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Sample records for cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum

  1. Down-regulation of the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum ryanodine channel in severely food-restricted rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Vizotto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have shown that myocardial dysfunction induced by food restriction is related to calcium handling. Although cardiac function is depressed in food-restricted animals, there is limited information about the molecular mechanisms that lead to this abnormality. The present study evaluated the effects of food restriction on calcium cycling, focusing on sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2, phospholamban (PLB, and ryanodine channel (RYR2 mRNA expressions in rat myocardium. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats, 60 days old, were submitted to ad libitum feeding (control rats or 50% diet restriction for 90 days. The levels of left ventricle SERCA2, PLB, and RYR2 were measured using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Body and ventricular weights were reduced in 50% food-restricted animals. RYR2 mRNA was significantly decreased in the left ventricle of the food-restricted group (control = 5.92 ± 0.48 vs food-restricted group = 4.84 ± 0.33, P < 0.01. The levels of SERCA2 and PLB mRNA were similar between groups (control = 8.38 ± 0.44 vs food-restricted group = 7.96 ± 0.45, and control = 1.52 ± 0.06 vs food-restricted group = 1.53 ± 0.10, respectively. Down-regulation of RYR2 mRNA expressions suggests that chronic food restriction promotes abnormalities in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release.

  2. Ryanodine modification of cardiac muscle responses to potassium-free solutions. Evidence for inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    To test whether ryanodine blocks the release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac muscle, we examined its effects on the aftercontractions and transient depolarizations or transient inward currents developed by guinea pig papillary muscles and voltage-clamped calf cardiac Purkinje fibers in potassium-free solutions. Ryanodine (0.1-1.0 microM) abolished or prevented aftercontractions and transient depolarizations by the papillary muscles without affecting any of the other sequ...

  3. Effect of triorganotin compounds on calcium transport mechanisms in rat cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although organotin compounds, in general, are neurotoxicants, recent studies indicate that these tin compounds affect heme metabolism as well as cardiovascular system. Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium pump together with phosphorylation of phospholamban has an important role in myocardial contraction and relaxation. Since organotin compounds interfere with cardiovascular system, we have studied the in vitro as well as in vivo effects of tributyltin bromide (TBT), triethyltin bromide (TET) and trimethyltin chloride (TMT) on cardiac SR Ca2+-pump activity, in order to know the relative potency of these tin compounds. SR was isolated from heart ventricles of male Sprague-Dawley rats and used for in vitro studies. For in vivo studies, rats were treated orally in corn oil for 6 days with different doses of TET (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg/d), TMT (0.75, 1.5 and 2.5 mg/kg/d) and TBT (0.75, 1.5 and 2.5 mg/kg/d). Rats were sacrificed 24 hr after the last dosage and cardiac SR was prepared. Cardiac SR Ca2+-ATPase and 45Ca-uptake were measured. All the three tin compounds inhibited Ca2+-ATPase and 45Ca-uptake in vitro in a concentration dependent manner. The order of potency for Ca2+-ATPase as determined IC50, is TBT (2 uM) > TET (63 uM) > TMT (280 uM). For 45Ca-uptake, if followed the same order i.e., TBT (0.35 uM) > TET (10 uM) > TMT (440 uM). In agreement with in vitro results, both SR Ca2+-ATPase and 45Ca-uptake were significantly inhibited in rats treated with these tin compounds. These studies indicate that triorganotin compounds affect Ca2+-pumping mechanisms and thereby alter cardiac contraction-relaxation process

  4. Cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak: basis and roles in cardiac dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, Donald M

    2014-01-01

    Synchronized SR calcium (Ca) release is critical to normal cardiac myocyte excitation-contraction coupling, and ideally this release shuts off completely between heartbeats. However, other SR Ca release events are referred to collectively as SR Ca leak (which includes Ca sparks and waves as well as smaller events not detectable as Ca sparks). Much, but not all, of the SR Ca leak occurs via ryanodine receptors and can be exacerbated in pathological states such as heart failure. The extent of SR Ca leak is important because it can (a) reduce SR Ca available for release, causing systolic dysfunction; (b) elevate diastolic [Ca]i, contributing to diastolic dysfunction; (c) cause triggered arrhythmias; and (d) be energetically costly because of extra ATP used to repump Ca. This review addresses quantitative aspects and manifestations of SR Ca leak and its measurement, and how leak is modulated by Ca, associated proteins, and posttranslational modifications in health and disease. PMID:24245942

  5. Effects of combination of irbesartan and perindopril on calcineurin expression and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase activity in rat cardiac pressure-overload hypertrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To observe effects of angiotensin (Ang) Ⅱ receptor antagonist (AT1) irbesartan and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor perindopril on rat myocardium calcineurin expression and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase activity in the model of pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy. Methods: Forty male adult Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 5 groups.One group was treated by sham operation; four groups were myocardium hypertrophy cases caused by banding aortic above renal artery. Drugs were given one week after operation. Group 1: sham group, rats (n=8) were gavaged with normal saline 2 ml/(kg·d)(ig); Group 2: control group, rats (n=8) were treated with normal saline 2 ml/(kg·d) (ig); Group 3: rats (n=8) were given perindopril 2 mg/(kg·d) (ig); Group 4: rats (n=8) were treated with irbesartan 20 mg/(kg·d) (ig); Group 5: rats (n=8) were given irbesartan 20 mg/(kg·d) plus perindopril 2 mg/(kg·d) (ig). Morphometric determination, calcineurin expression and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase activity were done at the end of 6 week of drug intervention. Expression of calcineurin in myocardium was detected by immunohistochemistry. Results: Left ventricular mass index (LVMI), transverse diameter of myocardial cell (TDM), calcineurin activity were remarkably decreased after drug intervention and this decrease was most remarkable in the combination drug therapy group. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase activity was increased after drug intervention, especially in the combined drug therapy group. Calcineurin expression in myocardium was remarkably decreased after drug intervention. LVMI was positively correlated with TDM and calcineurin, negatively correlated with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase. Conclusion:These data suggest that irbesartan and perindopril inhibit cardiac hypertrophy through the increased activity of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase and decreased expression of calcineurin. Their combination had better effects on regressing of

  6. Comparison of the calcium release channel of cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum by target inactivation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calcium release channel of sarcoplasmic reticulum which triggers muscle contraction in excitation-contraction coupling has recently been isolated. The channel has been found to be morphologically identical with the feet structures of the junctional face membrane of terminal cisternae and consists of an oligomer of a unique high molecular weight polypeptide. In this study, the authors compare the target size of the calcium release channel from heart and skeletal muscle using target inactivation analysis. The target molecular weights of the calcium release channel estimated by measuring ryanodine binding after irradiation are similar for heart (139,000) and skeletal muscle (143,000) and are smaller than the monomeric unit (estimated to be about 360,000). The target size, estimated by measuring polypeptide remaining after irradiation, was essentially the same for heart and skeletal muscle, 1,061,000 and 1,070,000, respectively, indicating an oligomeric association of protomers. Thus, the calcium release channel of both cardiac and skeletal muscle reacts uniquely with regard to target inactivation analysis in that (1) the size by ryanodine binding is smaller than the monomeric unit and (2) a single hit leads to destruction of more than one polypeptide, by measuring polypeptide remaining. The target inactivation analysis studies indicate that heart and skeletal muscle receptors are structurally very similar

  7. Purification of phospholamban, a 22,000 dalton protein from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum that is specifically phosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidlack, J.M.; Shamoo, A.E.

    1979-01-01

    Very low concentrations deoxycholate (DOC) were used to isolate two proteins from canine cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum. These two proteins are phospholamban, a 22,000 dalton protein, and the Ca/sup 2 +/ + Mg/sup 2 +/-ATPase, the major protein of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, responsible for the active transport of calcium. The 22,000 dalton protein is first solubilized in a very low concentration of DOC and then subjected to column chromatography. After molecular weight sieving on a Sephadex G-75 column, the 22,000 dalton protein appears as a purified protein on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels. The purified protein is specifically phosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Phospholipids are still bound to the isolated protein. The Ca/sup 2 +/ + Mg/sup 2 +/-ATPase is purified by first solubilizing all the extrinsic proteins with a low concentration of DOC. An increasing amount of DOC is then added to yield the purified Ca/sup 2 +/ + Mg/sup 2 +/-ATPase. This protein is at least 95% pure. Adding additional DOC to the purified enzyme enhances the enzyme's ability to hydrolyze ATP. (ERB)

  8. Alterations in sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial functions in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Dhalla, Naranjan S; Rangi, Shashanka; Zieroth, Shelley; Xu, Yan-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Although diabetes due to insulin deficiency or insulin resistance is a major cause of heart disease, the pathogenesis of cardiac dysfunction during the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy is not fully understood. Varying degrees of defects in subcellular organelles, such as sarcolemma, mitochondria, sarcoplasmic reticulum, myofibrils and extracellular matrix have been observed in the diabetic heart. These subcellular abnormalities in chronic diabetes become evident with the occurrence of h...

  9. Characterization of Ca2+-Dependent Protein-Protein Interactions within the Ca2+ Release Units of Cardiac Sarcoplasmic Reticulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Shilpa; Park, Chang Sik; Sreenivasaiah, Pradeep Kumar; Kim, Do Han

    2016-01-01

    In the heart, excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling is mediated by Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) through the interactions of proteins forming the Ca2+ release unit (CRU). Among them, calsequestrin (CSQ) and histidine-rich Ca2+ binding protein (HRC) are known to bind the charged luminal region of triadin (TRN) and thus directly or indirectly regulate ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) activity. However, the mechanisms of CSQ and HRC mediated regulation of RyR2 activity through TRN have remained unclear. We first examined the minimal KEKE motif of TRN involved in the interactions with CSQ2, HRC and RyR2 using TRN deletion mutants and in vitro binding assays. The results showed that CSQ2, HRC and RyR2 share the same KEKE motif region on the distal part of TRN (aa 202–231). Second, in vitro binding assays were conducted to examine the Ca2+ dependence of protein-protein interactions (PPI). The results showed that TRN-HRC interaction had a bell-shaped Ca2+ dependence, which peaked at pCa4, whereas TRN-CSQ2 or TRN-RyR2 interaction did not show such Ca2+ dependence pattern. Third, competitive binding was conducted to examine whether CSQ2, HRC, or RyR2 affects the TRN-HRC or TRN-CSQ2 binding at pCa4. Among them, only CSQ2 or RyR2 competitively inhibited TRN-HRC binding, suggesting that HRC can confer functional refractoriness to CRU, which could be beneficial for reloading of Ca2+ into SR at intermediate Ca2+ concentrations. PMID:26674963

  10. Acceleration of Ca(2+) repletion in the junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum and alternation of the Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release mechanism in hypertensive rat (SHR) cardiac muscle.

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    Tanaka, Midori; Tameyasu, Tsukasa

    2008-04-01

    We estimated the time taken for a repletion of the junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (JSR) Ca(2+) stores from a family of mechanical restitution curves after twitches of various magnitudes in the cardiac muscle of hypertensive rats (SHR), using a method described previously (Tameyasu et al. Jpn J Physiol. 2004;54:209-19), to evaluate abnormality in Ca(2+) handling by cardiac JSR in hypertension. We found no differences in contractility or in the time course of mechanical restitution between SHR and the controls (WKY) at 3 weeks of age. In comparison to WKY, 7- and 20-week-old SHR showed a greater rested state contraction (RST) and similar or smaller rapid cooling contracture, suggesting that their JSR contains a similar amount of Ca(2+) at saturation, but releases more Ca(2+) upon stimulation. The adult SHR and WKY showed similar mechanical restitution time courses, but the adults had longer pretwitch latencies. The function G(t) representing the time course of JSR Ca(2+) store repletion in adult SHR exceeded the WKY value at t JSR [Ca(2+)] change corresponding to the mechanical restitution after RST was smaller in the adult SHR at t JSR Ca(2+) store repletion and an alternation of the Ca(2+)-induced release of Ca(2+ )from the JSR in young adult SHR. PMID:18312741

  11. Cardiac function improved by sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase overexpression in a heart failure model induced by chronic myocardial ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei XIN

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Chronic myocardial ischemia(CMI has become an important cause of heart failure(HF.The aim of present study was to examine the effects of Sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase(SERCA2a gene transfer in HF model in large animal induced by CMI.Methods HF was reproduced in minipigs by ligating the initial segment of proximal left anterior descending(LAD coronary artery with an ameroid constrictor to produce progressive vessel occlusion and ischemia.After confirmation of myocardial perfusion defect and cardiac function impairment by SPECT and echocardiography in the model,animals were divided into 4 groups: HF group;HF+enhanced green fluorescent protein(EGFP group;HF+SERCA2a group;and sham operation group as control.rAAV1-EGFP and rAAV1-SERCA2a(1×1012 vg for each animal were directly and intramyocardially injected to the animals of HF+EGFP and HF+SERCA2a groups.Sixty days after the gene transfer,the expression of SERCA2a at the protein level was examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry,the changes in cardiac function were determined by echocardiographic and hemodynamic analysis,and the changes in serum inflammatory and neuro-hormonal factors(including BNP,TNF-a,IL-6,ET-1 and Ang II were determined by radioimmunoassay.Results Sixty days after gene transfer,LVEF,Ev/Av and ±dp/dtmax increased significantly(P < 0.05,along with an increase of SERCA2a protein expression in the ischemic myocardium(PP < 0.05,accompanied by a significant decrease of inflammatory and neural-hormonal factors(PP < 0.05 in HF+SERCA2a group as compared with HF/HF+EGFP group.Conclusions Overexpression of SERCA2a may significantly improve the cardiac function of the ischemic myocardium of HF model induced by CMI and reverse the activation of neural-hormonal factors,implying that it has a potential therapeutic significance in CMI related heart failure.

  12. Ameliorated stress related proteins are associated with improved cardiac function by sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase gene transfer in heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qing Fu; Xiao-Ying Li; Xiao-Chun Lu; Ya-Fei Mi; Tao Liu; Wei-Hua Ye

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed that overexpression of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA2a) in a variety of heart failure (HF) models was associated with greatly enhanced cardiac performance. However, it still undefined the effect of SERCA2a overexpression on the systemic inflammatory response and neuro-hormonal factors. Methods A rapid right ventricular pacing model of experimental HF was used in beagles. Then the animals underwent recombinant adeno-associated virus 1 (rAAV1) mediated gene transfection by direct intra-myocardium injection. HF animals were randomized to receive the SERCA2a gene, enhanced green fluorescent protein (control) gene, or equivalent phosphate buffered saline. Thirty days after gene delivery, the cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiographic testing. The protein level of SERCA2a was measured by western blotting. The proteomic analysis of left ventricular (LV) sample was determined using two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS. The serum levels of the systemic inflammatory and neuro-hormonal factors were assayed using radioimmunoassay kits. Results The cardiac function improved after SERCA- 2a gene transfer due to the significantly increased SERCA2a protein level. Beagles treated with SERCA2a had significantly decreased serum levels of the inflammatory markers (interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α) and neuro-hormonal factors (brain natriuretic peptide, endothelin-1 and angiotensin Ⅱ) compared with HF animals. The myocardial proteomic analysis showed that haptoglobin heavy chain, heat shock protein (alpha-crystallin-related, B6) were down-regulated, and galectin-1 was up-regulated in SERCA2a group compared with HF group, companied by up-regulated contractile proteins and NADH dehydrogenase. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that regional intramyocardial injections of rAAV1-SERCA2a vectors may improve global LV function, correlating with reverse activation of the systemic inflammatory

  13. Sarcoplasmic reticulum function and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 inhibition during progression of heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Rupp, Heinz; Vetter, Roland

    2000-01-01

    Failing cardiac hypertrophy is associated with an inadequate sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function. The hypothesis was examined that pressure overloaded hearts fail to increase SR Ca2+ uptake rate proportionally to the hypertrophy and that carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 inhibition by etomoxir ((±)-ethyl 2[6(4-chlorophenoxy)hexyl] oxirane-2-carboxylate) can counteract this process.Severe left ventricular pressure overload was induced in rats by constricting the ascending aorta for 8, 10, 14 a...

  14. Alterations in mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum from heart and skeletal muscle of horizontally casted primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordahl, L. A.; Stone, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Horizontally body-casted rhesus monkeys are used as an animal model in order to study the physiological changes known as cardiovascular deconditioning which occur during weightless conditions. No difference was found between the experimental and control animals in heart mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation which indicates that no apparent changes occurred in the primary energy-producing system of the heart. A marked increase in cytochrome oxidase activity was observed in the casted primate heart mitochondria compared to controls, while a 25% decrease in respiratory substrate-supported calcium uptake was found in casted primate heart mitochondria compared to controls. Sacroplasmic reticulum isolated from the primate hearts revealed marked changes in calcium transport activities. It is concluded that the marked depression in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum functions indicates altered calcium homeostasis in the casted-primate heart which could be a factor in cardiovascular deconditioning.

  15. Association of cardiac injury with iron-increased oxidative and nitrative modifications of the SERCA2a isoform of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueli; Li, Wenliang; Gao, Zhonghong; Li, Hailing

    2016-08-01

    The role of iron in the etiology of diabetes complications is not well established. Thus, this study was performed to test whether the iron-induced increase of oxidative/nitrative damage is involved in SERCA2a-related diabetic heart complication. Four randomly divided groups of rats were used: normal control group; iron overload group; diabetes group, and diabetic plus iron overload group. Iron supplementation stimulated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and led to an increase in cardiac protein carbonyls, nitrotyrosine (3-NT) formation, and iNOS protein expression, thus resulting in abnormal myocardium calcium homeostasis of diabetic rats. The levels of SECA2a oxidation/nitration were significantly increased in the iron overload diabetic rats, along with a decrease in SECA2a expression and activity. In order to elucidate the possible role of iron in SERCA2a dysfunction, the effects of iron (Fe(3+) or hemin) on peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) induced SERCA2a oxidation and nitration were further investigated in vitro. It was found that tyrosine nitration played more important role in SERCA2a inactivation than thiol oxidation. These results present a potential mechanism in which iron exacerbates the diabetes-induced oxidative/nitrative modification of SERCA2a, which may cause functional deficits in the myocyte associated with diabetic cardiac dysfunction. Our findings may help to further understand the role of iron in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. PMID:27222135

  16. The changes of cardioelectrical activity of rat with myocardial infarction receiving sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase gene modified bone marrow stem cell transplantation by microelectrode array technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范平

    2012-01-01

    Objective Therapy effects and cardiac electrical activity comparison of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) transplantation and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a) gene modified BMSCs transplantation after acute myocardial infarction(AMI) in rats.Methods Rats with AMI were divided

  17. Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase phosphorylates phospholamban and regulates calcium uptake in cardiomyocyte sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, Perla; Catalucci, Daniele; Lam, Jason T; Kondo, Richard; Gutiérrez, José Carlos Paz; Reddy, Sita; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio; Chien, Kenneth R; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar

    2005-03-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is caused by a CTG expansion in the 3'-untranslated region of a protein kinase gene (DMPK). Cardiovascular disease is one of the most prevalent causes of death in DM patients. Electrophysiological studies in cardiac muscles from DM patients and from DMPK(-/-) mice suggested that DMPK is critical to the modulation of cardiac contractility and to the maintenance of proper cardiac conduction activity. However, there are no data regarding the molecular signaling pathways involved in DM heart failure. Here we show that DMPK expression in cardiac myocytes is highly enriched in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) where it colocalizes with the ryanodine receptor and phospholamban (PLN), a muscle-specific SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a) inhibitor. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed that DMPK and PLN can physically associate. Furthermore, purified wild-type DMPK, but not a kinase-deficient mutant (K110A DMPK), phosphorylates PLN in vitro. Subsequent studies using the DMPK(-/-) mice demonstrated that PLN is hypo-phosphorylated in SR vesicles from DMPK(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that Ca(2+) uptake in SR is impaired in ventricular homogenates from DMPK(-/-) mice. Together, our data suggest the existence of a novel regulatory DMPK pathway for cardiac contractility and provide a molecular mechanism for DM heart pathology. PMID:15598648

  18. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Kevin Peter

    1978-01-01

    Light (30 to 32.5% sucrose) and heavy (38.5 to 42% sucrose) sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (LSR,HSR) were isolated from rabbit leg muscle using a combination of differential centrifugation and isopycnic zonal ultracentrifugation. Thin-section electron microscopy of LSR vesicles reveals empty vesicles of various sizes and shapes whereas the HSR vesicles appear as rounded vesicles of uniform size filled with electron dense material, similar to that seen in the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The sucrose HSR vesicles have an additional morphological feature which appears as membrane projections that resemble the SR feet. The freeze-fracture morphology of either type of SR reveals an asymmetric distribution of intramembraneous particles in the same orientation and distribution as the sarcoplasmic reticulum in vivo. Biochemical studies were made on the content of Ca, Mg, ATPase, and protein of the vesicles and phosphorylation of the vesicles. The biochemical and morphological data indicate that the LSR is derived from the longitudinal sarcoplasmic reticulum and the HSR is derived from the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, contains junctional SR membrane and has three unique proteins (calsequestrin, an intrinsic 30,000 dalton protein and a 9000 dalton proteolipid).

  19. Occurrence and Characteristics of a Rapid Exchange of Phosphate Oxygens Catalyzed by Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, T.; Boyer, P. D.

    1972-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from skeletal muscle actively take up Ca{sup ++} from the medium in the presence of Mg{sup ++} and ATP. This transport is coupled to ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by membrane-bound Ca{sup++}, Mg{sup ++}-ATPase which is activated by concurrent presence of Ca{sup ++} and Mg{sup ++}. Considerable informations have accumulated that give insight into the ATPase and its coupling to the calcium transport. The hydrolysis of ATP by this enzyme occurs through a phosphorylated intermediate. Formation and decomposition of the intermediate show vectorial requirements for Ca{sup ++} and Mg{sup ++}, suggesting an intimate involvement of the intermediate in the transport process. ATP synthesis from P{sub i} and ADP coupled to outflow of Ca{sup ++} from sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles has recently been demonstrated. This indicates the reversibility of the entire process of calcium transport in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles.

  20. Effects of boldine on mouse diaphragm and sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J J; Cheng, Y W

    1998-02-01

    The effects of boldine [(S)-2,9-dihydroxy-1,10-dimethoxyaporphine], a major alkaloid in the leaves and bark of boldo (Peumus boldus Mol.), on skeletal muscle were studied using mouse diaphragm and isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles. Boldine, at 10-200 microM, has little effect on the muscle-evoked twitches; however, the ryanodine-induced contracture was potentiated dose-dependently. At higher concentrations of 300 microM, boldine by itself induced muscle contracture of two phases, which were caused by the influx of extracellular Ca2+ and induction of Ca2+ release from the internal Ca2+ storage site, the sarcoplasmic reticulum, respectively. When tested with isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles, boldine dose-dependently induced Ca2+ release from actively loaded sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from skeletal muscle of rabbit or rat which was inhibited by ruthenium red, suggesting that the release was through the Ca2+ release channel, also known as the ryanodine receptor. Boldine also dose-dependently increased apparent [3H]-ryanodine binding with the EC50 value of 50 microM. In conclusion, we have shown that boldine could sensitize the ryanodine receptor and induce Ca2+ release from the internal Ca2+ storage site of skeletal muscle. PMID:9491763

  1. Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Release Channels in Ventricles of Older Adult Hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholl, Peter A.; Howlett, Susan E.

    2006-01-01

    Whether the density of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release channels/ryanodine receptors in the heart declines with age is not clear. We investigated age-related changes in the density of [3H]-ryanodine receptors in crude ventricular homogenates, which contained all ligand binding sites in heart and in isolated junctional SR membranes.…

  2. [Physiological functions of endoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca pump and pharmacology of inhibitors of the pump].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, M; Shigekawa, M

    1993-09-01

    This review is derived from the symposium held at the 66th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Pharmacological Society (March, 1993). The symposium consisted of six invited papers whose general theme was the application of recently found ATPase inhibitors selective to SR- and ER-Ca(2+)-ATPase to the analyses of the physiological and pharmacological roles of endoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca stores. Inhibitors used were: thapsigargin, cyclopiazonic acid, 2,5-di-(t-butyl)-1,4-benzohydroquinone and 3',3",5',5"-tetraiodosulfophthalein. Gingerol was found to facilitate the action of the ATPase. In either smooth, cardiac or skeletal muscle, sympathetic neurons or several cell lines these inhibitors affected a variety of cell functions and conditions such as contraction, ionic conductance and excitability of the plasma membrane, regulation of intracellular free Ca2+ concentration, transport of viral glycoprotein to the cell surface. Many of these studies utilized either single or cultured cell preparations or skinned muscle. These inhibitors were shown to be useful tools for investigating the SR and ER functioning as Ca sources or Ca sequestrating pumps, and further for estimating the contribution of ER or SR to regulating the flux of Ca2+ and other ions through the plasma membrane. Results of analyses using these inhibitors are discussed. PMID:8406230

  3. Effect of ionizing radiation on catalytic properties of Ca2+-ATP-ase from sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was studied kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics of Ca2+-ATP-ase of rat skeletal muscle (membranes of sarcoplasmic reticulum) after irradiation in doses 0,5, 4,0 and 8,0 Gy. It was shown that external gamma-irradiation at different doses changed kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics of the enzyme of sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes of skeletal muscle. These alterations probably correlate with disbalance of hormonal regulation of intracellular calcium metabolism and changes in membrane structure and functions

  4. Effect of ionizing radiation on catalytic properties of Ca2+-ATPase from sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was studied kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics of Ca2+-ATPase of rat skeletal muscle (membranes of sarcoplasmic reticulum) after irradiation in doses 0,5, 4,0 and 8,0 Gy. It was shown that external gamma-irradiation at different doses changed kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics of the enzyme of sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes of skeletal muscle. These alterations probably correlate with dis balance of hormonal regulation of intracellular calcium metabolism and changes in membrane structure and functions

  5. Sarcoplasmic reticulum function and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 inhibition during progression of heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Heinz; Vetter, Roland

    2000-01-01

    Failing cardiac hypertrophy is associated with an inadequate sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function. The hypothesis was examined that pressure overloaded hearts fail to increase SR Ca2+ uptake rate proportionally to the hypertrophy and that carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 inhibition by etomoxir ((±)-ethyl 2[6(4-chlorophenoxy)hexyl] oxirane-2-carboxylate) can counteract this process. Severe left ventricular pressure overload was induced in rats by constricting the ascending aorta for 8, 10, 14 and 28 weeks leading to cardiac hypertrophy (+62–+103% of sham-operated rats) and pulmonary congestion. Homogenate oxalate-facilitated SR Ca2+ uptake rate g wet wt−1 was reduced (P<0.05) by 29.9±1.8% irrespective of phospholamban phosphorylation (in the presence of catalytic subunit of protein kinase A) and inhibition of SR Ca2+ release channel by ruthenium red. SERCA2 protein level was reduced (P<0.05) by 30.4±0.8%. SR Ca2+ uptake rate was inversely correlated (P<0.05) with left ventricular weight but was not affected by the occurrence of pulmonary congestion. Because SR Ca2+ uptake rate of whole ventricles was not reduced, a hypertrophy proportional dilution of SR Ca2+ uptake has to be inferred which precedes pulmonary congestion. Treatment with etomoxir (15 mg kg body wt−1 day−1 for 10 weeks) did not affect left ventricular weight but decreased (P<0.05) the right ventricular hypertrophy related to pulmonary congestion. In parallel, SR Ca2+ uptake rate of left ventricle and myosin isozyme V1 were increased (P<0.05). Etomoxir represents a candidate approach for prevention of heart failure by inducing a hypertrophy proportional increase in SR Ca2+ uptake rate. PMID:11139455

  6. Effects of melittin on lipid-protein interactions in sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahaney, James E.; Kleinschmidt, Jörg H.; Marsh, Derek; Thomas, David D.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the physical mechanism by which melittin inhibits Ca-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes, we have used electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to probe the effect of melittin on lipid-protein interactions in SR. Previous studies have shown that melittin substantially restricts the rotational mobility of the Ca-ATPase but only slightly decreases the average lipid hydrocarbon chain fluidity in SR. Therefore, in the present stud...

  7. Mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum as model targets for neurotoxic and myotoxic phospholipases A2

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Ronald H.; Howard, Bruce D.

    1980-01-01

    Certain neurotoxins and myotoxins from snake venoms have phospholipase A2 activity (phosphatide 2-acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.4), which appears to be necessary for their toxicity. Several of these toxins inhibit the net uptake of Ca2+ into sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles and brain mitochondria. We have obtained evidence that the ability to inhibit this Ca2+ uptake is a mechanistically relevant correlate of the toxicity of these proteins rather than being just a nonspecific consequence of their ph...

  8. Electron microscope tomography: further demonstration of nanocontacts between caveolae and smooth muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Popescu, LM

    2008-01-01

    Abstract A spatial relationship between caveolae and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in smooth muscle cells (SMC) was previously reported in computer-assisted three-dimensional reconstruction from transmission electron microscope serial sections. The knowledge of the three-dimensional organization of the cortical space of SMC is essential to understand caveolae function at the cellular level. Cellular tomography using transmission electron microscopy tomography (EMT) is the only available technol...

  9. Effect of Ca2+ on the dimeric structure of scallop sarcoplasmic reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Scallop sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), visualized in situ by freeze- fracture and deep-etching, is characterized by long tubes displaying crystalline arrays of Ca2+-ATPase dimer ribbons, resembling those observed in isolated SR vesicles. The orderly arrangement of the Ca2+- ATPase molecules is well preserved in muscle bundles permeabilized with saponin. Treatment with saponin, however, is not needed to isolate SR vesicles displaying a crystalline surface structure. Omission of ATP from the isol...

  10. Effect of Zn2+ ions on ryanodine binding to sarcoplasmic reticulum of striated muscles in the presence of pyrithione

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong XIE; Ke-ying CHEN; Pei-hong ZHU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore whether the differential effects of Zn2+ on ryanodine binding to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR)of skeletal and cardiac muscles resulted from different permeability of the SR to Zn2+. METHODS: [3H]ryanodine binding assays were performed to examine the effect of Zn2+ on ryanodine binding to the SR in the presence of pyrithione sodium (PyNa), a specific Zn2+ ionophore. RESULTS: As a control, PyNa up to 50 μmol/L did not induce any effect on ryanodine binding to the SR of cardiac muscle. But PyNa 1-100 μmol/L increased ryanodine binding in skeletal muscle with maximum binding (222.2 %+20.9 % of the control) and inhibited ryanodine binding to 50 % of the control at about 500 μrnol/L. In the presence of PyNa 10 and 50 μmol/L the dose-dependence of the effect of Zn2+ in cardiac muscle was still monophasic and not changed by PyNa, while the biphasic effect of Zn2+in skeletal muscle became monophasic. CONCLUSION: Different permeability of the SR to Zn2+ may account for the differential effects of Zn2+on ryanodine binding in skeletal and cardiac muscles. PyNa is not a strictly specific Zn2+ ionophore.

  11. Cellular mechanisms of reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content in L-thyroxin-induced rat ventricular hypertrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lai-jing SONG; Guan-lei WANG; Jie LIU; Qin-ying QIU; Jing-hua OU; Yong-yuan GUAN

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To examine how the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content changes and the underlying mechanism in L-thyroxin-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Methods:Echocardiography was used to confirm the establishment of the cardiac hypertro-phy model. The confocal microscopy and fluorescent indicator Fluo-3 was ap-plied to examine the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]I), the Ca2+ sparks, and the caffeine-induced Ca2+ transient in freshly isolated cardiac ventricular myocytes. The activity of sarcolemmal and SR Ca2+-ATPase 2a (SERCA2a) in the ventricular tissue was also measured, respectively. Results:L-thyroxin (1 mg/kg injection for 10 d) induces left ventricular cardiac hypertrophy with normal myocardial function. The decreased caffeine-induced Ca2+ transient in the Ca2+-free solution was detected. The spontaneous Ca2+ sparks in hypertrophied myocytes occurred more frequently than in normal cells, with similar duration and spatial spread, but smaller amplitude. Then the basal [Ca2+]I increase was observed in quiescent left ventricular myocytes from hyperthyroidism rats. The activity of sarcolemmal and SR Ca2+-ATPase was decreased in the hypertrophied ventricle tissue. Conclusion:The results suggested that the reduced SR Ca2+ content may be associated with an increased Ca2+ leak and reduced SERCA2a activity, contributing to abnormal intracellular Ca2+ handling during hypertrophy in hyperthyroidism rats.

  12. Impaired sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release rate after fatiguing stimulation in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Sjøgaard, G; Madsen, Klavs

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to characterize the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function and contractile properties before and during recovery from fatigue in the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle. Fatiguing contractions (60 Hz, 150 ms/s for 4 min) induced a reduction of the SR Ca(2+) release rate.......05). Despite a slowing of the relaxation rate, we did not find any significant alterations in the SR Ca(2+) uptake function. These data demonstrate that the Ca(2+) release mechanism of SR is sensitive to repetitive in vitro muscle contraction. Moreover, the results indicate that +dF/dt to some extent depends...

  13. Bis-quaternary ammonium blockers as structural probes of the sarcoplasmic reticulum K+ channel

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    A series of n-alkyl-bis-alpha,omega-trimethylammonium (bisQn) compounds was synthesized, and their ability to block K+ currents through a K+ channel from sarcoplasmic reticulum was studied. K+ channels were inserted into planar phospholipid membranes, and single-channel K+ currents were measured in the presence of the blocking cations. These bisQn compounds block K+ currents only from the side of the membrane opposite to the addition of SR vesicles (the trans side). The block is dependent on ...

  14. Disturbances of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and transverse tubular system in 24-h electrostimulated fast-twitch skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frías, J A; Cadefau, J A; Prats, C;

    2005-01-01

    muscle to low-frequency stimulation, Pflugers Arch. 424 (1993) 529-537). To assess the involvement of sarcoplasmic reticulum and transverse tubular system in this force impairment, we isolated microsomal fractions from stimulated and control (contralateral, unstimulated) muscles on discontinuous sucrose...... damage to longitudinal sarcoplasmic reticulum and swelling of t-tubules revealed by electron microscopy. The ultrastructural changes observed here reflect exercise-induced damage of membrane systems that might severely compromise muscle function. Since this process is reversible, we suggest that it may...

  15. Two distinct distribution patterns of sarcoplasmic reticulum in two functionally different giant smooth muscle cells of Beroe ovata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cario, C; Malaval, L; Hernandez-Nicaise, M L

    1995-12-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum has been studied in radial and longitudinal giant smooth muscle fibres of the marine planktonic invertebrate Beroe. Impregnation with heavy metals has revealed that the smooth component is organised in a longitudinally oriented three-dimensional network of tubules running along the myofilaments. An ultrastructural morphometric analysis has shown that the relative volume of the sarcoplasmic reticulum is the same (1% of the myofilament volume) in both fibres but that the size, number and distribution of the sarcoplasmic reticulum tubules differ significantly. The longitudinal fibres are characterised physiologically by an action potential with a short calcium-dependent plateau that can trigger a short contraction; radial fibres produce action potentials without a plateau and their contraction requires a train of spikes. The sarcoplasmic reticulum tubules in longitudinal fibres are thinner (132 nm in diameter) and more numerous than those in radial fibres (160 nm in diameter). Moreover, the tubules are homogeneously distributed among the myofilaments in radial fibres, whereas they are more numerous in the centre of longitudinal muscles. PMID:8581937

  16. Temperature and Ca2+-dependence of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2(+)-ATPase in haddock, salmon, rainbow trout and zebra cichlid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Helene; Jessen, Flemming

    2002-01-01

    Temperature dependence of Ca2+-ATPase from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in rabbit muscle has been widely studied, and it is generally accepted that a break point in Arrhenius plot exist at approximately 20 degreesC. Whether the break point arises as a result of temperature dependent changes in...

  17. Investigation of function similarities between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and platelet calcium-dependent adenosinetriphosphatases with the inhibitors quercetin and calmidazolium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The platelet and skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-dependent adenosinetriphosphatases (Ca2+-ATPases) were functionally compared with respect to substrate activation by steady-state kinetic methods using the inhibitors quercetin and calmidazolium. Quercetin inhibited platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase activities in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 values of 25 and 10 μM, respectively. Calmidazolium also inhibited platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase activities, with half-maximal inhibition measured at 5 and 4 μM, respectively. Both inhibitors also affected the [45Ca] calcium transport activity of intact platelet microsomes at concentrations similar to those which reduced Ca2+-ATPase activity. These inhibitors were then used to examine substrate ligation by the platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump proteins. For both Ca2+-ATPase proteins, quercetin has an affinity for the E-Ca2 (fully ligated with respect to calcium at the exterior high-affinity calcium binding sites, unligated with respect to ATP) conformational state of the protein that is approximately 10-fold grater than for other conformational states in the hydrolytic cycle. Quercetin can thus be considered a competitive inhibitor of the calcium pump proteins with respect to ATP. In contrast to the effect of quercetin, calmidazolium interacts with the platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases in an uncompetitive manner. The dissociation constants for this inhibitor for the different conformational states of the calcium pump proteins were similar, indicating that calmidazolium has equal affinity for all of the reaction intermediates probed. These observations indicate that the substrate ligation processes are similar for the two pump proteins. This supports the concept that the hydrolytic cycles of the two proteins are comparable

  18. The rates of incorporation of inorganic orthophosphate, glycerol, and acetate into phospholipids of rabbit sarcoplasmic reticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive precursors, 32Psub(i), glycerol-2-3H, and acetate-3H were injected intravenously into male rabbits and the rates of incorporation into phospholipid fractions of the sarcoplasmic reticulum were estimated. Any distinct differences of specific activities among the phospholipid classes were not observed, although sphigomyelin showed a little lower value than that of other phospholipids. 1-O-Alkyl compounds, especially in ethanolamine phosphoglyceride fraction, got high specific activities even in the early stages of the experiment. The specific activities of 1-O-alkenyl compounds were fairly low as compared with those of 1-acyl and 1-O-alkyl compounds throughout the experiments of glycerol-3H and acetate-3H incorporation but reached to the level of 1-acyl compounds in the experiment of 32Psub(i) incorporation. Therefore, it was rather difficult to find the metabolic relationship between plasmalogen and alkyl ether phospholipids. (author)

  19. Vanilloid receptor expressed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of rat skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (VR1) was cloned as a capsaicin receptor from neuronal cells of dorsal root ganglia. VR1 was subsequently found in a few non-neuronal tissues, including skeletal muscle [Onozawa et al., Tissue distribution of capsaicin receptor in the various organs of rats, Proc. Jpn. Acad. Ser. B 76 (2000) 68-72]. We confirmed the expression of VR1 in muscle cells using the RT-PCR method and Western blot analysis. Immunostaining studies with a confocal microscope and an electron microscope indicated that VR1 was present in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), a store of Ca2+. The SR releases Ca2+ to cause a contraction when a muscle is excited. However, SR still releases a small amount of Ca2+ under relaxed conditions. We found that this leakage was enhanced by capsaicin and was antagonized by capsazepine, a capsaicin blocker, indicating that leakage of Ca2+ occurs through a channel composed of VR1

  20. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Kevin Peter

    1978-01-01

    Light (30 to 32.5% sucrose) and heavy (38.5 to 42% sucrose) sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (LSR, HSR) were isolated from rabbit leg muscle. They were then diluted and washed with sucrose or KCl and referred to as sucrose or KCl washed vesicles. Thin-section electron microscopy of LSR vesicles reveals empty vesicles of various sizes and shapes where as the HSR vesicles appear as rounded vesicles of uniform size filled with electron dense material. The LSR consists of predominantly Ca/sup 2 +/ + Mg/sup 2 +/ ATPase (80 to 90%), a small amount of the high affinity Ca binding protein (5%), and a 5000 dalton proteolipid. The sucrose HSR vesicles contain the Ca/sup 2 +/ + Mg/sup 2 +/ ATPase (50%), Calsequestrin (25%), high affinity Ca binding protein (5%), one extrinsic 34,000 dalton protein (3%), one intrinsic 30,000 dalton protein (3%), a 9000 dalton proteolipid, and a 5000 dalton proteolipid. The sucrose--washed HSR vesicles contain greater than three times the calcium content of the sucrose washed LSR vesicles where as the KCl--washed vesicles contain less than 15 nmoles Ca/sup 2 +//mg of protein each. The light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles were both able to accumulate calcium in the presence of ATP. Exchange of methanesulfonate for chloride resulted in the release of calcium from both the light and heavy SR vesicles. Sucrose causes a slight inhibition of chloride--induced calcium release from the heavy SR vesicles but it greatly reduces the release of calcium from the light SR vesicles. Sodium dantrolene (20 uM) has no effect on the release of calcium from the light SR vesicles but it inhibits the release of calcium from the heavy SR vesicles. The results indicate that the chloride--induced release of calcium may be acting by two mechanisms, osmotic swelling and depolarization.

  1. Lipid-protein interactions in sarcoplasmic reticulum are not perturbed by ionophore A23187. An EPR and fluorescence study.

    OpenAIRE

    Pringle, M J; Hidalgo, C

    1982-01-01

    The divalent-cation ionophore A23187 at micromolar concentrations prevents the ATP-dependent accumulation of calcium into sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Under the same conditions and throughout the temperature range of 4 degrees-37 degrees C, A23187 has no effect on either the rotational motion of the Ca2+ -ATPase in the membrane, or on the mobility of the lipid acyl chains. The steady-state fluorescence polarization of a polyene fluorescent probe incorporated into the membrane lipids was s...

  2. Characterization of calcium, nucleotide, phosphate, and vanadate bound states by derivatization of sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase with ThioGlo1.

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, S; Fabris, D.; Inesi, G

    1999-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles were incubated with the maleimide-directed probe ThioGlo1, resulting in ATPase inactivation. Reacted ThioGlo1, revealed by its enhanced fluorescence, was found to be associated with the cytosolic but not with the membrane-bound region of the ATPase. The dependence of inactivation on ThioGlo1 concentration suggests derivatization of approximately four residues per ATPase, of which Cys(364), Cys(498), and Cys(636) were identified in prominently fluorescent peptid...

  3. Activations of the Ca dependent K channel by Ca released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of mammalian smooth muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, K; Sakai, T; Kajioka, S; Kuriyama, H

    1989-01-01

    In mammalian smooth muscles, the outward K current recorded using the whole cell voltage clamp or patch clamp methods can be classified into the Ca-dependent and independent K currents. The former is sub-classified into the extra- and intra-cellular Ca dependent K current. The intra-cellular Ca dependent K current has a close relation to Ca released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, i.e. Ca released by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3), ryanodine or Ca ionophores (A23187 or ionomycin) modify the appearance of the K current. The transient (Ca dependent) outward current evoked by depolarization pulses, as measured using the whole cell voltage clamp method, is closely related with after-hyperpolarization of the action potential as recorded using the microelectrode method and is postulated to be due to activations of the Ca-induced Ca release mechanism in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The oscillatory (Ca dependent) outward K current is closely related with the amount of Ca released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during the long depolarization induced by electrical stimulation (command pulse) or applications of Ca releasers such as InsP3 or ryanodine. In this review, the Ca dependent K current recorded from smooth muscle cells is compared with the influx and release of Ca. PMID:2667516

  4. Reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum content of releasable Ca2+ in rat soleus muscle fibres after eccentric contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J S; Sahlin, K; Ørtenblad, N

    2007-01-01

    AIM: The purpose was to evaluate the effects of fatiguing eccentric contractions (EC) on calcium (Ca2+) handling properties in mammalian type I muscles. We hypothesized that EC reduces both endogenous sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) content of releasable Ca2+ (eSRCa2+) and myofibrillar Ca2+ sensitivity....... METHODS: Isolated rat soleus muscles performed 30 EC bouts. Single fibres were isolated from the muscle and after mechanical removal of sarcolemma used to measure eSRCa2+, rate of SR Ca2+ loading and myofibrillar Ca2+ sensitivity. RESULTS: Following EC maximal force in whole muscle was reduced by 30% and...... 16/100 Hz force ratio by 33%. The eSRCa2+ in fibres from non-stimulated muscles was 45 +/- 5% of the maximal loading capacity. After EC, eSRCa2+ per fibre CSA decreased by 38% (P = 0.05), and the maximal capacity of SR Ca2+ loading was depressed by 32%. There were no effects of EC on either...

  5. Characterization of functional TRPV1 channels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of mouse skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Lotteau

    Full Text Available TRPV1 represents a non-selective cation channel activated by capsaicin, acidosis and high temperature. In the central nervous system where TRPV1 is highly expressed, its physiological role in nociception is clearly identified. In skeletal muscle, TRPV1 appears implicated in energy metabolism and exercise endurance. However, how as a Ca(2+ channel, it contributes to intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+]i maintenance and muscle contraction remains unknown. Here, as in rats, we report that TRPV1 is functionally expressed in mouse skeletal muscle. In contrast to earlier reports, our analysis show TRPV1 presence only at the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR membrane (preferably at the longitudinal part in the proximity of SERCA1 pumps. Using intracellular Ca(2+ imaging, we directly accessed to the channel functionality in intact FDB mouse fibers. Capsaicin and resiniferatoxin, both agonists as well as high temperature (45°C elicited an increase in [Ca(2+]i. TRPV1-inhibition by capsazepine resulted in a strong inhibition of TRPV1-mediated functional responses and abolished channel activation. Blocking the SR release (with ryanodine or dantrolene led to a reduced capsaicin-induced Ca(2+ elevation suggesting that TRPV1 may participate to a secondary SR Ca(2+ liberation of greater amplitude. In conclusion, our experiments point out that TRPV1 is a functional SR Ca(2+ leak channel and may crosstalk with RyR1 in adult mouse muscle fibers.

  6. Pycnogenol and Ginkgo biloba extract: effect on peroxynitrite-oxidized sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zižková, Petronela; Viskupičová, Jana; Horáková, L'ubica

    2010-12-01

    The effect of two natural standardized plant extracts, Pycnogenol(®) and EGb 761, on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) activity and posttranslational modifications induced by peroxynitrite was investigated to assess their possible protective role. EGb 761 was found to have a protective effect on SERCA activity in the concentration range of 5-40 µg/ml. On the other hand, Pycnogenol(®) caused a decrease of SERCA activity at concentrations of 25 µg/ml. EGb 761 did not prevent protein carbonyl formation upon oxidation with peroxynitrite. On the contrary, Pycnogenol(®) at the concentrations of 5 and 10 µg/ml significantly decreased the level of protein carbonyls by 44% and 54%, respectively. Neither Pycnogenol(®) nor EGb 761 exerted a protective effect against thiol group oxidation.The plant extracts studied modulated peroxynitrite-injured SERCA activity by different ways and failed to correlate with posttranslational modifications. Their effect seems to be associated with their ability to change SERCA conformation rather than by their antioxidant capacity. PMID:21331179

  7. Characterization of detergent-solubilized sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase by high-performance liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase solubilized by the nonionic detergent octaethylene glycol monododecyl ether was studied by molecular sieve high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and analytical ultracentrifugation. Significant irreversible aggregation of soluble Ca2+-ATPase occurred within a few hours in the presence of ≤ 50 μM Ca2+. The aggregates were inactive and were primarily held together by hydrophobic forces. In the absence of reducing agent, secondary formation of disulfide bonds occurred. The stability of the inactive dimer upon dilution permitted unambiguous assignment of its elution position and sedimentation coefficient. At high 45Ca2+ concentration (500 μM), monomeric Ca2+-ATPase was stable for several house. Reversible self-association induced by variation in protein, detergent, and lipid concentrations was studied by large-zone HPLC. The association constant for dimerization of active Ca2+-ATPase was found to be 105-106 M-1 depending on the detergent concentration. More detergent was bound to monomeric than to dimeric Ca2+-ATPase, even above the critical micellar concentration of the detergent. Binding of Ca2+ and 48V vanadate as well as ATP-dependent phosphorylation was studied in monomeric and in reversibly associated dimeric preparations. In both forms, two high-affinity Ca2+ binding sites per phosphorylation site existed. The delipidated monomer purified by HPLC was able to form ADP-insensitive phosphoenzyme and to bind ATP and vanadate simultaneously. The results suggest that formation of Ca2+-ATPase oligomers in the membrane is governed by nonspecific forces (low affinity) and that each polypeptide chain constitutes a functional unit

  8. Pycnogenol® and Ginkgo biloba extract: effect on peroxynitrite-oxidized sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase

    OpenAIRE

    Žižková, Petronela; Viskupičová, Jana; Horáková, L'ubica

    2010-01-01

    The effect of two natural standardized plant extracts, Pycnogenol® and EGb 761, on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) activity and posttranslational modifications induced by peroxynitrite was investigated to assess their possible protective role. EGb 761 was found to have a protective effect on SERCA activity in the concentration range of 5–40 µg/ml. On the other hand, Pycnogenol® caused a decrease of SERCA activity at concentrations of 25 µg/ml. EGb 761 did not prevent protein carbon...

  9. Study on the effect of doxorubicin on expressions of genes encoding myocardial sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ transport proteins and the effect of taurine on myocardial protection in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄先玫; 朱卫华; 康曼丽

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the effect of doxorubicin(DOX) on gene expression of the myocardial sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR)Ca2+ transport proteins and the mechanism of taurine(Tau) protecting cardiac muscle cells, 9 rabbits were injected with DOX , 8 rabbits with DOX and Tau, and 9 rabbits with normal saline. Cardiac function , concentration of calcium in cardiomyocytes (Myo[Ca2+]i), activity of SR Ca2+-ATPase(SERCA2a), level of SERCA2a mRNA and Ca2+ released channels(RYR2)mRNA were detected. The left ventricle tissues were observed by electron microscopy. The results showed that cardiac index, left ventricular systolic pressure, activity of SR Ca2+-ATPase and level of SERCA2a mRNA decreased , while Myo[Ca2+]i increased in DOX-treated rabbits. DOX could not affect the level of RYR2 mRNA. Tau intervention could alleviate the increase of left ventricular diastolic pressure, Myo[Ca2+]i and the decrease of SERCA2a mRNA induced by doxorubicin. The results suggested that downregulation of SERCA2a gene expression was an important mechanism of DOX-induced cardiomyopathy and that Tau could partially improve the heart function by reducing calcium overload and alleviating downregulation of SERCA2a mRNA.

  10. 钙离子ATP酶2a基因修饰骨髓间充质干细胞移植改善慢性心力衰竭大鼠的心功能%Enhancement of cardiac function of chronic heart failure rats by marrow stromal cell-based sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ adenosine triphosphatase gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭豫涛; 李小鹰; 鲁小春; 吴迪; 姚克群; 陈平; 马康涛; 周春燕

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are still few effective methods to repair injured myocardium after myocardial failure and pathologically rebuild reverral myocardium. As a new therapy, normal myocytes and therapeutic gene to interfere injured myocardium have advantageous effects in improving heart function.OBJECTIVE: To observe the efficiency and stability of adenovirus-medicated gene transferred into different passages of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and investigate the effect of MSC-based sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase gene (SERCA2a) gene therapy for rats with chronic heart failure. To compare the effects of gene therapy, cell transplantation and MSC-based SERCA2a gene therapy for chronic heart failure. DESIGN: Randomized controlled study.SETTING: Department of Senile Angiocardiopathy, General Hospital of Chinese PLA; Department of Biochemistry, Beijing Medical University. MATERIALS: Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with 4 weeks old, clean grade and weighing 45-50 g provided by the Animal Experimental Center, Peking Medical University were used as donators of bone marrow. Other female SD rats of 12 weeks old, clean grade and weighing 200-250 g were used as receptors of cell transplantation and gene therapy. Sry gene of Y chromosome in male rats was used to evaluate whether transplanted cells of donators lived in myocardium of receptor rats. Ad-SERCa2a and Ad-EGFP were constructed by Doctor Lu Xiao-chun; MSC in the 3rd and 8th generations was isolating cultured on its own. METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the Zhou CY Laboratory (BSL-2), Department of Biochemistry, Beijing Medical University from July 2004 to December 2005. Thirty female SD rats received ligation at the left coronary artery to make models with chronic cardiac failure following acute myocardial infarction. And then, 29 rats were randomly divided into four groups, including gene therapy group (n=7), MSC group (n=7), gene-modified MSC group (n=8) and control group (n=7). Rats in the four groups

  11. A novel artificial microRNA expressing AAV vector for phospholamban silencing in cardiomyocytes improves Ca2+ uptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Gröβl

    Full Text Available In failing rat hearts, post-transcriptonal inhibition of phospholamban (PLB expression by AAV9 vector-mediated cardiac delivery of short hairpin RNAs directed against PLB (shPLBr improves both impaired SERCA2a controlled Ca2+ cycling and contractile dysfunction. Cardiac delivery of shPLB, however, was reported to cause cardiac toxicity in canines. Thus we developed a new AAV vector, scAAV6-amiR155-PLBr, expressing a novel engineered artificial microRNA (amiR155-PLBr directed against PLB under control of a heart-specific hybrid promoter. Its PLB silencing efficiency and safety were compared with those of an AAV vector expressing shPLBr (scAAV6-shPLBr from an ubiquitously active U6 promoter. Investigations were carried out in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (CM over a period of 14 days. Compared to shPLBr, amiR155-PLBr was expressed at a significantly lower level, resulting in delayed and less pronounced PLB silencing. Despite decreased knockdown efficiency of scAAV6-amiR155-PLBr, a similar increase of the SERCA2a-catalyzed Ca2+ uptake into sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR vesicles was observed for both the shPLBr and amiR155-PLBr vectors. Proteomic analysis confirmed PLB silencing of both therapeutic vectors and revealed that shPLBr, but not the amiR155-PLBr vector, increased the proinflammatory proteins STAT3, STAT1 and activated STAT1 phosphorylation at the key amino acid residue Tyr701. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis detected alterations in the expression of several cardiac microRNAs after treatment of CM with scAAV6-shPLBr and scAAV6-amiR155-PLBr, as well as after treatment with its related amiR155- and shRNAs-expressing control AAV vectors. The results demonstrate that scAAV6-amiR155-PLBr is capable of enhancing the Ca2+ transport function of the cardiac SR PLB/SERCA2a system as efficiently as scAAV6-shPLBr while offering a superior safety profile.

  12. Modulation of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase activity and oxidative modification during the development of adjuvant arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strosova, Miriam K; Karlovska, Janka; Zizkova, Petronela; Kwolek-Mirek, Magdalena; Ponist, Silvester; Spickett, Corinne M; Horakova, Lubica

    2011-07-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) was induced by intradermal administration of Mycobacterium butyricum to the tail of Lewis rats. In sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal muscles, we investigated the development of AA. SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) activity decreased on day 21, suggesting possible conformational changes in the transmembrane part of the enzyme, especially at the site of the calcium binding transmembrane part. These events were associated with an increased level of protein carbonyls, a decrease in cysteine SH groups, and alterations in SR membrane fluidity. There was no alteration in the nucleotide binding site at any time point of AA, as detected by a FITC fluorescence marker. Some changes observed on day 21 appeared to be reversible, as indicated by SERCA activity, cysteine SH groups, SR membrane fluidity, protein carbonyl content and fluorescence of an NCD-4 marker specific for the calcium binding site. The reversibility may represent adaptive mechanisms of AA, induced by higher relative expression of SERCA, oxidation of cysteine, nitration of tyrosine and presence of acidic phospholipids such as phosphatidic acid. Nitric oxide may regulate cytoplasmic Ca(2+) level through conformational alterations of SERCA, and decreasing levels of calsequestrin in SR may also play regulatory role in SERCA activity and expression. PMID:21531199

  13. Role of Golgi derived clathrin coated vesicles in the transport of calsequestrin to the sarcoplasmic reticulum of developing myotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) is the major intracellular calcium sequestering organelle in skeletal and heart muscle. Calsequestrin (CSQ) is a glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 42,000. This protein is located in the lumen of the SR and it binds Ca2+ to maintain the concentration of this cation in the lumen at 10/sup /minus/3/M. Highly purified coated vesicles (CVs) were isolated from chick muscle and a Western blot using polyclonal anti-CSQ revealed the presence of CSQ within the CVs. Another major protein in the SR, the Ca2+-ATPase, was not contained in CVs suggesting different routes of insertion into the SR. Cultured chick myotubes were labelled with Trans35S-label contain [35S]-methionine and [35S]-cysteine to follow the transport of CSQ. Labelled CSQ remained high in the CVs until after 45 minutes of chase, then declined. The amount of labelled CSQ in the SR continued to rise over the chase period. No CSQ was secreted. All the CSQ in CVs and SR was sensitive to the activity of endoglycosidase H, and a significant fraction also bound wheat germ agglutinin. A small amount of CSQ was also co-transported with the muscle protein acetylcholinesterase within CVs. Non-secreted forms of acetylcholinesterase had the same carbohydrate structure as CSQ and were shown to be degraded in the SR

  14. Effects of calmodulin and calmodulin inhibitors on Ca uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum of saponin skinned caudal artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmodulin (CaM) stimulates plasma membrane transport in many cell types, however, its role in Ca regulation by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in smooth muscle has not been established. 45Ca uptake was studied in saponin skinned strips of rat caudal artery as a function of CaM and the CaM inhibitors, W-7, calmidazolium (CaMZ), and trifluoperazine (TFP). Although caudal artery strips lose approximately 30% of total tissue CaM during skinning, 0.3 - 2 μM CaM did not increase 45Ca uptake over a wide range of free Ca concentrations (10-8 - 10-6M). Neither W-7 nor CaMZ at concentration of 10-4 - 2 x 10-4M inhibited the MgATP-dependent Ca uptake. Ca uptake was not affected by 50 μM TFP but a significant inhibition was produced by 500 μM. Studies of the effects of TFP on 45Ca efflux indicated that TFP concentrations which inhibited Ca uptake also significantly increased the rate of Ca release. The results suggest that total Ca uptake in caudal artery depends mainly upon MgATP and is not modulated by exogenous CaM or affected by these CaM inhibitors. They cannot preclude that CaM may affect initial velocities or that the CaM inhibitors failed to reach active sites

  15. Effects of calmodulin and calmodulin inhibitors on Ca uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum of saponin skinned caudal artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, M.A.; Silver, P.J.

