this window current produces an N-shaped steady-state current-voltage (I-V) curve that prevents depolarization block in the experimentally observed voltage range near -40 mV. The time constant of recovery from slow inactivation during the interspike interval limits the maximum steady firing rate observed prior to entry into depolarization block. These qualitative features of the entry into depolarization block can be reversed experimentally by replacing the native sodium conductance with a virtual conductance lacking the slow component of inactivation. We show that the activation of NMDA and AMPA receptors can affect bursting and depolarization block in different ways, depending upon their relative contributions to depolarization versus to the total linear/nonlinear conductance.

  6. Cysteine mutagenesis in the voltage-dependent sodium channel structural insights and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaselli, G F

    1997-08-01

    The superfamily of ion channel proteins comprise multisubunit transmembrane glycoproteins that are the fundamental electrical signaling molecules in the heart and other excitable tissues. The large size and hydrophobicity of these proteins present a formidable obstacle to the generation of a crystal structure. In lieu of a high-resolution structure, complementary methods have been used to study the structure function relationships of these essential excitability proteins. Molecular cloning and biophysical analysis of heterologously expressed wild-type and mutant channel proteins have provided insights into the structural basis of the essential channel functions of permeation and gating. This powerful combination of techniques also provides dynamic structural information regarding channel proteins not likely to be forthcoming from a crystal structure. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:211-218). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  7. Severe Salt-Losing Syndrome and Hyperkalemia Induced by Adult Nephron-Specific Knockout of the Epithelial Sodium Channel α-Subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Systemic pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA-1) is a severe salt-losing syndrome caused by loss-of-function mutations of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and characterized by neonatal life-threatening hypovolemia and hyperkalemia. The very high plasma aldosterone levels...... is neonatally lethal in mice. We generated adult inducible nephron-specific αENaC-knockout mice (Scnn1a(Pax8/LC1)) that exhibit hyperkalemia and body weight loss when kept on a regular-salt diet, thus mimicking PHA-1. Compared with control mice fed a regular-salt diet, knockout mice fed a regular-salt diet...... cannot be compensated for by other sodium channels and/or transporters, only by a high-sodium and reduced-potassium diet. We further conclude that hyperkalemia becomes the determining factor in regulating NCC activity, regardless of sodium loss, in the ENaC-mediated salt-losing PHA-1 phenotype....

  8. Structure and function of the voltage sensor of sodium channels probed by a beta-scorpion toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestèle, Sandrine; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Qu, Yusheng; Sampieri, François; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2006-07-28

    Voltage sensing by voltage-gated sodium channels determines the electrical excitability of cells, but the molecular mechanism is unknown. beta-Scorpion toxins bind specifically to neurotoxin receptor site 4 and induce a negative shift in the voltage dependence of activation through a voltage sensor-trapping mechanism. Kinetic analysis showed that beta-scorpion toxin binds to the resting state, and subsequently the bound toxin traps the voltage sensor in the activated state in a voltage-dependent but concentration-independent manner. The rate of voltage sensor trapping can be fit by a two-step model, in which the first step is voltage-dependent and correlates with the outward gating movement of the IIS4 segment, whereas the second step is voltage-independent and results in shifted voltage dependence of activation of the channel. Mutations of Glu(779) in extracellular loop IIS1-S2 and both Glu(837) and Leu(840) in extracellular loop IIS3-S4 reduce the binding affinity of beta-scorpion toxin. Mutations of positively charged and hydrophobic amino acid residues in the IIS4 segment do not affect beta-scorpion toxin binding but alter voltage dependence of activation and enhance beta-scorpion toxin action. Structural modeling with the Rosetta algorithm yielded a three-dimensional model of the toxin-receptor complex with the IIS4 voltage sensor at the extracellular surface. Our results provide mechanistic and structural insight into the voltage sensor-trapping mode of scorpion toxin action, define the position of the voltage sensor in the resting state of the sodium channel, and favor voltage-sensing models in which the S4 segment spans the membrane in both resting and activated states.

  9. Structure and Function of the Voltage Sensor of Sodium Channels Probed by a β-Scorpion Toxin*S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestèle, Sandrine; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Qu, Yusheng; Sampieri, François; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A.

    2006-01-01

    Voltage sensing by voltage-gated sodium channels determines the electrical excitability of cells, but the molecular mechanism is unknown. β-Scorpion toxins bind specifically to neurotoxin receptor site 4 and induce a negative shift in the voltage dependence of activation through a voltage sensor-trapping mechanism. Kinetic analysis showed that β-scorpion toxin binds to the resting state, and subsequently the bound toxin traps the voltage sensor in the activated state in a voltage-dependent but concentration-independent manner. The rate of voltage sensor trapping can be fit by a two-step model, in which the first step is voltage-dependent and correlates with the outward gating movement of the IIS4 segment, whereas the second step is voltage-independent and results in shifted voltage dependence of activation of the channel. Mutations of Glu779 in extracellular loop IIS1–S2 and both Glu837 and Leu840 in extracellular loop IIS3–S4 reduce the binding affinity of β-scorpion toxin. Mutations of positively charged and hydrophobic amino acid residues in the IIS4 segment do not affect β-scorpion toxin binding but alter voltage dependence of activation and enhance β-scorpion toxin action. Structural modeling with the Rosetta algorithm yielded a three-dimensional model of the toxin-receptor complex with the IIS4 voltage sensor at the extracellular surface. Our results provide mechanistic and structural insight into the voltage sensor-trapping mode of scorpion toxin action, define the position of the voltage sensor in the resting state of the sodium channel, and favor voltage-sensing models in which the S4 segment spans the membrane in both resting and activated states. PMID:16679310

  10. Ion conduction and conformational flexibility of a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteux, Céline; Vorobyov, Igor; Allen, Toby W

    2014-03-04

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels play an essential role in electrical signaling in the nervous system and are key pharmacological targets for a range of disorders. The recent solution of X-ray structures for the bacterial channel NavAb has provided an opportunity to study functional mechanisms at the atomic level. This channel's selectivity filter exhibits an EEEE ring sequence, characteristic of mammalian Ca(2+), not Na(+), channels. This raises the fundamentally important question: just what makes a Na(+) channel conduct Na(+) ions? Here we explore ion permeation on multimicrosecond timescales using the purpose-built Anton supercomputer. We isolate the likely protonation states of the EEEE ring and observe a striking flexibility of the filter that demonstrates the necessity for extended simulations to study conduction in this channel. We construct free energy maps to reveal complex multi-ion conduction via knock-on and "pass-by" mechanisms, involving concerted ion and glutamate side chain movements. Simulations in mixed ionic solutions reveal relative energetics for Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) within the pore that are consistent with the modest selectivity seen experimentally. We have observed conformational changes in the pore domain leading to asymmetrical collapses of the activation gate, similar to proposed inactivated structures of NavAb, with helix bending involving conserved residues that are critical for slow inactivation. These structural changes are shown to regulate access to fenestrations suggested to be pathways for lipophilic drugs and provide deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms connecting drug activity and slow inactivation.

  11. Negative-shift activation, current reduction and resurgent currents induced by β-toxins from Centruroides scorpions in sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Emanuele; Pedraza-Escalona, Martha; Gurrola, Georgina B; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Corzo, Gerardo; Wanke, Enzo; Possani, Lourival D

    2012-02-01

    The β-toxins purified from the New World scorpion venoms of the Centruroides species affect several voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) and thus are essential tools not only for the discrimination of different channel sub-types but also for studying the structure-function relationship between channels and toxins. This communication reports the results obtained with four different peptides purified from three species of Centruroides scorpions and assayed on seven distinct isoforms of VGSC (Na(v)1.1-Na(v)1.7) by specific functional analysis conducted through single cell electrophysiology. The toxins studied were CssII from Centruroides suffusus suffusus, Cll1 and Cll2 from Centruroides limpidus limpidus and a novel toxin from Centruroides noxius, which was characterized for the first time here. It has 67 amino acid residues and four disulfide bridges with a molecular mass of 7626 Da. Three different functional features were identified: current reduction of macroscopic conductance, left shift of the voltage-dependent activation and induction of resurgent currents at negative voltages following brief, strong depolarizations. The isoforms which revealed to be more affected resulted to be Na(v)1.6 > 1.1 > 1.2 and, for the first time, a β-toxin is here shown to induce resurgent current also in isoforms different from Na(v)1.6. Additionally, these results were analyzed with molecular modelling. In conclusion, although the four toxins have a high degree of identity, they display tri-modal function, each of which shows selectivity among the different sub-types of Na+ -channels. Thus, they are invaluable as tools for structure-function studies of β-toxins and offer a basis for the design of novel ion channel-specific drugs.

  12. Specific deletion of NaV1.1 sodium channels in inhibitory interneurons causes seizures and premature death in a mouse model of Dravet syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Cheah, Christine S.; Yu, Frank H.; Westenbroek, Ruth E.; Kalume, Franck K.; Oakley, John C; Potter, Gregory B.; Rubenstein, John L.; Catterall, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the brain sodium channel NaV1.1 cause Dravet syndrome (DS), a pharmacoresistant infantile-onset epilepsy syndrome with comorbidities of cognitive impairment and premature death. Previous studies using a mouse model of DS revealed reduced sodium currents and impaired excitability in GABAergic interneurons in the hippocampus, leading to the hypothesis that impaired excitability of GABAergic inhibitory neurons is the cause of epilepsy and premature deat...

  13. Neuroplastic alteration of TTX-resistant sodium channel with visceral pain and morphine-induced hyperalgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Jinghong Chen,1,2,4 Ze-hui Gong,4 Hao Yan,2 Zhijun Qiao,3 Bo-yi Qin41Department of Internal Medicine, Neuroscience Program, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA; 2The Divisions of Pharmacy, Pharmacology core lab, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 3University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX, USA; 4Beijing Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Beijing, China Abstract: The discovery of the tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R Na+ channel in nociceptive neurons has provided a special target for analgesic intervention. In a previous study we found that both morphine tolerance and persistent visceral inflammation resulted in visceral hyperalgesia. It has also been suggested that hyperexcitability of sensory neurons due to altered TTX-R Na+ channel properties and expression contributes to hyperalgesia; however, we do not know if some TTX-R Na+ channel property changes can be triggered by visceral hyperalgesia and morphine tolerance, or whether there are similar molecular or channel mechanisms in both situations. To evaluate the effects of morphine tolerance and visceral inflammation on the channel, we investigated the dorsal root ganglia (DRG neuronal change following these chronic treatments. Using whole-cell patch clamp recording, we recorded TTX-R Na+ currents in isolated adult rat lumbar and sacral (L6-S2 DRG neurons from normal and pathologic rats with colon inflammatory pain or chronic morphine treatment. We found that the amplitudes of TTX-R Na+ currents were signiflcantly increased in small-diameter DRG neurons with either morphine tolerance or visceral inflammatory pain. Meanwhile, the result also showed that those treatments altered the kinetics properties of the electrical current (ie, the activating and inactivating speed of the channel was accelerated. Our current results suggested that in both models, visceral chronic inflammatory pain and morphine tolerance causes electrophysiological changes in voltage

  14. A toxin to nervous, cardiac, and endocrine ERG K+ channels isolated from Centruroides noxius scorpion venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurrola, G B; Rosati, B; Rocchetti, M; Pimienta, G; Zaza, A; Arcangeli, A; Olivotto, M; Possani, L D; Wanke, E

    1999-05-01

    Toxins isolated from a variety of venoms are tools for probing the physiological function and structure of ion channels. The ether-a-go-go-related genes (erg) codify for the K+ channels (ERG), which are crucial in neurons and are impaired in human long-QT syndrome and Drosophila 'seizure' mutants. We have isolated a peptide from the scorpion Centruroides noxius Hoffmann that has no sequence homologies with other toxins, and demonstrate that it specifically inhibits (IC50=16+/-1 nM) only ERG channels of different species and distinct histogenesis. These results open up the possibility of investigating ERG channel structure-function relationships and novel pharmacological tools with potential therapeutic efficacy.

  15. Direct evidence that scorpion α-toxins (site-3 modulate sodium channel inactivation by hindrance of voltage-sensor movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongming Ma

    Full Text Available The position of the voltage-sensing transmembrane segment, S4, in voltage-gated ion channels as a function of voltage remains incompletely elucidated. Site-3 toxins bind primarily to the extracellular loops connecting transmembrane helical segments S1-S2 and S3-S4 in Domain 4 (D4 and S5-S6 in Domain 1 (D1 and slow fast-inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. As S4 of the human skeletal muscle voltage-gated sodium channel, hNav1.4, moves in response to depolarization from the resting to the inactivated state, two D4S4 reporters (R2C and R3C, Arg1451Cys and Arg1454Cys, respectively move from internal to external positions as deduced by reactivity to internally or externally applied sulfhydryl group reagents, methane thiosulfonates (MTS. The changes in reporter reactivity, when cycling rapidly between hyperpolarized and depolarized voltages, enabled determination of the positions of the D4 voltage-sensor and of its rate of movement. Scorpion α-toxin binding impedes D4S4 segment movement during inactivation since the modification rates of R3C in hNav1.4 with methanethiosulfonate (CH3SO2SCH2CH2R, where R = -N(CH33 (+ trimethylammonium, MTSET and benzophenone-4-carboxamidocysteine methanethiosulfonate (BPMTS were slowed ~10-fold in toxin-modified channels. Based upon the different size, hydrophobicity and charge of the two reagents it is unlikely that the change in reactivity is due to direct or indirect blockage of access of this site to reagent in the presence of toxin (Tx, but rather is the result of inability of this segment to move outward to the normal extent and at the normal rate in the toxin-modified channel. Measurements of availability of R3C to internally applied reagent show decreased access (slower rates of thiol reaction providing further evidence for encumbered D4S4 movement in the presence of toxins consistent with the assignment of at least part of the toxin binding site to the region of D4S4 region of the voltage

  16. Expression of hNav1.8 sodium channel protein in affected nerves of patients with trigeminal neuralgia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ling-lan; JIANG Xiao-zhong; ZHAO Yun-fu; LI Yu-li; HE Jin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the pathogenesis of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and to provide a new target for the drug treatment of TN by studying the expression of tetrodotoxin-resistant hNavl. 8 sodium channel protein in affected nerves of patients with TN. Methods: Twelve affected inferior alveolar nerves were obtained from patients with idiopathic TN, to whom the drug therapy was not effective. As negative control, one normal inferior alveolar nerve was obtained from patients who accepted the combined radical neck dissection with glossectomy and mandibulectomy. One muscle sample was obtained as normal control. One dorsal root ganglion from rat was as positive control. These tissues and prepared hNav1.8 antibody were conducted immunohistochemistry response. Results: hNavl. 8 channel protein was expresses in all the 12 specimens of the affected nerves of patients with TN, but not in the muscle sample and the normal inferior alveolar nerve. Conclusion:The abnormal expression of hNavl. 8 channel protein in the affected nerves of patients with TN may play an impo~nt role in the pathogenesis of TN.

  17. Phenolic acids isolated from the fungus Schizophyllum commune exert analgesic activity by inhibiting voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hui-Min; Wang, Gan; Liu, Ya-Ping; Rong, Ming-Qiang; Shen, Chuan-Bin; Yan, Xiu-Wen; Luo, Xiao-Dong; Lai, Ren

    2016-09-01

    The present study was designed to search for compounds with analgesic activity from the Schizophyllum commune (SC), which is widely consumed as edible and medicinal mushroom world. Thin layer chromatography (TLC), tosilica gel column chromatography, sephadex LH 20, and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) were used to isolate and purify compounds from SC. Structural analysis of the isolated compounds was based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The effects of these compounds on voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels were evaluated using patch clamp. The analgesic activity of these compounds was tested in two types of mouse pain models induced by noxious chemicals. Five phenolic acids identified from SC extracts in the present study included vanillic acid, m-hydroxybenzoic acid, o-hydroxybenzeneacetic acid, 3-hydroxy-5-methybenzoic acid, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid. They inhibited the activity of both tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-r) and tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-s) NaV channels. All the compounds showed low selectivity on NaV channel subtypes. After intraperitoneal injection, three compounds of these compounds exerted analgesic activity in mice. In conclusion, phenolic acids identified in SC demonstrated analgesic activity, facilitating the mechanistic studies of SC in the treatment of neurasthenia.

  18. A surface plasmon resonance approach to monitor toxin interactions with an isolated voltage-gated sodium channel paddle motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Ferracci, Géraldine; Bosmans, Frank; Bougis, Pierre E

    2015-02-01

    Animal toxins that inhibit voltage-gated sodium (Na(v)) channel fast inactivation can do so through an interaction with the S3b-S4 helix-turn-helix region, or paddle motif, located in the domain IV voltage sensor. Here, we used surface plasmon resonance (SPR), an optical approach that uses polarized light to measure the refractive index near a sensor surface to which a molecule of interest is attached, to analyze interactions between the isolated domain IV paddle and Na(v) channel-selective α-scorpion toxins. Our SPR analyses showed that the domain IV paddle can be removed from the Na(v) channel and immobilized on sensor chips, and suggest that the isolated motif remains susceptible to animal toxins that target the domain IV voltage sensor. As such, our results uncover the inherent pharmacological sensitivities of the isolated domain IV paddle motif, which may be exploited to develop a label-free SPR approach for discovering ligands that target this region.

  19. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates High Salt-Induced Activation of Epithelial Sodium Channels (ENaC in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Wan Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC is expressed in the endothelial cells. To test whether high salt affects the NO production via regulation of endothelial ENaC, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were incubated in solutions containing either normal or high sodium (additional 20 mM NaCl. Our data showed that high sodium treatment significantly increased α-, β-, and γ-ENaC expression levels in HUVECs. Using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that high sodium treatment significantly increased ENaC open probability (PO. Moreover, nitric oxide synthase (eNOS phosphorylation (Ser 1177 levels and NO production were significantly decreased by high sodium in HUVECs; the effects of high sodium on eNOS phosphorylation and NO production were inhibited by a specific ENaC blocker, amiloride. Our results showed that high sodium decreased AMP-activated kinase (AMPK phosphorylation in endothelial cells. On the other hand, metformin, an AMPK activator, prevented high sodium-induced upregulation of ENaC expression and PO. Moreover, metformin prevented high salt-induced decrease in NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that high sodium stimulates ENaC activation by negatively modulating AMPK activity, thereby leading to reduction in eNOS activity and NO production in endothelial cells.

  20. Cardiac HCN Channels: From Basic to Bedside%心脏HCN通道:从基础到临床

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范新荣; 王超

    2012-01-01

    研究表明超极化激活环核苷酸门控阳离子通道(HCN通道)大量分布于心脏及神经系统的特定部位,其介导的起搏电流引起窦房结细胞舒张期去极化,从而在心脏自主搏动及心律的调节等方面发挥着十分重要的生理功能.目前,已克隆得到4种HCN亚型基因,并通过功能表达分析指出各种HCN亚型具有不同的电生理学特性.但是目前有关HCN逶道在心脏电活动中的生理及病理生理机制仍未完全阐明.本篇综述旨在详细阐述心脏HCN通道的生物物理学特性、心脏通道蛋白表达、各种HCN通道突变引起的离子通道疾病以及几种通道阻滞药物电药理学特性的研究进展.%Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated ( HCN) channels, responsible for pacemaker current, are widely expressed in heart and nervous system, and HCN mediated currents play a key role in generation and regulation of diastolic depolarization which controls the spontaneous rate in sinoatrial node myocytes. Recently, four mammalian HCN isoforms, respectively termed HCN1-4, have been cloned. When heterologously expressed, each of the four HCN subunits has different electrophysiological properties. However, the physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms of HCN channels on cardiac electric activity have not been revealed completely. In this review we summarize recent insight into the biophysical characteristics of cardiac HCN channels, distribution of channels in heart, five kinds of HCN-related ionic channelopathies and electropharmacological properties of several If blockers.

  1. Differential expression of hERG1 channel isoforms reproduces properties of native I(Kr) and modulates cardiac action potential characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Peter; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2010-01-01

    The repolarizing cardiac rapid delayed rectifier current, I(Kr), is composed of ERG1 channels. It has been suggested that two isoforms of the ERG1 protein, ERG1a and ERG1b, both contribute to I(Kr). Marked heterogeneity in the kinetic properties of native I(Kr) has been described. We hypothesized...

  2. Mutations in conserved amino acids in the KCNQ1 channel and risk of cardiac events in type-1 long-QT syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jons, Christian; Moss, Arthur J; Lopes, Coeli M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type-1 long-QT syndrome (LQT1) is caused by mutations in the KCNQ1 gene. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether KCNQ1 mutations in highly conserved amino acid residues within the voltage-gated potassium channel family are associated with an increased risk of cardiac even...

  3. Co-Localization of Sodium Channel Na[v]1.6 and the Sodium--Calcium Exchanger at Sites of Axonal Injury in the Spinal Cord in EAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craner, Matthew J.; Hains, Bryan C.; Lo, Albert C.; Black, Joel A.; Waxman, Stephen G.

    2004-01-01

    Axonal degeneration contributes to the development of non-remitting neurological deficits and disability in multiple sclerosis, but the molecular mechanisms that underlie axonal loss in multiple sclerosis are not clearly understood. Studies of white matter axonal injury have demonstrated that voltage-gated sodium channels can provide a route for…

  4. Sequencing of SCN5A Identifies Rare and Common Variants Associated With Cardiac Conduction : Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnani, Jared W.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Prins, Bram P.; Arking, Dan E.; Lin, Honghuang; Yin, Xiaoyan; Liu, Ching-Ti; Morrison, Alanna C.; Zhang, Feng; Spector, Tim D.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bis, Joshua C.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Lumley, Thomas; Sitlani, Colleen M.; Cupples, Adrienne; Lubitz, Steven A.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Pulit, Sara L.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Santibanez, Jireh; Taylor, Herman A.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Lange, Leslie A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Jackson, Rebecca; Rich, Stephen S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Jamshidi, Yalda; Sotoodehnia, Nona

    2014-01-01

    Background-The cardiac sodium channel SCN5A regulates atrioventricular and ventricular conduction. Genetic variants in this gene are associated with PR and QRS intervals. We sought to characterize further the contribution of rare and common coding variation in SCN5A to cardiac conduction. Methods an

  5. Rufinamide Improves Functional and Behavioral Deficits via Blockade of Tetrodotoxin-Resistant Sodium Channels in Diabetic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharatmal, Shivsharan B; Singh, Jitendra N; Sharma, Shyam S

    2015-01-01

    Rufinamide is a structurally novel, antiepileptic drug approved for the treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Its mechanism of action involves inhibition of voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) with possible membrane-stabilizing effects. VGSCs play a significant role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. Therefore, we investigated the effects of rufinamide on tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium current (TTX-R I(Na)) in acutely dissociated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons isolated from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by using whole-cell voltage-clamp configuration. In addition, the functional and behavioural nociceptive parameters were evaluated to assess its potential in diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic rats demonstrated the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia with reduced nerve perfusion and conduction velocity as compared to control. Rufinamide treatments (3 and 10 mg/kg) significantly improved these functional and nociceptive deficits. Diabetic rat DRG neurons exhibited increased TTX-R I(Na) density as compared to control. The voltage-dependent activation and steady-state inactivation curves for TTX-R I(Na) in DRG neurons from diabetic rats were shifted negatively as compared to control. Rufinamide treatments significantly blocked the TTX-R Na+ channel activity as evident from significant reduction in I(Na) density and hyperpolarizing shift in activation and inactivation curves as compared to diabetic control. This suggests that rufinamide acts on TTX-R Na+ channels, reduces channel activity and attenuates nerve functional and behavioral parameters in diabetic rats. Altogether, these results indicate therapeutic potential of rufinamide in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

  6. Update on the frequency of Ile1016 mutation in voltage-gated sodium channel gene of Aedes aegypti in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siller, Quetzaly; Ponce, Gustavo; Lozano, Saul; Flores, Adriana E

    2011-12-01

    We analyzed 790 Aedes aegypti from 14 localities of Mexico in 2009 to update information on the frequency of the Ile1016 allele in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene that confers resistance to pyrethroids and DDT. The Ile1016 mutation was present in all 17 collections, and was close to fixation in Acapulco (frequency = 0.97), Iguala (0.93), and San Nicolas (0.90). Genotypes at the 1016 locus were not in Hardy-Weinberg proportions in collections from Panuco, Veracruz, Cosoleacaque, Coatzacoalcos, Tantoyuca, and Monterrey due in every case to an excess of homozygotes. The high frequencies of this mutation in Ae. aegypti are probably due to selection pressure from pyrethroid insecticides, particularly permethrin, which has been used in mosquito control programs for >10 years in Mexico.

  7. Mutations in sodium-channel gene SCN9A cause a spectrum of human genetic pain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenth, Joost P H; Waxman, Stephen G

    2007-12-01

    The voltage-gated sodium-channel type IX alpha subunit, known as Na(v)1.7 and encoded by the gene SCN9A, is located in peripheral neurons and plays an important role in action potential production in these cells. Recent genetic studies have identified Na(v)1.7 dysfunction in three different human pain disorders. Gain-of-function missense mutations in Na(v)1.7 have been shown to cause primary erythermalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, while nonsense mutations in Na(v)1.7 result in loss of Na(v)1.7 function and a condition known as channelopathy-associated insensitivity to pain, a rare disorder in which affected individuals are unable to feel physical pain. This review highlights these recent developments and discusses the critical role of Na(v)1.7 in pain sensation in humans.

  8. Divergent actions of the pyrethroid insecticides S-bioallethrin, tefluthrin, and deltamethrin on rat Na(v)1.6 sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jianguo; Soderlund, David M

    2010-09-15

    We expressed rat Na(v)1.6 sodium channels in combination with the rat beta(1) and beta(2) auxiliary subunits in Xenopus laevis oocytes and evaluated the effects of the pyrethroid insecticides S-bioallethrin, deltamethrin, and tefluthrin on expressed sodium currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. S-Bioallethrin, a type I structure, produced transient modification evident in the induction of rapidly decaying sodium tail currents, weak resting modification (5.7% modification at 100 microM), and no further enhancement of modification upon repetitive activation by high-frequency trains of depolarizing pulses. By contrast deltamethrin, a type II structure, produced sodium tail currents that were ~9-fold more persistent than those caused by S-bioallethrin, barely detectable resting modification (2.5% modification at 100 microM), and 3.7-fold enhancement of modification upon repetitive activation. Tefluthrin, a type I structure with high mammalian toxicity, exhibited properties intermediate between S-bioallethrin and deltamethrin: intermediate tail current decay kinetics, much greater resting modification (14.1% at 100 microM), and 2.8-fold enhancement of resting modification upon repetitive activation. Comparison of concentration-effect data showed that repetitive depolarization increased the potency of tefluthrin approximately 15-fold and that tefluthrin was approximately 10-fold more potent than deltamethrin as a use-dependent modifier of Na(v)1.6 sodium channels. Concentration-effect data from parallel experiments with the rat Na(v)1.2 sodium channel coexpressed with the rat beta(1) and beta(2) subunits in oocytes showed that the Na(v)1.6 isoform was at least 15-fold more sensitive to tefluthrin and deltamethrin than the Na(v)1.2 isoform. These results implicate sodium channels containing the Na(v)1.6 isoform as potential targets for the central neurotoxic effects of pyrethroids.

  9. Infrared light irradiation diminishes effective charge transfer in slow sodium channel gating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakhova, Vera B.; Bagraev, Nikolai T.; Klyachkin, Leonid E.; Malyarenko, Anna M.; Romanov, Vladimir V.; Krylov, Boris V.

    2001-02-01

    Effects of infrared light irradiation (IR) on cultured dorsal root ganglia cells were studied by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The IR field is demonstrated to diminish the effective charge transfer in the activation system from 6.2 +-0.6 to 4.5 +-0.4 in units of electron charge per e-fold change in membrane potential. The effects was blocked with ouabain. Our data is the first indication that sodium pump might be the molecular sensor of infrared irradiation in animal kingdom.