    1986-03-05

    Calmodulin (CaM) stimulates plasma membrane transport in many cell types, however, its role in Ca regulation by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in smooth muscle has not been established. /sup 45/Ca uptake was studied in saponin skinned strips of rat caudal artery as a function of CaM and the CaM inhibitors, W-7, calmidazolium (CaMZ), and trifluoperazine (TFP). Although caudal artery strips lose approximately 30% of total tissue CaM during skinning, 0.3 - 2 ..mu..M CaM did not increase /sup 45/Ca uptake over a wide range of free Ca concentrations (10/sup -8/ - 10/sup -6/M). Neither W-7 nor CaMZ at concentration of 10/sup -4/ - 2 x 10/sup -4/M inhibited the MgATP-dependent Ca uptake. Ca uptake was not affected by 50 ..mu..M TFP but a significant inhibition was produced by 500 ..mu..M. Studies of the effects of TFP on /sup 45/Ca efflux indicated that TFP concentrations which inhibited Ca uptake also significantly increased the rate of Ca release. The results suggest that total Ca uptake in caudal artery depends mainly upon MgATP and is not modulated by exogenous CaM or affected by these CaM inhibitors. They cannot preclude that CaM may affect initial velocities or that the CaM inhibitors failed to reach active sites.

  16. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake and speed of relaxation are depressed in nebulin-free skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Ottenheijm, Coen A. C.; Fong, Chi; Vangheluwe, Peter; Wuytack, Frank; Babu, Gopal J.; Periasamy, Muthu; Witt, Christian C.; Labeit, Siegfried; Granzier, Henk

    2008-01-01

    Previous work suggested that altered Ca2+ homeostasis might contribute to dysfunction of nebulin-free muscle, as gene expression analysis revealed that the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA)-inhibitor sarcolipin (SLN) is up-regulated >70-fold in nebulin knockout mice, and here we tested this proposal. We investigated SLN protein expression in nebulin-free and wild-type skeletal muscle, as well as expression of other Ca2+-handling proteins. Ca2+ uptake capacity was determined in ...

  17. Structural and functional correlation of the trypsin-digested Ca2+ release channel of skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, G; Rousseau, E; Lai, F A

    1989-01-25

    The effect of trypsin digestion on the (i) fragmentation pattern, (ii) activity, (iii) [3H]ryanodine binding, and (iv) sedimentation behavior of the skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ release channel complex has been examined. Mild tryptic digestion of heavy, junctional-derived SR vesicles resulted in the rapid disappearance of the high molecular weight (Mr approximately 400,000) Ca2+ release channel protein on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels and appearance of bands of lower Mr upon immunoblot analysis, without an appreciable effect on [3H]ryanodine binding or the apparent S value (30 S) of the 3-[3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (Chaps)-solubilized channel complex. Further degradation to bands of Mr greater than 70,000 on immunoblots correlated with a reduction of channel size from 30 S to 10-15 S and loss of high affinity [3H]ryanodine binding to the trypsinized receptor, while low affinity [3H]ryanodine binding and [3H]ryanodine bound prior to digestion were retained. Parallel 45Ca2+ efflux measurements also indicated retention of the Ca2+, Mg2+, and ATP regulatory sites, although Ca2+-induced 45Ca2+ release rates were changed. In planar lipid bilayer-single channel measurements, addition of trypsin to the cytoplasmic side of the high conductance (100 pS in 50 mM Ca2+), Ca2+-activated SR Ca2+ channel initially increased the fraction of channel open time and was followed by a complete and irreversible loss of channel activity. Trypsin did not change the unitary conductance, and was without effect on single channel activity when added to the lumenal side of the channel. PMID:2536370

  18. Role of SERCA and the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content on calcium waves propagation in rat ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Cantú, Ayleen; Pérez-Treviño, Perla; Montalvo-Parra, Dolores; Balderas-Villalobos, Jaime; Gómez-Víquez, Norma L; García, Noemí; Altamirano, Julio

    2016-08-15

    In Ca(2+)-overloaded ventricular myocytes, SERCA is crucial to steadily achieve the critical sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) level to trigger and sustain Ca(2+) waves, that propagate at constant rate (ʋwave). High luminal Ca(2+) sensitizes RyR2, thereby increasing Ca(2+) sparks frequency, and the larger RyR2-mediated SR Ca(2+) flux (dF/dt) sequentially activates adjacent RyR2 clusters. Recently, it was proposed that rapid SERCA Ca(2+) reuptake, ahead of the wave front, further sensitizes RyR2, increasing ʋwave. Nevertheless, this is controversial because rapid cytosolic Ca(2+) removal could instead impair RyR2 activation. We assessed whether rapid SR Ca(2+) uptake enhances ʋwave by changing SERCA activity (ҡDecay) over a large range (∼175%). We used normal (Ctrl) and hyperthyroid rat (HT; reduced phospholamban by ∼80%) myocytes treated with thapsigargin or isoproterenol (ISO). We found that ʋwave and dF/dt had a non-linear dependency with ҡDecay, while Ca(2+) waves amplitude was largely unaffected. Furthermore, SR Ca(2+) also showed a non-linear dependency with ҡDecay, however, the relationships ʋwave vs. SR Ca(2+) and ʋwave vs. dF/dt were linear, suggesting that high steady state SR Ca(2+) determines ʋwave, while rapid SERCA Ca(2+) uptake does not. Finally, ISO did not increase ʋwave in HT cells, therefore, ISO-enhanced ʋwave in Ctrl depended on high SR Ca(2+). PMID:27242324

  19. Correlation between uncoupled ATP hydrolysis and heat production by the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase: coupling effect of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, M; Farage, M; de Souza, A C; de Meis, L

    2001-11-16

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase transports Ca(2+) using the chemical energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. Part of the chemical energy is used to translocate Ca(2+) through the membrane (work) and part is dissipated as heat. The amount of heat produced during catalysis increases after formation of the Ca(2+) gradient across the vesicle membrane. In the absence of gradient (leaky vesicles) the amount of heat produced/mol of ATP cleaved is half of that measured in the presence of the gradient. After formation of the gradient, part of the ATPase activity is not coupled to Ca(2+) transport. We now show that NaF can impair the uncoupled ATPase activity with discrete effect on the ATPase activity coupled to Ca(2+) transport. For the control vesicles not treated with NaF, after formation of the gradient only 20% of the ATP cleaved is coupled to Ca(2+) transport, and the caloric yield of the total ATPase activity (coupled plus uncoupled) is 22.8 kcal released/mol of ATP cleaved. In contrast, the vesicles treated with NaF consume only the ATP needed to maintain the gradient, and the caloric yield of ATP hydrolysis is 3.1 kcal/mol of ATP. The slow ATPase activity measured in vesicles treated with NaF has the same Ca(2+) dependence as the control vesicles. This demonstrates unambiguously that the uncoupled activity is an actual pathway of the Ca(2+)-ATPase rather than a contaminating phosphatase. We conclude that when ATP hydrolysis occurs without coupled biological work most of the chemical energy is dissipated as heat. Thus, uncoupled ATPase activity appears to be the mechanistic feature underlying the ability of the Ca(2+)-ATPase to modulated heat production. PMID:11544263

  20. Rapid kinetic analysis of the calcium-release channels of skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum: The effect of inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During excitation of skeletal muscle fibers, Ca ions stored in the cisternal compartments of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) are released to the cytosol within milliseconds. In this study, the kinetics of the fast release of Ca were analyzed by means of a newly developed rapid filtration apparatus. Isolated SR vesicles of cisternal origin were preloaded with 1 mM 45CaCl2, Ca efflux was studied after dilution into media of various composition. The effect of extravesicular Ca on the gating of the Ca-release channels and its susceptibility to the influence of drugs were thoroughly investigated. In the presence of 1 mM MgCl2 and 3 mM ATP, highest rates of Ca release were observed at a free Ca concentration between 1 and 50 μM. In the lower micromolar Ca range, compounds such as neomycin and FLA 365 inhibited the release monophasically and with an IC50 of 0.37 and 3.4 μM, respectively. At Ca concentrations between 10 and 50 μM, the inhibitors could not block Ca release effectively. Close analysis of the dose-response curves revealed a biphasic pattern, indicative of the presence of two substrates of the Ca-release channel, displaying high- and low-affinity binding sites for the inhibitors. The results indicate the existence of various open substrates of the Ca channels that can be distinguished pharmacologically. Effective blockade of rapid Ca release requires inhibition of all substrates coexisting under a given condition

  1. Ryanodine receptor fragmentation and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak after one session of high-intensity interval exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Nicolas; Ivarsson, Niklas; Venckunas, Tomas; Neyroud, Daria; Brazaitis, Marius; Cheng, Arthur J; Ochala, Julien; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Girard, Sebastien; Volungevičius, Gintautas; Paužas, Henrikas; Mekideche, Abdelhafid; Kayser, Bengt; Martinez-Redondo, Vicente; Ruas, Jorge L; Bruton, Joseph; Truffert, Andre; Lanner, Johanna T; Skurvydas, Albertas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2015-12-15

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient way of improving physical performance in healthy subjects and in patients with common chronic diseases, but less so in elite endurance athletes. The mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of HIIT are uncertain. Here, recreationally active human subjects performed highly demanding HIIT consisting of 30-s bouts of all-out cycling with 4-min rest in between bouts (≤3 min total exercise time). Skeletal muscle biopsies taken 24 h after the HIIT exercise showed an extensive fragmentation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release channel, the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1). The HIIT exercise also caused a prolonged force depression and triggered major changes in the expression of genes related to endurance exercise. Subsequent experiments on elite endurance athletes performing the same HIIT exercise showed no RyR1 fragmentation or prolonged changes in the expression of endurance-related genes. Finally, mechanistic experiments performed on isolated mouse muscles exposed to HIIT-mimicking stimulation showed reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS)-dependent RyR1 fragmentation, calpain activation, increased SR Ca(2+) leak at rest, and depressed force production due to impaired SR Ca(2+) release upon stimulation. In conclusion, HIIT exercise induces a ROS-dependent RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of recreationally active subjects, and the resulting changes in muscle fiber Ca(2+)-handling trigger muscular adaptations. However, the same HIIT exercise does not cause RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of elite endurance athletes, which may explain why HIIT is less effective in this group. PMID:26575622

  2. Probing the SERCA1a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase phosphorylation-site mutant D351E with inorganic phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C.O. Carreira

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The expression of sarcoplasmic reticulum SERCA1a Ca2+-ATPase wild-type and D351E mutants was optimized in yeast under the control of a galactose promoter. Fully active wild-type enzyme was recovered in yeast microsomal membrane fractions in sufficient amounts to permit a rapid and practical assay of ATP hydrolysis and phosphoenzyme formation from ATP or Pi. Mutant and wild-type Ca2+-ATPase were assayed for phosphorylation by Pi under conditions that are known to facilitate this reaction in the wild-type enzyme, including pH 6.0 or 7.0 at 25ºC in the presence of dimethylsulfoxide. Although glutamyl (E and aspartyl (D residue side chains differ by only one methylene group, no phosphoenzyme could be detected in the D351E mutant, even upon the addition of 40% dimethylsulfoxide and 1 mM 32Pi in the presence of 10 mM EGTA and 5 mM MgCl2. These results show that in the D351E mutant, increasing hydrophobicity of the site with inorganic solvent was not a sufficient factor for the required abstraction of water in the reaction of E351 with Pi to form a glutamylphosphate (P-E351 phosphoenzyme moiety. Mutation D351E may disrupt the proposed alignment of the reactive water molecule with the aspartylphosphate (P-D351 moiety in the phosphorylation site, which may be an essential alignment both in the forward reaction (hydrolysis of aspartylphosphate and in the reverse reaction (abstraction of water upon formation of an aspartylphosphate intermediate.

  3. Calcium-sensing receptors regulate cardiomyocyte Ca2+ signaling via the sarcoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrion interface during hypoxia/reoxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Fang-hao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Communication between the SR (sarcoplasmic reticulum, SR and mitochondria is important for cell survival and apoptosis. The SR supplies Ca2+ directly to mitochondria via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs at close contacts between the two organelles referred to as mitochondrion-associated ER membrane (MAM. Although it has been demonstrated that CaR (calcium sensing receptor activation is involved in intracellular calcium overload during hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/Re, the role of CaR activation in the cardiomyocyte apoptotic pathway remains unclear. We postulated that CaR activation plays a role in the regulation of SR-mitochondrial inter-organelle Ca2+ signaling, causing apoptosis during H/Re. To investigate the above hypothesis, cultured cardiomyocytes were subjected to H/Re. We examined the distribution of IP3Rs in cardiomyocytes via immunofluorescence and Western blotting and found that type 3 IP3Rs were located in the SR. [Ca2+]i, [Ca2+]m and [Ca2+]SR were determined using Fluo-4, x-rhod-1 and Fluo 5N, respectively, and the mitochondrial membrane potential was detected with JC-1 during reoxygenation using laser confocal microscopy. We found that activation of CaR reduced [Ca2+]SR, increased [Ca2+]i and [Ca2+]m and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential during reoxygenation. We found that the activation of CaR caused the cleavage of BAP31, thus generating the pro-apoptotic p20 fragment, which induced the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and the translocation of bak/bax to mitochondria. Taken together, these results reveal that CaR activation causes Ca2+ release from the SR into the mitochondria through IP3Rs and induces cardiomyocyte apoptosis during hypoxia/reoxygenation.

  4. Discrepancy in calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and intracellular acidic stores for the protection of the heart against ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Aseel; Babiker, Fawzi

    2016-09-01

    We and others have demonstrated a protective effect of pacing postconditioning (PPC) against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, the mechanisms underlying this protection are not completely clear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and the novel intracellular acidic stores (AS). Isolated rat hearts (n = 6 per group) were subjected to coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion using a modified Langendorff system. Cardiac hemodynamics and contractility were assessed using a data acquisition program, and cardiac injury was evaluated by creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. Hearts were subjected to 30 min of regional ischemia, produced by ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, followed by 30 min of reperfusion. The hearts were also subjected to PPC (3 cycles of 30 s of left ventricle (LV) pacing alternated with 30 s of right atrium (RA) pacing) and/or were treated during reperfusion with agonists or antagonists of release of calcium from SR or AS. PPC significantly (P < 0.05) normalized LV, contractility, and coronary vascular dynamics and significantly (P < 0.001) decreased heart enzyme levels compared to the control treatments. The blockade of SR calcium release resulted in a significant (P < 0.01) recovery in LV function and contractility and a significant reduction in CK and LDH levels (P < 0.01) when applied alone or in combination with PPC. Interestingly, the release of calcium from AS alone or in combination with PPC significantly improved LV function and contractility (P < 0.05) and significantly decreased the CK and LDH levels (P < 0.01) compared to the control treatments. An additive effect was produced when agonism of calcium release from AS or blockade of calcium release from the SR was combined with PPC. Calcium release from AS and blockade of calcium release from the SR protect the heart against I

  5. Study on the effect of doxorubicin on expressions of genes encoding myocardial sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ transport proteins and the effect of taurine on myocardial protection in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄先玫; 朱卫华; 康曼丽

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the effect of doxorubicin(DOX) on gene expression of the myocardial sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR)Ca2+ transport proteins and the mechanism of taurine(Tau) protecting cardiac muscle cells, 9 rabbits were injected with DOX , 8 rabbits with DOX and Tau, and 9 rabbits with normal saline. Cardiac function , concentration of calcium in cardiomyocytes ( Myo [ Ca2+ ]i ), activity of SR Ca2+ -ATPase (SERCA2a) , level of SERCA2a mRNA and Ca2+ released channels(RYR2) mRNA were detected. The left ventricle tissues were observed by electron microscopy. The results showed that cardiac index, left ventricular systolic pressure, activity of SR Ca2+ -ATPase and level of SERCA2a mRNA decreased , while Myo[ Ca2+ ]i increased in DOX-treated rabbits. DOX could not affect the level of RYR2 mRNA. Tau intervention could alleviate the increase of left ventricular diastolic pressure, Myo[ Ca2+ ] i and the decrease of SERCA2a mRNA induced by doxorubicin. Tile results suggested that downregulation of SERCA2a gene expression was an important mechanism of DOX-induced cardiomyopathy and that Tau could partially improve the heart function by reducing calcium overload and alleviating downregulation of SERCA2a mRNA.

  6. A low-dose β1-blocker in combination with milrinone improves intracellular Ca2+ handling in failing cardiomyocytes by inhibition of milrinone-induced diastolic Ca2+ leakage from the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeki Kobayashi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adding a low-dose β1-blocker to milrinone improves cardiac function in failing cardiomyocytes and the underlying cardioprotective mechanism. BACKGROUND: The molecular mechanism underlying how the combination of low-dose β1-blocker and milrinone affects intracellular Ca(2+ handling in heart failure remains unclear. METHODS: We investigated the effect of milrinone plus landiolol on intracellular Ca(2+ transient (CaT, cell shortening (CS, the frequency of diastolic Ca(2+ sparks (CaSF, and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+ concentration ({Ca(2+}SR in normal and failing canine cardiomyocytes and used immunoblotting to determine the phosphorylation level of ryanodine receptor (RyR2 and phospholamban (PLB. RESULTS: In failing cardiomyocytes, CaSF significantly increased, and peak CaT and CS markedly decreased compared with normal myocytes. Administration of milrinone alone slightly increased peak CaT and CS, while CaSF greatly increased with a slight increase in {Ca(2+}SR. Co-administration of β1-blocker landiolol to failing cardiomyocytes at a dose that does not inhibit cardiomyocyte function significantly decreased CaSF with a further increase in {Ca(2+}SR, and peak CaT and CS improved compared with milrinone alone. Landiolol suppressed the hyperphosphorylation of RyR2 (Ser2808 in failing cardiomyocytes but had no effect on levels of phosphorylated PLB (Ser16 and Thr17. Low-dose landiolol significantly inhibited the alternans of CaT and CS under a fixed pacing rate (0.5 Hz in failing cardiomyocytes. CONCLUSION: A low-dose β1-blocker in combination with milrinone improved cardiac function in failing cardiomyocytes, apparently by inhibiting the phosphorylation of RyR2, not PLB, and subsequent diastolic Ca(2+ leak.

  7. Thyroid hormone downregulates the expression and function of sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated CaM kinase II in the rabbit heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mao; Xu, Ande; Narayanan, Njanoor

    2006-09-01

    Phosphorylation of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-cycling proteins by a membrane-associated Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) is a well-documented physiological mechanism for regulation of transmembrane Ca2+ fluxes and the cardiomyocyte contraction-relaxation cycle. The present study investigated the effects of L-thyroxine-induced hyperthyroidism on protein expression of SR CaM kinase II and its substrates, endogenous CaM kinase II-mediated SR protein phosphorylation, and SR Ca2+ pump function in the rabbit heart. Membrane vesicles enriched in junctional SR (JSR) or longitudinal SR (LSR) isolated from euthyroid and hyperthyroid rabbit hearts were utilized. Endogenous CaM kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ release channel (RyR-CRC), Ca2+-ATPase, and phospholamban (PLN) was significantly lower (30-70%) in JSR and LSR vesicles from hyperthyroid than from euthyroid rabbit heart. Western immunoblotting analysis revealed significantly higher (approximately 40%) levels of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2) in JSR, but not in LSR, from hyperthyroid than from euthyroid rabbit heart. Maximal velocity of Ca2+ uptake was significantly increased in JSR (130%) and LSR (50%) from hyperthyroid compared with euthyroid rabbit hearts. Apparent affinity of the Ca2+-ATPase for Ca2+ did not differ between the two groups. Protein levels of PLN and CaM kinase II were significantly lower (30-40%) in JSR, LSR, and ventricular tissue homogenates from hyperthyroid rabbit heart. These findings demonstrate selective downregulation of expression and function of CaM kinase II in hyperthyroid rabbit heart in the face of upregulated expression and function of SERCA2 predominantly in the JSR compartment. PMID:16617128

  8. Determination of the separate lipid and protein profile structures derived from the total membrane profile structure or isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum via x-ray and neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes were prepared to contain biosynthetically deuterated SR phospholipids utilizing specific and general phospholipid exchange proteins (PLEP). Functional measurements and freeze fracture on SR dispersions and x-ray diffraction of hydrated oriented membrane multilayers revealed that the exchanged SR membranes were very similar to unexchanged SR membranes. Low resolution (28-A) neutron diffraction studies utilizing SR membranes exchanged with either protonated or perdeuterated SR phospholipids allowed direct determination of the lipid profile within the isolated SR membrane at two different unit cell repeat distances. These lipid profile structures were found to be highly asymmetric regarding the conformation of the fatty acid chain extents and compositional distribution of phospholipid molecules in the inner vs. outer monolayer of the SR membrane bilayer. The relatively high resolution (11-A) electron-density profile from x-ray diffraction was decomposed by utilizing the asymmetry in the number of phospholipid molecules residing in the inner vs. outer monolayer of the SR lipid bilayer as obtained from the neutron diffraction study. To our knowledge, this represents the first direct determination of a lipid bilayer profile structure within an isolated membrane system

  9. A phosphorylated conformational state of the (Ca2+-Mg2+)-ATPase of fast skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum can mediate rapid Ca2+ release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesi, M; Wen, Y S

    1983-05-25

    A rapid Ca2+ release from Ca2+-loaded sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles from fast skeletal muscle can be induced under conditions which permit the formation of a stable phosphorylated intermediate of the (Ca2+-Mg2+)-ATPase. Such a state can be achieved experimentally by phosphorylating the ATPase in the absence of Mg2+ ions, which otherwise would stimulate the dephosphorylation step(s). Also, quercetine stimulates the rapid release of Ca2+ if used in the concentration range which does not produce inhibition of phosphoenzyme formation, but which inhibits phosphoenzyme dephosphorylation. The rapid efflux of Ca2+ ions proceeds as long as the low affinity Ca2+-binding sites facing the lumen of the vesicles are saturated and as long as Ca2+ is removed from the catalytic sites facing the cytosol. A molecular mechanism of the phosphoenzyme-mediated Ca2+ release is proposed. This mechanism is based on a rapid shuttling of the ATPase molecules between an ADP-sensitive and an ADP-insensitive phosphorylated state. PMID:6133856

  10. [Changes of sarcolemma Na+/K+ ATPase and sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane Ca2+ ATPase activity after stem cell transplantation in chronic heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhongcai; Chen, Mao; Deng, Juelin; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Li; Rao, Li; Yang, Qing; Huang, Dejia

    2007-02-01

    To assess the changes of sarcolemma Na+/K+ ATPase (CMNKA) and sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) activities after stem cells transplantation in heart failure. Rabbit was used as heart failure model by intravenously injecting adriamycin. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs), bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or skeletal myoblasts (SMs) were introduced into coronary arteies through the root of aorta when two balloons occluding just above sinus of Valsalva. After 4 weeks, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)was evaluated by echocardiography, and the activities of CMNKA and SERCA were measured by colorimeter. In BMCs (n=8)and MSCs (n=8) group, LVEF were significantly improved (P SMs group (n=6) compared to sham group (n=8). The CMNKA activity in all stem cells groups was significantly increased compared to sham group (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, in comparison with sham group, the incremental tendencies of SERCA activity were seen in stem cells groups. In conclusion, stem cells transplantation could increase the activities of CMNKA and SERCA in heart failure, a possible mechanism to improve heart function. PMID:17333908

  11. High-resolution scanning electron-microscopic studies on the three-dimensional structure of mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum in the different twitch muscle fibers of the frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, T; Yamasaki, Y

    1987-12-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in the three types of twitch fibers, i.e., the red, white and intermediate skeletal muscle fibers, of the vastus lateralis muscle of the Japanese meadow frog (Rana nigromaculata nigromaculata Hallowell) was examined by high resolution scanning electron microscopy, after removal of the cytoplasmic matrices. The small red fibers have numerous mitochondrial columns of large diameter, while the large white fibers have a small number of mitochondrial columns of small diameter. In the medium-size intermediate fibers, the number and diameter of the mitochondrial columns are intermediate between those of the red and white fibers. In all three types of fibers, the terminal cisternae and transverse tubules form triads at the level of each Z-line. The thick terminal cisternae continue into much thinner flat intermediate cisternae, through a transitional part where a row of tiny indentations can be observed. Numerous slender longitudinal tubules originating from the intermediate cisternae, extend longitudinally or obliquely and form elongated oval networks of various sizes in front of the A-band, then fuse to form the H-band collar (fenestrated collar) around the myofibrils. On the surface of the H-band collar, small fenestrations as well as tiny hollows are seen. The three-dimensional structure of SR is basically the same in all three muscle fiber-types. However, the SR is sparse on the surface of mitochondria, so the mitochondria-rich red fiber has a smaller total volume of SR than the mitochondria-poor white fiber. The volume of SR of the intermediate fiber is intermediate between other the two. PMID:3690630

  12. Acute effects of taurine on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ accumulation and contractility in human type I and type II skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutka, T L; Lamboley, C R; Murphy, R M; Lamb, G D

    2014-10-01

    Taurine occurs in high concentrations in muscle and is implicated in numerous physiological processes, yet its effects on many aspects of contractility remain unclear. Using mechanically skinned segments of human vastus lateralis muscle fibers, we characterized the effects of taurine on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ accumulation and contractile apparatus properties in type I and type II fibers. Prolonged myoplasmic exposure (>10 min) to taurine substantially increased the rate of accumulation of Ca2+ by the SR in both fiber types, with no change in the maximum amount accumulated; no such effect was found with carnosine. SR Ca2+ accumulation was similar with 10 or 20 mM taurine, but was significantly slower at 5 mM taurine. Cytoplasmic taurine (20 mM) had no detectable effects on the responsiveness of the Ca2+ release channels in either fiber type. Taurine caused a small increase in Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile apparatus in type I fibers, but type II fibers were unaffected; maximum Ca(2+)-activated force was unchanged in both cases. The effects of taurine on SR Ca2+ accumulation (1) only became apparent after prolonged cytoplasmic exposure, and (2) persisted for some minutes after complete removal of taurine from the cytoplasm, consistent with the hypothesis that the effects were due to an action of taurine from inside the SR. In summary, taurine potentiates the rate of SR Ca2+ uptake in both type I and type II human fibers, possibly via an action from within the SR lumen, with the degree of potentiation being significantly reduced at low physiological taurine levels. PMID:25123198

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation exploration of cooperative migration mechanism of calcium ions in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yongqi; Li, Huifang; Bu, Yuxiang

    2009-10-01

    Calcium ATPase is a member of the P-type ATPase, and it pumps calcium ions from the cytoplasm into the reticulum against a concentration gradient. Several X-ray structures of different conformations have been solved in recent years, providing basis for elucidating the active transport mechanism of Ca2+ ions. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed at atomic level to investigate the dynamical process of calcium ions moving from the outer mouth of the protein to their binding sites. Five initial locations of Ca2+ ions were considered, and the simulations lasted for 2 or 6 ns, respectively. Specific pathways leading to the binding sites and large structural rearrangements around binding sites caused by uptake of calcium ions were identified. A cooperative binding mechanism was observed from our simulation. Firstly, the first Ca2+ ion binds to site I, and then, the second Ca2+ ion approaches. The interactions between the second Ca2+ and the residues around site I disturb the binding state of site I and weaken its binding ability for the first bound Ca2+. Because of the electrostatic repulsion of the second Ca2+ and the electrostatic attraction of site II, the first bound Ca2+ shifts from site I to site II. Concertedly, the second Ca2+ binds to site I, forming a binding state with two Ca2+ ions, one at site I and the other at site II. Both of Glu908 and Asp800 coordinate with the two Ca2+ ions simultaneously during the concerted binding process, which is believed to be the hinge to achieve the concerted binding. In our simulations, four amino acid residues that serve as the channel to link the outer mouth and the binding sites during the binding process were recognized, namely Tyr837, Tyr763, Asn911, and Ser767. The analyses regarding the activity of the proteins via mutations of some key residues also supported our cooperative mechanism. PMID:19242958

  14. PARM-1 is an endoplasmic reticulum molecule involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in rat cardiac myocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Isodono

    Full Text Available To identify novel transmembrane and secretory molecules expressed in cardiac myocytes, signal sequence trap screening was performed in rat neonatal cardiac myocytes. One of the molecules identified was a transmembrane protein, prostatic androgen repressed message-1 (PARM-1. While PARM-1 has been identified as a gene induced in prostate in response to castration, its function is largely unknown. Our expression analysis revealed that PARM-1 was specifically expressed in hearts and skeletal muscles, and in the heart, cardiac myocytes, but not non-myocytes expressed PARM-1. Immunofluorescent staining showed that PARM-1 was predominantly localized in endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In Dahl salt-sensitive rats, high-salt diet resulted in hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and subsequent heart failure, and significantly stimulated PARM-1 expression in the hearts, with a concomitant increase in ER stress markers such as GRP78 and CHOP. In cultured cardiac myocytes, PARM-1 expression was stimulated by proinflammatory cytokines, but not by hypertrophic stimuli. A marked increase in PARM-1 expression was observed in response to ER stress inducers such as thapsigargin and tunicamycin, which also induced apoptotic cell death. Silencing PARM-1 expression by siRNAs enhanced apoptotic response in cardiac myocytes to ER stresses. PARM-1 silencing also repressed expression of PERK and ATF6, and augmented expression of CHOP without affecting IRE-1 expression and JNK and Caspase-12 activation. Thus, PARM-1 expression is induced by ER stress, which plays a protective role in cardiac myocytes through regulating PERK, ATF6 and CHOP expression. These results suggested that PARM-1 is a novel ER transmembrane molecule involved in cardiac remodeling in hypertensive heart disease.

  15. Reactive Oxygen Species, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: The Link with Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Gary; Yan, Bryan P.; Chan, Yin W. F.; Tian, Xiao Yu; Huang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac arrhythmias represent a significant problem globally, leading to cerebrovascular accidents, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death. There is increasing evidence to suggest that increased oxidative stress from reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is elevated in conditions such as diabetes and hypertension, can lead to arrhythmogenesis. Method: A literature review was undertaken to screen for articles that investigated the effects of ROS on cardiac ion channel function, remodeling and arrhythmogenesis. Results: Prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress is observed in heart failure, leading to increased production of ROS. Mitochondrial ROS, which is elevated in diabetes and hypertension, can stimulate its own production in a positive feedback loop, termed ROS-induced ROS release. Together with activation of mitochondrial inner membrane anion channels, it leads to mitochondrial depolarization. Abnormal function of these organelles can then activate downstream signaling pathways, ultimately culminating in altered function or expression of cardiac ion channels responsible for generating the cardiac action potential (AP). Vascular and cardiac endothelial cells become dysfunctional, leading to altered paracrine signaling to influence the electrophysiology of adjacent cardiomyocytes. All of these changes can in turn produce abnormalities in AP repolarization or conduction, thereby increasing likelihood of triggered activity and reentry. Conclusion: ROS plays a significant role in producing arrhythmic substrate. Therapeutic strategies targeting upstream events include production of a strong reducing environment or the use of pharmacological agents that target organelle-specific proteins and ion channels. These may relieve oxidative stress and in turn prevent arrhythmic complications in patients with diabetes, hypertension, and heart failure. PMID:27536244

  16. Multiscale Modeling of Calcium Cycling in Cardiac Ventricular Myocyte: Macroscopic Consequences of Microscopic Dyadic Function

    OpenAIRE

    Gaur, Namit; Rudy, Yoram

    2011-01-01

    In cardiac ventricular myocytes, calcium (Ca) release occurs at distinct structures (dyads) along t-tubules, where L-type Ca channels (LCCs) appose sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca release channels (RyR2s). We developed a model of the cardiac ventricular myocyte that simulates local stochastic Ca release processes. At the local Ca release level, the model reproduces Ca spark properties. At the whole-cell level, the model reproduces the action potential, Ca currents, and Ca transients. Changes i...

  17. Ca2+ Alternans in a Cardiac Myocyte Model that Uses Moment Equations to Represent Heterogeneous Junctional SR Ca2+

    OpenAIRE

    Huertas, Marco A; Smith, Gregory D.; Györke, Sándor

    2010-01-01

    Multiscale whole-cell models that accurately represent local control of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in cardiac myocytes can reproduce high-gain Ca2+ release that is graded with changes in membrane potential. Using a recently introduced formalism that represents heterogeneous local Ca2+ using moment equations, we present a model of cardiac myocyte Ca2+ cycling that exhibits alternating sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release when periodically stimulated by depolarizing voltage pulses. The model...

  18. Surface charge potentiates conduction through the cardiac ryanodine receptor channel

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Single channel currents through cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channels were measured in very low levels of current carrier (e.g., 1 mM Ba2+). The hypothesis that surface charge contributes to these anomalously large single channel currents was tested by changing ionic strength and surface charge density. Channel identity and sidedness was pharmacologically determined. At low ionic strength (20 mM Cs+), Cs+ conduction in the lumen-->myoplasm (L-->M) direction was significant...

  19. A Low-Dose β1-Blocker in Combination with Milrinone Improves Intracellular Ca2+ Handling in Failing Cardiomyocytes by Inhibition of Milrinone-Induced Diastolic Ca2+ Leakage from the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    KOBAYASHI, Shigeki; Susa, Takehisa; Ishiguchi, Hironori; Myoren, Takeki; Murakami, Wakako; Kato, Takayoshi; Fukuda, Masakazu; Hino, Akihiro; Suetomi, Takeshi; Ono, Makoto; Uchinoumi, Hitoshi; Tateishi, Hiroki; Mochizuki, Mamoru; Oda, Tetsuro; Okuda, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adding a low-dose β1-blocker to milrinone improves cardiac function in failing cardiomyocytes and the underlying cardioprotective mechanism. Background The molecular mechanism underlying how the combination of low-dose β1-blocker and milrinone affects intracellular Ca2+ handling in heart failure remains unclear. Methods We investigated the effect of milrinone plus landiolol on intracellular Ca2+ transient (CaT), cell shortening (...

  20. Radioligand assay of cardiac calcium release channel and its application in SHR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To establish the best condition in assaying the calcium release channel (ryanodine receptor) in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (CSR), and analyse the CSR ryanodine receptor in spantanous hypertensive rat (SHR). Methods: 3H-ryanodine was used as a radioligand to analyse the binding in Sprague Dawley rat cardiac homogenate in following conditions: varied protein concentrations, different free calcium concentrations, different incubation time. The effect of sarcoplasmic reticulum purifying process and ryanodine competitive binding were also studied. Using these best conditions, SHR and control group (WKY) CSR ryanodine receptor were studied. Results: 1) There was a positive linear correlation between 3H-ryanodine binding and the homogenate protein concentration. 2) When the free calcium concentration was 30 μmol/L∼1 mmol/L, the 3H-ryanodine binding reached the maximum. While the free calcium concentration was lower than 1 μmol/L, there was no 3H-ryanodine binding. 3) The 3H-ryanodine binding kept increasing during incubation, from 0 to 60 min, and equilibrium reached by 90 min. 4) The ryanodine specifically inhibited 3H-ryanodine binding in cardiac homogenate. 5) During the sarcoplasmic reticulum purifying process, the 3H-ryanodine binding in a unit amount of cardiac homogenate decreased with the centrifugal force and times applied in centrifugation. 6) SHR and WKY CSR ryanodine receptor saturation curve and Scatchard analysis showed this method produced a very high level of specific binding, up to 45 nmol/L ryanodine, which inferred a single class of binding sites. The Bmax value of CSR ryanodine receptor in SHR left ventricle was significantly higher than that in WKY (P3H-ryanodine can be used as a radioligand to analyse the calcium release channel in cardiac homogenate, and ryanodine receptor may play an important role in hypertensive left ventricular remodeling process

  1. Ablation of triadin causes loss of cardiac Ca2+ release units, impaired excitation–contraction coupling, and cardiac arrhythmias

    OpenAIRE

    Chopra, Nagesh; Yang, Tao; Asghari, Parisa; Moore, Edwin D.; Huke, Sabine; Akin, Brandy; Cattolica, Robert A.; Perez, Claudio F.; Hlaing, Thinn; Knollmann-Ritschel, Barbara E. C.; Jones, Larry R.; Pessah, Isaac N; Allen, Paul D.; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Knollmann, Björn C.

    2009-01-01

    Heart muscle excitation–contraction (E-C) coupling is governed by Ca2+ release units (CRUs) whereby Ca2+ influx via L-type Ca2+ channels (Cav1.2) triggers Ca2+ release from juxtaposed Ca2+ release channels (RyR2) located in junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (jSR). Although studies suggest that the jSR protein triadin anchors cardiac calsequestrin (Casq2) to RyR2, its contribution to E-C coupling remains unclear. Here, we identify the role of triadin using mice with ablation of the Trdn gene (...

  2. Dysfunction and changes of gene expression in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump in endotoxin-induced diaphragm%内毒素血症大鼠膈肌功能障碍和肌浆网钙泵基因表达的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方迎艳; 郭晓磊; 马丽; 高琴; 叶红伟; 关宿东

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate endotoxemia inducing the changes of diaphragm dysfunction and gene expression in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump in rats. Methods Rats were given saline (0. 5 ml ip, saline control group) and endotoxin (12 mg/kg ip, en-dotoxin group) respectively. Animals were killed at 24, 48 and 96 hours after injections. Assessments were made of the diaphragm contractility, such as peak twitch tension (Pt) , maximum tetanic tension (Po) , time to peak contraction (CT) , half relaxation time ( 1/2RT) and diaphragm force-frequency relationships, and the change of the ultrastructures and the content of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump (SERCA mRNA) was analyzed by reverse transcriptase polymerize chain reactive. Results Compared with control group, Pt and Po of endotoxin group were lower (P <0. 01) , CT and 1/2RT of endotoxin group were significantly longer (P <0. 01) ; Tetanic force under the stimulus frequency of 10, 20, 40, 60, 100 Hz in endotoxin group were decreased significantly (P<0. 01). Transmission electron microscopic morphometry of diaphragm in endotoxin group revealed diaphragm myoneme confused and broken, sarcoplasmic reticulum was distended, the quantity of mitochondria was decreased, mitochondria edema and expanded, its cristae broken and vague, a great quantity of mitochondria vacuolization or vesiculation. The expression of SERCA mRNA in diaphragm was lower in endotoxin group than that of control group (P < 0.01). Conclusions Endotoxin destroys the diaphragmatic ultrastructure and induces diaphragmatic dysfunction, it could also decrease SERCA mRNA contents.%目的 探讨内毒素血症大鼠膈肌功能和膈肌肌浆网钙泵基因(SERCA)表达的变化.方法 直接采用腹腔注射内毒素12 mg/kg建立大鼠内毒素血症模型,32只成年雄性SD大鼠随机分成四组:生理盐水对照组和内毒素24 h组,48 h组,96 h组,即分别在注射内毒素24、48、96 h后处死大鼠,应用体外灌流大鼠膈肌条的方

  3. Calsequestrins in skeletal and cardiac muscle from adult Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Sandra; Mosole, Simone; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Argenton, Francesco; Volpe, Pompeo; Nori, Alessandra

    2016-04-01

    Calsequestrin (Casq) is a high capacity, low affinity Ca(2+)-binding protein, critical for Ca(2+)-buffering in cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum. All vertebrates have multiple genes encoding for different Casq isoforms. Increasing interest has been focused on mammalian and human Casq genes since mutations of both cardiac (Casq2) and skeletal muscle (Casq1) isoforms cause different, and sometime severe, human pathologies. Danio rerio (zebrafish) is a powerful model for studying function and mutations of human proteins. In this work, expression, biochemical properties cellular and sub-cellular localization of D. rerio native Casq isoforms are investigated. By quantitative PCR, three mRNAs were detected in skeletal muscle and heart with different abundances. Three zebrafish Casqs: Casq1a, Casq1b and Casq2 were identified by mass spectrometry (Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002455). Skeletal and cardiac zebrafish calsequestrins share properties with mammalian Casq1 and Casq2. Skeletal Casqs were found primarily, but not exclusively, at the sarcomere Z-line level where terminal cisternae of sarcoplasmic reticulum are located. PMID:26585961

  4. Ion channelopathy and hyperphosphorylation contributing to cardiac arrhythmias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-zai DAI; Feng YU

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is related to the abnormality of ion channels not only in sarcolemma but also in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which regulates the process of calcium release and up-take intracellularly. Patterns of ion channelopathy in the sarcolemma can be divided into single channel disorder from gene mutations and multiple channels disorder in a diseased hypertrophied heart. Abnormal RyR2, FKBP12.6, SERCA2a, and PLB are also involved in the initiation of cardiac arrhythmias. Maladjustment by hyperphosphorylation on the ion channels in the sarcolemma and RyR2-FKBP12.6 and SERCA2a-PLB is discussed. Hyperphosphorylation, which is the main abnormality upstream to ion channels, can be targeted for suppressing the deterioration of ion channelopathy in terms of new drug discovery in the treatment and prevention of malignant cardiac arrhythmias.

  5. 甲状腺功能减退对新生仔鼠心肌肌浆网钙转运蛋白表达的影响%Alteration of myocardial sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ transport protein expression in neonatal hypothyroid rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛姗姗; 赵正言

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the alteration of sarcoplasmic reticulum ( SR ) Ca2 + transport proteins including sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ - ATPase 2a( SERCA2a ) and phospholamban( PLB ) mRNA expression as well as the alteration of myocardial SR Ca2+ - ATPase activity in neonatal hypothyroid rats, and to explore the effect of levothyroxine( L - T4 ) substitution therapy on the above indexes.METHODS: Hypothyroidism was induced by the administration of propylthiouracil ( PTU, 50 mg/d ) to the pregnant SD rats by gavage beginning on embryonic day 15 and continuing throughout the lactational period.A subgroup of neonatal hypothyroid rats were intraperitoneally injected with L - T4 levothroxine ( 20 μg/kg BW daily ), starting from the day of birth.Other pregnant SD rats received normal saline instead of PTU.The samples of the rats in all 3 groups were harvested at postnatal day 3, 5 and 7 respectively ( n = 10 ).After measurement of serum thyroid hormone levels, the hearts were removed and the ventricles were weighed ( HW ).The concentration of calcium in ventricular myocardium( ventricular myoCa2+ ) was detected by fluorospectrophotometry and the activity of SR Ca2+ -ATPase was determined by the inorganic phosphorus method.The mRNA expression of SERCA2a and PLB was also detected by real - time PCR.RESULTS: Neonatal hypothyroid rats had a significant lower level of SERCA2a mRNA ( P < 0.05 ) and a higher level of PLB mRNA ( P < 0.01 ), and subsequent lower SERCA2a/PLB at each postnatal day ( P <0.01 ) was observed.Compared with hypothyroid group, the mRNA expression of SERCA2a significantly increased ( P < 0.05 ) and that of PLB significantly decreased ( P < 0.05 ) in L - T4 treatment group.The concentration of ventricular MyoCa2+ in hypothyroid group was significantly higher than that in control group ( P < 0.01 ), and that in L - T4 treatment group showed a significant decrease as compared with hypothyroid group ( P < 0.05 ).The activity of sarcoplasmic

  6. Inhibition of CaMKII does not attenuate cardiac hypertrophy in mice with dysfunctional ryanodine receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asima Chakraborty

    Full Text Available In cardiac muscle, the release of calcium ions from the sarcoplasmic reticulum through ryanodine receptor ion channels (RyR2s leads to muscle contraction. RyR2 is negatively regulated by calmodulin (CaM and by phosphorylation of Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII. Substitution of three amino acid residues in the CaM binding domain of RyR2 (RyR2-W3587A/L3591D/F3603A, RyR2ADA impairs inhibition of RyR2 by CaM and results in cardiac hypertrophy and early death of mice carrying the RyR2ADA mutation. To test the cellular function of CaMKII in cardiac hypertrophy, mutant mice were crossed with mice expressing the CaMKII inhibitory AC3-I peptide or the control AC3-C peptide in the myocardium. Inhibition of CaMKII by AC3-I modestly reduced CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation of RyR2 at Ser-2815 and markedly reduced CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation of SERCA2a regulatory subunit phospholamban at Thr-17. However the average life span and heart-to-body weight ratio of Ryr2ADA/ADA mice expressing the inhibitory peptide were not altered compared to control mice. In Ryr2ADA/ADA homozygous mice, AC3-I did not alter cardiac morphology, enhance cardiac function, improve sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ handling, or suppress the expression of genes implicated in cardiac remodeling. The results suggest that CaMKII was not required for the rapid development of cardiac hypertrophy in Ryr2ADA/ADA mice.

  7. Olmesartan, an AT1 Antagonist, Attenuates Oxidative Stress, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Cardiac Inflammatory Mediators in Rats with Heart Failure Induced by Experimental Autoimmune Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayakumar Sukumaran, Kenichi Watanabe, Punniyakoti T. Veeraveedu, Narasimman Gurusamy, Meilei Ma, Rajarajan A. Thandavarayan, Arun Prasath Lakshmanan, Ken'ichi Yamaguchi, Kenji Suzuki, Makoto Kodama

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have demonstrated that angiotensin II has been involved in immune and inflammatory responses which might contribute to the pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases. Recent evidence suggests that oxidative stress may play a role in myocarditis. Here, we investigated whether olmesartan, an AT1R antagonist protects against experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM by suppression of oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and inflammatory cytokines. EAM was induced in Lewis rats by immunization with porcine cardiac myosin, were divided into two groups and treated with either olmesartan (10 mg/kg/day or vehicle for a period of 21 days. Myocardial functional parameters measured by hemodynamic and echocardiographic analyses were significantly improved by the treatment with olmesartan compared with those of vehicle-treated rats. Treatment with olmesartan attenuated the myocardial mRNA expressions of proinflammatory cytokines, [Interleukin (IL-1β, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ] and the protein expression of tumor necrosis factor-α compared with that of vehicle-treated rats. Myocardial protein expressions of AT1R, NADPH oxidase subunits (p47phox, p67phox, gp91phox and the expression of markers of oxidative stress (3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and the cardiac apoptosis were also significantly decreased by the treatment with olmesartan compared with those of vehicle-treated rats. Furthermore, olmesartan treatment down-regulated the myocardial expressions of glucose regulated protein-78, growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene, caspase-12, phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and phospho-JNK. These findings suggest that olmesartan protects against EAM in rats, at least in part via suppression of oxidative stress, ER stress and inflammatory cytokines.

  8. Ca2+-Clock-Dependent Pacemaking in the Sinus Node Is Impaired in Mice with a Cardiac Specific Reduction in SERCA2 Abundance

    OpenAIRE

    Logantha, Sunil Jit R.J.; Stokke, Mathis K.; Atkinson, Andrew J.; Kharche, Sanjay R.; Parveen, Sajida; Saeed, Yawer; Sjaastad, Ivar; Sejersted, Ole M; Dobrzynski, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Background: The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2) pump is an important component of the Ca2+-clock pacemaker mechanism that provides robustness and flexibility to sinus node pacemaking. We have developed transgenic mice with reduced cardiac SERCA2 abundance (Serca2 KO) as a model for investigating SERCA2's role in sinus node pacemaking. Methods and Results: In Serca2 KO mice, ventricular SERCA2a protein content measured by Western blotting was 75% (P < 0.05) lower than that in contr...

  9. Cardiac contraction and calcium transport function aftersevere burn injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To examine the function change of myocardial calcium transports and determined what role the change plays in cardiac dysfunction after severe burn injury in rats. Methods: The contraction and relaxation properties of the left ventricle (LV) were studied in the isolated hearts preparations of Wistar rats at 3, 8, and 24 h after a 30%TBSA (total body surface area) full-thickness burn. The calcium transport function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was measured by the millipore filtration technique. Results: The maximal rate of LV pressure (± dp/dtmax) of the burn group was significantly lower than that of the control group (P < 0.01). In addition, the calciumdependent ATPase activity and the coupling ratio of SR were also markedly depressed. Conclusions: It indicates that the decrease in the SR calcium transport function is one of the important mechanisms for the cardiac contractile dysfunction after severe burn injury.

  10. Recording of calcium transient and analysis of calcium removal mechanisms in cardiac myocytes from rats and ground squirrels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    With confocal microscopy, we recorded calcium transients and analyzed calcium removal rate at different temperatures in cardiac myocytes from the rat, a non-hibernator, and the ground squirrel, a hibernator. The results showed a remarkable increase of the diastolic level of calcium transients in the rat but no detectable change in the ground squirrel. Calcium transient of the ground squirrel, compared with that of the rat at the same temperature, had a shorter duration and showed a faster calcium removal. As indicated by the pharmacological effect of cyclopiazonic acid, calcium uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was the major mechanism of calcium removal, and was faster in the ground squirrel than in the rat. Our results confirmed the essential role of SR in hypothermia-tolerant adaptation, and negated the importance of Na-Ca exchange. We postulated the possibility to improve hypothermia-tolerance of the cardiac tissue of non-hibernating mammals.

  11. Interactions between sarco-endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria in cardiac and skeletal muscle – pivotal roles in Ca2+ and reactive oxygen species signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Eisner, Verónica; Csordás, György; Hajnóczky, György

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are strategically and dynamically positioned in the cell to spatially coordinate ATP production with energy needs and to allow the local exchange of material with other organelles. Interactions of mitochondria with the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) have been receiving much attention owing to emerging evidence on the role these sites have in cell signaling, dynamics and biosynthetic pathways. One of the most important physiological and pathophysiological paradigms for SR/ER–...

  12. Hearts of dystonia musculorum mice display normal morphological and histological features but show signs of cardiac stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin G Boyer

    Full Text Available Dystonin is a giant cytoskeletal protein belonging to the plakin protein family and is believed to crosslink the major filament systems in contractile cells. Previous work has demonstrated skeletal muscle defects in dystonin-deficient dystonia musculorum (dt mice. In this study, we show that the dystonin muscle isoform is localized at the Z-disc, the H zone, the sarcolemma and intercalated discs in cardiac tissue. Based on this localization pattern, we tested whether dystonin-deficiency leads to structural defects in cardiac muscle. Desmin intermediate filament, microfilament, and microtubule subcellular organization appeared normal in dt hearts. Nevertheless, increased transcript levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF, 66% beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MHC, 95% and decreased levels of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump isoform 2A (SERCA2a, 26%, all signs of cardiac muscle stress, were noted in dt hearts. Hearts from two-week old dt mice were assessed for the presence of morphological and histological alterations. Heart to body weight ratios as well as left ventricular wall thickness and left chamber volume measurements were similar between dt and wild-type control mice. Hearts from dt mice also displayed no signs of fibrosis or calcification. Taken together, our data provide new insights into the intricate structure of the sarcomere by situating dystonin in cardiac muscle fibers and suggest that dystonin does not significantly influence the structural organization of cardiac muscle fibers during early postnatal development.

  13. PGC-1α accelerates cytosolic Ca2+ clearance without disturbing Ca2+ homeostasis in cardiac myocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy metabolism and Ca2+ handling serve critical roles in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) is a multi-functional coactivator that is involved in the regulation of cardiac mitochondrial functional capacity and cellular energy metabolism. However, the regulation of PGC-1α in cardiac Ca2+ signaling has not been fully elucidated. To address this issue, we combined confocal line-scan imaging with off-line imaging processing to characterize calcium signaling in cultured adult rat ventricular myocytes expressing PGC-1α via adenoviral transduction. Our data shows that overexpressing PGC-1α improved myocyte contractility without increasing the amplitude of Ca2+ transients, suggesting that myofilament sensitivity to Ca2+ increased. Interestingly, the decay kinetics of global Ca2+ transients and Ca2+ waves accelerated in PGC-1α-expressing cells, but the decay rate of caffeine-elicited Ca2+ transients showed no significant change. This suggests that sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a), but not Na+/Ca2+ exchange (NCX) contribute to PGC-1α-induced cytosolic Ca2+ clearance. Furthermore, PGC-1α induced the expression of SERCA2a in cultured cardiac myocytes. Importantly, overexpressing PGC-1α did not disturb cardiac Ca2+ homeostasis, because SR Ca2+ load and the propensity for Ca2+ waves remained unchanged. These data suggest that PGC-1α can ameliorate cardiac Ca2+ cycling and improve cardiac work output in response to physiological stress. Unraveling the PGC-1α-calcium handing pathway sheds new light on the role of PGC-1α in the therapy of cardiac diseases.

  14. Overexpression of calsequestrin in L6 myoblasts: formation of endoplasmic reticulum subdomains and their evolution into discrete vacuoles where aggregates of the protein are specifically accumulated.

    OpenAIRE

    Gatti, G.; Podini, P; Meldolesi, J

    1997-01-01

    Calsequestrin (CSQ), the major low-affinity Ca(2+)-binding glycoprotein of striated muscle fibers, is concentrated to yield aggregates that occupy the lumen of the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). When infected or transfected into L6 myoblast, the protein is also concentrated, however, in dense vacuoles apparently separate from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). CSQ-rich cells appear otherwise normal; in particular, neither other proteins involved in Ca2+ homeostasis nor ER...

  15. Overexpression of junctophilin-2 does not enhance baseline function but attenuates heart failure development after cardiac stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ang; Zhang, Xiaoying; Iyer, Venkat Ramesh; Chen, Biyi; Zhang, Caimei; Kutschke, William J; Weiss, Robert M; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Song, Long-Sheng

    2014-08-19

    Heart failure is accompanied by a loss of the orderly disposition of transverse (T)-tubules and a decrease of their associations with the junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (jSR). Junctophilin-2 (JP2) is a structural protein responsible for jSR/T-tubule docking. Animal models of cardiac stresses demonstrate that down-regulation of JP2 contributes to T-tubule disorganization, loss of excitation-contraction coupling, and heart failure development. Our objective was to determine whether JP2 overexpression attenuates stress-induced T-tubule disorganization and protects against heart failure progression. We therefore generated transgenic mice with cardiac-specific JP2 overexpression (JP2-OE). Baseline cardiac function and Ca(2+) handling properties were similar between JP2-OE and control mice. However, JP2-OE mice displayed a significant increase in the junctional coupling area between T-tubules and the SR and an elevated expression of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, although other excitation-contraction coupling protein levels were not significantly changed. Despite similar cardiac function at baseline, overexpression of JP2 provided significantly protective benefits after pressure overload. This was accompanied by a decreased percentage of surviving mice that developed heart failure, as well as preservation of T-tubule network integrity in both the left and right ventricles. Taken together, these data suggest that strategies to maintain JP2 levels can prevent the progression from hypertrophy to heart failure. PMID:25092313

  16. PGC-1{alpha} accelerates cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} clearance without disturbing Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis in cardiac myocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Min, E-mail: chenminyx@gmail.com [Institute of Molecular Medicine, State Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yunnan Centers for Diseases Prevention and Control, Kunming 650022 (China); Wang, Yanru [Institute of Molecular Medicine, State Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Qu, Aijuan [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2010-06-11

    Energy metabolism and Ca{sup 2+} handling serve critical roles in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1{alpha}) is a multi-functional coactivator that is involved in the regulation of cardiac mitochondrial functional capacity and cellular energy metabolism. However, the regulation of PGC-1{alpha} in cardiac Ca{sup 2+} signaling has not been fully elucidated. To address this issue, we combined confocal line-scan imaging with off-line imaging processing to characterize calcium signaling in cultured adult rat ventricular myocytes expressing PGC-1{alpha} via adenoviral transduction. Our data shows that overexpressing PGC-1{alpha} improved myocyte contractility without increasing the amplitude of Ca{sup 2+} transients, suggesting that myofilament sensitivity to Ca{sup 2+} increased. Interestingly, the decay kinetics of global Ca{sup 2+} transients and Ca{sup 2+} waves accelerated in PGC-1{alpha}-expressing cells, but the decay rate of caffeine-elicited Ca{sup 2+} transients showed no significant change. This suggests that sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (SERCA2a), but not Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange (NCX) contribute to PGC-1{alpha}-induced cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} clearance. Furthermore, PGC-1{alpha} induced the expression of SERCA2a in cultured cardiac myocytes. Importantly, overexpressing PGC-1{alpha} did not disturb cardiac Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis, because SR Ca{sup 2+} load and the propensity for Ca{sup 2+} waves remained unchanged. These data suggest that PGC-1{alpha} can ameliorate cardiac Ca{sup 2+} cycling and improve cardiac work output in response to physiological stress. Unraveling the PGC-1{alpha}-calcium handing pathway sheds new light on the role of PGC-1{alpha} in the therapy of cardiac diseases.