  10. Identification of a cluster of residues in transmembrane segment 6 of domain III of the cockroach sodium channel essential for the action of pyrethroid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuzhe; Lee, Jung-Eun; Nomura, Yoshiko; Zhang, Tianxiang; Zhorov, Boris S; Dong, Ke

    2009-04-15

    A phenylalanine residue (Phe1519) in the sixth transmembrane segment of domain III (IIIS6) of the cockroach BgNa(v) sodium channel is required for the binding and action of pyrethroids. However, whether or not other residues in IIIS6 participate in the action of pyrethroids remains to be determined. In the present study, we conducted a systematic analysis of 20 residues in IIIS6 of the BgNa(v) channel using alanine-scanning mutagenesis. Our results show that alanine substitutions of four residues, Ile1514, Gly1516, Phe1518 and Asn1522, altered sodium channel sensitivity to pyrethroid insecticides. Whereas the G1516A, F1518A and N1522A substitutions diminished sodium channel sensitivity to all seven pyrethroids examined, including four type I (lacking the alpha-cyano group at the phenoxybenzyl alcohol) and three type II (containing the alpha-cyano group) pyrethroids, the I1514A substitution enhanced sodium channel sensitivity to four type I and type II pyrethroids that contain the phenoxybenzyl alcohol only. We also show that alanine/lysine substitutions of Leu1521 and Ser1517 affected the action of BTX (batrachotoxin), but not pyrethroids. In the Kv1.2-based homology model of the open sodium channel, side chains of Ile1514, Phe1518 and Asn1522 are exposed towards helix IIS5 and linker IIS4-IIS5, which contain previously identified pyrethroid-interacting residues, whereas Ser1517 and Leu1521 face the inner pore where the BTX receptor is located. Thus the present study provides further evidence for structural models in which pyrethroids bind to the lipid-exposed interface formed by helices IIIS6, IIS5 and linker helix IIS4-IIS5, whereas BTX binds to the pore-exposed side of the IIIS6 helix.

  11. Properties of sodium and potassium channels of the squid giant axon far below 0 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukita, F

    1982-01-01

    Squid giant axon could be excited in concentrated glycerol solutions containing normal concentrations of electrolytes, when osmolalities of solutions inside and outside the axon were matched. These glycerol solutions did not freeze at the temperature as low as -19 degrees C. The nerve excitation in these solutions were observed at this low temperature. The excitation process at this low temperature was slowed down and time constants of the excitation kinetics were several hundredfold larger than those in normal seawater at 10 degrees C, under which temperature the squid habituated. The temperature coefficients for the electrophysiological membrane parameters under this condition were larger than those in normal seawater above 0 degrees C. The Q10 value for the conduction velocity was 2.0 and that of the duration of the action potential was around 8.5. The time course of the membrane currents was also slowed with the Q10 value of around 5 and the magnitude decreased with the Q10 value of around 2 as the temperature was lowered. The Q10 values for the kinetics of the on process of the Na-channel were around 4.5 and were almost the same as those of the off process of the Na-channel in the wide range of the temperature below 0 degrees C. The Q10 value of the on process of K-channel was around 6.5 and was larger than those for Na-channel. The Q10 values increased gradually as the temperature was lowered.

  12. Positive symptoms in multiple sclerosis: their treatment with sodium channel blockers, lidocaine and mexiletine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, M; Kanazawa, I

    1999-01-15

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) often show positive symptoms of painful tonic seizure and dysesthesia as well as negative symptoms of paralysis and hypesthesia. Positive manifestation is paroxysmal and/or persistent. These are considered to be mediated by ectopic impulses generated at the site of demyelination, whereas negative symptoms are caused by conduction block. Conduction block at a demyelinated segment should reduce positive symptoms, but worsen negative ones. As reported previously, lidocaine, an Na channel blocker unmasks silent negative symptoms presumably by further reducing the action current in demyelinated portions and blocking conduction. Furthermore, because it blocks Na channels in a voltage- and frequency dependent manner, fibers that mediate positive symptoms are preferentially blocked. We administered lidocaine to 30 MS patients with positive symptoms. Lidocaine (mean plasma level, 2.4 pg/ml) almost completely abolished the paroxysmal manifestation of painful tonic seizures, neuralgic attacks, paroxysmal itching, and Lhermitte's sign. It also markedly alleviated persistent symptoms, but less so than paroxysmal symptoms. Similar effects were obtained with orally-administered mexiletine (300-400 mg/day), a derivative of lidocaine, but to a lesser extent. Na channel blockers have a dual effect on symptoms in MS, depending on whether symptoms are positive or negative. The mechanism that produces positive symptoms and the effects of the drugs on these symptoms are discussed.

  13. Functional interaction between S1 and S4 segments in voltage-gated sodium channels revealed by human channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarouch, Mohamed-Yassine; Kasimova, Marina A; Tarek, Mounir; Abriel, Hugues

    2014-01-01

    The p.I141V mutation of the voltage-gated sodium channel is associated with several clinical hyper-excitability phenotypes. To understand the structural bases of the p.I141V biophysical alterations, molecular dynamics simulations were performed. These simulations predicted that the p.I141V substitution induces the formation of a hydrogen bond between the Y168 residue of the S2 segment and the R225 residue of the S4 segment. We generated a p.I141V-Y168F double mutant for both the Nav1.4 and Nav1.5 channels. The double mutants demonstrated the abolition of the functional effects of the p.I141V mutation, consistent with the formation of a specific interaction between Y168-S2 and R225-S4. The single p.Y168F mutation, however, positively shifted the activation curve, suggesting a compensatory role of these residues on the stability of the voltage-sensing domain.

  14. Characteristics of single large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels and their regulation of action potentials and excitability in parasympathetic cardiac motoneurons in the nucleus ambiguus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Min; Hatcher, Jeff T; Wurster, Robert D; Chen, Qin-Hui; Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2014-01-15

    Large-conductance Ca2(+)-activated K+ channels (BK) regulate action potential (AP) properties and excitability in many central neurons. However, the properties and functional roles of BK channels in parasympathetic cardiac motoneurons (PCMNs) in the nucleus ambiguus (NA) have not yet been well characterized. In this study, the tracer X-rhodamine-5 (and 6)-isothiocyanate (XRITC) was injected into the pericardial sac to retrogradely label PCMNs in FVB mice at postnatal 7-9 days. Two days later, XRITC-labeled PCMNs in brain stem slices were identified. Using excised patch single-channel recordings, we identified voltage-gated and Ca(2+)-dependent BK channels in PCMNs. The majority of BK channels exhibited persistent channel opening during voltage holding. These BK channels had a conductance of 237 pS and a 50% opening probability at +27.9 mV, the channel open time constant was 3.37 ms at +20 mV, and dwell time increased exponentially as the membrane potential depolarized. At the +20-mV holding potential, the [Ca2+]50 was 15.2 μM with a P0.5 of 0.4. Occasionally, some BK channels showed a transient channel opening and fast inactivation. Using whole cell voltage clamp, we found that BK channel mediated outward currents and afterhyperpolarization currents (IAHP). Using whole cell current clamp, we found that application of BK channel blocker iberiotoxin (IBTX) increased spike half-width and suppressed fast afterhyperpolarization (fAHP) amplitude following single APs. In addition, IBTX application increased spike half-width and reduced the spike frequency-dependent AP broadening in trains and spike frequency adaption (SFA). Furthermore, BK channel blockade decreased spike frequency. Collectively, these results demonstrate that PCMNs have BK channels that significantly regulate AP repolarization, fAHP, SFA, and spike frequency. We conclude that activation of BK channels underlies one of the mechanisms for facilitation of PCMN excitability.

  15. Investigations of the Navβ1b sodium channel subunit in human ventricle; functional characterization of the H162P Brugada Syndrome mutant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Lei; Koivumaki, Jussi; Liang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    that these electrophysiological changes resulted in a reduction in both action potential amplitude and maximum upstroke velocity. The experimental data thereby indicate that Navβ1b/H162P results in reduced sodium channel activity functionally affecting the ventricular action potential. This result is an important replication...

  16. THE PRESENCE OF A B SUBUNIT INCREASES SENSITIVITY OF SODIUM CHANNEL NAV1.3, BUT NOT NAV1.2, TO TYPE II PYRETHROIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltage-sensitive sodium channels (VSSCs) are a primary target of pyrethroid insecticides. VSSCs are comprised of a pore-forming ¿ and auxillary ß subunits, and multiple isoforms of both subunit types exist. The sensitivity of different isoform combinations to pyrethroids has not...

  17. Structural mapping of the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Distance between the tetrodotoxin and Centruroides suffusus suffusus II beta-scorpion toxin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbon, H; Angelides, K J

    1984-05-25

    A 7- dimethylaminocoumarin -4-acetate fluorescent derivative of toxin II from the venom of the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css II) has been prepared to study the structural, conformational, and cellular properties of the beta-neurotoxin receptor site on the voltage-dependent sodium channel. The derivative retains high affinity for its receptor site on the synaptosomal sodium channel with a KD of 7 nM and site capacity of 1.5 pmol/mg of synaptosomal protein. The fluorescent toxin is very environmentally sensitive and the fluorescence emission upon binding indicates that the Css II receptor is largely hydrophobic. Binding of tetrodotoxin or batrachotoxin does not alter the spectroscopic properties of bound Css II, whereas toxin V from Leiurus quinquestriatus effects a 10-nm blue shift to a more hydrophobic environment. This is the first direct indication of conformational coupling between these separate neurotoxin receptor sites. The distance between the tetrodotoxin and Css II scorpion toxin receptors on the sodium channel was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Efficiencies were measured by both donor quenching and acceptor-sensitized emission. The distance between these two neurotoxin sites is about 34 A. The implications of these receptor locations together with other known molecular distances are discussed in terms of a molecular structure of the voltage-dependent sodium channel.

  18. Voltage dependence of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling: unitary Ca2+ current amplitude and open channel probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano, Julio; Bers, Donald M

    2007-09-14

    Excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac myocytes occurs by Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release, where L-type Ca2+ current evokes a larger sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release. The Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release amplification factor or gain (SR Ca2+ release/I(Ca)) is usually assessed by the V(m) dependence of current and Ca2+ transients. Gain rises at negative V(m), as does single channel I(Ca) (i(Ca)), which has led to the suggestion that the increases of i(Ca) amplitude enhances gain at more negative V(m). However, I(Ca) = NP(o) x i(Ca) (where NP(o) is the number of open channels), and NP(o) and i(Ca) both depend on V(m). To assess how i(Ca) and NP(o) separately influence Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release, we measured I(Ca) and junctional SR Ca2+ release in voltage-clamped rat ventricular myocytes using "Ca2+ spikes" (confocal microscopy). To vary i(Ca) alone, we changed [Ca2+](o) rapidly at constant test V(m) (0 mV) or abruptly repolarized from +120 mV to different V(m) (at constant [Ca2+](o)). To vary NP(o) alone, we altered Ca2+ channel availability by varying holding V(m) (at constant test V(m)). Reducing either i(Ca) or NP(o) alone increased excitation-contraction coupling gain. Thus, increasing i(Ca) does not increase gain at progressively negative test V(m). Such enhanced gain depends on lower NP(o) and reduced redundant Ca2+ channel openings (per junction) and a consequently smaller denominator in the gain equation. Furthermore, modest i(Ca) (at V(m) = 0 mV) may still effectively trigger SR Ca2+ release, whereas at positive V(m) (and smaller i(Ca)), high and well-synchronized channel openings are required for efficient excitation-contraction coupling. At very positive V(m), reduced i(Ca) must explain reduced SR Ca2+ release.

  19. Point mutations at the local anesthetic receptor site modulate the state-dependent block of rat Na v1.4 sodium channels by pyrazoline-type insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Kristopher S; Soderlund, David M

    2007-05-01

    Pyrazoline-type insecticides (PTIs) selectively block sodium channels at membrane potentials that promote slow sodium channel inactivation and are proposed to interact with a site that overlaps the local anesthetic (LA) receptor site. Mutagenesis studies identified two amino acid residues in the S6 segment of homology domain IV (Phe-1579 and Tyr-1586 in the rat Na(v)1.4 sodium channel) as principal elements of the LA receptor. To test the hypothesis that PTIs bind to the LA receptor, we constructed mutated Na(v)1.4/F1579A and Na(v)1.4/Y1586A cDNAs, expressed native and mutated channels in Xenopus oocytes, and examined the effects of these mutations on channel block by three PTIs (indoxacarb, its bioactivation product DCJW, and RH3421) by two-electrode voltage clamp. DCJW and RH3421 had no effect on Na(v)1.4 channels held at -120mV but caused a slowly developing block upon depolarization to -30mV. Estimated IC(50) values following 15min of exposure were 1 and 4muM for DCJW and RH3421, respectively. Indoxacarb failed to block Na(v)1.4 channels under all experimental conditions. Sensitivity to block by DCJW and RH3421 at -30mV was significantly reduced in Na(v)1.4/F1579A channels, a finding that is consistent with the impact of this mutation on drug binding. In contrast to its effect on drug binding, the Y1586A mutation increased the sensitivity of Na(v)1.4 channels held at -30mV to all three compounds, conferring modest sensitivity to indoxacarb and increasing sensitivity to DCJW and RH3421 by 58- and 16-fold, respectively. These results provide direct evidence for the action of PTIs at the LA receptor.

  20. Specific binding of toxin II from Centruroides suffusus suffusus to the sodium channel in electroplaque membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, K P; Barhanin, J; Lazdunski, M

    1982-10-26

    The binding of toxin II from the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus (CssII) to electroplaque membranes from Electrophorus electricus was studied with the use of a radiolabeled derivative of the toxin ([125I]CssII). Specific binding of the latter to the membranes required the protonation of a group, either in the membrane or in the toxin itself, with an apparent pKa value of 7.5 and also the presence of a certain minimum concentration of ions, though there was no requirement for a specific ion. At 20 degrees C and pH 6 the second-order rate constant for formation of the [125I]CssII-membrane complex was about 5 X 10(6) M-1 s-1, while the first-order constant for its dissociation was about 2 X 10(-3) s-1. Under equilibrium conditions specific binding of [125I]CssII was a simple saturable function of [125I]CssII concentration, characterized by a dissociation constant of 0.4-0.7 nM and a maximum capacity of 0.9-2.4 pmol of toxin/mg of membrane protein. The latter value was the same as the number of membrane sites that could specifically bind a radiolabeled derivative of tetrodotoxin. Unlabeled CssII displaced bound [125I]CssII with an apparent dissociation constant of about 1 nM. None of 19 other neurotoxins or local anaesthetics known to interact with Na+ channels in excitable cells affected [125I]CssII binding, but it was completely inhibited by toxin gamma from the scorpion Tityus serrulatus serrulatus. These findings suggest that the Na+ channel possesses a distinct class of binding sites to which these two scorpion toxins bind with high affinities. On the other hand, no CssII receptor was detected in crab axonal membranes, indicating that it is not a characteristic feature of all Na+ channels.

  1. Inhibition of nitrite-induced toxicity in channel catfish by calcium chloride and sodium chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasso J.R., Wright; Simco, B.A.; Davis, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    Environmental chloride has been shown to inhibit methemoglobin formation in fish, thereby offering a protective effect against nitrite toxicity. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were simultaneously exposed to various environmental nitrite and chloride levels (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) in dechlorinated tap water (40 mg/L total hardness, 47 mg/L alkalinity, 4 mg/L chloride, pH = 6.9-7.1, and temperature 21-24°C). Methemoglobin levels in fish simultaneously exposed to 2.5 mg/L nitrite and up to 30 mg/L chloride as either CaCl2 or NaCl were similar but significantly lower than in unprotected fish. Exposure to 10 mg/L nitrite and 60 mg/L chloride resulted in methemoglobin levels similar to those of the controls; most unprotected fish died. Fish exposed to 10 mg/L nitrite had significantly lower methemoglobin levels when protected with 15.0 mg/L chloride as CaCl2 than with NaCl. Fish exposed to nitrite in the presence of 60 mg/L chloride (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) had similar 24-h LC50 values that were significantly elevated above those obtained in the absence of chloride. Calcium had little effect on tolerance to nitrite toxicity in channel catfish in contrast to its large effect reported in steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri).

  2. Crystal Structure of a Fibroblast Growth Factor Homologous Factor (FHF) Defines a Conserved Surface on FHFs for Binding and Modulation of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, R.; Dover, K; Laezza, F; Shtraizent, N; Huang, X; Tchetchik, D; Eliseenkova, A; Goldfarb, M; Mohammadi, M; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) produce sodium currents that underlie the initiation and propagation of action potentials in nerve and muscle cells. Fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) bind to the intracellular C-terminal region of the Nav alpha subunit to modulate fast inactivation of the channel. In this study we solved the crystal structure of a 149-residue-long fragment of human FHF2A which unveils the structural features of the homology core domain of all 10 human FHF isoforms. Through analysis of crystal packing contacts and site-directed mutagenesis experiments we identified a conserved surface on the FHF core domain that mediates channel binding in vitro and in vivo. Mutations at this channel binding surface impaired the ability of FHFs to co-localize with Navs at the axon initial segment of hippocampal neurons. The mutations also disabled FHF modulation of voltage-dependent fast inactivation of sodium channels in neuronal cells. Based on our data, we propose that FHFs constitute auxiliary subunits for Navs.

  3. A sodium channel inhibitor ISTX-I with a novel structure provides a new hint at the evolutionary link between two toxin folds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Mingqiang; Liu, Jiangxin; Zhang, Meilin; Wang, Gan; Zhao, Gang; Wang, Guodong; Zhang, Yaping; Hu, Kaifeng; Lai, Ren

    2016-01-01

    Members of arachnida, such as spiders and scorpions, commonly produce venom with specialized venom glands, paralyzing their prey with neurotoxins that specifically target ion channels. Two well-studied motifs, the disulfide-directed hairpin (DDH) and the inhibitor cystine knot motif (ICK), are both found in scorpion and spider toxins. As arachnids, ticks inject a neurotoxin-containing cocktail from their salivary glands into the host to acquire a blood meal, but peptide toxins acting on ion channels have not been observed in ticks. Here, a new neurotoxin (ISTX-I) that acts on sodium channels was identified from the hard tick Ixodes scapularis and characterized. ISTX-I exhibits a potent inhibitory function with an IC50 of 1.6 μM for sodium channel Nav1.7 but not other sodium channel subtypes. ISTX-I adopts a novel structural fold and is distinct from the canonical ICK motif. Analysis of the ISTX-I, DDH and ICK motifs reveals that the new ISTX-I motif might be an intermediate scaffold between DDH and ICK, and ISTX-I is a clue to the evolutionary link between the DDH and ICK motifs. These results provide a glimpse into the convergent evolution of neurotoxins from predatory and blood-sucking arthropods. PMID:27407029

  4. The cardiac L-type calcium channel distal carboxy terminus autoinhibition is regulated by calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Shawn M; Andres, Douglas A; Sievert, Gail; Satin, Jonathan

    2013-02-01

    The L-type calcium channel (LTCC) provides trigger Ca(2+) for sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-release, and LTCC function is influenced by interacting proteins including the LTCC distal COOH terminus (DCT) and calmodulin. DCT is proteolytically cleaved and reassociates with the LTCC complex to regulate calcium channel function. DCT reduces LTCC barium current (I(Ba,L)) in reconstituted channel complexes, yet the contribution of DCT to LTCC Ca(2+) current (I(Ca,L)) in cardiomyocyte systems is unexplored. This study tests the hypothesis that DCT attenuates cardiomyocyte I(Ca,L). We measured LTCC current and Ca(2+) transients with DCT coexpressed in murine cardiomyocytes. We also heterologously coexpressed DCT and Ca(V)1.2 constructs with truncations corresponding to the predicted proteolytic cleavage site, Ca(V)1.2Δ1801, and a shorter deletion corresponding to well-studied construct, Ca(V)1.2Δ1733. DCT inhibited I(Ba,L) in cardiomyocytes, and in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing Ca(V)1.2Δ1801 and Ca(V)1.2Δ1733. Ca(2+)-CaM relieved DCT block in cardiomyocytes and HEK cells. The selective block of I(Ba,L) combined with Ca(2+)-CaM effects suggested that DCT-mediated blockade may be relieved under conditions of elevated Ca(2+). We therefore tested the hypothesis that DCT block is dynamic, increasing under relatively low Ca(2+), and show that DCT reduced diastolic Ca(2+) at low stimulation frequencies but spared high frequency Ca(2+) entry. DCT reduction of diastolic Ca(2+) and relief of block at high pacing frequencies and under conditions of supraphysiological bath Ca(2+) suggests that a physiological function of DCT is to increase the dynamic range of Ca(2+) transients in response to elevated pacing frequencies. Our data motivate the new hypothesis that DCT is a native reverse use-dependent inhibitor of LTCC current.

  5. Cardiac actions of phencyclidine in isolated guinea pig and rat heart: possible involvement of slow channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temma, K.; Akera, T.; Ng, Y.C.

    1985-03-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the positive inotropic effect of phencyclidine were studied in isolated preparations of guinea pig and rat heart. In electrically paced left atrial muscle preparations, phencyclidine increased the force of contraction; rat heart muscle preparations were more sensitive than guinea pig heart muscle preparations. The positive inotropic effect of phencyclidine was not significantly reduced by a combination of phentolamine and nadolol; however, the effect was competitively blocked by verapamil in the presence of phentolamine and nadolol. Inhibition of the outward K+ current by tetraethylammonium chloride also produced a positive inotropic effect; however, the effect of tetraethylammonium was reduced by phentolamine and nadolol, and was almost insensitive to verapamil. The inotropic effect of phencyclidine was associated with a marked prolongation of the action potential duration and a decrease in maximal upstroke velocity of the action potential, with no change in the resting membrane potential. The specific (/sup 3/H)phencyclidine binding observed with membrane preparations from guinea pig ventricular muscle was saturable with a single class of high-affinity binding site. This binding was inhibited by verapamil, diltiazem, or nitrendipine, but not by ryanodine or tetrodotoxin. These results suggest that the positive inotropic effect of phencyclidine results from enhanced Ca/sup 2 +/ influx via slow channels, either by stimulation of the channels or secondary to inhibition of outward K/sup +/ currents.

  6. Block of inactivated sodium channels and of depolarization-induced automaticity in guinea pig papillary muscle by amiodarone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, J W; Hondeghem, L M; Katzung, B G

    1984-09-01

    The electrophysiological effects of amiodarone were studied in guinea pig papillary muscle by means of the single sucrose gap voltage clamp technique. The first time derivative of the upstroke of the action potential was measured as an indicator of the sodium current. The preparations were not voltage clamped during the action potential upstroke. Acute effects of amiodarone (4.4 X 10(-5) M and 8.8 X 10(-5) M; six experiments each) and effects of chronic administration at a single dose level (nine experimental vs. eight control animals) were studied. Results were qualitatively the same for all experimental conditions, and concentration dependent in the acute studies. Amiodarone caused marked use-dependent depression of the first time derivative of the upstroke of the action potential during stimulus trains. For example, at normal resting potential, chronic amiodarone treatment reduced the first time derivative of the upstroke of the action potential of the 16th beat of trains of cycle length 300 msec to 70 +/- 15% (mean +/- SD) of the initial value. This blocking effect was accentuated at more depolarized holding potentials and reduced at hyperpolarized holding potentials. Reduction of the first time derivative of the upstroke of the action potential was found to depend upon sodium channel inactivation. For all experiments, the mean normalized first time derivative of the upstroke of the action potential following a 1-second clamp in the -20 to +20 mV range was 0.92 +/- 0.08 in the control condition and 0.66 +/- 0.20 in the presence of amiodarone (less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. The central mechanism underlying hypertension: a review of the roles of sodium ions, epithelial sodium channels, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, oxidative stress and endogenous digitalis in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hakuo; Yoshika, Masamichi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Nishimura, Masato

    2011-11-01

    The central nervous system has a key role in regulating the circulatory system by modulating the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, pituitary hormone release, and the baroreceptor reflex. Digoxin- and ouabain-like immunoreactive materials were found >20 years ago in the hypothalamic nuclei. These factors appeared to localize to the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei and the nerve fibers at the circumventricular organs and supposed to affect electrolyte balance and blood pressure. The turnover rate of these materials increases with increasing sodium intake. As intracerebroventricular injection of ouabain increases blood pressure via sympathetic activation, an endogenous digitalis-like factor (EDLF) was thought to regulate cardiovascular system-related functions in the brain, particularly after sodium loading. Experiments conducted mainly in rats revealed that the mechanism of action of ouabain in the brain involves sodium ions, epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs) and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), all of which are affected by sodium loading. Rats fed a high-sodium diet develop elevated sodium levels in their cerebrospinal fluid, which activates ENaCs. Activated ENaCs and/or increased intracellular sodium in neurons activate the RAAS; this releases EDLF in the brain, activating the sympathetic nervous system. The RAAS promotes oxidative stress in the brain, further activating the RAAS and augmenting sympathetic outflow. Angiotensin II and aldosterone of peripheral origin act in the brain to activate this cascade, increasing sympathetic outflow and leading to hypertension. Thus, the brain Na(+)-ENaC-RAAS-EDLF axis activates sympathetic outflow and has a crucial role in essential and secondary hypertension. This report provides an overview of the central mechanism underlying hypertension and discusses the use of antihypertensive agents.

  8. Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) subunit mRNA and protein expression in rats with puromycin aminonucleoside-induced nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audigé, A; Yu, Z R; Frey, B M; Uehlinger, D E; Frey, F J; Vogt, B

    2003-04-01

    In experimental nephrotic syndrome, urinary sodium excretion is decreased during the early phase of the disease. The molecular mechanism(s) leading to salt retention has not been completely elucidated. The rate-limiting constituent of collecting duct sodium transport is the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). We examined the abundance of ENaC subunit mRNAs and proteins in puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN)-induced nephrotic syndrome. The time courses of urinary sodium excretion, plasma aldosterone concentration and proteinuria were studied in male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with a single dose of either PAN or vehicle. The relative amounts of alphaENaC, betaENaC and gammaENaC mRNAs were determined in kidneys from these rats by real-time quantitative TaqMan PCR, and the amounts of proteins by Western blot. The kinetics of urinary sodium excretion and the appearance of proteinuria were comparable with those reported previously. Sodium retention occurred on days 2, 3 and 6 after PAN injection. A significant up-regulation of alphaENaC and betaENaC mRNA abundance on days 1 and 2 preceded sodium retention on days 2 and 3. Conversely, down-regulation of alphaENaC, betaENaC and gammaENaC mRNA expression on day 3 occurred in the presence of high aldosterone concentrations, and was followed by a return of sodium excretion to control values. The amounts of alphaENaC, betaENaC and gammaENaC proteins were not increased during PAN-induced sodium retention. In conclusion, ENaC mRNA expression, especially alphaENaC, is increased in the very early phase of the experimental model of PAN-induced nephrotic syndrome in rats, but appears to escape from the regulation by aldosterone after day 3.

  9. Proteolytic activation of the epithelial sodium channel ENaC in preeclampsia examined with urinary exosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Maria Ravn; Rytz, Mie; Frederiksen-Møller, Britta

    2015-01-01

    of ENaC by proteolytic cleavage of the γ-subunit ectodomain and release of a 43-aminoacid inhibitory tract from the channel. Exosomes are membrane vesicles released into the urine from apical membranes of the kidney epithelial cells. OBJECTIVES: (1) To investigate if the proteolytic state of the ENaC γ......-subnit can be studied in urine exosomes from pregnant women. (2) To investigate if the ENaC γ-subunit ectodomain is abnormally activated by proteolysis in preeclamptic women. METHODS: 100 mL spot urine samples from 14 preeclamptic women, 17 pregnant women and 9 non-pregnant women were collected with protease...... inhibitors. Plasmin/plasminogen was measured. Exosomes were recovered by ultracentrifugation at 220,000×g at 4°C for 100 min. The exosome fraction was used for western blotting with a newly developed monoclonal antibody, mAb3C7, directed against the "inhibitory" tract in γ-ENaC. Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) was used...