  17. Pathophysiological mechanism and therapeutic role of S100 proteins in cardiac failure: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbalzano, Egidio; Mandraffino, Giuseppe; Casciaro, Marco; Quartuccio, Sebastiano; Saitta, Antonino; Gangemi, Sebastiano

    2016-09-01

    S100 proteins are a family of highly acidic calcium-binding proteins involved in calcium handling in many tissues and organs. Some of these proteins are highly expressed in cardiac tissue, and an impairment of some specific S100 proteins has been related to heart failure. To check this hypothesis, we decided to review the literature since 2008 until May 2015. According to the studies collected, recovering S100A1 levels may enhance contractile/relaxing performance in heart failure, reverse negative force-frequency relationship, improve contractile reserve, reverse diastolic dysfunction and protect against pro-arrhythmic reductions of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium. The safety profile of gene therapy was also confirmed. Increased S100B protein levels were related to a worse outcome in chronic heart failure. S100A8/A9 complex plasma levels, as well as other inflammatory biomarkers, were significantly higher in chronic heart failure patients. S100A2 seems to increase both contractile and relaxation performance in animal cardiomyocytes. Otherwise, S100A6 cardiac expression seems to have no effects on contractility. S100A4 KO mice showed reduced cardiac interstitial fibrosis. Data collected encourage a potential prospective application in human. These proteins could be exploited as biomarkers in stadiation and prognosis of chronic heart failure, as well as therapeutic target to rescue failing heart. Registration details The study protocol has been registered in PROSPERO ( http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/ ) under registration number CRD42015027932. PMID:26833319

  18. Cardiac hypertrophy, arrhythmogenicity and the new myocardial phenotype. II. The cellular adaptational process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swynghedauw, B; Chevalier, B; Charlemagne, D; Mansier, P; Carré, F

    1997-07-01

    Ventricular fibrosis is not the only structural determinant of arrhythmias in left ventricular hypertrophy. In an experimental model of compensatory cardiac hypertrophy (CCH) the degree of cardiac hypertrophy is also independently linked to ventricular arrhythmias. Cardiac hypertrophy reflects the level of adaptation, and matches the adaptational modifications of the myocardial phenotype. We suggest that these modifications have detrimental aspects. The increased action potential (AP) and QT duration and the prolonged calcium transient both favour spontaneous calcium oscillations, and both are potentially arrhythmogenic and linked to phenotypic changes in membrane proteins. To date, only two ionic currents have been studied in detail: Ito is depressed (likely the main determinant in AP durations), and If, the pacemaker current, is induced in the overloaded ventricular myocytes. In rat CCH, the two components of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, namely Ca(2+)-ATPase and ryanodine receptors, are down-regulated in parallel. Nevertheless, while the inward calcium current is unchanged, the functionally linked duo composed of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanged and (Na+, K+)-ATPase, is less active. Such an imbalance may explain the prolonged calcium transient. The changes in heart rate variability provide information about the state of the autonomic nervous system and has prognostic value even in CCH. Transgenic studies have demonstrated that the myocardial adrenergic and muscarinic receptor content is also a determining factor. During CCH, several phenotypic membrane changes participate in the slowing of contraction velocity and are thus adaptational. They also have a detrimental counterpart and, together with fibrosis, favour arrhythmias. PMID:9302342

  19. Role of glycogen availability in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ kinetics in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Nielsen, Joachim; Saltin, Bengt;

    2011-01-01

    Glucose is stored as glycogen in skeletal muscle. The importance of glycogen as a fuel during exercise has been recognized since the 1960s; however, little is known about the precise mechanism that relates skeletal muscle glycogen to muscle fatigue. We show that low muscle glycogen is associated ...... signal that links energy utilization, i.e. muscle contraction, with the energy content in the muscle, thereby inhibiting a detrimental depletion of the muscle energy store.......Glucose is stored as glycogen in skeletal muscle. The importance of glycogen as a fuel during exercise has been recognized since the 1960s; however, little is known about the precise mechanism that relates skeletal muscle glycogen to muscle fatigue. We show that low muscle glycogen is associated...... with an impairment of muscle ability to release Ca(2+), which is an important signal in the muscle activation. Thus, depletion of glycogen during prolonged, exhausting exercise may contribute to muscle fatigue by causing decreased Ca(2+) release inside the muscle. These data provide indications of a...

  20. Myosin VI in skeletal muscle: its localization in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, neuromuscular junction and muscle nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Karolczak, Justyna; Sobczak, Magdalena; Majewski, Łukasz; Yeghiazaryan, Marine; Jakubiec-Puka, Anna; Ehler, Elisabeth; Sławińska, Urszula; Wilczyński, Grzegorz M.; Rędowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2012-01-01

    Myosin VI (MVI) is a unique unconventional motor moving backwards on actin filaments. In non-muscle cells, it is involved in cell migration, endocytosis and intracellular trafficking, actin cytoskeleton dynamics, and possibly in gene transcription. An important role for MVI in striated muscle functioning was suggested in a report showing that a point mutation (H236R) within the MVI gene was associated with cardiomyopathy (Mohiddin et al., J Med Genet 41:309–314, 2004). Here, we have addressed...

  1. Effects of Reduced Muscle Glycogen on Sarcoplasmic Reticulum (SR), Muscle and Exercise Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Batts, Timothy W.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue during exercise is associated with reduced muscle glycogen. However, evidence linking glycogen content to fatigue is lacking. In this study we examined whether reduced muscle glycogen content limited SR function or muscle performance. Two groups of female Sprague-Dawley rats were fasted for 24 hr and exercised for 90 min to reduce muscle glycogen; rats fasted after exercise formed the low glycogen (LG) group. Rats in the high glycogen (HG) group were allowed free access to food and...

  2. Ablation of triadin causes loss of cardiac Ca2+ release units, impaired excitation-contraction coupling, and cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Nagesh; Yang, Tao; Asghari, Parisa; Moore, Edwin D; Huke, Sabine; Akin, Brandy; Cattolica, Robert A; Perez, Claudio F; Hlaing, Thinn; Knollmann-Ritschel, Barbara E C; Jones, Larry R; Pessah, Isaac N; Allen, Paul D; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Knollmann, Björn C

    2009-05-01

    Heart muscle excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling is governed by Ca(2+) release units (CRUs) whereby Ca(2+) influx via L-type Ca(2+) channels (Cav1.2) triggers Ca(2+) release from juxtaposed Ca(2+) release channels (RyR2) located in junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (jSR). Although studies suggest that the jSR protein triadin anchors cardiac calsequestrin (Casq2) to RyR2, its contribution to E-C coupling remains unclear. Here, we identify the role of triadin using mice with ablation of the Trdn gene (Trdn(-/-)). The structure and protein composition of the cardiac CRU is significantly altered in Trdn(-/-) hearts. jSR proteins (RyR2, Casq2, junctin, and junctophilin 1 and 2) are significantly reduced in Trdn(-/-) hearts, whereas Cav1.2 and SERCA2a remain unchanged. Electron microscopy shows fragmentation and an overall 50% reduction in the contacts between jSR and T-tubules. Immunolabeling experiments show reduced colocalization of Cav1.2 with RyR2 and substantial Casq2 labeling outside of the jSR in Trdn(-/-) myocytes. CRU function is impaired in Trdn(-/-) myocytes, with reduced SR Ca(2+) release and impaired negative feedback of SR Ca(2+) release on Cav1.2 Ca(2+) currents (I(Ca)). Uninhibited Ca(2+) influx via I(Ca) likely contributes to Ca(2+) overload and results in spontaneous SR Ca(2+) releases upon beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation with isoproterenol in Trdn(-/-) myocytes, and ventricular arrhythmias in Trdn(-/-) mice. We conclude that triadin is critically important for maintaining the structural and functional integrity of the cardiac CRU; triadin loss and the resulting alterations in CRU structure and protein composition impairs E-C coupling and renders hearts susceptible to ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:19383796

  3. Electron-conformational transformations govern the temperature dependence of the cardiac ryanodine receptor gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskvin, A. S.; Iaparov, B. I.; Ryvkin, A. M.; Solovyova, O. E.; Markhasin, V. S.

    2015-07-01

    Temperature influences many aspects of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, in particular, hypothermia increases the open probability ( P open) of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-release channels (ryanodine-sensitive RyR channels) rising the SR Ca2+ load in mammalian myocytes. However, to the best of our knowledge, no theoretical models are available for that effect. Traditional Markov chain models do not provide a reasonable molecular mechanistic insight on the origin of the temperature effects. Here in the paper we address a simple physically clear electron-conformational model to describe the RyR gating and argue that a synergetic effect of external thermal fluctuation forces (Gaussian-Markovian noise) and internal friction via the temperature stimulation/suppression of the open-close RyR tunneling probability can be considered as a main contributor to temperature effects on the RyR gating. Results of the computer modeling allowed us to successfully reproduce all the temperature effects observed for an isolated RyR gating in vitro under reducing the temperature: increase in P open and mean open time without any significant effect on mean closed

  4. Bioactive electrospun fish sarcoplasmic proteins as a drug delivery system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephansen, Karen; Chronakis, Ioannis S.; Jessen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Nano-microfibers were made from cod (Gadus morhua) sarcoplasmic proteins (FSP) (Mw< 200 kDa) usingthe electrospinning technique. The FSP fibers were studied by scanning electron microscopy, and thefiber morphology was found to be strongly dependent on FSP concentration. Interestingly, the FSP...

  5. Severe Injury Is Associated With Insulin Resistance, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response, and Unfolded Protein Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Herndon, David N.; Song, Juquan; Boehning, Darren; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Baker, Henry V.; Gauglitz, Gerd G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We determined whether postburn hyperglycemia and insulin resistance are associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress/unfolded protein response (UPR) activation leading to impaired insulin receptor signaling. Background Inflammation and cellular stress, hallmarks of severely burned and critically ill patients, have been causally linked to insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes via induction of ER stress and the UPR. Methods Twenty severely burned pediatric patients were compared with 36 nonburned children. Clinical markers, protein, and GeneChip analysis were used to identify transcriptional changes in ER stress and UPR and insulin resistance–related signaling cascades in peripheral blood leukocytes, fat, and muscle at admission and up to 466 days postburn. Results Burn-induced inflammatory and stress responses are accompanied by profound insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. Genomic and protein analysis revealed that burn injury was associated with alterations in the signaling pathways that affect insulin resistance, ER/sarcoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammation, and cell growth/apoptosis up to 466 days postburn. Conclusion Burn-induced insulin resistance is associated with persistent ER/sarcoplasmic reticulum stress/UPR and subsequent suppressed insulin receptor signaling over a prolonged period of time. PMID:22241293

  6. Role of Mitochondrial Enzymes and Sarcoplasmic ATPase in Cardioprotection Mediated by Aqueous Extract of Desmodium gangeticum (L) DC Root on Ischemic Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, G A; Paddikkala, J

    2010-11-01

    The present study investigate the protective effect of aqueous root extract of Desmodium gangeticum in preserving mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic ATPase during ischemia reperfusion injury. The isolated rat hearts in both drug and control group were subjected to warm ischemia (37°), followed by reperfusion with the Langendorff perfusion system. The aqueous root extract of Desmodium gangeticum (L) at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight was found to be effective in the rat heart for the management of ischemic reperfusion injury. Physiological parameters were significantly (PDesmodium gangeticum treated rat heart. These results suggest that Desmodium gangeticum aqueous root extract can preserve the mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic ATPase in the myocardium, resulting in the improvement of cardiac function after ischemia reperfusion injury. PMID:21969747

  7. Dietary ractopamine influences sarcoplasmic proteome profile of pork Longissimus thoracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Lima, Bruno R C; Suman, Surendranath P; Li, Shuting; Beach, Carol M; Silva, Teofilo J P; Silveira, Expedito T F; Bohrer, Benjamin M; Boler, Dustin D

    2015-05-01

    Dietary ractopamine improves pork leanness, whereas its effect on sarcoplasmic proteome has not been characterized. Therefore, the influence of ractopamine on sarcoplasmic proteome of post-mortem pork Longissimus thoracis muscle was examined. Longissimus thoracis samples were collected from carcasses (24 h post-mortem) of purebred Berkshire barrows (n=9) managed in mixed-sex pens and fed finishing diets containing ractopamine (RAC; 7.4 mg/kg for 14 days followed by 10.0 mg/kg for 14 days) or without ractopamine for 28 days (CON). Sarcoplasmic proteome was analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Nine protein spots were differentially abundant between RAC and CON groups. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphoglucomutase-1 were over-abundant in CON, whereas serum albumin, carbonic anhydrase 3, L-lactate dehydrogenase A chain, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase A, and myosin light chain 1/3 were over-abundant in RAC. These results suggest that ractopamine influences the abundance of enzymes involved in glycolytic metabolism, and the differential abundance of glycolytic enzymes could potentially influence the conversion of muscle to meat. PMID:25576742

  8. Transitions of protein traffic from cardiac ER to junctional SR

    OpenAIRE

    Sleiman, Naama H.; McFarland, Timothy P.; Jones, Larry R.; Cala, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    The junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (jSR) is an important and unique ER subdomain in the adult myocyte that concentrates resident proteins to regulate Ca2+ release. To investigate cellular mechanisms for sorting and trafficking proteins to jSR, we overexpressed canine forms of junctin (JCT) or triadin (TRD) in adult rat cardiomyocytes. Protein accumulation over time was visualized by confocal fluorescence microscopy using species-specific antibodies. Newly synthesized JCTdog and TRDdog appe...

  9. Cardiac ryanodine receptor in metabolic syndrome: is JTV519 (K201 future therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dincer UD

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available U Deniz DincerDepartment of Pharmacology, Ufuk University School of Medicine. Mevlana Bulvari, Balgat, Ankara, TurkeyAbstract: Metabolic syndrome is characterized by a combination of obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance. This multifaceted syndrome is often accompanied by a hyperdynamic circulatory state characterized by increased blood pressure, total blood volume, cardiac output, and metabolic tissue demand. Experimental, epidemiological, and clinical studies have demonstrated that patients with metabolic syndrome have significantly elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates. One of the main and frequent complications seen in metabolic syndrome is cardiovascular disease. The primary endpoints of cardiometabolic risk are coronary and peripheral arterial disease, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, and stroke. Alterations in expression and/or functioning of several key proteins involved in regulating and maintaining ionic homeostasis can cause cardiac disturbances. One such group of proteins is known as ryanodine receptors (intracellular calcium release channels, which are the major channels through which Ca2+ ions leave the sarcoplasmic reticulum, leading to cardiac muscle contraction. The economic cost of metabolic syndrome and its associated complications has a significant effect on health care budgets. Improvements in body weight, blood lipid profile, and hyperglycemia can reduce cardiometabolic risk. However, constant hyperadrenergic stimulation still contributes to the burden of disease. Normalization of the hyperdynamic circulatory state with conventional therapies is the most reasonable therapeutic strategy to date. JTV519 (K201 is a newly developed 1,4-benzothiazepine drug with antiarrhythmic and cardioprotective properties. It appears to be very effective in not only preventing but also in reversing the characteristic myocardial changes and preventing

  10. Structural and functional characterization of the purified cardiac ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ release channel complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K; Lai, F A; Liu, Q Y; Rousseau, E; Erickson, H P; Meissner, G

    1989-01-15

    Using density gradient centrifugation and [3H]ryanodine as a specific marker, the ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ release channel complex from Chaps-solubilized canine cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) has been purified in the form of an approximately 30 S complex, comprised of Mr approximately 400,000 polypeptides. Purification resulted in a specific activity of approximately 450 pmol bound ryanodine/mg of protein, a 60-70% recovery of ryanodine binding activity, and retention of the high affinity ryanodine binding site (KD = 3 nM). Negative stain electron microscopy revealed a 4-fold symmetric, four-leaf clover structure, which could fill a box approximately 30 x 30 nm and was thus morphologically similar to the SR-transverse-tubule, junctionally associated foot structure. The structural, sedimentation, and ryanodine binding data strongly suggest there is one high affinity ryanodine binding site/30 S complex, comprised of four Mr approximately 400,000 subunits. Upon reconstitution into planar lipid bilayers, the purified complex exhibited a Ca2+ conductance (70 pS in 50 mM Ca2+) similar to that of the native cardiac Ca2+ release channel (75 pS). The reconstituted complex was also found to conduct Na+ (550 pS in 500 mM Na+) and often to display complex Na+ subconducting states. The purified channel could be activated by micromolar Ca2+ or millimolar ATP, inhibited by millimolar Mg2+ or micromolar ruthenium red, and modified to a long-lived open subconducting state by ryanodine. The sedimentation, subunit composition, morphological, and ryanodine binding characteristics of the purified cardiac ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ release channel complex were similar to those previously described for the purified ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ release channel complex from fast-twitch skeletal muscle. PMID:2463249

  11. Potential role of cardiac calsequestrin in the lethal arrhythmic effects of cocaine*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Emiliano J.; Hayes, Robert P.; Barr, John T; Lewis, Kevin M.; Webb, Brian N.; Subramanian, Arun K; Nissen, Mark S.; Jones, Jeffrey P.; Shelden, Eric A.; Sorg, Barbara A; Fill, Michael; Schenk, James O.; Kang, ChulHee

    2014-01-01

    Background Cocaine-related deaths are continuously rising and its overdose is often associated with lethal cardiotoxic effects. Methods and Results Our approach, employing isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and light scattering in parallel, has confirmed the significant affinity of human cardiac calsequestrin (CASQ2) for cocaine. Calsequestrin (CASQ) is a major Ca2+-storage protein within the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of both cardiac and skeletal muscles. CASQ acts as a Ca2+ buffer and Ca2+-channel regulator through its unique Ca2+-dependent oligomerization. Equilibrium dialysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy experiments illustrated the perturbational effect of cocaine on CASQ2 polymerization, resulting in substantial reduction of its Ca2+-binding capacity. We also confirmed the accumulation of cocaine in rat heart tissue and the substantial effects cocaine has on cultured C2C12 cells. The same experiments were performed with methamphetamine as a control, which displayed neither affinity for CASQ2 nor any significant effects on its function. Since cocaine did not have any direct effect on the Ca2+-release channel judging from our single channel recordings, these studies provide new insights into how cocaine may interfere with the normal E-C coupling mechanism with lethal arrhythmogenic consequences. Conclusion We propose that cocaine accumulates in SR through its affinity for CASQ2 and affects both SR Ca2+ storage and release by altering the normal CASQ2 Ca2+-dependent polymerization. By this mechanism, cocaine use could produce serious cardiac problems, especially in people who have genetically-impaired CASQ2, defects in other E-C coupling components, or compromised cocaine metabolism and clearance. PMID:23876860

  12. Ca2+-dependent proteolysis of junctophilin-1 and junctophilin-2 in skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, R M; Dutka, T L; Horvath, D; Bell, J R; Delbridge, L M; Lamb, G D

    2013-02-01

    Excessive increases in intracellular [Ca(2+)] in skeletal muscle fibres cause failure of excitation-contraction coupling by disrupting communication between the dihydropyridine receptors in the transverse tubular system and the Ca(2+) release channels (RyRs) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), but the exact mechanism is unknown. Previous work suggested a possible role of Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis in this uncoupling process but found no proteolysis of the dihydropyridine receptors, RyRs or triadin. Junctophilin-1 (JP1; ∼90 kDa) stabilizes close apposition of the transverse tubular system and SR membranes in adult skeletal muscle; its C-terminal end is embedded in the SR and its N-terminal associates with the transverse tubular system membrane. Exposure of skeletal muscle homogenates to precisely set [Ca(2+)] revealed that JP1 undergoes Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis over the physiological [Ca(2+)] range in tandem with autolytic activation of endogenous μ-calpain. Cleavage of JP1 occurs close to the C-terminal, yielding a ∼75 kDa diffusible fragment and a fixed ∼15 kDa fragment. Depolarization-induced force responses in rat skinned fibres were abolished following 1 min exposure to 40 μm Ca(2+), with accompanying loss of full-length JP1. Supraphysiological stimulation of rat skeletal muscle in vitro by repeated tetanic stimulation in 30 mm caffeine also produced marked proteolysis of JP1 (and not RyR1). In dystrophic mdx mice, JP1 proteolysis is seen in limb muscles at 4 and not at 10 weeks of age. Junctophilin-2 in cardiac and skeletal muscle also undergoes Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis, and junctophilin-2 levels are reduced following cardiac ischaemia-reperfusion. Junctophilin proteolysis may contribute to skeletal muscle weakness and cardiac dysfunction in a range of circumstances. PMID:23148318

  13. Posttranslational modifications of cardiac ryanodine receptors: Ca2+ signaling and EC-coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niggli, Ernst; Ullrich, Nina D.; Gutierrez, D.; Kyrychenko, Sergii; Poláková, Eva; Shirokova, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    In cardiac muscle, a number of posttranslational protein modifications can alter the function of the Ca2+ release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), also known as the ryanodine receptor (RyR). During every heartbeat RyRs are activated by the Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mechanism and contribute a large fraction of the Ca2+ required for contraction. Some of the posttranslational modifications of the RyR are known to affect its gating and Ca2+ sensitivity. Presently, research in a number of laboratories is focussed on RyR phosphorylation, both by PKA and CaMKII, or on RyR modifications caused by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS / RNS). Both classes of posttranslational modifications are thought to play important roles in the physiological regulation of channel activity, but are also known to provoke abnormal alterations during various diseases. Only recently it was realized that several types of posttranslational modifications are tightly connected and form synergistic (or antagonistic) feed-back loops resulting in additive and potentially detrimental downstream effects. This review summarizes recent findings on such posttranslational modifications, attempts to bridge molecular with cellular findings, and opens a perspective for future work trying to understand the ramifications of crosstalk in these multiple signaling pathways. Clarifying these complex interactions will be important in the development of novel therapeutic approaches, since this may form the foundation for the implementation of multi-pronged treatment regimes in the future. PMID:22960642

  14. Solution-blown nanofiber mats from fish sarcoplasmic protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sett, S.; Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; Yarin, A.L.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, solution-blowing was adopted to form nanofibers from fish sarcoplasmic proteins (FSPs). Nanofiber mats containing different weight ratios (up to 90/10) of FSP in the FSP/nylon 6 blended nanofibers were formed from formic acid solutions, and compared to electrospun fibers made...... production rate of solution-blowing was increased 30-fold in relation to electrospinning. Overall, this study reveals FSP as an interesting biopolymeric alternative to synthetic polymers, and the introduction of FSP to nylon 6 provides a composite with controlled properties....

  15. The effects of compensated cardiac hypertrophy on dihydropyridine and ryanodine receptors in rat, ferret and guinea-pig hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannou, F; Sainte-Beuve, C; Oliviero, P; Do, E; Trouvé, P; Charlemagne, D

    1995-05-01

    The number of dihydropyridine and ryanodine receptors (DHP-R and RyR) has been measured in control and hypertrophied ventricles from rats, guinea pigs and ferrets to determine whether these two channels contribute to the alterations in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), and in Ca2+ transient during compensated cardiac hypertrophy. We found that ventricular hypertrophy did not change the density of DHP-R. Mild hypertrophy did not alter the density of RyR in the rat but decreased it in the guinea-pig and in the ferret (30% and 36%, respectively). Severe hypertrophy decreased the density of RyR by 20% in the rat and by 34% in the guinea-pig. Therefore, the decrease is greater in ferret and guinea-pig hearts than in rat heart. We conclude that the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channels but not the L-type Ca2+ channels could contribute to the slowing of intracellular Ca2+ movements and to the reduced velocity of shortening of the hypertrophied hearts. We suggest that, in the guinea pig and ferret hearts which express only the beta myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform, the reduced velocity of shortening during hypertrophy is related to the decrease in RyR density, whereas in the rat, it is regulated primarily via a shift in the MHC isoform, except in severe hypertrophy in which the moderate decrease in RyR would also be involved. PMID:7473781

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and cardiovascular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohui Duan; Yongfen Qi; Chaoshu Tang

    2009-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) serves several important functions, mainly post-translational modification, folding and assembly of newly synthesized secretary proteins, synthesizing lipids and cellular calcium storage. Various factors can disrupt ER homeostasis and disturb its functions, which leads to the accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins and to potential cellular dysfunction and pathological consequences, collectively termed ER stress. Recent progress suggests that ER stress plays a key role in the immune response, diabetes, tumor growth, and some neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, ER stress is involved in several processes of cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, cardiomyopathy, cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and atherosclerosis. Further research on the relation of ER stress to cardiovascular diseases will greatly enhance the understanding of these pathological processes and provide novel avenues to potential therapies.

  17. The human cardiac muscle ryanodine receptor-calcium release channel: identification, primary structure and topological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunwell, R E; Wickenden, C; Bertrand, B M; Shevchenko, V I; Walsh, M B; Allen, P D; Lai, F A

    1996-09-01

    Rapid Ca2+ efflux from intracellular stores during cardiac muscle excitation-contraction coupling is mediated by the ryanodine-sensitive calcium-release channel, a large homotetrameric complex present in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. We report here the identification, primary structure and topological analysis of the ryanodine receptor-calcium release channel from human cardiac muscle (hRyR-2). Consistent with sedimentation and immunoblotting studies on the hRyR-2 protein, sequence analysis of ten overlapping cDNA clones reveals an open reading frame of 14901 nucleotides encoding a protein of 4967 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 564 569 Da for hRyR-2. In-frame insertions corresponding to eight and ten amino acid residues were found in two of the ten cDNAs isolated, suggesting that novel, alternatively spliced transcripts of the hRyR-2 gene might exist. Six hydrophobic stretches, which are present within the hRyR-2 C-terminal 500 amino acids and are conserved in all RyR sequences, may be involved in forming the transmembrane domain that constitutes the Ca(2+)-conducting pathway, in agreement with competitive ELISA studies with a RyR-2-specific antibody. Sequence alignment of hRyR-2 with other RyR isoforms indicates a high level of overall identity within the RyR family, with the exception of two important regions that exhibit substantial variability. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the RyR-2 isoform diverged from a single ancestral gene before the RyR-1 and RyR-3 isoforms to form a distinct branch of the RyR family tree. PMID:8809036

  18. Serial block face scanning electron microscopy for the study of cardiac muscle ultrastructure at nanoscale resolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinali, Christian; Kitmitto, Ashraf

    2014-11-01

    Electron microscopy techniques have made a significant contribution towards understanding muscle physiology since the 1950s. Subsequent advances in hardware and software have led to major breakthroughs in terms of image resolution as well as the ability to generate three-dimensional (3D) data essential for linking structure to function and dysfunction. In this methodological review we consider the application of a relatively new technique, serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM), for the study of cardiac muscle morphology. Employing SBF-SEM we have generated 3D data for cardiac myocytes within the myocardium with a voxel size of ~15 nm in the X-Y plane and 50 nm in the Z-direction. We describe how SBF-SEM can be used in conjunction with selective staining techniques to reveal the 3D cellular organisation and the relationship between the t-tubule (t-t) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) networks. These methods describe how SBF-SEM can be used to provide qualitative data to investigate the organisation of the dyad, a specialised calcium microdomain formed between the t-ts and the junctional portion of the SR (jSR). We further describe how image analysis methods may be applied to interrogate the 3D volumes to provide quantitative data such as the volume of the cell occupied by the t-t and SR membranes and the volumes and surface area of jSR patches. We consider the strengths and weaknesses of the SBF-SEM technique, pitfalls in sample preparation together with tips and methods for image analysis. By providing a 'big picture' view at high resolutions, in comparison to conventional confocal microscopy, SBF-SEM represents a paradigm shift for imaging cellular networks in their native environment. PMID:25149127

  19. Calcium concentration and movement in the diadic cleft space of the cardiac ventricular cell.

    OpenAIRE

    Langer, G. A.; Peskoff, A

    1996-01-01

    We model the space between the junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (JSR) membrane and the inner leaflet of the transverse tubular ("T") sarcolemmal (SL) membrane, the diadic cleft, with respect to calcium (Ca) concentration and movement. The model predicts the following: 1) Ca influx via the "L" channel increases [Ca] to 1 microM within a distance of 50 nm from the channel mouth in < 500 microseconds. This is sufficient to trigger Ca release from a domain of 9 "feet." 2) By contrast, "reverse" ...

  20. Temperature and Ca2+-dependence of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2(+)-ATPase in haddock, salmon, rainbow trout and zebra cichlid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Helene; Jessen, Flemming

    2002-01-01

    the enzyme or its membrane lipid environment is still a matter of discussion. In this study we compared the temperature dependence and Ca2+-dependence of SR Ca2+-ATPase in haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus), salmon (Salmo, salar), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and zebra cichlid (Cichlasoma...... nigrofasciatum). The Arrhenius plot of zebra cichlid showed a break point at 20 degreesC, and the haddock Arrhenius plot was non-linear with pronounced changes in slope in the. temperature area, 6-14 degreesC. In Arrhenius plot from both salmon and rainbow trout a plateau exists with an almost constant SR Ca2......+- ATPase activity. The temperature range of the plateau was 14-21 and 18-25 degreesC in salmon and rainbow trout, respectively. Ca2+-dependence in the four different fish species investigated was very similar with half maximal activation (K-0.5) between 0.2 and 0.6 muM and half maximal inhibition (I-0...

  1. Defective sarcoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria communication in aged heart and its effect on ischemia and reperfusion injury

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Sanz, Celia; Meseguer Navarro, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Las alteraciones mitocondriales están vinculadas a la mayor vulnerabilidad de padecer enfermedades durante el envejecimiento. La edad avanzada es un factor determinante de la incidencia y gravedad de la cardiopatía isquémica. Estudios preclínicos sugieren la existencia de un daño celular intrínseco, por mecanismos no del todo establecidos, que contribuye a un incremento de la susceptibilidad del miocardio senescente al daño isquémico. Esta tesis investiga el papel de la comunicación mitocondr...

  2. Defective sarcoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria communication in aged heart and its effect on ischemia and reperfusion injury

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Sanz, Celia

    2015-01-01

    Las alteraciones mitocondriales están vinculadas a la mayor vulnerabilidad de padecer enfermedades durante el envejecimiento. La edad avanzada es un factor determinante de la incidencia y gravedad de la cardiopatía isquémica. Estudios preclínicos sugieren la existencia de un daño celular intrínseco, por mecanismos no del todo establecidos, que contribuye a un incremento de la susceptibilidad del miocardio senescente al daño isquémico. Esta tesis investiga el papel de la comunicación mitoco...

  3. Impact of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Release on Calcium Dynamics and Action Potential Morphology in Human Atrial Myocytes: A Computational Study

    OpenAIRE

    Koivumäki, Jussi T.; Korhonen, Topi; Tavi, Pasi

    2011-01-01

    Electrophysiological studies of the human heart face the fundamental challenge that experimental data can be acquired only from patients with underlying heart disease. Regarding human atria, there exist sizable gaps in the understanding of the functional role of cellular Ca2+ dynamics, which differ crucially from that of ventricular cells, in the modulation of excitation-contraction coupling. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to develop a mathematical model of the human atrial myoc...

  4. Effects of alpha-linolenic acid vs. docosahexaenoic acid supply on the distribution of fatty acids among the rat cardiac subcellular membranes after a short- or long-term dietary exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rousseau-Ralliard Delphine

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous work showed that the functional cardiac effect of dietary alpha-linolenic acid (ALA in rats requires a long feeding period (6 months, although a docosahexaenoic (DHA acid-supply affects cardiac adrenergic response after 2 months. However, the total cardiac membrane n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA composition remained unchanged after 2 months. This delay could be due to a specific reorganization of the different subcellular membrane PUFA profiles. This study was designed to investigate the evolution between 2 and 6 months of diet duration of the fatty acid profile in sarcolemmal (SL, mitochondrial (MI, nuclear (NU and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR membrane fractions. Methods Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 3 dietary groups (n = 10/diet/period, either n-3 PUFA-free diet (CTL, or ALA or DHA-rich diets. After 2 or 6 months, the subcellular cardiac membrane fractions were separated by differential centrifugations and sucrose gradients. Each membrane profile was analysed by gas chromatography (GC after lipid extraction. Results As expected the n-3 PUFA-rich diets incorporated n-3 PUFA instead of n-6 PUFA in all the subcellular fractions, which also exhibited individual specificities. The diet duration increased SFA and decreased PUFA in SL, whereas NU remained constant. The SR and MI enriched in n-3 PUFA exhibited a decreased DHA level with ageing in the DHA and CTL groups. Conversely, the n-3 PUFA level remained unchanged in the ALA group, due to a significant increase in docosapentaenoic acid (DPA. N-3 PUFA rich diets lead to a better PUFA profile in all the fractions and significantly prevent the profile modifications induced by ageing. Conclusion With the ALA diet the n-3 PUFA content, particularly in SR and SL kept increasing between 2 and 6 months, which may partly account for the delay to achieve the modification of adrenergic response.

  5. Mutations in calmodulin cause ventricular tachycardia and sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyegaard, Mette; Overgaard, Michael Toft; Sondergaard, M.T.; Vranas, Marta; Behr, Elijah R.; Hildebrandt, L.L.; Lund, J.; Hedley, Paula L.; Camm, A. John; Wettrell, Göran; Fosdal, Inger; Christiansen, Michael; Borglum, Anders D.

    2012-01-01

    substantial part of sudden cardiac deaths in young individuals. Mutations in RYR2, encoding the cardiac sarcoplasmic calcium channel, have been identified as causative in approximately half of all dominantly inherited CPVT cases. Applying a genome-wide linkage analysis in a large Swedish family with a severe......Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a devastating inherited disorder characterized by episodic syncope and/or sudden cardiac arrest during exercise or acute emotion in individuals without structural cardiac abnormalities. Although rare, CPVT is suspected to cause a...... calmodulin-binding-domain peptide at low calcium concentrations. We conclude that calmodulin mutations can cause severe cardiac arrhythmia and that the calmodulin genes are candidates for genetic screening of individual cases and families with idiopathic ventricular tachycardia and unexplained sudden cardiac...

  6. Contribution of spontaneous L-type Ca2+ channel activation to the genesis of Ca2+ sparks in resting cardiac myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Guangqin; FU; Yu; YANG; Dongmei; HAO; Xuemei; BAI; S

    2004-01-01

    Ca2+ sparks are the elementary events of intracellular Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac myocytes. In order to investigate whether spontaneous L-type Ca2+ channel activation contributes to the genesis of spontaneous Ca2+ sparks, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluo-4 to visualize local Ca2+ sparks in intact rat ventricular myocytes. In the presence of 0.2 mmol/L CdCl2 which inhibits spontaneous L-type Ca2+ channel activation, the rate of occurrence of spontaneous Ca2+ sparks was halved from 4.20 to 2.04 events/(100 μm·s), with temporal and spatial properties of individual Ca2+ sparks unchanged. Analysis of the Cd2+-sensitive spark production revealed an open probability of ~10-5 for L-type channels at the rest membrane potentials (-80 mV). Thus, infrequent and stochastic openings of sarcolemmal L-type Ca2+ channels in resting heart cells contribute significantly to the production of spontaneous Ca2+ sparks.

  7. Ca2+-Clock-Dependent Pacemaking in the Sinus Node Is Impaired in Mice with a Cardiac Specific Reduction in SERCA2 Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logantha, Sunil Jit R. J.; Stokke, Mathis K.; Atkinson, Andrew J.; Kharche, Sanjay R.; Parveen, Sajida; Saeed, Yawer; Sjaastad, Ivar; Sejersted, Ole M.; Dobrzynski, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Background: The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2) pump is an important component of the Ca2+-clock pacemaker mechanism that provides robustness and flexibility to sinus node pacemaking. We have developed transgenic mice with reduced cardiac SERCA2 abundance (Serca2 KO) as a model for investigating SERCA2's role in sinus node pacemaking. Methods and Results: In Serca2 KO mice, ventricular SERCA2a protein content measured by Western blotting was 75% (P clock with 2 μM ryanodine induced bradycardia that was less pronounced in Serca2 KO preparations (9 ± 1% vs. 20 ± 3% in Serca2 FF; P clock. Mathematical modeling was used to dissect the effects of membrane- and Ca2+-clock components on Serca2 KO mouse heart rate and sinus node action potential. Computer modeling predicted a slowing of heart rate with SERCA2 downregulation and the heart rate slowing was pronounced at >70% reduction in SERCA2 activity. Conclusions: Serca2 KO mice show a disrupted Ca2+-clock-dependent pacemaker mechanism contributing to impaired sinus node and atrioventricular node function.

  8. Contractile systolic and diastolic dysfunction in renin-induced hypertensive cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flesch, M; Schiffer, F; Zolk, O; Pinto, Y; Rosenkranz, S; HirthDietrich, C; Arnold, G; Paul, M; Bohm, M

    1997-01-01

    The present study investigated whether functional, molecular, and biochemical alterations occurring in chronic heart failure can already be detected in compensated hypertensive cardiac hypertrophy. Force of contraction (isolated papillary muscle strip preparations), sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) prote

  9. Ryanodine receptors/calcium release channels in heart failure and sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, A R

    2001-04-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) ions are second messengers in signaling pathways in all types of cells. They regulate muscle contraction, electrical signals which determine the cardiac rhythm and cell growth pathways in the heart. In the past decade cDNA cloning has provided clues as to the molecular structure of the intracellular Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors, RyR, and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, IP3R) on the sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) and an understanding of how these molecules regulate Ca2+ homeostasis in the heart is beginning to emerge. The intracellular Ca2+ release channels form a distinct class of ion channels distinguished by their structure, size, and function. Both RyRs and IP3Rs have gigantic cytoplasmic domains that serve as scaffolds for modulatory proteins that regulate the channel pore located in the carboxy terminal 10% of the channel sequence. The channels are tetramers comprised of four RyR or IP3R subunits. RyR2 is required for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling in the heart. Using co-sedimentation and co-immunoprecipitation we have defined a macromolecular complex comprised of RyR2, FKBP12.6, PKA, the protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A, and an anchoring protein mAKAP. We have shown that protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation of RyR2 dissociates FKBP12.6 and regulates the channel open probability (P(o)). In failing human hearts RyR2 is PKA hyperphosphorylated resulting in defective channel function due to increased sensitivity to Ca2+-induced activation. PMID:11273716

  10. CaMKII Regulation of Cardiac Ryanodine Receptors and Inositol Triphosphate Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel eCamors

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ryanodine receptors (RyRs and inositol triphosphate receptors (InsP3Rs are structurally related intracellular calcium release channels that participate in multiple primary or secondary amplified Ca2+ signals, triggering muscle contraction and oscillatory Ca2+ waves, or activating transcription factors. In the heart, RyRs play an indisputable role in the process of excitation-contraction coupling as the main pathway for Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR, and a less prominent role in the process of excitation-transcription coupling. Conversely, InsP3Rs are believed to contribute in subtle ways, only, to contraction of the heart, and in more important ways to regulation of transcription factors. Because uncontrolled activity of either RyRs or InsP3Rs may elicit life-threatening arrhythmogenic and/or remodeling Ca2+ signals, regulation of their activity is of paramount importance for normal cardiac function. Due to their structural similarity, many regulatory factors, accessory proteins, and posttranslational processes are equivalent for RyRs and InsP3Rs. Here we discuss regulation of RyRs and InsP3Rs by CaMKII phosphorylation, but touch on other kinases whenever appropriate. CaMKII is emerging as a powerful modulator of RyR and InsP3R activity but interestingly, some of the complexities and controversies surrounding phosphorylation of RyRs also apply to InsP3Rs, and a clear-cut effect of CaMKII on either channel eludes investigators for now. Nevertheless, some effects of CaMKII on global cellular activity, such as SR Ca2+ leak or force-frequency potentiation, appear clear now, and this constrains the limits of the controversies and permits a more tractable approach to elucidate the effects of phosphorylation at the single channel level.

  11. Protein kinase RNA- like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) signaling pathway plays a major role in reactive oxygen species (ROS)- mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress- induced apoptosis in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhong-Wei; Zhu, Hai-Tao; Chen, Kun-Lun; Dong, Xin; Wei, Jin; Qiu, Chuan; Xue, Jia-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Background Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is considered one of the mechanisms contributing to reactive oxygen species (ROS)- mediated cell apoptosis. In diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), cell apoptosis is generally accepted as the etiological factor and closely related to cardiac ROS generation. ER stress is proposed the link between ROS and cell apoptosis; however, the signaling pathways and their roles in participating ER stress- induced apoptosis in DCM are still unclear. Methods In this s...

  12. CYP2J2-Derived Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids Suppress Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xingxu; Ni, Li; Yang, Lei; Duan, Quanlu; Chen, Chen; Edin, Matthew L.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; WANG, DAO WEN

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress causes apoptosis and is associated with heart failure. Whether CYP2J2 and its arachidonic acid metabolites [epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs)] have a protective influence on ER stress and heart failure has not been studied. Assays of myocardial samples from patients with end-stage heart failure showed evidence of ER stress. Chronic infusion of isoproterenol (ISO) or angiotensin II (AngII) by osmotic mini-pump induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart fai...

  13. Cell contact as an independent factor modulating cardiac myocyte hypertrophy and survival in long-term primary culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, W. A.; Decker, M. L.; Behnke-Barclay, M.; Janes, D. M.; Decker, R. S.

    1998-01-01

    Cardiac myocytes maintained in cell culture develop hypertrophy both in response to mechanical loading as well as to receptor-mediated signaling mechanisms. However, it has been shown that the hypertrophic response to these stimuli may be modulated through effects of intercellular contact achieved by maintaining cells at different plating densities. In this study, we show that the myocyte plating density affects not only the hypertrophic response and features of the differentiated phenotype of isolated adult myocytes, but also plays a significant role influencing myocyte survival in vitro. The native rod-shaped phenotype of freshly isolated adult myocytes persists in an environment which minimizes myocyte attachment and spreading on the substratum. However, these conditions are not optimal for long-term maintenance of cultured adult cardiac myocytes. Conditions which promote myocyte attachment and spreading on the substratum, on the other hand, also promote the re-establishment of new intercellular contacts between myocytes. These contacts appear to play a significant role in the development of spontaneous activity, which enhances the redevelopment of highly differentiated contractile, junctional, and sarcoplasmic reticulum structures in the cultured adult cardiomyocyte. Although it has previously been shown that adult cardiac myocytes are typically quiescent in culture, the addition of beta-adrenergic agonists stimulates beating and myocyte hypertrophy, and thereby serves to increase the level of intercellular contact as well. However, in densely-plated cultures with intrinsically high levels of intercellular contact, spontaneous contractile activity develops without the addition of beta-adrenergic agonists. In this study, we compare the function, morphology, and natural history of adult feline cardiomyocytes which have been maintained in cultures with different levels of intercellular contact, with and without the addition of beta-adrenergic agonists

  14. Four Dimensional (4-D BioChemInfoPhysics Models of Cardiac Cellular and Sub-Cellular Vibrations (Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Hua Zou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD continued to be the leading cause of death. Failure or abnormal cardiac cellular or sub-cellular vibrations (oscillations could lead failure or abnormal heart beats that could cause CVD. Understanding the mechanisms of the vibrations (oscillations could help to prevent or to treat the diseases. Scientists have studied the mechanisms for more than 100 years. To our knowledge, the mechanisms are still unclear today. In this investigation, based on published data or results, conservation laws of the momentum as well as the energy, in views of biology, biochemistry, informatics and physics (BioChemInfoPhysics, we proposed our models of cardiac cellular and sub-cellular vibrations (oscillations of biological components, such as free ions in Biological Fluids (BF, Biological Membranes (BM, Ca++H+ (Ca++ and Na+K+ ATPases, Na+Ca++ exchangers (NCX, Ca++ carriers and myosin heads. Approach: Our models were described with 4-D (x, y, z, t or r, ?, z, t momentum transfer equations in mathematical physics. Results: The momentum transfer equations were solved with free and forced, damped, un-damped and over-damped, vibrations (oscillations. The biological components could be modeled as resonators or vibrators (oscillators, such as liquid plasmas, membranes, active springs, passive springs and active swings. Conclusion: We systematically provided new insights of automation (ignition and maintain, transportation, propagation and orientation of the cardiac cellular and sub-cellular vibrations (oscillations and resonances, with our BioChemInfoPhysics models of 4-D momentum transfer equations. Our modeling results implied: Auto-rhythmic cells (Sinoatrial Node Cells (SANC, Atrioventricular Node Cells (AVNC, Purkinje fibers, non-Auto-rhythmic ventricular myocytes and their Sarcoplasmic Reticulums (SR work as Biological Liquid Plasma Resonators (BLPR. The resonators were

  15. Impact of detubulation on force and kinetics of cardiac muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrantini, Cecilia; Coppini, Raffaele; Sacconi, Leonardo; Tosi, Benedetta; Zhang, Mei Luo; Wang, Guo Liang; de Vries, Ewout; Hoppenbrouwers, Ernst; Pavone, Francesco; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Tesi, Chiara; Poggesi, Corrado; ter Keurs, Henk E D J

    2014-06-01

    Action potential-driven Ca(2+) currents from the transverse tubules (t-tubules) trigger synchronous Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes. Loss of t-tubules has been reported in cardiac diseases, including heart failure, but the effect of uncoupling t-tubules from the sarcolemma on cardiac muscle mechanics remains largely unknown. We dissected intact rat right ventricular trabeculae and compared force, sarcomere length, and intracellular Ca(2+) in control trabeculae with trabeculae in which the t-tubules were uncoupled from the plasma membrane by formamide-induced osmotic shock (detubulation). We verified disconnection of a consistent fraction of t-tubules from the sarcolemma by two-photon fluorescence imaging of FM4-64-labeled membranes and by the absence of tubular action potential, which was recorded by random access multiphoton microscopy in combination with a voltage-sensitive dye (Di-4-AN(F)EPPTEA). Detubulation reduced the amplitude and prolonged the duration of Ca(2+) transients, leading to slower kinetics of force generation and relaxation and reduced twitch tension (1 Hz, 30°C, 1.5 mM [Ca(2+)]o). No mechanical changes were observed in rat left atrial trabeculae after formamide shock, consistent with the lack of t-tubules in rodent atrial myocytes. Detubulation diminished the rate-dependent increase of Ca(2+)-transient amplitude and twitch force. However, maximal twitch tension at high [Ca(2+)]o or in post-rest potentiated beats was unaffected, although contraction kinetics were slower. The ryanodine receptor (RyR)2 Ca-sensitizing agent caffeine (200 µM), which increases the velocity of transverse Ca(2+) release propagation in detubulated cardiomyocytes, rescued the depressed contractile force and the slower twitch kinetics of detubulated trabeculae, with negligible effects in controls. We conclude that partial loss of t-tubules leads to myocardial contractile abnormalities that can be rescued by enhancing and accelerating the

  16. Time Course of the Response of Myofibrillar and Sarcoplasmic Protein Metabolism to Unweighting of the Soleus Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Kathryn A.; Satarug, Soisungwan; Tischler, Marc E.

    1993-01-01

    Contributions of altered in vivo protein synthesis and degradation to unweighting atrophy of the soleus muscle in tail-suspended young female rats were analyzed daily for up to 6 days. Specific changes in myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins were also evaluated to assess their contributions to the loss of total protein. Synthesis of myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins was estimated by intramuscular (IM) injection and total protein by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of flooding doses of H-3-phenylaianine. Total protein loss was greatest during the first 3 days following suspension and was a consequence of the loss of myofibrillar rather than sarcoplasmic proteins. However, synthesis of total myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins diminished in parallel beginning in the first 24 hours. Therefore sarcoplasmic proteins must be spared due to a decrease in their degradation. In contrast, myofibrillar protein degradation increased, thus explaining the elevated degradation of the total pool. Following 72 hours of suspension, protein synthesis remained low, but the rate of myofibrillar protein loss diminished, suggesting a slowing of degradation. These various results show acute loss of protein during unweighting atrophy is a consequence of decreased synthesis and increased degradation of myofibrillar proteins, and sarcoplasmic proteins are spared due to slower degradation, likely explaining the sparing of plasma membrane receptors. Based on other published data, we propose that the slowing of atrophy after the initial response may be attributed to an increased effect of insulin.

  17. Myoglobin-mediated oxygen delivery to mitochondria of isolated cardiac myocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Wittenberg, B A; Wittenberg, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    Myoglobin-mediated oxygen delivery to intracellular mitochondria is demonstrated in cardiac myocytes isolated from the hearts of mature rats. Myocytes are held at high ambient oxygen pressure, 40-340 torr (5-45 kPa); sarcoplasmic myoglobin is fully oxygenated. In this condition oxygen availability does not limit respiratory rate; myoglobin-facilitated diffusion contributes no additional oxygen flux and, since oxygen consumption is measured in steady states, the storage function of myoglobin v...

  18. A mutation in the human phospholamban gene, deleting arginine 14, results in lethal, hereditary cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Haghighi, Kobra; Kolokathis, Fotis; Gramolini, Anthony O.; Waggoner, Jason R.; Pater, Luke; Lynch, Roy A.; Fan, Guo-Chang; Tsiapras, Dimitris; Parekh, Rohan R.; Dorn, Gerald W., II; MacLennan, David H.; Kremastinos, Dimitrios Th; Kranias, Evangelia G.

    2006-01-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-cycling proteins are key regulators of cardiac contractility, and alterations in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-cycling properties have been shown to be causal of familial cardiomyopathies. Through genetic screening of dilated cardiomyopathy patients, we identified a previously uncharacterized deletion of arginine 14 (PLN-R14Del) in the coding region of the phospholamban (PLN) gene in a large family with hereditary heart failure. No homozygous individuals were ide...

  19. Chemical and Functional Characterization of Sarcoplasmic Proteins from Giant Squid (Dosidicus gigas) Mantle

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa Linda Lopez-Enriquez; Victor Manuel Ocano-Higuera; Wilfrido Torres-Arreola; Josafat Marina Ezquerra-Brauer; Enrique Marquez-Rios

    2015-01-01

    Modification of pH and NaCl concentration changed the physicochemical properties of sarcoplasmic proteins (SP) from jumbo squid mantle and consequently their functional properties. Better results of emulsifying activity index (EAI) and foam capacity (FC) were exhibited at pH 11 in NaCl absence due to higher solubility. But better emulsifying stability index (ESI) was obtained at pH 11 in 0.5 M NaCl, while, foaming stability (FS) was better at pH near to isoelectric point (pI). These results s...

  20. Gαq protein carboxyl terminus imitation polypeptide GCIP-27 improves cardiac function in chronic heart failure rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Lan Lu

    Full Text Available Gαq protein carboxyl terminus imitation polypeptide (GCIP-27 has been shown to alleviate pathological cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by various factors. Pathological cardiac hypertrophy increases the morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases while it compensates for poor heart function. This study was designed to investigate the effects of GCIP-27 on heart function in rats with heart failure induced by doxorubicin.Forty-eight rats were randomly divided into the following six groups receiving vehicle (control, doxorubicin (Dox, losartan (6 mg/kg, i.g. and three doses of GCIP-27 (10, 30, 90 μg/kg; i.p., bid, respectively. Heart failure was induced by Dox, which was administered at a 20 mg/kg cumulative dose. After 10 weeks of treatment, we observed that GCIP-27 (30, 90 μg/kg significantly increased ejection fraction, fraction shortening, stroke volume and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase activity of Dox-treated hearts. Additionally, GCIP-27 decreased myocardial injury, heart weight index and left ventricular weight index, fibrosis and serum cardiac troponin-I concentration in Dox-treated mice. Immunohistochemistry, western blotting and real-time PCR experiments indicated that GCIP-27 (10-90 μg/kg could markedly upregulate the protein expression of myocardial α-myosin heavy chain (MHC, Bcl-2, protein kinase C (PKC ε and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK 1/2 as well as the mRNA expression of α-MHC, but downregulated the expression of β-MHC, Bax and PKC βII, and the mRNA expression levels of β-MHC in Dox-treated mice. It was also found that GCIP-27 (30, 90 μg/L decreased cell size and protein content of cardiomyocytes significantly in vitro by comparison of Dox group.GCIP-27 could effectively ameliorate heart failure development induced by Dox. PKC-ERK1/2 signaling might represent the underlying mechanism of the beneficial effects of GCIP-27.

  1. Critical roles of hydrophobicity and orientation of side chains for inactivation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase with thapsigargin and thapsigargin analogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Liu, Huizhen; Sonntag, Yonathan;

    2010-01-01

    site between transmembrane segments to the putative N-terminal Ca(2+) entry pathway. The long chain analogs provide a rational basis for the localization of the linker, the presence of which is necessary for enabling prostate-specific antigen to cleave peptide-conjugated prodrugs targeting SERCA of...... that a balanced hydrophobicity and accurate positioning of the side chains, provided by the central guaianolide ring structure, defines a pharmacophore of Tg that governs both high affinity and access to the protein-binding site. Tg analogs substituted with long linkers at O-8 extend from the binding...... new Tg derivatives with improved properties for SERCA targeting. Finally, we propose that the Tg binding pocket may be a regulatory site that, for example, is sensitive to cholesterol....

  2. Critical Roles of Hydrophobicity and Orientation of Side Chains for Inactivation of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPase with Thapsigargin and Thapsigargin Analogs*

    OpenAIRE

    Winther, Anne-Marie L.; Liu, Huizhen; Sonntag, Yonathan; Olesen, Claus; le Maire, Marc; Soehoel, Helmer; Olsen, Carl-Erik; Christensen, S. Brøgger; Nissen, Poul; Møller, Jesper V.

    2010-01-01

    Thapsigargin (Tg), a specific inhibitor of sarco/endoplasmic Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA), binds with high affinity to the E2 conformation of these ATPases. SERCA inhibition leads to elevated calcium levels in the cytoplasm, which in turn induces apoptosis. We present x-ray crystallographic and intrinsic fluorescence data to show how Tg and chemical analogs of the compound with modified or removed side chains bind to isolated SERCA 1a membranes. This occurs by uptake via the membrane lipid followed b...

  3. Uncoupling of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺-ATPase by N-arachidonoyl dopamine. Members of the endocannabinoid family as thermogenic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmmoud, Yasser Ahmed; Gaster, Michel

    2013-01-01

    -terminal p83C fragment from further cleavage. Moreover, we found a significantly decreased cytoplasmic ATP levels following treatment of skeletal muscle cells with 100 nM NADA. This effect was dependent on the presence of glucose and abolished by pretreatment with the specific SERCA inhibitor thapsigargin......, regardless of the presence of glucose. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: NADA is an endogenous molecule that may function as SERCA uncoupling agent in vivo. Members of the endocannabinoid family exert concerted actions on several Ca²⁺-handling proteins. Uncoupling of SERCA by exogenous compounds could be a novel...