  10. Different pH-sensitivity patterns of 30 sodium channel inhibitors suggest chemically different pools along the access pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Alexandra; Lenkey, Nora; Pesti, Krisztina; Fodor, Laszlo; Mike, Arpad

    2015-01-01

    The major drug binding site of sodium channels is inaccessible from the extracellular side, drug molecules can only access it either from the membrane phase, or from the intracellular aqueous phase. For this reason, ligand-membrane interactions are as important determinants of inhibitor properties, as ligand-protein interactions. One-way to probe this is to modify the pH of the extracellular fluid, which alters the ratio of charged vs. uncharged forms of some compounds, thereby changing their interaction with the membrane. In this electrophysiology study we used three different pH values: 6.0, 7.3, and 8.6 to test the significance of the protonation-deprotonation equilibrium in drug access and affinity. We investigated drugs of several different indications: carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin, lidocaine, bupivacaine, mexiletine, flecainide, ranolazine, riluzole, memantine, ritanserin, tolperisone, silperisone, ambroxol, haloperidol, chlorpromazine, clozapine, fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine, amitriptyline, imipramine, desipramine, maprotiline, nisoxetine, mianserin, mirtazapine, venlafaxine, nefazodone, and trazodone. We recorded the pH-dependence of potency, reversibility, as well as onset/offset kinetics. As expected, we observed a strong correlation between the acidic dissociation constant (pKa) of drugs and the pH-dependence of their potency. Unexpectedly, however, the pH-dependence of reversibility or kinetics showed diverse patterns, not simple correlation. Our data are best explained by a model where drug molecules can be trapped in at least two chemically different environments: A hydrophilic trap (which may be the aqueous cavity within the inner vestibule), which favors polar and less lipophilic compounds, and a lipophilic trap (which may be the membrane phase itself, and/or lipophilic binding sites on the channel). Rescue from the hydrophilic and lipophilic traps can be promoted by alkalic and acidic extracellular pH, respectively. PMID:26441665

  11. Different pH-sensitivity patterns of 30 sodium channel inhibitors suggest chemically different pools along the access pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eLazar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The major drug binding site of sodium channels is inaccessible from the extracellular side, drug molecules can only access it either from the membrane phase, or from the intracellular aqueous phase. For this reason, ligand-membrane interactions are as important determinants of inhibitor properties, as ligand-protein interactions. One way to probe this is to modify the pH of the extracellular fluid, which alters the ratio of charged vs. uncharged forms of some compounds, thereby changing their interaction with the membrane. In this electrophysiology study we used three different pH values: 6.0, 7.3 and 8.6 to test the significance of the protonation-deprotonation equilibrium in drug access and affinity. We investigated drugs of several different indications: carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin, lidocaine, bupivacaine, mexiletine, flecainide, ranolazine, riluzole, memantine, ritanserin, tolperisone, silperisone, ambroxol, haloperidol, chlorpromazine, clozapine, fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine, amitriptyline, imipramine, desipramine, maprotiline, nisoxetine, mianserin, mirtazapine, venlafaxine, nefazodone and trazodone. We recorded the pH-dependence of potency, reversibility, as well as onset/offset kinetics. As expected, we observed a strong correlation between the acidic dissociation constant (pKa of drugs and the pH-dependence of their potency. Unexpectedly, however, the pH-dependence of reversibility or kinetics showed diverse patterns, not simple correlation. Our data are best explained by a model where drug molecules can be trapped in at least two chemically different environments: A hydrophilic trap (which may be the aqueous cavity within the inner vestibule, which favors polar and less lipophilic compounds, and a lipophilic trap (which may be the membrane phase itself, and/or lipophilic binding sites on the channel. Rescue from the hydrophilic and lipophilic traps can be promoted by alkalic and acidic extracellular pH, respectively.

  12. Structure of membrane-active toxin from crab spider Heriaeus melloteei suggests parallel evolution of sodium channel gating modifiers in Araneomorphae and Mygalomorphae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkut, Antonina A; Peigneur, Steve; Myshkin, Mikhail Yu; Paramonov, Alexander S; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Arseniev, Alexander S; Grishin, Eugene V; Tytgat, Jan; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2015-01-01

    We present a structural and functional study of a sodium channel activation inhibitor from crab spider venom. Hm-3 is an insecticidal peptide toxin consisting of 35 amino acid residues from the spider Heriaeus melloteei (Thomisidae). We produced Hm-3 recombinantly in Escherichia coli and determined its structure by NMR spectroscopy. Typical for spider toxins, Hm-3 was found to adopt the so-called "inhibitor cystine knot" or "knottin" fold stabilized by three disulfide bonds. Its molecule is amphiphilic with a hydrophobic ridge on the surface enriched in aromatic residues and surrounded by positive charges. Correspondingly, Hm-3 binds to both neutral and negatively charged lipid vesicles. Electrophysiological studies showed that at a concentration of 1 μm Hm-3 effectively inhibited a number of mammalian and insect sodium channels. Importantly, Hm-3 shifted the dependence of channel activation to more positive voltages. Moreover, the inhibition was voltage-dependent, and strong depolarizing prepulses attenuated Hm-3 activity. The toxin is therefore concluded to represent the first sodium channel gating modifier from an araneomorph spider and features a "membrane access" mechanism of action. Its amino acid sequence and position of the hydrophobic cluster are notably different from other known gating modifiers from spider venom, all of which are described from mygalomorph species. We hypothesize parallel evolution of inhibitor cystine knot toxins from Araneomorphae and Mygalomorphae suborders.

  13. Functional and molecular characterization of voltage-gated sodium channels in uteri from nonpregnant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Marian; Pinto, Francisco M; Wray, Susan; Cintado, Cristina G; Noheda, Pedro; Buschmann, Helmut; Candenas, Luz

    2007-11-01

    We investigated the function and expression of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSC) in the uteri of nonpregnant rats using organ bath techniques, intracellular [Ca(2+)] fluorescence measurements, and RT-PCR. In longitudinally arranged whole-tissue uterine strips, veratridine, a VGSC activator, caused the rapid appearance of phasic contractions of irregular frequency and amplitude. After 50-60 min in the continuous presence of veratridine, rhythmic contractions of very regular frequency and slightly increasing amplitude occurred and were sustained for up to 12 h. Both the early and late components of the contractile response to veratridine were inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by tetrodotoxin (TTX). In small strips dissected from the uterine longitudinal smooth muscle layer and loaded with Fura-2, veratridine also caused rhythmic contractions, accompanied by transient increases in [Ca(2+)](i), which were abolished by treatment with 0.1 microM TTX. Using end-point and real-time quantitative RT-PCR, we detected the presence of the VGSC alpha subunits Scn2a1, Scn3a, Scn5a, and Scn8a in the cDNA from longitudinal muscle. The mRNAs of the auxiliary beta subunits Scbn1b, Scbn2b, Scbn4b, and traces of Scn3b were also present. These data show for the first time that Scn2a1, Scn3a, Scn5a, and Scn8a, as well as all VGSC beta subunits are expressed in the longitudinal smooth muscle layer of the rat myometrium. In addition, our data show that TTX-sensitive VGSC are able to mediate phasic contractions maintained over long periods of time in the uteri of nonpregnant rats.

  14. Novel Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel of Pyrethroid-Resistant Varroa destructor Populations from the Southeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cabrera, Joel; Rodríguez-Vargas, Sonia; Davies, T. G. Emyr; Field, Linda M.; Schmehl, Daniel; Ellis, James D.; Krieger, Klemens; Williamson, Martin S.

    2016-01-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa destructor has a significant worldwide impact on bee colony health. In the absence of control measures, parasitized colonies invariably collapse within 3 years. The synthetic pyrethroids tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin have proven very effective at managing this mite within apiaries, but intensive control programs based mainly on one active ingredient have led to many reports of pyrethroid resistance. In Europe, a modification of leucine to valine at position 925 (L925V) of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel was correlated with resistance, the mutation being found at high frequency exclusively in hives with a recent history of pyrethroid treatment. Here, we identify two novel mutations, L925M and L925I, in tau-fluvalinate resistant V. destructor collected at seven sites across Florida and Georgia in the Southeastern region of the USA. Using a multiplexed TaqMan® allelic discrimination assay, these mutations were found to be present in 98% of the mites surviving tau-fluvalinate treatment. The mutations were also found in 45% of the non-treated mites, suggesting a high potential for resistance evolution if selection pressure is applied. The results from a more extensive monitoring programme, using the Taqman® assay described here, would clearly help beekeepers with their decision making as to when to include or exclude pyrethroid control products and thereby facilitate more effective mite management programmes. PMID:27191597

  15. Novel Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel of Pyrethroid-Resistant Varroa destructor Populations from the Southeastern USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel González-Cabrera

    Full Text Available The parasitic mite Varroa destructor has a significant worldwide impact on bee colony health. In the absence of control measures, parasitized colonies invariably collapse within 3 years. The synthetic pyrethroids tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin have proven very effective at managing this mite within apiaries, but intensive control programs based mainly on one active ingredient have led to many reports of pyrethroid resistance. In Europe, a modification of leucine to valine at position 925 (L925V of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel was correlated with resistance, the mutation being found at high frequency exclusively in hives with a recent history of pyrethroid treatment. Here, we identify two novel mutations, L925M and L925I, in tau-fluvalinate resistant V. destructor collected at seven sites across Florida and Georgia in the Southeastern region of the USA. Using a multiplexed TaqMan® allelic discrimination assay, these mutations were found to be present in 98% of the mites surviving tau-fluvalinate treatment. The mutations were also found in 45% of the non-treated mites, suggesting a high potential for resistance evolution if selection pressure is applied. The results from a more extensive monitoring programme, using the Taqman® assay described here, would clearly help beekeepers with their decision making as to when to include or exclude pyrethroid control products and thereby facilitate more effective mite management programmes.

  16. Mineralocorticoid receptor stimulation induces urinary storage dysfunction via upregulation of epithelial sodium channel expression in the rat urinary bladder epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiji; Hotta, Yuji; Maeda, Kotomi; Kataoka, Tomoya; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Hamakawa, Takashi; Sasaki, Shoichi; Yasui, Takahiro; Asai, Kiyofumi; Kimura, Kazunori

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) expression in rat bladder and the physiological role of the MR-epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) pathway in controlling bladder function in 10-12-week-old, male Sprague-Dawley rats. First, we examined the mRNA expression of MR and localization of MR and ENaC-α proteins in the urinary bladder. MR mRNA expression was observed in untreated-rat urinary bladders, and MR and ENaC-α proteins were localized in the epithelium. Next, rats were treated with vehicle (controls) or fludrocortisone (an MR agonist) for 3 days, and ENaC-α protein expression levels and bladder function were evaluated on day 4. ENaC-α protein expression was significantly higher in fludrocortisone-treated rats than in controls. In addition, cystometry was performed during intravesical infusion of saline and amiloride (an ENaC inhibitor). While intercontraction intervals (ICIs) during saline infusion were significantly shorter in the fludrocortisone group than in the controls, infusion of amiloride normalized the ICIs in the fludrocortisone group. However, no intra- or inter-group differences in maximum intravesical pressure were observed. Taken together, MR protein is localized in the rat urinary bladder epithelium, and may regulate ENaC expression and bladder afferent input. The MR-ENaC pathway may be a therapeutic target for ameliorating storage symptoms.

  17. Frequency-dependent reliability of spike propagation is function of axonal voltage-gated sodium channels in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhilai; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2013-12-01

    The spike propagation on nerve axons, like synaptic transmission, is essential to ensure neuronal communication. The secure propagation of sequential spikes toward axonal terminals has been challenged in the neurons with a high firing rate, such as cerebellar Purkinje cells. The shortfall of spike propagation makes some digital spikes disappearing at axonal terminals, such that the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying spike propagation reliability is crucial to find the strategy of preventing loss of neuronal codes. As the spike propagation failure is influenced by the membrane potentials, this process is likely caused by altering the functional status of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC). We examined this hypothesis in Purkinje cells by using pair-recordings at their somata and axonal blebs in cerebellar slices. The reliability of spike propagation was deteriorated by elevating spike frequency. The frequency-dependent reliability of spike propagation was attenuated by inactivating VGSCs and improved by removing their inactivation. Thus, the functional status of axonal VGSCs influences the reliability of spike propagation.

  18. Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation-induced plasticity is NMDA-receptor independent but sodium-channel blocker and benzodiazepines sensitive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila eChaieb

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Application of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS between 0.1 and 640 Hz of the primary motor cortex (M1 for 10 minutes induces a persistent excitability increase lasting for at least 60 minutes. However, the mechanism of tRNS-induced cortical excitability alterations is not yet fully understood. Objective: The main aim of this study was to get first efficacy data with regard to the possible neuronal effect of tRNS. Methods: Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS was used to measure levels of cortical excitability before and after combined application of tRNS at an intensity of 1mA for 10mins stimulation duration and a pharmacological agent (or sham on 8 healthy male participants. Results: The sodium channel blocker carbamazepine showed a tendency towards inhibiting MEPs 5-60 mins poststimulation. The GABAA agonist lorazepam suppressed tRNS-induced cortical excitability increases at 0-20 and 60 min time points. The partial NMDA receptor agonist D-cycloserine, the NMDA receptor antagonist dextromethorphan and the D2/D3 receptor agonist ropinirole had no significant effects on the excitability increases seen with tRNS.Conclusions: In contrast to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, aftereffects of tRNS are seem to be not NMDA receptor dependent and can be suppressed by benzodiazepines suggesting that tDCS and tRNS depend upon different mechanisms.

  19. First chemical synthesis of a scorpion alpha-toxin affecting sodium channels: the Aah I toxin of Androctonus australis hector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'Barek, Sarrah; Fajloun, Ziad; Cestèle, Sandrine; Devaux, Christiane; Mansuelle, Pascal; Mosbah, Amor; Jouirou, Besma; Mantegazza, Massimo; Van Rietschoten, Jurphaas; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Rochat, Hervé; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Sampieri, François

    2004-11-01

    Aah I is a 63-residue alpha-toxin isolated from the venom of the Buthidae scorpion Androctonus australis hector, which is considered to be the most dangerous species. We report here the first chemical synthesis of Aah I by the solid-phase method, using a Fmoc strategy. The synthetic toxin I (sAah I) was renatured in DMSO-Tris buffer, purified and subjected to thorough analysis and comparison with the natural toxin. The sAah I showed physico-chemical (CD spectrum, molecular mass, HPLC elution), biochemical (amino-acid composition, sequence), immunochemical and pharmacological properties similar to those of the natural toxin. The synthetic toxin was recognized by a conformation-dependent monoclonal anti-Aah I antibody, with an IC50 value close to that for the natural toxin. Following intracerebroventricular injection, the synthetic and the natural toxins were similarly lethal to mice. In voltage-clamp experiments, Na(v) 1.2 sodium channel inactivation was inhibited by the application of sAah I or of the natural toxin in a similar way. This work describes a simple protocol for the chemical synthesis of a scorpion alpha-toxin, making it possible to produce structural analogues in time.

  20. Functional Expression of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels Navl.5 in Human Breast Caner Cell Line MDA-MB-231

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui GAO; Jing WANG; Yi SHEN; Ming LEI; Zehua WANG

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are known to be involved in the initiation and progression of many malignancies,and the different subtypes of VGSCs play important roles in the metastasis cascade of many tumors.This study investigated the functional expression of Nav 1.5 and its effect on invasion behavior of human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231.The mRNA and pro-tein expression of Navl.5 was detected by real time PCR,Western Blot and immunofluorescence.The effects of Navl.5 on cell proliferation,migration and invasion were respectively assessed by MTT and Transwell.The effects of Nav1.5 on the secretion of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) by MDA-MB-231 were analyzed by RT-PCR.The over-expressed Navl.5 was present on the membrane of MDA-MB-231 cells.The invasion ability in vitro and the MMP-9 mRNA expression were respec-tively decreased to (47.82±0.53)% and (43.97±0.64)% (P<0.05) respectively in MDA-MB-231 cells treated with VGSCs specific inhibitor tetrodotoxin (TTX) by blocking Navl.5 activity.It was con-eluded that Nav1.5 functional expression potentiated the invasive behavior of human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 by increasing the secretion of MMP-9.

  1. Inactivation properties of sodium channel Nav1.8 maintain action potential amplitude in small DRG neurons in the context of depolarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waxman Stephen G

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG express five of the nine known voltage-gated sodium channels. Each channel has unique biophysical characteristics which determine how it contributes to the generation of action potentials (AP. To better understand how AP amplitude is maintained in nociceptive DRG neurons and their centrally projecting axons, which are subjected to depolarization within the dorsal horn, we investigated the dependence of AP amplitude on membrane potential, and how that dependence is altered by the presence or absence of sodium channel Nav1.8. Results In small neurons cultured from wild type (WT adult mouse DRG, AP amplitude decreases as the membrane potential is depolarized from -90 mV to -30 mV. The decrease in amplitude is best fit by two Boltzmann equations, having V1/2 values of -73 and -37 mV. These values are similar to the V1/2 values for steady-state fast inactivation of tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-s sodium channels, and the tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-r Nav1.8 sodium channel, respectively. Addition of TTX eliminates the more hyperpolarized V1/2 component and leads to increasing AP amplitude for holding potentials of -90 to -60 mV. This increase is substantially reduced by the addition of potassium channel blockers. In neurons from Nav1.8(-/- mice, the voltage-dependent decrease in AP amplitude is characterized by a single Boltzmann equation with a V1/2 value of -55 mV, suggesting a shift in the steady-state fast inactivation properties of TTX-s sodium channels. Transfection of Nav1.8(-/- DRG neurons with DNA encoding Nav1.8 results in a membrane potential-dependent decrease in AP amplitude that recapitulates WT properties. Conclusion We conclude that the presence of Nav1.8 allows AP amplitude to be maintained in DRG neurons and their centrally projecting axons even when depolarized within the dorsal horn.

  2. A Literature Review of the Use of Sodium Bicarbonate for the Treatment of QRS Widening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruccoleri, Rebecca E; Burns, Michele M

    2016-03-01

    Sodium bicarbonate is a well-known antidote for tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) poisoning. It has been used for over half a century to treat toxin-induced sodium channel blockade as evidenced by QRS widening on the electrocardiogram (ECG). The purpose of this review is to describe the literature regarding electrophysiological mechanisms and clinical use of this antidote after poisoning by tricyclic antidepressants and other agents. This article will also address the literature supporting an increased serum sodium concentration, alkalemia, or the combination of both as the responsible mechanism(s) for sodium bicarbonate's antidotal properties. While sodium bicarbonate has been used as a treatment for cardiac sodium channel blockade for multiple other agents including citalopram, cocaine, flecainide, diphenhydramine, propoxyphene, and lamotrigine, it has uncertain efficacy with bupropion, propranolol, and taxine-containing plants.

  3. Electrocardiographic Biomarkers for Detection of Drug-Induced Late Sodium Current Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Jose; Johannesen, Lars; Hosseini, Meisam; Mason, Jay W.; Sager, Philip T.; Pueyo, Esther; Strauss, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Drugs that prolong the heart rate corrected QT interval (QTc) on the electrocardiogram (ECG) by blocking the hERG potassium channel and also block inward currents (late sodium or L-type calcium) are not associated with torsade de pointes (e.g. ranolazine and verapamil). Thus, identifying ECG signs of late sodium current block could aid in the determination of proarrhythmic risk for new drugs. A new cardiac safety paradigm for drug development (the “CiPA” initiative) will involve the preclinical assessment of multiple human cardiac ion channels and ECG biomarkers are needed to determine if there are unexpected ion channel effects in humans. Methods and Results In this study we assess the ability of eight ECG morphology biomarkers to detect late sodium current block in the presence of QTc prolongation by analyzing a clinical trial where a selective hERG potassium channel blocker (dofetilide) was administered alone and then in combination with two late sodium current blockers (lidocaine and mexiletine). We demonstrate that late sodium current block has the greatest effect on the heart-rate corrected J-Tpeak interval (J-Tpeakc), followed by QTc and then T-wave flatness. Furthermore, J-Tpeakc is the only biomarker that improves detection of the presence of late sodium current block compared to using QTc alone (AUC: 0.83 vs. 0.72 respectively, p<0.001). Conclusions Analysis of the J-Tpeakc interval can differentiate drug-induced multichannel block involving the late sodium current from selective hERG potassium channel block. Future methodologies assessing drug effects on cardiac ion channel currents on the ECG should use J-Tpeakc to detect the presence of late sodium current block. Trial Registration NCT02308748 and NCT01873950 PMID:28036334

  4. The roles and relations of calpastatin, calmodulin and an undefined cytoplasmic factor in the regulation of cardiac L-type Ca2+ channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Li-ying; ZHU Tong; HU Hui-yuan; ZHAO Mei-mi; RUI Feng; LIU Yan; ZHAO Jin-sheng; tsuko Minobe; Masaki Kameyama

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the mechanism that cytoplasmic factors could recover L-type Ca2+ channel activity after "run-down'. The factors include ATP, calpastatin and H fraction (a high molecular fraction of bovine cardiac cytoplasm). Methods Single Ca2+ channel activities were recorded with patch clamp technique in guinea-pig cardiac myocytes. Run-down was induced by the inside-out patch formation. Calpastatin (CS), calmodulin(CaM) and three GST-fusion fragment peptides derived from the C-terminal tail of guineapig Car1.2, CT-1 (amino acids number 1509-1791), CTo2 (1777-2003) and CT-3 (1944-2169) were produced as GST fusion proteins. Results (1)CaM + ATP or CS + ATP restored the channels after rundown;however, the CaM or CS's effects became smaller with the longer run-down time. (2)After run down, CaM-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII) produced Ca2+ channel activity to only 2-10% of the basal activity, however, in the presence of CaMKII, the time-dependent nature of the CaM effect was abolished. (3) In pull-down assay, CT-1 treated with CaMKII showed a higher affinity for CaM than that treated with phosphatase. (4)CaMKII was detected in the H fraction of bovine cardiac cytoplasm. Conclusions The results show that CS, CaM and CaMKII are all involved in the maintenance of the basal activity of L-type Ca2+ channels, and that there might be cross talks among the four factors (CS, CaM, CaMKII and the undefined cytoplasmic factor). This work was supported by the grants from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 30670761, No. 30671726).

  5. Anesthetic drug midazolam inhibits cardiac human ether-à-go-go-related gene channels: mode of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vonderlin N

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nadine Vonderlin,1 Fathima Fischer,1 Edgar Zitron,1,2 Claudia Seyler,1 Daniel Scherer,1 Dierk Thomas,1,2 Hugo A Katus,1,2 Eberhard P Scholz1 1Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Heidelberg, 2German Centre for Cardiovascular Research, Partner Site Heidelberg/Mannheim, Heidelberg, Germany Abstract: Midazolam is a short-acting benzodiazepine that is in wide clinical use as an anxiolytic, sedative, hypnotic, and anticonvulsant. Midazolam has been shown to inhibit ion channels, including calcium and potassium channels. So far, the effects of midazolam on cardiac human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG channels have not been analyzed. The inhibitory effects of midazolam on heterologously expressed hERG channels were analyzed in Xenopus oocytes using the double-electrode voltage clamp technique. We found that midazolam inhibits hERG channels in a concentration-dependent manner, yielding an IC50 of 170 µM in Xenopus oocytes. When analyzed in a HEK 293 cell line using the patch-clamp technique, the IC50 was 13.6 µM. Midazolam resulted in a small negative shift of the activation curve of hERG channels. However, steady-state inactivation was not significantly affected. We further show that inhibition is state-dependent, occurring within the open and inactivated but not in the closed state. There was no frequency dependence of block. Using the hERG pore mutants F656A and Y652A we provide evidence that midazolam uses a classical binding site within the channel pore. Analyzing the subacute effects of midazolam on hERG channel trafficking, we further found that midazolam does not affect channel surface expression. Taken together, we show that the anesthetic midazolam is a low-affinity inhibitor of cardiac hERG channels without additional effects on channel surface expression. These data add to the current understanding of the pharmacological profile of the anesthetic midazolam. Keywords: midazolam, anesthetics, human ether

  6. Antinociceptive Effects of AGAP, a Recombinant Neurotoxic Polypeptide: Possible Involvement of the Tetrodotoxin-Resistant Sodium Channels in Small Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Li; Liu, Xi-Fang; Li, Gui-Xia; Ban, Meng-qi; Chen, Jian-Zhao; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Jing-Hai; Wu, Chun-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Antitumor-analgesic peptide (AGAP) is a novel recombinant polypeptide. The primary study showed that AGAP 1.0 mg/kg exhibited strong analgesic and antitumor effects. The tail vein administration of AGAP potently reduced pain behaviors in mice induced by intraplantar injection of formalin or intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid, without affecting basal pain perception. To further assess the mechanisms of AGAP, the effects of AGAP on sodium channels were assessed using the whole-cell patch clamp recordings in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. The results showed that AGAP (3–1000 nM) inhibited the sodium currents in small-diameter DRG neurons in a dose-dependent manner. 1000 nM AGAP could inhibit the current density-voltage relationship curve of sodium channels in a voltage-dependent manner and negatively shift the activation curves. 1000 nM AGAP could reduce the tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium currents by 42.8% in small-diameter DRG neurons. Further analysis revealed that AGAP potently inhibited NaV1.8 currents by 59.4%, and negatively shifted the activation and inactivation kinetics. 1000 nM AGAP also reduced the NaV1.9 currents by 33.7%, but had no significant effect on activation and inactivation kinetics. Thus, our results demonstrated that submicromolar concentrations of AGAP inhibited TTX-R sodium channel in rat small-diameter DRG neurons. It is concluded that these new results may better explain, at least in part, the analgesic properties of this polypeptide. PMID:28066245

  7. Antinociceptive effects of AGAP, a recombinant neurotoxic polypeptide: Possible involvement of the tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels in small dorsal root ganglia neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chunli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Antitumor-analgesic peptide(AGAP)is a novel recombinant polypeptide. The primary study showed that AGAP 1.0 mg/kg exhibited strong analgesic and antitumor effects. The tail vein administration of AGAP potently reduced pain behaviors in mice induced by intraplantar injection of formalin or intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid, without affecting basal pain perception. To further assess the mechanisms of AGAP, the effects of AGAP on sodium channels were assessed using the whole-cell patch clamp recordings in dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons. The results showed that AGAP (3-1000 nM inhibited the sodium currents in small-diameter DRG neurons in a dose-dependent manner. 1000 nM AGAP could inhibit the current density-voltage relationship curve of sodium channels in a voltage-dependent manner and negatively shift the activation curves. 1000 nM AGAP could reduce the tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R sodium currents by 42.8% in small-diameter DRG neurons. Further analysis revealed that AGAP potently inhibited NaV1.8 currents by 59.4%, and negatively shifted the activation and inactivation kinetics. 1000 nM AGAP also reduced the NaV1.9 currents by 33.7%, but had no significant effect on activation and inactivation kinetics. Thus, our results demonstrated that submicromolar concentrations of AGAP inhibited TTX-R sodium channel in rat small-diameter DRG neurons. It is concluded that these new results may better explain, at least in part, the analgesic properties of this polypeptide.

  8. Evidence for Dual Binding Sites for 1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) in Insect Sodium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Zhorov, Boris S; Dong, Ke

    2016-02-26

    1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT), the first organochlorine insecticide, and pyrethroid insecticides are sodium channel agonists. Although the use of DDT is banned in most of the world due to its detrimental impact on the ecosystem, indoor residual spraying of DDT is still recommended for malaria control in Africa. Development of resistance to DDT and pyrethroids is a serious global obstacle for managing disease vectors. Mapping DDT binding sites is necessary for understanding mechanisms of resistance and modulation of sodium channels by structurally different ligands. The pioneering model of the housefly sodium channel visualized the first receptor for pyrethroids, PyR1, in the II/III domain interface and suggested that DDT binds within PyR1. Previously, we proposed the second pyrethroid receptor, PyR2, at the I/II domain interface. However, whether DDT binds to both pyrethroid receptor sites remains unknown. Here, using computational docking of DDT into the Kv1.2-based mosquito sodium channel model, we predict that two DDT molecules can bind simultaneously within PyR1 and PyR2. The bulky trichloromethyl group of each DDT molecule fits snugly between four helices in the bent domain interface, whereas two p-chlorophenyl rings extend into two wings of the interface. Model-driven mutagenesis and electrophysiological analysis confirmed these propositions and revealed 10 previously unknown DDT-sensing residues within PyR1 and PyR2. Our study proposes a dual DDT-receptor model and provides a structural background for rational development of new insecticides.