  4. Effects of carnosine on contractile apparatus Ca²⁺ sensitivity and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺ release in human skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutka, T L; Lamboley, C R; McKenna, M J; Murphy, R M; Lamb, G D

    2012-03-01

    There is considerable interest in potential ergogenic and therapeutic effects of increasing skeletal muscle carnosine content, although its effects on excitation-contraction (EC) coupling in human muscle have not been defined. Consequently, we sought to characterize what effects carnosine, at levels attained by supplementation, has on human muscle fiber function, using a preparation with all key EC coupling proteins in their in situ positions. Fiber segments, obtained from vastus lateralis muscle of human subjects by needle biopsy, were mechanically skinned, and their Ca(2+) release and contractile apparatus properties were characterized. Ca(2+) sensitivity of the contractile apparatus was significantly increased by 8 and 16 mM carnosine (increase in pCa(50) of 0.073 ± 0.007 and 0.116 ± 0.006 pCa units, respectively, in six type I fibers, and 0.063 ± 0.018 and 0.103 ± 0.013 pCa units, respectively, in five type II fibers). Caffeine-induced force responses were potentiated by 8 mM carnosine in both type I and II fibers, with the potentiation in type II fibers being entirely explicable by the increase in Ca(2+) sensitivity of the contractile apparatus caused by carnosine. However, the potentiation of caffeine-induced responses caused by carnosine in type I fibers was beyond that expected from the associated increase in Ca(2+) sensitivity of the contractile apparatus and suggestive of increased Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Thus increasing muscle carnosine content likely confers benefits to muscle performance in both fiber types by increasing the Ca(2+) sensitivity of the contractile apparatus and possibly also by aiding Ca(2+) release in type I fibers, helping to lessen or slow the decline in muscle performance during fatiguing stimulation. PMID:22174397

  5. Celestial Blast in Bleak Reticulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    The southern Reticulum constellation [1] certainly isn't a big hit for amateur astronomers. This tiny, bleak and diamond-shaped constellation, not far on the sky from the Large Magellanic Cloud, is often overlooked. But recently, astronomers had a closer look at a galaxy situated inside it. And more precisely at an exploding star hosted by the spiral galaxy NGC 1559 [2]. On the night of August 4, 2005, the renowned Australian amateur astronomer and SN discoverer Reverend Robert Evans discovered a supernova just North of the galaxy with his 0.31-m telescope. The supernova - the explosion of a star - was of magnitude 13.8, that is, only 20 times fainter than the entire host galaxy. Being the 104th supernova discovered in 2005, it received the name SN 2005df. Notably, Evans had already discovered 2 other supernovae in the same galaxy: in 1984 (SN 1984J) and in 1986 (SN 1986L). The following night, astronomer Marilena Salvo and her Australian colleagues classified the supernova as a somewhat unusual type Ia supernova, caught probably 10 days before it reached its maximum brightness. Such a supernova is thought to be the result of the explosion of a small and dense star - a white dwarf [3] - inside a binary system. As its companion was continuously spilling matter onto the white dwarf, the white dwarf reached a critical mass, leading to a fatal instability and the supernova. These are exactly a kind of supernovae in which Dietrich Baade, Ferdinando Patat (ESO), Lifan Wang (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA), and their colleagues are interested. In particular, they study the polarization properties of this kind of supernova in order to learn more about their asphericity, which holds important clues to the detailed physics that governs this terminal catastrophe in the life of such stars. Having an accepted observing programme that uses the FORS1 multi-mode instrument on Kueyen, one of the four Unit Telescopes of ESO's 8.2m Very Large Telescope at Cerro Paranal

  6. Chemical and Functional Characterization of Sarcoplasmic Proteins from Giant Squid (Dosidicus gigas Mantle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Linda Lopez-Enriquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modification of pH and NaCl concentration changed the physicochemical properties of sarcoplasmic proteins (SP from jumbo squid mantle and consequently their functional properties. Better results of emulsifying activity index (EAI and foam capacity (FC were exhibited at pH 11 in NaCl absence due to higher solubility. But better emulsifying stability index (ESI was obtained at pH 11 in 0.5 M NaCl, while, foaming stability (FS was better at pH near to isoelectric point (pI. These results suggest that SP from jumbo squid may be a promising ingredient, whose functional properties can be manipulated by changing pH and NaCl concentration.

  7. Design and characterization of self-assembled fish sarcoplasmic protein-alginate nanocomplexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; Mattebjerg, Maria Ahlm; Wattjes, Jasper;

    2015-01-01

    Macrostructures based on natural polymers are subject to large attention, as the application range is wide within the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this study we present nanocomplexes (NCXs) made from electrostatic self-assembly between negatively charged alginate and positively charged...... caused a decreased viability in HeLa and U2OS cell lines. The simple processing procedure and the high stability of the NCXs, makes them excellent candidates for use in the food and pharmaceutical industry. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....... fish sarcoplasmic proteins (FSP), prepared by bulk mixing. A concentration screening revealed that there was a range of alginate and FSP concentrations where stable NCXs with similar properties were formed, rather than two exact concentrations. The size of the NCXs was 293 +/- 3 nm, and the zeta...

  8. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attack or other heart problem. You might consider cardiac rehab if you have had: Heart attack Coronary heart disease (CHD) Heart failure Angina (chest pain) Heart or heart valve surgery Heart transplant Procedures such as angioplasty and stenting In some ...

  9. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program to help people who have A heart attack Angioplasty or coronary artery bypass grafting for coronary heart disease A heart valve repair or replacement A ...

  10. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Costello BT; Nadel J.; Taylor AJ

    2016-01-01

    Benedict T Costello,1,2 James Nadel,3 Andrew J Taylor,1,21Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Alfred Hospital, 2Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, 3School of Medicine, University of Notre Dame, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Cardiac sarcoidosis is a rare but life-threatening condition, requiring a high degree of clinical suspicion and low threshold for investigation to make the diagnosis. The cardiac manifestations include heart failure, conducting syst...

  11. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Associated ROS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Maher Ali Zeeshan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a fascinating network of tubules through which secretory and transmembrane proteins enter unfolded and exit as either folded or misfolded proteins, after which they are directed either toward other organelles or to degradation, respectively. The ER redox environment dictates the fate of entering proteins, and the level of redox signaling mediators modulates the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Accumulating evidence suggests the interrelation of ER stress and ROS with redox signaling mediators such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI-endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin (ERO-1, glutathione (GSH/glutathione disuphide (GSSG, NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4, NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR, and calcium. Here, we reviewed persistent ER stress and protein misfolding-initiated ROS cascades and their significant roles in the pathogenesis of multiple human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, inflammation, ischemia, and kidney and liver diseases.

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Lu Cai; Wei Xu; Jiancheng Xu; Qi Zhou

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an organelle entrusted with lipid synthesis, calcium homeostasis, protein folding, and maturation. Perturbation of ER-associated functions results in an evolutionarily conserved cell stress response, the unfolded protein response (UPR) that is also called ER stress. ER stress is aimed initially at compensating for damage but can eventually trigger cell death if ER stress is excessive or prolonged. Now the ER stress has been associated with numerous diseases. ...

  13. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Genome Damage, and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dicks, Naomi; Gutierrez, Karina; Michalak, Marek; Bordignon, Vilceu; Agellon, Luis B.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been linked to many diseases, including cancer. A large body of work has focused on the activation of the ER stress response in cancer cells to facilitate their survival and tumor growth; however, there are some studies suggesting that the ER stress response can also mitigate cancer progression. Despite these contradictions, it is clear that the ER stress response is closely associated with cancer biology. The ER stress response classically encompasses ac...

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress, genome damage and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Naomi eDicks; Karina eGutierrez; Marek eMichalak; Vilceu eBordignon; Agellon, Luis B.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been linked to many diseases, including cancer. A large body of work has focused on the activation of the ER stress response in cancer cells to facilitate their survival and tumor growth, however, there are some studies suggesting that the ER stress response can also mitigate cancer progression. Despite these contradictions, it is clear that the ER stress response is closely associated with cancer biology. The ER stress response classically encompasses ...

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in periimplantation embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Michalak, Marek; Gye, Myung Chan

    2015-01-01

    Stress coping mechanisms are critical to minimize or overcome damage caused by ever changing environmental conditions. They are designed to promote cell survival. The unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway is mobilized in response to the accumulation of unfolded proteins, ultimately in order to regain endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis. Various elements of coping responses to ER stress including Perk, Ask1, Bip, Chop, Gadd34, Ire1, Atf4, Atf6, and Xbp1 have been identified and were found...

  16. Nonvesicular Lipid Transfer from the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Lev, Sima

    2012-01-01

    The transport of lipids from their synthesis site at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to different target membranes could be mediated by both vesicular and nonvesicular transport mechanisms. Nonvesicular lipid transport appears to be the major transport route of certain lipid species, and could be mediated by either spontaneous lipid transport or by lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs). Although nonvesicular lipid transport has been extensively studied for more than four decades, its underlying mecha...

  17. Mechanism of Fluorescence and Conformational Changes of the Sarcoplasmic Calcium Binding Protein of the Sand Worm Nereis diversicolor upon Ca2+ or Mg2+ Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Sillen, Alain; Verheyden, Stefan; Delfosse, Lotte; Braem, Tania; Robben, Johan; Volckaert, Guido; Engelborghs, Yves

    2003-01-01

    The calcium-binding protein isolated from the sarcoplasm of the muscles of the sand worm Nereis diversicolor has four EF-hands and three active binding sites for Ca2+ or Mg2+. Nereis diversicolor sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein contains three tryptophan residues at positions 4, 57, and 170, respectively. The Wt protein shows a very limited fluorescence increase upon binding of Ca2+ or Mg2+. Single-tryptophan-containing mutants were produced and purified. The fluorescence titrations of th...

  18. Flavour formation from hydrolysis of pork sarcoplasmic protein extract by a unique LAB culture isolated from Harbin dry sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Liu, Qian; Sun, Qinxiu; Kong, Baohua; Xiong, Youling

    2015-02-01

    The lactic acid bacteria Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus curvatus, and Lactobacillus fermentum isolated from Harbin dry sausage were assessed for their protein hydrolysis and flavour development in pork muscle sarcoplasmic protein extracts. Gel electrophoresis indicated that sarcoplasmic proteins were degraded by all of the strains, especially by P. pentosaceus and L. curvatus. Trichloroacetic acid-soluble peptides increased in all of the samples (P acid contents than did the other two strains(P acid and alanine appeared to be the predominant free amino acids. The volatile compound analysis indicated that the highest aldehydes, alcohols and acid contents were found in the sample with P. pentosaceus followed by L. curvatus. The results revealed that P. pentosaceus could be appropriate for use as a meat starter culture. PMID:25460113

  19. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  20. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  1. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedema, J.P.; Zondervan, P.E.; van Hagen, P.; ten Cate, F.J.; Bresser, P.; Doubell, A.F.; Pattynama, P.; Hoogsteden, H.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Symptomatic cardiac involvement occurs in approximately 5% of patients. The prevalence of sarcoidosis in the Netherlands is unknown, but estimated to be approximately 20 per 100,000 population (3200 patients). We report on five patients who presented with different manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis, and give a brief review on the current management of this condition. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be of great help in diagnosing this condition as well as in the follow-up of the response to therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:25696121

  2. Cardiac Pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete survey of physiological biophysical,clinical and engineering aspects of cardiac facing,including the history and an assessment of possible future developments.Among the topics studied are: pacemakers, energy search, heart stimulating with pacemakers ,mathematical aspects of the electric cardio stimulation chronic, pacemaker implants,proceeding,treatment and control

  3. Identification and characterization of alpha-I-proteinase inhibitor from common carp sarcoplasmic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriangkanakun, Siriphon; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y; Yongsawadigul, Jirawat

    2016-02-01

    Purification of proteinase inhibitor from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) sarcoplasmic proteins resulted in 2.8% yield with purification fold of 111. Two inhibitors, namely inhibitor I and II, exhibited molecular mass of 47 and 52 kDa, respectively, based on non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Both inhibitors I and II were identified to be alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI) based on LC-MS/MS. They were glycoproteins and molecular mass after peptide-N-glycosidase F treatment was 38 and 45 kDa, respectively. The N-glycosylation sites of both inhibitors were determined to be at N214 and N226. The inhibitors specifically inhibited trypsin. The common carp α1-PI showed high thermal stability with denaturation temperatures of 65.43 and 73.31 °C, which were slightly less than those of ovomucoid. High stability toward NaCl was also evident up to 3M. The common carp α1-PI effectively reduced autolytic degradation of bigeye snapper surimi at the concentration as low as 0.025%. PMID:26304452

  4. Analysis of endoplasmic reticulum by confocal microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janáček, Jiří; Radochová, Barbora; Demjénová, E.; Schwarzerová, K.; Tomori, Z.; Karen, Petr; Kubínová, Lucie

    Prague : Czech Pattern Recognition Society, 2005 - (Hlaváč, V.), s. 22-23 ISBN 80-01-03239-6. [Prague Post Genome Technology Workshop 2005. Prague (CZ), 06.06.2005-07.06.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB6011309; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100110502 Grant ostatní: CZ-SK(CZ) KONTAKT 139 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : confocal microscopy * endoplasmic reticulum * image analysis Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology

  5. Pharmacological blockade of voltage-gated calcium channels as a potential cardioprotective strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Pushparaj, Charumathi

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) are essential for initiating and regulating cardiac function. During the cardiac action potential, Ca2+ influx through L-type channels triggers the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release that enables the EC coupling. Ca2+ can also enter cardiac myocytes through low-voltage-activated T-type channels, which are expressed throughout cardiac development until the end of the neonatal period, and can contribute to pacemaker activity as well as EC coupling to some ex...

  6. A high-affinity Ca{sup 2+} pump, ECA1, from the endoplasmic reticulum is inhibited by cyclopiazonic acid but not by thapsigargin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Liang; Sze, H. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics

    1998-11-01

    To identify and characterize individual Ca{sup 2+} pumps, the authors have expressed an Arabidopsis ECA1 gene encoding an endoplasmic reticulum-type Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase homolog in the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mutant K616. The mutant (pmc1pmr1cnb1) lacks a Golgi and a vacuolar membrane Ca{sup 2+} pump and grows very poorly on Ca{sup 2+}-depleted medium. Membranes isolated from the mutant showed high H{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+}-antiport but no Ca{sup 2+}-pump activity. Expression of ECA1 in endomembranes increased mutant growth by 10- to 20-fold in Ca{sup 2+}-depleted medium. {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} pumping into vesicles from ECA1 transformants was detected after the H{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+}-antiport activity was eliminated with bafilomycin A{sub 1} and gramicidin D. The pump had a high affinity for Ca{sup 2+} (K{sub m} = 30 nM) and displayed two affinities for ATP. Cyclopiazonic acid, a specific blocker of animal sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase, inhibited Ca{sup 2+} transport but thapsigargin did not. Transport was insensitive to calmodulin. These results suggest that this endoplasmic reticulum-type Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase could support cell growth in plants as in yeast by maintaining submicromolar levels of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} and replenishing Ca{sup 2+} in endomembrane compartments. This study demonstrates that the yeast K616 mutant provides a powerful expression system to study the structure/function relationships of Ca{sup 2+} pumps from eukaryotes.

  7. Inhibition of the Unfolded Protein Response Mechanism Prevents Cardiac Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Joanna; Dyck, Jason R. B.; Lopaschuk, Gary D.; Agellon, Luis B.; Michalak, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac fibrosis attributed to excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins is a major cause of heart failure and death. Cardiac fibrosis is extremely difficult and challenging to treat in a clinical setting due to lack of understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to cardiac fibrosis and effective anti-fibrotic therapies. The objective in this study was to examine whether unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway mediates cardiac fibrosis and whether a pharmacological intervention to modulate UPR can prevent cardiac fibrosis and preserve heart function. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate here that the mechanism leading to development of fibrosis in a mouse with increased expression of calreticulin, a model of heart failure, stems from impairment of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis, transient activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and stimulation of the TGFβ1/Smad2/3 signaling pathway. Remarkably, sustained pharmacologic inhibition of the UPR pathway by tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) is sufficient to prevent cardiac fibrosis, and improved exercise tolerance. Conclusions We show that the mechanism leading to development of fibrosis in a mouse model of heart failure stems from transient activation of UPR pathway leading to persistent remodelling of cardiac tissue. Blocking the activation of the transiently activated UPR pathway by TUDCA prevented cardiac fibrosis, and improved prognosis. These findings offer a window for additional interventions that can preserve heart function. PMID:27441395

  8. Cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chlumský, Jaromír; Holá, Dana; Hlaváček, Karel; Michal, Michal; Švec, Alexander; Špatenka, Jaroslav; Dušek, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sarcoma is a very rare neoplasm and is difficult to diagnose. The case of a 51-year-old man with a left atrial tumour, locally recurrent three months after its surgical removal, is presented. Computed tomography showed metastatic spread to the lung parenchyma. On revised histology, the mass extirpated was a sarcoma. Because of the metastatic spread, further therapy was symptomatic only; the patient died 15 months after the first manifestation of his problems. Immunohistochemical stain...

  9. Cardiac Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Joorabian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a spectrum of different types of cardiac"ncalcifications with the importance and significance"nof each type of cardiac calcification, especially"ncoronary artery calcification. Radiologic detection of"ncalcifications within the heart is quite common. The"namount of coronary artery calcification correlates"nwith the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD."nCalcification of the aortic or mitral valve may indicate"nhemodynamically significant valvular stenosis."nMyocardial calcification is a sign of prior infarction,"nwhile pericardial calcification is strongly associated"nwith constrictive pericarditis. A spectrum of different"ntypes of cardiac calcifications (linear, annular,"ncurvilinear,... could be seen in chest radiography and"nother imaging modalities. So a carful inspection for"ndetection and reorganization of these calcifications"nshould be necessary. Numerous modalities exist for"nidentifying coronary calcification, including plain"nradiography, fluoroscopy, intravascular ultrasound,"nMRI, echocardiography, and conventional, helical and"nelectron-beam CT (EBCT. Coronary calcifications"ndetected on EBCT or helical CT can be quantifie,"nand a total calcification score (Cardiac Calcification"nScoring may be calculated. In an asymptomatic"npopulation and/or patients with concomitant risk"nfactors like diabetes mellitus, determination of the"npresence of coronary calcifications identifies the"npatients at risk for future myocardial infarction and"ncoronary artery disease. In patients without coronary"ncalcifications, future cardiovascular events could"nbe excluded. Therefore, detecting and recognizing"ncalcification related to the heart on chest radiography"nand other imaging modalities such as fluoroscopy, CT"nand echocardiography may have important clinical"nimplications.

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Oshitari

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Toshiyuki Oshitari1,2, Natsuyo Hata1, Shuichi Yamamoto11Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba City, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kimitsu Central Hospital, Kisarazu City, Chiba, JapanAbstract: Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases including Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Many recent studies have shown that ER stress is related to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, and with the death of pancreatic β-cells, insulin resistance, and the death of the vascular cells in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy is a major complication of diabetes and results in death of both neural and vascular cells. Because the death of the neurons directly affects visual function, the precise mechanism causing the death of neurons in early diabetic retinopathy must be determined. The ideal therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy would be to treat the factors involved with both the vascular and neuronal abnormalities in diabetic retinopathy. In this review, we present evidence that ER stress is involved in the death of both retinal neurons and vascular cells in diabetic eyes, and thus reducing or blocking ER stress may be a potential therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum stress, diabetic retinopathy, vascular cell death, neuronal cell death

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Oshitari

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Toshiyuki Oshitari1,2, Natsuyo Hata1, Shuichi Yamamoto11Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba City, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kimitsu Central Hospital, Kisarazu City, Chiba, JapanAbstract: Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases including Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Many recent studies have shown that ER stress is related to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, and with the death of pancreatic β-cells, insulin resistance, and the death of the vascular cells in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy is a major complication of diabetes and results in death of both neural and vascular cells. Because the death of the neurons directly affects visual function, the precise mechanism causing the death of neurons in early diabetic retinopathy must be determined. The ideal therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy would be to treat the factors involved with both the vascular and neuronal abnormalities in diabetic retinopathy. In this review, we present evidence that ER stress is involved in the death of both retinal neurons and vascular cells in diabetic eyes, and thus reducing or blocking ER stress may be a potential therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum stress, diabetic retinopathy, vascular cell death, neuronal cell death

  12. Cardiac conduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cardiac conduction system is a group of specialized cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals ... to contract. The main components of the cardiac conduction system are the SA node, AV node, bundle ...

  13. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum: mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum interplay in type 2 diabetes pathophysiology.

    OpenAIRE

    Rieusset, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    International audience Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are two important metabolic organelles for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and their functional defects are suspected to participate to the aetiology of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Particularly, excessive lipid intake and/or ectopic lipid accumulation in tissues (referred as lipotoxicity) are involved in alterations of both organelles and are closely linked to peripheral insulin resistance and defective insulin secretion...

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in brain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yingchao; Li, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is an intricate mechanism that mediates numerous responses during brain ischemia, thus being essential to determine the fate of neurons. In recent years, studies of the mechanisms of brain ischemic injury have centered on ER stress, glutamate excitotoxicity, dysfunction of mitochondria, inflammatory reactions, calcium overload and death receptor pathways. The role of ER stress is highly important. In addition to resulting in neuronal cell death through calcium toxicity and apoptotic pathways, ER stress also triggers a series of adaptive responses including unfolded protein response (UPR), autophagy, the expression of pro-survival proteins and the enhancement of ER self-repair ability, leading to less ischemic brain damage. This paper provides an overview of recent advances in understanding of the relations between ER stress and brain ischemia. PMID:26289799

  15. Nonvesicular lipid transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Sima

    2012-01-01

    The transport of lipids from their synthesis site at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to different target membranes could be mediated by both vesicular and nonvesicular transport mechanisms. Nonvesicular lipid transport appears to be the major transport route of certain lipid species, and could be mediated by either spontaneous lipid transport or by lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs). Although nonvesicular lipid transport has been extensively studied for more than four decades, its underlying mechanism, advantage and regulation, have not been fully explored. In particular, the function of LTPs and their involvement in intracellular lipid movement remain largely controversial. In this article, we describe the pathways by which lipids are synthesized at the ER and delivered to different cellular membranes, and discuss the role of LTPs in lipid transport both in vitro and in intact cells. PMID:23028121

  16. In Vitro Contracture Test Results and Anaesthetic Management of a Patient with Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy for Cardiac Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Schuster

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD is a hereditary neuromuscular disorder characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness, early contractures, and dilated cardiomyopathy. We reported an uneventful general anaesthesia using total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA for cardiac transplantation in a 19-year-old woman suffering from EDMD. In vitro contracture test results of two pectoralis major muscle bundles of the patient suggest that exposition to triggering agents does not induce a pathological sarcoplasmic calcium release in the lamin A/C phenotype. However, due to the lack of evidence in the literature, we would recommend TIVA for patients with EDMD if general anaesthesia is required.

  17. Cardiac MRI in Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijkx, T.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is often used in athletes to image cardiac anatomy and function and is increasingly requested in the context of screening for pathology that can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD). In this thesis, patterns of cardiac adaptation to sports are investigated with C

  18. A plasma membrane-type Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase of 120 kilodaltons on the endoplasmic reticulum from carrot (Daucus carota) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, F.H.; Ratterman, D.M.; Sze, H. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Cytosolic Ca[sup 2+] levels are regulated in part by Ca[sup 2+]-pumping ATPases that export Ca[sup 2+] from the cytoplasm; The types and properties of Ca[sup 2+] pumps in plants are not well understood. The kinetic properties of a 120-kD phosphoenzyme (PE) intermediate formed during the reaction cycle of a Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase from suspension-cultured carrot (Daucus carota) cells are characterized. Only one Ca[sup 2+]-dependent phosphoprotein was formed when carrot membrane vesicles were incubated with [[gamma]-[sup 32]P]ATP. Formation of this 120-kD phosphoprotein was inhibited by vanadate, enhanced by La[sup 3+], and decreased by hydroxylamine, confirming its identification as an intermediate of a phosphorylated-type Ca[sup 2+]-translocating ATPase. The 120-kD Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase was most abundant in endoplasmic reticulum-enriched fractions, in which the Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase was estimated to be 0.1% of membrane protein. Direct quantitation of Ca[sup 2+]-dependent phosphoprotein was used to examine the kinetics of PE formation. PE formation exhibited a K[sub m] for Ca[sup 2+] of 1 to 2 [mu]m and a K[sub m] for ATP of 67 nm. Relative affinities of substrates, determined by competition experiments, were 0.075 [mu]m for ATP, 1 [mu]m for ADP, 100 [mu]m for ITP, and 250 [mu]m for GTP. Thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid, specific inhibitors of animal sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase, had no effect on PE formation; erythrosin B inhibited with 50% inhibition at <0.1 [mu]m. Calmodulin (1 [mu]m) stimulated PE formation by 25%. The results indicate that the carrot 120-kD Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase is similar but not identical to animal plasma membrane-type Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase and yet is located on endomembranes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum. This type of Ca[sup 2+] pump may reside on the cortical endoplasmic reticulum, thought to play a major role in anchoring the cytoskeleton and in facilitating secretion. 34 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Activation of autophagy by unfolded proteins during endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Srivastava, Renu; Howell, Stephen H; Bassham, Diane C

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress is defined as the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, and is caused by conditions such as heat or agents that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress, including tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Autophagy, a major pathway for degradation of macromolecules in the vacuole, is activated by these stress agents in a manner dependent on inositol-requiring enzyme 1b (IRE1b), and delivers endoplasmic reticulum fragments to the vacuole for degradation. In this study, we examined the mechanism for activation of autophagy during endoplasmic reticulum stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. The chemical chaperones sodium 4-phenylbutyrate and tauroursodeoxycholic acid were found to reduce tunicamycin- or dithiothreitol-induced autophagy, but not autophagy caused by unrelated stresses. Similarly, over-expression of BINDING IMMUNOGLOBULIN PROTEIN (BIP), encoding a heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) molecular chaperone, reduced autophagy. Autophagy activated by heat stress was also found to be partially dependent on IRE1b and to be inhibited by sodium 4-phenylbutyrate, suggesting that heat-induced autophagy is due to accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression in Arabidopsis of the misfolded protein mimics zeolin or a mutated form of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY*) also induced autophagy in an IRE1b-dependent manner. Moreover, zeolin and CPY* partially co-localized with the autophagic body marker GFP-ATG8e, indicating delivery to the vacuole by autophagy. We conclude that accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum is a trigger for autophagy under conditions that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:26616142

  20. Presenilins Are Enriched in Endoplasmic Reticulum Membranes Associated with Mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Area-Gomez, Estela; de Groof, Ad J. C.; Boldogh, Istvan; Bird, Thomas D.; Gibson, Gary E.; Koehler, Carla M.; Yu, Wai Haung; Duff, Karen E.; Yaffe, Michael P.; Liza A Pon; Schon, Eric A.

    2009-01-01

    Presenilin-1 (PS1) and -2 (PS2), which when mutated cause familial Alzheimer disease, have been localized to numerous compartments of the cell, including the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, nuclear envelope, endosomes, lysosomes, the plasma membrane, and mitochondria. Using three complementary approaches, subcellular fractionation, γ-secretase activity assays, and immunocytochemistry, we show that presenilins are highly enriched in a subcompartment of the endoplasmic reticulum that is associate...

  1. Teaching Calcium-Induced Calcium Release in Cardiomyocytes Using a Classic Paper by Fabiato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Willmann

    2008-01-01

    This teaching paper utilizes the materials presented by Dr. Fabiato in his review article entitled "Calcium-induced release of calcium from the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum." In the review, supporting evidence of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is presented. Data concerning potential objections to the CICR theory are discussed as well. In…

  2. Shaping the endoplasmic reticulum in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencz, Csilla-Maria; Guigas, Gernot; Veres, Andreas; Neumann, Brigitte; Stemmann, Olaf; Weiss, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Organelles in eukaryotic cells often have complex shapes that deviate significantly from simple spheres. A prime example is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that forms an extensive network of membrane tubules in many mammalian cell types and in reconstitution assays in vitro. Despite the successful hunt for molecular determinants of ER shape we are still far from having a comprehensive understanding of ER network morphogenesis. Here, we have studied the hitherto neglected influence of the host substrate when reconstituting ER networks in vitro as compared to ER networks in vivo. In culture cells we observed cytoplasm-spanning ER networks with tubules being connected almost exclusively by three-way junctions and segment lengths being narrowly distributed around a mean length of about 1μm. In contrast, networks reconstituted from purified ER microsomes on flat glass or gel substrates of varying stiffness showed significantly broader length distributions with an up to fourfold larger mean length. Self-assembly of ER microsomes on small oil droplets, however, yielded networks that resembled more closely the native ER network of mammalian cells. We conclude from these observations that the ER microsomes' inherent self-assembly capacity is sufficient to support network formation with a native geometry if the influence of the host substrate's surface chemistry becomes negligible. We hypothesize that under these conditions the networks' preference for three-way junctions follows from creating 'starfish-shaped' vesicles when ER microsomes with a protein-induced spontaneous curvature undergo fusion. PMID:27287725

  3. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Ergin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, which results from different stimuli, is an important cellular event. There are different types of response to ER stress. One of them is evolutionarily conserved unfolded protein response (UPR. UPR has three sensors for further activation of molecules. These sensors are inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1, activated transcription factor 6 (ATF6, and ER-resident protein kinase RNA (PKR-like ER kinase (PERK. In the absence of ER stress, these sensors are maintained in an inactive state. However, under ER stress conditions, they became activated and induce the downstream targets. As a consequence of ER stress, the cell may stay alive or became dead. Several studies have shown that ER stress is associated with different types of diseases such as diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer’s disease, prion disease, and cancer. As a cancer type, it has been shown that pancreatic cancer is also associated with ER stress. Pancreatic cancer has a low cure potential with its late diagnosis. Its association with ER stress is seen as a new therapeutic approach. The aim of this is review is to provide an overview of the mechanisms of ER stress and its relationship with pancreatic cancer, one of the diseases in which ER stress affects pathogenesis.

  4. Glycoprotein Quality Control and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER supports many cellular processes and performs diverse functions, including protein synthesis, translocation across the membrane, integration into the membrane, folding, and posttranslational modifications including N-linked glycosylation; and regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis. In mammalian systems, the majority of proteins synthesized by the rough ER have N-linked glycans critical for protein maturation. The N-linked glycan is used as a quality control signal in the secretory protein pathway. A series of chaperones, folding enzymes, glucosidases, and carbohydrate transferases support glycoprotein synthesis and processing. Perturbation of ER-associated functions such as disturbed ER glycoprotein quality control, protein glycosylation and protein folding results in activation of an ER stress coping response. Collectively this ER stress coping response is termed the unfolded protein response (UPR, and occurs through the activation of complex cytoplasmic and nuclear signaling pathways. Cellular and ER homeostasis depends on balanced activity of the ER protein folding, quality control, and degradation pathways; as well as management of the ER stress coping response.

  5. The use of label-free mass spectrometry for relative quantification of sarcoplasmic proteins during the processing of dry-cured ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Marta; Mora, Leticia; Concepción Aristoy, M; Toldrá, Fidel

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify changes in the abundance of the major sarcoplasmic proteins throughout the ham dry-curing process by using a label-free mass spectrometry methodology based on the measurement of mass spectral peak intensities obtained from the extracted ion chromatogram. For this purpose, extraction of sarcoplasmic proteins was followed by trypsin digestion and analysis by nanoliquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (Q/TOF) for the identification and relative quantification of sarcoplasmic proteins through individual quantification of trypsinised peptides. In total, 20 proteins, including 12 glycolytic enzymes, were identified and quantified. The accuracy of the protocol was based on MS/MS replicates, and beta-lactoglobulin protein was used to normalise data and correct possible variations during sample preparation or LC-MS/MS analysis. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics provides precise identification and quantification of proteins in comparison with traditional methodologies based on gel electrophoresis, especially in the case of overlapping proteins. Moreover, the label-free approach used in this study proved to be a simple, fast, reliable method for evaluating proteolytic degradation of sarcoplasmic proteins during the processing of dry-cured ham. PMID:26593512

  6. Cardiac perception and cardiac control. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, D

    1977-12-01

    The evidence regarding specific cardiac perception and discrimination, and its relationship to voluntary cardiac control, is critically reviewed. Studies are considered in three sections, depending on the method used to assess cardiac perception: questionnaire assessment, discrimination procedures, and heartbeat tracking. The heartbeat tracking procedure would appear to suffer least from interpretative difficulties. Recommendations are made regarding the style of analysis used to assess heartbeat perception in such tracking tasks. PMID:348240

  7. Primary reticulum cell sarcoma of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seventeen cases of primary reticulum cell sarcoma of bone are presented. The disease may be seen at any age, usually occurs in the long or flat bones and, in spite of involving a given bone very extensively, usually leaves the patient in good general condition. Roentgenographically, the lesion is primarily destructive, often massive. In the early stages, diffuse medullary mottling may be the only sign. Later, the expansive tumor may give rise to fragmentation of the cortex and pathological fracture. Histologically, the tumor cells have round, oval, indented, or lobulated nuclei which are nearly twice the size of that of a lymphocyte. The chromatin is scattered and the cytoplasm is considerable in amount. In spite of its apparently malignant nature, the tumor is amenable to appropriate treatment, 13 of the 17 cases being alive from 6 months to 14 years from the initial symptom. Seven of these patients have been apparently free from disease 10 or more years. Five patients were treated by amputation alone. Of these, 2 are dead; 3 are alive from 3 to 11 years from onset. The authors have already referred to a possible explanation for the deaths in this group. Three patients were treated by radiation alone. Of these 1 is dead; 2 are alive from 1 to 3 years later, but in each there is still neoplastic disease. Of the 9 patients treated by amputation and radiation, 8 are alive from 6 months to 14 years from onset. From a consideration of the cases presented, the best procedure would appear to be early diagnosis by biopsy followed by immediate amputation and radiation

  8. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Harmeet; Kaufman, Randal J

    2011-04-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated upon the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that are sensed by the binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP)/glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78). The accumulation of unfolded proteins sequesters BiP so it dissociates from three ER-transmembrane transducers leading to their activation. These transducers are inositol requiring (IRE) 1α, PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), and activating transcription factor (ATF) 6α. PERK phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) resulting in global mRNA translation attenuation, and concurrently selectively increases the translation of several mRNAs, including the transcription factor ATF4, and its downstream target CHOP. IRE1α has kinase and endoribonuclease (RNase) activities. IRE1α autophosphorylation activates the RNase activity to splice XBP1 mRNA, to produce the active transcription factor sXBP1. IRE1α activation also recruits and activates the stress kinase JNK. ATF6α transits to the Golgi compartment where it is cleaved by intramembrane proteolysis to generate a soluble active transcription factor. These UPR pathways act in concert to increase ER content, expand the ER protein folding capacity, degrade misfolded proteins, and reduce the load of new proteins entering the ER. All of these are geared toward adaptation to resolve the protein folding defect. Faced with persistent ER stress, adaptation starts to fail and apoptosis occurs, possibly mediated through calcium perturbations, reactive oxygen species, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP. The UPR is activated in several liver diseases; including obesity associated fatty liver disease, viral hepatitis, and alcohol-induced liver injury, all of which are associated with steatosis, raising the possibility that ER stress-dependent alteration in lipid homeostasis is the mechanism that underlies the steatosis. Hepatocyte apoptosis is a pathogenic event in several liver

  10. Diffuse infiltrative cardiac tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the cardiac magnetic resonance images of an unusual form of cardiac tuberculosis. Nodular masses in a sheet-like distribution were seen to infiltrate the outer myocardium and pericardium along most of the cardiac chambers. The lesions showed significant resolution on antitubercular therapy

  11. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation and Lipid Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Julian; Huang, Edmond Y; Olzmann, James A

    2016-07-17

    The endoplasmic reticulum is the port of entry for proteins into the secretory pathway and the site of synthesis for several important lipids, including cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and phospholipids. Protein production within the endoplasmic reticulum is tightly regulated by a cohort of resident machinery that coordinates the folding, modification, and deployment of secreted and integral membrane proteins. Proteins failing to attain their native conformation are degraded through the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway via a series of tightly coupled steps: substrate recognition, dislocation, and ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal destruction. The same ERAD machinery also controls the flux through various metabolic pathways by coupling the turnover of metabolic enzymes to the levels of key metabolites. We review the current understanding and biological significance of ERAD-mediated regulation of lipid metabolism in mammalian cells. PMID:27296502

  12. The protein translocation machinery of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, P; Gilmore, R; Müller, M; Blobel, G

    1982-12-24

    The rough endoplasmic reticulum (r.e.r.) has been postulated to possess a single translation-coupled translocation system (in multiple copies) that effects signal sequence-mediated translocation of all secretory and lysosomal proteins and integration of all integral membrane proteins whose port of entry is the rough endoplasmic reticulum (G. Blobel 1980 Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 1496-1500). Two proteins have been isolated that are components of the r.e.r. translocation system. Their properties and function in protein translocation across and integration into membranes are discussed. PMID:6131460

  13. Cardiac tumours in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons Jonathan M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac tumours are benign or malignant neoplasms arising primarily in the inner lining, muscle layer, or the surrounding pericardium of the heart. They can be primary or metastatic. Primary cardiac tumours are rare in paediatric practice with a prevalence of 0.0017 to 0.28 in autopsy series. In contrast, the incidence of cardiac tumours during foetal life has been reported to be approximately 0.14%. The vast majority of primary cardiac tumours in children are benign, whilst approximately 10% are malignant. Secondary malignant tumours are 10–20 times more prevalent than primary malignant tumours. Rhabdomyoma is the most common cardiac tumour during foetal life and childhood. It accounts for more than 60% of all primary cardiac tumours. The frequency and type of cardiac tumours in adults differ from those in children with 75% being benign and 25% being malignant. Myxomas are the most common primary tumours in adults constituting 40% of benign tumours. Sarcomas make up 75% of malignant cardiac masses. Echocardiography, Computing Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of the heart are the main non-invasive diagnostic tools. Cardiac catheterisation is seldom necessary. Tumour biopsy with histological assessment remains the gold standard for confirmation of the diagnosis. Surgical resection of primary cardiac tumours should be considered to relieve symptoms and mechanical obstruction to blood flow. The outcome of surgical resection in symptomatic, non-myxomatous benign cardiac tumours is favourable. Patients with primary cardiac malignancies may benefit from palliative surgery but this approach should not be recommended for patients with metastatic cardiac tumours. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy may prolong survival. The prognosis for malignant primary cardiac tumours is generally extremely poor.

  14. Role of Mitochondrial Enzymes and Sarcoplasmic ATPase in Cardioprotection Mediated by Aqueous Extract of Desmodium gangeticum (L) DC Root on Ischemic Reperfusion Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kurian, G. A.; Paddikkala, J.

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigate the protective effect of aqueous root extract of Desmodium gangeticum in preserving mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic ATPase during ischemia reperfusion injury. The isolated rat hearts in both drug and control group were subjected to warm ischemia (37°), followed by reperfusion with the Langendorff perfusion system. The aqueous root extract of Desmodium gangeticum (L) at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight was found to be effective in the rat heart for the management of ...

  15. Close encounter: mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    De Strooper, Bart; Scorrano, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis is linked to loss of presenilins, components of γ-secretase. Presenilins are located at MAM, a membrane domain at the interface of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Presenilin loss alters ER–mitochondrial communication, linking it to AD pathogenesis.

  16. Stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eFinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration,a combination of these approaches couldameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation ofmultiple cell players.

  17. Primary structure and properties of helothermine, a peptide toxin that blocks ryanodine receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Morrissette, J; Krätzschmar, J.; Haendler, B; el-Hayek, R; Mochca-Morales, J; Martin, B M; Patel, J.R.; Moss, R.L.; Schleuning, W. D.; Coronado, R

    1995-01-01

    Helothermine, a protein from the venom of the Mexican beaded lizard (Heloderma horridum horridum), was found to inhibit [3H]ryanodine binding to cardiac and skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum, to block cardiac and skeletal ryanodine receptor channels incorporated into planar bilayers, and to block Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release triggered by photolysis of nitr-5 in saponin-permeabilized trabeculae from rat ventricle. Cloning of the helothermine cDNA revealed that the protein is composed of 223 amino...

  18. Limited effects of exogenous glucose during severe hypoxia and a lack of hypoxia-stimulated glucose uptake in isolated rainbow trout cardiac muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Tracy A.; DellaValle, Brian; Gesser, Hans;

    2013-01-01

    for aerobic preparations (1) paced at 0.5 or 1.1 Hz, (2) at 15 or 23°C, (3) receiving adrenergic stimulation or (4) during reoxygenation with or without adrenaline after severe hypoxia. Contractile responses to ryanodine, an inhibitor of Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, were also not...... affected by exogenous glucose. However, glucose did attenuate the fall in twitch force during severe hypoxia. Glucose uptake was assayed in non-contracting ventricle strips using 2-[(3)H] deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) under aerobic and hypoxic conditions, at different incubation temperatures and with different...... inhibitors. Based upon a lack of saturation of 2-DG uptake and incomplete inhibition of uptake by cytochalasin B and d-glucose, 2-DG uptake was mediated by a combination of facilitated transport and simple diffusion. Hypoxia stimulated lactate efflux sixfold to sevenfold with glucose present, but did not...

  19. Skeletal muscle myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein synthesis rates are affected differently by altitude-induced hypoxia in native lowlanders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Haslund, Mads Lyhne; Robach, Paul;

    2010-01-01

    and expired breath samples were collected hourly during the 4 hour trial and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained at 1 and 4 hours after tracer priming in the overnight fasted state. Myofibrillar protein synthesis rate was doubled; 0.041±0.018 at sea-level to 0.080±0.018%·hr(-1) (p0.05). Trends...... to increments in whole body protein kinetics were seen: Degradation rate elevated from 2.51±0.21 at sea level to 2.73±0.13 µmol·kg(-1)·min(-1) (p¿=¿0.05) at high altitude and synthesis rate similar; 2.24±0.20 at sea level and 2.43±0.13 µmol·kg(-1)·min(-1) (p>0.05) at altitude. We conclude that whole body amino...... acid flux is increased due to an elevated protein turnover rate. Resting skeletal muscle myocontractile protein synthesis rate was concomitantly elevated by high-altitude induced hypoxia, whereas the sarcoplasmic protein synthesis rate was unaffected by hypoxia. These changed responses may lead...

  20. Skeletal muscle myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein synthesis rates are affected differently by altitude-induced hypoxia in native lowlanders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Haslund, Mads Lyhne; Robach, Paul;

    2010-01-01

    and expired breath samples were collected hourly during the 4 hour trial and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained at 1 and 4 hours after tracer priming in the overnight fasted state. Myofibrillar protein synthesis rate was doubled; 0.041±0.018 at sea-level to 0.080±0.018%⋅hr(-1) (p... acclimatized to high altitude. The sarcoplasmic protein synthesis rate was in contrast unaffected by altitude exposure; 0.052±0.019 at sea-level to 0.059±0.010%⋅hr(-1) (p>0.05). Trends to increments in whole body protein kinetics were seen: Degradation rate elevated from 2.51±0.21 at sea level to 2.......73±0.13 µmol⋅kg(-1)⋅min(-1) (p = 0.05) at high altitude and synthesis rate similar; 2.24±0.20 at sea level and 2.43±0.13 µmol⋅kg(-1)⋅min(-1) (p>0.05) at altitude. We conclude that whole body amino acid flux is increased due to an elevated protein turnover rate. Resting skeletal muscle myocontractile protein...

  1. Preoperative cardiac risk management

    OpenAIRE

    Vidaković Radosav; Poldermans Don; Nešković Aleksandar N.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 100 million people undergo noncardiac surgery annually worldwide. It is estimated that around 3% of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery experience a major adverse cardiac event. Although cardiac events, like myocardial infarction, are major cause of perioperative morbidity or mortality, its true incidence is difficult to assess. The risk of perioperative cardiac complications depends mainly on two conditions: 1) identified risk factors, and 2) the type of the surgical p...

  2. Variable stars in large Magellanic cloud globular clusters. III. Reticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the third in a series of papers studying the variable stars in old globular clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The primary goal of this series is to look at how the characteristics and behavior of RR Lyrae stars in Oosterhoff-intermediate systems compare to those of their counterparts in Oosterhoff-I/II systems. In this paper we present the results of our new time-series BVI photometric study of the globular cluster Reticulum. We found a total of 32 variables stars (22 RRab, 4 RRc, and 6 RRd stars) in our field of view. We present photometric parameters and light curves for these stars. We also present physical properties, derived from Fourier analysis of light curves, for some of the RR Lyrae stars. We discuss the Oosterhoff classification of Reticulum and use our results to re-derive the distance modulus and age of the cluster.

  3. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skagen, Peter Storgaard; Horn, T; Kruse, H A;

    2011-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) fragments, cartilage and blood from four patients were used for morphological and molecular analysis. Controls included articular cartilage and blood samples from healthy individuals. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed abnormalities in...... chondrocytes and extracellular matrix of cartilage from OCD patients. Abnormal type II collagen heterofibrils in "bundles" and chondrocytes with abnormal accumulation of matrix proteins in distended rough endoplasmic reticulum were typical findings. Further, Von Kossa staining and TEM showed empty lacunae...... polymorphism was found within the COL2A1 gene for one patient. We suggest that OCD lesions are caused by an alteration in chondrocyte matrix synthesis causing an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease phenotype, which disturbs or abrupts endochondral ossification....

  4. Variable Stars in Large Magellanic Cloud Globular Clusters III: Reticulum

    CERN Document Server

    Kuehn, Charles A; Smith, Horace A; Catelan, Márcio; Jeon, Young-Beom; Nemec, James M; Walker, Alistair R; Kunder, Andrea; Pritzl, Barton J; De Lee, Nathan; Borissova, Jura

    2013-01-01

    This is the third in a series of papers studying the variable stars in old globular clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The primary goal of this series is to look at how the characteristics and behavior of RR Lyrae stars in Oosterhoff-intermediate systems compare to those of their counterparts in Oosterhoff-I/II systems. In this paper we present the results of our new time-series BVI photometric study of the globular cluster Reticulum. We found a total of 32 variables stars (22 RRab, 4 RRc, and 6 RRd stars) in our field of view. We present photometric parameters and light curves for these stars. We also present physical properties, derived from Fourier analysis of light curves, for some of the RR Lyrae stars. We discuss the Oosterhoff classification of Reticulum and use our results to re-derive the distance modulus and age of the cluster.

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in mouse decidua during early pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiao-Wei; Yan, Jia-Qi; Dou, Hai-Ting; Liu, Jie; Liu, Li; Zhao, Meng-Long; Liang, Xiao-Huan; Yang, Zeng-Ming

    2016-10-15

    Unfolded or misfolded protein accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen leads to endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress). Although it is known that ER stress is crucial for mammalian reproduction, little is known about its physiological significance and underlying mechanism during decidualization. Here we show that Ire-Xbp1 signal transduction pathway of unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in decidual cells. The process of decidualization is compromised by ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid sodium (TUDCA) and Ire specific inhibitor STF-083010 both in vivo and in vitro. A high concentration of ER stress inducer tunicamycin (TM) suppresses stromal cells proliferation and decidualization, while a lower concentration is beneficial. We further show that ER stress induces DNA damage and polyploidization in stromal cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that the GRP78/Ire1/Xbp1 signaling pathway of ER stress-UPR is activated and involved in mouse decidualization. PMID:27283502

  6. Blunt cardiac rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T D; Flynn, T C; Rowlands, B J; Ward, R E; Fischer, R P

    1984-04-01

    Blunt injury to the heart ranges from contusion to disruption. This report comprises 14 patients seen during a 6-year period with cardiac rupture secondary to blunt trauma. Eight patients were injured in automobile accidents, two patients were injured in auto-pedestrian accidents, two were kicked in the chest by ungulates, and two sustained falls. Cardiac tamponade was suspected in ten patients. Five patients presented with prehospital cardiac arrest or arrested shortly after arrival. All underwent emergency department thoracotomy without survival. Two patients expired in the operating room during attempted cardiac repair; both had significant extracardiac injury. Seven patients survived, three had right atrial injuries, three had right ventricular injuries, and one had a left atrial injury. Cardiopulmonary bypass was not required for repair of the surviving patients. There were no significant complications from the cardiac repair. The history of significant force dispersed over a relatively small area of the precordium as in a kicking injury from an animal or steering wheel impact should alert the physician to possible cardiac rupture. Cardiac rupture should be considered in patients who present with signs of cardiac tamponade or persistent thoracic bleeding after blunt trauma. PMID:6708151

  7. Dithiothreitol and the translocation of preprolactin across mammalian endoplasmic reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    The translocation mode of preprolactin (pPL) across mammalian endoplasmic reticulum was reinvestigated in light of recent findings that nascent secretory polypeptides synthesized in the presence of a highly reducing environment could be translocated posttranslationally and independently of their attachment to the ribosome (Maher, P. A., and S. J. Singer, 1986, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 83:9001-9005). The effects of the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) on pPL synthesis and translocation w...

  8. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skagen, Peter Storgaard; Horn, T; Kruse, H A;

    2011-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) fragments, cartilage and blood from four patients were used for morphological and molecular analysis. Controls included articular cartilage and blood samples from healthy individuals. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed abnormalities ...... polymorphism was found within the COL2A1 gene for one patient. We suggest that OCD lesions are caused by an alteration in chondrocyte matrix synthesis causing an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease phenotype, which disturbs or abrupts endochondral ossification....

  9. Fluvoxamine Attenuated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Leptin Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Hosoi, Toru; Miyahara, Tsuyoshi; Kayano, Takaaki; Yokoyama, Shota; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) is involved in the development of metabolic syndrome. However, pharmacological treatments targeting ER stress are not well understood. In the present study, we found that fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor used for depression, can attenuate ER stress-induced “leptin resistance,” i.e., insensitivity to the anti-obesity hormone leptin. Treatment with tunicamycin, an ER stress-inducing reagent, caused ...

  10. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Protein Quality Control in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Jianming eLi; Yidan eLiu

    2014-01-01

    A correct three-dimensional structure is crucial for the physiological functions of a protein, yet the folding of proteins to acquire native conformation is a fundamentally error-prone process. Eukaryotic organisms have evolved a highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-mediated protein quality control (ERQC) mechanism to monitor folding processes of secretory and membrane proteins, allowing export of only correctly folded proteins to their physiological destinations, retaining incompletely/mis...

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum anchored heme-oxygenase 1 faces the cytosol

    OpenAIRE

    Gottlieb, Yehonatan; Truman, Marianna; Cohen, Lyora A.; Leichtmann-Bardoogo, Yael; Meyron-Holtz, Esther G.

    2012-01-01

    Heme-oxygenase 1 is an endoplasmic reticulum-anchored enzyme that breaks down heme into iron, carbon monoxide and biliverdin. Heme is a hydrophobic co-factor in many proteins, including hemoglobin. Free heme is highly cytotoxic and, therefore, both heme synthesis and breakdown are tightly regulated. During turnover of heme proteins, heme is released in the phago-lysosomal compartment or the cytosol. The subcellular location of the heme-oxygenase 1 active site has not been clarified. Using con...

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in diethylnitrosamine-induced rat liver cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Bin; Cui, Li-Min; MA, DONG-JIE; LIU, SHUANG-PING; ZHANG, XUE-WU

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the significance of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) in the development of diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced liver cancer in rats, critical regulatory factors in ERS signaling pathways were investigated in the present study. The results showed that the expression of ERS-related proteins gradually increased in the early and mid-term stages of carcinogenesis, while in the later stages, the expression of these proteins did not change significantly after reaching a peak. ERS is involv...

  13. Acrolein Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Causes Airspace Enlargement

    OpenAIRE

    Kitaguchi, Yoshiaki; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute; Hanaoka, Masayuki; Natarajan, Ramesh; Kraskauskas, Donatas; Norbert F. Voelkel

    2012-01-01

    Background Given the relative abundance and toxic potential of acrolein in inhaled cigarette smoke, it is surprising how little is known about the pulmonary and systemic effects of acrolein. Here we test the hypothesis whether systemic administration of acrolein could cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and lung cell apoptosis, leading to the enlargement of the alveolar air spaces in rats. Methods Acute and chronic effects of intraperitoneally administered acrolein were tested. Mean alve...

  14. ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM STRESS AS A PRO-FIBROTIC STIUMULUS

    OpenAIRE

    Tanjore, Harikrishna; Lawson, William E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.

    2012-01-01

    Current evidence suggests a prominent role for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in fibrotic conditions affecting a number of internal organs, including the lungs, liver, GI tract, kidney, and heart. ER stress enhances the susceptibility of structural cells, in most cases the epithelium, to pro-fibrotic stimuli. Studies suggest that ER stress facilitates fibrotic remodeling through activation of pro-apoptotic pathways, induction of epithel...

  15. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Insulin Biosynthesis: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mi-Kyung Kim; Hye-Soon Kim; In-Kyu Lee; Keun-Gyu Park

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance and pancreatic beta cell dysfunction are major contributors to the pathogenesis of diabetes. Various conditions play a role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and are correlated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Pancreatic beta cells are susceptible to ER stress. Many studies have shown that increased ER stress induces pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and diabetes mellitus using genetic models of ER stress and by various stimuli. There are many re...

  16. Activation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response Following Trauma-Hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Jian, Bixi; Hsieh, Chi-Hsun; Chen, Jianguo; Choudhry, Mashkoor; Bland, Kirby; Chaudry, Irshad; Raju, Raghavan

    2008-01-01

    Hemorrhagic trauma leads to organ dysfunction, sepsis and death. There is abnormal production of proinflammatory cytokines by Kupffer cells, tissue hypoxia and liver injury following trauma-hemorrhage. The physiological conditions consequent to trauma-hemorrhage are consistent with factors necessary to initiate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response. However, the contribution of ER stress to apoptosis and liver injury after trauma-hemorrhage is not known. In the prese...

  17. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in drug-induced toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Foufelle, Fabienne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    International audience Drug-induced toxicity is a key issue for public health because some side effects can be severe and life-threatening. These adverse effects can also be a major concern for the pharmaceutical companies since significant toxicity can lead to the interruption of clinical trials, or the withdrawal of the incriminated drugs from the market. Recent studies suggested that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress could be an important event involved in drug liability, in addition to...

  18. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Namrata eChaudhari; Priti eTalwar; Avinash eParimisetty; Christian eLefebvre d'Hellencourt; Palaniyandi eRavanan

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse b...

  19. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhari, Namrata; Talwar, Priti; Parimisetty, Avinash; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Ravanan, Palaniyandi

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse b...

  20. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  1. Mathematical cardiac electrophysiology

    CERN Document Server

    Colli Franzone, Piero; Scacchi, Simone

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the main mathematical and numerical models in computational electrocardiology, ranging from microscopic membrane models of cardiac ionic channels to macroscopic bidomain, monodomain, eikonal models and cardiac source representations. These advanced multiscale and nonlinear models describe the cardiac bioelectrical activity from the cell level to the body surface and are employed in both the direct and inverse problems of electrocardiology. The book also covers advanced numerical techniques needed to efficiently carry out large-scale cardiac simulations, including time and space discretizations, decoupling and operator splitting techniques, parallel finite element solvers. These techniques are employed in 3D cardiac simulations illustrating the excitation mechanisms, the anisotropic effects on excitation and repolarization wavefronts, the morphology of electrograms in normal and pathological tissue and some reentry phenomena. The overall aim of the book is to present rigorously the mathematica...

  2. [Cardiac evaluation before non-cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzenbach, Jan; Boehm, Olaf

    2016-07-01

    Before non-cardiac surgery, evaluation of cardiac function is no frequent part of surgical treatment. European societies of anesthesiology and cardiology published consensus-guidelines in 2014 to present a reasonable approach for preoperative evaluation. This paper intends to differentiate the composite of perioperative risk and to display the guidelines methodical approach to handle it. Features to identify patients at risk from an ageing population with comorbidities, are the classification of surgical risk, functional capacity and risk indices. Application of diagnostic means, should be used adjusted to this risk estimation. Cardiac biomarkers are useful to discover risk of complications or mortality, that cannot be assessed by clinical signs. After preoperative optimization and perioperative cardiac protection, the observation of the postoperative period remains, to prohibit complications or even death. In consideration of limited resources of intensive care department, postoperative ward rounds beyond intensive care units are considered to be an appropriate instrument to avoid or recognize complications early to reduce postoperative mortality. PMID:27479258

  3. Inhibition of sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase increases caffeine- and halothane-induced contractures in muscle bundles of malignant hyperthermia susceptible and healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roewer Norbert

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant hyperthermia (MH is triggered by halogenated anaesthetics and depolarising muscle relaxants, leading to an uncontrolled hypermetabolic state of skeletal muscle. An uncontrolled sarcoplasmic Ca2+ release is mediated via the ryanodine receptor. A compensatory mechanism of increased sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase activity was described in pigs and in transfected cell lines. We hypothesized that inhibition of Ca2+ reuptake via the sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA enhances halothane- and caffeine-induced muscle contractures in MH susceptible more than in non-susceptible skeletal muscle. Methods With informed consent, surplus muscle bundles of 7 MHS (susceptible, 7 MHE (equivocal and 16 MHN (non-susceptible classified patients were mounted to an isometric force transducer, electrically stimulated, preloaded and equilibrated. Following 15 min incubation with cyclopiazonic acid (CPA 25 μM, the European MH standard in-vitro-contracture test protocol with caffeine (0.5; 1; 1.5; 2; 3; 4 mM and halothane (0.11; 0.22; 0.44; 0.66 mM was performed. Data as median and quartiles; Friedman- and Wilcoxon-test for differences with and without CPA; p Results Initial length, weight, maximum twitch height, predrug resting tension and predrug twitch height of muscle bundles did not differ between groups. CPA increased halothane- and caffeine-induced contractures significantly. This increase was more pronounced in MHS and MHE than in MHN muscle bundles. Conclusion Inhibition of the SERCA activity by CPA enhances halothane- and caffeine-induced contractures especially in MHS and MHE skeletal muscle and may help for the diagnostic assignment of MH susceptibility. The status of SERCA activity may play a significant but so far unknown role in the genesis of malignant hyperthermia.

  4. Cardiac metabolism and arrhythmias

    OpenAIRE

    Barth, Andreas S.; Tomaselli, Gordon F.

    2009-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death remains a leading cause of mortality in the Western world, accounting for up to 20% of all deaths in the U.S.1, 2 The major causes of sudden cardiac death in adults age 35 and older are coronary artery disease (70–80%) and dilated cardiomyopathy (10–15%).3 At the molecular level, a wide variety of mechanisms contribute to arrhythmias that cause sudden cardiac death, ranging from genetic predisposition (rare mutations and common polymorphisms in ion channels and structural...