  9. TNF-α enhances the currents of voltage gated sodium channels in uninjured dorsal root ganglion neurons following motor nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Pang, Rui-Ping; Shen, Kai-Feng; Zimmermann, Manfred; Xin, Wen-Jun; Li, Yong-Yong; Liu, Xian-Guo

    2011-02-01

    The ectopic discharges observed in uninjured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following various lesions of spinal nerves have been attributed to functional alterations of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). Such mechanisms may be important for the development of neuropathic pain. However, the pathophysiology underlying the functional modulation of VGSCs following nerve injury is largely unknown. Here, we studied this issue with use of a selective lumbar 5 ventral root transection (L5-VRT) model, in which dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons remain intact. We found that the L5-VRT increased the current densities of TTX-sensitive Na channels as well as currents in Nav1.8, but not Nav1.9 channels in uninjured DRG neurons. The thresholds of action potentials decreased and firing rates increased in DRG neurons following L5-VRT. As we found that levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) increased in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in DRG tissue after L5-VRT, we tested whether the increased TNF-α might result in the changes in sodium channels. Indeed, recombinant rat TNF (rrTNF) enhanced the current densities of TTX-S and Nav1.8 in cultured DRG neurons dose-dependently. Furthermore, genetic deletion of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR-1) in mice attenuated the mechanical allodynia and prevented the increase in sodium currents in DRG neurons induced by L5-VRT. These data suggest that the increase in sodium currents in uninjured DRG neurons following nerve injury might be mediated by over-production of TNF-α.

  10. Determining the Advantages, Costs, and Trade-Offs of a Novel Sodium Channel Mutation in the Copepod Acartia hudsonica to Paralytic Shellfish Toxins (PST.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Finiguerra

    Full Text Available The marine copepod Acartia hudsonica was shown to be adapted to dinoflagellate prey, Alexandrium fundyense, which produce paralytic shellfish toxins (PST. Adaptation to PSTs in other organisms is caused by a mutation in the sodium channel. Recently, a mutation in the sodium channel in A. hudsonica was found. In this study, we rigorously tested for advantages, costs, and trade-offs associated with the mutant isoform of A. hudsonica under toxic and non-toxic conditions. We combined fitness with wild-type: mutant isoform ratio measurements on the same individual copepod to test our hypotheses. All A. hudsonica copepods express both the wild-type and mutant sodium channel isoforms, but in different proportions; some individuals express predominantly mutant (PMI or wild-type isoforms (PWI, while most individuals express relatively equal amounts of each (EI. There was no consistent pattern of improved performance as a function of toxin dose for egg production rate (EPR, ingestion rate (I, and gross growth efficiency (GGE for individuals in the PMI group relative to individuals in the PWI expression group. Neither was there any evidence to indicate a fitness benefit to the mutant isoform at intermediate toxin doses. No clear advantage under toxic conditions was associated with the mutation. Using a mixed-diet approach, there was also no observed relationship between individual wild-type: mutant isoform ratios and among expression groups, on both toxic and non-toxic diets, for eggs produced over three days. Lastly, expression of the mutant isoform did not mitigate the negative effects of the toxin. That is, the reductions in EPR from a toxic to non-toxic diet for copepods were independent of expression groups. Overall, the results did not support our hypotheses; the mutant sodium channel isoform does not appear to be related to adaptation to PST in A. hudsonica. Other potential mechanisms responsible for the adaptation are discussed.

  11. Effects of Intrathecally Administerd NaV1.8 Antisense Oligonucleotide on the Expression of Sodium Channel mRNA in Dorsal Root Ganglion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yongmin; YAO Shanglong; SONG Wenge; WANG Yuelan; LIU Dong; ZEN Lian

    2005-01-01

    Neuropathic pain has been hypothesized to be the result of aberrant expression and function of sodium channels at the site of injury. To investigate the effects of NaV1.8 antisense oligonucleotide on the expression of sodium channel mRNA in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in chronic neuropathic pain. 24 Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-260 g were anesthetized with the in of sciatic nerve trunk by 4-0 chromic gut. The mechanical and thermal pain threshold were measured before operation and 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 days after operation. A PE-10 catheter was implanted in subarachnoid space at lumbar region. On the 7th postoperative day the animals were randomly divided into 4 groups. The drugs were injected intrathecally twice a day for 5 consecutive days in group 2-4. The animals were decapitated 14 days after the surgery. The L4-L6 DRG of the operated side was removed and crushed, and total RNA was extracted with Trizol reagent. The contralateral side was used as control. The change of NaV1.8 sodium channel transcripts was determined by RT-PCR. Pain threshold was significantly lowered after CCI as compared with that in control group and was elevated 3 days after antisense oligonucleotide injection. Sensory neuron specific TTX-R sodium channel NaV1.8 transcript was down-regulated after antisense oligonucleotide injection at the dosage of 45 μg as compared with that in CCI group (P<0.01), and it was even greater at the dosage of 90 μg. The intrathecally injected NaV1.8 antisense oligonucleotide can reduce the mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia partially by downregulating the SNS transcript expression.

  12. AtHKT1;1 mediates nernstian sodium channel transport properties in Arabidopsis root stelar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaowu Xue

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis AtHKT1;1 protein was identified as a sodium (Na⁺ transporter by heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, direct comparative in vivo electrophysiological analyses of a plant HKT transporter in wild-type and hkt loss-of-function mutants has not yet been reported and it has been recently argued that heterologous expression systems may alter properties of plant transporters, including HKT transporters. In this report, we analyze several key functions of AtHKT1;1-mediated ion currents in their native root stelar cells, including Na⁺ and K⁺ conductances, AtHKT1;1-mediated outward currents, and shifts in reversal potentials in the presence of defined intracellular and extracellular salt concentrations. Enhancer trap Arabidopsis plants with GFP-labeled root stelar cells were used to investigate AtHKT1;1-dependent ion transport properties using patch clamp electrophysiology in wild-type and athkt1;1 mutant plants. AtHKT1;1-dependent currents were carried by sodium ions and these currents were not observed in athkt1;1 mutant stelar cells. However, K⁺ currents in wild-type and athkt1;1 root stelar cell protoplasts were indistinguishable correlating with the Na⁺ over K⁺ selectivity of AtHKT1;1-mediated transport. Moreover, AtHKT1;1-mediated currents did not show a strong voltage dependence in vivo. Unexpectedly, removal of extracellular Na⁺ caused a reduction in AtHKT1;1-mediated outward currents in Columbia root stelar cells and Xenopus oocytes, indicating a role for external Na⁺ in regulation of AtHKT1;1 activity. Shifting the NaCl gradient in root stelar cells showed a Nernstian shift in the reversal potential providing biophysical evidence for the model that AtHKT1;1 mediates passive Na⁺ channel transport properties.

  13. Neurotoxic activity of venom from the Australian eastern mouse spider (Missulena bradleyi) involves modulation of sodium channel gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rash, L D; Birinyi-Strachan, L C; Nicholson, G M; Hodgson, W C

    2000-08-01

    Mouse spiders represent a potential cause of serious envenomation in humans. This study examined the activity of Missulena bradleyi venom in several in vitro preparations. Whilst female M. bradleyi venom at doses up to 0.05 microl ml(-1) failed to alter twitch or resting tension in all preparations used, male venom (0.02 and 0.05 microl ml(-1)) produced potent effects on transmitter release in both smooth and skeletal neuromuscular preparations. In the mouse phrenic nerve diaphragm preparation, male M. bradleyi venom (0.02 microl ml(-1)) caused rapid fasciculations and an increase in indirectly evoked twitches. Male venom (0.02 and 0.05 microl ml(-1)) also caused a large contracture and rapid decrease in indirectly evoked twitches in the chick biventer cervicis muscle, however had no effect on responses to exogenous ACh (1 mM) or potassium chloride (40 mM). In the chick preparation, contractile responses to male M. bradleyi venom (0.05 microl ml(-1)) were attenuated by (+)-tubocurarine (100 microM) and by tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 microM). Both actions of male M. bradleyi venom were blocked by Atrax robustus antivenom (2 units ml(-1)). In the unstimulated rat vas deferens, male venom (0.05 microl ml(-1)) caused contractions which were inhibited by a combination of prazosin (0.3 microM) and P(2X)-receptor desensitization (with alpha,beta-methylene ATP 10 microM). In the rat stimulated vas deferens, male venom (0.05 microl ml(-1)) augmented indirectly evoked twitches. Male venom (0.1 microl ml(-1)) causes a slowing of inactivation of TTX-sensitive sodium currents in acutely dissociated rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. These results suggest that venom from male M. bradleyi contains a potent neurotoxin which facilitates neurotransmitter release by modifying TTX-sensitive sodium channel gating. This action is similar to that of the delta-atracotoxins from Australian funnel-web spiders.

  14. Molecular Surface of JZTX-V (β-Theraphotoxin-Cj2a Interacting with Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Subtype NaV1.4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Luo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs; NaV1.1–NaV1.9 have been proven to be critical in controlling the function of excitable cells, and human genetic evidence shows that aberrant function of these channels causes channelopathies, including epilepsy, arrhythmia, paralytic myotonia, and pain. The effects of peptide toxins, especially those isolated from spider venom, have shed light on the structure–function relationship of these channels. However, most of these toxins have not been analyzed in detail. In particular, the bioactive faces of these toxins have not been determined. Jingzhaotoxin (JZTX-V (also known as β-theraphotoxin-Cj2a is a 29-amino acid peptide toxin isolated from the venom of the spider Chilobrachys jingzhao. JZTX-V adopts an inhibitory cysteine knot (ICK motif and has an inhibitory effect on voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels. Previous experiments have shown that JZTX-V has an inhibitory effect on TTX-S and TTX-R sodium currents on rat DRG cells with IC50 values of 27.6 and 30.2 nM, respectively, and is able to shift the activation and inactivation curves to the depolarizing and the hyperpolarizing direction, respectively. Here, we show that JZTX-V has a much stronger inhibitory effect on NaV1.4, the isoform of voltage-gated sodium channels predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle cells, with an IC50 value of 5.12 nM, compared with IC50 values of 61.7–2700 nM for other heterologously expressed NaV1 subtypes. Furthermore, we investigated the bioactive surface of JZTX-V by alanine-scanning the effect of toxin on NaV1.4 and demonstrate that the bioactive face of JZTX-V is composed of three hydrophobic (W5, M6, and W7 and two cationic (R20 and K22 residues. Our results establish that, consistent with previous assumptions, JZTX-V is a Janus-faced toxin which may be a useful tool for the further investigation of the structure and function of sodium channels.

  15. Molecular Characterization of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels and Their Relations with Paralytic Shellfish Toxin Bioaccumulation in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullot, Floriane; Castrec, Justine; Bidault, Adeline; Dantas, Natanael; Payton, Laura; Perrigault, Mickael; Tran, Damien; Amzil, Zouher; Boudry, Pierre; Soudant, Philippe; Hégaret, Hélène; Fabioux, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Paralytic shellfish toxins (PST) bind to voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) and block conduction of action potential in excitable cells. This study aimed to (i) characterize Nav sequences in Crassostrea gigas and (ii) investigate a putative relation between Nav and PST-bioaccumulation in oysters. The phylogenetic analysis highlighted two types of Nav in C. gigas: a Nav1 (CgNav1) and a Nav2 (CgNav2) with sequence properties of sodium-selective and sodium/calcium-selective channels, respectively. Three alternative splice transcripts of CgNav1 named A, B and C, were characterized. The expression of CgNav1, analyzed by in situ hybridization, is specific to nervous cells and to structures corresponding to neuromuscular junctions. Real-time PCR analyses showed a strong expression of CgNav1A in the striated muscle while CgNav1B is mainly expressed in visceral ganglia. CgNav1C expression is ubiquitous. The PST binding site (domain II) of CgNav1 variants possess an amino acid Q that could potentially confer a partial saxitoxin (STX)-resistance to the channel. The CgNav1 genotype or alternative splicing would not be the key point determining PST bioaccumulation level in oysters. PMID:28106838

  16. Regulation of epithelial sodium channel a-subunit expression by adenosine receptor A2a in alveolar epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Wang; WANG Dao-xin; ZHANG Wei; LI Chang-yi

    2011-01-01

    Background The amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel a-subunit (a-ENaC) is an important factor for alveolar fluid clearance during acute lung injury. The relationship between adenosine receptor A2a (A2aAR) expressed in alveolar epithelial cells and aα-ENaC is poorly understood. We targeted the A2aAR in this study to investigate its role in the expression of αa-ENaC and in acute lung injury.Methods A549 cells were incubated with different concentrations of A2aAR agonist CGS-21680 and with 100 μmol/L CGS-21680 for various times. Rats were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) after CGS-21680 was injected. Animals were sacrificed and tissue was harvested for evaluation of lung injury by analysis of the lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, lung permeability and myeloperoxidase activity. RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to determine the mRNA and protein expression levels of α-ENaC in A549 cells and alveolar type II epithelial cells.Results Both mRNA and protein levels of α-ENaC were markedly higher from 4 hours to 24 hours after exposure to 100μmol/L CGS-21680. There were significant changes from 0.1 umol/L to 100 μmol/L CGS-21680, with a positive correlation between increased concentrations of CGS-21680 and expression of α-ENaC. Treatment with CGS-21680during LPS induced lung injury protected the lung and promoted α-ENaC expression in the alveolar epithelial cells.Conclusion Activation of A2aAR has a protective effect during the lung injury, which may be beneficial to the prognosis of acute lung injury.

  17. Eps15 Homology Domain-containing Protein 3 Regulates Cardiac T-type Ca2+ Channel Targeting and Function in the Atria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Jerry; Musa, Hassan; Kline, Crystal F.; Makara, Michael A.; Little, Sean C.; Higgins, John D.; Hund, Thomas J.; Band, Hamid; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Proper trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters is requisite for normal cardiac function. Endosome-based protein trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters in the heart is poorly understood, particularly in vivo. In fact, for select cardiac cell types such as atrial myocytes, virtually nothing is known regarding endosomal transport. We previously linked the C-terminal Eps15 homology domain-containing protein 3 (EHD3) with endosome-based protein trafficking in ventricular cardiomyocytes. Here we sought to define the roles and membrane protein targets for EHD3 in atria. We identify the voltage-gated T-type Ca2+ channels (CaV3.1, CaV3.2) as substrates for EHD3-dependent trafficking in atria. Mice selectively lacking EHD3 in heart display reduced expression and targeting of both Cav3.1 and CaV3.2 in the atria. Furthermore, functional experiments identify a significant loss of T-type-mediated Ca2+ current in EHD3-deficient atrial myocytes. Moreover, EHD3 associates with both CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. T-type Ca2+ channel function is critical for proper electrical conduction through the atria. Consistent with these roles, EHD3-deficient mice demonstrate heart rate variability, sinus pause, and atrioventricular conduction block. In summary, our findings identify CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 as substrates for EHD3-dependent protein trafficking in heart, provide in vivo data on endosome-based trafficking pathways in atria, and implicate EHD3 as a key player in the regulation of atrial myocyte excitability and cardiac conduction. PMID:25825486

  18. Gene expression profile of sodium channel subunits in the anterior cingulate cortex during experimental paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willias Masocha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent, causes neuropathic pain whose supraspinal pathophysiology is not fully understood. Dysregulation of sodium channel expression, studied mainly in the periphery and spinal cord level, contributes to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. We examined gene expression of sodium channel (Nav subunits by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC at day 7 post first administration of paclitaxel, when mice had developed paclitaxel-induced thermal hyperalgesia. The ACC was chosen because increased activity in the ACC has been observed during neuropathic pain. In the ACC of vehicle-treated animals the threshold cycle (Ct values for Nav1.4, Nav1.5, Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 were above 30 and/or not detectable in some samples. Thus, comparison in mRNA expression between untreated control, vehicle-treated and paclitaxel treated animals was done for Nav1.1, Nav1.2, Nav1.3, Nav1.6, Nax as well as Navβ1–Navβ4. There were no differences in the transcript levels of Nav1.1–Nav1.3, Nav1.6, Nax, Navβ1–Navβ3 between untreated and vehicle-treated mice, however, vehicle treatment increased Navβ4 expression. Paclitaxel treatment significantly increased the mRNA expression of Nav1.1, Nav1.2, Nav1.6 and Nax, but not Nav1.3, sodium channel alpha subunits compared to vehicle-treated animals. Treatment with paclitaxel significantly increased the expression of Navβ1 and Navβ3, but not Navβ2 and Navβ4, sodium channel beta subunits compared to vehicle-treated animals. These findings suggest that during paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain (PINP there is differential upregulation of sodium channels in the ACC, which might contribute to the increased neuronal activity observed in the area during neuropathic pain.

  19. Gene expression profile of sodium channel subunits in the anterior cingulate cortex during experimental paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent, causes neuropathic pain whose supraspinal pathophysiology is not fully understood. Dysregulation of sodium channel expression, studied mainly in the periphery and spinal cord level, contributes to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. We examined gene expression of sodium channel (Nav) subunits by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) at day 7 post first administration of paclitaxel, when mice had developed paclitaxel-induced thermal hyperalgesia. The ACC was chosen because increased activity in the ACC has been observed during neuropathic pain. In the ACC of vehicle-treated animals the threshold cycle (Ct) values for Nav1.4, Nav1.5, Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 were above 30 and/or not detectable in some samples. Thus, comparison in mRNA expression between untreated control, vehicle-treated and paclitaxel treated animals was done for Nav1.1, Nav1.2, Nav1.3, Nav1.6, Nax as well as Navβ1–Navβ4. There were no differences in the transcript levels of Nav1.1–Nav1.3, Nav1.6, Nax, Navβ1–Navβ3 between untreated and vehicle-treated mice, however, vehicle treatment increased Navβ4 expression. Paclitaxel treatment significantly increased the mRNA expression of Nav1.1, Nav1.2, Nav1.6 and Nax, but not Nav1.3, sodium channel alpha subunits compared to vehicle-treated animals. Treatment with paclitaxel significantly increased the expression of Navβ1 and Navβ3, but not Navβ2 and Navβ4, sodium channel beta subunits compared to vehicle-treated animals. These findings suggest that during paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain (PINP) there is differential upregulation of sodium channels in the ACC, which might contribute to the increased neuronal activity observed in the area during neuropathic pain. PMID:27896032

  20. Late cardiac sodium current can be assessed using automated patch-clamp [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4kj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Chevalier

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac late Na+ current is generated by a small fraction of voltage-dependent Na+ channels that undergo a conformational change to a burst-gating mode, with repeated openings and closures during the action potential (AP plateau. Its magnitude can be augmented by inactivation-defective mutations, myocardial ischemia, or prolonged exposure to chemical compounds leading to drug-induced (di-long QT syndrome, and results in an increased susceptibility to cardiac arrhythmias. Using CytoPatch™ 2 automated patch-clamp equipment, we performed whole-cell recordings in HEK293 cells stably expressing human Nav1.5, and measured the late Na+ component as average current over the last 100 ms of 300 ms depolarizing pulses to -10 mV from a holding potential of -100 mV, with a repetition frequency of 0.33 Hz. Averaged values in different steady-state experimental conditions were further corrected by the subtraction of current average during the application of tetrodotoxin (TTX 30 μM. We show that ranolazine at 10 and 30 μM in 3 min applications reduced the late Na+ current to 75.0 ± 2.7% (mean ± SEM, n = 17 and 58.4 ± 3.5% (n = 18 of initial levels, respectively, while a 5 min application of veratridine 1 μM resulted in a reversible current increase to 269.1 ± 16.1% (n = 28 of initial values. Using fluctuation analysis, we observed that ranolazine 30 μM decreased mean open probability p from 0.6 to 0.38 without modifying the number of active channels n, while veratridine 1 μM increased n 2.5-fold without changing p. In human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, veratridine 1 μM reversibly increased APD90 2.12 ± 0.41-fold (mean ± SEM, n = 6. This effect is attributable to inactivation removal in Nav1.5 channels, since significant inhibitory effects on hERG current were detected at higher concentrations in hERG-expressing HEK293 cells, with a 28.9 ± 6.0% inhibition (mean ± SD, n = 10 with 50 μM veratridine.      

  1. Design, evaluation and application of an eight channel transmit/receive coil array for cardiac MRI at 7.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gräßl, Andreas, E-mail: Andreas.Graessl@mdc-berlin.de [Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Winter, Lukas, E-mail: Lukas.Winter@mdc-berlin.de [Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Thalhammer, Christof, E-mail: Christof.Thalhammer@mdc-berlin.de [Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Renz, Wolfgang, E-mail: Wolfgang.Renz@mdc-berlin.de [Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Siemens Healthcare, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Kellman, Peter, E-mail: kellmanp@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Cardiac Energetics, National Institutes of Health/NHLBI, Bethesda, MD (United States); Martin, Conrad, E-mail: Conrad.Martin@mdc-berlin.de [Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian von, E-mail: florian.von-knobelsdorff@charite.de [Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); HELIOS Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Department of Cardiology and Nephrology, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Experimental and Clinical Research Center (ECRC), Charité – University Medicine Campus Berlin Buch, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Tkachenko, Valeriy, E-mail: v.o.tkachenko@googlemail.com [Experimental and Clinical Research Center (ECRC), Charité – University Medicine Campus Berlin Buch, 13125 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2013-05-15

    The objective of this work is to design, examine and apply an eight channel transmit/receive coil array tailored for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging at 7.0 T that provides image quality suitable for clinical use, patient comfort, and ease of use. The cardiac coil array was designed to consist of a planar posterior section and a modestly curved anterior section. For radio frequency (RF) safety validation, numerical computations of the electromagnetic field (EMF) and the specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution were conducted. In vivo cardiac imaging was performed using a 2D CINE FLASH technique. For signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) assessment reconstructed images were scaled in SNR units. The parallel imaging capabilities of the coil were examined using GRAPPA and SENSE reconstruction with reduction factors of up to R = 4. The assessment of the RF characteristics yielded a maximum noise correlation of 0.33. The baseline SNR advantage at 7.0 T was put to use to acquire 2D CINE images of the heart with a spatial resolution of 1 mm × 1 mm × 4 mm. The coil array supports 1D acceleration factors of up to R = 3 without impairing image quality significantly. For un-accelerated 2D CINE FLASH acquisitions the results revealed an SNR of approximately 140 for the left ventricular blood pool. Blood/myocardium contrast was found to be approximately 90 for un-accelerated 2D CINE FLASH acquisitions. The proposed 8 channel cardiac transceiver surface coil has the capability to acquire high contrast, high spatial and temporal resolution in vivo images of the heart at 7.0 T.

  2. Distinct primary structures of the major peptide toxins from the venom of the spider Macrothele gigas that bind to sites 3 and 4 in the sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corzo, Gerardo; Gilles, Nicolas; Satake, Honoo; Villegas, Elba; Dai, Li; Nakajima, Terumi; Haupt, Joachim

    2003-07-17

    Six peptide toxins (Magi 1-6) were isolated from the Hexathelidae spider Macrothele gigas. The amino acid sequences of Magi 1, 2, 5 and 6 have low similarities to the amino acid sequences of known spider toxins. The primary structure of Magi 3 is similar to the structure of the palmitoylated peptide named PlTx-II from the North American spider Plectreurys tristis (Plectreuridae). Moreover, the amino acid sequence of Magi 4, which was revealed by cloning of its cDNA, displays similarities to the Na+ channel modifier delta-atracotoxin from the Australian spider Atrax robustus (Hexathelidae). Competitive binding assays using several 125I-labelled peptide toxins clearly demonstrated the specific binding affinity of Magi 1-5 to site 3 of the insect sodium channel and also that of Magi 5 to site 4 of the rat sodium channel. Only Magi 6 did not compete with the scorpion toxin LqhalphaIT in binding to site 3 despite high toxicity on lepidoptera larvae of 3.1 nmol/g. The K(i)s of other toxins were between 50 pM for Magi 4 and 1747 nM for Magi 1. In addition, only Magi 5 binds to both site 3 in insects (K(i)=267 nM) and site 4 in rat brain synaptosomes (K(i)=1.2 nM), whereas it showed no affinities for either mammal binding site 3 or insect binding site 4. Magi 5 is the first spider toxin with binding affinity to site 4 of a mammalian sodium channel.

  3. Neutralization of Gating Charges in Domain II of the Sodium Channel α Subunit Enhances Voltage-Sensor Trapping by a β-Scorpion Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestèle, Sandrine; Scheuer, Todd; Mantegazza, Massimo; Rochat, Hervé; Catterall, William A.

    2001-01-01

    β-Scorpion toxins shift the voltage dependence of activation of sodium channels to more negative membrane potentials, but only after a strong depolarizing prepulse to fully activate the channels. Their receptor site includes the S3–S4 loop at the extracellular end of the S4 voltage sensor in domain II of the α subunit. Here, we probe the role of gating charges in the IIS4 segment in β-scorpion toxin action by mutagenesis and functional analysis of the resulting mutant sodium channels. Neutralization of the positively charged amino acid residues in the IIS4 segment by mutation to glutamine shifts the voltage dependence of channel activation to more positive membrane potentials and reduces the steepness of voltage-dependent gating, which is consistent with the presumed role of these residues as gating charges. Surprisingly, neutralization of the gating charges at the outer end of the IIS4 segment by the mutations R850Q, R850C, R853Q, and R853C markedly enhances β-scorpion toxin action, whereas mutations R856Q, K859Q, and K862Q have no effect. In contrast to wild-type, the β-scorpion toxin Css IV causes a negative shift of the voltage dependence of activation of mutants R853Q and R853C without a depolarizing prepulse at holding potentials from −80 to −140 mV. Reaction of mutant R853C with 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate causes a positive shift of the voltage dependence of activation and restores the requirement for a depolarizing prepulse for Css IV action. Enhancement of sodium channel activation by Css IV causes large tail currents upon repolarization, indicating slowed deactivation of the IIS4 voltage sensor by the bound toxin. Our results are consistent with a voltage-sensor–trapping model in which the β-scorpion toxin traps the IIS4 voltage sensor in its activated position as it moves outward in response to depolarization and holds it there, slowing its inward movement on deactivation and enhancing subsequent channel activation. Evidently

  4. Elevated neuronal excitability due to modulation of the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.6 by Aβ1-42

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant increases in neuronal network excitability may contribute to the cognitive deficits in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, the mechanisms underlying hyperexcitability are not fully understood. Such overexcitation of neuronal networks has been detected in the brains of APP/PS1 mice. In the present study, using current-clamp recording techniques, we observed that 12 days in vitro (DIV primary cultured pyramidal neurons from P0 APP/PS1 mice exhibited a more prominent action potential burst and a lower threshold than WT littermates. Moreover, after treatment with Aβ1-42 peptide, 12 DIV primary cultured neurons showed similar changes, to a greater degree than in controls. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed that the voltage-dependent sodium current density of neurons incubated with Aβ1-42 was significantly increased, without change in the voltage-dependent sodium channel kinetic characteristics. Immunohistochemistry and western blot results showed that, after treatment with Aβ1-42, expressions of Nav and Nav1.6 subtype increased in cultured neurons or APP/PS1 brains compared to control groups. The intrinsic neuronal hyperexcitability of APP/PS1 mice might thus be due to an increased expression of voltage-dependent sodium channels induced by Aβ1-42. These results may illuminate the mechanism of aberrant neuronal networks in AD.

  5. Two types of scorpion receptor sites, one related to the activation, the other to the inactivation of the action potential sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couraud, F; Jover, E; Dubois, J M; Rochat, H

    1982-01-01

    The action of the neurotoxin in Buthinae scorpion venoms (Androctonus, Buthus or Leiurus genera) has been extensively studied. These proteins induce a prolongation of the action potential of nerves and muscles by slowing down inactivation of the sodium channel. Their affinity for their receptor site depends on membrane potential. In the present report we describe a toxin from a Centrurinae scorpion, Centruroides suffusus, which binds rat brain synaptosomes at a receptor site distinct from the Buthinae scorpion site independently of voltage. We name Androctonus-like toxins, alpha-scorpion toxins (alpha-ScTX), and Centruroides-like toxins, beta-scorpion toxins (beta-ScTX). We further report that beta-ScTX induces repetitive firing in frog myelinated nerve fibres by producing an abnormal sodium permeability. The beta-toxin binds specifically to rat brain synaptosomes (Kd = 3 nM) and induces an inhibition of the uptake and a stimulation of the release of GABA at concentrations which are in good agreement with the Kd value. These effects are blocked by tetrodotoxin. The binding site of beta -ScTX is distinct from those of other neurotoxins acting on the sodium channel like tetrodotoxin, alpha-ScTX and