  5. [Cardiac Rehabilitation 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Andreas

    2015-11-25

    The goals of cardiac rehabilitation are (re-)conditioning and secondary prevention in patients with heart disease or an elevated cardiovascular risk profile. Rehabilitation is based on motivation through education, on adapted physical activity, instruction of relaxation techniques, psychological support and optimized medication. It is performed preferably in groups either in outpatient or inpatient settings. The Swiss working group on cardiac rehabilitation provides a network of institutions with regular quality auditing. Positive effects of rehabilitation programs on mortality and morbidity have been established by numerous studies. Although a majority of patients after cardiac surgery are being referred to rehabilitation, these services are notoriously underused after catheter procedures. PMID:26602848

  6. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Hochstrasser, Stefan; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The costs of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation are established and compared to the corresponding costs of usual care. The effect on health-related quality of life is analyzed. METHODS: An unprecedented and very detailed cost assessment was carried out, as no guidelines existed for...... uncertain and may be as high as euro 1.877. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is more costly than usual care, and the higher costs are not outweighed by a quality of life gain. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is, therefore, not cost-effective....

  7. Molecular Basis of Cardiac Myxomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Singhal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tumors are rare, and of these, primary cardiac tumors are even rarer. Metastatic cardiac tumors are about 100 times more common than the primary tumors. About 90% of primary cardiac tumors are benign, and of these the most common are cardiac myxomas. Approximately 12% of primary cardiac tumors are completely asymptomatic while others present with one or more signs and symptoms of the classical triad of hemodynamic changes due to intracardiac obstruction, embolism and nonspecific constitutional symptoms. Echocardiography is highly sensitive and specific in detecting cardiac tumors. Other helpful investigations are chest X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography scan. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for primary cardiac tumors and is usually associated with a good prognosis. This review article will focus on the general features of benign cardiac tumors with an emphasis on cardiac myxomas and their molecular basis.

  8. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator February 19, 2009 Halifax Health Medical Center, Daytona Beach, FL Welcome to Halifax Health Daytona Beach, Florida. Over the next hour you' ...

  9. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scan, or MUGA, which shows how well your heart is pumping blood. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which gives doctors detailed pictures of your heart. How is SCA treated? Sudden cardiac arrest should ...

  10. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Risk Factors & Prevention Heart Diseases & Disorders Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) SCA: Who's At Risk? Prevention of SCA What Causes SCA? SCA Awareness Atrial Flutter Heart Block Heart Failure Sick Sinus Syndrome Substances & Heart Rhythm Disorders Symptoms & ...

  11. Sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aranđelović Aleksandra Č.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death in an athlete is rare and tragic event. An athlete's death draws high public attention given that athletes are considered the healthiest category of society. The vast majority of sudden cardiac death in young athletes is due to congenital cardiac malformations such as hypertrophie cardiomyopathy and various coronary artery anomalies. In athletes over age 35, the usual cause of sudden cardiac death is coronary artery disease. With each tragic death of a young athlete, there is a question why this tragedy has not been prevented. The American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association recommend that a pre-participation exam should include a complete cardiovascular history and physical examination.

  12. Cardiac Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to assess cardiac risk include: High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) : Studies have shown that measuring ... LDL-C but does not respond to typical strategies to lower LDL-C such as diet, exercise, ...

  13. Cardiac arrest - cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Basri Lenjani; Besnik Elshani; Nehat Baftiu; Kelmend Pallaska; Kadir Hyseni; Njazi Gashi; Nexhbedin Karemani; Ilaz Bunjaku; Taxhidin Zaimi; Arianit Jakupi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation(CPR) measures within the golden minutes inEurope.Methods:The material was taken from theUniversityClinical Center ofKosovo -EmergencyCentre inPristina, during the two(2) year period(2010-2011).The collected date belong to the patients with cardiac arrest have been recorded in the patients' log book protocol at the emergency clinic.Results:During the2010 to2011 in the emergency center of theCUCK inPristina have been treated a total of269 patients with cardiac arrest, of whom159 or59.1% have been treated in2010, and110 patients or40.9% in2011.Of the269 patients treated in the emergency centre,93 or34.6% have exited lethally in the emergency centre, and176 or 65.4% have been transferred to other clinics.In the total number of patients with cardiac arrest, males have dominated with186 cases, or69.1%.The average age of patients included in the survey was56.7 year oldSD±16.0 years.Of the269 patients with cardiac arrest, defibrillation has been applied for93 or34.6% of patients.In the outpatient settings defibrillation has been applied for3 or3.2% of patients.Patients were defibrillated with application of one to four shocks. Of27 cases with who have survived cardiac arrest, none of them have suffered cardiac arrest at home,3 or11.1% of them have suffered cardiac arrest on the street, and24 or88.9% of them have suffered cardiac arrest in the hospital.5 out of27 patients survived have ended with neurological impairment.Cardiac arrest cases were present during all days of the week, but frequently most reported cases have been onMonday with32.0% of cases, and onFriday with24.5% of cases. Conclusions:All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care(with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care) the rate of survival is higher.

  14. Awareness in cardiac anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Serfontein, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac surgery represents a sub-group of patients at significantly increased risk of intraoperative awareness. Relatively few recent publications have targeted the topic of awareness in this group. The aim of this review is to identify areas of awareness research that may equally be extrapolated to cardiac anesthesia in the attempt to increase understanding of the nature and significance of this scenario and how to reduce it.

  15. Safety in cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Siregar, S.

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of safety in cardiac surgery is a complex process, which involves many clinical, practical, methodological and statistical issues. The objective of this thesis was to measure and to compare safety in cardiac surgery in The Netherlands using the Netherlands Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (NVT) database. The safety of care is usually measured using patient outcomes. If outcomes are not available, the process and structure of care may be used. Outcomes should be adjusted ...

  16. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, Marthin; Held, Klaus; Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the rehabilitation measures provided for cardiac patients in Germany and to outline its legal basis and outcomes. In Germany the cardiac rehabilitation system is different from rehabilitation measures in other European countries. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany since 1885 is based on specific laws and the regulations of insurance providers. Cardiac rehabilitation has predominantly been offered as an inpatient service, but has recently been complemented by outpatient services. A general agreement on the different indications for offering these two services has yet to be reached. Cardiac rehabilitation is mainly offered after an acute cardiac event and bypass surgery. It is also indicated in severe heart failure and special cases of percutaneous coronary intervention. Most patients are men (>65%) and the age at which events occur is increasing. The benefits obtained during the 3-4 weeks after an acute event, and confirmed in numerous studies, are often later lost under 'usual care' conditions. Many attempts have been made by rehabilitation institutions to improve this deficit by providing intensive aftercare. One instrument set up to achieve this is the nationwide institution currently comprising more than 6000 heart groups with approximately 120000 outpatients. After coronary artery bypass grafting or acute coronary syndrome cardiac rehabilitation can usually be started within 10 days. The multidisciplinary rehabilitation team consists of cardiologists, psychologists, exercise therapists, social workers, nutritionists and nurses. The positive effects of cardiac rehabilitation are also important economically, for example, for the improvement of secondary prevention and vocational integration. PMID:17301623

  17. Ranolazine in Cardiac Arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Marwan; Mahmoud, Ahmed; Elgendy, Islam Y; Richard Conti, C

    2016-03-01

    Ranolazine utilization in the management of refractory angina has been established by multiple randomized clinical studies. However, there is growing evidence showing an evolving role in the field of cardiac arrhythmias. Multiple experimental and clinical studies have evaluated the role of ranolazine in prevention and management of atrial fibrillation, with ongoing studies on its role in ventricular arrhythmias. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacological, experimental, and clinical evidence behind ranolazine use in the management of various cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26459200

  18. Cardiac tumours in infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yadava, O.P.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac tumours in infancy are rare and are mostly benign with rhabdomyomas, fibromas and teratomas accounting for the majority. The presentation depends on size and location of the mass as they tend to cause cavity obstruction or arrhythmias. Most rhabdomyomas tend to regress spontaneously but fibromas and teratomas generally require surgical intervention for severe haemodynamic or arrhythmic complications. Other relatively rare cardiac tumours too are discussed along with an Indian perspect...

  19. Cardiac Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Long procedure time and somewhat suboptimal results hinder the widespread use of catheter ablation of complex arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF. Due to lack of contrast differentiation between the area of interest and surrounding structures in a moving organ like heart, there is a lack of proper intraprocedural guidance using current imaging techniques for ablation. Cardiac image registration is currently under investigation and is in clinical use for AF ablation. Cardiac image registration, which involves integration of two images in the context of left atrium (LA, is intermodal, with the acquired image and the real-time reference image residing in different image spaces, and involves optimization, where one image space is transformed into the other. Unlike rigid body registration, cardiac image registration is unique and challenging due to cardiac motion during the cardiac cycle and due to respiration. This review addresses the basic principles of the emerging technique of registration and the inherent limitations as they relate to cardiac imaging and registration.

  20. Cardiac Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasbir Sra

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Long procedure time and somewhat suboptimal results hinder the widespread use of catheter ablation of complex arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF. Due to lack of contrast differentiation between the area of interest and surrounding structures in a moving organ like heart, there is a lack of proper intraprocedural guidance using current imaging techniques for ablation. Cardiac image registration is currently under investigation and is in clinical use for AF ablation. Cardiac image registration, which involves integration of two images in the context of the left atrium (LA, is intermodal, with the acquired image and the real-time reference image residing in different image spaces, and involves optimization, where one image space is transformed into the other. Unlike rigid body registration, cardiac image registration is unique and challenging due to cardiac motion during the cardiac cycle and due to respiration. This review addresses the basic principles of the emerging technique of registration and the inherent limitations as they relate to cardiac imaging and registration.

  1. Proplatelet formation in megakaryocytes is associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Nobuhiro; Nakanishi, Keiko

    2016-07-01

    Although previous studies suggest that proplatelet formation in megakaryocytes involves caspase-3, the mechanism underlying the activation of caspase-3 is unknown. Here, we analyzed caspase activation in a human megakaryoblastic cell line, MEG-01, which forms proplatelets spontaneously. Specific activation of caspase-3 and caspase-4 was found in proplatelets. Consistent with previous observations of caspase-4 autoactivation in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, several ER stress marker proteins were expressed during proplatelet formation. A pharmacological ER stressor enhanced platelet production via proplatelet formation, whereas inhibition of caspase-4 caused suppression. These results suggest that ER stress is a mechanism underlying the maturation of megakaryocytes. PMID:27296088

  2. A luminal flavoprotein in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riemer, Jan; Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian; Johansson, Linda; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Ellgaard, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The quality control system of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) discriminates between native and nonnative proteins. The latter are degraded by the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. Whereas many cytosolic and membrane components of this system are known, only few luminal players have been...... identified. In this study, we characterize ERFAD (ER flavoprotein associated with degradation), an ER luminal flavoprotein that functions in ERAD. Upon knockdown of ERFAD, the degradation of the ERAD model substrate ribophorin 332 is delayed, and the overall level of polyubiquitinated cellular proteins is...

  3. Postoperative cardiac arrest due to cardiac surgery complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the role of anesthetists in the management of cardiac arrest occurring in association with cardiac anesthesia. In this retrospective study we studied the potential performances for each of the relevant incidents among 712 patients undergoing cardiac operations at Golestan and Naft Hospitals Ahwaz between November 2006 and July 2008. Out of total 712 patients undergoing cardiac surgery, cardiac arrest occurred in 28 cases (3.9%) due to different postoperative complications. This included massive bleeding (50% of cardiac arrest cases, 1.9% of patients); pulseless supra ventricular tachycardia (28.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 1.1% of patients); Heart Failure (7% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.2% of patients); Aorta Arc Rapture (3.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of patients); Tamponade due to pericardial effusion (3.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of total patients); Right Atrium Rupture (3.5% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of patients) were detected after cardiac surgery. Out of 28 cases 7 deaths occurred (25% of cardiac arrest cases, 0.1% of patients). The most prevalent reason for cardiac arrest during post operative phase was massive bleeding (50%) followed by pulseless supra ventricular tachycardia (28.5%). Six patients had some morbidity and the remaining 15 patients recovered. There are often multiple contributing factors to a cardiac arrest under cardiac anesthesia, as much a complete systematic assessment of the patient, equipment, and drugs should be completed. We also found that the diagnosis and management of cardiac arrest in association with cardiac anesthesia differs considerably from that encountered elsewhere. (author)

  4. Mechanism of fluorescence and conformational changes of the sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein of the sand worm Nereis diversicolor upon Ca2+ or Mg2+ binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillen, Alain; Verheyden, Stefan; Delfosse, Lotte; Braem, Tania; Robben, Johan; Volckaert, Guido; Engelborghs, Yves

    2003-09-01

    The calcium-binding protein isolated from the sarcoplasm of the muscles of the sand worm Nereis diversicolor has four EF-hands and three active binding sites for Ca(2+) or Mg(2+). Nereis diversicolor sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein contains three tryptophan residues at positions 4, 57, and 170, respectively. The Wt protein shows a very limited fluorescence increase upon binding of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+). Single-tryptophan-containing mutants were produced and purified. The fluorescence titrations of these mutants show a limited decrease of the affinity for calcium, but no alterations of the cooperativity. Upon adding calcium, Trp170 shows a strong fluorescence increase, Trp57 an extensive fluorescence decrease, and Trp4 shows no fluorescence change. Therefore mutant W4F/W170F is ideally suited to analyze the fluorescence titrations and to study the binding mechanism. Mutations of the calcium ligands at the z-position in the three binding sites show no effect at site I and a total loss of cooperativity at sites III and IV. The quenching of Trp57 upon calcium binding is dependent on the presence of arginine R25, but this residue is not just a simple dynamic quencher. The role of the salt bridge R25-D58 is also investigated. PMID:12944301

  5. [Involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress in solid organ transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallet, Nicolas; Bouvier, Nicolas; Beaune, Philippe; Legendre, Christophe; Anglicheau, Dany; Thervet, Eric

    2010-04-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a situation caused by the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, triggering an evolutionary conserved adaptive response termed the unfolded protein response. When adaptation fails, excessive and prolonged ER stress triggers cell suicide. Important roles for ER-initiated cell death pathways have been recognized for several diseases, including diabetes, hypoxia, ischemia/reperfusion injury, neurodegenerative and heart diseases. The implication of the ER stress is not well recognized in solid organ transplantation, but increasing evidence suggests its implication in mediating allograft injury. The purpose of this review is to summarize the mechanisms of ER stress and to discuss its implication during tissue injury in solid organ transplantation. The possible implications of the ER stress in the modifications of cell functional properties and phenotypic changes are also discussed beyond the scope of adaptation and cell death. Increasing the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of acute and chronic allograft damages could lead to the development of new biomarkers and to the discovery of new therapeutic strategies to prevent the initiation of graft dysfunction or to promote the tissue regeneration after injury. PMID:20412745

  6. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum crosstalk in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Giovanni; Kawamata, Hibiki

    2016-06-01

    Physical and functional interactions between mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are crucial for cell life. These two organelles are intimately connected and collaborate to essential processes, such as calcium homeostasis and phospholipid biosynthesis. The connections between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum occur through structures named mitochondria associated membranes (MAMs), which contain lipid rafts and a large number of proteins, many of which serve multiple functions at different cellular sites. Growing evidence strongly suggests that alterations of ER-mitochondria interactions are involved in neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a devastating and rapidly fatal motor neuron disease. Mutations in proteins that participate in ER-mitochondria interactions and MAM functions are increasingly being associated with genetic forms of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. This evidence strongly suggests that, rather than considering the two organelles separately, a better understanding of the disease process can derive from studying the alterations in their crosstalk. In this review we discuss normal and pathological ER-mitochondria interactions and the evidence that link them to ALS. PMID:26282323

  7. Ricin A chain reaches the endoplasmic reticulum after endocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricin is a potent ribosome inactivating protein and now has been widely used for synthesis of immunotoxins. To target ribosome in the mammalian cytosol, ricin must firstly retrograde transport from the endomembrane system to reach the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where the ricin A chain (RTA) is recognized by ER components that facilitate its membrane translocation to the cytosol. In the study, the fusion gene of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-RTA was expressed with the pET-28a (+) system in Escherichia coli under the control of a T7 promoter. The fusion protein showed a green fluorescence. The recombinant protein can be purified by metal chelated affinity chromatography on a column of NTA. The rabbit anti-GFP antibody can recognize the fusion protein of EGFP-RTA just like the EGFP protein. The cytotoxicity of EGFP-RTA and RTA was evaluated by the MTT assay in HeLa and HEP-G2 cells following fluid-phase endocytosis. The fusion protein had a similar cytotoxicity of RTA. After endocytosis, the subcellular location of the fusion protein can be observed with the laser scanning confocal microscopy and the immuno-gold labeling Electro Microscopy. This study provided important evidence by a visualized way to prove that RTA does reach the endoplasmic reticulum

  8. Molecular Characterization of Endoplasmic Reticulum Oxidoreductin 1 from Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minchul Seo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We isolated a complementary DNA (cDNA clone encoding endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1 (bERO1, a specific oxidant of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI from Bombyx mori. This protein has a putative open reading frame (ORF of 489 amino acids and a predicted size of 57.4 kDa. Although bERO1 protein shares less than 57% amino acid sequence homology with other reported ERO1s, it contains two conserved redox active motifs, a Cys-X-X-X-X-Cys motif of N-terminal and Cys-X-X-Cys-X-X-Cys motif of C-terminal. Both motifs are typically present in ERO1 protein family members. The bEro1 mRNA expression was highest in posterior silk gland on the sixth day of the 5th instar larvae. Expression of bEro1 mRNA also markedly increased during endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress induced by stimulation with antimycin, calcium ionophore A23187, dithiothreitol, H2O2, monencin, and tunicamycin. In addition, expression levels of bEro1 exactly coincided with that of bPdi. This is the first result suggesting that bERO1 plays an essential role in ER quality control through the combined activities of bERO1 and bPDI as a catalyst of protein folding in the ER and sustaining cellular redox homeostasis.

  9. Advances in the mechanisms of atherosclerosis vulnerable plague and endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Zhang; Ruo-Lan Huang; Ru Mo; Ling Wang; Xiao Chang; Mu-Juan Xu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:Ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease occupy the first two place of world health economic burden, atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque rupture as the common factor of these diseases, is thought to be a key target of ischemic cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease control. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is one of the classical pathway of cell apoptosis. More and more studies have indicated that the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway was involved in the development of atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In this paper, the three main signal pathways of endoplasmic reticulum stress, including Protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), Activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) and Inositol-requiring protein 1αα(IRE1α) were reviewed. The relationship between the risk factors of atherosclerosis (including hyperlipidemia, hypertension and hyperglycemia) and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and the relationship between major cellular components (macrophages, vascular endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells and vascular smooth muscle cells) of vulnerable plaque and endoplasmic reticulum stress were reviewed.

  10. Pediatric cardiac postoperative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auler Jr. José Otávio Costa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo, Medical School is a referral center for the treatment of congenital heart diseases of neonates and infants. In the recent years, the excellent surgical results obtained in our institution may be in part due to modern anesthetic care and to postoperative care based on well-structured protocols. The purpose of this article is to review unique aspects of neonate cardiovascular physiology, the impact of extracorporeal circulation on postoperative evolution, and the prescription for pharmacological support of acute cardiac dysfunction based on our cardiac unit protocols. The main causes of low cardiac output after surgical correction of heart congenital disease are reviewed, and methods of treatment and support are proposed as derived from the relevant literature and our protocols.

  11. Giant Cardiac Cavernous Hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Eric; Costic, Joseph; Laub, Glenn

    2015-07-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic giant cardiac cavernous hemangioma in a 71-year-old man. The intracardiac mass was discovered incidentally during surveillance for his prostate cancer; however, the patient initially declined intervention. On presentation to our institution 7 years later, the lesion had enlarged significantly, and the patient consented to excision. At surgery, an 8 × 6.5 × 4.8 cm intracardiac mass located on the inferior heart border was excised with an intact capsule through a median sternotomy approach. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. We discuss the diagnostic workup, treatment, and characteristics of this rare cardiac tumor. PMID:26140782

  12. Radiography in cardiology [cardiac disorders, cardiac insufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic procedure in cardiology nearly always requires an X-ray examination of the thorax. This examination is very informative when it is correctly performed and interpreted. The radiographs need to be read precisely and comprehensively: this includes the evaluation of the silhouette of the heart (size, form and position) as well as the examination of extra-cardiac thoracic structures allowing among other things to search for signs of cardiac insufficiency. The conclusion of the X-ray examination can be drawn after having brought together information concerning the case history, the clinical examination and the study of the radiographs. The radiologist finds himself in one of three situations: (1) the information provided by the X-ray pictures is characteristic of a disease and permits a diagnosis, (2) the X-ray pictures indicate a group of hypotheses; further complementary tests could be useful and (3) the X-ray pictures provide ambiguous even contradictory information; it is necessary to complete the radiological examination by other techniques such as an ultrasonographic study of the heart

  13. Serum myoglobin after cardiac catheterisation.

    OpenAIRE

    McComb, J. M.; McMaster, E A

    1982-01-01

    Study of 80 consecutive patients undergoing elective diagnostic cardiac catheterisation showed that after the procedure 25 (31%) developed myoglobinaemia. This was attributed to complications of the catheterisation in two. The remaining 23 had received premedication by intramuscular injection. In patients without intramuscular injections myoglobinaemia did not occur after uncomplicated cardiac catheterisation. The study did not support the proposition that cardiac catheterisation results in m...

  14. BAT3 guides misfolded glycoproteins out of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper H L Claessen

    Full Text Available Secretory and membrane proteins that fail to acquire their native conformation within the lumen of the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER are usually targeted for ubiquitin-dependent degradation by the proteasome. How partially folded polypeptides are kept from aggregation once ejected from the ER into the cytosol is not known. We show that BAT3, a cytosolic chaperone, is recruited to the site of dislocation through its interaction with Derlin2. Furthermore, we observe cytoplasmic BAT3 in a complex with a polypeptide that originates in the ER as a glycoprotein, an interaction that depends on the cytosolic disposition of both, visualized even in the absence of proteasomal inhibition. Cells depleted of BAT3 fail to degrade an established dislocation substrate. We thus implicate a cytosolic chaperone as an active participant in the dislocation of ER glycoproteins.

  15. Cytoprotective small molecule modulators of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Soumyabrata; Dahl, Russell

    2016-06-01

    Cellular health depends on the normal function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to fold, assemble, and modify critical proteins to maintain viability. When the ER cannot process proteins effectively, a condition known as ER stress ensues. When this stress is excessive or prolonged, cell death via apoptotic pathways is triggered. Interestingly, most major diseases have been shown to be intimately linked to ER stress, including diabetes, stroke, neurodegeneration, and many cancers. Thus, controlling ER stress presents a significant strategy for drug development for these diseases. The goal of this review is to present various small molecules that alleviate ER stress with the intention that they may serve as useful starting points for therapeutic agent development. PMID:27091069

  16. Plant transducers of the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response

    KAUST Repository

    Iwata, Yuji

    2012-12-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) activates a set of genes to overcome accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a condition termed ER stress, and constitutes an essential part of ER protein quality control that ensures efficient maturation of secretory and membrane proteins in eukaryotes. Recent studies on Arabidopsis and rice identified the signaling pathway in which the ER membrane-localized ribonuclease IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) catalyzes unconventional cytoplasmic splicing of mRNA, thereby producing the active transcription factor Arabidopsis bZIP60 (basic leucine zipper 60) and its ortholog in rice. Here we review recent findings identifying the molecular components of the plant UPR, including IRE1/bZIP60 and the membrane-bound transcription factors bZIP17 and bZIP28, and implicating its importance in several physiological phenomena such as pathogen response. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, Tony J; Robinson, Philip C; Haroon, Nigil

    2015-09-01

    There has been significant progress in our understanding of the pathogenesis of AS. The advent of genome-wide association studies has increased the known loci associated with AS to more than 40. The endoplasmic reticulum resident aminopeptidases (ERAP) 1 and 2 were identified in this manner and are of particular interest. There appears to be a genetic as well as a functional interaction of ERAP1 and 2 with HLA-B27 based on the known functions of these molecules. Recent studies on the structure, immunological effects and the peptide-trimming properties of ERAP 1 and 2 have helped to provide insight into their pathogenic potential in AS. In this review, we explore the role of ERAP 1 and 2 in the pathogenesis of AS. PMID:26070942

  18. Fluvoxamine attenuated endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced leptin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru eHosoi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress is involved in the development of metabolic syndrome. However, pharmacological treatments targeting ER stress are not well understood. In the present study, we found that fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor used for depression, can attenuate ER stress-induced leptin resistance, i.e. insensitivity to the anti-obesity hormone leptin. Treatment with tunicamycin, an ER stress-inducing reagent, caused cell death which was significantly inhibited by fluvoxamine. Leptin activates JAK2-STAT3 signaling. ER stress caused an impairment of leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation which was reversed by fluvoxamine. Fluvoxamine would be a novel leptin-sensitizing drug, which targets ER stress.

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Sensing in the Unfolded Protein Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Brooke M.; Pincus, David; Gotthardt, Katja; Gallagher, Ciara M.; Walter, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Secretory and transmembrane proteins enter the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as unfolded proteins and exit as either folded proteins in transit to their target organelles or as misfolded proteins targeted for degradation. The unfolded protein response (UPR) maintains the protein-folding homeostasis within the ER, ensuring that the protein-folding capacity of the ER meets the load of client proteins. Activation of the UPR depends on three ER stress sensor proteins, Ire1, PERK, and ATF6. Although the consequences of activation are well understood, how these sensors detect ER stress remains unclear. Recent evidence suggests that yeast Ire1 directly binds to unfolded proteins, which induces its oligomerization and activation. BiP dissociation from Ire1 regulates this oligomeric equilibrium, ultimately modulating Ire1’s sensitivity and duration of activation. The mechanistic principles of ER stress sensing are the focus of this review. PMID:23388626

  20. Human phospholamban null results in lethal dilated cardiomyopathy revealing a critical difference between mouse and human

    OpenAIRE

    Haghighi, Kobra; Kolokathis, Fotis; Pater, Luke; Lynch, Roy A.; Asahi, Michio; Gramolini, Anthony O.; Fan, Guo-Chang; Tsiapras, Dimitris; Hahn, Harvey S.; Adamopoulos, Stamatis; Liggett, Stephen B.; Dorn, Gerald W., II; MacLennan, David H.; Kremastinos, Dimitrios T.; Kranias, Evangelia G.

    2003-01-01

    In human disease and experimental animal models, depressed Ca2+ handling in failing cardiomyocytes is widely attributed to impaired sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function. In mice, disruption of the PLN gene encoding phospholamban (PLN) or expression of dominant-negative PLN mutants enhances SR and cardiac function, but effects of PLN mutations in humans are unknown. Here, a T116G point mutation, substituting a termination codon for Leu-39 (L39stop), was identified in two families with heredita...

  1. Gel-based phosphoproteomics analysis of sarcoplasmic proteins in postmortem porcine muscle with pH decline rate and time differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Honggang; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Karlsson, Anders H;

    2011-01-01

    Meat quality development is highly influenced by the pH decline caused by the postmortem (PM) glycolysis. Protein phosphorylation is an important mechanism in regulating the activity of glycometabolic enzymes. Here, a gel-based phosphoproteomic study was performed to analyze the protein...... phosphorylation in sarcoplasmic proteins from three groups of pigs with different pH decline rates from PM 1 to 24¿h. Globally, the fast pH decline group had the highest phosphorylation level at PM 1¿h, but lowest at 24¿h, whereas the slow pH decline group showed the reverse case. The same pattern was also...... observed in most individual bands in 1-DE. The protein phosphorylation levels of 12 bands were significantly affected by the synergy effects of pH and time (p...

  2. Hepato-cardiac disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasser; Mahrous; Fouad; Reem; Yehia

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationship between the liver and the heart is important for both hepatologists and cardiologists. Hepato-cardiac diseases can be classified into heart diseases affecting the liver, liver diseases affecting the heart, and conditions affecting the heart and the liver at the same time. Differential diagnoses of liver injury are extremely important in a cardiologist’s clinical practice calling for collaboration between cardiologists and hepatologists due to the many other diseases that can affect the liver and mimic haemodynamic injury. Acute and chronic heart failure may lead to acute ischemic hepatitis or chronic congestive hepatopathy. Treatment in these cases should be directed to the primary heart disease. In patients with advanced liver disease, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may develop including hemodynamic changes, diastolic and systolic dysfunctions, reduced cardiac performance and electrophysiological abnormalities. Cardiac evaluation is important for patients with liver diseases especially before and after liver transplantation. Liver transplantation may lead to the improvement of all cardiac changes and the reversal of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. There are systemic diseases that may affect both the liver and the heart concomitantly including congenital, metabolic and inflammatory diseases as well as alcoholism. This review highlights these hepatocardiac diseases

  3. Primary cardiac tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac tumors happen to be among the less known pathologies without clear treatment standards. Even one decade ago most of the cardiac tumor diagnosis were made post mortem, and only reports of isolated cases could be found in the literature, showing the lack of interest in the investigation of these pathologies by cardiology and cardiovascular surgery specialists. With the development of echocardiography and of cardiovascular surgery, more cases of primary and metastatic cardiac tumors have been diagnosed. Many cases have been treated by palliative or curative surgical interventions, thus increasing the reports in the world literature and the experience in this field, and pointing out the real incidence of these pathologies, not being as bizarre as it had been considered. a revision of the literature will be made, in which the frequency and the suggested interventions will be reported, as well as the cases of cardiac pathology in two cardiovascular centers of the country known by the author. The echocardiographic, pathologic and histological characteristics of the representative cases will be presented, without a greater evidence level, due to the problem's incidence and the few cases reported by these centers

  4. Cardiac MRI tagging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac MRI tagging is an original technique based upon the perturbation of the magnetization of determined regions of the myocardium (tags). The motion of the tags accurately reflects the deformation of the underlying tissue. Data analysis requires special techniques to reconstruct the 3D motion of the heart, and to evaluate the myocardial strain, locally and throughout the whole heart. (authors)

  5. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Over the next hour you'll see the implantation of an automated implantable cardiac defibrillator. The surgery ... evening we're going to be discussing the implantation of a defibrillator. It’s a battery-powered implantable ...

  6. Cardiac effects of vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jean-Sébastien; Dicken, Bryan; Bigam, David; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2014-07-01

    Vasopressin is an essential hormone involved in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. It has been in use therapeutically for many decades, with an emphasis on its vasoconstrictive and antidiuretic properties. However, this hormone has a ubiquitous influence and has specific effects on the heart. Although difficult to separate from its powerful vascular effects in the clinical setting, a better understanding of vasopressin's direct cardiac effects could lead to its more effective clinical use for a variety of shock states by maximizing its therapeutic benefit. The cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin are complex and require further elucidation. Complicating our understanding include the various receptors and secondary messengers involved in vasopressin's effects, which may lead to various results based on differing doses and varying environmental conditions. Thus, there have been contradictory reports on vasopressin's action on the coronary vasculature and on its effect on inotropy. However, beneficial results have been found and warrant further study to expand the potential therapeutic role of vasopressin. This review outlines the effect of vasopressin on the coronary vasculature, cardiac contractility, and on hypertrophy and cardioprotection. These cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin represent an interesting area for further study for potentially important therapeutic benefits. PMID:24621650

  7. Cardiac pacemaker power sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of chemical and radioisotope batteries used in cardiac pacemakers is presented. The battery systems are examined in terms of longevity, reliability, cost, size and shape, energy density, weight, internal resistance versus time, end-of-life voltage, chemical compatibility, and potential failure mechanisms

  8. [Cardiac amyloidosis. General review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laraki, R

    1994-04-01

    Cardiac amyloidosis, most often of AL type, is a non-exceptional disease as it represents 5 to 10% of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. It realizes typically a restrictive cardiomyopathy. Nevertheless the wide diversity of possible presentation makes it a "big shammer" which must be evoked in front of every unexplained cardiopathy after the age of forty. If some associated manifestations can rapidly suggest the diagnosis, as a peripheric neuropathy especially a carpal tunnel syndrome or palpebral ecchymosis, cardiac involvement can also evolve in an apparently isolated way. The most suggestive paraclinic elements for the diagnosis are, in one hand, the increased myocardial echogenicity with a "granular sparkling" appearance seen throughout all walls of the left ventricle and, in the other hand, the association of a thickened left ventricle and a low voltage (electrocardiogram could also show pseudo-infarct Q waves). In front of such aspects, the proof of amyloidosis is brought by an extra-cardiac biopsy or by scintigraphy with labelled serum amyloid P component, so that the indications of endomyocardial biopsy are very limited today. The identification of the amyloid nature of a cardiopathy has an direct therapeutic implication: it contra-indicates the use of digitalis, calcium channel blockers and beta-blockers. The treatment of AL amyloidosis (chemotherapy with alkylant agents) remains very unsatisfactory especially in the cardiac involvement which is the most frequent cause of death (in AL amyloidosis). Last, cardiac amyloidosis is a bad indication for transplantation which results are burden by rapid progression of deposits especially in the gastro-intestinal tract and the nervous system. PMID:8059146

  9. Cardiac surgery outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Linda S; Barnett, Scott D; Beachy, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Accrediting organizations and payers are demanding valid and reliable data that demonstrate the value of services. Federal agencies, healthcare industry groups, and healthcare watchdog groups are increasing the demand for public access to outcomes data. A new and growing outcomes dynamic is the information requested by prospective patients in an increasingly consumer-oriented business. Patients demand outcomes, and resources are developing to meet these demands. Physicians are increasingly confronted with requests for information about their mortality and morbidity rates, malpractice suits, and disciplinary actions received. For example, in Virginia, prospective patients have access to data provided by the nonprofit group Virginia Health Information. After numerous resolutions by the Virginia Senate since 1999, the prospective Virginia medical consumer now has access to several annual publications: Virginia Hospitals: A Consumer's Guide, 1999 Annual Report and Strategic Plan Update, and the 1999 Industry Report: Virginia Hospitals and Nursing Facilities. Consumers have access to cardiac outcomes data stratified by hospital, gender, and cardiac service line (cardiac surgery, noninvasive cardiology, and invasive cardiology). This is particularly relevant to IHI because Virginia Health Information specifically targets cardiac care. IHI has a sizable investment in cardiovascular outcomes and has found outcomes measurement and research are key to providing quality care. IHI's goal is to move from an outcomes management model to a disease management model. The hope is to incorporate all aspects of the patient's continuum of care, from preoperative and diagnostic services through cardiac interventions to postoperative rehabilitation. Furthermore, every step along the way will be supported with functional status and quality of life assessments. Although these goals are ambitious and expensive, the return on investment is high. PMID:14618772

  10. The overexpression of nuclear envelope protein Lap2β induces endoplasmic reticulum reorganisation via membrane stacking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina G. Volkova

    2012-06-01

    Some nuclear envelope proteins are localised to both the nuclear envelope and the endoplasmic reticulum; therefore, it seems plausible that even small amounts of these proteins can influence the organisation of the endoplasmic reticulum. A simple method to study the possible effects of nuclear envelope proteins on endoplasmic reticulum organisation is to analyze nuclear envelope protein overexpression. Here, we demonstrate that Lap2β overexpression can induce the formation of cytoplasmic vesicular structures derived from endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Correlative light and electron microscopy demonstrated that these vesicular structures were composed of a series of closely apposed membranes that were frequently arranged in a circular fashion. Although stacked endoplasmic reticulum cisternae were highly ordered, Lap2β could readily diffuse into and out of these structures into the surrounding reticulum. It appears that low-affinity interactions between cytoplasmic domains of Lap2β can reorganise reticular endoplasmic reticulum into stacked cisternae. Although the effect of one protein may be insignificant at low concentrations, the cumulative effect of many non-specialised proteins may be significant.

  11. Kinematics and chemistry of recently discovered Reticulum 2 and Horologium 1 dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Koposov, Sergey E; Belokurov, Vasily; Lewis, James R; Gilmore, Gerard; Worley, Clare; Hourihane, Anna; Bensby, T; Bragaglia, A; Bergemann, M; Carraro, G; Flaccomio, E; Heiter, U; Hill, V; Jofre, P; de Laverny, P; Monaco, L; Sbordone, L; Mikolaitis, S; Ryde, N

    2015-01-01

    Photometry alone is not sufficient to unambiguously distinguish between ultra-faint star clusters and dwarf galaxies because of their overlap in morphological properties. Here we report on VLT/GIRAFFE spectra of candidate member stars in two recently discovered ultra-faint satellites Reticulum 2 and Horologium 1, obtained as part of the ongoing Gaia-ESO Survey. We identify 18 members in Reticulum 2 and 5 in Horologium 1. We find Reticulum 2 to have a velocity dispersion of ~3.22 km/s, implying a M/L ratio of ~ 500. We have inferred stellar parameters for all candidates and we find Reticulum 2 to have a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -2.46+/-0.1, with an intrinsic dispersion of ~ 0.29, and is alpha-enhanced to the level of [alpha/Fe]~0.4. We conclude that Reticulum 2 is a dwarf galaxy. We also report on the serendipitous discovery of four stars in a previously unknown stellar substructure near Reticulum 2 with [Fe/H] ~ -2 and V_hel ~ 220 km/s, far from the systemic velocity of Reticulum 2. For Horologium 1 we in...

  12. Kinematics and Chemistry of Recently Discovered Reticulum 2 and Horologium 1 Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koposov, Sergey E.; Casey, Andrew R.; Belokurov, Vasily; Lewis, James R.; Gilmore, Gerard; Worley, Clare; Hourihane, Anna; Randich, S.; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Bergemann, M.; Carraro, G.; Costado, M. T.; Flaccomio, E.; Francois, P.; Heiter, U.; Hill, V.; Jofre, P.; Lando, C.; Lanzafame, A. C.; de Laverny, P.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Sbordone, L.; Mikolaitis, Š.; Ryde, N.

    2015-09-01

    We report on VLT/GIRAFFE spectra of stars in two recently discovered ultra-faint satellites, Reticulum 2 and Horologium 1, obtained as part of the Gaia-ESO Survey. We identify 18 members in Reticulum 2 and five in Horologium 1. We find Reticulum 2 to have a velocity dispersion of {3.22}-0.49+1.64 {km} {{{s}}}-1, implying a mass-to-light ratio (M/L) of ˜500. The mean metallicity of Reticulum 2 is [{Fe}/{{H}}]=-2.46, with an intrinsic dispersion of ˜0.3 dex and α-enhancement of ˜0.4 dex. We conclude that Reticulum 2 is a dwarf galaxy. We also report on the serendipitous discovery of four stars in a previously unknown stellar substructure near Reticulum 2 with [{Fe}/{{H}}]˜ -2 and {V}{hel}˜ 220 {km} {{{s}}}-1, far from the systemic velocity of Reticulum 2. For Horologium 1 we infer a velocity dispersion of σ ≤ft(V\\right)={4.9}-0.9+2.8 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and a M/L ratio of ˜600, leading us to conclude that Horologium 1 is also a dwarf galaxy. Horologium 1 is slightly more metal-poor than Reticulum 2 ([{Fe}/{{H}}]=-2.76) and is similarly α-enhanced: [α /{Fe}]˜ 0.3 {dex} with a significant spread of metallicities of 0.17 dex. The line-of-sight velocity of Reticulum 2 is offset by 100 km s-1 from the prediction of the orbital velocity of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), thus making its association with the Cloud uncertain. However, at the location of Horologium 1, both the backward-integrated orbit of the LMC and its halo are predicted to have radial velocities similar to that of the dwarf. Therefore, it is possible that Horologium 1 is or once was a member of the Magellanic family.

  13. Risk factors and the effect of cardiac resynchronization therapy on cardiac and non-cardiac mortality in MADIT-CRT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perkiomaki, Juha S; Ruwald, Anne-Christine; Kutyifa, Valentina;

    2015-01-01

    causes, 108 (63.9%) deemed cardiac, and 61 (36.1%) non-cardiac. In multivariate analysis, increased baseline creatinine was significantly associated with both cardiac and non-cardiac deaths [hazard ratio (HR) 2.97, P ...AIMS: To understand modes of death and factors associated with the risk for cardiac and non-cardiac deaths in patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (CRT-D) vs. implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy, which may help clarify...

  14. Kinematics and chemistry of recently discovered Reticulum 2 and Horologium 1 dwarf galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Koposov, S. E.; Casey, A. R.; Belokurov, V.; Lewis, J.R.; Gilmore, G.; Worley, C.; Hourihane, A.; Randich, S.; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Bergemann, M.; Carraro, G.; Costado, M. T.; Flaccomio, E.; Francois, P.

    2015-01-01

    Photometry alone is not sufficient to unambiguously distinguish between ultra-faint star clusters and dwarf galaxies because of their overlap in morphological properties. Here we report on VLT/GIRAFFE spectra of candidate member stars in two recently discovered ultra-faint satellites Reticulum 2 and Horologium 1, obtained as part of the ongoing Gaia-ESO Survey. We identify 18 members in Reticulum 2 and 5 in Horologium 1. We find Reticulum 2 to have a velocity dispersion of ~3.22 km/s, implyin...

  15. Cardiac fusion and complex congenital cardiac defects in thoracopagus twins: diagnostic value of cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Jun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Hye-Sung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Most thoracopagus twins present with cardiac fusion and associated congenital cardiac defects, and assessment of this anatomy is of critical importance in determining patient care and outcome. Cardiac CT with electrocardiographic triggering provides an accurate and quick morphological assessment of both intracardiac and extracardiac structures in newborns, making it the best imaging modality to assess thoracopagus twins during the neonatal period. In this case report, we highlight the diagnostic value of cardiac CT in thoracopagus twins with an interatrial channel and complex congenital cardiac defects. (orig.)

  16. Transitions of protein traffic from cardiac ER to junctional SR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleiman, Naama H; McFarland, Timothy P; Jones, Larry R; Cala, Steven E

    2015-04-01

    The junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (jSR) is an important and unique ER subdomain in the adult myocyte that concentrates resident proteins to regulate Ca(2+) release. To investigate cellular mechanisms for sorting and trafficking proteins to jSR, we overexpressed canine forms of junctin (JCT) or triadin (TRD) in adult rat cardiomyocytes. Protein accumulation over time was visualized by confocal fluorescence microscopy using species-specific antibodies. Newly synthesized JCTdog and TRDdog appeared by 12-24h as bright fluorescent puncta close to the nuclear surface, decreasing in intensity with increasing radial distance. With increasing time (24-48h), fluorescent puncta appeared at further radial distances from the nuclear surface, eventually populating jSR similar to steady-state patterns. CSQ2-DsRed, a form of CSQ that polymerizes ectopically in rough ER, prevented anterograde traffic of newly made TRDdog and JCTdog, demonstrating common pathways of intracellular trafficking as well as in situ binding to CSQ2 in juxtanuclear rough ER. Reversal of CSQ-DsRed interactions occurred when a form of TRDdog was used in which CSQ2-binding sites are removed ((del)TRD). With increasing levels of expression, CSQ2-DsRed revealed a novel smooth ER network that surrounds nuclei and connects the nuclear axis. TRDdog was retained in smooth ER by binding to CSQ2-DsRed, but escaped to populate jSR puncta. TRDdog and (del)TRD were therefore able to elucidate areas of ER-SR transition. High levels of CSQ2-DsRed in the ER led to loss of jSR puncta labeling, suggesting a plasticity of ER-SR transition sites. We propose a model of ER and SR protein traffic along microtubules, with prominent transverse/radial ER trafficking of JCT and TRD along Z-lines to populate jSR, and an abundant longitudinal/axial smooth ER between and encircling myonuclei, from which jSR proteins traffic. PMID:25640161

  17. Alcohol Dehydrogenase Protects against Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Myocardial Contractile Dysfunction via Attenuation of Oxidative Stress and Autophagy: Role of PTEN-Akt-mTOR Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaojiao Pang

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER plays an essential role in ensuring proper folding of the newly synthesized proteins. Aberrant ER homeostasis triggers ER stress and development of cardiovascular diseases. ADH is involved in catalyzing ethanol to acetaldehyde although its role in cardiovascular diseases other than ethanol metabolism still remains elusive. This study was designed to examine the impact of ADH on ER stress-induced cardiac anomalies and underlying mechanisms involved using cardiac-specific overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH.ADH and wild-type FVB mice were subjected to the ER stress inducer tunicamycin (1 mg/kg, i.p., for 48 hrs. Myocardial mechanical and intracellular Ca(2+ properties, ER stress, autophagy and associated cell signaling molecules were evaluated.ER stress compromised cardiac contractile function (evidenced as reduced fractional shortening, peak shortening, maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening, prolonged relengthening duration and impaired intracellular Ca(2+ homeostasis, oxidative stress and upregulated autophagy (increased LC3B, Atg5, Atg7 and p62, along with dephosphorylation of PTEN, Akt and mTOR, all of which were attenuated by ADH. In vitro study revealed that ER stress-induced cardiomyocyte anomaly was abrogated by ADH overexpression or autophagy inhibition using 3-MA. Interestingly, the beneficial effect of ADH was obliterated by autophagy induction, inhibition of Akt and mTOR. ER stress also promoted phosphorylation of the stress signaling ERK and JNK, the effect of which was unaffected by ADH transgene.Taken together, these findings suggested that ADH protects against ER stress-induced cardiac anomalies possibly via attenuation of oxidative stress and PTEN/Akt/mTOR pathway-regulated autophagy.

  18. Cardiac arrest in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tress Erika

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major advances in the field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA were made during the last decade, starting with the publication of pediatric Utstein guidelines, the 2005 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and culminating in multicenter collaborations. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of in-hospital and out-of-hospital CA are now well described. Four phases of CA are described and the term "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" has been proposed, along with treatment goals for each of its four phases: immediate post-arrest, early post-arrest, intermediate and recovery phase. Hypothermia is recommended to be considered as a therapy for post-CA syndrome in comatose patients after CA, and large multicenter prospective studies are underway. We reviewed landmark articles related to pediatric CA published during the last decade. We present the current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of CA relevant to pre-hospital and acute care health practitioners.

  19. Cardiac arrest in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tress, Erika E; Kochanek, Patrick M; Saladino, Richard A; Manole, Mioara D

    2010-07-01

    Major advances in the field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) were made during the last decade, starting with the publication of pediatric Utstein guidelines, the 2005 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and culminating in multicenter collaborations. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of in-hospital and out-of-hospital CA are now well described. Four phases of CA are described and the term "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" has been proposed, along with treatment goals for each of its four phases: immediate post-arrest, early post-arrest, intermediate and recovery phase. Hypothermia is recommended to be considered as a therapy for post-CA syndrome in comatose patients after CA, and large multicenter prospective studies are underway. We reviewed landmark articles related to pediatric CA published during the last decade. We present the current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of CA relevant to pre-hospital and acute care health practitioners. PMID:20930971

  20. Socially differentiated cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Larsen, Finn Breinholt;

    2012-01-01

    recruitment and participation among low educated and socially vulnerable patients must be addressed to lower inequality in post-MI health. Our aim was to improve referral, attendance, and adherence rates among socially vulnerable patients by systematic screening and by offering a socially differentiated...... standard rehabilitation programme (SRP). If patients were identified as socially vulnerable, they were offered an extended version of the rehabilitation programme (ERP). Excluded patients were offered home visits by a cardiac nurse. Concordance principles were used in the individualised programme elements......%. Patients were equally distributed to the SRP and the ERP. No inequality was found in attendance and adherence among referred patients. Conclusions: It seems possible to overcome unequal referral, attendance, and adherence in cardiac rehabilitation by organisation of systematic screening and social...

  1. Cardiac metastases of osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteosarcoma is a malignancy whose various sites of metastasis greatly modify its ultimate prognosis. We report a case of simultaneous pulmonary and cardiac metastases in a 41-year-old male patient with osteosarcoma of the tibia, presenting after more then one year of completion of adjuvant therapy with progressive dyspnea and cyanosis. Diagnosis was made on computerized tomogram and echocardiogram. The metastatic mass entirely occupying the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery proved fatal. (author)

  2. Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    MILICA RADISIC; GORDANA VUNJAK-NOVAKOVIC

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that clinically sized (1-5 mm thick),compact cardiac constructs containing physiologically high density of viable cells (~108 cells/cm3) can be engineered in vitro by using biomimetic culture systems capable of providing oxygen transport and electrical stimulation, designed to mimic those in native heart. This hypothesis was tested by culturing rat heart cells on polymer scaffolds, either with perfusion of culture medium (physiologic interstitial velocity, supplementation of p...

  3. Cardiac developmental toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Mahler, Gretchen J.; Jonathan T Butcher

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is a highly prevalent problem with mostly unknown origins. Many cases of CHD likely involve an environmental exposure coupled with genetic susceptibility, but practical and ethical considerations make nongenetic causes of CHD difficult to assess in humans. The development of the heart is highly conserved across all vertebrate species, making animal models an excellent option for screening potential cardiac teratogens. This review will discuss exposures known to cause ...

  4. Penetrating Cardiac Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZYAZICIOĞLU, Ahmet

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To present our experience of penetrating cardiac injuries treated at Atatürk University hospital; in 17 years 38 patients were analyzed. Methods: Patients were classified into three groups: group A (stable), 12; group B (shock), 21; and group C (agonal), five. Five patients were treated by pericardial window and three by pericardiocentesis. Two patients in group C, 19 patients in group B and five patients in group A underwent median sternotomy or thoracotomy in the operating room...

  5. Benign cardiac tumours: cardiac CT and MRI imaging appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Primary benign cardiac tumours are rarely found in clinical practice and are generally evaluated with echocardiography. However, with the increasing usage of helical multislice CT, the initial detection and evaluation of these masses may be made by the radiologist during routine daily practice for other indications. The echocardiographic, CT and cardiac MRI appearances of various benign cardiac tumours and masses are described and illustrated in this review

  6. Cardiac tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILICA RADISIC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that clinically sized (1-5 mm thick,compact cardiac constructs containing physiologically high density of viable cells (~108 cells/cm3 can be engineered in vitro by using biomimetic culture systems capable of providing oxygen transport and electrical stimulation, designed to mimic those in native heart. This hypothesis was tested by culturing rat heart cells on polymer scaffolds, either with perfusion of culture medium (physiologic interstitial velocity, supplementation of perfluorocarbons, or with electrical stimulation (continuous application of biphasic pulses, 2 ms, 5 V, 1 Hz. Tissue constructs cultured without perfusion or electrical stimulation served as controls. Medium perfusion and addition of perfluorocarbons resulted in compact, thick constructs containing physiologic density of viable, electromechanically coupled cells, in contrast to control constructs which had only a ~100 mm thick peripheral region with functionally connected cells. Electrical stimulation of cultured constructs resulted in markedly improved contractile properties, increased amounts of cardiac proteins, and remarkably well developed ultrastructure (similar to that of native heart as compared to non-stimulated controls. We discuss here the state of the art of cardiac tissue engineering, in light of the biomimetic approach that reproduces in vitro some of the conditions present during normal tissue development.

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in vertebrate mutant rhodopsin models of retinal degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Kroeger, H.; LaVail, MM; Lin, JH

    2014-01-01

    © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2014. Rhodopsin mutations cause many types of heritable retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Biochemical and in vitro studies have demonstrated that many RPlinked mutant rhodopsins produce misfolded rhodopsin proteins, which are prone to aggregation and retention within the endoplasmic reticulum, where they cause endoplasmic reticulum stress and activate the Unfolded Protein Response signaling pathways. Many vertebrate models of retinal degeneration have been crea...

  8. Relevance of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Cell Signaling in Liver Cold Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Emma Folch-Puy; Arnau Panisello; Joan Oliva; Alexandre Lopez; Carlos Castro Benítez; René Adam; Joan Roselló-Catafau

    2016-01-01

    International audience The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is involved in calcium homeostasis, protein folding and lipid biosynthesis. Perturbations in its normal functions lead to a condition called endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). This can be triggered by many physiopathological conditions such as alcoholic steatohepatitis, insulin resistance or ischemia-reperfusion injury. The cell reacts to ERS by initiating a defensive process known as the unfolded protein response (UPR), which comprise...

  9. Control of calcium transport in the myocardium by the cyclic AMP-Protein kinase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, A M; Tada, M; Kirchberger, M A

    1975-01-01

    At least three mechanical changes characterize the response of cardiac muscle to agents that enhance cyclic AMP production. In common with other inotropic interventions, tension is augmented and the rate of tension rise is increased. The third response, acceleration of the rate of relaxation, is characteristic of the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. These mechanical effects can be attributed to changes in (1) the amount of Ca2+ released during systole, (2) the rate of Ca2+ release at the onset of systole, and (3) the rate at which Ca2+ is reaccumulated by the sarcoplasmic reticulum at the end of systole. The ability of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinases to phosphorylate the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum in vitro parallels stimulation of both Ca2+ transport and Ca2+-activated ATPase. The phosphoprotein formed in the presence of cyclic AMP and protein kinase has the chemical characteristics of a phosphoester, contains mostly phosphoserine, and has an electrophoretic mobility in SDS polyacrylamide gels that corresponds to a protein of 22,000 daltons. This 22,000-dalton protein, tentatively named phospholamban, thus differs from the acyl phosphooprotein formed by the Ca2+-transport ATPase, which as an apparent molecular weight of 90,000 to 100,000 daltons. Phospholamban has not been found in fast skeletal muscle, nor is Ca2+ transport accelerated by cyclic AMP and protein kinase in sarcoplasmic reticulum from these muslces which do not respond to beta-adrenergic agonists with accelerated relaxation. It thus appears likely that phosphorylation of phospholamban correlates both with an increased rate of Ca2+ transport by cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum in vitro and accelerated relaxation in the intact myocardium. Preliminary findings are consistent with the view that phosphorylation of phospholamban may be related to other actions on Ca2+ fluxes brought about by agents which activate adenylate cyclase in the myocardium, but these interpretations must remain

  10. Indeterminacy of Spatiotemporal Cardiac Alternans

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in action potential duration (at the cellular level) or in ECG morphology (at the whole heart level), is a marker of ventricular fibrillation, a fatal heart rhythm that kills hundreds of thousands of people in the US each year. Investigating cardiac alternans may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias and eventually better algorithms for the prediction and prevention of such dreadful diseases. In paced cardiac tissue, alternans develops under increasingly shorter pacing period. Existing experimental and theoretical studies adopt the assumption that alternans in homogeneous cardiac tissue is exclusively determined by the pacing period. In contrast, we find that, when calcium-driven alternans develops in cardiac fibers, it may take different spatiotemporal patterns depending on the pacing history. Because there coexist multiple alternans solutions for a given pacing period, the alternans pattern on a fiber becomes unpredictable. Usin...

  11. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac p...... competent endocrine cells. The structurally related atrial natriuretic peptide will be mentioned where appropriate, whereas C-type natriuretic peptide will not be considered as a cardiac peptide of relevance in mammalian physiology....... characterized. An ongoing characterization of the molecular heterogeneity will help appreciate the biosynthetic capacity of the endocrine heart and could introduce new diagnostic possibilities. Notably, different biosynthetic products may not be equal markers of the same pathophysiological processes. An...... inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...

  12. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac...... inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...... competent endocrine cells. The structurally related atrial natriuretic peptide will be mentioned where appropriate, whereas C-type natriuretic peptide will not be considered as a cardiac peptide of relevance in mammalian physiology....

  13. An overview of cardiac morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Abdulla, Tariq; Summers, Ron; Houyel, Lucile

    2013-11-01

    Accurate knowledge of normal cardiac development is essential for properly understanding the morphogenesis of congenital cardiac malformations that represent the most common congenital anomaly in newborns. The heart is the first organ to function during embryonic development and is fully formed at 8 weeks of gestation. Recent studies stemming from molecular genetics have allowed specification of the role of cellular precursors in the field of heart development. In this article we review the different steps of heart development, focusing on the processes of alignment and septation. We also show, as often as possible, the links between abnormalities of cardiac development and the main congenital heart defects. The development of animal models has permitted the unraveling of many mechanisms that potentially lead to cardiac malformations. A next step towards a better knowledge of cardiac development could be multiscale cardiac modelling. PMID:24138816

  14. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition induces endoplasmic-reticulum-stress response in human colorectal tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Zeindl-Eberhart

    Full Text Available Tumor cells are stressed by unfavorable environmental conditions like hypoxia or starvation. Driven by the resulting cellular stress tumor cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Additionally, cellular stress is accompanied by endoplasmic reticulum-stress which induces an unfolded protein response. It is unknown if epithelial-mesenchymal transition and endoplasmic reticulum-stress are occurring as independent parallel events or if an interrelationship exists between both of them. Here, we show that in colorectal cancer cells endoplasmic reticulum-stress depends on the induction of ZEB-1, which is a main factor of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In the absence of ZEB-1 colorectal cancer cells cannot mount endoplasmic reticulum-stress as a reaction on cellular stress situations like hypoxia or starvation. Thus, our data suggest that there is a hierarchy in the development of cellular stress which starts with the presence of environmental stress that induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition which allows finally endoplasmic reticulum-stress. This finding highlights the central role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition during the process of tumorigenesis as epithelial-mesenchymal transition is also associated with chemoresistance and cancer stemness. Consequently, endoplasmic reticulum-stress might be a well suited target for chemotherapy of colorectal cancers.

  15. Aggregation and retention of human urokinase type plasminogen activator in the yeast endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smirnov Vladimir N

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secretion of recombinant proteins in yeast can be affected by their improper folding in the endoplasmic reticulum and subsequent elimination of the misfolded molecules via the endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation pathway. Recombinant proteins can also be degraded by the vacuolar protease complex. Human urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA is poorly secreted by yeast but the mechanisms interfering with its secretion are largely unknown. Results We show that in Hansenula polymorpha overexpression worsens uPA secretion and stimulates its intracellular aggregation. The absence of the Golgi modifications in accumulated uPA suggests that aggregation occurs within the endoplasmic reticulum. Deletion analysis has shown that the N-terminal domains were responsible for poor uPA secretion and propensity to aggregate. Mutation abolishing N-glycosylation decreased the efficiency of uPA secretion and increased its aggregation degree. Retention of uPA in the endoplasmic reticulum stimulates its aggregation. Conclusions The data obtained demonstrate that defect of uPA secretion in yeast is related to its retention in the endoplasmic reticulum. Accumulation of uPA within the endoplasmic reticulum disturbs its proper folding and leads to formation of high molecular weight aggregates.

  16. Direct observation of molecular arrays in the organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korkhov Vladimir M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tubules and sheets of endoplasmic reticulum perform different functions and undergo inter-conversion during different stages of the cell cycle. Tubules are stabilized by curvature inducing resident proteins, but little is known about the mechanisms of endoplasmic reticulum sheet stabilization. Tethering of endoplasmic reticulum membranes to the cytoskeleton or to each other has been proposed as a plausible way of sheet stabilization. Results Here, using fluorescence microscopy we show that the previously proposed mechanisms, such as membrane tethering via GFP-dimerization or coiled coil protein aggregation – do not explain the formation of the calnexin-induced organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum membrane stacks. We also show that the LINC complex proteins known to serve a tethering function in the nuclear envelope are excluded from endoplasmic reticulum stacks. Finally, using cryo-electron microscopy of vitreous sections methodology that preserves cellular architecture in a hydrated, native-like state, we show that the sheet stacks are highly regular and may contain ordered arrays of macromolecular complexes. Some of these complexes decorate the cytosolic surface of the membranes, whereas others appear to span the width of the cytosolic or luminal space between the stacked sheets. Conclusion Our results provide evidence in favour of the hypothesis of endoplasmic reticulum sheet stabilization by intermembrane tethering.

  17. The Endoplasmic Reticulum: A Social Network in Plant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Chen; Caitlin Doyle; Xingyun Qi; Huanquan Zheng

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an interconnected network comprised of ribosome-studded sheets and smooth tubules.The ER plays crucial roles in the biosynthesis and transport of proteins and lipids,and in calcium (Ca2+) regulation in compartmentalized eukaryotic cells including plant cells.To support its well-segregated functions,the shape of the ER undergoes notable changes in response to both developmental cues and outside influences.In this review,we will discuss recent findings on molecular mechanisms underlying the unique morphology and dynamics of the ER,and the importance of the interconnected ER network in cell polarity.In animal and yeast cells,two family proteins,the reticulons and DP1/Yop1,are required for shaping high-curvature ER tubules,while members of the atlastin family of dynamin-like GTPases are involved in the fusion of ER tubules to make an interconnected ER network.In plant cells,recent data also indicate that the reticulons are involved in shaping ER tubules,while RHD3,a plant member of the atlastin GTPases,is required for the generation of an interconnected ER network.We will also summarize the current knowledge on how the ER interacts with other membrane-bound organelles,with a focus on how the ER and Golgi interplay in plant cells.

  18. Terasaki Ramps in the Endoplasmic Reticulum: Structure, Function and Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Greg; Guven, Jemal; Valencia, Dulce-Maria

    2015-03-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has long been considered an exceedingly important and complex cellular organelle in eukaryotes (like you). It is a membrane structure, part folded lamellae, part tubular network, that both envelopes the nucleus and threads its way outward, all the way to the cell's periphery. Despite the elegant mechanics of bilayer membranes offered by the work of Helfrich and Canham, as far as the ER is concerned, theory has mostly sat on the sidelines. However, refined imaging of the ER has recently revealed beautiful and subtle geometrical forms - simple geometries, from the mathematical point of view - which some have called a ``parking garage for ribosomes.'' I'll review the discovery and physics of Terasaki ramps and discuss their relation to cell-biological questions, such as ER and nuclear-membrane re-organization during mitosis. Rather than being a footnote in a textbook on differential geometry, these structures suggest answers to a number of the ER's structure-function problems.

  19. Coordination of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Signaling During Maize Seed Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boston, Rebecca S.

    2010-11-20

    Seed storage reserves represent one of the most important sources of renewable fixed carbon and nitrogen found in nature. Seeds are well-adapted for diverting metabolic resources to synthesize storage proteins as well as enzymes and structural proteins needed for their transport and packaging into membrane bound storage protein bodies. Our underlying hypothesis is that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response provides the critical cellular control of metabolic flux required for optimal accumulation of storage reserves in seeds. This highly conserved response is a cellular mechanism to monitor the protein folding environment of the ER and restore homeostasis in the presence of unfolded or misfolded proteins. In seeds, deposition of storage proteins in protein bodies is a highly specialized process that takes place even in the presence of mutant proteins that no longer fold and package properly. The capacity of the ER to deposit these aberrant proteins in protein bodies during a period that extends several weeks provides an excellent model for deconvoluting the ER stress response of plants. We have focused in this project on the means by which the ER senses and responds to functional perturbations and the underlying intracellular communication that occurs among biosynthetic, trafficking and degradative pathways for proteins during seed development.

  20. Protein Bodies in Leaves Exchange Contents through the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberianfar, Reza; Sattarzadeh, Amirali; Joensuu, Jussi J.; Kohalmi, Susanne E.; Menassa, Rima

    2016-01-01

    Protein bodies (PBs) are organelles found in seeds whose main function is the storage of proteins that are used during germination for sustaining growth. PBs can also be induced to form in leaves when foreign proteins are produced at high levels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and when fused to one of three tags: Zera®, elastin-like polypeptides (ELP), or hydrophobin-I (HFBI). In this study, we investigate the differences between ELP, HFBI and Zera PB formation, packing, and communication. Our results confirm the ER origin of all three fusion-tag-induced PBs. We show that secretory pathway proteins can be sequestered into all types of PBs but with different patterns, and that different fusion tags can target a specific protein to different PBs. Zera PBs are mobile and dependent on actomyosin motility similar to ELP and HFBI PBs. We show in vivo trafficking of proteins between PBs using GFP photoconversion. We also show that protein trafficking between ELP or HFBI PBs is faster and proteins travel further when compared to Zera PBs. Our results indicate that fusion-tag-induced PBs do not represent terminally stored cytosolic organelles, but that they form in, and remain part of the ER, and dynamically communicate with each other via the ER. We hypothesize that the previously documented PB mobility along the actin cytoskeleton is associated with ER movement rather than independent streaming of detached organelles. PMID:27242885

  1. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Protein Quality Control in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming eLi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A correct three-dimensional structure is crucial for the physiological functions of a protein, yet the folding of proteins to acquire native conformation is a fundamentally error-prone process. Eukaryotic organisms have evolved a highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-mediated protein quality control (ERQC mechanism to monitor folding processes of secretory and membrane proteins, allowing export of only correctly folded proteins to their physiological destinations, retaining incompletely/mis-folded ones in the ER for additional folding attempts, marking and removing terminally-misfolded ones via a unique multiple-step degradation process known as ER-associate degradation (ERAD. Most of our current knowledge on ERQC and ERAD came from genetic and biochemical investigations in yeast and mammalian cells. Recent studies in the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana uncovered homologous components and similar mechanisms in plants for monitoring protein folding and for retaining, repairing, and removing misfolded proteins. These studies also revealed critical roles of the plant ERQC/ERAD systems in regulating important biochemical/physiological processes, such as abiotic stress tolerance and plant defense. In this review, we discuss our current understanding about the molecular components and biochemical mechanisms of the plant ERQC/ERAD system in comparison to yeast and mammalian systems.

  2. Hyperhomocysteinemia,endoplasmic reticulum stress,and alcoholic liver injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Ji; Neil Kaplowitz

    2004-01-01

    Deficiencies in vitamins or other factors (B6, B12, folic acid,betaine) and genetic disorders for the metabolism of the non-protein amino acid-homocysteine (Hcy) lead to hyperhomocysteinemia (Hhcy). Hhcy is an integral component of several disorders including cardiovascular disease, neurodegeneration, diabetes and alcoholic liver disease. Hhcy unleashes mediators of inflammation such as NFκB, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8, increases production of intracellular superoxide anion causing oxidative stress and reducing intracellular level of nitric oxide (NO), and induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress which can explain many processes of Hcy-promoted cell injury such as apoptosis,fat accumulation, and inflammation. Animal models have played an important role in determining the biological effects of Hhcy. ER stress may also be involved in other liver diseases such as α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT) deficiency and hepatitis C and/or B virus infection. Future research should evaluate the possible potentiative effects of alcohol and hepatic virus infection on ER stress-induced liver injury, study potentially beneficial effects of lowering Hcy and preventing ER stress in alcoholic humans,and examine polymorphism of Hcy metabolizing enzymes as potential risk-factors for the development of Hhcy and liver disease.

  3. Protein bodies in leaves exchange contents through the endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza eSaberianfar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein bodies (PBs are organelles found in seeds whose main function is the storage of proteins that are used during germination for sustaining growth. PBs can also be induced to form in leaves when foreign proteins are produced at high levels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and when fused to one of three tags: Zera®, elastin-like polypeptides (ELP, or hydrophobin-I (HFBI. In this study, we investigate the differences between ELP, HFBI and Zera PB formation, packing, and communication. Our results confirm the ER origin of all three fusion-tag-induced PBs. We show that secretory pathway proteins can be sequestered into all types of PBs but with different patterns, and that different fusion tags can target a specific protein to different PBs. Zera PBs are mobile and dependent on actomyosin motility similar to ELP and HFBI PBs. We show in vivo trafficking of proteins between PBs using GFP photoconversion. We also show that protein trafficking between ELP or HFBI PBs is faster and proteins travel further when compared to Zera PBs. Our results indicate that fusion-tag-induced PBs do not represent terminally stored cytosolic organelles, but that they form in, and remain part of the ER, and dynamically communicate with each other via the ER. We hypothesize that the previously documented PB mobility along the actin cytoskeleton is associated with ER movement rather than independent streaming of detached organelles.

  4. Proper symmetric and asymmetric endoplasmic reticulum partitioning requires astral microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Jeremy T; Schoborg, Todd A; Bergman, Zane J; Riggs, Blake; Rusan, Nasser M

    2015-08-01

    Mechanisms that regulate partitioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during cell division are largely unknown. Previous studies have mostly addressed ER partitioning in cultured cells, which may not recapitulate physiological processes that are critical in developing, intact tissues. We have addressed this by analysing ER partitioning in asymmetrically dividing stem cells, in which precise segregation of cellular components is essential for proper development and tissue architecture. We show that in Drosophila neural stem cells, called neuroblasts, the ER asymmetrically partitioned to centrosomes early in mitosis. This correlated closely with the asymmetric nucleation of astral microtubules (MTs) by centrosomes, suggesting that astral MT association may be required for ER partitioning by centrosomes. Consistent with this, the ER also associated with astral MTs in meiotic Drosophila spermatocytes and during syncytial embryonic divisions. Disruption of centrosomes in each of these cell types led to improper ER partitioning, demonstrating the critical role for centrosomes and associated astral MTs in this process. Importantly, we show that the ER also associated with astral MTs in cultured human cells, suggesting that this centrosome/astral MT-based partitioning mechanism is conserved across animal species. PMID:26289801

  5. Heme oxygenase-1 comes back to endoplasmic reticulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hong Pyo [School of Biological Sciences, Ulsan University (Korea, Republic of); Pae, Hyun-Ock [Department of Immunology, Wonkwang University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Back, Sung Hun; Chung, Su Wol [School of Biological Sciences, Ulsan University (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Je Moon [Department of Opthalmology, Ulasn University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Son, Yong [Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Wonkwang University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hun-Taeg, E-mail: chung@ulsan.ac.kr [School of Biological Sciences, Ulsan University (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Although multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. {yields} HO-1 expression at ER is induced by a diverse set of conditions that cause ER stressors. {yields} CO may induce HO-1 expression in human ECs by activating Nrf2 through PERK phosphorylation in a positive-feedback manner. {yields} ER-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress is discussed. -- Abstract: Originally identified as a rate-limiting enzyme for heme catabolism, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has expanded its roles in anti-inflammation, anti-apoptosis and anti-proliferation for the last decade. Regulation of protein activity by location is well appreciated. Even though multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. In this review we discuss the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress.

  6. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in drug-induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foufelle, Fabienne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Drug-induced toxicity is a key issue for public health because some side effects can be severe and life-threatening. These adverse effects can also be a major concern for the pharmaceutical companies since significant toxicity can lead to the interruption of clinical trials, or the withdrawal of the incriminated drugs from the market. Recent studies suggested that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress could be an important event involved in drug liability, in addition to other key mechanisms such as mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Indeed, drug-induced ER stress could lead to several deleterious effects within cells and tissues including accumulation of lipids, cell death, cytolysis, and inflammation. After recalling important information regarding drug-induced adverse reactions and ER stress in diverse pathophysiological situations, this review summarizes the main data pertaining to drug-induced ER stress and its potential involvement in different adverse effects. Drugs presented in this review are for instance acetaminophen (APAP), arsenic trioxide and other anticancer drugs, diclofenac, and different antiretroviral compounds. We also included data on tunicamycin (an antibiotic not used in human medicine because of its toxicity) and thapsigargin (a toxic compound of the Mediterranean plant Thapsia garganica) since both molecules are commonly used as prototypical toxins to induce ER stress in cellular and animal models. PMID:26977301

  7. Supramolecular architecture of endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Busnadiego, Rubén

    2016-04-15

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) forms membrane contact sites (MCS) with most other cellular organelles and the plasma membrane (PM). These ER-PM MCS, where the membranes of the ER and PM are closely apposed, were discovered in the early days of electron microscopy (EM), but only recently are we starting to understand their functional and structural diversity. ER-PM MCS are nowadays known to mediate excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) in striated muscle cells and to play crucial roles in Ca(2+)and lipid homoeostasis in all metazoan cells. A common feature across ER-PM MCS specialized in different functions is the preponderance of cooperative phenomena that result in the formation of large supramolecular assemblies. Therefore, characterizing the supramolecular architecture of ER-PM MCS is critical to understand their mechanisms of function. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) is a powerful EM technique uniquely positioned to address this issue, as it allows 3D imaging of fully hydrated, unstained cellular structures at molecular resolution. In this review I summarize our current structural knowledge on the molecular organization of ER-PM MCS and its functional implications, with special emphasis on the emerging contributions of cryo-ET. PMID:27068966

  8. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata eChaudhari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS. Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturb fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways has been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and others. In this review we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress and mitochondrial signaling events which further induce or exacerbate ER stress.

  9. Sudden Cardiac Death in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasfy, Meagan M; Hutter, Adolph M; Weiner, Rory B

    2016-01-01

    There are clear health benefits to exercise; even so, patients with cardiac conditions who engage in exercise and athletic competition may on rare occasion experience sudden cardiac death (SCD). This article reviews the epidemiology and common causes of SCD in specific athlete populations. There is ongoing debate about the optimal mechanism for SCD prevention, specifically regarding the inclusion of the ECG and/or cardiac imaging in routine preparticipation sports evaluation. This controversy and contemporary screening recommendations are also reviewed. PMID:27486488

  10. Cardiac Rehabilitation: Guidelines and Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Catherine Monpere

    1998-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation has been shown to improve exercise tolerance and symptomatology in patients experiencing angina or heart failure and reduce long term mortality after myocardial infarction, with a good cost-effectiveness ratio. In addition to these `hard' endpoints, cardiac rehabilitation improves the patient's quality of life and risk factor profile through a multifactorial intervention. Indeed, cardiac rehabilitation is no longer restricted to physical reconditioning, but should now b...

  11. Inhibition mechanism of the intracellular transporter Ca2+-pump from sarco-endoplasmic reticulum by the antitumor agent dimethyl-celecoxib.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Coca

    Full Text Available Dimethyl-celecoxib is a celecoxib analog that lacks the capacity as cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor and therefore the life-threatening effects but retains the antineoplastic properties. The action mechanism at the molecular level is unclear. Our in vitro assays using a sarcoplasmic reticulum preparation from rabbit skeletal muscle demonstrate that dimethyl-celecoxib inhibits Ca2+-ATPase activity and ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport in a concentration-dependent manner. Celecoxib was a more potent inhibitor of Ca2+-ATPase activity than dimethyl-celecoxib, as deduced from the half-maximum effect but dimethyl-celecoxib exhibited higher inhibition potency when Ca2+ transport was evaluated. Since Ca2+ transport was more sensitive to inhibition than Ca2+-ATPase activity the drugs under study caused Ca2+/Pi uncoupling. Dimethyl-celecoxib provoked greater uncoupling and the effect was dependent on drug concentration but independent of Ca2+-pump functioning. Dimethyl-celecoxib prevented Ca2+ binding by stabilizing the inactive Ca2+-free conformation of the pump. The effect on the kinetics of phosphoenzyme accumulation and the dependence of the phosphoenzyme level on dimethyl-celecoxib concentration were independent of whether or not the Ca2+-pump was exposed to the drug in the presence of Ca2+ before phosphorylation. This provided evidence of non-preferential interaction with the Ca2+-free conformation. Likewise, the decreased phosphoenzyme level in the presence of dimethyl-celecoxib that was partially relieved by increasing Ca2+ was consistent with the mentioned effect on Ca2+ binding. The kinetics of phosphoenzyme decomposition under turnover conditions was not altered by dimethyl-celecoxib. The dual effect of the drug involves Ca2+-pump inhibition and membrane permeabilization activity. The reported data can explain the cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects that have been attributed to the celecoxib analog. Ligand docking simulation predicts interaction of

  12. Diagnostic imaging of cardiac hypertrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As imaging techniques for cardiac hypertrophy, the ultrasonic dimension gauze technique, echocardiography, ventriculography and the RI technique including emission RI tomography were outlined. (Chiba, N.)

  13. Cardiac manifestations of myotonic dystrophy type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Helle; Vissing, John; Witting, Nanna; Bundgaard, Henning; Køber, Lars

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the degree of cardiac involvement regarding left ventricular ejection fraction, conduction abnormalities, arrhythmia, risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and the associations between cardiac involvement and cytosine-thymine-guanine (CTG)-repeat, neuromuscular involvement, age and gender...

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum redox state is not perturbed by pharmacological or pathological endoplasmic reticulum stress in live pancreatic β-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmgard Schuiki

    Full Text Available Accumulation of unfolded, misfolded and aggregated proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER causes ER stress. ER stress can result from physiological situations such as acute increases in secretory protein biosynthesis or pathological conditions that perturb ER homeostasis such as alterations in the ER redox state. Here we monitored ER redox together with transcriptional output of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR in INS-1 insulinoma cells stably expressing eroGFP (ER-redox-sensor and mCherry protein driven by a GRP78 promoter (UPR-sensor. Live cell imaging, flow cytometry and biochemical characterization were used to examine these parameters in response to various conditions known to induce ER stress. As expected, treatment of the cells with the reducing agent dithiothreitol caused a decrease in the oxidation state of the ER accompanied by an increase in XBP-1 splicing. Unexpectedly however, other treatments including tunicamycin, thapsigargin, DL-homocysteine, elevated free fatty acids or high glucose had essentially no influence on the ER redox state, despite inducing ER stress. Comparable results were obtained with dispersed rat islet cells expressing eroGFP. Thus, unlike in yeast cells, ER stress in pancreatic β-cells is not associated with a more reducing ER environment.

  15. CDIP1-BAP31 Complex Transduces Apoptotic Signals from Endoplasmic Reticulum to Mitochondria under Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takushi Namba

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Resolved endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response is essential for intracellular homeostatic balance, but unsettled ER stress can lead to apoptosis. Here, we show that a proapoptotic p53 target, CDIP1, acts as a key signal transducer of ER-stress-mediated apoptosis. We identify B-cell-receptor-associated protein 31 (BAP31 as an interacting partner of CDIP1. Upon ER stress, CDIP1 is induced and enhances an association with BAP31 at the ER membrane. We also show that CDIP1 binding to BAP31 is required for BAP31 cleavage upon ER stress and for BAP31-Bcl-2 association. The recruitment of Bcl-2 to the BAP31-CDIP1 complex, as well as CDIP1-dependent truncated Bid (tBid and caspase-8 activation, contributes to BAX oligomerization. Genetic knockout of CDIP1 in mice leads to impaired response to ER-stress-mediated apoptosis. Altogether, our data demonstrate that the CDIP1/BAP31-mediated regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway represents a mechanism for establishing an ER-mitochondrial crosstalk for ER-stress-mediated apoptosis signaling.

  16. Antifibrinolytics in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achal Dhir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery exerts a significant strain on the blood bank services and is a model example in which a multi-modal blood-conservation strategy is recommended. Significant bleeding during cardiac surgery, enough to cause re-exploration and/or blood transfusion, increases morbidity and mortality. Hyper-fibrinolysis is one of the important contributors to increased bleeding. This knowledge has led to the use of anti-fibrinolytic agents especially in procedures performed under cardiopulmonary bypass. Nothing has been more controversial in recent times than the aprotinin controversy. Since the withdrawal of aprotinin from the world market, the choice of antifibrinolytic agents has been limited to lysine analogues either tranexamic acid (TA or epsilon amino caproic acid (EACA. While proponents of aprotinin still argue against its non-availability. Health Canada has approved its use, albeit under very strict regulations. Antifibrinolytic agents are not without side effects and act like double-edged swords, the stronger the anti-fibrinolytic activity, the more serious the side effects. Aprotinin is the strongest in reducing blood loss, blood transfusion, and possibly, return to the operating room after cardiac surgery. EACA is the least effective, while TA is somewhere in between. Additionally, aprotinin has been implicated in increased mortality and maximum side effects. TA has been shown to increase seizure activity, whereas, EACA seems to have the least side effects. Apparently, these agents do not differentiate between pathological and physiological fibrinolysis and prevent all forms of fibrinolysis leading to possible thrombotic side effects. It would seem prudent to select the right agent knowing its risk-benefit profile for a given patient, under the given circumstances.

  17. Single ventricle cardiac defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single ventricle heart is defined as a rare cardiac abnormality with a single ventricle chamber involving diverse functional and physiological defects. Our case is of a ten month-old baby boy who died shortly after admission to the hospital due to vomiting and diarrhoea. Autopsy findings revealed cyanosis of finger nails and ears. Internal examination revealed; large heart, weighing 60 grams, single ventricle, without a septum and upper membranous part. Single ventricle is a rare pathology, hence, this paper aims to discuss this case from a medico-legal point of view. (author)

  18. Diverse roles of endoplasmic reticulum stress sensors in bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillich, Helena; Loose, Maria; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial infection often leads to cellular damage, primarily marked by loss of cellular integrity and cell death. However, in recent years, it is being increasingly recognized that, in individual cells, there are graded responses collectively termed cell-autonomous defense mechanisms that induce cellular processes designed to limit cell damage, enable repair, and eliminate bacteria. Many of these responses are triggered not by detection of a particular bacterial effector or ligand but rather by their effects on key cellular processes and changes in homeostasis induced by microbial effectors when recognized. These in turn lead to a decrease in essential cellular functions such as protein translation or mitochondrial respiration and the induction of innate immune responses that may be specific to the cellular deficit induced. These processes are often associated with specific cell compartments, e.g., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Under non-infection conditions, these systems are generally involved in sensing cellular stress and in inducing and orchestrating the subsequent cellular response. Thus, perturbations of ER homeostasis result in accumulation of unfolded proteins which are detected by ER stress sensors in order to restore the normal condition. The ER is also important during bacterial infection, and bacterial effectors that activate the ER stress sensors have been discovered. Increasing evidence now indicate that bacteria have evolved strategies to differentially activate different arms of ER stress sensors resulting in specific host cell response. In this review, we will describe the mechanisms used by bacteria to activate the ER stress sensors and discuss their role during infection. PMID:26883353

  19. Disulfide Mispairing During Proinsulin Folding in the Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haataja, Leena; Manickam, Nandini; Soliman, Ann; Tsai, Billy; Liu, Ming; Arvan, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Proinsulin folding within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) remains incompletely understood, but it is clear that in mutant INS gene-induced diabetes of youth (MIDY), progression of the (three) native disulfide bonds of proinsulin becomes derailed, causing insulin deficiency, β-cell ER stress, and onset of diabetes. Herein, we have undertaken a molecular dissection of proinsulin disulfide bond formation, using bioengineered proinsulins that can form only two (or even only one) of the native proinsulin disulfide bonds. In the absence of preexisting proinsulin disulfide pairing, Cys(B19)-Cys(A20) (a major determinant of ER stress response activation and proinsulin stability) preferentially initiates B-A chain disulfide bond formation, whereas Cys(B7)-Cys(A7) can initiate only under oxidizing conditions beyond that existing within the ER of β-cells. Interestingly, formation of these two "interchain" disulfide bonds demonstrates cooperativity, and together, they are sufficient to confer intracellular transport competence to proinsulin. The three most common proinsulin disulfide mispairings in the ER appear to involve Cys(A11)-Cys(A20), Cys(A7)-Cys(A20), and Cys(B19)-Cys(A11), each disrupting the critical Cys(B19)-Cys(A20) pairing. MIDY mutations inhibit Cys(B19)-Cys(A20) formation, but treatment to force oxidation of this disulfide bond improves folding and results in a small but detectable increase of proinsulin export. These data suggest possible therapeutic avenues to ameliorate ER stress and diabetes. PMID:26822090

  20. Transcriptional analysis implicates endoplasmic reticulum stress in bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Tang

    Full Text Available Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE is a fatal, transmissible, neurodegenerative disease of cattle. To date, the disease process is still poorly understood. In this study, brain tissue samples from animals naturally infected with BSE were analysed to identify differentially regulated genes using Affymetrix GeneChip Bovine Genome Arrays. A total of 230 genes were shown to be differentially regulated and many of these genes encode proteins involved in immune response, apoptosis, cell adhesion, stress response and transcription. Seventeen genes are associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and 10 of these 17 genes are involved in stress related responses including ER chaperones, Grp94 and Grp170. Western blotting analysis showed that another ER chaperone, Grp78, was up-regulated in BSE. Up-regulation of these three chaperones strongly suggests the presence of ER stress and the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR in BSE. The occurrence of ER stress was also supported by changes in gene expression for cytosolic proteins, such as the chaperone pair of Hsp70 and DnaJ. Many genes associated with the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and the autophagy-lysosome system were differentially regulated, indicating that both pathways might be activated in response to ER stress. A model is presented to explain the mechanisms of prion neurotoxicity using these ER stress related responses. Clustering analysis showed that the differently regulated genes found from the naturally infected BSE cases could be used to predict the infectious status of the samples experimentally infected with BSE from the previous study and vice versa. Proof-of-principle gene expression biomarkers were found to represent BSE using 10 genes with 94% sensitivity and 87% specificity.

  1. Full-length Ebola glycoprotein accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharyya Suchita

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Filoviridae family comprises of Ebola and Marburg viruses, which are known to cause lethal hemorrhagic fever. However, there is no effective anti-viral therapy or licensed vaccines currently available for these human pathogens. The envelope glycoprotein (GP of Ebola virus, which mediates entry into target cells, is cytotoxic and this effect maps to a highly glycosylated mucin-like region in the surface subunit of GP (GP1. However, the mechanism underlying this cytotoxic property of GP is unknown. To gain insight into the basis of this GP-induced cytotoxicity, HEK293T cells were transiently transfected with full-length and mucin-deleted (Δmucin Ebola GP plasmids and GP localization was examined relative to the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum (ER, Golgi, early and late endosomes using deconvolution fluorescent microscopy. Full-length Ebola GP was observed to accumulate in the ER. In contrast, GPΔmucin was uniformly expressed throughout the cell and did not localize in the ER. The Ebola major matrix protein VP40 was also co-expressed with GP to investigate its influence on GP localization. GP and VP40 co-expression did not alter GP localization to the ER. Also, when VP40 was co-expressed with the nucleoprotein (NP, it localized to the plasma membrane while NP accumulated in distinct cytoplasmic structures lined with vimentin. These latter structures are consistent with aggresomes and may serve as assembly sites for filoviral nucleocapsids. Collectively, these data suggest that full-length GP, but not GPΔmucin, accumulates in the ER in close proximity to the nuclear membrane, which may underscore its cytotoxic property.

  2. Topography of glycosylation reactions in the rough endoplasmic reticulum membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The translocation of UDP-glucose and GDP-mannose from an external to a luminal compartment has been examined in rat liver vesicles derived from the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). RER vesicles with the same topographical orientation as in vivo were incubated with a mixture of [3H]UDP-glucose and UDP-[14C]glucose to demonstrate that the intact sugar nucleotide was translocated into the lumen of the vesicles. The translocation of UDP-glucose was dependent on temperature and was saturable at high concentrations of the sugar nucleotide. The transfer of glucose to endogenous acceptors was dependent on the translocation of UDP-glucose into the lumen of the RER since leaky vesicles resulted in both a decrease in transport and transfer of glucose to endogenous acceptors. Preliminary results suggest that the mechanism of UDP-glucose transport into RER-derived vesicles is via a coupled exchange with luminal UMP. Using the same experimental approach to detect translocation of UDP-glucose into the lumen of RER vesicles, we were unable to detect transport of GDP-mannose. Incubation of leaky vesicles with GDP-mannose resulted in stimulation of the amount of mannose transferred to endogenous acceptors, in marked contrast to that observed for UDP-glucose and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. These results suggest that whereas UDP-glucose is translocated across the RER membrane in vitro, GDP-mannose is not transported. In addition, these results tentatively suggest that there is asymmetric synthesis of the lipid-linked oligosaccharides within the membrane of the RER

  3. Hypokalemia and sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Keld

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately three million people suffer sudden cardiac death annually. These deaths often emerge from a complex interplay of substrates and triggers. Disturbed potassium homeostasis among heart cells is an example of such a trigger. Thus, hypokalemia and, also, more transient...... of fatal arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death a patient is, the more attention should be given to the potassium homeostasis....

  4. Atrial tumors in cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool for the diagnosis of cardiac masses. Various cardiac tumors are predisposed to occurring in atrial structures. The aim of this review article is the description of atrial tumors and their morphological features in MRI. In general, cardiac tumors are rare: approximately 0.001-0.03% in autopsy studies. About 75% of them are benign. The most common cardiac tumor is the myxoma. They are predisposed to occur in the atria and show a characteristically strong hyperintense signal on T2-wieghted images in MRI. In other sequences a heterogeneous pattern reflects its variable histological appearance. Lipomas exhibit a signal behavior identical to fatty tissue with a typical passive movement in cine imaging. Fibroelastomas are the most common tumors of the cardiac valves. Consisting of avascular fibrous tissue, they often present with hypointense signal intensities. Thrombi attached to their surface can cause severe emboli even in small tumors. Amongst primary cardiac malignancies, sarcomas are most common and favor the atria. Secondary malignancies of the heart are far more common than primary ones (20-40 times). In case of known malignancies, approximately 10% of patients develop cardiac metastasis at the end of their disease. Lymphogenic metastases favor the pericardium, while hematogenic spread prefers the myocardium. Since they are not real atrial tumors, thrombi and anatomical structures of the atria have to be differentiated from other pathologies. (orig.)

  5. Cardiac arrest – cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within 10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care (with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care the rate of survival is higher.

  6. Brain Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Mechanistically Distinguishes the Saline-Intake and Hypertensive Response to DOCA-Salt

    OpenAIRE

    Jo, Fusakazu; Jo, Hiromi; Hilzendeger, Aline M.; Thompson, Anthony P.; Cassell, Martin D.; Rutkowski, D. Thomas; Davisson, Robin L.; Grobe, Justin L.; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress has become an important mechanism in hypertension. We examined the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in mediating the increased saline intake and hypertensive effects in response to DOCA-salt. Intracerebroventricular delivery of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-reducing chemical chaperone Tauroursodeoxycholic acid did not affect the magnitude of hypertension, but markedly decreased saline intake in response to DOCA-salt. Increased saline intake returned after T...

  7. Secretion of Endoplasmic Reticulum Aminopeptidase 1 Is Involved in the Activation of Macrophages Induced by Lipopolysaccharide and Interferon-γ*

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Yoshikuni; Ogawa, Kenji; Hattori, Akira; Tsujimoto, Masafumi

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) is a multifunctional enzyme with an important role in processing antigenic peptides presented to class I major histocompatibility complex in the endoplasmic reticulum. In this study, we found that endoplasmic reticulum-retained ERAP1 was secreted from macrophages in response to activation by treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon (IFN)-γ and enhanced their phagocytic activity. Enhancement of the phagocytic activity of murine macro...

  8. Pneumothorax in cardiac pacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard;

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To identify risk factors for pneumothorax treated with a chest tube after cardiac pacing device implantation in a population-based cohort.METHODS AND RESULTS: A nationwide cohort study was performed based on data on 28 860 patients from the Danish Pacemaker Register, which included all Danish...... patients who received their first pacemaker (PM) or cardiac resynchronization device from 1997 to 2008. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals for the association between risk factors and pneumothorax treated with a chest tube. The median...... age was 77 years (25th and 75th percentile: 69-84) and 55% were male (n = 15 785). A total of 190 patients (0.66%) were treated for pneumothorax, which was more often in women [aOR 1.9 (1.4-2.6)], and in patients with age >80 years [aOR 1.4 (1.0-1.9)], a prior history of chronic obstructive pulmonary...

  9. Leadership in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Christopher; Patel, Vanash; Ibrahim, Michael; Ahmed, Kamran; Wong, Kathie A; Darzi, Ara; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2011-06-01

    Despite the efficacy of cardiac surgery, less invasive interventions with more uncertain long-term outcomes are increasingly challenging surgery as first-line treatment for several congenital, degenerative and ischemic cardiac diseases. The specialty must evolve if it is to ensure its future relevance. More importantly, it must evolve to ensure that future patients have access to treatments with proven long-term effectiveness. This cannot be achieved without dynamic leadership; however, our contention is that this is not enough. The demands of a modern surgical career and the importance of the task at hand are such that the serendipitous emergence of traditional charismatic leadership cannot be relied upon to deliver necessary change. We advocate systematic analysis and strategic leadership at a local, national and international level in four key areas: Clinical Care, Research, Education and Training, and Stakeholder Engagement. While we anticipate that exceptional individuals will continue to shape the future of our specialty, the creation of robust structures to deliver collective leadership in these key areas is of paramount importance. PMID:20884217

  10. Cardiac chamber scintiscanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two methods of cardiac chamber scintiscanning, i.e. 'first pass' and 'ECG-triggered' examinations, are explained and compared. Two tables indicate the most significant radiation doses of the applied radio tracers, i.e. 99m-Tc-pertechnetate and 99m-Tc-HSA, to which a patient is exposed. These averaged values are calculated from various data given in specialised literature. On the basis of data given in literature, an effective half-life of approximately 5 hours in the intravascular space was calculated for the erythrocytes labelled with technetium 99m. On this basis, the radiation doses for the patients due to 99m-Tc-labelled erythrocytes are estimated. The advantages and disadvantages of the two methods applied for cardiac chamber scintiscanning are put into contrast and compared with the advantages and disadvantages of the quantitative X-ray cardiography of the left heart. The still existing problems connected with the assessment of ECG-triggered images are discussed in detail. The author performed investigations of his own, which concerned the above-mentioned problems. (orig./MG)

  11. Affect intensity and cardiac arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blascovich, J; Brennan, K; Tomaka, J; Kelsey, R M; Hughes, P; Coad, M L; Adlin, R

    1992-07-01

    Relationships between affect intensity and basal, evoked, and perceived cardiac arousal were investigated in 3 experiments. Affect intensity was assessed using Larsen and Diener's (1987) Affect Intensity Measure (AIM). Cardiac arousal was evoked with exercise in the 1st study and with mental arithmetic in the 2nd and 3rd. Perceived cardiac arousal was measured under optimal conditions using a standard heartbeat discrimination procedure. Women as a group scored higher on the AIM. Affect intensity was unrelated to basal or evoked cardiac arousal and was negatively related to perceived cardiac arousal in all 3 studies. Data suggest that affect intensity, although unrelated to actual physiological arousal, is negatively related to the accuracy with which individuals perceive their own arousal. Results are discussed within the context of an expanded arousal-regulation model (Blascovich, 1990). PMID:1494983

  12. Cytokines downregulate the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum pump Ca2+ ATPase 2b and deplete endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+, leading to induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress in pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardozo, Alessandra K; Ortis, Fernanda; Storling, Joachim;

    2005-01-01

    , beta-cells showed marked sensitivity to apoptosis induced by SERCA blockers, as compared with fibroblasts. Cytokine-induced ER Ca(2+) depletion was paralleled by an NO-dependent induction of CHOP protein and activation of diverse components of the ER stress response, including activation of inositol......Cytokines and free radicals are mediators of beta-cell death in type 1 diabetes. Under in vitro conditions, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) + gamma-interferon (IFN-gamma) induce nitric oxide (NO) production and apoptosis in rodent and human pancreatic beta-cells. We have previously shown, by...... microarray analysis of primary beta-cells, that IL-1beta + IFN-gamma decrease expression of the mRNA encoding for the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum pump Ca(2+) ATPase 2b (SERCA2b) while inducing expression of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-related and proapoptotic gene CHOP (C/EBP [CCAAT/enhancer binding...

  13. Silver nanoparticles induce endoplasmatic reticulum stress response in zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christen, Verena [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Capelle, Martinus [Crucell, P.O. Box 2048, NL-2301 Leiden (Netherlands); Fent, Karl, E-mail: karl.fent@fhnw.ch [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich, Department of Environmental Systems Science, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2013-10-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) find increasing applications, and therefore humans and the environment are increasingly exposed to them. However, potential toxicological implications are not sufficiently known. Here we investigate effects of AgNPs (average size 120 nm) on zebrafish in vitro and in vivo, and compare them to human hepatoma cells (Huh7). AgNPs are incorporated in zebrafish liver cells (ZFL) and Huh7, and in zebrafish embryos. In ZFL cells AgNPs lead to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress response, and TNF-α. Transcriptional alterations also occur in pro-apoptotic genes p53 and Bax. The transcriptional profile differed in ZFL and Huh7 cells. In ZFL cells, the ER stress marker BiP is induced, concomitant with the ER stress marker ATF-6 and spliced XBP-1 after 6 h and 24 h exposure to 0.5 g/L and 0.05 g/L AgNPs, respectively. This indicates the induction of different pathways of the ER stress response. Moreover, AgNPs induce TNF-α. In zebrafish embryos exposed to 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 5 mg/L AgNPs hatching was affected and morphological defects occurred at high concentrations. ER stress related gene transcripts BiP and Synv are significantly up-regulated after 24 h at 0.1 and 5 mg/L AgNPs. Furthermore, transcriptional alterations occurred in the pro-apoptotic genes Noxa and p21. The ER stress response was strong in ZFL cells and occurred in zebrafish embryos as well. Our data demonstrate for the first time that AgNPs lead to induction of ER stress in zebrafish. The induction of ER stress can have several consequences including the activation of apoptotic and inflammatory pathways. - Highlights: • Effects of silver nanoparticles (120 nm AgNPs) are investigated in zebrafish. • AgNPs induce all ER stress reponses in vitro in zebrafish liver cells. • AgNPs induce weak ER stress in zebrafish embryos. • AgNPs induce oxidative stress and transcripts of pro-apoptosis genes.

  14. Cardiac potassium channel subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Nicole; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2014-01-01

    About 10 distinct potassium channels in the heart are involved in shaping the action potential. Some of the K(+) channels are primarily responsible for early repolarization, whereas others drive late repolarization and still others are open throughout the cardiac cycle. Three main K(+) channels...... drive the late repolarization of the ventricle with some redundancy, and in atria this repolarization reserve is supplemented by the fairly atrial-specific KV1.5, Kir3, KCa, and K2P channels. The role of the latter two subtypes in atria is currently being clarified, and several findings indicate that...... they could constitute targets for new pharmacological treatment of atrial fibrillation. The interplay between the different K(+) channel subtypes in both atria and ventricle is dynamic, and a significant up- and downregulation occurs in disease states such as atrial fibrillation or heart failure. The...

  15. Trends in Cardiac Pacemaker Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswara Sarma Mallela

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Batteries used in Implantable cardiac pacemakers-present unique challenges to their developers and manufacturers in terms of high levels of safety and reliability. In addition, the batteries must have longevity to avoid frequent replacements. Technological advances in leads/electrodes have reduced energy requirements by two orders of magnitude. Micro-electronics advances sharply reduce internal current drain concurrently decreasing size and increasing functionality, reliability, and longevity. It is reported that about 600,000 pacemakers are implanted each year worldwide and the total number of people with various types of implanted pacemaker has already crossed 3 million. A cardiac pacemaker uses half of its battery power for cardiac stimulation and the other half for housekeeping tasks such as monitoring and data logging. The first implanted cardiac pacemaker used nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery, later on zinc-mercury battery was developed and used which lasted for over 2 years. Lithium iodine battery invented and used by Wilson Greatbatch and his team in 1972 made the real impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers. This battery lasts for about 10 years and even today is the power source for many manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers. This paper briefly reviews various developments of battery technologies since the inception of cardiac pacemaker and presents the alternative to lithium iodine battery for the near future.

  16. Platelets and cardiac arrhythmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JonasSDe Jong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death remains one of the most prevalent modes of death in industrialized countries, and myocardial ischemia due to thrombotic coronary occlusion is its primary cause. The role of platelets in the occurrence of SCD extends beyond coronary flow impairment by clot formation. Here we review the substances released by platelets during clot formation and their arrhythmic properties. Platelet products are released from three types of platelet granules: dense core granules, alpha-granules, and platelet lysosomes. The physiologic properties of dense granule products are of special interest as a potential source of arrhythmic substances. They are released readily upon activation and contain high concentrations of serotonin, histamine, purines, pyrimidines, and ions such as calcium and magnesium. Potential arrhythmic mechanisms of these substances, e.g. serotonin and high energy phosphates, include induction of coronary constriction, calcium overloading, and induction of delayed after-depolarizations. Alpha-granules produce thromboxanes and other arachidonic acid products with many potential arrhythmic effects mediated by interference with cardiac sodium, calcium and potassium channels. Alpha-granules also contain hundreds of proteins that could potentially serve as ligands to receptors on cardiomyocytes. Lysosomal products probably do not have an important arrhythmic effect. Platelet products and ischemia can induce coronary permeability, thereby enhancing interaction with surrounding cardiomyocytes. Antiplatelet therapy is known to improve survival after myocardial infarction. Although an important part of this effect results from prevention of coronary clot formation, there is evidence to suggest that antiplatelet therapy also induces anti-arrhythmic effects during ischemia by preventing the release of platelet activation products.

  17. Metoclopramide-induced cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M. Rumore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of cardiac arrest in a patient receiving intravenous (IV metoclopramide and review the pertinent literature. A 62-year-old morbidly obese female admitted for a gastric sleeve procedure, developed cardiac arrest within one minute of receiving metoclopramide 10 mg via slow intravenous (IV injection. Bradycardia at 4 beats/min immediately appeared, progressing rapidly to asystole. Chest compressions restored vital function. Electrocardiogram (ECG revealed ST depression indicative of myocardial injury. Following intubation, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. Various cardiac dysrrhythmias including supraventricular tachycardia (SVT associated with hypertension and atrial fibrillation occurred. Following IV esmolol and metoprolol, the patient reverted to normal sinus rhythm. Repeat ECGs revealed ST depression resolution without pre-admission changes. Metoclopramide is a non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist. Seven cases of cardiac arrest and one of sinus arrest with metoclopramide were found in the literature. The metoclopramide prescribing information does not list precautions or adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to cardiac arrest. The reaction is not dose related but may relate to the IV administration route. Coronary artery disease was the sole risk factor identified. According to Naranjo, the association was possible. Other reports of cardiac arrest, severe bradycardia, and SVT were reviewed. In one case, five separate IV doses of 10 mg metoclopramide were immediately followed by asystole repeatedly. The mechanism(s underlying metoclopramide’s cardiac arrest-inducing effects is unknown. Structural similarities to procainamide may play a role. In view of eight previous cases of cardiac arrest from metoclopramide having been reported, further elucidation of this ADR and patient monitoring is needed. Our report should alert clinicians to monitor patients and remain diligent in surveillance and

  18. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in the loss of retinal ganglion cells in diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping Yang; Lemeng Wu; Dongmei Wang; Ying Li; Hongliang Dou; Mark OMTso; Zhizhong Ma

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress is closely involved in the early stage of diabetic retinopathy. In the present study, a streptozotocin-induced diabetic animal model was given an intraperitoneal injection of tauroursodeoxycholic acid. Results from immunofluorescent co-localization experiments showed that both caspase-12 protein and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 phosphorylation levels significantly in-creased, which was associated with retinal ganglion celldeath in diabetic retinas. The C/ERB ho-mologous protein pathway directly contributed to glial reactivity, and was subsequently responsible for neuronal loss and vascular abnormalities in diabetic retinopathy. Our experimental findings in-dicate that endoplasmic reticulum stress plays an important role in diabetes-induced retinal neu-ronal loss and vascular abnormalities, and that inhibiting the activation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway provides effective protection against diabetic retinopathy.

  19. [Role of endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions in intracellular calcium homeostasis and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Jia, Hang-Huan; Xu, Man; Yu, Xiao-Jiang; Liu, Long-Zhu; Zang, Wei-Jin

    2016-08-25

    Calcium overload is one of the important mechanisms of cardiovascular disease. Endoplasmic reticulum is an important organelle which regulates intracellular calcium homeostasis by uptake, storage and mobilization of calcium. So it plays a critical role in regulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum, which is widely distributed in cytoplasm, has a large number of membrane junction sites. Recent studies have reported that these junction sites are distributed on plasma membrane and organelle membranes (mitochondria, lysosomes, Golgi apparatus, etc.), separately. They could form complexes to regulate calcium transport. In this review, we briefly outlined the recent research progresses of endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions in intracellular calcium homeostasis and cardiovascular disease, which may offer a new strategy for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27546511

  20. Cardiac perioperative complications in noncardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Radovanović Dragana; Kolak Radmila; Stokić Aleksandar; Radovanović Zoran; Jovanović Gordana

    2008-01-01

    Anesthesiologists are confronted with an increasing population of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery who are at risk for cardiac complications in the perioperative period. Perioperative cardiac complications are responsible for significant mortality and morbidity. The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of perioperative (operative and postoperative) cardiac complications and correlations between the incidence of perioperative cardiac complications and type of surgical ...

  1. Epigenetic regulation in cardiac fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ming; Yu; Yong; Xu

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis represents an adoptive response in the heart exposed to various stress cues. While resolution of the fibrogenic response heralds normalization of heart function, persistent fibrogenesis is usually associated with progressive loss of heart function and eventually heart failure. Cardiac fibrosis is regulated by a myriad of factors that converge on the transcription of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins, a process the epigenetic machinery plays a pivotal role. In this minireview, we summarize recent advances regarding the epigenetic regulation of cardiac fibrosis focusing on the role of histone and DNA modifications and non-coding RNAs.

  2. Sarco(endoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPase-2 Gene: Structure and Transcriptional Regulation of the Human Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Zarain-Herzberg

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The sarco(endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCAs belong to a family of active calcium transport enzymes encoded by the SERCA1, 2, and 3 genes. In this study, we describe the complete structure of the human SERCA2 gene and its 5’ -regulatory region. The hSERCA2 gene is located in chromosome 12 position q24.1 in Contig NT_009770.8, spans 70 kb, and is organized in 21 exons intervened by 20 introns. The last two exons of the pre-mRNA produce by alternatively splicing the cardiac/slow-twitch muscle-specific SERCA2a isoform and the ubiquitous SERCA2b isoform. The sequence of the proximal 225-bp regulatory region of the SERCA2 genes is 80% G+C-rich and is conserved among human, rabbit, rat, and mouse species. It contains a TATA-like-box, an E-box/USF sequence, a CAAT-box, four Sp1 binding sites, and a thyroid hormone responsive element (TRE. There are two other conserved regulatory regions located between positions -410 to -661 bp and from -919 to -1410 bp. Among the DNA cis-elements present in these two regulatory regions there are potential binding sites for: GATA-4, -5, -6, Nkx-2.5/Csx, OTF-1, USF, MEF-2, SRF, PPAR/RXR, AP-2, and TREs. Upstream from position -1.5 kb, there is no significant homology among the SERCA2 genes cloned. In addition, the human gene has several repeated sequences mainly of the Alu and L2 type located upstream from position -1.7 kb, spanning in a continuous fashion for more than 40 kb. In this study, we report the cloning of 2.4 kb of 5’-regulatory region and demonstrate that the proximal promoter region is sufficient for expression in cardiac myocytes, and the region from -225 to -1232 bp contains regulatory DNA elements which down-regulate the expression of the SERCA2 gene in neonatal cardiomyocytes.

  3. Immune responsiveness and incidence of reticulum cell sarcoma in long-term syngeneic radiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term syngeneic radiation chimeras displayed a very low incidence of reticulum cell sarcoma as compared with control mice. Immune reactivity of these animals was studied in vivo by anti-dinitrophenyl antibody titer and affinity and in vitro by mitotic responsiveness to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A and lipopolysaccharide. Antibody titer and affinity as well as the response to T lectins were found to be increased in chimeras. These results were attributed to increased function of mature T2 cells, which could explain the reduced incidence of reticulum cell sarcoma in chimeras

  4. Cardiac catheterization and angiography. Third edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book discusses the papers on cardiac catheterization and angiography. The topics covered are: historical perspective and present practice of cardiac catheterization; angiography principles and utilization of radiologic and cineangiographic equipment; complications, incidence and prevention of side effects of cardiac catheterization; techniques; blood flow measurement of heart; pressure measurement; diagnostic techniques of angiography; special catheter techniques; coronary angiography, temporary and permanent pacemakers, potential role of lasers in the cardiac catheterization and evaluation of cardiac function

  5. Antifibrotic therapies to control cardiac fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Zhaobo; Guan, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis occurs naturally after myocardial infarction. While the initially formed fibrotic tissue prevents the infarcted heart tissue from rupture, the progression of cardiac fibrosis continuously expands the size of fibrotic tissue and causes cardiac function decrease. Cardiac fibrosis eventually evolves the infarcted hearts into heart failure. Inhibiting cardiac fibrosis from progressing is critical to prevent heart failure. However, there is no efficient therapeutic approach curren...

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin-1α (Ero1α) improves folding and secretion of mutant proinsulin and limits mutant proinsulin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Jordan; Birk, Julia; Haataja, Leena; Liu, Ming; Ramming, Thomas; Weiss, Michael A.; Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian; Arvan, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Upon chronic up-regulation of proinsulin synthesis, misfolded proinsulin can accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of pancreatic β-cells, promoting ER stress and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In Mutant Ins-gene-induced Diabetes of Youth (MIDY), misfolded mutant proinsulin impairs ER exit of co-expressed wild-type proinsulin, limiting insulin production and leading to eventual β-cell death. In this study we have investigated the hypothesis that increased expression of ER oxidoreductin-1α (E...

  7. Robotic Applications in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan P. Kypson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, cardiac surgery has been performed through a median sternotomy, which allows the surgeon generous access to the heart and surrounding great vessels. As a paradigm shift in the size and location of incisions occurs in cardiac surgery, new methods have been developed to allow the surgeon the same amount of dexterity and accessibility to the heart in confined spaces and in a less invasive manner. Initially, long instruments without pivot points were used, however, more recent robotic telemanipulation systems have been applied that allow for improved dexterity, enabling the surgeon to perform cardiac surgery from a distance not previously possible. In this rapidly evolving field, we review the recent history and clinical results of using robotics in cardiac surgery.

  8. Cardiac manifestations in systemic sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sevdalina; Lambova

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, which develops as a direct consequence of systemic sclerosis(SSc), may manifest as myocardial damage, fibrosis of the conduction system, pericardial and, less frequently, as valvular disease. In addition, cardiac complications in SSc may develop as a secondary phenomenon due to pulmonary arterial hypertension and kidney pathology. The prevalence of primary cardiac involvement in SSc is variable and difficult to determine because of the diversity of cardiac manifestations, the presence of subclinical periods, the type of diagnostic tools applied, and the diversity of patient populations. When clinically manifested, cardiac involvement is thought to be an important prognostic factor. Profound microvascular disease is a pathognomonic feature of SSc, as both vasospasm and structural alterations are present. Such alterations are thought to predict macrovascular atherosclerosis over time. There are contradictory reports regarding the prevalence of atherosclerosis in SSc. According to some authors, the prevalence of atherosclerosis of the large epicardial coronary arteries is similar to that of the general population, in contrast with other rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. However, the level of inflammation in SSc is inferior. Thus, the atherosclerotic process may not be as aggressive and not easily detectable in smaller studies. Echocardiography(especially tissue Doppler imaging), single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomography are sensitive techniques for earlier detection of both structural and functional scleroderma-related cardiac pathologies. Screening for subclinical cardiac involvement via modern, sensitive tools provides an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment, which is of crucial importance for a positive outcome.

  9. Computational Modeling of Cardiac Electromechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamoorthi, Shankarjee

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a leading cause of death worldwide. Notably, the electrophysiologiy and microstructural requirements for a fatal ventricular arrhythmia remain incompletely understood, thereby the treatment remains largely empirical. Standard antiarrhythmic drug therapy has failed to reduce, and in some instances has increased, the incidence of Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD). Hence, a more complete understanding of the mechanisms that foment a fatal arrhythmia is needed and computational m...

  10. Cardiac Biomarkers in Hyperthyroid Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Sangster, Jodi Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hyperthyroidism has substantial effects on the circulatory system. The cardiac biomarkers NT-proBNP and troponin I (cTNI) have proven useful in identifying cats with myocardial disease but have not been as extensively investigated in hyperthyroidism.Hypothesis: Plasma NT-proBNP and cTNI concentrations are higher in cats with primary cardiac disease than in cats with hyperthyroidism and higher in cats with hyperthyroidism than in healthy control cats.Animals: Twenty-three hyperthyr...

  11. Current trends in cardiac rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Dafoe, W; Huston, P

    1997-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation can reduce mortality and morbidity for patients with many types of cardiac disease cost-effectively, yet is generally underutilized. Rehabilitation is helpful not only for patients who have had a myocardial infarction but also for those with stable angina or congestive heart failure or those who have undergone myocardial revascularization procedures, a heart transplant or heart valve surgery. The beneficial effects of rehabilitation include a reduction in the rate of de...

  12. An overview of cardiac morphogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Abdulla, Tariq; Summers, Ron; Houyel, Lucile

    2013-01-01

    International audience Accurate knowledge of normal cardiac development is essential for properly understanding the morphogenesis of congenital cardiac malformations that represent the most common congenital anomaly in newborns. The heart is the first organ to function during embryonic development and is fully formed at 8 weeks of gestation. Recent studies stemming from molecular genetics have allowed specification of the role of cellular precursors in the field of heart development. In th...

  13. Gastrointestinal Complications and Cardiac Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) complications are an uncommon but potentially devastating complication of cardiac surgery. The reported incidence varies between .3% and 5.5% with an associated mortality of .3–87%. A wide range of GI complications are reported with bleeding, mesenteric ischemia, pancreatitis, cholecystitis, and ileus the most common. Ischemia is thought to be the main cause of GI complications with hypoperfusion during cardiac surgery as well as systemic inflammation, hypothermia, drug ...

  14. Cardiac abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Bilt, I.A.C. van der

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage(aSAH) is a devastating neurological disease. During the course of the aSAH several neurological and medical complications may occur. Cardiac abnormalities after aSAH are observed often and resemble stress cardiomyopathy or Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy(Broken Heart Syndrome) that has been described after acute stress. It is a reversible cardiac dysfunction with distinct imaging features(the echocardiographic or left ventricular angiographic image resembles a Tak...

  15. Temperature sensitivity of cardiac function in pelagic fishes with different vertical mobilities: yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus), mahimahi (Coryphaena hippurus), and swordfish (Xiphias gladius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Gina L J; Shiels, Holly A; Brill, Richard W

    2009-01-01

    We measured the temperature sensitivity, adrenergic sensitivity, and dependence on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) of ventricular muscle from pelagic fishes with different vertical mobility patterns: bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus), yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), and mahimahi (Coryphaena hippurus) and a single specimen from swordfish (Xiphias gladius). Ventricular muscle from the bigeye tuna and mahimahi exhibited a biphasic response to an acute decrease in temperature (from 26 degrees to 7 degrees C); twitch force and kinetic parameters initially increased and then declined. The magnitude of this response was larger in the bigeye tuna than in the mahimahi. Under steady state conditions at 26 degrees C, inhibition of SR Ca(2+) release and reuptake with ryanodine and thapsigargin decreased twitch force and kinetic parameters, respectively, in the bigeye tuna only. However, the initial inotropy associated with decreasing temperature was abolished by SR inhibition in both the bigeye tuna and the mahimahi. Application of adrenaline completely reversed the effects of ryanodine and thapsigargin, but this effect was diminished at cold temperatures. In the yellowfin tuna, temperature and SR inhibition had minor effects on twitch force and kinetics, while adrenaline significantly increased these parameters. Limited data suggest that swordfish ventricular muscle responds to acute temperature reduction, SR inhibition, and adrenergic stimulation in a manner similar to that of bigeye tuna ventricular muscle. In aggregate, our results show that the temperature sensitivity, SR dependence, and adrenergic sensitivity of pelagic fish hearts are species specific and that these differences reflect species-specific vertical mobility patterns. PMID:19284308

  16. FGF21 and cardiac physiopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna ePlanavila

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The heart is not traditionally considered either a target or a site of fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21 production. However, recent findings indicate that FGF21 can act as a cardiomyokine; that is, it is produced by cardiac cells at significant levels and acts in an autocrine manner on the heart itself. The heart is sensitive to the effects of FGF21, both systemic and locally generated, owing to the expression in cardiomyocytes of β-Klotho, the key co-receptor known to confer specific responsiveness to FGF21 action. FGF21 has been demonstrated to protect against cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac inflammation, and oxidative stress. FGF21 expression in the heart is induced in response to cardiac insults, such as experimental cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial infarction in rodents, as well as in failing human hearts. Intracellular mechanisms involving PPARα and Sirt1 mediate transcriptional regulation of the FGF21 gene in response to exogenous stimuli. In humans, circulating FGF21 levels are elevated in coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis, and are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. These findings provide new insights into the role of FGF21 in the heart and may offer potential therapeutic strategies for cardiac disease.

  17. Physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ippei; Minamino, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The heart must continuously pump blood to supply the body with oxygen and nutrients. To maintain the high energy consumption required by this role, the heart is equipped with multiple complex biological systems that allow adaptation to changes of systemic demand. The processes of growth (hypertrophy), angiogenesis, and metabolic plasticity are critically involved in maintenance of cardiac homeostasis. Cardiac hypertrophy is classified as physiological when it is associated with normal cardiac function or as pathological when associated with cardiac dysfunction. Physiological hypertrophy of the heart occurs in response to normal growth of children or during pregnancy, as well as in athletes. In contrast, pathological hypertrophy is induced by factors such as prolonged and abnormal hemodynamic stress, due to hypertension, myocardial infarction etc. Pathological hypertrophy is associated with fibrosis, capillary rarefaction, increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and cellular dysfunction (impairment of signaling, suppression of autophagy, and abnormal cardiomyocyte/non-cardiomyocyte interactions), as well as undesirable epigenetic changes, with these complex responses leading to maladaptive cardiac remodeling and heart failure. This review describes the key molecules and cellular responses involved in physiological/pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27262674

  18. Cardiac MRI in suspected myocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of ECG-gated breath-hold MRI in diagnosing acute myocardidits. Material and methods: Cardiac MRI was performed on 21 consecutive patients with suspected myocarditis. ECG-gated breath-hold T2-weighted images with fat suppression were acquired in 3 standard views. T1-weighted imaging (FLASH) was performed 10 min after IV administration of Gd-DTPA. Laboratory data included creatine kinase, troponin T and serological tests, ECG findings and echocardiography. Imaging findings were retrospectively compared to the discharge diagnoses. Signal alterations were semiquantitatively classified. Results: Acute myocarditis was diagnosed in 9 patients and cardiac sarcoidosis in 2 patients. Late enhancement was observed in 4 patients with acute myocarditis and in both patients with cardiac sarcoidosis. Semiquantitative evaluation revealed 9 true positive, 9 true negative, 1 false positive and 2 false negative results. Conclusion: Cardiac MRI has the potential to detect acute myocarditis and to diagnose cardiac sarcoidosis. Late enhancement of Gd-DTPA can be found in both viral myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis. (orig.)

  19. Cardiac imaging. A multimodality approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An excellent atlas on modern diagnostic imaging of the heart Written by an interdisciplinary team of experts, Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach features an in-depth introduction to all current imaging modalities for the diagnostic assessment of the heart as well as a clinical overview of cardiac diseases and main indications for cardiac imaging. With a particular emphasis on CT and MRI, the first part of the atlas also covers conventional radiography, echocardiography, angiography and nuclear medicine imaging. Leading specialists demonstrate the latest advances in the field, and compare the strengths and weaknesses of each modality. The book's second part features clinical chapters on heart defects, endocarditis, coronary heart disease, cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, cardiac tumors, pericardial diseases, pulmonary vascular diseases, and diseases of the thoracic aorta. The authors address anatomy, pathophysiology, and clinical features, and evaluate the various diagnostic options. Key features: - Highly regarded experts in cardiology and radiology off er image-based teaching of the latest techniques - Readers learn how to decide which modality to use for which indication - Visually highlighted tables and essential points allow for easy navigation through the text - More than 600 outstanding images show up-to-date technology and current imaging protocols Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach is a must-have desk reference for cardiologists and radiologists in practice, as well as a study guide for residents in both fields. It will also appeal to cardiac surgeons, general practitioners, and medical physicists with a special interest in imaging of the heart. (orig.)

  20. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Marie; Diaz, Lars Jorge; Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm;

    2014-01-01

    genetic testing for DM1. Information on incident cardiac diseases was obtained from the NPR. We estimated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of cardiac disease compared with the background population, overall and according to selected diagnostic subgroups (cardiomyopathy, heart failure, conduction...... disorders, arrhythmias, and device implantation). In the DM cohort, SIR for any cardiac disease was 3.42 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.01-3.86]; for a cardiac disease belonging to the selected subgroups 6.91 (95% CI: 5.93-8.01) and for other cardiac disease 2.59 (95% CI: 2.03-3.25). For a cardiac disease...... belonging to the selected subgroups, the risk was particularly high in the first year after DM diagnosis [SIR 15.4 (95% CI: 10.9-21.3)] but remained significantly elevated in subsequent years [SIR 6.07 (95% CI: 5.11-7.16]). The risk was higher in young cohort members [e.g. 20-39 years: SIR 18.1 (95% CI: 12...

  1. Cardiac output during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebenmann, C; Rasmussen, P.; Sørensen, H.;

    2015-01-01

    Several techniques assessing cardiac output (Q) during exercise are available. The extent to which the measurements obtained from each respective technique compares to one another, however, is unclear. We quantified Q simultaneously using four methods: the Fick method with blood obtained from the...... right atrium (Q(Fick-M)), Innocor (inert gas rebreathing; Q(Inn)), Physioflow (impedance cardiography; Q(Phys)), and Nexfin (pulse contour analysis; Q(Pulse)) in 12 male subjects during incremental cycling exercise to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (FiO2  = 12%). While all four methods reported a...... progressive increase in Q with exercise intensity, the slopes of the Q/oxygen uptake (VO2) relationship differed by up to 50% between methods in both normoxia [4.9 ± 0.3, 3.9 ± 0.2, 6.0 ± 0.4, 4.8 ± 0.2 L/min per L/min (mean ± SE) for Q(Fick-M), Q(Inn), QP hys and Q(Pulse), respectively; P = 0.001] and...

  2. Mechanistic investigation of imatinib-induced cardiac toxicity and the involvement of c-Abl kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenyue; Lu, Shuyan; McAlpine, Indrawan; Jamieson, Joseph D; Lee, Dong U; Marroquin, Lisa D; Heyen, Jonathan R; Jessen, Bart A

    2012-09-01

    The Bcr-abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate is the frontline therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia. Imatinib has been reported to cause congestive heart failure and left ventricular contractile dysfunction in patients and cardiomyopathy in rodents, findings proposed to be associated with its pharmacological activity. To investigate the specific role of Abelson oncogene 1 (c-Abl) in imatinib-induced cardiac toxicity, we performed targeted gene inhibition of c-Abl by RNA interference in neonatal cardiomyocytes (NCMs). Suppression of c-Abl did not lead to cytotoxicity or induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. To further dis associate c-Abl from imatinib-induced cardiac toxicity, we designed imatinib structural analogs that do not have appreciable c-Abl inhibition in NCMs. The c-Abl inactive analogs induced cytotoxicity and ER stress, at similar or greater potencies and magnitudes as imatinib. Furthermore, combining c-Abl gene silencing with imatinib and analogs treatment did not significantly shift the cytotoxicity dose response curves. Imatinib and analogs were shown to accumulate in lysosomes, likely due to their physicochemical properties, and disrupt autophagy. The toxicity induced by imatinib and analogs can be rescued by bafilomycin A pretreatment, demonstrating the involvement of lysosomal accumulation in cardiac toxicity. The results from our studies strongly suggest that imatinib induces cardiomyocyte dysfunction through disruption of autophagy and induction of ER stress, independent of c-Abl inhibition. PMID:22641616

  3. Effects of ginger extract on smooth muscle activity of sheep reticulum and rumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Mamaghani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reticulorumen hypomotility leads to the impaired physiologic functions of the digestive tract. Prokinetic action of ginger has been demonstrated in the laboratory animals and human. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydroalcoholic extract of ginger on contraction and motility of reticulum and rumen of ruminants. Collected samples of reticulum and rumen from eight sheep were investigated in vitro. The extract at the concentration of 0.1 and 1.0 mg L-1 had no effect on any preparations. Contraction of reticulum and rumen preparations was occurred at 10.0 and 100 mg L-1 concentrations (p < 0.05. Concentration of 1000 mg L-1 caused a relaxation in preparations contracted with 10.0 and 100 mg L-1. Likewise, the concentration of 1000 mg L-1 significantly (p < 0.05 inhibited ACh-induced contraction in both tissues. Six sheep were involved in electromyographic study. Administration of 40 mg kg-1 of the extract increased the overall frequency of contractions of the reticulum and rumen at the subsequent three days with the prominent increase at the second day (p < 0.05. Results of in vitro study indicated that hydroalcoholic extract of ginger contained spasmogenic and spasmolytic constituents. The results in vivo study represented evidences that the extract may have stimulant effect on reticulorumen motility in 40 mg kg-1 concentration.

  4. Water-mediated interactions influence the binding of thapsigargin to sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosinetriphosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Eleonora S.; Villadsen, Jesper; Tenori, Eleonora;

    2013-01-01

    A crystal structure suggests four water molecules are present in the binding cavity of thapsigargin in sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). Computational chemistry indicates that three of these water molecules mediate an extensive hydrogen-bonding network between thapsigargin...

  5. Accumulation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum in Alzheimer's disease: new morphological evidence of axoplasmic flow disturbances.

    OpenAIRE

    Richard, S; Brion, Jean Pierre; Couck, A. M.; Flament Durand, Jacqueline

    1989-01-01

    Numerous enlarged neurites and presynaptic terminals containing tubulovesicular profiles of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) were observed in frontal biopsies from six patients with Alzheimer's disease. These accumulations of SER probably reflect disturbances of axoplasmic flows. In addition, curvilinear tubular inclusions similar to those characteristic of Farber's disease were found in one patient. Finally, accumulation of glycogen within neurites and enlarged mitochondria were observed i...

  6. Chlorhexidine-induced apoptosis or necrosis in L929 fibroblasts: A role for endoplasmic reticulum stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorhexidine (CHX), widely used as antiseptic and therapeutic agent in medicine and dentistry, has a toxic effect both in vivo and in vitro. The intrinsic mechanism underlying CHX-induced cytotoxicity in eukaryotic cells is, however, still unknown. A recent study from our laboratory has suggested that CHX may induce death in cultured L929 fibroblasts via endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. This hypothesis was further tested by means of light and electron microscopy, quantification of apoptosis and necrosis by flow cytometry, fluorescence visualization of the cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum, and evaluation of the expression of 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein 78 (Grp78), a marker of activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in cultured L929 fibroblasts. Our finding showing increased Grp 78 expression in CHX-treated cells and the results of flow cytometry, cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum fluorescence visualization, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy allowed us to suggest that CHX elicits accumulation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, which causes ER overload, resulting in ER stress and cell death either by necrosis or apoptosis. It must be pointed out, however, that this does not necessarily mean that ER stress is the only way that CHX kills L929 fibroblasts, but rather that ER stress is an important target or indicator of cell death induced by this drug

  7. Respiratory metabolism and calorie restriction relieve persistent endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by calcium shortage in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busti, Stefano; Mapelli, Valeria; Tripodi, Farida;

    2016-01-01

    reticulum (ER stress) triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR) and generates a state of oxidative stress that decreases cell viability. These effects are severe during growth on rapidly fermentable carbon sources and can be mitigated by decreasing the protein synthesis rate or by inducing cellular...

  8. Membrane protein targeting to the outskirts of the endoplasmic reticulum : A characterization of sorting signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kralt, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    The majority of membrane proteins synthesized in the cell is inserted into the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The ER forms a network that extends from the nuclear envelope (NE), a double membrane surrounding the nucleus, to the cortical ER that underlies the plasma membrane (PM). Locali

  9. Evidence of a Continuous Endoplasmic Reticulum in the Protozoan Parasite Entamoeba histolytica▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Jose E; Huston, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, the cause of amebiasis, is believed to have no continuous endoplasmic reticulum (ER), with ER functions occurring in vesicles. Here, using an ER-targeted green fluorescent protein fusion protein and fluorescence loss in photobleaching, we have unambiguously demonstrated the presence of a continuous ER compartment in living E. histolytica trophozoites.

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum stress leads to the selective transcriptional downregulation of the glucoamylase gene in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Sheikh, H.; Watson, A.J.; Lacey, G.A.; Punt, P.J.; MacKenzie, D.A.; Jeenes, D.J.; Pakula, T.; Penttilä, M.; Alcocer, M.J.C.; Archer, D.B.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a new endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated stress response in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. The inhibition of protein folding within the ER leads to cellular responses known collectively as the unfolded protein response (UPR) and we show that the selective transcriptional do

  11. A lentivirally delivered photoactivatable GFP to assess continuity in the endoplasmic reticulum of neurones and glia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jones, V. C.; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Jones, O. T.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 458, č. 4 (2009), s. 809-818. ISSN 0031-6768 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/08/1384 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : endoplasmic reticulum * calcium store * neurone Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.695, year: 2009

  12. Tributyltin induces apoptotic signaling in hepatocytes through pathways involving the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-n-butyltin is a widespread environmental toxicant, which accumulates in the liver. This study investigates whether tri-n-butyltin induces pro-apoptotic signaling in rat liver hepatocytes through pathways involving the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Tri-n-butyltin activated the endoplasmic reticulum pathway of apoptosis, which was demonstrated by the activation of the protease calpain, its translocation to the plasma membrane, followed by cleavage of the calpain substrates, cytoskeletal protein vinculin, and caspase-12. Caspase-12 is localized to the cytoplasmic side of the endoplasmic reticulum and is involved in apoptosis mediated by the endoplasmic reticulum. Tri-n-butyltin also caused translocation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bad from the cytosol to mitochondria, as well as changes in mitochondrial membrane permeability, events which can activate the mitochondrial death pathway. Tri-n-butyltin induced downstream apoptotic events in rat hepatocytes at the nuclear level, detected by chromatin condensation and by confocal microscopy using acridine orange. We investigated whether the tri-n-butyltin-induced pro-apoptotic events in hepatocytes could be linked to perturbation of intracellular calcium homeostasis, using confocal microscopy. Tri-n-butyltin caused changes in intracellular calcium distribution, which were similar to those induced by thapsigargin. Calcium was released from a subcellular compartment, which is likely to be the endoplasmic reticulum, into the cytosol. Cytosolic acidification, which is known to trigger apoptosis, also occurred and involved the Cl-/HCO3- exchanger. Pro-apoptotic events in hepatocytes were inhibited by the calcium chelator, Bapta-AM, and by a calpain inhibitor, which suggests that changes in intracellular calcium homeostasis are involved in tri-n-butyltin-induced apoptotic signaling in rat hepatocytes

  13. Computed tomography of cardiac pseudotumors and neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anavekar, Nandan S; Bonnichsen, Crystal R; Foley, Thomas A; Morris, Michael F; Martinez, Matthew W; Williamson, Eric E; Glockner, James F; Miller, Dylan V; Breen, Jerome F; Araoz, Philip A

    2010-07-01

    Important features of cardiac masses can be clearly delineated on cardiac computed tomography (CT) imaging. This modality is useful in identifying the presence of a mass, its relationship with cardiac and extracardiac structures, and the features that distinguish one type of mass from another. A multimodality approach to the evaluation of cardiac tumors is advocated, with the use of echocardiography, CT imaging and magnetic resonance imaging as appropriately indicated. In this article, various cardiac masses are described, including pseudotumors and true cardiac neoplasms, and the CT imaging findings that may be useful in distinguishing these rare entities are presented. PMID:20705174

  14. Cardiac output monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathews Lailu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive and non-invasive methods of estimation of cardiac output (CO were developed to overcome the limitations of invasive nature of pulmonary artery catheterization (PAC and direct Fick method used for the measurement of stroke volume (SV. The important minimally invasive techniques available are: oesophageal Doppler monitoring (ODM, the derivative Fick method (using partial carbon dioxide (CO 2 breathing, transpulmonary thermodilution, lithium indicator dilution, pulse contour and pulse power analysis. Impedance cardiography is probably the only non-invasive technique in true sense. It provides information about haemodynamic status without the risk, cost and skill associated with the other invasive or minimally invasive techniques. It is important to understand what is really being measured and what assumptions and calculations have been incorporated with respect to a monitoring device. Understanding the basic principles of the above techniques as well as their advantages and limitations may be useful. In addition, the clinical validation of new techniques is necessary to convince that these new tools provide reliable measurements. In this review the physics behind the working of ODM, partial CO 2 breathing, transpulmonary thermodilution and lithium dilution techniques are dealt with. The physical and the physiological aspects underlying the pulse contour and pulse power analyses, various pulse contour techniques, their development, advantages and limitations are also covered. The principle of thoracic bioimpedance along with computation of CO from changes in thoracic impedance is explained. The purpose of the review is to help us minimize the dogmatic nature of practice favouring one technique or the other.

  15. Animal models of cardiac cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Francesca; Malara, Natalia; Mollace, Vincenzo; Rosano, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Elisabetta

    2016-09-15

    Cachexia is the loss of body weight associated with several chronic diseases including chronic heart failure (CHF). The cachectic condition is mainly due to loss of skeletal muscle mass and adipose tissue depletion. The majority of experimental in vivo studies on cachexia rely on animal models of cancer cachexia while a reliable and appropriate model for cardiac cachexia has not yet been established. A critical issue in generating a cardiac cachexia model is that genetic modifications or pharmacological treatments impairing the heart functionality and used to obtain the heart failure model might likely impair the skeletal muscle, this also being a striated muscle and sharing with the myocardium several molecular and physiological mechanisms. On the other hand, often, the induction of heart damage in the several existing models of heart failure does not necessarily lead to skeletal muscle loss and cachexia. Here we describe the main features of cardiac cachexia and illustrate some animal models proposed for cardiac cachexia studies; they include the genetic calsequestrin and Dahl salt-sensitive models, the monocrotaline model and the surgical models obtained by left anterior descending (LAD) ligation, transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and ascending aortic banding. The availability of a specific animal model for cardiac cachexia is a crucial issue since, besides the common aspects of cachexia in the different syndromes, each disease has some peculiarities in its etiology and pathophysiology leading to cachexia. Such peculiarities need to be unraveled in order to find new targets for effective therapies. PMID:27317993

  16. Vitamin D and Cardiac Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Irene M; Norris, Keith C; Artaza, Jorge N

    2016-01-01

    Calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol or 1,25-D3) is the hormonally active metabolite of vitamin D. Experimental studies of vitamin D receptors and 1,25-D3 establish calcitriol to be a critical regulator of the structure and function of the heart. Clinical studies link vitamin D deficiency with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Emerging evidence demonstrates that calcitriol is highly involved in CVD-related signaling pathways, particularly the Wnt signaling pathway. Addition of 1,25-D3 to cardiomyocyte cells and examination of its effects on cardiomyocytes and mainly Wnt11 signaling allowed the specific characterization of the role of calcitriol in cardiac differentiation. 1,25-D3 is demonstrated to: (i) inhibit cell proliferation without promoting apoptosis; (ii) decrease expression of genes related to the regulation of the cell cycle; (iii) promote formation of cardiomyotubes; (iv) induce expression of casein kinase-1-α1, a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway; and (v) increase expression of noncanonical Wnt11, which has been recognized to induce cardiac differentiation during embryonic development and in adult cells. Thus, it appears that vitamin D promotes cardiac differentiation through negative modulation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and upregulation of noncanonical Wnt11 expression. Future work to elucidate the role(s) of vitamin D in cardiovascular disorders will hopefully lead to improvement and potentially prevention of CVD, including abnormal cardiac differentiation in settings such as postinfarction cardiac remodeling. PMID:26827957

  17. Cardiac factors in orthostatic hypotension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löllgen, H.; Dirschedl, P.; Koppenhagen, K.; Klein, K. E.

    Cardiac function is determined by preload, afterload, heart rate and contractility. During orthostatic stress, the footward blood shift is compensated for by an increase of afterload. LBNP is widely used to analyze effects of volume displacement during orthostatic stress. Comparisons of invasive ( right heart catheterization) and non-invasive approach (echocardiography) yielded similar changes. Preload and afterload change with graded LBNP, heart rate increases, and stroke volume and cardiac output decrease. Thus, the working point on the left ventricular function curve is shifted to the left and downward, similar to hypovolemia. However, position on the Frank-Starling curve, the unchanged ejection fraction, and the constant Vcf indicate a normal contractile state during LBNP. A decrease of arterial oxygen partial pressure during LBNP shwos impaired ventilation/perfusion ratio. Finally, LBNP induced cardiac and hemodynamic changes can be effectively countermeasured by dihydroergotamine, a potent venoconstrictor. Comparison of floating catheter data with that of echocardiography resulted in close correlation for cardiac output and stroke volume. In addition, cardiac dimensions changed in a similar way during LBNP. From our findings, echocardiography as a non-invasive procedure can reliably used in LBNP and orthostatic stress tests. Some informations can be obtained on borderline values indicating collaps or orthostatic syncope. Early fainters can be differentiated from late fainters by stroke volume changes.

  18. Cardiac Penetrating Injuries and Pseudoaneurysm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shifeng

    2002-01-01

    Objective To discuss the early diagnosis and treatment of cardiac penetrating injuries and pseudoaneurysm. Methods 18 cases of cardiac penetrating injuries, in which 2 cases were complicated with pseudoaneurysm, were diagnosed by emergency operation and color Doppler echocardiography between May 1973 and Dec. 2001 in our hospital. The basis for emergency operation is the injured path locating in cardiac dangerous zone, severe shock or pericardial tamponade. ResultsAmong 18 cases of this study, 17 cases underwent emergency operation. During the operation, 11 cases were found injured in right ventricle, 2 cases were found injured in right atrium, 1 case was found injured in pulmonary artery,4 cases were found injured in left ventricle, 2 cases were found complicated with pseudoaneurysm. 17cases underwent cardiac repair including 1 case of rupture of aneurysm. 1 case underwent elective aneurysm resection. In whole group, 15 cases survived(83.33% ), 3 cases died( 16.67%). The cause of death is mainly hemorrhagic shock. Conclusion Highly suspicious cardiac penetrating injuries or hemopericaridium should undergo direct operative exploration. Pseudoaneurysm should be resected early,which can prevent severe complications.

  19. CT diagnosis of cardiac lipoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the application of CT in the diagnosis of cardiac lipoma. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 6 patients with cardiac lipoma confirmed by operation and pathology was done. Four patients had singles slice electron beam CT plain and contrast and movie scan. Two patients had 64-slice CT plain and enhanced scan. Results: (1) One patient was isolated intracavitary lipoma in the right artrium, 1 patient was isolated intrapericardial lipoma and 4 patients were intramural lipomas. Of the 4 intramural lipoma, 2 were infiltrative lipomas located in the left ventricle wall or the right ventricle and septum, 2 patients were isolated in the atrio-ventricular septum. (2) CT and three-dimensional reconstruction could depict the location, shape, size, margin and characteristic fat density of lipoma, indicating the diagnosis and classifications. The displacement of coronary artery, pulmonary inflammation and effusions of pericardium and pleural cavity could also be revealed. Conclusion: Cardiac lipoma can be accurately diagnosed and classified by CT. (authors)

  20. Mechanical Regulation of Cardiac Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HuseyinCagatayYalcin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical forces are an essential contributor to and unavoidable component of cardiac formation, both inducing and orchestrating local and global molecular and cellular changes. Experimental animal studies have contributed substantially to understanding the mechanobiology of heart development. More recent integration of high-resolution imaging modalities with computational modeling has greatly improved our quantitative understanding of hemodynamic flow in heart development. Merging these latest experimental technologies with molecular and genetic signaling analysis will accelerate our understanding of the relationships integrating mechanical and biological signaling for proper cardiac formation. These advances will likely be essential for clinically translatable guidance for targeted interventions to rescue malforming hearts and/or reconfigure malformed circulations for optimal performance. This review summarizes our current understanding on the levels of mechanical signaling in the heart and their roles in orchestrating cardiac development.

  1. Structural insights into the human RyR2 N-terminal region involved in cardiac arrhythmias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borko, Ľubomír; Bauerová-Hlinková, Vladena, E-mail: vladena.bauerova@savba.sk; Hostinová, Eva; Gašperík, Juraj [Institute of Molecular Biology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 21, 845 51 Bratislava (Slovakia); Beck, Konrad [Cardiff University School of Dentistry, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XY Wales (United Kingdom); Lai, F. Anthony [Cardiff University School of Medicine, Cardiff CF14 4XN Wales (United Kingdom); Zahradníková, Alexandra, E-mail: vladena.bauerova@savba.sk [Institute of Molecular Biology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 21, 845 51 Bratislava (Slovakia); Institute of Molecular Physiology and Genetics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 5, 833 34 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ševčík, Jozef, E-mail: vladena.bauerova@savba.sk [Institute of Molecular Biology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 21, 845 51 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2014-11-01

    X-ray and solution structures of the human RyR2 N-terminal region were obtained under near-physiological conditions. The structure exhibits a unique network of interactions between its three domains, revealing an important stabilizing role of the central helix. Human ryanodine receptor 2 (hRyR2) mediates calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, enabling cardiomyocyte contraction. The N-terminal region of hRyR2 (amino acids 1–606) is the target of >30 arrhythmogenic mutations and contains a binding site for phosphoprotein phosphatase 1. Here, the solution and crystal structures determined under near-physiological conditions, as well as a homology model of the hRyR2 N-terminal region, are presented. The N-terminus is held together by a unique network of interactions among its three domains, A, B and C, in which the central helix (amino acids 410–437) plays a prominent stabilizing role. Importantly, the anion-binding site reported for the mouse RyR2 N-terminal region is notably absent from the human RyR2. The structure concurs with the differential stability of arrhythmogenic mutations in the central helix (R420W, I419F and I419F/R420W) which are owing to disparities in the propensity of mutated residues to form energetically favourable or unfavourable contacts. In solution, the N-terminus adopts a globular shape with a prominent tail that is likely to involve residues 545–606, which are unresolved in the crystal structure. Docking the N-terminal domains into cryo-electron microscopy maps of the closed and open RyR1 conformations reveals C{sup α} atom movements of up to 8 Å upon channel gating, and predicts the location of the leucine–isoleucine zipper segment and the interaction site for spinophilin and phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 on the RyR surface.

  2. Ca2+-regulated-cAMP/PKA signaling in cardiac pacemaker cells links ATP supply to demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Yael; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Lyashkov, Alexey E.; Spurgeon, Harold A.; Sollott, Steven J.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale In sinoatrial node cells (SANC), Ca2+ activates adenylate cyclase (AC) to generate a high basal level of cAMP-mediated/protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of Ca2+ cycling proteins. These result in spontaneous sarcoplasmic-reticulum (SR) generated rhythmic Ca2+ oscillations during diastolic depolarization, that not only trigger the surface membrane to generate rhythmic action potentials (APs), but, in a feed-forward manner, also activate AC/PKA signaling. ATP is consumed to pump Ca2+ to the SR, to produce cAMP, to support contraction and to maintain cell ionic homeostasis. Objective Since a negative feedback mechanism links ATP-demand to ATP production, we hypothesized that (1) both basal ATP supply and demand in SANC would be Ca2+-cAMP/PKA dependent; and (2) due to its feed–forward nature, a decrease in flux through the Ca2+-cAMP/PKA signaling axis will reduce the basal ATP production rate. Methods and Results O2 consumption in spontaneous beating SANC was comparable to ventricular myocytes (VM) stimulated at 3 Hz. Graded reduction of basal Ca2+-cAMP/PKA signaling to reduce ATP demand in rabbit SANC produced graded ATP depletion (r2=0.96), and reduced O2 consumption and flavoprotein fluorescence. Neither inhibition of glycolysis, selectively blocking contraction nor specific inhibition of mitochondrial Ca2+ flux reduced the ATP level. Conclusions Feed-forward basal Ca2+-cAMP/PKA signaling both consumes ATP to drive spontaneous APs in SANC and is tightly linked to mitochondrial ATP production. Interfering with Ca2+-cAMP/PKA signaling not only slows the firing rate and reduces ATP consumption, but also appears to reduce ATP production so that ATP levels fall. This distinctly differs from VM, which lack this feed-forward basal cAMP/PKA signaling, and in which ATP level remains constant when the demand changes. PMID:21835182

  3. Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device implantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard;

    2013-01-01

    Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) treatment, including permanent pacemakers (PMs), cardiac resynchronization therapy devices with defibrillators (CRT-Ds) or without (CRT-Ps), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are associated with increased patient...

  4. How Is Sudden Cardiac Arrest Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart (a sign of CHD). MUGA Test or Cardiac MRI A MUGA (multiple gated acquisition) test shows how ... create pictures of many parts of your heart. Cardiac MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe procedure that ...

  5. An update on insertable cardiac monitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming J; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Krieger, Derk W

    2015-01-01

    Continuous cardiac rhythm monitoring has undergone compelling progress over the past decades. Cardiac monitoring has emerged from 12-lead electrocardiograms being performed at the discretion of the treating physician to in-hospital telemetry, Holter monitoring, prolonged external event monitoring...

  6. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Specialist Share Twitter Facebook SCA Risk Assessment Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without ... of all ages and health conditions. Start Risk Assessment The Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment Tool ...

  7. Cardiac Metastasis from Invasive Thymoma Via the Superior Vena Cava: Cardiac MRI Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac tumors are rare, and metastatic deposits are more common than primary cardiac tumors. We present cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 50-year-old woman with invasive thymoma. Cardiac MRI revealed a heterogeneous, lobulated anterior mediastinal mass invading the superior vena cava and extending to the right atrium. In cine images there was no invasion to the right atrial wall.

  8. The Golgi apparatus is a functionally distinct Ca2+ store regulated by PKA and Epac branches of the β1-adrenergic signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaokang.; Kirton, Hannah M.; MacDougall, David A.; Boyle, John P.; Deuchars, James; Frater, Brenda; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan; Hardy, Matthew E.; White, Edward; Calaghan, Sarah C.; Peers, Chris; Steele, Derek S.

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ release from the Golgi apparatus regulates key functions of the organelle, including vesicle trafficking. However, the signaling pathways that control this form of Ca2+ release are poorly understood and evidence of discrete Golgi Ca2+ release events is lacking. Here, we identified the Golgi apparatus as the source of prolonged Ca2+ release events that originate from the nuclear ‘poles’ of primary cardiac cells. Once initiated, Golgi Ca2+ release was unaffected by global depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+, and disruption of the Golgi apparatus abolished Golgi Ca2+ release without affecting sarcoplasmic reticulum function, suggesting functional and anatomical independence of Golgi and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores. Maximal activation of β1-adrenoceptors had only a small stimulating effect on Golgi Ca2+ release. However, inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 or 4, or downregulation of PDE 3 and 4 in heart failure markedly potentiated β1-adrenergic stimulation of Golgi Ca2+ release, consistent with compartmentalization of cAMP signaling within the Golgi apparatus microenvironment. β1-adrenergic stimulation of Golgi Ca2+ release involved activation of both Epac and PKA signaling pathways and CaMKII. Interventions that stimulated Golgi Ca2+ release induced trafficking of vascular growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) from the Golgi apparatus to the surface membrane. These data establish the Golgi apparatus as a juxtanuclear focal point for Ca2+ and β1-adrenergic signaling, which functions independently from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the global Ca2+ transients that underlie the primary contractile function of the cell. PMID:26462734

  9. Pregnancy as a cardiac stress model

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Eunhee; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy occurs during pregnancy as a consequence of both volume overload and hormonal changes. Both pregnancy- and exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy are generally thought to be similar and physiological. Despite the fact that there are shared transcriptional responses in both forms of cardiac adaptation, pregnancy results in a distinct signature of gene expression in the heart. In some cases, however, pregnancy can induce adverse cardiac events in previously healthy women witho...

  10. Regulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy: the nuclear option

    OpenAIRE

    Kuster, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiac hypertrophy is the response of the heart to an increased workload. After myocardial infarction (MI) the surviving muscle tissue has to work harder to maintain cardiac output. This sustained increase in workload leads to cardiac hypertrophy. Despite its apparent appropriateness, cardiac hypertrophy is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure and is therefore called pathological hypertrophy. That hypertrophy is not bad per se, is illustrated by the hyp...

  11. Traumatic Tricuspid Regurgitation Following Cardiac Massage

    OpenAIRE

    Na, Sungwon; Nam, Sang Beom; Lee, Yong Kyung; Oh, Young Jun; Kwak, Young-Lan

    2007-01-01

    We report a 66-yr-old male patient who developed tricuspid regurgitation secondary to internal cardiac massage. After uneventful off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery, the subject experienced cardiac arrest in the intensive care unit. External cardiac massage was initiated and internal cardiac massage was performed eventually. A transesophageal echocardiography revealed avulsion of the anterior papillary muscle and chordae to the anterior leaflet after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitati...

  12. [Cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography in cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, H; Seki, S; Mizuguchi, A; Tsuchida, H; Watanabe, H; Namiki, A

    1990-04-01

    The cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography, NCCOM3, was evaluated in adult patients (n = 12) who were subjected to coronary artery bypass grafting. Values of cardiac output measured by impedance cardiography were compared to those by the thermodilution method. Changes of base impedance level used as an index of thoracic fluid volume were also investigated before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Correlation coefficient (r) of the values obtained by thermodilution with impedance cardiography was 0.79 and the mean difference was 1.29 +/- 16.9 (SD)% during induction of anesthesia. During the operation, r was 0.83 and the mean difference was -14.6 +/- 18.7%. The measurement by impedance cardiography could be carried out through the operation except when electro-cautery was used. Base impedance level before CPB was significantly lower as compared with that after CPB. There was a negative correlation between the base impedance level and central venous pressure (CVP). No patients showed any signs suggesting lung edema and all the values of CVP, pulmonary artery pressure and blood gas analysis were within normal ranges. From the result of this study, it was concluded that cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography was useful in cardiac surgery, but further detailed examinations will be necessary on the relationship between the numerical values of base impedance and the clinical state of the patients. PMID:2362347

  13. Health Literacy Predicts Cardiac Knowledge Gains in Cardiac Rehabilitation Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Colleen C.; Rawson, Katherine; Hughes, Joel W.; Waechter, Donna; Rosneck, James

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Health literacy is increasingly recognised as a potentially important patient characteristic related to patient education efforts. We evaluated whether health literacy would predict gains in knowledge after completion of patient education in cardiac rehabilitation. Method: This was a re-post observational analysis study design based on…

  14. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintao Zhang

    Full Text Available Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells.Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29 were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5-5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining, and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot.Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II, beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin and genetic

  15. Childhood cancer survivors: cardiac disease & social outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.M. Feijen

    2015-01-01

    The thesis is divided in two parts; Cardiac health problems and healthcare consumption & social outcomes in CCS. The general aims of part 1 creates optimal conditions for the evaluation of cardiac events in 5-year childhood cancer survivors, evaluation of the long term risk of cardiac events, and to

  16. MRI of cardiac rhabdomyoma in the fetus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivelitz, Dietmar E.; Muehler, Matthias [Institut fuer Radiologie, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Charite, Schumannstrasse 20/21, 10098, Berlin (Germany); Rake, Annett; Chaoui, Rabih [Klinik fuer Gynaekologie und Geburtshilfe, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Charite, Schumannstrasse 20/21, 10098, Berlin (Germany); Scheer, Ianina [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Abteilung Paediatrische Radiologie, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Charite, Schumannstrasse 20/21, 10098, Berlin (Germany)

    2004-08-01

    Primary cardiac tumors are rarely diagnosed in utero and are usually seen on prenatal echocardiography. Cardiac rhabdomyomata can be associated with tuberous sclerosis. Prenatal MRI can be performed to assess associated malformations. This case report illustrates the ability of fetal MRI to image cardiac rhabdomyata and compares it with prenatal and postnatal echocardiography. (orig.)

  17. Telocytes in exercise-induced cardiac growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Junjie; Chen, Ping; Qu, Yi; Yu, Pujiao; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Hongbao; Fu, Siyi; Bei, Yihua; Chen, Yan; Che, Lin; Xu, Jiahong

    2016-05-01

    Exercise can induce physiological cardiac growth, which is featured by enlarged cardiomyocyte cell size and formation of new cardiomyocytes. Telocytes (TCs) are a recently identified distinct interstitial cell type, existing in many tissues and organs including heart. TCs have been shown to form a tandem with cardiac stem/progenitor cells in cardiac stem cell niches, participating in cardiac regeneration and repair. Although exercise-induced cardiac growth has been confirmed as an important way to promote cardiac regeneration and repair, the response of cardiac TCs to exercise is still unclear. In this study, 4 weeks of swimming training was used to induce robust healthy cardiac growth. Exercise can induce an increase in cardiomyocyte cell size and formation of new cardiomyocytes as determined by Wheat Germ Lectin and EdU staining respectively. TCs were identified by three immunofluorescence stainings including double labelling for CD34/vimentin, CD34/platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor-α and CD34/PDGF receptor-β. We found that cardiac TCs were significantly increased in exercised heart, suggesting that TCs might help control the activity of cardiac stem/progenitor cells, cardiomyocytes or endothelial cells. Adding cardiac TCs might help promote cardiac regeneration and renewal. PMID:26987685

  18. Cardiac, Skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Hyngstrom, John R; Garten, Ryan S; Diakos, Nikolaos A; Ives, Stephen J; Dela, Flemming; Larsen, Steen; Drakos, Stavros; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-01-01

    Unlike cardiac and skeletal muscle, little is known about vascular smooth muscle mitochondrial function. Therefore, this study examined mitochondrial respiratory rates in the smooth muscle of healthy human feed arteries and compared with that of healthy cardiac and skeletal muscle. Cardiac, skele...

  19. Technique for producing cardiac radionuclide motion images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequential frames of different portions of the cardiac cycle are gated into a minicomputer by using an EKG signal recorded onto digital tape simultaneously with imaging information. Serial display of these frames on the computer oscilloscope or projection of 35-mm half frames of these images provides a cardiac motion image with information content adequate for qualitatively assessing cardiac motion. (U.S.)

  20. Regulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy: the nuclear option

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W.D. Kuster (Diederik)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiac hypertrophy is the response of the heart to an increased workload. After myocardial infarction (MI) the surviving muscle tissue has to work harder to maintain cardiac output. This sustained increase in workload leads to cardiac hypertrophy. Despite its apparent appropriateness, c

  1. Cardiac tumors: optimal cardiac MR sequences and spectrum of imaging appearances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reviews the optimal cardiac MRI sequences for and the spectrum of imaging appearances of cardiac tumors. CONCLUSION: Recent technologic advances in cardiac MRI have resulted in the rapid acquisition of images of the heart with high spatial and temporal resolution and excellent myocardial tissue characterization. Cardiac MRI provides optimal assessment of the location, functional characteristics, and soft-tissue features of cardiac tumors, allowing accurate differentiation of benign and malignant lesions.

  2. Response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteeg, Henneke; Schiffer, Angélique A; Widdershoven, Jos W; Meine, Mathias M; Doevendans, Pieter A; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a promising treatment for a subgroup of patients with advanced congestive heart failure and a prolonged QRS interval. Despite the majority of patients benefiting from CRT, 10-40% of patients do not respond to this treatment and are labeled as nonresponders...

  3. Rejection in the cardiac transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard chest radiography remains the most frequent applied method for monitoring post surgical cardiac transplant patients. Evidence suggests that after the 1st month cardiac enlargement is indeed a useful indicator of rejection, sometimes being caused by pericardial effusion and/or changes in left ventricular mass. Opportunistic infections, either pulmonary lesions or mediastinal abscesses, as well as malignant tumours may all occur and require evaluation or exclusion. Conventional computed transmission tomography is an excellent technique for surveying the entire thorax relatively non-invasively and is recommended whenever pulmonary, cardiac or mediastinal changes are unexplained. Coronary arteriography with or without digital subtraction remains the definitive method for examining the coronary arteries. Left ventricular function can be evaluated with either angiography or other non-invasive methods including such techniques as echocardiography and nuclear medicine. More recently monoclonal antibody labels for antimyosin show promise for identifying rejection. Ultrafast CT scanning is now available in a number of centres. It allows millisecond cross-sectional cine-tomography of the heart as well as of the whole chest, and also provides 3-D quantitative analyses of end-diastolic and systolic function including regional wall thickening dynamics and estimations of myocardial mass. Right, as well as left-sided cardiac chambers, are demonstrated routinely during the same ultrafast CT procedure. MRI, like ultrafast CT, is a new technique still being explored. MRI as well as MR spectroscopy are regarded as diagnostic radiology procedures. (author). 32 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  4. Cardiac functional analysis with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are among the leading causes of death worldwide. Even in the 21st century CVD will still be the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality. Precise evaluation of cardiac function is therefore mandatory for therapy planning and monitoring. In this article the contribution of MRI-based analysis of cardiac function will be addressed. Nowadays cine-MRI is considered as the standard of reference (SOR) in cardiac functional analysis. ECG-triggered steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequences are mainly used as they stand out due to short acquisition times and excellent contrast between the myocardium and the ventricular cavity. An indispensible requirement for cardiac functional analysis is an exact planning of the examination and based on that the coverage of the whole ventricle in short axial slices. By means of dedicated post-processing software, manual or semi-automatic segmentation of the endocardial and epicardial contours is necessary for functional analysis. In this way end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and the ejection fraction (EF) are defined and regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMA) can be detected. (orig.)

  5. Molecular therapies for cardiac arrhythmias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.J. Boink

    2013-01-01

    Despite the ongoing advances in pharmacology, devices and surgical approaches to treat heart rhythm disturbances, arrhythmias are still a significant cause of death and morbidity. With the introduction of gene and cell therapy, new avenues have arrived for the local modulation of cardiac disease. Th

  6. The cardiac patient in Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamsi-Pasha, Majed; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Ramadan is one of the five fundamental pillars of Islam. During this month, the majority of the 1.6 billion Muslims worldwide observe an absolute fast from dawn to sunset without any drink or food. Our review shows that the impact of fasting during Ramadan on patients with stable cardiac disease is minimal and does not lead to any increase in acute events. Most patients with the stable cardiac disease can fast safely. Most of the drug doses and their regimen are easily manageable during this month and may need not to be changed. Ramadan fasting is a healthy nonpharmacological means for improving cardiovascular risk factors. Most of the Muslims, who suffer from chronic diseases, insist on fasting Ramadan despite being exempted by religion. The Holy Quran specifically exempts the sick from fasting. This is particularly relevant if fasting worsens one's illness or delays recovery. Patients with unstable angina, recent myocardial infarction, uncontrolled hypertension, decompensated heart failure, recent cardiac intervention or cardiac surgery or any debilitating diseases should avoid fasting. PMID:27144139

  7. Cardiac pacemakers and nuclear batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the introduction giving the indications for cardiac pacemaker therapy with special regard to the use of pacemakers powered by nuclear batteries, reference is made to the resulting radiation exposure of the patient. The activities of the Federal Health Office in this field such as recommendations and surveys including the entire Federal Republic are outlined. (orig.)

  8. CARDIAC TRANSPLANTATION: AN ANESTHETIC CHALLENGE

    OpenAIRE

    Premalatha; Jayaraman,

    2014-01-01

    : Heart transplantation has emerged as the definitive therapy for patients with end-stage cardiomyopathy. The two most common forms of cardiac disease that lead to transplantation are ischemic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy, which together comprise approximately 90% of cases. The other less common forms of heart disease include viral cardiomyopathy, infiltrative cardiomyopathy, postpartum cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease and congenital heart disease

  9. Epidural analgesia for cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Svircevic; M.M. Passier; A.P. Nierich; D. van Dijk; C.J. Kalkman; G.J. van der Heijden

    2013-01-01

    Background A combination of general anaesthesia (GA) with thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) may have a beneficial effect on clinical outcomes by reducing the risk of perioperative complications after cardiac surgery. Objectives The objective of this review was to determine the impact of perioperativ

  10. Historical highlights in cardiac pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, L A

    1990-01-01

    The benchmarks in cardiac pacing are identified, beginning with F. Steiner (1871), who rhythmically stimulated the chloroform-arrested hearts of 3 horses, 1 donkey, 10 dogs, 14 cats, and 8 rabbits. The chloroform-arrested heart in human subjects was paced by T. Greene in the following year (1872) in the UK. In 1882, H. Ziemssen in Germany applied cardiac pacing to a 42-year old woman who had a large defect in the anterior left chest wall subsequent to resection of an enchondroma. Intentional cardiac pacing did not occur until 1932, when A.A. Hyman in the US demonstrated that cardiac pacing could be clinically practical. Hyman made a batteryless pacemaker for delivery in induction shock stimuli (60-120/min) to the atria. His pacemaker was powered by a hand-wound, spring-driven generator which provided 6 min of pacemaking without rewinding. Closed-chest ventricular pacing was introduced in the US in 1952 by P.M. Zoll et al. Zoll (1956) also introduced closed-chest ventricular defibrillation. W.L. Weirich et al. (1958) demonstrated that direct-heart stimulation in closed-chest patients could be achieved with slender wire electrodes. S. Furman and J.B. Schwedel (1959) developed a monopolar catheter electrode for ventricular pacing in man. In the same year, W. Greatbatch and W.M. Chardack developed the implantable pacemaker. PMID:18238328

  11. An Involvement of Oxidative Stress in Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Its Associated Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidur Bhandary

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is the major site of calcium storage and protein folding. It has a unique oxidizing-folding environment due to the predominant disulfide bond formation during the process of protein folding. Alterations in the oxidative environment of the ER and also intra-ER Ca2+ cause the production of ER stress-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS. Protein disulfide isomerases, endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin-1, reduced glutathione and mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins also play crucial roles in ER stress-induced production of ROS. In this article, we discuss ER stress-associated ROS and related diseases, and the current understanding of the signaling transduction involved in ER stress.

  12. THE RESPONSE OF DISSEMINATED RETICULUM CELL SARCOMA TO THE INTRAVENOUS INJECTION OF COLLOIDAL RADIOACTIVE GOLD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Philip; Levitt, Seymour H.

    1963-06-15

    Case histories of two patients treated with colloidal radiogold for diffuse reticulum cell sarcoma are presented. Further analysis of the method is suggested by the unusually long survival time of one of the patients. It was concluded that, although external radiotherapy remains the treatment of choice in localized reticulum cell sarcoma, intravenous colloidal radiogold may be a useful agent in lymphosarcomas with diffuse minute neoplastic liver and spleen involvements. Intravenous colloidal radiogold can produce bone marrow depression and thrombocytopenia which can lead to death. This factor tends to argue against therapeutic use of the agent. It is suggested that no more than 50 mC Au/sup 198/ intravenously should be used for treatment of this disease. (R.M.G.)

  13. Organization of the cytoplasmic reticulum in the central vacuole of parenchyma cells in Allium cepa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz J. Wodzicki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An elaborate and complex cytoplasmic reticulum composed of fine filaments and lamellae ranging from 0.1 to 4 microns in size is revealed by viewing the central vacuole of onion bulb parenchyma cells with the scanning election microscope. The larger cytoplasmic strands, visible with the light microscope, are composed of numerous smaller filaments (some tubular which might explain the observed bidirectional movement of particles in these larger strands. The finely divided cytoplasmic network of filaments is continuous with the parietal cytoplasm inclosing the vacuolar sap. In these highly vacuolated cells the mass of the protoplast is in the form of an intravacuolar reticulum immersed in the cell sap. The probable significance of the vacuolar sap in relation to physiological processes of the cell is discussed.

  14. Neuroprotective effects of atorvastatin against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury through the inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-wen Yang; Zhi-ping Hu

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia triggers secondary ischemia/reperfusion injury and endoplasmic reticulum stress initiates cell apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of the signaling pathway remains unclear. We hypothesize that the regulatory mechanisms are mediated by the protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/eukaryotic initiation factor 2α in the endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling pathway. To verify this hypothesis, we occluded the middle cere-bral artery in rats to establish focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion model. Results showed that the expression levels of protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase and caspase-3, as well as the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, were increased after ischemia/reperfusion. Administration of atorvastatin decreased the expression of protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, caspase-3 and phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, reduced the infarct volume and improved ultrastructure in the rat brain. After salubrinal, the speciifc inhibitor of phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α was given into the rats in-tragastrically, the expression levels of caspase-3 and phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α in the were decreased, a reduction of the infarct volume and less ultrastructural damage were observed than the untreated, ischemic brain. However, salubrinal had no impact on the expression of protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase. Experimental ifndings indi-cate that atorvastatin inhibits endoplasmic reticulum stress and exerts neuroprotective effects. The underlying mechanisms of attenuating ischemia/reperfusion injury are associated with the protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/eukaryotic initiation factor 2α/caspase-3 pathway.

  15. Selective Modulation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Markers in Prostate Cancer Cells by a Standardized Mangosteen Fruit Extract

    OpenAIRE

    Gongbo Li; Petiwala, Sakina M.; Dana R Pierce; Larisa Nonn; Jeremy J Johnson

    2013-01-01

    The increased proliferation of cancer cells is directly dependent on the increased activity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) machinery which is responsible for protein folding, assembly, and transport. In fact, it is so critical that perturbations in the endoplasmic reticulum can lead to apoptosis. This carefully regulated organelle represents a unique target of cancer cells while sparing healthy cells. In this study, a standardized mangosteen fruit extract (MFE) was evaluated for modulating...

  16. Cardiac arrest: resuscitation and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Kaustubha D; Halperin, Henry R; Becker, Lance B

    2015-06-01

    The modern treatment of cardiac arrest is an increasingly complex medical procedure with a rapidly changing array of therapeutic approaches designed to restore life to victims of sudden death. The 2 primary goals of providing artificial circulation and defibrillation to halt ventricular fibrillation remain of paramount importance for saving lives. They have undergone significant improvements in technology and dissemination into the community subsequent to their establishment 60 years ago. The evolution of artificial circulation includes efforts to optimize manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation, external mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation devices designed to augment circulation, and may soon advance further into the rapid deployment of specially designed internal emergency cardiopulmonary bypass devices. The development of defibrillation technologies has progressed from bulky internal defibrillators paddles applied directly to the heart, to manually controlled external defibrillators, to automatic external defibrillators that can now be obtained over-the-counter for widespread use in the community or home. But the modern treatment of cardiac arrest now involves more than merely providing circulation and defibrillation. As suggested by a 3-phase model of treatment, newer approaches targeting patients who have had a more prolonged cardiac arrest include treatment of the metabolic phase of cardiac arrest with therapeutic hypothermia, agents to treat or prevent reperfusion injury, new strategies specifically focused on pulseless electric activity, which is the presenting rhythm in at least one third of cardiac arrests, and aggressive post resuscitation care. There are discoveries at the cellular and molecular level about ischemia and reperfusion pathobiology that may be translated into future new therapies. On the near horizon is the combination of advanced cardiopulmonary bypass plus a cocktail of multiple agents targeted at restoration of normal metabolism and

  17. A Cluster of Thin Tubular Structures Mediates Transformation of the Endoplasmic Reticulum to Autophagic Isolation Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Uemura, Takefumi; Yamamoto, Masaya; Kametaka, Ai; Sou, Yu-shin; Yabashi, Atsuko; Yamada, Akane; Annoh, Hiromichi; Kametaka, Satoshi; Komatsu, Masaaki; Waguri, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings have suggested that the autophagic isolation membrane (IM) might originate from a domain of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) called the omegasome. However, the morphological relationships between ER, omegasome, and IM remain unclear. In the present study, we found that hybrid structures composed of a double FYVE domain-containing protein 1 (DFCP1)-positive omegasome and the IM accumulated in Atg3-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Moreover, correlative light and elect...

  18. Severe Burn–Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Hepatic Damage in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Juquan; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Herndon, David N; Boehning, Darren; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2009-01-01

    Severe burn injury results in liver dysfunction and damage, with subsequent metabolic derangements contributing to patient morbidity and mortality. On a cellular level, significant postburn hepatocyte apoptosis occurs and likely contributes to liver dysfunction. However, the underlying mechanisms of hepatocyte apoptosis are poorly understood. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response/unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway can lead to hepatocyte apoptosis under conditions of liver dysfun...

  19. Emerging evidence for endoplasmic reticulum stress in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Tanjore, Harikrishna; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Lawson, William E.

    2012-01-01

    While the factors that regulate the onset and progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are incompletely understood, recent investigations have revealed that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) are prominent in alveolar epithelial cells in this disease. Initial observations linking ER stress and IPF were made in cases of familial interstitial pneumonia (FIP), the familial form of IPF, in a family with a mutation in surfactant protei...

  20. Robust Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation of Rhodopsin Precedes Retinal Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Chiang, WC; Kroeger, H.; Sakami, S; Messah, C; Yasumura, D; Matthes, MT; Coppinger, JA; Palczewski, K; LaVail, MM; Lin, JH

    2014-01-01

    © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Rhodopsin is a G protein-coupled receptor essential for vision and rod photoreceptor viability. Disease-associated rhodopsin mutations, such as P23H rhodopsin, cause rhodopsin protein misfolding and trigger endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, activating the unfolded protein response (UPR). The pathophysiologic effects of ER stress and UPR activation on photoreceptors are unclear. Here, by examining P23H rhodopsin knock-in mice, we found that th...

  1. Chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyrate prevents endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by T17M rhodopsin

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Haibo; Xiong, Siqi; Xia, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Background Rhodopsin mutations are associated with the autosomal dominant form of retinitis pigmentosa. T17M mutation in rhodopsin predisposes cells to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and induces cell death. This study aimed to examine whether chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyrate prevents ER stress induced by rhodopsin T17M. Results ARPE-19 cells were transfected with myc-tagged wild-type (WT) and T17M rhodopsin constructs. Turnover of WT and T17M rhodopsin was measured by cycloheximide chas...

  2. Neural dysregulation of peripheral insulin action and blood pressure by brain endoplasmic reticulum stress

    OpenAIRE

    Purkayastha, Sudarshana; Zhang, Hai; Zhang, Guo; Ahmed, Zaghloul; Wang, Yi; Cai, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Chronic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was recently revealed to affect hypothalamic neuroendocrine pathways that regulate feeding and body weight. However, it remains unexplored whether brain ER stress could use a neural route to rapidly cause the peripheral disorders that underlie the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and the metabolic syndrome. Using a pharmacologic model that delivered ER stress inducer thapsigargin into the brain, this study demonstrated that a short-term brain ER s...

  3. The quality control of glycoprotein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, a trip from trypanosomes to mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Parodi

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available The present review deals with the stages of synthesis and processing of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides occurring in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum and their relationship to the acquisition by glycoproteins of their proper tertiary structures. Special emphasis is placed on reactions taking place in trypanosomatid protozoa since their study has allowed the detection of the transient glucosylation of glycoproteins catalyzed by UDP-Glc:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase and glucosidase II. The former enzyme has the unique property of covalently tagging improperly folded conformations by catalyzing the formation of protein-linked Glc1Man7GlcNAc2, Glc1Man8GlcNac2 and Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 from the unglucosylated proteins. Glucosyltransferase is a soluble protein of the endoplasmic reticulum that recognizes protein domains exposed in denatured but not in native conformations (probably hydrophobic amino acids and the innermost N-acetylglucosamine unit that is hidden from macromolecular probes in most native glycoproteins. In vivo, the glucose units are removed by glucosidase II. The influence of oligosaccharides in glycoprotein folding is reviewed as well as the participation of endoplasmic reticulum chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin that recognize monoglucosylated species in the same process. A model for the quality control of glycoprotein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, i.e., the mechanism by which cells recognize the tertiary structure of glycoproteins and only allow transit to the Golgi apparatus of properly folded species, is discussed. The main elements of this control are calnexin and calreticulin as retaining components, the UDP-Glc:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase as a sensor of tertiary structures and glucosidase II as the releasing agent.

  4. Cytochrome P450 System Proteins Reside in Different Regions of the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Ji Won PARK; Reed, James R.; Brignac-Huber, Lauren M.; Backes, Wayne L.

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 function is dependent on the ability of these enzymes to successfully interact with their redox partners, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and cytochrome b5, in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Because the ER is heterogeneous in lipid composition, membrane microdomains with different characteristics are formed. Ordered microdomains are more tightly packed, and enriched in saturated fatty acids, sphingomyelin and cholesterol, whereas disordered regions contain higher levels...

  5. Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Aminopeptidases in Health and Disease: from Infection to Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Doriana Fruci; Franco Locatelli; Paolo Romania; Silvia Lorenzi; Loredana Cifaldi

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) aminopeptidases ERAP1 and ERAP2 (ERAPs) are essential for the maturation of a wide spectrum of proteins involved in various biological processes. In the ER, these enzymes work in concert to trim peptides for presentation on MHC class I molecules. Loss of ERAPs function substantially alters the repertoire of peptides presented by MHC class I molecules, critically affecting recognition of both NK and CD8+ T cells. In addition, these enzymes are ...

  6. The Specificity of Trimming of MHC Class I-Presented Peptides in the Endoplasmic Reticulum1

    OpenAIRE

    Hearn, Arron; Ian A York; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2009-01-01

    Aminopeptidases in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can cleave antigenic peptides and in so doing either create or destroy MHC class I-presented epitopes. However the specificity of this trimming process overall and of the major ER aminopeptidase ERAP1 in particular is not well understood. This issue is important because peptide trimming influences the magnitude and specificity of CD8 T cell responses. By systematically varying the N-terminal flanking sequences of peptides in a cell free bioche...

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Aminopeptidase-1 Functions Regulate Key Aspects of the Innate Immune Response

    OpenAIRE

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Seregin, Sergey S.; Rastall, David P. W.; Charles F Aylsworth; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Busuito, Christopher J.; Godbehere-Roosa, Sarah; Kim, Sungjin; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase-1 (ERAP1) is a multifunctional, ubiquitously expressed enzyme whose peptide-trimming role during antigen processing for presentation by MHC I molecules is well established, however, a role for ERAP1 in modulating global innate immune responses has not been described to date. Here we demonstrate that, relative to wild type mice, mice lacking ERAP1 exhibit exaggerated innate immune responses early during pathogen recognition, as characterized by increased ac...

  8. p53 increases MHC class I expression by upregulating the endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase ERAP1

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bei; Niu, Dandan; Lai, Liyun; Ren, Ee Chee

    2013-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor has an important role in cancer cells. Here we show that p53 regulates expression of major histocompatibility complex I on the cell surface. We show that the tumour cell line HCT116, which lacks p53 exhibits significantly lower major histocompatibility complex I expression than its wild-type counterpart. Using a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and gene expression analysis, we demonstrate that p53 upregulates expression of endoplasmic reticulum...

  9. Structural insights into the molecular ruler mechanism of the endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase ERAP1

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Gandhi; Damodharan Lakshminarasimhan; Yixin Sun; Hwai-Chen Guo

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) is an essential component of the immune system, because it trims peptide precursors and generates the N--restricted epitopes. To examine ERAP1's unique properties of length- and sequence-dependent processing of antigen precursors, we report a 2.3 Å resolution complex structure of the ERAP1 regulatory domain. Our study reveals a binding conformation of ERAP1 to the carboxyl terminus of a peptide, and thus provides direct evidence for the molecular...

  10. Linking cocaine to endoplasmic reticulum in striatal neurons: role of glutamate receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Choe, Eun Sang; Ahn, Sung Min; Yang, Ju Hwan; Go, Bok Soon; WANG, John Q.

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) controls protein folding. Accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER triggers an ER stress response to accelerate normal protein folding or if failed to cause apoptosis. The ER stress response is a conserved cellular response in mammalian cells and is sensitive to various physiological or pathophysiological stimuli. Recent studies unravel that this response in striatal neurons is subject to the tight modulation by psychostimulants. Cocaine and amp...

  11. Elimination of endoplasmic reticulum stress and cardiovascular, type 2 diabetic, and other metabolic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Luoma, Pauli V

    2012-01-01

    Multiple factors including unhealthy living habits influence the life-maintaining functions of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and induce ER stress and metabolic abnormalities. The ER responds to the disturbances by activating mechanisms that increase the capacity to eliminate ER stress. This article elucidates the effects of ER activation that eliminates both ER stress and associated cardiovascular, type 2 diabetic (DM2), and other metabolic diseases. ER-activating compounds eliminate ER stre...

  12. Proinsulin Misfolding and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress During the Development and Progression of Diabetes1

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Jinhong; Cui, Jingqiu; He, Qing; Chen, Zheng; Arvan, Peter; Liu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    To maintain copious insulin granule stores in the face of ongoing metabolic demand, pancreatic beta cells must produce large quantities of proinsulin, the insulin precursor. Proinsulin biosynthesis can account for up to 30–50% of total cellular protein synthesis of beta cells. This puts pressure on the beta cell secretory pathway, especially the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where proinsulin undergoes its initial folding, including the formation of three evolutionarily conserved disulfide bonds...

  13. Release of Ca2+ from the Endoplasmic Reticulum Contributes to Ca2+ Signaling in Dictyostelium discoideum

    OpenAIRE

    Wilczynska, Zofia; Happle, Kathrin; Müller-Taubenberger, Annette; Schlatterer, Christina; Malchow, Dieter; Fisher, Paul R.

    2005-01-01

    Ca2+ responses to two chemoattractants, folate and cyclic AMP (cAMP), were assayed in Dictyostelium D. discoideum mutants deficient in one or both of two abundant Ca2+-binding proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), calreticulin and calnexin. Mutants deficient in either or both proteins exhibited enhanced cytosolic Ca2+ responses to both attractants. Not only were the mutant responses greater in amplitude, but they also exhibited earlier onsets, faster rise rates, earlier peaks, and faste...

  14. Psychological Stress, Cocaine and Natural Reward Each Induce Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Genes in Rat Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlovsky, Ashly A.; Boehning, Darren; Li, Dingge; Zhang, Yafang; Fan, Xiuzhen; Green, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Our prior research has shown that the transcription of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress transcription factors Activating Transcription Factor 3 (ATF3) and ATF4 are induced by amphetamine and restraint stress in rat striatum. However, presently it is unknown the full extent of ER stress responses to psychological stress or cocaine, and which of the three ER stress pathways is activated. The current study examines transcriptional responses of key ER stress target genes subsequent to psychologi...

  15. Biting the Iron Bullet: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Adds the Pain of Hepcidin to Chronic Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Messner, Donald J.; Kowdley, Kris V.

    2010-01-01

    Hepcidin is a peptide hormone that is secreted by the liver and controls body iron homeostasis. Hepcidin overproduction causes anemia of inflammation, whereas its deficiency leads to hemochromatosis. Inflammation and iron are known extracellular stimuli for hepcidin expression. We found that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress also induces hepcidin expression and causes hypoferremia and spleen iron sequestration in mice. CREBH (cyclic AMP response element-binding protein H), an ER stress-activa...

  16. Critical Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Cognitive Impairment Induced by Microcystin-LR

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Cai; Jue Liu; Cairong Li; Jianghua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies showed that cyanobacteria-derived microcystin-leucine-arginine (MCLR) can cause hippocampal pathological damage and trigger cognitive impairment; but the underlying mechanisms have not been well understood. The objective of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of MCLR-induced cognitive deficit; with a focus on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The Morris water maze test and electrophysiological study demonstrated that MCLR caused spatial memory injury in male Wis...

  17. Biochemical, immunological, and immunocytochemical evidence for the association of chalcone synthase with endoplasmic reticulum membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hrazdina, G; Zobel, A M; Hoch, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    Chalcone synthase [naringenin-chalcone synthase; malonyl-CoA:4-coumaroyl-CoA malonyltransferase (cyclizing), E.C. 2.3.1.74], the key enzyme of flavonoid pathways that was believed to be soluble, has been localized on ribosome-bearing endoplasmic reticulum membranes in the epidermis of buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum M.) hypocotyls. Enzyme activity measurement and immunoblots of buckwheat hypocotyl homogenates that were fractionated on linear sucrose density gradients and developed with a spec...

  18. Exercise copes with prolonged stress-induced impairment of spatial memory performance by endoplasmic reticulum stress

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Jong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The present study demonstrates that prolonged restraint administration for 21 days caused memory impairment and induced hippocampal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis. On the contrary, this change was revered by treadmill running for 8 weeks. Repeated psychological stress caused an increase in escape latency time in the water maze test, accompanied by the induction of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), and ...

  19. Absence of adipose triglyceride lipase protects from hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs, Claudia D.; Claudel, Thierry; Kumari, Pooja; Haemmerle, Guenter; Pollheimer, Marion J.; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Scharnagl, Hubert; Halilbasic, Emina; Gumhold, Judith; Silbert, Dagmar; Koefeler, Harald; Trauner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by triglyceride (TG) accumulation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Because fatty acids (FAs) may trigger ER stress, we hypothesized that the absence of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL/PNPLA2)-the main enzyme for intracellular lipolysis, releasing FAs, and closest homolog to adiponutrin (PNPLA3) recently implicated in the pathogenesis of NAFLD-protects against hepatic ER stress. Wild-type (WT) and ATGL knockout (KO) mice were ch...

  20. Endoplasmic Reticulum Thiol Oxidase Deficiency Leads to Ascorbic Acid Depletion and Noncanonical Scurvy in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zito, Ester; Hansen, Henning Gram; Yeo, Giles S.H.; Fujii, Junichi; Ron, David

    2012-01-01

    Summary Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) thiol oxidases initiate a disulfide relay to oxidatively fold secreted proteins. We found that combined loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding the ER thiol oxidases ERO1α, ERO1β, and PRDX4 compromised the extracellular matrix in mice and interfered with the intracellular maturation of procollagen. These severe abnormalities were associated with an unexpectedly modest delay in disulfide bond formation in secreted proteins but a profound, 5-fold lower pr...

  1. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Neurodegeneration in Rats Neonatally Infected with Borna Disease Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, B L; Lipkin, W. I.

    2006-01-01

    Borna disease virus infection of neonatal rats results in a characteristic behavioral syndrome and apoptosis of subsets of neurons in the hippocampus and cerebellum (neonatal Borna disease [NBD]). The cellular mechanisms leading to neurodevelopmental damage in NBD have not been fully elucidated. Insights into this model may have general implications for understanding the pathogenesis of virus-associated neurodevelopmental damage. Here we report the presence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stres...

  2. Interaction between Mitochondria and the Endoplasmic Reticulum: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Jaechan Leem; Eun Hee Koh

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are closely associated with β -cell dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance. Thus, each of these factors contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). The accumulated evidence reveals structural and functional communications between mitochondria and the ER. It is now well established that ER stress causes apoptotic cell death by disturbing mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis. In addition, recent studies have s...

  3. Role of autophagy in diabetes and endoplasmic reticulum stress of pancreatic β-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Quan, Wenying; Lim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Myung-Shik

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by insulin resistance and failure of pancreatic β-cells producing insulin. Autophagy plays a crucial role in cellular homeostasis through degradation and recycling of organelles such as mitochondria or endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here we discussed the role of β-cell autophagy in development of diabetes, based on our own studies using mice with β-cell-specific deletion of Atg7 (autophagy-related 7), an important autophagy gene, and studies by others. β...

  4. A Molecular Fluorescent Probe for Targeted Visualization of Temperature at the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Satoshi Arai; Sung-Chan Lee; Duanting Zhai; Madoka Suzuki; Young Tae Chang

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of cellular heat production and propagation remains elusive at a subcellular level. Here we report the first small molecule fluorescent thermometer selectively targeting the endoplasmic reticulum (ER thermo yellow), with the highest sensitivity reported so far (3.9%/°C). Unlike nanoparticle thermometers, ER thermo yellow stains the target organelle evenly without the commonly encountered problem of aggregation, and successfully demonstrates the ability to monitor intracellular te...

  5. Mechanisms of Alcohol-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Organ Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng Ji

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol is readily distributed throughout the body in the blood stream and crosses biological membranes, which affect virtually all biological processes inside the cell. Excessive alcohol consumption induces numerous pathological stress responses, part of which is endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. ER stress, a condition under which unfolded/misfolded protein accumulates in the ER, contributes to alcoholic disorders of major organs such as liver, pancreas, heart, and brain. Potential...

  6. Calcium and IP3 dynamics in cardiac myocytes: Experimental and computational perspectives and approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix eHohendanner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium plays a crucial role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC, but it is also a pivotal second messenger activating Ca2+-dependent transcription factors in a process termed excitation-transcription coupling (ETC. Evidence accumulated over the past decade indicates a pivotal role of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in the regulation of cytosolic and nuclear Ca2+ signals. IP3 is generated by stimulation of plasma membrane receptors that couple to phospholipase C (PLC, liberating IP3 from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2. An intriguing aspect of IP3 signaling is the presence of the entire PIP2-PLC-IP3 signaling cascade as well as the presence of IP3Rs at the inner and outer membranes of the nuclear envelope (NE which functions as a Ca2+ store. The observation that the nucleus is surrounded by its own putative Ca2+ store raises the possibility that nuclear IP3-dependent Ca2+ release plays a critical role in ETC. This provides a potential mechanism of regulation that acts locally and autonomously from the global cytosolic Ca2+ signal underlying ECC. Moreover, there is evidence that: (i the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR and NE are a single contiguous Ca2+ store; (ii the nuclear pore complex is the major gateway for Ca2+ and macromolecules to pass between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm; (iii the inner membrane of the NE hosts key Ca2+ handling proteins including the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX/GM1 complex, ryanodine receptors (RyRs, nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate receptors (NAADPRs, Na+/K+ ATPase and Na+/H+ exchanger. Thus, it appears that the nucleus represents a Ca2+ signaling domain equipped with its own ion channels and transporters that allow for complex local Ca2+ signals. Many experimental and modeling approaches have been used for the study of intracellular Ca2+ signaling but the key to understanding of the dual role of Ca2+ mediating ECC and ECT lays in quantitative differences of

  7. Ca(2+ release events in cardiac myocytes up close: insights from fast confocal imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav M Shkryl

    Full Text Available The spatio-temporal properties of Ca(2+ transients during excitation-contraction coupling and elementary Ca(2+ release events (Ca(2+ sparks were studied in atrial and ventricular myocytes with ultra-fast confocal microscopy using a Zeiss LSM 5 LIVE system that allows sampling rates of up to 60 kHz. Ca(2+ sparks which originated from subsarcolemmal junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (j-SR release sites in atrial myocytes were anisotropic and elongated in the longitudinal direction of the cell. Ca(2+ sparks in atrial cells originating from non-junctional SR and in ventricular myocytes were symmetrical. Ca(2+ spark recording in line scan mode at 40,000 lines/s uncovered step-like increases of [Ca(2+]i. 2-D imaging of Ca(2+ transients revealed an asynchronous activation of release sites and allowed the sequential recording of Ca(2+ entry through surface membrane Ca(2+ channels and subsequent activation of Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release. With a latency of 2.5 ms after application of an electrical stimulus, Ca(2+ entry could be detected that was followed by SR Ca(2+ release after an additional 3 ms delay. Maximum Ca(2+ release was observed 4 ms after the beginning of release. The timing of Ca(2+ entry and release was confirmed by simultaneous [Ca(2+]i and membrane current measurements using the whole cell voltage-clamp technique. In atrial cells activation of discrete individual release sites of the j-SR led to spatially restricted Ca(2+ release events that fused into a peripheral ring of elevated [Ca(2+]i that subsequently propagated in a wave-like fashion towards the center of the cell. In ventricular myocytes asynchronous Ca(2+ release signals from discrete sites with no preferential subcellular location preceded the whole-cell Ca(2+ transient. In summary, ultra-fast confocal imaging allows investigation of Ca(2+ signals with a time resolution similar to patch clamp technique, however in a less invasive fashion.

  8. Cardiac troponin: an emerging cardiac biomarker in animal health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal V. Undhad

    Full Text Available Analysis of cardiac troponin I (cTn I and T (cTnT are considered the “gold standard” for the non-invasive diagnosis of myocardial injury in human and animals. It has replaced traditionally used cardiac biomarkers such as myoglobin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, creatine kinase (CK and CK-MB due to its high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of myocardial injury. Cardiac troponins are proteins that control the calcium-mediated interaction between actin and myosin, allowing contraction at the sarcomere level. Concentration of the cTn can be correlated microscopic lesion and loss of immunolabeling in myocardium damage. Troponin concentration remains elevated in blood for 1-2wks so that wide window is available for diagnosis of myocardial damage. The cTn test has >95% specificity and sensitivity and test is less time consuming (10 to 15 minutes and less costly (INR 200 to INR 500. [Vet. World 2012; 5(8.000: 508-511

  9. Cardiac Arrest in a Heart Transplant Patient Receiving Dexmedetomidine During Cardiac Catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Lawrence Israel; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Stenquist, Scott; Twite, Mark David

    2016-06-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α-2 agonist with a sedative and cardiopulmonary profile that makes it an attractive anesthetic in pediatric cardiac patients. Cardiac transplant patients may suffer from acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system and, therefore, are at an increased risk of the electrophysiological effect of dexmedetomidine. We present such a patient who had a cardiac arrest while receiving dexmedetomidine during cardiac catheterization. Because acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system is difficult to diagnose, dexmedetomidine should be used with caution in pediatric heart transplant patients. PMID:26721807

  10. When did cardiac surgery begin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumacker, H B

    1989-01-01

    Heart surgery is generally regarded as having begun on September 10, 1896 when Ludwig Rehn sutured a myocardial laceration successfully. There are valid reasons, however, to believe that cardiac surgery had its origin nearly a century earlier with the operative drainage of the pericardium by the little known Spanish surgeon, Francisco Romero, and highly regarded Baron Dominique Jean Larrey. This procedure entailed making a thoracic incision and opening and draining the pericardium. It must necessarily be considered a cardiac operation. The pericardium is part of the heart; its epicardium continues as the serosal layer of the fibrous pericardium; the pericardium is fused to the heart's base and great vessels; all books on heart surgery include pericardial operations. When Romero first operated is unknown, but it antedated 1814 when his work was presented in Paris; Larrey's operation was performed in 1810. These contributions are presented, and their priority with regard to the later initial efforts to suture myocardial laceration is reviewed briefly. PMID:2651455

  11. Modeling Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atara Novak

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT is an inherited arrhythmogenic cardiac disorder characterized by life-threatening arrhythmias induced by physical or emotional stress, in the absence structural heart abnormalities. The arrhythmias may cause syncope or degenerate into cardiac arrest and sudden death which usually occurs during childhood. Recent studies have shown that CPVT is caused by mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2 or calsequestrin 2 (CASQ2 genes. Both proteins are key contributors to the intracellular Ca2+ handling process and play a pivotal role in Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol during systole. Although the molecular pathogenesis of CPVT is not entirely clear, it was suggested that the CPVT mutations promote excessive sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak, which initiates delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs and triggered arrhythmias in cardiac myocytes. The recent breakthrough discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC generated from somatic cells (e.g. fibroblasts, keratinocytes now enables researches to investigate mutated cardiomyocytes generated from the patient’s iPSC. To this end, in the present article we review recent studies on CPVT iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, thus demonstrating in the mutated cells catecholamine-induced DADs and triggered arrhythmias.

  12. Historical perspectives of cardiac electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüderitz, Berndt

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of clinical electrophysiology has a long and fascinating history. From earliest times, no clinical symptom impressed the patient (and the physician) more than an irregular heart beat. Although ancient Chinese pulse theory laid the foundation for the study of arrhythmias and clinical electrophysiology in the 5th century BC, the most significant breakthrough in the identification and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias first occurred in this century. In the last decades, our knowledge of electrophysiology and pharmacology has increased exponentially. The enormous clinical significance of cardiac rhythm disturbances has favored these advances. On the one hand, patients live longer and thus are more likely to experience arrhythmias. On the other hand, circulatory problems of the cardiac vessels have increased enormously, and this has been identified as the primary cause of cardiac rhythm disorders. Coronary heart disease has become not just the most significant disease of all, based on the statistics for cause of death. Arrhythmias are the main complication of ischemic heart disease, and they have been directly linked to the frequently arrhythmogenic sudden death syndrome, which is now presumed to be an avoidable "electrical accident" of the heart. A retrospective look--often charming in its own right--may not only make it easier to sort through the copious details of this field and so become oriented in this universe of important and less important facts: it may also provide the observer with a chronological vantage point from which to view the subject. The study of clinical electrophysiology is no dry compendium of facts and figures, but rather a dynamic field of study evolving out of the competition between various ideas, intentions and theories. PMID:19196616

  13. Cardiac rehabilitation: a comprehensive review

    OpenAIRE

    Lear Scott A; Ignaszewski Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a commonly used treatment for men and women with cardiovascular disease. To date, no single study has conclusively demonstrated a comprehensive benefit of CR. Numerous individual studies, however, have demonstrated beneficial effects such as improved risk-factor profile, slower disease progression, decreased morbidity, and decreased mortality. This paper will review the evidence for the use of CR and discuss the implications and limitations of these stu...

  14. Cardiac Biomarkers in Hyperthyroid Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Sangster, J.K.; Panciera, D L; Abbott, J.A.; Zimmerman, K.C.; Lantis, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyperthyroidism has substantial effects on the circulatory system. The cardiac biomarkers NT‐proBNP and troponin I (cTNI) have proven useful in identifying cats with myocardial disease but have not been extensively investigated in hyperthyroidism. Hypothesis Plasma NT‐proBNP and cTNI concentrations are higher in cats with primary myocardial disease than in cats with hyperthyroidism and higher in cats with hyperthyroidism than in healthy control cats. Animals Twenty‐three hyperthyro...

  15. Functiogenesis of cardiac pacemaker activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tetsuro; Kamino, Kohtaro

    2016-07-01

    Throughout our investigations on the ontogenesis of the electrophysiological events in early embryonic chick hearts, using optical techniques to record membrane potential probed with voltage-sensitive dyes, we have introduced a novel concept of "functiogenesis" corresponding to "morphogenesis". This article gives an account of the framework of "functiogenesis", focusing on the cardiac pacemaker function and the functional organization of the pacemaking area. PMID:26719289

  16. Comparative Aspects of Cardiac Adaptation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    New York : Springer, 2013 - (Ošťádal, B.; Dhalla, N.), s. 3-18 ISBN 978-1-4614-5202-7. - (Advances in Biochemistry in Health and Disease) R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/1308 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cardiac adaptation * poikilotherms * homeotherms Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  17. Cardiac Biomarkers and Cycling Race

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Le Goff, Jean-François Kaux, Sébastien Goffaux, Etienne Cavalier

    2015-01-01

    In cycling as in other types of strenuous exercise, there exists a risk of sudden death. It is important both to understand its causes and to see if the behavior of certain biomarkers might highlight athletes at risk. Many reports describe changes in biomarkers after strenuous exercise (Nie et al., 2011), but interpreting these changes, and notably distinguishing normal physiological responses from pathological changes, is not easy. Here we have focused on the kinetics of different cardiac bi...

  18. Cardiac involvement in tuberous sclerosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mühler, E G; Turniski-Harder, V; Engelhardt, W.; von Bernuth, G

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the incidence, importance, and history of cardiac involvement in infants and children with tuberous sclerosis. DESIGN--Prospective study; clinical examination, sector and Doppler echocardiography, standard and ambulatory electrocardiography. SETTING--A tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS--21 patients with tuberous sclerosis aged 1 day to 16 years (mean 6.3 years); follow up investigations were available in 14 cases (10 retrospective, 4 prospective; mean follow up 4.3 years...

  19. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  20. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Singh Gulati, G., E-mail: gulatigurpreet@rediffmail.com [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Seth, S. [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Sharma, S. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India)

    2012-02-15

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  1. Review Article of Cardiac Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jittiporn PURATTANAMAL

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac amyloidosis is a term that means the deposit of abnormal proteins in the myocardium leading to global thickening of the heart walls. The clinical character is that of infiltrative cardiomyopathy. AL amyloidosis is the most common type that involves cardiac failure. Cardiac amyloid precedes clinical congestive heart failure, especially right-sided heart failure. Laboratory investigations have identified the amyloid fibril proteins deposited in the organ tissues. Immunofixation tests are the most sensitive that recognize the paraprotein mean light chain protein or immunoglobulin subtype deposit. Prognosis is poor if AL amyloidosis is untreated. Treatment of systemic involvement in AL amyloidosis is via chemotherapy such as melphalan and prednisolone. UK experts have reported the results of treatment in AL amyloidosis. Regardless of the use of adjunctive chemotherapy, the five-year survival after heart transplantation was generally poorer for AL (20 % at five years, but similar for non-AL amyloidosis (64 % at five years, than heart transplants in other cases. Progression of the systemic disease contributed to increased mortality. A specific treatment that increases the chances of survival is unknown.

  2. Gastrointestinal complications and cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Sara J

    2014-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) complications are an uncommon but potentially devastating complication of cardiac surgery. The reported incidence varies between .3% and 5.5% with an associated mortality of .3-87%. A wide range of GI complications are reported with bleeding, mesenteric ischemia, pancreatitis, cholecystitis, and ileus the most common. Ischemia is thought to be the main cause of GI complications with hypoperfusion during cardiac surgery as well as systemic inflammation, hypothermia, drug therapy, and mechanical factors contributing. Several nonischemic mechanisms may contribute to GI complications, including bacterial translocation, adverse drug reactions, and iatrogenic organ injury. Risk factors for GI complications are advanced age (>70 years), reoperation or emergency surgery, comorbidities (renal disease, respiratory disease, peripheral vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiac failure), perioperative use of an intra-aortic balloon pump or inotrope therapy, prolonged surgery or cardiopulmonary bypass, and postoperative complications. Multiple strategies to reduce the incidence of GI complications exist, including risk stratification scores, targeted inotrope and fluid therapy, drug therapies, and modification of cardiopulmonary bypass. Currently, no single therapy has consistently proven efficacy in reducing GI complications. Timely diagnosis and treatment, while tailored to the specific complication and patient, is essential for optimal management and outcomes in this challenging patient population. PMID:25208431

  3. Research progress of inflammation reaction related to endoplasmic reticulum stress in ischemic endoplasmic reticulum stress%缺血性脑中风中与内质网应激相关炎症反应研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄志英; 李韶菁; 张晓旭; 孙文利; 陈畅; 李德凤; 方婧; 付梅红; 刘庆山; 颜天华

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum plays a key role in both basic structure formation and function performance of microenviron-ment. Endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis unbalance caused by endoplasmic reticulum stress has become a hot research topic in recent years. This paper focuses on the role of endoplasmic retic-ulum stress in ischemic stroke. Research progress of related sig-naling pathways were reviewed, especially mechanisms through which endoplasmic reticulum stress trigger the inflammatory reac-tion, so as to provide a new research method for prevention of is-chemic stroke.%内质网是机体微环境的重要组成结构和功能单位,内质网内稳态失衡导致的内质网应激成为近年来的一个研究热点。该文主要针对内质网应激在缺血性脑中风中的作用及相关信号通路的研究进展进行综述,特别对内质网应激触发脑中风炎症反应的机制进行了系统的整理和总结,以期为缺血性中风的防治提供新的研究思路。

  4. Cardiac tamponade: contrast reflux as an indicator of cardiac chamber equalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauta Foeke Jacob

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic hemopericardium remains a rare entity; it does however commonly cause cardiac tamponade which remains a major cause of death in traumatic blunt cardiac injury. Objectives We present a case of blunt chest trauma complicated by cardiac tamponade causing cardiac chamber equalization revealed by reflux of contrast. Case report A 29-year-old unidentified male suffered blunt chest trauma in a motor vehicle collision. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated a periaortic hematoma and hemopericardium. Significant contrast reflux was seen in the inferior vena cava and hepatic veins suggesting a change in cardiac chamber pressures. After intensive treatment including cardiac massage this patient expired of cardiac arrest. Conclusion Reflux of contrast on CT imaging can be an indicator of traumatic cardiac tamponade.

  5. Cardiac Stem Cells: Biology and Clinical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Goichberg, Polina; Chang, Jerway; Liao, Ronglih; Leri, Annarosa

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Heart disease is the primary cause of death in the industrialized world. Cardiac failure is dictated by an uncompensated reduction in the number of viable and fully functional cardiomyocytes. While current pharmacological therapies alleviate the symptoms associated with cardiac deterioration, heart transplantation remains the only therapy for advanced heart failure. Therefore, there is a pressing need for novel therapeutic modalities. Cell-based therapies involving cardiac stem ...

  6. Cardiac imaging: Current and emerging applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jankharia B; Raut A

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scan have made big inroads as modalities used for evaluation of various pathologies of the heart. Cardiac MRI is typically used for perfusion and viability studies as well as to study various cardiomyopathies, valvular diseases and the pericardium. It has been used in the evaluation of congenital heart diseases over the last two decades. Cardiac CT is used mainly for the evaluation of the coronary arteries, typically in the...

  7. Disseminated cysticercosis with pulmonary and cardiac involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Jain Bharat; Sankhe Shilpa; Agrawal Mukta; Naphade Prashant

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary and cardiac involvement by cysticercosis is extremely rare, and is usually asymptomatic. We report the case of a 19-year-old boy who presented with a history of headache and vomiting and was found to have disseminated cysticercosis with pulmonary and cardiac involvement; the emphasis is on the rare occurrence of pulmonary, cardiac, pancreatic, intraocular, and extradural spinal canal involvement in the same patient. This case demonstrates the extent to which cysticercosis can be dis...

  8. Motivational factors of adherence to cardiac rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Shahsavari, Hooman; Shahriari, Mohsen; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2012-01-01

    Background: Main suggested theories about patients’ adherence to treatment regimens recognize the importance of motivation in positive changes in behaviors. Since cardiac diseases are chronic and common, cardiac rehabilitation as an effective prevention program is crucial in management of these diseases. There is always concern about the patients’ adherence to cardiac rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to describe the motivational factors affecting the patients’ participation and compl...

  9. Cardiac tumours simulating collagen vascular disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzpatrick, A. P.; Lanham, J. G.; Doyle, D V

    1986-01-01

    Cardiac tumours can mimic collagen vascular disease and they are often accompanied by profound systemic upset. Both benign and malignant tumours may present in this way. Three cases of cardiac tumour, two malignant and one benign, are reported with just such a presentation. A review of fifteen similar case reports showed that a spectrum of different collagen vascular diseases was diagnosed and treated before the true diagnosis emerged. In half of these cases the cardiac tumour was only diagno...

  10. Methods in pharmacology: measurement of cardiac output

    OpenAIRE

    Geerts, Bart F; Aarts, Leon P; Jansen, Jos R.

    2011-01-01

    Many methods of cardiac output measurement have been developed, but the number of methods useful for human pharmacological studies is limited. The ‘holy grail’ for the measurement of cardiac output would be a method that is accurate, precise, operator independent, fast responding, non-invasive, continuous, easy to use, cheap and safe. This method does not exist today. In this review on cardiac output methods used in pharmacology, the Fick principle, indicator dilution techniques, arterial pul...

  11. Electrocardiographically Determination of Cardiac Enlargements in Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Gönül, Remzi; OR, Mehmet Erman; DODURKA, Tamer

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the electrocardiographic parameters necessary to determine cardiac enlargements and to establish and distinguish such complaints from each other in the early stage in dogs with circulatory problems were assessed. The material of the study consisted of 33 dogs 1.5-15 years of age with cardiac enlargements determined from 140 dogs suspected of having cardiac disease based on clinical, radiographic and electrocardiographic analyses. In these dogs, 12 cases of left atrial hypert...

  12. Interdisciplinary preoperative patient education in cardiac surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    De Weert, J.; van Dulmen, S.; Bar, P.; Venus, E.

    2003-01-01

    Patient education in cardiac surgery is complicated by the fact that cardiac surgery patients meet a lot of different health care providers. Little is known about education processes in terms of interdisciplinary tuning. In this study, complete series of consecutive preoperative consultations of 51 cardiac surgery patients with different health care providers (physicians, nurses and health educators) were videotaped. The information exchange between patients and providers was analyzed directl...

  13. The sarcolipin-bound calcium pump stabilizes calcium sites exposed to the cytoplasm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Bublitz, Maike; Karlsen, Jesper Lykkegaard;

    2013-01-01

    The contraction and relaxation of muscle cells is controlled by the successive rise and fall of cytosolic Ca(2+), initiated by the release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and terminated by re-sequestration of Ca(2+) into the sarcoplasmic reticulum as the main mechanism of Ca(2+) removal...

  14. Digital subtraction angiography in cardiac diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DSA was done in 133 examinations of 128 patients during 2 years consist of 9 examination of IV DSA and 124 examination of selective cardiac DSA after cardiac catheterization. Open heart surgery was performed in 90 patients and 12 patients showed discrepancy between pre-and post operative diagnosis, showing a total 86.7% of diagnostic accuracy with DSA. We experienced the significant reduction in dose of contrast media, 30-40% of dose of conventional cardiac angiography. It is concluded that DSA is useful in the evaluation of septal defects, valvular disease and other congenital heart disease. DSA is an accurate simple and safe method in evaluating of cardiac diseases.

  15. Contemporary Breast Radiotherapy and Cardiac Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboa, Debra Nana; Evans, Suzanne Buckley

    2016-01-01

    Long-term cardiac effects are an important component of survivorship after breast radiotherapy. The pathophysiology of cardiotoxicity, history of breast radiotherapy, current methods of cardiac avoidance, modern outcomes, context of historical outcomes, quantifying cardiac effects, and future directions are reviewed in this article. Radiation-induced oxidative stress induces proinflammatory cytokines and is a process that potentiates late effects of fibrosis and intimal proliferation in endothelial vasculature. Breast radiation therapy has changed substantially in recent decades. Several modern technologies exist to improve cardiac avoidance such as deep inspiration breath hold, gating, accelerated partial breast irradiation, and use of modern 3-dimensional planning. Modern outcomes may vary notably from historical long-term cardiac outcomes given the differences in cardiac dose with modern techniques. Methods of quantifying radiation-related cardiotoxicity that correlate with future cardiac risks are needed with current data exploring techniques such as measuring computed tomography coronary artery calcium score, single-photon emission computed tomography imaging, and biomarkers. Placing historical data, dosimetric correlations, and relative cardiac risk in context are key when weighing the benefits of radiotherapy in breast cancer control and survival. Estimating present day cardiac risk in the modern treatment era includes challenges in length of follow-up and the use of confounding cardiotoxic agents such as evolving systemic chemotherapy and targeted therapies. Future directions in both multidisciplinary management and advancing technology in radiation oncology may provide further improvements in patient risk reduction and breast cancer survivorship. PMID:26617212

  16. MRI in cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarcoidosis and amyloidosis are both multisystem disorders, which may involve the heart; however, isolated cardiac disease is rare. Diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis is crucial because the patient prognosis is dependent on cardiac involvement and early treatment. Echocardiography is the first line imaging modality in the diagnostic work-up of both diseases, possibly giving hints towards the correct diagnosis. Besides myocardial biopsy and radionuclide studies cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely performed in patients suspect of having infiltrative cardiomyopathy. The T1 mapping procedure is currently being evaluated as a new technique for detection and quantification of global myocardial enhancement, as seen in cardiac amyloidosis. Sensitivities and specificities for detection of cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis can be significantly improved by MRI, especially with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging. In cardiac sarcoidosis the use of LGE is outcome-related while in amyloidosis analysis of T1-mapping may be of prognostic value. If cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis or amyloidosis is suspected cardiac MRI including LGE should be performed for establishing the diagnosis. (orig.)

  17. [Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkkunen, Ilkka; Hoppu, Sanna; Kämäräinen, Antti

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac arrest as the first symptom of coronary artery disease is not uncommon. Some of previously healthy people with sudden cardiac arrest may be saved by effective resuscitation and post-resuscitative therapy. The majority of cardiac arrest patients experience the cardiac arrest outside of the hospital, in which case early recognition of lifelessness, commencement of basic life support and entry to professional care without delay are the prerequisites for recovery. After the heart has started beating again, the clinical picture of post-resuscitation syndrome must be recognized and appropriate treatment utilized. PMID:22204143

  18. Cardiac tissue engineering in magnetically actuated scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac tissue engineering offers new possibilities for the functional and structural restoration of damaged or lost heart tissue by applying cardiac patches created in vitro. Engineering such functional cardiac patches is a complex mission, involving material design on the nano- and microscale as well as the application of biological cues and stimulation patterns to promote cell survival and organization into a functional cardiac tissue. Herein, we present a novel strategy for creating a functional cardiac patch by combining the use of a macroporous alginate scaffold impregnated with magnetically responsive nanoparticles (MNPs) and the application of external magnetic stimulation. Neonatal rat cardiac cells seeded within the magnetically responsive scaffolds and stimulated by an alternating magnetic field of 5 Hz developed into matured myocardial tissue characterized by anisotropically organized striated cardiac fibers, which preserved its features for longer times than non-stimulated constructs. A greater activation of AKT phosphorylation in cardiac cell constructs after applying a short-term (20 min) external magnetic field indicated the efficacy of magnetic stimulation to actuate at a distance and provided a possible mechanism for its action. Our results point to a synergistic effect of magnetic field stimulation together with nanoparticulate features of the scaffold surface as providing the regenerating environment for cardiac cells driving their organization into functionally mature tissue. (paper)

  19. The involvement of SMILE/TMTC3 in endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud Racapé

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The state of operational tolerance has been detected sporadically in some renal transplanted patients that stopped immunosuppressive drugs, demonstrating that allograft tolerance might exist in humans. Several years ago, a study by Brouard et al. identified a molecular signature of several genes that were significantly differentially expressed in the blood of such patients compared with patients with other clinical situations. The aim of the present study is to analyze the role of one of these molecules over-expressed in the blood of operationally tolerant patients, SMILE or TMTC3, a protein whose function is still unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first confirmed that SMILE mRNA is differentially expressed in the blood of operationally tolerant patients with drug-free long term graft function compared to stable and rejecting patients. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach and a colocalization study by confocal microscopy we furthermore report an interaction of SMILE with PDIA3, a molecule resident in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In accordance with this observation, SMILE silencing in HeLa cells correlated with the modulation of several transcripts involved in proteolysis and a decrease in proteasome activity. Finally, SMILE silencing increased HeLa cell sensitivity to the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib, a drug that induces ER stress via protein overload, and increased transcript expression of a stress response protein, XBP-1, in HeLa cells and keratinocytes. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study we showed that SMILE is involved in the endoplasmic reticulum stress response, by modulating proteasome activity and XBP-1 transcript expression. This function of SMILE may influence immune cell behavior in the context of transplantation, and the analysis of endoplasmic reticulum stress in transplantation may reveal new pathways of regulation in long-term graft acceptance thereby increasing our understanding of tolerance.

  20. A comparison of genetic findings in sudden cardiac death victims and cardiac patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Christin L; Ferrero-Miliani, Laura; Frank-Hansen, Rune;

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is responsible for a large proportion of non-traumatic, sudden and unexpected deaths in young individuals. Sudden cardiac death is a known manifestation of several inherited cardiac diseases. In post-mortem examinations, about two-thirds of the SCD cases show structural...

  1. [Thoracic lavage and open cardiac massage as treatment of hypothermic cardiac arrest--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Timo; Vänni, Ville; Kettunen, Minna; Reinikainen, Matti; Hakala, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass is the treatment of choice for a severely hypothermic patient with cardiac arrest. However, the treatment is not always available. We describe a successful three-and-a-half hour resuscitation of a hypothermic cardiac arrest patient with manual chest compressions followed by open cardiac massage and rewarming with thoracic lavage. PMID:27188092

  2. Thyroid hormone regulates cardiac performance during cold acclimation in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Alexander G; Seebacher, Frank

    2014-03-01

    Limitations to oxygen transport reduce aerobic scope and thereby activity at thermal extremes. Oxygen transport in fish is facilitated to a large extent by cardiac function so that climate variability may reduce fitness by constraining the performance of the heart. In zebrafish (Danio rerio), thyroid hormone (TH) regulates skeletal muscle function and metabolism in response to thermal acclimation. Here, we aimed to determine whether TH also regulates cardiac function during acclimation. We used propylthiouracil and iopanoic acid to induce hypothyroidism in zebrafish over a 3 week acclimation period to either 18 or 28°C. We found that cold-acclimated fish had higher maximum heart rates and sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) activity than warm-acclimated fish. Hypothyroid treatment significantly decreased these responses in the cold-acclimated fish, but it did not affect the warm-acclimated fish. TH did not influence SERCA gene transcription, nor did it increase metabolic rate, of isolated whole hearts. To verify that physiological changes following hypothyroid treatment were in fact due to the action of TH, we supplemented hypothyroid fish with 3,5-diiodothryronine (T2) or 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3). Supplementation of hypothyroid fish with T2 or T3 restored heart rate and SERCA activity to control levels. We also show that, in zebrafish, changes in cardiac output in response to warming are primarily mediated by heart rate, rather than by stroke volume. Thus, changes in heart rate are important for the overall aerobic capacity of the fish. In addition to its local effects on heart phenotype, we show that TH increases sympathetic tone on the heart at rest and during maximum exercise. Our findings reveal a new pathway through which fish can mitigate the limiting effects of temperature variability on oxygen transport to maintain aerobic scope and promote thermal tolerance. PMID:24265422

  3. A postmortem study on indigestible foreign bodies in the rumen and reticulum of ruminants, eastern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifu Negash

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was conducted on ruminants (cattle, sheep and goats slaughtered at Haramaya University and Haramaya municipal abattoirs from November 2013 to April 2014 in Haramaya, eastern Ethiopia. The objective of the study was to identify types and estimate the prevalence of foreign bodies in the rumen and reticulum of domestic ruminants in the area. From 810 randomly selected study animals, 422 (52.1% were found to have foreign bodies. Of the 332 cattle, 193 sheep and 285 goats examined, 144 (43.4%, 109 (56.5% and 169 (59.3% respectively were found with various types of foreign bodies. The prevalence of foreign bodies was significantly (χ2 = 17.53, p < 0.05 higher in sheep (59.3% and goats (56.7% than in cattle (43.4%. Overall the prevalence of foreign bodies in study animals with poor body condition was significantly higher (χ2 = 38.57, p < 0.05 than in those with medium and good body condition. A higher percentage of foreign bodies occurred in the rumen alone (87.9% than in the reticulum alone (5.0%, with the rest present in both. Significantly higher proportions of foreign bodies were observed in the rumen of cattle (χ2 = 332, p < 0.05, sheep (χ2 = 193, p < 0.05 and goats (χ2 = 285.0, p = 0.000 than in the reticulum. Plastic was the most commonly encountered (79.2% foreign body, followed by cloth (15.3% and rope (12.3%. In addition, metal (0.9% and calcified material and/or stone (1.0% were found in the reticulum of cattle. Lack of a plastic waste disposal system in the area as well as communal/free grazing of livestock in highly waste-polluted areas seemed to be major factors in the high occurrence of foreign bodies in ruminants. To change this, collaborative intervention schemes involving professionals, policy makers, livestock keepers and environmental activists are needed.

  4. The Endoplasmic Reticulum of Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Contains Functional TRPV1 Channels*

    OpenAIRE

    Gallego-Sandín, Sonia; Rodríguez-García, Arancha; Alonso, María Teresa; García-Sancho, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a plasma membrane Ca2+ channel involved in transduction of painful stimuli. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons express ectopic but functional TRPV1 channels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) (TRPV1ER). We have studied the properties of TRPV1ER in DRG neurons and HEK293T cells expressing TRPV1. Activation of TRPV1ER with capsaicin or other vanilloids produced an increase of cytosolic Ca2+ due to Ca2+ release from the ER. The decrease of ...

  5. Apolipoprotein E4 Domain Interaction Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Impairs Astrocyte Function*

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Ning; Ramaswamy, Gayathri; Weisgraber, Karl H.

    2009-01-01

    Domain interaction, a structural property of apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4), is predicted to contribute to the association of apoE4 with Alzheimer disease. Arg-61 apoE mice, a gene-targeted mouse model specific for domain interaction, have lower brain apoE levels and synaptic, functional, and cognitive deficits. We hypothesized that domain interaction elicits an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in astrocytes and an unfolded protein response that targets Arg-61 apoE for degradation. Primary Arg-61...

  6. Ribosome binding sites visualized on freeze-fractured membranes of the rough endoplasmic reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Freeze-fracture micrographs of cells of the green alga Micrasterias denticulata stabilized by ultrarapid freezing reveal imprints of polysomes on the rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes. The imprints appear as broad, spiral ridges on the P faces and as corresponding wide grooves on the E faces of the membranes. Distinct 110-A particles with a spacing of 270 +/- 45 A are associated with the P-face ridges. Where imprints of individual ribosomes can be discerned, it is seen that there is a 1:1...

  7. Survival and death of endoplasmic-reticulum-stressed cells:Role of autophagy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in ER stress, which subsequently activates the unfolded protein response that induces a transcriptional program to alleviate the stress. Another cellular process that is activated during ER stress is autophagy, a mechanism of enclosing intracellular compo- nents in a double-membrane autophagosome, and then delivering it to the lysosome for degradation. Here, we discuss the role of autophagy in cellular response to ER stress, the signaling pathways linking ER stress to autophagy, and the possible implication of modulating autophagy in treatment of diseases such as cancer.

  8. ERp57 Modulates STAT3 Signaling from the Lumen of the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    OpenAIRE

    Coe, Helen; Jung, Joanna; Groenendyk, Jody; Prins, Daniel; Michalak, Marek

    2009-01-01

    ERp57 is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident thiol disulfide oxidoreductase. Using the gene trap technique, we created a ERp57-deficient mouse model. Targeted deletion of the Pdia3 gene, which encodes ERp57, in mice is embryonic lethal at embryonic day (E) 13.5. β-Galactosidase reporter gene analysis revealed that ERp57 is expressed early on during blastocyst formation with the highest expression in the inner cell mass. In early stages of mouse embryonic development (E11.5) there is a rela...

  9. Selenoprotein S/SEPS1 Modifies Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Z Variant α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency*

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Emer; Catherine M. Greene; Carroll, Tomás P; Noel G. McElvaney; O'Neill, Shane J

    2009-01-01

    Z α1-antitrypsin (ZAAT) deficiency is a disease associated with emphysematous lung disease and also with liver disease. The liver disease of AAT deficiency is associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. SEPS1 is a selenoprotein that, through a chaperone activity, decreases ER stress. To determine the effect of SEPS1 on ER stress in ZAAT deficiency, we measured activity of the grp78 promoter and levels of active ATF6 as markers of the unfolded protein response in HepG2 cells transfected...

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced in the human placenta during labour

    OpenAIRE

    Veerbeek, J. H. W.; Tissot van Patot, M C; Burton, G J; Yung, H.W.

    2014-01-01

    Placental endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been postulated in the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia (PE) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), but its activation remains elusive. Oxidative stress induced by ischaemia/hypoxia-reoxygenation activates ER stress in vitro. Here, we explored whether exposure to labour represents an in vivo model for the study of acute placental ER stress. ER stress markers, GRP78, P-eIF2α and XBP-1, were significantly higher in laboured placentas than in ...

  11. SSI1 encodes a novel Hsp70 of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae endoplasmic reticulum.

    OpenAIRE

    Baxter, B K; James, P; Evans, T.(Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK); Craig, E A

    1996-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a well-characterized, essential member of the Hsp70 family of molecular chaperones, Kar2p. Kar2p has been shown to be involved in the translocation of proteins into the ER as well as the proper folding of proteins in that compartment. We report the characterization of a novel Hsp70 of the ER, Ssi1p. Ssi1p, which shares 24% of the amino acids of Kar2p, is not essential for growth under normal conditions. Howe...

  12. ATP increases within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum upon intracellular Ca2+ release

    OpenAIRE

    Vishnu, Neelanjan; Jadoon Khan, Muhammad; Karsten, Felix; Groschner, Lukas N.; Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Rost, Rene; Hallström, Seth; Imamura, Hiromi; Graier, Wolfgang F; Malli, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Multiple functions of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) essentially depend on ATP within this organelle. However, little is known about ER ATP dynamics and the regulation of ER ATP import. Here we describe real-time recordings of ER ATP fluxes in single cells using an ER-targeted, genetically encoded ATP sensor. In vitro experiments prove that the ATP sensor is both Ca2+ and redox insensitive, which makes it possible to monitor Ca2+-coupled ER ATP dynamics specifically. The approach uncovers a c...

  13. The Emp24 complex recruits a specific cargo molecule into endoplasmic reticulum-derived vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Muniz, M.; Nuoffer, C; Hauri, H P; Riezman, H

    2000-01-01

    Members of the yeast p24 family, including Emp24p and Erv25p, form a heteromeric complex re- quired for the efficient transport of selected proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi ap- paratus. The specific functions and sites of action of this complex are unknown. We show that Emp24p is di- rectly required for efficient packaging of a lumenal cargo protein, Gas1p, into ER-derived vesicles. Emp24p and Erv25p can be directly cross-linked to Gas...

  14. Role of Sec24 isoforms in selective export of membrane proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Wendeler, Markus W; Paccaud, Jean-Pierre; Hauri, Hans-Peter

    2007-01-01

    Sec24 of the COPII (coat protein complex II) vesicle coat mediates the selective export of membrane proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in yeast. Human cells express four Sec24 isoforms, but their role is unknown. Here, we report the differential effects of Sec24 isoform-specific silencing on the transport of the membrane reporter protein ERGIC-53 (ER–Golgi intermediate compartment-53) carrying the cytosolic ER export signals di-phenylalanine, di-tyrosine, di-leucine, di-isoleucine, ...

  15. ‘Ryanopathy’: causes and manifestations of RyR2 dysfunction in heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Belevych, Andriy E.; Radwański, Przemysław B.; Carnes, Cynthia A.; Györke, Sandor

    2013-01-01

    The cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2), a Ca2+ release channel on the membrane of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), plays a key role in determining the strength of the heartbeat by supplying Ca2+ required for contractile activation. Abnormal RyR2 function is recognized as an important part of the pathophysiology of heart failure (HF). While in the normal heart, the balance between the cytosolic and intra-SR Ca2+ regulation of RyR2 function maintains the contraction–relaxation cycle, in HF, this...

  16. Effects of eugenol on resting tension of rat atria

    OpenAIRE

    R.R. Olivoto; C.E.N. Damiani; I. Kassouf Silva; Lofrano-Alves, M.S.; M. A. Oliveira; Fogaça, R.T.H.

    2014-01-01

    In cardiac and skeletal muscle, eugenol (μM range) blocks excitation-contraction coupling. In skeletal muscle, however, larger doses of eugenol (mM range) induce calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The effects of eugenol are therefore dependent on its concentration. In this study, we evaluated the effects of eugenol on the contractility of isolated, quiescent atrial trabeculae from male Wistar rats (250-300 g; n=131) and measured atrial ATP content. Eugenol (1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 mM...

  17. Imaging features of cardiac myxoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the imaging features of cardiac myxoma and their diagnostic values. Methods: Twenty-two patrents with cardiac myxoma were reviewed retrospectively for the clinical, pathologic, and radiologic findings. Posteroanterior and lateral chest radiographs, American Imatron C-150 XP Electron Beam CT examination, and Germany Siemens 1.5T Magnetom Vision MR scan were performed on every patient. Results: (1) Radiographs of 17 patients with left atrial myxoma showed evidence of mitral valve obstruction in 14(82.3%), radiographs of 5 patients with right atrial myxoma demonstrated right atrium enlargement in 3(60%) respectively. (2) CT scans of 22 myxomas demonstrated 18 (81.8%) lesions were hypoattenuated and 4 (19.1%) were isoattenuated relative to the myocardium. Calcification or ossification was seen in 3 patients. All myxomas apart from massive one were found attaching to the atrial septum. Movie mode could dis- play the movement of myxoma across the atrioventicular valves. (3) MRI studies of 22 myxomas showed 19 (86.3%) heterogeneous signal intensity and 3 (13.7%) homogeneous. They exhibited slight high or homogeneous signal intensity with both T1- and T2-weighted sequences, and low signal intensity with cine gradient recalled echo sequences. Point of attachment was visible in 21 (95.4%) cases. Conclusion: The typical radiograph sign of cardiac myxomas is mitral valve obstruction, CT and MR can demonstrate intracavitary lobular masses attacthing to artrial spetum. The latter two kinds of examinations not only provide accurate assessment of the size, location, and attachment point of these lesions, but also have important qualitative diagnostic advantage. (authors)

  18. EVALUATION OF NEONATAL CARDIAC MURMURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaiah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular malformations are the most common cause of congenital malformations, the diagnosis of which requires a close observation in the neonatal period. Early recognition of CHD is important in the neonatal period, as many of them may be fatal if undiagnosed and may require immediate intervention. The objectives of this study are to study the epidemiology of neonatal cardiac murmurs, to identify clinical characteristics which differentiate pathological murmur from functional murmurs and to assess the reliability of clinical evaluation in diagnosing CHD. Method of study included all neonates admitted to the NICU, postnatal ward, attending pediatric OPD or neonatal follow up clinic and were detected to have cardiac murmurs. It was a cross sectional study over a period of 16months. A clinical diagnosis was made based on history and clinical examination. Then Chest X-ray and ECG, Echocardiography was done in all neonates for confirmation of the diagnosis. These neonates were again examined daily till they were in hospital and during the follow-up visit at 6 weeks. The results of 70 neonates in this study conducted over a period of 24 months included the incidence of cardiac murmurs among intramural neonates which was 13.5 for 1000 live births. Most frequent symptom was fast breathing in 10(14.3% cases. VSD was the most common diagnosis clinically in 23 (33% babies. The most frequent Echo diagnosis was acyanotic complex congenital heart disease in 25(36% cases followed by 12(17% cases each of VSD and ASD respectively. Overall in our study 77.1% (54cases of the murmurs were diagnosed correctly and confirmed by Echocardiography The study concluded that it is possible to make clinical diagnosis in many cases of congenital heart diseases, the functional murmurs could be differentiated from those arising from structural heart disease and evaluation of the infants based only on murmurs, few congenital heart diseases can be missed.

  19. Sudden Cardiac Death and Post Cardiac Arrest Syndrome. An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zima Endre

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A satisfactory neurologic outcome is the key factor for survival in patients with sudden cardiac death (SCD, however this is highly dependent on the haemodynamic status. Short term cardiopulmonary resuscitation and regained consciousness on the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC is indicative of a better prognosis. The evaluation and treatment of SCD triggering factors and of underlying acute and chronic diseases will facilitate prevention and lower the risk of cardiac arrest. Long term CPR and a prolonged unconscious status after ROSC, in the Intensive Care Units or Coronary Care Units, indicates the need for specific treatment and supportive therapy including efforts to prevent hyperthermia. The prognosis of these patients is unpredictable within the first seventy two hours, due to unknown responses to therapeutic management and the lack of specific prognostic factors. Patients in these circumstances require the highest level of intensive care and aetiology driven treatment without any delay, independently of their coma state. Current guidelines sugest the use of multiple procedures in arriving at a diagnosis and prognosis of these critical cases.

  20. Introduction to noninvasive cardiac mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, Laura; Cuculich, Phillip S; Bernus, Olivier; Efimov, Igor; Dubois, Rémi

    2015-03-01

    From the dawn of the twentieth century, the electrocardiogram (ECG) has revolutionized the way clinical cardiology has been practiced, and it has become the cornerstone of modern medicine today. Driven by clinical and research needs for a more precise understanding of cardiac electrophysiology beyond traditional ECG, inverse solution electrocardiography has been developed, tested, and validated. This article outlines the important progress from ECG development, through more extensive measurement of body surface potentials, and the fundamental leap to solving the inverse problem of electrocardiography, with a focus on mathematical methods and experimental validation. PMID:25784020